Sample records for near-surface leakage monitoring

  1. Near Surface Leakage Monitoring for the Verification and Accounting of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Using a Field Ready {sup 14}C Isotopic Analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marino, Bruno

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Results for the development of a field ready multi-isotopic analyzer for {sup 12}CO{sub 2}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2} and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and applications for carbon capture and storage (CCS) containment performance are described. A design goal of the field platform was to provide isotopic data with a high data rate, a standardized reference baseline and acceptable precision (e.g., ~ ±50 per mil D{sup 14}CO{sub 2}) for detection and quantification of fossil-fuel CO{sub 2} CCS leakage scenarios. The instrument platform was not designed to replace high precision accelerator mass spectrometry. An additional goal was to combine project scale isotopic data and associated fluxes with unique financial instruments linking CCS containment performance to a publicly traded security providing project revenue to stakeholders. While the primary goals of the project were attained additional work is needed for the instrument platform and deployment within a full scale CCS site that was not available during the project timeframe.

  2. Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include the infrared gas analyzer, the accumulation chamber method, the eddy covariance method,...

  3. Near-surface monitoring strategies for geologic carbon dioxide storage verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hepple, Robert P.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas fluxes and concentrations in the near- surface environment for an array of applications including pipeline leak

  4. Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include (1) the infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) for measurement of concentrations at point locations, (2) the...

  5. Development of monitoring system of helium leakage from canister

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toriu, D. [Kyoto University, CERE, Kyoto, 615-8540 (Japan); Ushijima, S. [Kyoto University, ACCMS, Kyoto, 606-8501 (Japan); Takeda, H. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry - CRIEPI, Abiko 1646, 270-1194 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a computational method for the helium leakage from a canister. The governing equations for compressible fluids consist of mass conservation equation in Eulerian description, momentum equations and energy equation. The numerical procedures are divided into three phases, advection, diffusion and acoustic phases, and the equations of compressible fluids are discretized with a finite volume method. Thus, the mass conservation law is sufficiently satisfied in the calculation region. In particular, our computational method enables us to predict the change of the temperature distributions around the canister boundaries by calculating the governing equations for the compressible gas flows, which are leaked out from a slight crack on the canister boundary. In order to confirm the validity of our method, it was applied to the basic problem, 2-dimensional natural convection flows in a rectangular cavity. As a result, it was shown that the naturally convected flows can be reasonably simulated by our method. Furthermore, numerical experiments were conducted for the helium leakage from canister and we derived a close relationship between the inner pressure and the boundary temperature distributions.

  6. Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piet, S.J.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The INEEL Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) program has launched a new R and D project on Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity to increase knowledge and capabilities for using engineering and ecological components to improve the integrity of near-surface barriers used to confine contaminants from the public and the environment. The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions and enable improved solutions for future cleanup decisions. The research is planned to (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms (weathering, biological, geological, chemical, radiological, and catastrophic) in times shorter than service life, (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics, (c) develop sensor systems to identify degradation prior to failure, and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems to increase reliability and reduce the risk of failure. Our project combine s selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing and the meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The performance of evapo-transpiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers will be examined.

  7. Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piet, Steven James; Breckenridge, Robert Paul; Beller, John Michael; Geesey, Gill Gregroy; Glenn, David Frankie; Jacobson, Jacob Jordan; Martian, Pete; Matthern, Gretchen Elise; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Porro, Indrek; Southworth, Finis Hio; Steffler, Eric Darwin; Stormberg, Angelica Isabel; Stormberg, Gregory John; Versteeg, Roelof Jan; White, Gregory J

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INEEL Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) program has launched a new R&D project on Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity to increase knowledge and capabilities for using engineering and ecological components to improve the integrity of near-surface barriers used to confine contaminants from the public and the environment. The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions and enable improved solutions for future cleanup decisions. The research is planned to (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms (weathering, biological, geological, chemical, radiological, and catastrophic) in times shorter than service life, (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics, (c) develop sensor systems to identify degradation prior to failure, and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems to increase reliability and reduce the risk of failure. Our project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing and the meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The performance of evapo- transpiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers will be examined.

  8. Sources for Pu in near surface air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmann, G.; Thom, C.; Baechmann, K.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides evidence that most of the Pu in the near surface air today is due to resuspension. Vertical and particle size distribution in near surface air over a period of three years were measured. The seasonal variations of Pu in air and the influence of meteorological parameters on these variations are shown. Samples were taken before the Chernobyl accident in an area where only Pu fallout from the atmospheric nuclear tests of the early sixties occurs. The comparison of the behavior of Pu with other trace elements, which were also measured, showed similar behavior of Pu and elements like Ca, Ti and Fe in near surface air. This confirms that most Pu is resuspended because the main source for these elements in air is the soil surface. Resuspension factors and resuspension rate are estimated for all measured elements. A resuspension factor of 0.8 X 10(-8) m-1 and a resuspension rate of 0.09 X 10(-9) s-1 is calculated for Pu.

  9. Stored CO2 and Methane Leakage Risk Assessment and Monitoring Tool Development: CO2 Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Kieki

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary project goal is to develop and test tools for optimization of ECBM recovery and geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in coalbeds, in addition to tools for monitoring CO{sub 2} sequestration in coalbeds to support risk assessment. Three critical topics identified are (1) the integrity of coal bed methane geologic and engineered systems, (2) the optimization of the coal bed storage process, and (3) reliable monitoring and verification systems appropriate to the special conditions of CO{sub 2} storage and flow in coals.

  10. Location of the solar dynamo and near-surface shear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axel Brandenburg

    2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The location of the solar dynamo is discussed in the context of new insights into the theory of nonlinear turbulent dynamos. It is argued that, from a dynamo-theoretic point of view, the bottom of the convection zone is not a likely location and that the solar dynamo may be distributed over the convection zone. The near surface shear layer produces not only east-west field alignment, but it also helps the dynamo disposing of its excess small scale magnetic helicity.

  11. Modeling the Near-Surface Using High-Resolution Seismic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Zayer, Ramzy Mohammed

    2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Arabian Peninsula, the near-surface represents a major challenge in seismic exploration. For accurate deep subsurface reservoir imaging, an accurate near-surface velocity model is required. In this dissertation, I ...

  12. Early detection of brine and CO2 leakage through abandoned wells using pressure and surface-deformation monitoring data: Concept and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    and surface-deformation modeling tools to estimate the location and permeability of leaky features by Elsevier Ltd. 1. Introduction The ability to detect CO2 leakage is a key component of risk assessment storage for- mation to shallower groundwater aquifers, ultimately to the atmosphere, through abandoned

  13. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  14. Elucidating geochemical response of shallow heterogeneous aquifers to CO2 leakage using high-performance computing: Implications for monitoring of CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Siirila, Erica R.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting and quantifying impacts of potential carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into shallow aquifers that overlie geologic CO2 storage formations is an important part of developing reliable carbon storage techniques. Leakage of CO2 through fractures, faults or faulty wellbores can reduce groundwater pH, inducing geochemical reactions that release solutes into the groundwater and pose a risk of degrading groundwater quality. In order to help quantify this risk, predictions of metal concentrations are needed during geologic storage of CO2. Here, we present regional-scale reactive transport simulations, at relatively fine-scale, of CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers run on the PFLOTRAN platform using high-performance computing. Multiple realizations of heterogeneous permeability distributions were generated using standard geostatistical methods. Increased statistical anisotropy of the permeability field resulted in more lateral and vertical spreading of the plume of impacted water, leading to increased Pb2+ (lead) concentrations and lower pH at a well down gradient of the CO2 leak. Pb2+ concentrations were higher in simulations where calcite was the source of Pb2+ compared to galena. The low solubility of galena effectively buffered the Pb2+ concentrations as galena reached saturation under reducing conditions along the flow path. In all cases, Pb2+ concentrations remained below the maximum contaminant level set by the EPA. Results from this study, compared to natural variability observed in aquifers, suggest that bicarbonate (HCO3) concentrations may be a better geochemical indicator of a CO2 leak under the conditions simulated here.

  15. Labyrinth Seal Leakage Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A seal is a component used in a turbomachine to reduce internal leakage of the working fluid and to increase the machine's efficiency. The stability of a turbomachine partially depends upon the rotodynamic coefficients of the seal. The integral...

  16. Self Adaptive Body Biasing Scheme for Leakage Power Reduction in Nanoscale CMOS Circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayers, Joseph

    leakage, which has already been introduced by [1]. However, the increasing RBB increases drain current components, ISUBTH, IBTBT, and gate induced drain leakage (IGIDL) currents, are generated from in the charge pump. The voltage in the capacitor is fed back to the leakage monitoring circuit through

  17. Geophysical Prospecting 38,621-63 1,199O ALIGNMENT OF NEAR-SURFACE INCLUSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    crucial to drilling operations, the rotation of the crack- and stress-geometry near-surface has important January 1990. 'Edinburgh Anisotropy Project, British Geological Survey, Murchison House, West Mains Road

  18. Determination of leakage areas in nuclear piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keim, E. [Siemens/KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the design and operation of nuclear power plants the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of a piping component has to be shown. This means that the length of a crack resulting in a leak is smaller than the critical crack length and that the leak is safely detectable by a suitable monitoring system. The LBB-concept of Siemens/KWU is based on computer codes for the evaluation of critical crack lengths, crack openings, leakage areas and leakage rates, developed by Siemens/KWU. In the experience with the leak rate program is described while this paper deals with the computation of crack openings and leakage areas of longitudinal and circumferential cracks by means of fracture mechanics. The leakage areas are determined by the integration of the crack openings along the crack front, considering plasticity and geometrical effects. They are evaluated with respect to minimum values for the design of leak detection systems, and maximum values for controlling jet and reaction forces. By means of fracture mechanics LBB for subcritical cracks has to be shown and the calculation of leakage areas is the basis for quantitatively determining the discharge rate of leaking subcritical through-wall cracks. The analytical approach and its validation will be presented for two examples of complex structures. The first one is a pipe branch containing a circumferential crack and the second one is a pipe bend with a longitudinal crack.

  19. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangler, L.H.; Dobeck, L.M.; Nehrir, A.; Humphries, S.; Barr, J.; Keith, C.; Shaw, J.; Rouse, J.; Cunningham, A.; Benson, S.; Repasky, K.S.; Lewicki, J.; Wells, A.; Diehl, R.; Strazisar, B.; Fessenden, J.; Rahn, T.; Amonette, J.; Barr, J.; Pickles, W.; Jacobson, J.; Silver, E.; Male, E.; Rauch, H.; Gullickson, K.; Trautz, R.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Wielopolski, L.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A controlled field pilot has been developed in Bozeman, Montana, USA, to study near surface CO2 transport and detection technologies. A slotted horizontal well divided into six zones was installed in the shallow subsurface. The scale and CO2 release rates were chosen to be relevant to developing monitoring strategies for geological carbon storage. The field site was characterized before injection, and CO2 transport and concentrations in saturated soil and the vadose zone were modeled. Controlled releases of CO2 from the horizontal well were performed in the summers of 2007 and 2008, and collaborators from six national labs, three universities, and the U.S. Geological Survey investigated movement of CO2 through the soil, water, plants, and air with a wide range of near surface detection techniques. An overview of these results will be presented.

  20. Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergy InformationNaturaSystems | Open Energy

  1. Near-Surface Eddy Heat and Momentum Fluxes in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in Drake Passage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprintall, Janet

    Near-Surface Eddy Heat and Momentum Fluxes in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in Drake Passage Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) momentum balance. The observations span 7 yr and are compared to eddy Current (ACC) pathway is marked by exceptionally high mesoscale eddy activity (e.g., Stammer 1998; Hughes

  2. Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake lineae (RSL), thought to represent seasonal brines, has sparked interest in analogous environments watershed and show that this, together with small amounts of meltwater, are capable of generating brines

  3. Near-surface enrichment of zooplankton over a shallow back reef: implications for coral reef food webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alldredge, A. L.; King, J. M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0534-4 REPORT Near-surface enrichment of zooplankton over anear the bottom but no enrichment aloft. In Moorea, whereand mixing, zooplankton enrichment extended throughout the

  4. Electrical leakage detection circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wild, Arthur

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for detecting electrical leakage between a power supply and a frame of a vehicle or machine. The disclosed method includes coupling a first capacitor between a frame and a first terminal of a power supply for a predetermined period of time. The current flowing between the frame and the first capacitor is limited to a predetermined current limit. It is determined whether the voltage across the first capacitor exceeds a threshold voltage. A first output signal is provided when the voltage across the capacitor exceeds the threshold voltage.

  5. Dear Susan, On behalf of the entire Near Surface Geophysics Section (NSGS) of the Society of Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dear Susan, On behalf of the entire Near Surface Geophysics Section (NSGS) of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and Environmental and Engineering Geophysical Society (EEGS), I would like extraordinary leadership in advancing the cause of near surface geophysics through longterm, tireless

  6. Measurements near the Atmospheric Surface Flux Group tower at SHEBA: Near-surface conditions and surface energy budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persson, Ola

    Group tower at SHEBA: Near-surface conditions and surface energy budget, J. Geophys. Res., 107(C10Measurements near the Atmospheric Surface Flux Group tower at SHEBA: Near-surface conditions and surface energy budget P. Ola G. Persson,1 Christopher W. Fairall,2 Edgar L. Andreas,3 Peter S. Guest,4

  7. Isotopic evidence of a near surface history for the source rocks of the central Coast Plutonic Complex, British Columbia, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetmore, Paul H.

    Isotopic evidence of a near surface history for the source rocks of the central Coast Plutonic portion of the source rocks resided at near surface levels at some time prior to burial and partial an evolved crustal source. We argue that these data indicate that the rocks that formed the source region

  8. ENGINEERED NEAR SURFACE DISPOSAL FACILITY OF THE INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX FOR SOLID RADWASTE MANAGEMENT AT CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziehm, Ronny; Pichurin, Sergey Grigorevich

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of the turnkey project ''Industrial Complex for Solid Radwaste Management (ICSRM) at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP)'' an Engineered Near Surface Disposal Facility (ENSDF, LOT 3) will be built on the VEKTOR site within the 30 km Exclusion Zone of the ChNPP. This will be performed by RWE NUKEM GmbH, Germany, and it governs the design, licensing support, fabrication, assembly, testing, inspection, delivery, erection, installation and commissioning of the ENSDF. The ENSDF will receive low to intermediate level, short lived, processed/conditioned wastes from the ICSRM Solid Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, LOT 2), the ChNPP Liquid Radwaste Treatment Plant (LRTP) and the ChNPP Interim Storage Facility for RBMK Fuel Assemblies (ISF). The ENSDF has a capacity of 55,000 m{sup 3}. The primary functions of the ENSDF are: to receive, monitor and record waste packages, to load the waste packages into concrete disposal units, to enable capping and closure of the disposal unit s, to allow monitoring following closure. The ENSDF comprises the turnkey installation of a near surface repository in the form of an engineered facility for the final disposal of LILW-SL conditioned in the ICSRM SWPF and other sources of Chernobyl waste. The project has to deal with the challenges of the Chernobyl environment, the fulfillment of both Western and Ukrainian standards, and the installation and coordination of an international project team. It will be shown that proven technologies and processes can be assembled into a unique Management Concept dealing with all the necessary demands and requirements of a turnkey project. The paper emphasizes the proposed concepts for the ENSDF and their integration into existing infrastructure and installations of the VEKTOR site. Further, the paper will consider the integration of Western and Ukrainian Organizations into a cohesive project team and the requirement to guarantee the fulfillment of both Western standards and Ukrainian regulations and licensing requirements. The paper provides information on the output of the Detail Design and will reflect the progress of the design work.

  9. AIR LEAKAGE OF NEWLY INSTALLED RESIDENTIAL WINDOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidt, John

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tables 2.0.2a 2.0.2b PAGE Air Leakage Through Sash/FrameOperation Types . . . . . Air Leakage of Installed WindowsComparison of Window Types Air Leakage Performance of

  10. Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

  11. Method of detecting leakage from geologic formations used to sequester CO.sub.2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Curt (Pittsburgh, PA); Wells, Arthur (Bridgeville, PA); Diehl, J. Rodney (Pittsburgh, PA); Strazisar, Brian (Venetia, PA)

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides methods for the measurement of carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs. Tracer moieties are injected along with carbon dioxide into geological formations. Leakage is monitored by gas chromatographic analyses of absorbents. The invention also provides a process for the early leak detection of possible carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs by measuring methane (CH.sub.4), ethane (C.sub.2H.sub.6), propane (C.sub.3H.sub.8), and/or radon (Rn) leakage rates from the reservoirs. The invention further provides a method for branding sequestered carbon dioxide using perfluorcarbon tracers (PFTs) to show ownership.

  12. Scoping survey of perceived concerns, issues, and problems for near-surface disposal of FUSRAP waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, J.E.; Gilbert, T.L.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a scoping summary of concerns, issues, and perceived problems for near-surface disposal of radioactive waste, based on a survey of the current literature. Near-surface disposal means land burial in or within 15 to 20 m of the earth's surface. It includes shallow land burial (burial in trenches, typically about 6 m deep with a 2-m cap and cover) and some intermediate-depth land burial (e.g., trenches and cap similar to shallow land burial, but placed below 10 to 15 m of clean soil). Proposed solutions to anticipated problems also are discussed. The purpose of the report is to provide a better basis for identifying and evaluating the environmental impacts and related factors that must be analyzed and compared in assessing candidate near-surface disposal sites for FUSRAP waste. FUSRAP wastes are of diverse types, and their classification for regulatory purposes is not yet fixed. Most of it may be characterized as low-activity bulk solid waste, and is similar to mill tailings, but with somewhat lower average specific activity. It may also qualify as Class A segregated waste under the proposed 10 CFR 61 rules, but the parent radionuclides of concern in FUSRAP (primarily U-238 and Th-232) have longer half-lives than do the radionuclides of concern in most low-level waste. Most of the references reviewed deal with low-level waste or mill tailings, since there is as yet very little literature in the public domain on FUSRAP per se.

  13. Near-surface seismic attenuation of P-waves in West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Zahrani, Said Awdhah

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    impedance contmsts in the near-surface layers. Data were also analyzed to characterize vertical and horizontal variations in the ambient noise levels near the surface. It was found that by burying geophones 10 ft below the surface, the ambient noise level... was reduced by 20 dB. Furthermore, by burying geophone 50 ft or 100 ft, the ambient noise levels were less by 30 to 35 dB than at the surface. The ambient noise level increases at the surface because of numerous noise sources which in turn decreases...

  14. Combined UHV/high-pressure catalysis setup for depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization and catalytic testing of model catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayr, Lukas; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)] [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Rameshan, Raffael [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria) [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Rameshan, Christoph [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria) [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Institute of Materials Chemistry, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/BC/01, 1060 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-high vacuum (UHV) setup for “real” and “inverse” model catalyst preparation, depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization, and quantification of catalytic activity and selectivity under technologically relevant conditions is described. Due to the all-quartz reactor attached directly to the UHV-chamber, transfer of the catalyst for in situ testing without intermediate contact to the ambient is possible. The design of the UHV-compatible re-circulating batch reactor setup allows the study of reaction kinetics under close to technically relevant catalytic conditions up to 1273 K without contact to metallic surfaces except those of the catalyst itself. With the attached differentially pumped exchangeable evaporators and the quartz-microbalance thickness monitoring equipment, a reproducible, versatile, and standardised sample preparation is possible. For three-dimensional near-surface sample characterization, the system is equipped with a hemispherical analyser for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron-beam or X-ray-excited Auger-electron spectroscopy, and low-energy ion scattering measurements. Due the dedicated geometry of the X-ray gun (54.7°, “magic angle”) and the rotatable sample holder, depth analysis by angle-resolved XPS measurements can be performed. Thus, by the combination of characterisation methods with different information depths, a detailed three-dimensional picture of the electronic and geometric structure of the model catalyst can be obtained. To demonstrate the capability of the described system, comparative results for depth-resolved sample characterization and catalytic testing in methanol steam reforming on PdGa and PdZn near-surface intermetallic phases are shown.

  15. 4.2 RAPID FORCING OF THE SURFACE AND NEAR-SURFACE ATMOSPHERE Edgar L Andreas*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, Cathleen

    1 of 12 4.2 RAPID FORCING OF THE SURFACE AND NEAR-SURFACE ATMOSPHERE Edgar L Andreas*1 , Cathleen A quite fast--1 Hz for most instruments and 10 Hz for six * Corresponding author address: Edgar L Andreas

  16. Transitions from near-surface to interior redox upon lithiation in conversion electrode materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Kai; Xin, Huolin L.; Zhao, Kejie; Yu, Xiqian; Norlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Li, Jing; Jiang, Yi; Cadigan, Christopher A.; Richards, Ryan M.; et al

    2015-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoparticle electrodes in lithium-ion batteries have both near-surface and interior contributions to their redox capacity, each with distinct rate capabilities. Using combined electron microscopy, synchrotron X-ray methods and ab initio calculations, we have investigated the lithiation pathways that occur in NiO electrodes. We find that the near-surface electroactive (Ni˛??Ni?) sites saturated very quickly, and then encounter unexpected difficulty in propagating the phase transition into the electrode (referred to as a “shrinking-core” mode). However, the interior capacity for Ni˛??Ni? can be accessed efficiently following the nucleation of lithiation “fingers” which propagate into the sample bulk, but only after a certain incubationmore »time. Our microstructural observations of the transition from a slow shrinking-core mode to a faster lithiation finger mode corroborate with synchrotron characterization of large-format batteries, and can be rationalized by stress effects on transport at high-rate discharge. The finite incubation time of the lithiation fingers sets the intrinsic limitation for the rate capability (and thus the power) of NiO for electrochemical energy storage devices. The present work unravels the link between the nanoscale reaction pathways and the C-rate-dependent capacity loss, and provides guidance for the further design of battery materials that favors high C-rate charging.« less

  17. Transitions from near-surface to interior redox upon lithiation in conversion electrode materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Kai [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xin, Huolin L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhao, Kejie [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Yu, Xiqian [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Norlund, Dennis [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Weng, Tsu-Chien [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Li, Jing [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Jiang, Yi [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Cadigan, Christopher A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Richards, Ryan M. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Doeff, Marca M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stach, Eric A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Li, Ju [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lin, Feng [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Su, Dong [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2015-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoparticle electrodes in lithium-ion batteries have both near-surface and interior contributions to their redox capacity, each with distinct rate capabilities. Using combined electron microscopy, synchrotron X-ray methods and ab initio calculations, we have investigated the lithiation pathways that occur in NiO electrodes. We find that the near-surface electroactive (Ni˛??Ni?) sites saturated very quickly, and then encounter unexpected difficulty in propagating the phase transition into the electrode (referred to as a “shrinking-core” mode). However, the interior capacity for Ni˛??Ni? can be accessed efficiently following the nucleation of lithiation “fingers” which propagate into the sample bulk, but only after a certain incubation time. Our microstructural observations of the transition from a slow shrinking-core mode to a faster lithiation finger mode corroborate with synchrotron characterization of large-format batteries, and can be rationalized by stress effects on transport at high-rate discharge. The finite incubation time of the lithiation fingers sets the intrinsic limitation for the rate capability (and thus the power) of NiO for electrochemical energy storage devices. The present work unravels the link between the nanoscale reaction pathways and the C-rate-dependent capacity loss, and provides guidance for the further design of battery materials that favors high C-rate charging.

  18. Method for detecting resin leakage in LWR coolant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girard, J.E.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resin leakage from condensate polishing units can result in steam generator corrosion. This report describes the development of a resin leakage detection method based in analyzing the organic breakdown products released from resin on heating. The breakdown products are analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection. Some of the organic products formed have been identified. A design for a resin monitoring unit, suitable for incorporation into the IONTRAC system, is presented. Theoretically, detection of ppB levels of resin by processing about one liter of water, is possible.

  19. Structure of the near-surface layers of the Sun: asphericity and time variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia; Richard S. Bogart

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results on the structure of the near-surface layers of the Sun obtained by inverting frequencies of high-degree solar modes from "ring diagrams". We have results for eight epochs between June 1996 and October 2003. The frequencies for each epoch were obtained from ring diagrams constructed from MDI Dopplergrams spanning complete Carrington rotations. We find that there is a substantial latitudinal variation of both sound speed and the adiabatic index Gamma_1 in the outer 2% of the Sun. We find that both the sound-speed and Gamma_1 profiles change with changes in the level of solar activity. In addition, we also study differences between the northern and southern hemispheres of the Sun and find a small asymmetry that appears to reflect the difference in magnetic activity between the two hemispheres.

  20. Near-surface gas mapping studies of salt geologic features at Weeks Island and other sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molecke, M.A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carney, K.R.; Autin, W.J.; Overton, E.B. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field sampling and rapid gas analysis techniques were used to survey near-surface soil gases for geotechnical diagnostic purposes at the Weeks Island Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site and other salt dome locations in southern Louisiana. This report presents the complete data, results and interpretations obtained during 1995. Weeks Island 1994 gas survey results are also briefly summarized; this earlier study did not find a definitive correlation between sinkhole No. 1 and soil gases. During 1995, several hundred soil gas samples were obtained and analyzed in the field by gas chromatography, for profiling low concentrations and gas anomalies at ppm to percent levels. The target gases included hydrogen, methane, ethane and ethylene. To supplement the field data, additional gas samples were collected at various site locations for laboratory analysis of target gases at ppb levels. Gases in the near-surface soil originate predominantly from the oil, from petrogenic sources within the salt, or from surface microbial activity. Surveys were conducted across two Weeks Island sinkholes, several mapped anomalous zones in the salt, and over the SPR repository site and its perimeter. Samples were also taken at other south Louisiana salt dome locations for comparative purposes. Notable results from these studies are that elevated levels of hydrogen and methane (1) were positively associated with anomalous gassy or shear zones in the salt dome(s) and (2) are also associated with suspected salt fracture (dilatant) zones over the edges of the SPR repository. Significantly elevated areas of hydrogen, methane, plus some ethane, were found over anomalous shear zones in the salt, particularly in a location over high pressure gas pockets in the salt, identified in the mine prior to SPR operations. Limited stable isotope ratio analyses, SIRA, were also conducted and determined that methane samples were of petrogenic origin, not biogenic.

  1. Leakage currents in SOI MOSFETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annamala, N.K.; Biwer, M.C.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total dose response of both NMOS and PMOS FETs fabricated on SOI substrates was studied. Two types of back-channel leakage currents were identified. A back-channel leakage due to MOSFET action uses the substrate bias as the gate bias. The other component is due to soft reverse characteristics of the body-drain junction. The back-channel leakage due to MOSFET action varies with the substrate bias and hence varies with irradiation due to threshold voltage shift. The soft reverse characteristics are a function of drain-body voltage and hence vary with substrate bias and irradiation. I-V characteristics and subthreshold currents of both front and back channels as a function of total dose were obtained.

  2. Air leakage of Insulated Concrete Form houses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durschlag, Hannah (Hanna Rebekah)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air leakage has been shown to increase building energy use due to additional heating and cooling loads. Although many construction types have been examined for leakage, an exploration of a large number of Insulated Concrete ...

  3. Investigation of stepped labyrinth seal leakage performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Thomas Stanley

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leakage resistance of advanced design, stepped labyrinth seals has been examined based on geometric considerations. Leakage measurements were obtained in an attempt to identify geometric and flow characteristics contributing to a desired seal...

  4. Arnold Schwarzenegger INDOOR-OUTDOOR AIR LEAKAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;#12;Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage in Apartments and Commercial Buildings Appendix A Air Infiltration Model for Large Buildings Appendix B Analysis of Commercial Building Data Appendix C Commercial Building Data contains data and discussion of the leakage parameter in commercial buildings. The leakage parameter

  5. STATE OF CALIFORNIA VALVE LEAKAGE TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA VALVE LEAKAGE TEST CEC-MECH-8A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE MECH-8A NA7.5.7 Valve Leakage Test (Page 1 of 3) Project Name/Address: System Name VALVE LEAKAGE TEST CEC-MECH-8A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE

  6. Near-surface neotectonic deformation associated with seismicity in the northeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, S.S.; Gold, D.P.; Gardner, T.W.; Slingerland, R.L.; Thornton, C.P. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA). Dept. of Geosciences)

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the Lancaster, PA seismic zone a multifaceted investigation revealed several manifestations of near-surface, neotectonic deformation. Remote sensing data together with surface geological and geophysical observations, and recent seismicity reveal that the neotectonic deformation is concentrated in a NS-trending fault zone some 50 km in length and 10--20 km in width. Anomalies associated with this zone include distinctive lineament and surface erosional patterns; geologically recent uplift evidenced by elevations of stream terraces along the Susquehanna River; and localized contemporary travertine deposits in streams down-drainage from the inferred active fault zone. In the Moodus seismic zone the frequency of tectonically-controlled lineaments was observed to increase in the Moodus quadrangle compared to adjacent areas and dominant lineament directions were observed that are perpendicular and parallel to the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress direction (N80-85E) recently determined from in-situ stress measurements in a 1.5 km-deep borehole in the seismic zone and from well-constrained earthquake focal mechanisms. 284 refs., 33 figs.

  7. Ion-trap measurements of electric-field noise near surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Brownnutt; M. Kumph; P. Rabl; R. Blatt

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric-field noise near surfaces is a common problem in diverse areas of physics, and a limiting factor for many precision measurements. There are multiple mechanisms by which such noise is generated, many of which are poorly understood. Laser-cooled, trapped ions provide one of the most sensitive systems to probe electric-field noise at MHz frequencies and over a distance range 30 - 3000 $\\mu$m from the surface. Over recent years numerous experiments have reported spectral densities of electric-field noise inferred from ion heating-rate measurements and several different theoretical explanations for the observed noise characteristics have been proposed. This paper provides an extensive summary and critical review of electric-field noise measurements in ion traps, and compares these experimental findings with known and conjectured mechanisms for the origin of this noise. This reveals that the presence of multiple noise sources, as well as the different scalings added by geometrical considerations, complicate the interpretation of these results. It is thus the purpose of this review to assess which conclusions can be reasonably drawn from the existing data, and which important questions are still open. In so doing it provides a framework for future investigations of surface-noise processes.

  8. Effect of atmospheric water vapor on modification of stable isotopes in near-surface snow on ice sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walden, Von P.

    in the near-surface snow of East Antarctica. The processes of forced ventilation, pore-space diffusion to forced ventilation for several annual cycles. Postdepositional modification during the Last Glacial. Introduction [2] Stable isotopes of water in polar snow and ice have long been regarded as proxies for local

  9. NDT&E International 39 (2006) 641651 Iterative inversion method for eddy current profiling of near-surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Peter B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NDT&E International 39 (2006) 641­651 Iterative inversion method for eddy current profiling of near-dependent penetration depth, eddy current measurements are capable of mapping the near-surface depth profile-independent intrinsic electric conductivity depth profile from the frequency-dependent apparent eddy current

  10. Characterization of heterogeneous near-surface materials by joint 2D inversion of dc resistivity and seismic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meju, Max

    multidimensional non- invasive dc resistivity and seismic refraction investigations of the near-surface have and seismic data Luis A. Gallardo1 and Max A. Meju Department of Environmental Science, Lancaster University-gradients of electrical resistivity and seismic velocity as constraints so as to investigate more precisely

  11. Estimating near-surface shear wave velocities in Japan by applying seismic interferometry to KiK-net data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Estimating near-surface shear wave velocities in Japan by applying seismic interferometry to KiK-net throughout Japan by applying seismic interferometry to the data recorded with KiK-net, a strong motion network in Japan. Each KiK-net station has two receivers; one receiver on the surface and the other

  12. Isotopic Evidence of a Near Surface History for the Source Rocks of the Central Coast Mountains Batholith, British

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetmore, Paul H.

    Isotopic Evidence of a Near Surface History for the Source Rocks of the Central Coast Mountains from 322 Ma to ~50 Ma indicate that the source regions for these rocks were relatively uniform and typical for island arcs around the Pacific. Initial whole-rock 87 Sr/86 Sr range from 0.7032 up to 0

  13. Geochemical evidence of a near-surface history for source rocks of the central Coast Mountains Batholith, British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetmore, Paul H.

    Geochemical evidence of a near-surface history for source rocks of the central Coast Mountains to ,50 Ma, indicate that the source regions for these rocks were relatively uniform and typical abundance of deep crustal or upper-mantle source rocks (DePaolo 1981; Kistler 1990; Chen and Tilton 1991; De

  14. What can be learned from natural analogues studies in view of CO2 leakage issues in1 Carbon Capture and Storage applications? Geochemical case study of Sainte-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    What can be learned from natural analogues studies in view of CO2 leakage issues in1 Carbon Capture.34 35 Keywords36 Natural analogue37 Carbon Capture and Storage38 Soil gas monitoring39 Water monitoring

  15. Single atom sputtering events: direct observation of near-surface depleted zones in ion-irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Current, M. I.; Wei, C. Y.; Seidman, D. N.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three-dimensional spatial arrangement of vacancies contained in depleted zones (DZs), of ion-irradiated tungsten specimens, was determined with atomic resolution by the field-ion microscope (FIM) technique. These DZs were detected in the near-surface region of specimens which had been irradiated in situ at less than or equal to15 K with 20 keV W/sup +/, 30 keV W/sup +/, Kr/sup +/, Cu/sup +/, or Ar/sup +/ ions. The values of the ion dose employed were small (less than or equal to 10/sup 13/ ions cm/sup -2/); therefore, each DZ analyzed was the result of the impact of a single projectile ion. At the irradiation temperature (less than or equal to 15/sup 0/K) both the self-intersitital atoms and vacancies were immobile, so that the primary state of radiation damage was preserved. The following properties of each DZ were determined: the total number of vacancies; the number of vacancies in the near-surface region; the spatial extent - that is, the dimensions required to determine a volume; the average vacancy concentration; the average vacancy concentration associated with the non-surface region; the first-nearest neighbor cluster distribution for the vacancies in the near-surface region; the radial distribution function of all the vacancies; the distribution of vacancies as a function of depth normal to the irradiated surface; and the sputtering yield. Most of the above properties of the near-surface DZs had similar values to those of the DZs detected in the bulk of the FIM specimens. The total number of vacancies detected in the near-surface region wasapproximately consistent with theoretical estimates of the average sputtering yield. The sputtering yield of individual DZs exhibited significant fluctuations from the measured average sputtering yield.

  16. Centrifuge modeling of radioactive waste migration through backfill in a near surface disposal facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurumoorthy, C.; Kusakabe, O. [Geotechnical Engineering Division, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama Meguroku, Tokyo 1528552 (Japan)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations on the performance of backfill barrier in Near Surface Disposal Facility (NSDF) for radioactive wastes are important to ensure the long term safety of such disposal option. Favorable condition to delay migration of radionuclides from disposed waste to far fields is diffusion process. However, advective dispersion/diffusion mechanism plays an important role due to changes in backfill over a period of time. In order to understand these mechanisms, detailed laboratory experiments are usually conducted for developing mathematical models to assess the behaviour of backfill. However, these experiments are time consuming and suffer with the limitations due to material complexity. Also, there are constraints associated with validation of theoretical predictions due to intricacy of boundary conditions as well as the time scale is quite different as compared to the time required for completion of the processes in the field. Keeping in view these aspects, centrifuge modeling technique has been adopted by various researchers to model and understand various geo-environment problems in order to provide a link between the real life situation termed as the 'Prototype' and its model, which is exposed to a higher gravitational field. An attempt has been made in this paper to investigate the feasibility of this technique to model advective dispersion/diffusion mechanism of radionuclides through saturated Bentonite-Sand (B:S) backfill. Various stages of centrifuge modeling are highlighted. Column tests were conducted in the centrifuge to evaluate the hydraulic conductivity of B:S mixture under prototype NSDF stress conditions. Results showed that steady state hydraulic conductivity under saturated conditions was 2.86 10{sup -11} m/sec. Studies indicate the feasibility of centrifuge modeling technique and usefulness to model advective diffusion of radionuclides through B:S backfill. (authors)

  17. Near-surface meteorological conditions associated with active resuspension of dust by wind erosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meteorological conditions associated with extreme winds in the lee of the Colorado Rocky Mountains were studied from the viewpoint of dust resuspension and dispersion. Wind, dispersion, temperature, and dew point conditions occurring near the surface were discussed in detail for a selected event. Near-surface wind speeds were compared to observations made at a standard sampling height. These field data were developed to aid in validation and interpretation of wind tunnel observations and application of dispersion models to wind erosion resuspension. Three conclusions can immediately be drawn from this investigation. First, wind storms in nature are quite gusty, with gusts exceeding the mean speed by 50 percent or more. However, wind direction variations are small by comparison. Thus, wind tunnel studies should be able to simulate the large along-flow turbulence, while keeping cross-flow turbulence to a moderate level. This also has an application to the puff modeling of high winds. Puff models normally assume that the along-flow dispersion coefficient is equal to the cross-flow value. This study suggests that the along-flow coefficient should be much larger than its cross-flow counterpart. Another conclusion involves the usual assumption of Pasquill-Gifford stability class D. In the event studied here, the atmosphere was well mixed with near-neutral thermal stability, yet the horizontal dispersion stability class varied from G to A. Thus, an assumption of Class D horizontal dispersion during high winds would not have been valid during this case. A final conclusion involves the widely applied assumption of a logarithmic wind speed profile during high wind events. This study has indicated that such an assumption is appropriate.

  18. Monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  19. Strategies To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based On Monitoring...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based On Monitoring and Analysis Of CO2 In The Near-Surface Environment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  20. Near surface inversion layer recombination in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivated n-type silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirnstorfer, Ingo, E-mail: Ingo.Dirnstorfer@namlab.com; Simon, Daniel K.; Jordan, Paul M. [NaMLab gGmbH, Nöthnitzerstr. 64, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Mikolajick, Thomas [NaMLab gGmbH, Nöthnitzerstr. 64, 01187 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institut für Halbleiter-und Mikrosystemtechnik (IHM), 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    On n-type silicon, negatively charged surface passivation layers create a near surface recombination channel, which could significantly reduce the effective carrier lifetime at low injection levels (?n?near surface region, fixed charges in the dielectric layer significantly change the carrier concentrations and the recombination rate of defects. Sentaurus device simulations show that the contribution of the near surface recombination to the effective carrier lifetime depends on the properties of the involved defects. The lifetime reduction is strongest when the involved defects have an energy level in the lower half of the band gap and a very high electron to hole capture cross section ratio. For the simulation, a very low defect density in the order of 10{sup 8?}cm{sup ?3} is assumed, which is a realistic value in highly pure float zone silicon. Quasi-steady state photoconductance measurements on n-type silicon with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation are done and fitted with the recombination model. Very good correlation between simulation and experiment is achieved when the involved recombination centers have an electron to hole capture cross section ratio of 10{sup 7} and an energy level of ?0.2?eV w.r.t. the intrinsic level. The simulated defect properties are discussed in respect of transition metal and doping related defects reported in literature.

  1. Effect of soil erosion on the long-term stability of FUSRAP near-surface waste-burial sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decontamination of FUSRAP sites could result in the generation of large volumes (in excess of 400,000 m/sup 3/) of low-activity radioactive wastes (primarily contaminated soil and building materials) requiring subsequent disposal. It is likely that near-surface burial will be seriously considered as an option for disposal of these materials. A number of factors - including soil erosion - could adversely affect the long-term stability of a near-surface waste-burial site. The majority of FUSRAP sites are located in the humid eastern United States, where the principal cause of erosion is the action of water. This report examines the effect of soil erosion by water on burial-site stability based on analysis of four hypothetical near-surface burial sites. The Universal Soil Loss Equation was employed to estimate average annual soil loss from burial sites and the 1000-year effects of soil loss on the soil barrier (burial trench cap) placed over low-activity wastes. Results suggest that the land use of the burial site and the slope gradient of the burial trench cap significantly affect the rate of soil erosion. The development of measures limiting the potential land use of a burial site (e.g., mixing large rocks into the burial trench cap) may be required to preserve the integrity of a burial trench for long periods of time.

  2. UNCORRECTEDPROOF 2 Requirements of a global near-surface soil moisture satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    application when used as data assimilation input, else slight model forecast 15 degradation may result is vital to under- 26 standing the earth system water, energy, and carbon 27 cycles. Fluxes-sensitive socioeconomic 35 activities, such as water management, agriculture, flood 36 and drought monitoring, and policy

  3. Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faakye, O.; Arena, L.; Griffiths, D.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most common method for measuring air leakage is to use a single blower door to pressurize and/or depressurize the test unit. In detached housing, the test unit is the entire home and the single blower door measures air leakage to the outside. In attached housing, this 'single unit', 'total', or 'solo' test method measures both the air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces as well air leakage to the outside. Measuring and minimizing this total leakage is recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce energy losses to the outside, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect. However, two significant limitations of the total leakage measurement in attached housing are: for retrofit work, if total leakage is assumed to be all to the outside, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly over predicted; for new construction, the total leakage values may result in failing to meet an energy-based house tightness program criterion. The scope of this research is to investigate an approach for developing a viable simplified algorithm that can be used by contractors to assess energy efficiency program qualification and/or compliance based upon solo test results.

  4. On mitigating emissions leakage under biofuel policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D; Rajagopal, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy efficiency literature suggests subsidies target efficiency in services with inelastic demand.demand for food, feed, timber and forestry products and supply side shocks such as weather and energydemand-side policies. Summary of leakage modeling literature Analyzing and quantifying leakage from energy

  5. LBNL -42691 Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL - 42691 1 Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer of or agreement with these findings, nor that of any CIEE sponsor. #12;LBNL - 42691 2 Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant of the Residential Thermal Distribution Systems research done by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL

  6. CO2 leakage up from a geological storage site to shallow fresh groundwater: CO2-water-rock interaction assessment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CO2 leakage up from a geological storage site to shallow fresh groundwater: CO2-water repository requires the investigation of the potential CO2 leakage back into fresh groundwater, particularly sensitive monitoring techniques in order to detect potential CO2 leaks and their magnitude as well

  7. Inversion Procedure for Eddy Current Profiling of the Near-Surface Residual Stress in Shot-Peened Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, F.; Nagy, P.B. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0070 (United States)

    2005-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of their frequency-dependent penetration depth, eddy current measurements are capable of mapping the near-surface depth profile of the electrical conductivity. This technique can be used to nondestructively characterize the subsurface residual stress distribution in certain types of shot-peened metals, e.g., in nickel-base superalloys. For quantitative evaluation of the experimental results, analytical and computational techniques are needed to solve the direct and inverse problems, i.e., to predict the frequency-dependent apparent eddy current conductivity from the depth profile of the frequency-independent intrinsic electrical conductivity of the specimen and vice versa. Simple analytical approximations are presented for both the direct and inverse eddy current problems by exploiting two specific features of the electrical conductivity variation caused by near-surface residual stresses in shot-peened metals. First, compressive residual stresses are limited to a shallow surface region of depth much less than typical probe coil diameters. Second, the change in electrical conductivity due to residual stresses is always very small, typically less than 1%. The proposed approximations are verified by numerical comparison to much more complicated numerical solutions.

  8. Iterative Inversion Method for Eddy Current Evaluation of Near-Surface Residual Stress Profile in Surface-Treated Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abu-Nabah, Bassam A.; Nagy, Peter B. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0070 (United States)

    2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of their frequency-dependent penetration depth, eddy current measurements are capable of mapping the near-surface depth profile of the electric conductivity. This technique can be used to nondestructively characterize the subsurface residual stress distribution in certain types of shot-peened metals, e.g., in nickel-base superalloys. To predict the depth-dependent, but frequency-independent, intrinsic electric conductivity from the frequency-dependent apparent eddy current conductivity (AECC), a highly convergent iterative inversion procedure is presented. The proposed technique exploits three specific features of the subsurface electric conductivity variation caused by near-surface residual stresses in shot-peened metals. First, compressive residual stresses are limited to a shallow surface region of depth much less than typical probe coil diameters. Second, the change in electric conductivity due to residual stresses is always very small, typically less than 1%. Third, the electric conductivity profile is fairly smooth and continuous. The accuracy of the proposed iterative inversion procedure is one order of magnitude better than that of the previously developed simpler method (J. Appl. Phys. 96, 1257 2004)

  9. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this project, Building Science Corporation worked with production home builder K. Hovnanian to conduct testing at a single-family home in Waldorf, Maryland, constructed in accordance with the 2009 International Residential Code. The team used automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques to conduct a series of 25 tests to measure the garage and house air leakage and pressure relationships and the garage-to-house air leakage.

  10. Cycle isolation monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C. [Santee Copper, Moncks Corner, SC (United States)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

  11. Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed. For houses employing whole-house supply ventilation (positive pressure) or balanced ventilation (same pressure effect as the Baseline condition), adherence to the EPA Indoor airPLUS house-to-garage air sealing requirements should be sufficient to expect little to no garage-to-house air transfer.

  12. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  13. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  14. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, P.N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Survey, or CBECS (EIA, 2003), to compare the types of buildings in our commercial building leakage database

  15. STATE OF CALIFORNIA DUCT LEAKAGE TEST EXISTING DUCT SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) ventilation systems, shall not be sealed/taped off during duct leakage testing. CFI OA ducts that utilize

  16. From near-surface to root-zone soil moisture using an exponential filter: an assessment of the method based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    provides a means to quantitatively describe the water content of a shallow near-surface soil layer, wg of the method based on in-situ observations and model simulations C. Albergel1 , C. Rüdiger1,* , T. Pellarin2. A recursive exponential filter equation using a time constant, T, is used to compute a soil water index

  17. Nonvolatile memory disturbs due to gate and junction leakage currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroder, Dieter K.

    ) from traps within the gate oxides. Such low gate leakage currents can lead to sufficient charge; accepted 10 September 2002 Abstract We address disturbs due to gate oxide and junction leakage currents in floating gate nonvolatile memories (NVM). The junction leakage is important, because the gate oxide current

  18. Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    No 52-2013 Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry halshs-00870689,version1-7Oct2013 #12;Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy The efficiency of unilateral climate policies may be hampered by carbon leakage and competitiveness losses

  19. Carbon Leakage in General and Partial Equilibrium August 7, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Carbon Leakage in General and Partial Equilibrium Larry Karp August 7, 2012 Abstract The general of leakage, and the magnitude of border tax adjustments (BTAs) needed to offset it. A BTA based on carbon intensity in countries without carbon constraints is an export subsidy and creates negative leakage

  20. Leakage-Aware Energy Synchronization for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhi-Li

    Leakage-Aware Energy Synchronization for Wireless Sensor Networks Ting Zhu, Ziguo Zhong, Yu Gu-capacitor as the only energy storage unit. To efficiently use the harvested energy, we design and imple- ment leakage-aware con- trol can effectively utilize energy that could otherwise leak away. Nodes running leakage-aware

  1. Training toward Advanced 3D Seismic Methods for CO2 Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Liner

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of our work is graduate and undergraduate student training related to improved 3D seismic technology that addresses key challenges related to monitoring movement and containment of CO{sub 2}, specifically better quantification and sensitivity for mapping of caprock integrity, fractures, and other potential leakage pathways. We utilize data and results developed through previous DOE-funded CO{sub 2} characterization project (DE-FG26-06NT42734) at the Dickman Field of Ness County, KS. Dickman is a type locality for the geology that will be encountered for CO{sub 2} sequestration projects from northern Oklahoma across the U.S. midcontinent to Indiana and Illinois. Since its discovery in 1962, the Dickman Field has produced about 1.7 million barrels of oil from porous Mississippian carbonates with a small structural closure at about 4400 ft drilling depth. Project data includes 3.3 square miles of 3D seismic data, 142 wells, with log, some core, and oil/water production data available. Only two wells penetrate the deep saline aquifer. In a previous DOE-funded project, geological and seismic data were integrated to create a geological property model and a flow simulation grid. We believe that sequestration of CO{sub 2} will largely occur in areas of relatively flat geology and simple near surface, similar to Dickman. The challenge is not complex geology, but development of improved, lower-cost methods for detecting natural fractures and subtle faults. Our project used numerical simulation to test methods of gathering multicomponent, full azimuth data ideal for this purpose. Our specific objectives were to apply advanced seismic methods to aide in quantifying reservoir properties and lateral continuity of CO{sub 2} sequestration targets. The purpose of the current project is graduate and undergraduate student training related to improved 3D seismic technology that addresses key challenges related to monitoring movement and containment of CO{sub 2}, specifically better quantification and sensitivity for mapping of caprock integrity, fractures, and other potential leakage pathways. Specifically, our focus is fundamental research on (1) innovative narrow-band seismic data decomposition and interpretation, and (2) numerical simulation of advanced seismic data (multi-component, high density, full azimuth data) ideal for mapping of cap rock integrity and potential leakage pathways.

  2. Leakage gas recirculation system for use in Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asano, K.

    1980-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A leakage gas return device for a Stirling engine includes a pumping cylinder divided into first and second chambers by a piston, one of the chambers for receiving leakage gas from the block seal through a first one way valve and returning the leakage gas to the engine cylinder through a second one-way valve. The other chamber is first connected to a low pressure oil source to permit expansion of the first chamber by the leakage gas, and at bottom dead center the second chamber is connected to a high pressure oil source to thereby force the leakage gas back into the engine cylinder.

  3. Reducing preheater leakage boosts output and availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extent to which air preheater function affects power plant performance is often underestimated. The rotary regenerative air heater is widely used in gas, oil and coal-fired power plants. Gas leakage can occur through the sealing system dividing the hot and cold sides as the air preheater rotates at 1 to 3 rpm. Hot and cold sides need to be properly sealed to prevent this. Paragon's Duramax seals can largely overcome this problem. 1 fig.

  4. Near-surface remote sensing of canopy architecture and land-atmosphere interactions in an oak savanna ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Youngryel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensor, built with light emitting diodes (LEDs), to monitorSun photometer with light emitting diodes as spectrallySen, C. (2009). Light emitting diode as sensor for miniature

  5. Development of Risk Insights for Regulatory Review of a Near-Surface Disposal Facility for Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esh, D.W.; Ridge, A.C.; Thaggard, M. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop T7J8, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consult with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) about non-High Level Waste (HLW) determinations. In its consultative role, NRC performs technical reviews of DOE's waste determinations but does not have regulatory authority over DOE's waste disposal activities. The safety of disposal is evaluated by comparing predicted disposal facility performance to the performance objectives specified in NRC regulations for the disposal of low-level waste (10 CFR Part 61 Subpart C). The performance objectives contain criteria for protection of the public, protection of inadvertent intruders, protection of workers, and stability of the disposal site after closure. The potential radiological dose to receptors typically is evaluated with a performance assessment (PA) model that simulates the release of radionuclides from the disposal site, transport of radionuclides through the environment, and exposure of potential receptors to residual contamination for thousands of years. This paper describes NRC's development and use of independent performance assessment modeling to facilitate review of DOE's non-HLW determination for the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) at the Savannah River Site. NRC's review of the safety of near-surface disposal of radioactive waste at the SDF was facilitated and focused by risk insights developed with an independent PA model. The main components of NRC's performance assessment model are presented. The development of risk insights that allow the staff to focus review efforts on those areas that are most important to satisfying the performance objectives is discussed. Uncertainty analysis was performed of the full stochastic model using genetic variable selection algorithms. The results of the uncertainty analysis were then used to guide the development of simulations of other scenarios to understand the key risk drivers and risk limiters of the SDF. Review emphasis was placed on those aspects of the disposal system that were expected to drive performance: the physical and chemical performance of the cementitious wasteform and concrete vaults. Refinement of the modeling of the degradation and release from the cementitious wasteform had a significant effect on the predicted dose to a member of the public. (authors)

  6. Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most common method of measuring air leakage is to perform single (or solo) blower door pressurization and/or depressurization test. In detached housing, the single blower door test measures leakage to the outside. In attached housing, however, this "solo" test method measures both air leakage to the outside and air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces. Although minimizing leakage to neighboring units is highly recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly overpredicted if the solo air leakage number is used in the energy analysis. Guarded blower door testing is more appropriate for isolating and measuring leakage to the outside in attached housing. This method uses multiple blower doors to depressurize adjacent spaces to the same level as the unit being tested. Maintaining a neutral pressure across common walls, ceilings, and floors acts as a "guard" against air leakage between units. The resulting measured air leakage in the test unit is only air leakage to the outside. Although preferred for assessing energy impacts, the challenges of performing guarded testing can be daunting.

  7. Correcting radiation survey data to account for increased leakage during intensity modulated radiotherapy treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kairn, T. [Premion Cancer Care, Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower Qld 4066, Australia and Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2434, Brisbane Qld 4000 (Australia)] [Premion Cancer Care, Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower Qld 4066, Australia and Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2434, Brisbane Qld 4000 (Australia); Crowe, S. B.; Trapp, J. V. [Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2434, Brisbane Qld 4000 (Australia)] [Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2434, Brisbane Qld 4000 (Australia)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments require more beam-on time and produce more linac head leakage to deliver similar doses to conventional, unmodulated, radiotherapy treatments. It is necessary to take this increased leakage into account when evaluating the results of radiation surveys around bunkers that are, or will be, used for IMRT. The recommended procedure of applying a monitor-unit based workload correction factor to secondary barrier survey measurements, to account for this increased leakage when evaluating radiation survey measurements around IMRT bunkers, can lead to potentially costly overestimation of the required barrier thickness. This study aims to provide initial guidance on the validity of reducing the value of the correction factor when applied to different radiation barriers (primary barriers, doors, maze walls, and other walls) by evaluating three different bunker designs.Methods: Radiation survey measurements of primary, scattered, and leakage radiation were obtained at each of five survey points around each of three different radiotherapy bunkers and the contribution of leakage to the total measured radiation dose at each point was evaluated. Measurements at each survey point were made with the linac gantry set to 12 equidistant positions from 0° to 330°, to assess the effects of radiation beam direction on the results.Results: For all three bunker designs, less than 0.5% of dose measured at and alongside the primary barriers, less than 25% of the dose measured outside the bunker doors and up to 100% of the dose measured outside other secondary barriers was found to be caused by linac head leakage.Conclusions: Results of this study suggest that IMRT workload corrections are unnecessary, for survey measurements made at and alongside primary barriers. Use of reduced IMRT workload correction factors is recommended when evaluating survey measurements around a bunker door, provided that a subset of the measurements used in this study are repeated for the bunker in question. Reduction of the correction factor for other secondary barrier survey measurements is not recommended unless the contribution from leakage is separately evaluated.

  8. assembly leakage unit: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the cracks are the objective of the inversion process. The proposed procedure Reilly, James P. 72 Statistical Leakage Estimation in 32nm CMOS Considering Cells Correlations...

  9. air leakage database: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the cracks are the objective of the inversion process. The proposed procedure Reilly, James P. 86 Leakage-Aware Energy Synchronization for Wireless Sensor Networks Computer...

  10. Optimization Online - The carbon leakage effect on the cement ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elisabetta Allevi

    2015-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 8, 2015 ... The carbon leakage effect on the cement sector under different climate policies. Elisabetta Allevi(elisabetta.allevi ***at*** unibs.it)

  11. Key Factors for Determining Groundwater Impacts Due to Leakage from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Susan A.; Keating, Elizabeth; Mansoor, Kayyum; Dai, Zhenxue; Sun, Yunwei; Trainor-Guitton, Whitney; Brown, Christopher F.; Bacon, Diana H.

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is developing a science-based toolset for the analysis of potential impacts to groundwater chemistry from CO2 injection (www.netldoe.gov/nrap). The toolset adopts a stochastic approach in which predictions address uncertainties in shallow groundwater and leakage scenarios. It is derived from detailed physics and chemistry simulation results that are used to train more computationally efficient models, referred to here as reduced-order models (ROMs), for each component system. In particular, these tools can be used to help regulators and operators understand the expected sizes and longevity of plumes in pH, TDS, and dissolved metals that could result from a leakage of brine and/or CO2 from a storage reservoir into aquifers. This information can inform, for example, decisions on monitoring strategies that are both effective and efficient. We have used this approach to develop predictive reduced-order models for two common types of reservoirs, but the approach could be used to develop a model for a specific aquifer or other common types of aquifers. In this paper we describe potential impacts to groundwater quality due to CO2 and brine leakage, discuss an approach to calculate thresholds under which no impact to groundwater occurs, describe the time scale for impact on groundwater, and discuss the probability of detecting a groundwater plume should leakage occur. To facilitate this, multi-phase flow and reactive transport simulations and emulations were developed for two classes of aquifers, considering uncertainty in leakage source terms and aquifer hydrogeology. We targeted an unconfined fractured carbonate aquifer based on the Edwards aquifer in Texas and a confined alluvium aquifer based on the High Plains Aquifer in Kansas, which share characteristics typical of many drinking water aquifers in the United States. The hypothetical leakage scenarios centered on the notion that wellbores are the most likely conduits for brine and CO2 leaks. Leakage uncertainty was based on hypothetical injection of CO2 for 50 years at a rate of 5 million tons per year into a depleted oil/gas reservoir with high permeability and, one or more wells provided leakage pathways from the storage reservoir to the overlying aquifer. This scenario corresponds to a storage site with historical oil/gas production and some poorly completed legacy wells that went undetected through site evaluation, operations, and post-closure. For the aquifer systems and leakage scenarios studied here, CO2 and brine leakage are likely to drive pH below and increase total dissolved solids (TDS) above the “no-impact thresholds;” and the subsequent plumes, although small, are likely to persist for long periods of time in the absence of remediation. In these scenarios, however, risk to human health may not be significant for two reasons. First, our simulated plume volumes are much smaller than the average inter-well spacing for these representative aquifers, so the impacted groundwater would be unlikely to be pumped for drinking water. Second, even within the impacted plume volumes little water exceeds the primary maximum contamination levels.

  12. Efficiency and Leakage Analysis of a Twin-Screw Multiphase Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turhan, Yusuf

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Furthermore, the leakage models are used to calculate the mechanical efficiency with the single-phase experiment data. The TAMU experiment results are used to evaluate the accuracy of the leakage models. The leakage models show their accuracy in terms...

  13. Model Code for the Control of Residential HVAC Distribution System Leakage and HVAC-Induced Building Leakage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wemhoff, P.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumption for air conditioning, as well as a 50 percent increase in peak cooling load and an 80 percent increase in peak heating load. In addition, building air leakage may be expected to be several times greater when duct leakage is present or when avenues...

  14. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangler, Lee H.; Dobeck, Laura M.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Humphries, Seth D.; Barr, Jamie L.; Keith, Charlie J.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Rouse, Joshua H.; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Benson, Sally M.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. R.; Strazisar, Brian; Fessenden, Julianna; Rahn, Thom A.; Amonette, James E.; Barr, Jonathan L.; Pickles, William L.; Jacobson, James D.; Silver, Eli A.; Male, Erin J.; Rauch, Henry W.; Gullickson, Kadie; Trautz, Robert; Kharaka, Yousif; Birkholzer, Jens; Wielopolski, Lucien

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A facility has been constructed to perform controlled shallow releases of CO2 at flow rates that challenge near surface detection techniques and can be scalable to desired retention rates of large scale CO2 storage projects. Preinjection measurements were made to determine background conditions and characterize natural variability at the site. Modeling of CO2 transport and concentration in saturated soil and the vadose zone was also performed to inform decisions about CO2 release rates and sampling strategies. Four releases of CO2 were carried out over the summer field seasons of 2007 and 2008. Transport of CO2 through soil, water, plants, and air was studied using near surface detection techniques. Soil CO2 flux, soil gas concentration, total carbon in soil, water chemistry, plant health, net CO2 flux, atmospheric CO2 concentration, movement of tracers, and stable isotope ratios were among the quantities measured. Even at relatively low fluxes, most techniques were able to detect elevated levels of CO2 in the soil, atmosphere, or water. Plant stress induced by CO2 was detectable above natural seasonal variations.

  15. Flow visualization and leakage measurements of labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, James Wayne

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large scale test rig is used to conduct an experimental investigation into the leakage resistance properties and flow characteristics of labyrinth seals. A novel test facility with multiple cavities that provides 2D, planar flow at a scale...

  16. Leakage Prediction of Labyrinth Seals Having Advanced Cavity Shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panicker, Sunil M.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Labyrinth seals are widely used in various turbo machines including turbines, compressors and pumps. Their purpose is to prevent the backflow of the working fluid. This backflow is due to the leakage of the seal. This loss affects the efficiency...

  17. Flow visualization and leakage measurements of worn labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Brian Frank

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale flow visualization test facility is used to conduct an experimental investigation into the leakage resistance and flow characteristics of worn labyrinth seals. Wear in labyrinth seals is a consequence of contact between the rotating...

  18. Advanced configurations for leakage reduction in a labyrinth seal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veldanda, Sharath B.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADVANCED CONFIGURATIONS FOR LEAKAGE REDUCTION IN A LABYRINTH SEAL A Thesis by SHARATH B. VELDANDA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering ADVANCED CONFIGURATION FOR LEAKAGE REDUCTION IN A LABYRINTH SEAL A Thesis by SHARATH B. VELDANDA Approved as to style and content by: David L. Rhode y~~ (Member) K. D. Korkan (Member...

  19. Potential method for measurement of CO2 leakage from underground sequestration fields using radioactive tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachelor, Paula P.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Amonette, James E.; Hayes, James C.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Saripalli, Prasad

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) release to the environment is a pressing challenge that should be addressed to avert the potential devastating effects of global warming. Within the United States, the most abundant sources of CO2 emissions are those generate from coal- or gas-fired power plants; one method to control CO2 emissions is to sequester it in deep underground geological formations. From integrated assessment models the overall leakage rates from these storage locations must be less than 0.1% of stored volume per year for long-term control. The ability to detect and characterize nascent leaks, in conjunction with subsequent remediation efforts, will significantly decrease the amount of CO2 released back into the environment. Because potential leakage pathways are not necessarily known a priori, onsite monitoring must be performed; the monitoring region in the vicinity of a CO2 injection well may be as large as 100 km2, which represents the estimated size of a supercritical CO2 bubble that would form under typical injection scenarios. By spiking the injected CO2 with a radiological or stable isotope tracer, it will be possible to detect ground leaks from the sequestered CO2 using fewer sampling stations, with greater accuracy than would be possible using simple CO2 sensors. The relative merits of various sorbent materials, radiological and stable isotope tracers, detection methods and potential interferences will be discussed.

  20. Arsenic Mineralogy of Near-surface Tailings and Soils: Influences on Arsenic Mobility and Bioaccessibility in the Nova Scotia Mining Districts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, S.; Parsons, M; Jamieson, H; Lanzirotti, A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mineral form, grain size and texture of As-bearing particles are important factors influencing the risk to human health associated with exposure to As-contaminated soils, sediments and mine wastes. Mining of arsenopyrite-bearing gold ores in Nova Scotia in the late 1800s and early 1900s has left a legacy of weathered, As-rich tailings deposits in more than 60 gold districts across the province. Fourteen samples of near-surface tailings and one of soil from several former gold mines frequented by the public were sieved to <150 {mu}m and characterized using conventional mineralogical techniques (XRD, microscopy and EPMA) and synchrotron micro-analysis ({mu}-X-ray diffraction, {mu}-X-ray fluorescence and {mu}-X-ray absorption spectroscopy). This study is part of a broader coordinated effort by a multi-department federal and provincial advisory committee formed to coordinate the study of ecosystem and human health risks associated with historical gold mine sites in Nova Scotia. Our study shows that (i) the mineralogy of As in weathered tailings is highly variable, with aggregates of more than one As-bearing phase common in a given sample, and (ii) major differences in As mineralogy in the tailings are mainly controlled by factors that influence the weathering history (e.g., presence or absence of mill concentrates, degree of water saturation, and abundance of relict carbonate minerals). The variable solubility of these primary and secondary As-bearing minerals influences both the environmental mobility and the bioaccessibility of As in near-surface tailings and soil samples.

  1. Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Wanyu R. Chan, Jeffrey,000 single-family detached homes have sufficient information for the analysis of air leakage in relation variability in normalized leakage. ResDB also contains the before and after retrofit air leakage measurements

  2. Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Location, Air Leakage and Insulation Iain S. Walker Energy4 Duct Insulation, Location and Leakageinsulation

  3. Leakage and rotordynamic effects of pocket damper seals and see-through labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamal Eldin, Ahmed Mohamed

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests ........................................................................... 73 VIII LEAKAGE TESTS: EFFECTS OF SEAL DESIGN PARAMETERS ............. 79 Review of Earlier Tests...

  4. Leakage and rotordynamic effects of pocket damper seals and see-through labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamal Eldin, Ahmed Mohamed

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests ........................................................................... 73 VIII LEAKAGE TESTS: EFFECTS OF SEAL DESIGN PARAMETERS ............. 79 Review of Earlier Tests...

  5. Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Christopher E. (Schenectady, NY); Dinc, Osman S. (Troy, NY); Bagepalli, Bharat S. (Schenectady, NY); Correia, Victor H. (New Lebanon, NY); Aksit, Mahmut F. (Troy, NY)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the "plane" of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member.

  6. Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfe, C.E.; Dinc, O.S.; Bagepalli, B.S.; Correia, V.H.; Aksit, M.F.

    1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-path leakage seal is described for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the ``plane`` of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member. 4 figs.

  7. Determination of leakage and unaccounted-for gas-distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, J.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It was leakage from ill fitting pipes and the resultant danger of explosions, fires, and asphxiation that delayed for a long time the use of gas in private homes. The industry has solved the problem of ill fitting pipes but safety, profits, and the conservation of a natural resource still demands a keen concern over leakage and unaccounted-for gas. The generally accepted definition of unaccountedfor gas is simple. It is the difference between the amount of gas supplied to and taken out of a piping system. By this definition, leakage is only a part of unaccounted-for gas, although the terms are sometimes used synonymously. It is the need to determine the ''tightness'' or freedom from leaks of the distribution system that requires an operator to evaluate all other components of unaccounted-for gas.

  8. Air Leakage of U.S. Homes: Model Prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air tightness is an important property of building envelopes. It is a key factor in determining infiltration and related wall-performance properties such as indoor air quality, maintainability and moisture balance. Air leakage in U.S. houses consumes roughly 1/3 of the HVAC energy but provides most of the ventilation used to control IAQ. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been gathering residential air leakage data from many sources and now has a database of more than 100,000 raw measurements. This paper uses a model developed from that database in conjunction with US Census Bureau data for estimating air leakage as a function of location throughout the US.

  9. A promising concept for using near-surface measuring angles in angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy considering elastic scattering effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oswald, S.; Oswald, F. [IFW Dresden, Postfach 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing number of applications of very thin films requires both reliable thin-layer and interface characterization. A powerful method for characterization in the nanometer thickness range is the angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). This is a nondestructive depth-profiling method, which can provide elemental content as well as chemical information. Two of the drawbacks of ARXPS are, that it requires dedicated mathematical modeling and that, at least up until now, its use has been restricted away from near-surface angles. In this paper we present a method for the mathematical description of a few, hitherto unaccounted, measurement effects in order to improve the simulations of ARXPS data for complex surface structures. As an immediate application, we propose a simple algorithm to consider the effects of elastic scattering in the standard ARXPS data interpretation, which in principle would allow the use of the whole angular range for the analysis; thus leading to a significant increase in the usable information content from the measurements. The potential of this approach is demonstrated with model calculations for a few thin film examples.

  10. Proceedings, 2005 International Oil Spill Conference. American Petroleum Institute, Washington, DC. pp. 541-545. Ten Years of Realtime, Near-Surface Current Observations Supporting Oil Spill Response1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000 barrels of Bunker C oil into the Gulf of Mexico off Texas' coast. Sea conditions dispersedProceedings, 2005 International Oil Spill Conference. American Petroleum Institute, Washington, DC. pp. 541-545. Ten Years of Realtime, Near-Surface Current Observations Supporting Oil Spill Response1

  11. Interaction of wide-band-gap single crystals with 248-nm excimer laser irradiation. X. Laser-induced near-surface absorption in single-crystal NaCl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickinson, J. Thomas

    are expected to play an important role in optical break- down and surface damage. II. EXPERIMENT The results of a few thousand kelvin even in the absence of visible surface damage. The origin of the laser absorption radiation. As much as 20% of the incident radiation at 248 nm must be absorbed in the near-surface region

  12. Application of Buckmaster Electrolyte Ion Leakage Test to Woody Biofuel Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broderick, Thomas F [Forest Concepts, LLC; Dooley, James H [Forest Concepts, LLC

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In an earlier ASABE paper, Buckmaster reported that ion conductivity of biomass leachate in aqueous solution was directly correlated with activity access to plant nutrients within the biomass materials for subsequent biological or chemical processing. The Buckmaster test involves placing a sample of the particles in a beaker of constant-temperature deionized water and monitoring the change in electrical conductivity over time. We adapted the Buckmaster method to a range of woody biomass and other cellulosic bioenergy feedstocks. Our experimental results suggest differences of electrolyte leakage between differently processed woody biomass particles may be an indicator of their utility for conversion in bioenergy processes. This simple assay appears to be particularly useful to compare different biomass comminution techniques and particle sizes for biochemical preprocessing.

  13. The Wavelet Variance, Allan Variance and Leakage David A. Howe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    The Wavelet Variance, Allan Variance and Leakage by David A. Howe Time and Frequency Division)--543--1300 FAX: (206)--543--6785 Contribution of the U. S. Government, not subject to copyright. #12; Abstract---Wavelets. The discrete wavelet transform can be used to decompose a time series with respect to a set of basis functions

  14. Transport of waste leakage in stratified Hongbin Zhan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    , stratified formations. 1 INTRODUCTION Underground waste disposal is used for industrial and domestic wastes, the leakage of waste from a storage site is often carried off site by groundwater. In addition, strong greater than unity. It is known that many field acquifers and geological formations have a wide range

  15. Robust Strategy for Intake Leakage Detection in Diesel Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Robust Strategy for Intake Leakage Detection in Diesel Engines Riccardo Ceccarelli , Philippe are provided using advanced Diesel engine developed under AMEsim. I. INTRODUCTION The modern Diesel engine has of the functioning of a air-path in a Diesel engine with exhaust gas recirculation circuit is presented. More

  16. PROACTIVE SECRET SHARING How to Cope With Perpetual Leakage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldwasser, Shafi

    PROACTIVE SECRET SHARING Or: How to Cope With Perpetual Leakage Amir Herzberg Stanis/law Jarecki,stasio,hugo,motig@watson.ibm.com October 15, 1998 Abstract Secret sharing schemes protect secrets by distributing them over different the entire life­time of the secret the adversary is restricted to compromise less than k of the n locations

  17. Sensitivity of Forced Air Distribution System Efficiency to Climate, Duct Location, Air Leakage and Insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Air Leakage and Insulation Iain S. Walker Energy Performance of Buildings Group Indoor Environment ................................................................................................................................................ 4 Duct Insulation, Location and Leakage Examples............................................................... 4 Figure 2. Sheet metal ducts in a basement insulated with asbestos

  18. Direct measurement of the carrier leakage in an InGaAsP/InP laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, T.R.; Margalit, S.; Koren, U.; Yu, K.L.; Chiu, L.C.; Hasson, A.; Yariv, A.

    1983-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Carrier leakage over the heterobarrier in an InGaAsP/InP laser is measured directly in a laser-bipolar-transistor structure. Experimental results indicate a significant amount of carrier leakage under normal laser operating conditions.

  19. A Computational Study on the Leakage of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide through Labyrinth Seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pidaparti, Sandeep R

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    of turbomachinery equipment it is important to reduce internal leakage through seals. A computational study was performed to understand the leakage through seals subject to large pressure differential using Open source CFD software OpenFOAM. FIT (Fluid Property...

  20. Model Code for the Prevention of Residential HAC Distribution System Leakage and HAC-Induced Building Leakage, 1994 Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wemhoff, P.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the requirements of 100.0(b)l.b., and shall be tested in accordance with standard SMAC-3. Leakage testing may be limited to representative sections of the duct system, but in no case shall such tested sections include less than 25 percent of the total...

  1. An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilley, George

    An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration J. L the success of geologic carbon sequestration projects. To detect subtle CO2 leakage signals, we present), An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res

  2. Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Iain S. Walker, Mike Lubliner, Darryl Dickerhoff,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers of California. #12;1 Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Iain S. Walker, LBNL Mike Lubliner, Washington been made in reducing air leakage in residential and to a lesser extent small commercial forced air

  3. Carbon leakage and competitiveness of cement and steel industries under the EU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    No 53-2013 Carbon leakage and competitiveness of cement and steel industries under the EU ETS: much2014 #12;Carbon leakage and competitiveness of cement and steel industries under the EU ETS: much ado about nothing Abstract In a world of uneven climate policies, concerns about carbon leakage

  4. Gas-path leakage seal for a turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagepalli, B.S.; Aksit, M.F.; Farrell, T.R.

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a turbine (such as combustor casing segments of a gas turbine). The seal includes a flexible and generally imperforate metal sheet assemblage having opposing first and second surfaces and two opposing raised edges extending a generally identical distance above and below the surfaces. A first cloth layer assemblage has a thickness generally equal to the previously-defined identical distance and is superimposed on the first surface between the raised edges. A second cloth layer assemblage is generally identical to the first cloth layer assemblage and is superimposed on the second surface between the raised edges. 5 figs.

  5. Turbocharger with sliding piston, and having vanes and leakage dams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Quentin (Nancy, FR); Alnega, Ahmed (Thaon Les Vosges, FR)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbocharger having a sliding piston for regulating exhaust gas flow into the turbine wheel includes a set of first vanes mounted on a fixed first wall of the turbine nozzle and projecting axially toward an opposite second wall of the nozzle, and/or a set of second vanes mounted on the end of the piston and projecting in an opposite axial direction toward the first wall of the nozzle. For the/each set of vanes, there are leakage dams formed on the wall that is adjacent the vane tips when the piston is closed. The leakage dams are closely adjacent the vane tips and discourage exhaust gas from leaking in a generally radial direction past the vane tips as the piston just begins to open from its fully closed position.

  6. A Residential Duct Leakage Case Study on 'Good Cents' Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, J. A.; Perez, R.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of round or rectangular ducts running through their walls, ceilings, attics, and basements. According to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), even energy experts once believed that air duct leakage was insignificant (EPRI, 1992). In the late 1980s..., researchers began to realize that a significant relationship existed between residential air duct systems and energy loss (EPRI, 1996). Previous studies showed that air duct losses on the order of 35% were typical in residential construction (Jump, et...

  7. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

  8. Semi-analytical model of brine and CO2 leakage through an abandoned plugged well. Applications for determining an Area of Review and CO2 leakage rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Semi-analytical model of brine and CO2 leakage through an abandoned plugged well. Applications for determining an Area of Review and CO2 leakage rate Arnaud Réveillčre, Jérémy Rohmer, Frédéric Wertz / contact the leak, and of CO2,g as a first approach. Compared to the state of the art, it adds the possibility

  9. The measured energy impact of air leakage on a house

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaidya, Shilpa Arvind

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    +mC. &(1 ? e) (3. 13) 2p and, we have UA( 7'mdoor 7'ouldoor ) Auolor solar = ( power (3 14) Asplar is deduced from the test in which the house has no air leakage, i e. , when UA = UAp In this case, A~ala~ =17Ap fu (3 ?) 7 ? 7' uuloor ouuioor where j...) & power i. e. , UAp- Ti udoor ? Touidoor ? f u 7 solar (3. 18) 21 Then UA can be determined as o&rer + VAtkfi (sol&rr UA = To&door 7 oai&ioor (3 19) 3. 2. 3. Infiltration Heat Exchange Effectiveness, IIIEE and energy saving ratio, ttc...

  10. Numerical Simulations of Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Hajime; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To secure a stable supply of petroleum gas, underground storage caverns for liquified petroleum gas (LPG) are commonly used in many countries worldwide. Storing LPG in underground caverns requires that the surrounding rock mass remain saturated with groundwater and that the water pressure be higher than the liquid pressure inside the cavern. In previous studies, gas containment criteria for underground gas storage based on hydraulic gradient and pressure have been discussed, but these studies do not consider the physicochemical characteristics and behavior of LPG such as vaporization and dissolution in groundwater. Therefore, while these studies are very useful for designing storage caverns, they do not provide better understanding of the either the environmental effects of gas contamination or the behavior of vaporized LPG. In this study, we have performed three-phase fluid flow simulations of gas leakage from underground LPG storage caverns, using the multiphase multicomponent nonisothermal simulator TMVOC (Pruess and Battistelli, 2002), which is capable of solving the three-phase nonisothermal flow of water, gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. A two-dimensional cross-sectional model resembling an actual underground LPG facility in Japan was developed, and gas leakage phenomena were simulated for three different permeability models: (1) a homogeneous model, (2) a single-fault model, and (3) a heterogeneous model. In addition, the behavior of stored LPG was studied for the special case of a water curtain suddenly losing its function because of operational problems, or because of long-term effects such as clogging of boreholes. The results of the study indicate the following: (1) The water curtain system is a very powerful means for preventing gas leakage from underground storage facilities. By operating with appropriate pressure and layout, gas containment can be ensured. (2) However , in highly heterogeneous media such as fractured rock and fault zones, local flow paths within which the gas containment criterion is not satisfied could be formed. To eliminate such zones, treatments such as pre/post grouting or an additional installment of water-curtain boreholes are essential. (3) Along highly conductive features such as faults, even partially saturated zones possess certain effects that can retard or prevent gas leakage, while a fully unsaturated fault connected to the storage cavern can quickly cause a gas blowout. This possibility strongly suggests that ensuring water saturation of the rock surrounding the cavern is a very important requirement. (4) Even if an accident should suddenly impair the water curtain, the gas plume does not quickly penetrate the ground surface. In these simulations, the plume takes several months to reach the ground surface.

  11. avoiding leakage flow-induced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the cracks are the objective of the inversion process. The proposed procedure Reilly, James P. 106 Leakage-Aware Energy Synchronization for Wireless Sensor Networks Computer...

  12. as-built leakage diagnosis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the cracks are the objective of the inversion process. The proposed procedure Reilly, James P. 51 Leakage-Aware Energy Synchronization for Wireless Sensor Networks Computer...

  13. Building America Case Study: Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space, Waldorf, Maryland (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed. For houses employing whole-house supply ventilation (positive pressure) or balanced ventilation (same pressure effect as the Baseline condition), adherence to the EPA Indoor airPLUS house-to-garage air sealing requirements should be sufficient to expect little to no garage-to-house air transfer.

  14. Determination of leakage and unaccounted-for gas distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spriggs, C.M. [Oklahoma Natural Gas Co., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All gas systems leak. Gas escapes every system in one way or another. This is true because gas is permeable to every system. For instance, with PE2306 pipe, the volume of methane lost through permeation in one mile of two-inch pipe operated at 60 psi is about 0.26 cubic feet per day. So, if every system leaks, then how much do we lose? Hence, we have unaccounted-for gas. Unaccounted-for gas is truly accounted-for gas--but it is missing! It is the difference between the amount of gas accounted into a system and the amount of gas accounted out. Many factors cause unaccounted-for gas. Each should be examined before the missing gas is all attributed to leakage--a single cause of unaccounted-for gas. Factors I would suggest evaluating are the following: (1) Measured conditions; (2) Accounting methods; (3) Meter errors; (4) Gas used for construction and operations; (5) Major damage and relief valve trips; (6) Meter reading errors, stolen gas, etc.; and (7) Leakage.

  15. Helium/solid powder O-ring leakage correlation experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leisher, W.B.; Weissman, S.H.; Tallant, D.R.; Kubo, M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a method to test powder leakage that has passed O-ring seals. To validate this method we have spiked a test fixture with 98 ng of U and recovered 130 +- 25 ng of U. We did not detect U at a detection limit of 26 ng in a fixture which was treated as a blank. This method has been applied to the leakage of UO/sub 2/ powder passing the type of EPDM O-ring seals used in a SNM shipping cask belonging to PNC. Considering the three experimental tests in which no or very small quantities of U were detected as effective blank test, it appears that the level of external contamination is negligible. Therefore, we believe that the U quantities greater than 26 ng (6 tests) passed the primary O-ring seal. From this limited quantity of data, we observe no apparent correlation between the amount of U measured and either helium leak rate or equivalent tube diameter. The data for the 130/sup 0/C tests indicate the possibility of a U/time relationship; however, more data are needed for verification.

  16. A MONITOR FOR DETECTING NUCLEAR WASTE LEAKAGE IN A SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klainer, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uranium analysis, laser-induced fluorescence, selective laser excitation, fluorescence (Submitted to Analytical Chemistry,Chemistry and Environmental Science Divisions Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA 94550 ULTRA-TRACE DETECTION OF URANIUMuranium-containing groundwater samples. The results to dare have been formally submitted for publication in Analytical Chemistry,

  17. A MONITOR FOR DETECTING NUCLEAR WASTE LEAKAGE IN A SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klainer, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uranium analysis, laser-induced fluorescence, selective laser excitation, fluorescence (Submitted to Analytical Chemistry,Chemistry and Environmental Science Divisions Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA 94550 ULTRA-TRACE DETECTION OF URANIUM

  18. Monitoring materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide techniques for effectively implementing alpha and/or beta and/or gamma monitoring of items or locations as desired. Indirect alpha monitoring by detecting ions generated by alpha emissions, in conjunction with beta and/or gamma monitoring is provided. The invention additionally provides for screening of items prior to alpha monitoring using beta and/or gamma monitoring, so as to ensure that the alpha monitoring apparatus is not contaminated by proceeding direct to alpha monitoring of a heavily contaminated item or location. The invention provides additional versatility in the emission forms which can be monitored, whilst maintaining accuracy and avoiding inadvertent contamination.

  19. Performance Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimization Performance Monitoring Performance Monitoring A redirector page has been set up without anywhere to redirect to. Last edited: 2014-08-25 14:37:27...

  20. Managing Static Leakage Energy in Microprocessor Functional Units Steven Dropsho, Volkan Kursun, David H. Albonesi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Eby G.

    Managing Static Leakage Energy in Microprocessor Functional Units ÂŁ Steven DropshoĂť, Volkan Kursun microprocessors. Many studies so far have examined and proposed techniques to reduce leakage in on-chip storage dissipation has become a critical design con- straint in high performance microprocessors. Until recently

  1. Circumstances of leakage related to low urethral closure pressure Xavier Fritel, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with no obvious reason were all associated with ISD, while leakage on coughing or sneezing was not. Conclusions;Introduction Classically, the circumstances of urinary leakage (coughing, sneezing, running, walking, upright during coughing or Valsalva maneuvers.2 This proportional relation between severity of incontinence

  2. STATE OF CALIFORNIA DUCT LEAKAGE TEST COMPLETELY NEW OR REPLACEMENT DUCT SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA DUCT LEAKAGE TEST ­ COMPLETELY NEW OR REPLACEMENT DUCT SYSTEM CEC- CF-4R TESTING CF-4R-MECH-20 Duct Leakage Test ­ Completely New or Replacement Duct System (Page 1 of 3) Site, and also for completely new or replacement duct systems in existing dwellings. For existing dwellings

  3. STATE OF CALIFORNIA DUCT LEAKAGE TEST COMPLETELY NEW OR REPLACEMENT DUCT SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA DUCT LEAKAGE TEST ­ COMPLETELY NEW OR REPLACEMENT DUCT SYSTEM CEC- CF-6R Leakage Test ­ Completely New or Replacement Duct System (Page 1 of 3) Site Address: Enforcement Agency new or replacement duct systems in existing dwellings. For existing dwellings, a completely new

  4. Leakage Evaluated and Controlled from Industrial Process Pipeline by Optimum Gasket Assembly Stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Ching

    will ultimately result in a complete proposal to prevent any hazardous gas leaks in the process industries0 Leakage Evaluated and Controlled from Industrial Process Pipeline by Optimum Gasket Assembly and vehicles), but they have ignore the leakage between pipelines in process industries. When hazardous

  5. Tradeoffs between Gate Oxide Leakage and Delay for Dual ToxToxTox Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    lead to gate oxide leakage current (Igate), are coming into play from the 90nm node onwards. AccordingTradeoffs between Gate Oxide Leakage and Delay for Dual ToxToxTox Circuits Anup Kumar Sultania Department of ECE University of Minnesota Minneapolis, MN 55455. sachin@ece.umn.edu ABSTRACT Gate oxide

  6. Remediation of CO2 Leakage from Deep Saline Aquifer Storage Based on Reservoir and Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Remediation of CO2 Leakage from Deep Saline Aquifer Storage Based on Reservoir and Pollution Hazards and Safety of CO2 Storage" Division, Orléans, FRANCE www.brgm.fr References Audigane, P., Chiaberge, C., Lions, J., Humez, P., 2009. Modeling of CO2 leakage through an abandoned well from a deep

  7. How secure is CO2 storage? Leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How secure is CO2 storage? Leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs Johannes Miocic, Stuart. The goal of CCS is to store carbon dioxide (CO2) in the subsurface for a long period of time (>10,000 yr).1 It is important that the stored CO2 does not leak from the reservoir to the surface . 3. Faults as leakage

  8. Carrier leakage and temperature dependence of InGaAsP lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, T.R.; Chang, B.; Chiu, L.C.; Yu, K.L.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct measurement of electron and hole leakage in InGaAsP/InP lasers has been carried out. The effect of electron leakage on the temperature sensitivity of InGaAsP/InP lasers has been revealed.

  9. Accurate Temperature-Dependent Integrated Circuit Leakage Power Estimation is Easy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dick, Robert

    , coarse-grained thermal models, combined with linear leakage power consumption models, permit highly-accurate system-wide leakage power consumption estimation. The results of our proofs are further confirmed via of today's high-performance micro- processors [2]. Power consumption, temperature, and performance must now

  10. USE OF GCLS TO CONTROL LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOMEMBRANE DEFECTS UNDER HIGH HYDRAULIC HEADS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    USE OF GCLS TO CONTROL LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOMEMBRANE DEFECTS UNDER HIGH HYDRAULIC HEADS Christine T liners under conditions representative of dams (i.e., high hydraulic heads). Specifically, the objective of interface contact, hydraulic head, and GCL hydration procedures on the leakage rate were considered

  11. Applying Decay Strategies to Branch Predictors for Leakage Energy Savings Zhigang Hu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martonosi, Margaret

    Applying Decay Strategies to Branch Predictors for Leakage Energy Savings Zhigang HuĂť Philo Juang@cs.virginia.edu doug@cs.princeton.edu Abstract With technology advancing toward deep submicron, leak- age energy--already shown to reduce leakage energy for caches--to branch-prediction structures. Due to the structural

  12. STUDY OF POTENTIAL LEAKAGE ON SEVERAL STRESSED FITTINGS FOR HYDROGEN PRESSURES UP TO 700 BAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in terms of flow rate. CONTEXT Risks induced by H2 use are first the leakage, and then explosion or fire, self-ignition: jet fire characteristics. 2. If explosive atmosphere is formed: reached levels leakage potential and subsequently explosion and flame hazards. Thus, as part of the "Horizon Hydrogčne

  13. Managing Static Leakage Energy in Microprocessor Functional Units Steven Dropshoy, Volkan Kursun, David H. Albonesi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwarkadas, Sandhya

    ; by New York State Office of Science, Technology & Academic Re­ search to the Center for AdvancedManaging Static Leakage Energy in Microprocessor Functional Units #3; Steven Dropshoy, Volkan energy due to subthreshold leakage current is pro­ jected to become a major component of the total energy

  14. LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS Christine T. Weber, The University of Texas at Austin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    clay liner (e.g. 10-9 m/s). In spite of their function as hydraulic barriers, geomembrane liners shouldLEAKAGE THROUGH GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS Christine T. Weber, The University of Texas was conducted to quantify leakage through a geomembrane liner system when subjected to high hydraulic heads

  15. Using Big Data and Smart Field Technology for Detecting Leakage in a CO2 Storage Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    sequestration of carbon dioxide is one of the most fascinating developing technologies in order to reduce Leakage Detection System (ILDS). The main concern for geologic CO2 sequestration is the capability of the underground carbon dioxide storage to confine and sustain the injected CO2 for very long time. If a leakage

  16. Moisture Risk in Unvented Attics Due to Air Leakage Paths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, D.; Shaffer, M.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IBACOS completed an initial analysis of moisture damage potential in an unvented attic insulated with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam. To complete this analysis, the research team collected field data, used computational fluid dynamics to quantify the airflow rates through individual airflow (crack) paths, simulated hourly flow rates through the leakage paths with CONTAM software, correlated the CONTAM flow rates with indoor humidity ratios from Building Energy Optimization software, and used Warme und Feuchte instationar Pro two-dimensional modeling to determine the moisture content of the building materials surrounding the cracks. Given the number of simplifying assumptions and numerical models associated with this analysis, the results indicate that localized damage due to high moisture content of the roof sheathing is possible under very low airflow rates. Reducing the number of assumptions and approximations through field studies and laboratory experiments would be valuable to understand the real-world moisture damage potential in unvented attics.

  17. Dynamic leakage of faults during differential depletion: Theory, models, and examples from the Niger delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, N.L.; Kaars Sijpestein, C.H.; Osai, L.N.; Okoli, O.C. (Shell Petroleum Development Co. of Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of fault sealing have addressed possible fault leakage during secondary migration due to the effects of increased hydrocarbon-water capillary pressure, fracturing, or small-scale incremental fault movements. Of equal importance to production geologists is the failure and leakage of faults during field development due to differential depletion of adjacent fault blocks. This paper examines the unique problems associated with this dynamic leakage of faults. It is theoretically shown that the fault sealing mechanism, and the extent of the seal, directly influences the failure process which in turn results in a variety of favorable and unfavorable effects on field development. The qualitative models give considerable insight into such aspects as oil-column expansion and resaturation losses, interfault block aquifer support (with important implications to material balance calculations), possible leakage or spillage of oil across faults, and potential fault failure during (re)injection projects. Examples of dynamic fault leakage are presented from selected fields of the Niger delta.

  18. An experimental and computational leakage investigation of labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambrosia, Matthew Stanley

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the tooth tip clearance the deeper the flow path penetrated into the seal cavity. The experimental measurements show that the tooth tip axial position, as well as the minimum-tooth clearance, affect the leakage. A significant improvement in leakage...

  19. Taxes and Trading versus Intensity Standards: Second-Best Environmental Policies with Incomplete Regulation (Leakage) or Market Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Stephen P.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trading) have not been compared under leakage or market power.and Trading versus Intensity Standards: Second-Best Environmental Policies with Incomplete Regulation (Leakage) or Market Powerand Trading versus Intensity Standards: Second-Best Environmental Policies with Incomplete Regulation (Leakage) or Market Power

  20. Leakage diagnostics, sealant longevity, sizing and technology transfer in residential thermal distribution systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, I.; Sherman, M.; Modera, M.; Siegel, J.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field study concentrated on measurement of duct leakage to outside the conditioned space because this is most useful in energy calculations. For room by room load/comfort requirements, the total duct leakage (including leaks to conditioned space) is more appropriate, particularly for additional comfort considerations. The objective of this field study is to help to identify major sources of uncertainty and to quantify the trade offs between different test methods. The identification of the areas requiring significant improvement will aid in future development of duct leakage test methods. For example, during the course of this study a new method for correcting house pressure tests to account for the presence of duct leakage in measured envelope leakage was developed. Each of the measurement techniques investigated has resulted from a different set of priorities and hence compromises. Thus each one of them is measuring a different physical quantity, although they all report the same parameter; duct leakage to outside at operating conditions. Given that real houses do not meet all of the simplifying assumptions that must be made to achieve similarity, the same numbers from each test method are not expected. Potentially these differences can be quite large and one of the benefits of field measurement is that the differences in the measurements helps put a realistic bound on how different some of these leakage diagnostics may be.

  1. Field and hot carrier enhanced leakage in InGaAsP/InP heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, L.C.; Yu, K.L.; Margalit, S.; Chen, T.R.; Koren, U.; Hasson, A.; Yariv, A.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations regarding the temperature sensitivity and power saturation of InGaAsP lasers and light emitting diodes (LED's) have led to extensive studies to find the responsible mechanisms. In the present investigation, attention is given to an electron leakage over the heterobarrier which incorporates the influence of both the electric field and carrier heating effect. A model calculation is conducted regarding the field and hot carrier enhanced electron leakage over the heterobarrier in InGaAsP/InP LED's and lasers. The obtained rsults show the importance of the doping level in the P-InP confining layer in determining the magnitude of the leakage current.

  2. Effect of Return Air Leakage on Air Conditioner Performance in Hot/Humid Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, D. L.; Rodriguez, A.; Davis, M.; Kondepudi, S.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were designed for testing systems with cooling capacities of up to 10 tons. The unit used for return air leakage tests was a 3.5 ton (12.3 kW) split system air conditioner with TXV expansion and a scroll compressor. It had a seasonal energy... leakage on capacity, power, and energy efficiency ratio (EER) of an air conditioner were quantified. The air conditioner was subjected to an outdoor temperature of 100°F (37.g°C). The indoor conditions for the no leakage test were set at 75OF (23.g...

  3. Sedimentological and geophysical studies of clastic reservoir analogs: Methods, applications and developments of ground-penetrating radar for determination of reservoir geometries in near-surface settings. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMechan, G.A.; Soegaard, K.

    1998-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated sedimentologic and GPR investigation has been carried out on a fluvial channel sandstone in the mid-Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone at Coyote Basin along the southwestern flank of the San Rafael Uplift in east-central Utah. This near-surface study, which covers a area of 40 {times} 16.5 meters to a depth of 15 meters, integrates detailed stratigraphic data from outcrop sections and facies maps with multi-frequency 3-D GPR surveys. The objectives of this investigation are two-fold: (1) to develop new ground-penetrating radar (GPR) technology for imaging shallow subsurface sandstone bodies, and (2) to construct an empirical three-dimensional sandstone reservoir model suitable for hydrocarbon flow-simulation by imaging near-surface sandstone reservoir analogs with the use of GPR. The sedimentological data base consists of a geologic map of the survey area and a detailed facies map of the cliff face immediately adjacent to the survey area. Five vertical sections were measured along the cliff face adjacent to the survey area. In addition, four wells were cored within the survey area from which logs were recorded. In the sections and well logs primary sedimentary structures were documented along with textural information and permeability data. Gamma-ray profiles were also obtained for all sections and core logs. The sedimentologic and stratigraphic information serves as the basis from which much of the processing and interpretation of the GPR data was made. Three 3-D GPR data sets were collected over the survey area at frequencies of 50 MHZ, 100 MHZ, and 200 MHZ.

  4. Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon SequestrationSites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

    2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and its storage in deep geologic formations. One of the concerns of geologic carbon sequestration is that injected CO{sub 2} may leak out of the intended storage formation, migrate to the near-surface environment, and seep out of the ground or into surface water. In this research, we investigate the process of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage into saturated sediments and overlying surface water bodies such as rivers, lakes, wetlands, and continental shelf marine environments. Natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are well studied and provide insight into the expected transport mechanisms and fate of seepage fluxes of similar magnitude. Also, natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are pervasive in surface water environments at levels that may mask low-level carbon sequestration leakage and seepage. Extreme examples are the well known volcanic lakes in Cameroon where lake water supersaturated with respect to CO{sub 2} overturned and degassed with lethal effects. Standard bubble formation and hydrostatics are applicable to CO{sub 2} bubbles in surface water. Bubble-rise velocity in surface water is a function of bubble size and reaches a maximum of approximately 30 cm s{sup -1} at a bubble radius of 0.7 mm. Bubble rise in saturated porous media below surface water is affected by surface tension and buoyancy forces, along with the solid matrix pore structure. For medium and fine grain sizes, surface tension forces dominate and gas transport tends to occur as channel flow rather than bubble flow. For coarse porous media such as gravels and coarse sand, buoyancy dominates and the maximum bubble rise velocity is predicted to be approximately 18 cm s{sup -1}. Liquid CO{sub 2} bubbles rise slower in water than gaseous CO{sub 2} bubbles due to the smaller density contrast. A comparison of ebullition (i.e., bubble formation) and resulting bubble flow versus dispersive gas transport for CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} at three different seepage rates reveals that ebullition and bubble flow will be the dominant form of gas transport in surface water for all but the smallest seepage fluxes or shallowest water bodies. The solubility of the gas species in water plays a fundamental role in whether ebullition occurs. We used a solubility model to examine CO{sub 2} solubility in waters with varying salinity as a function of depth below a 200 m-deep surface water body. In this system, liquid CO{sub 2} is stable between the deep regions where supercritical CO{sub 2} is stable and the shallow regions where gaseous CO{sub 2} is stable. The transition from liquid to gaseous CO{sub 2} is associated with a large change in density, with corresponding large change in bubble buoyancy. The solubility of CO{sub 2} is lower in high-salinity waters such as might be encountered in the deep subsurface. Therefore, as CO{sub 2} migrates upward through the deep subsurface, it will likely encounter less saline water with increasing capacity to dissolve CO{sub 2} potentially preventing ebullition, depending on the CO{sub 2} leakage flux. However, as CO{sub 2} continues to move upward through shallower depths, CO{sub 2} solubility in water decreases strongly leading to greater likelihood of ebullition and bubble flow in surface water. In the case of deep density-stratified lakes in which ebullition is suppressed, enhanced mixing and man-made degassing schemes can alleviate the buildup of CO{sub 2} and related risk of dangerous rapid discharges. Future research efforts are needed to increase understanding of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage in surface water and saturated porous media. For example, we recommend experiments and field tests of CO{sub 2} migration in saturated systems to formulate bubble-driven water-displacement models and relative permeability functions that can be used in simulation models.

  5. Compilation of current literature on seals, closures, and leakage for radioactive material packagings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warrant, M.M.; Ottinger, C.A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an overview of the features that affect the sealing capability of radioactive material packagings currently certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The report is based on a review of current literature on seals, closures, and leakage for radioactive material packagings. Federal regulations that relate to the sealing capability of radioactive material packagings, as well as basic equations for leakage calculations and some of the available leakage test procedures are presented. The factors which affect the sealing capability of a closure, including the properties of the sealing surfaces, the gasket material, the closure method and the contents are discussed in qualitative terms. Information on the general properties of both elastomer and metal gasket materials and some specific designs are presented. A summary of the seal material, closure method, and leakage tests for currently certified packagings with large diameter seals is provided. 18 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Surface CO2 leakage during the first shallow subsurface CO2 release experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, J.L.; Oldenburg, C.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    numbered 0-6. Plots of F CO2 measured along the surface wellin Figure 2. Figure 2. Log F CO2 maps for measurements madeof soil CO 2 flux (F CO2 ). The surface leakage onset,

  7. Regulation, Allocation, and Leakage in Cap-and-Trade Markets for CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B; Chen, Yihsu

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Philippe Quirion. Co2 abatement, competitiveness andDaniel Kahn. Allocation of co2 emissions al- lowances in theA short-run case analysis of co2 leakage and nox and so2

  8. CFD based rotordynamic coefficients for labyrinth seals and impeller leakage paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Avijit

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accurately using simple flow model like bulk flow. CFD approach is employed since it can accurately predict and capture recirculating zones using proper mesh distribution. The Impeller Leakage paths and Labyrinth Seals, typically, have a recirculation zone...

  9. A Simple Energy Model for the Harvesting and Leakage in a Supercapacitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingram, Mary Ann

    A Simple Energy Model for the Harvesting and Leakage in a Supercapacitor Aravind Kailas Dept.brunelli@disi.unitn.it Abstract--The modeling of energy storage devices such as supercapacitors for wireless sensor networks

  10. Natural and industrial analogues for leakage of CO2 from storagereservoirs: identification of features, events, and processes and lessonslearned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The injection and storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deepgeologic formations is a potentially feasible strategy to reduce CO2emissions and atmospheric concentrations. While the purpose of geologiccarbon storage is to trap CO2 underground, CO2 could migrate away fromthe storage site into the shallow subsurface and atmosphere if permeablepathways such as well bores or faults are present. Large-magnitudereleases of CO2 have occurred naturally from geologic reservoirs innumerous volcanic, geothermal, and sedimentary basin settings. Carbondioxide and natural gas have also been released from geologic CO2reservoirs and natural gas storage facilities, respectively, due toinfluences such as well defects and injection/withdrawal processes. Thesesystems serve as natural and industrial analogues for the potentialrelease of CO2 from geologic storage reservoirs and provide importantinformation about the key features, events, and processes (FEPs) that areassociated with releases, as well as the health, safety, andenvironmental consequences of releases and mitigation efforts that can beapplied. We describe a range of natural releases of CO2 and industrialreleases of CO2 and natural gas in the context of these characteristics.Based on this analysis, several key conclusions can be drawn, and lessonscan be learned for geologic carbon storage. First, CO2 can bothaccumulate beneath, and be released from, primary and secondaryreservoirs with capping units located at a wide range of depths. Bothprimary and secondary reservoir entrapments for CO2 should therefore bewell characterized at storage sites. Second, many natural releases of CO2have been correlated with a specific event that triggered the release,such as magmatic fluid intrusion or seismic activity. The potential forprocesses that could cause geomechanical damage to sealing cap rocks andtrigger the release of CO2 from a storage reservoir should be evaluated.Third, unsealed fault and fracture zones may act as fast and directconduits for CO2 flow from depth to the surface. Risk assessment shouldtherefore emphasize determining the potential for and nature of CO2migration along these structures. Fourth, wells that are structurallyunsound have the potential to rapidly release large quantities of CO2 tothe atmosphere. Risk assessment should therefore be focused on thepotential for both active and abandoned wells at storage sites totransport CO2 to the surface, particularly at sites with depleted oil orgas reservoirs where wellsare abundant. Fifth, the style of CO2 releaseat the surface varies widely between and within different leakage sites.In rare circumstances, the release of CO2 can be a self-enhancing and/oreruptive process; this possibility should be assessed in the case of CO2leakage from storage reservoirs. Sixth, the hazard to human health hasbeen small in most cases of large surface releases of CO2. This could bedue to implementation of public education and CO2 monitoring programs;these programs should therefore be employed to minimize potential health,safety, and environmental effects associated with CO2 leakage. Finally,while changes in groundwater chemistry were related to CO2 leakage due toacidification and interaction with host rocks along flow paths, watersremained potable in most cases. Groundwaters should be monitored forchanges that may be associated with storage reservoirleakage.

  11. Leakage Risk Assessment for a Potential CO2 Storage Project in Saskatchewan, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houseworth, J.E.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Mazzoldi, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Nicot, J.-P.; Bryant, S.L.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CO{sub 2} sequestration project is being considered to (1) capture CO{sub 2} emissions from the Consumers Cooperative Refineries Limited at Regina, Saskatchewan and (2) geologically sequester the captured CO{sub 2} locally in a deep saline aquifer. This project is a collaboration of several industrial and governmental organizations, including the Petroleum Technology Research Centre (PTRC), Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC), SaskEnvironment Go Green Fund, SaskPower, CCRL, Schlumberger Carbon Services, and Enbridge. The project objective is to sequester 600 tonnes CO{sub 2}/day. Injection is planned to start in 2012 or 2013 for a period of 25 years for a total storage of approximately 5.5 million tonnes CO{sub 2}. This report presents an assessment of the leakage risk of the proposed project using a methodology known as the Certification Framework (CF). The CF is used for evaluating CO{sub 2} leakage risk associated with geologic carbon sequestration (GCS), as well as brine leakage risk owing to displacement and pressurization of brine by the injected CO{sub 2}. We follow the CF methodology by defining the entities (so-called Compartments) that could be impacted by CO{sub 2} leakage, the CO{sub 2} storage region, the potential for leakage along well and fault pathways, and the consequences of such leakage. An understanding of the likelihood and consequences of leakage forms the basis for understanding CO{sub 2} leakage risk, and forms the basis for recommendations of additional data collection and analysis to increase confidence in the risk assessment.

  12. Analysis of leakage current in buried heterostructure lasers with semiinsulating blocking layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asada, S.; Sugou, S.; Kasahara, K.; Kumashiro, S.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An effective device structure for reducing leakage current in buried heterostructure laser diodes with semiinsulating InP blocking layers has been analyzed with the use of a semiconductor device simulator in which deep trap levels are taken into account. Adding a thin wide-bandgap InGaP layer in the semiinsulating region at the mesa boundaries as a barrier to prevent double injection into the semiinsulating region is predicted to be markedly effective in reducing leakage current.

  13. Large scale test rig for flow visualization and leakage measurement of labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broussard, Daniel Harold

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LARGE SCALE TEST RIG FOR FLOW VISUALIZATION AND LEAKAGE MEASUREMENT OF LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis by DANIEL HAROLD BROUSSARD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of requirements for degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering LARGE SCALE TEST RIG FOR FLOW VISUALIZATION AND LEAKAGE MEASUREMENT OF LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis by DANIEL HAROLD BROUSSARD Approved as to style and content by: David L. Rhode...

  14. Theory versus experiment of the rotordynamic and leakage characteristics of smooth annular bushing oil seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culotta, Vittorio G.

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    THEORY VERSUS EXPERIMENT OF THE ROTORDYNAMIC AND LEAKAGE CHARACTERISTICS OF SMOOTH ANNULAR BUSHING OIL SEALS A Thesis by VITTORIO GIUSEPPE CULOTTA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2004 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THEORY VERSUS EXPERIMENT OF THE ROTORDYNAMIC AND LEAKAGE CHARACTERISTICS OF SMOOTH ANNULAR BUSHING OIL SEALS A...

  15. Assessment Of Carbon Leakage In Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: ACase Study In Jambi Province, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boer, Rizaldi; Wasrin, Upik R.; Hendri, Perdinan; Dasanto,Bambang D.; Makundi, Willy; Hero, Julius; Ridwan, M.; Masripatin, Nur

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rehabilitation of degraded forest land throughimplementation of carbon sink projects can increase terrestrial carbonstock. However, carbon emissions outside the project boundary, which iscommonly referred to as leakage, may reduce or negate the sequestrationbenefits. This study assessed leakage from carbon sink projects thatcould potentially be implemented in the study area comprised of elevensub-districts in the Batanghari District, Jambi Province, Sumatra,Indonesia. The study estimates the probability of a given land use/coverbeing converted into other uses/cover, by applying a logit model. Thepredictor variables were: proximity to the center of the land use area,distance to transportation channel (road or river), area of agriculturalland, unemployment (number of job seekers), job opportunities, populationdensity and income. Leakage was estimated by analyzing with and withoutcarbon sink projects scenarios. Most of the predictors were estimated asbeing significant in their contribution to land use cover change. Theresults of the analysis show that leakage in the study area can be largeenough to more than offset the project's carbon sequestration benefitsduring the period 2002-2012. However, leakage results are very sensitiveto changes of carbon density of the land uses in the study area. Byreducing C-density of lowland and hill forest by about 10 percent for thebaseline scenario, the leakage becomes positive. Further data collectionand refinement is therefore required. Nevertheless, this study hasdemonstrated that regional analysis is a useful approach to assessleakage.

  16. Development of iteration strategies for a practical implementation of a higher order transverse leakage approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prinsloo, R. H.; Tomasevic, D. I. [Necsa, PO Box 582, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transverse integrated nodal diffusion methods currently represent the standard in full core neutronic simulation. The primary shortcoming in this approach is the utilization of the quadratic transverse leakage approximation. This approach, although proven to work well for typical LWR problems, is not consistent with the formulation of nodal methods and can cause accuracy and convergence problems. In previous work, an improved, consistent quadratic leakage approximation was formulated, which derived from the class of higher order nodal methods developed some years ago. In this paper a number of iteration schemes are developed around this consistent quadratic leakage approximation which yield accurate node average results in much improved calculational times. The developed consistent leakage approximation is extended in this work via a number of numerical schemes, the most promising of which results from utilizing the consistent leakage approximation as a correction method to the standard quadratic leakage approximation. Numerical results are demonstrated on a set of benchmark problems, such as the 3D IAEA LWR and MOX C5 problems. (authors)

  17. Atomic multipole relaxation rates near surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Crosse; Stefan Scheel

    2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The spontaneous relaxation rates for an atom in free space and close to an absorbing surface are calculated to various orders of the electromagnetic multipole expansion. The spontaneous decay rates for dipole, quadrupole and octupole transitions are calculated in terms of their respective primitive electric multipole moments and the magnetic relaxation rate is calculated for the dipole and quadrupole transitions in terms of their respective primitive magnetic multipole moments. The theory of electromagnetic field quantization in magnetoelectric materials is used to derive general expressions for the decay rates in terms of the dyadic Green function. We focus on the decay rates in free space and near an infinite half space. For the decay of atoms near to an absorbing dielectric surface we find a hierarchy of scaling laws depending on the atom-surface distance z.

  18. Ion Monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

  19. Investigation of leakage current paths in n-GaN by conductive atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Bumho; Park, Yongjo, E-mail: yp0520@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: eyoon@snu.ac.kr [Energy Semiconductor Research Center, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)] [Energy Semiconductor Research Center, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Daeyoung; Nanishi, Yasushi [WCU Hybrid Materials Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)] [WCU Hybrid Materials Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Kisu [Energy Semiconductor Research Center, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of) [Energy Semiconductor Research Center, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sewoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Kuk [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Euijoon, E-mail: yp0520@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: eyoon@snu.ac.kr [Energy Semiconductor Research Center, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of) [Energy Semiconductor Research Center, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); WCU Hybrid Materials Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated electrical characteristics of leakage current paths in n-GaN layer grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition with conductive-atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). The C-AFM mapping shows two kinds of leakage current paths existing in the n-GaN layer: open-core dislocation and pure screw dislocation. From the localized I-V curves measured by C-AFM, we confirmed that the open-core screw dislocation shows more significant leakage current. We explained these results in terms of a modified Schottky band model based on donor states formed by oxygen segregation at the (10?10) sidewall of the open-core screw dislocation.

  20. Electrostatic monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Cumbria, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Cumbria, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Cumbria, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for more simply measuring alpha and/or beta emissions arising from items or locations. The technique uses indirect monitoring of the emissions by detecting ions generated by the emissions, the ions being attracted electrostatically to electrodes for discharge of collection. The apparatus and method employ a chamber which is sealed around the item or location during monitoring with no air being drawn into or expelled from the chamber during the monitoring process. A simplified structure and operations arises as a result, but without impairing the efficiency and accuracy of the detection technique.

  1. Experimental investigation of an oscillating circular piston positive displacement flowmeter: II - Leakage flows and wear tests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, Charlotte E; Baker, Roger C; Hutchings, Ian M

    viscosities were mixtures of white spirit and multigrade motor oil. The values achieved for viscosity and resultant density are set out in Part I of this paper [1 Table 3]. To assess the effect of density change, white spirit, motor oil, water and salt water... flow rates was negligible. This suggests that the difference in the leakage f #8;#1; #8;Figure 5 Percentage leakage with the 316 SS circular piston with and without Molykote low friction coating in a water flow. #12;3.4 Effect of lubrication holes...

  2. Fluoroscopically Guided Feeding Tube Insertion for Relief of Postoperative Gastrointestinal Anastomotic Obstruction and Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Young-Min [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ymhan@chonbuk.ac.kr; Kim, Chan-Young; Yang, Doo-Hyun [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Hyo-Sung; Jin, Gong-Yong [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of feeding tube insertion and enteral feeding for the treatment of postoperative gastrointestinal anastomotic obstruction and leakage. Materials and Methods. From June 1999 to June 2002, thirty-four cases of postoperative gastrointestinal anastomotic obstruction and leakage after surgery for gastric carcinoma were treated by insertion of a feeding tube under fluoroscopic guidance. Twenty-one patients were male and 13 were female. The patients' ages ranged from 39 to 74 years (mean age: 61 years). All the patients experienced vomiting, and 15 patients had anastomotic site or duodenal stump leakage. We evaluated the feasibility of feeding tube insertion for enteral feeding to improve the obstruction and facilitate leakage site closure, and the patients' nutritional benefit was also evaluated by checking the serum albumin level between pre- and post-enteral feeding via the feeding tube.Results. Thirty-two patients (94%) were successfully managed by feeding tube insertion, but the remaining two were not managed, and this was due to severe angulations at the anastomotic site. The procedure times for feeding tube insertion ranged from 15 to 60 minutes (mean time: 45 minutes). Twenty-eight patients experienced symptomatic relief of gastrointestinal obstruction, and they were able to resume a normal regular diet after feeding tube removal. Three patients underwent stent insertion due to recurrent symptoms, and one patient underwent jejunostomy feeding due to the presence of a persistent leakage site. Eleven patients achieved leakage site closure after enteral feeding via a feeding tube. The serum albumin level was significant, increased from pre-enteral feeding (2.65 {+-} 0.37 g/dL) to the post-enteral feeding (3.64 {+-} 0.58 g/dL) via the feeding tube (p < 0.001). The duration of follow-up ranged from one to 53 months (mean: 23 months). Conclusion. The insertion of a feeding tube for enteral feeding under fluoroscopic guidance is safe, and it provides effective relief from gastrointestinal anastomotic site obstruction and leakage after gastric surgery. Moreover, our findings indicate that feeding tube insertion for enteral feeding may be used as the primary procedure to treat postoperative anastomotic obstruction and leakage.

  3. Power Supply Optimization in Sub-130 nm Leakage Dominant Technologies Man L Mui Kaustav Banerjee Amit Mehrotra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Supply Optimization in Sub-130 nm Leakage Dominant Technologies Man L Mui Kaustav Banerjee a methodology for systematically optimizing the power supply voltage for maximizing the performance of VLSI cir- cuits in technologies where leakage power is not an insignificant fraction of the total power

  4. Universality of non-Ohmic shunt leakage in thin-film solar cells S. Dongaonkar,1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Muhammad A.

    Universality of non-Ohmic shunt leakage in thin-film solar cells S. Dongaonkar,1,a J. D. Servaites thin-film solar cell types: hydrogenated amorphous silicon a-Si:H p-i-n cells, organic bulk heterojunction BHJ cells, and Cu In,Ga Se2 CIGS cells. All three device types exhibit a significant shunt leakage

  5. Managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline aquifer reservoirs through the creation of a hydraulic barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - up in the storage reservoir. For some man-made leakages (e.g. abandoned well), and more importantlyGHGT-10 Managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline aquifer reservoirs through the creation emissions. Depleted oil and gas fields or saline aquifers are seen as possible storage reservoirs

  6. An Integrated Circuit/Architecture Approach to Reducing Leakage in Deep-Submicron High-Performance I-Caches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijaykumar, T. N.

    battery life and diminishes the utility of por- table systems. Historically, the primary source of energy] estimates a factor of 7.5 increase in leakage current and a five-fold increase in total leakage energy- ing speeds by scaling down the supply voltage and proportionately reducing the transistor threshold

  7. 1984 power plant performance monitoring workshop: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An EPRI workshop on fossil plant performance monitoring and improvement was conducted in Washington, DC, October 23-25, 1984. The main theme of the workshop was the EPRI-PEPCo performance monitoring project (EPRI projects RP1681 and RP2153) highlighted in the opening session. The objective of this project is to develop an advanced instrumentation and monitoring system to improve heat rate, recover lost capacity, optimize system dispatch, and plan maintenance more effectively. Interim results of this project, which can now be used by the utility industry, were emphasized in the presentations including (1) the boiler parametric analysis program for optimizing boiler combustion efficiency and (2) the N2 packing monitor that measures the steam leakage from the high-pressure to the intermediate-pressure turbine. Other EPRI projects, such as RP1711-2 and RP1878-1, were also highlighted. RP1711-2 employs root-cause investigation techniques to trace plant heat-rate degradation problems and recommend cost-effective solutions, while RP1878-1 introduces a nonradioactive tracer technique to monitor turbine efficiency. Twenty-seven papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. Section 6 - working group minutes - was not entered by itself. (LTN)

  8. SMART METER PRIVACY USING A RECHARGEABLE BATTERY: MINIMIZING THE RATE OF INFORMATION LEAKAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khisti, Ashish

    SMART METER PRIVACY USING A RECHARGEABLE BATTERY: MINIMIZING THE RATE OF INFORMATION LEAKAGE David. INTRODUCTION Deployments of smart electricity meters to residential homes con- tinue unabated around the world resources. Smart meters are essential to coordinate the desired charging and discharg- ing of the batteries

  9. Design for MOSIS Educational Program (Research) Testchip for AHIP protocol, ASIC flow, and Leakage Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    protocol) block on the Xilinx controller. Our lab setup and testing methodology is similar to that of ATC0Design for MOSIS Educational Program (Research) Testchip for AHIP protocol, ASIC flow, and Leakage Control Through Body Biasing Seongmoo Heo, Graduate Student Krste Asanovi´c, Associate Professor

  10. Carbon Leakage in the Primary Aluminium Sector: What evidence after 6 years of the EU ETS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS). The findings suggest that while rising electricity prices. Keywords: carbon leakage, European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS), CO2 pricing 1 1 #12;32 2 1 - Introduction Since the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) began pricing CO2 emissions within

  11. CO2 leakage through existing wells: current technology and regulations S. Taku Ide1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the most likely features, events and processes that affect well integrity after initial CO2 injection. As long as the #12;integrity of the cap rock is not compromised by permeable conduits like wellsCO2 leakage through existing wells: current technology and regulations S. Taku Ide1 , S. Julio

  12. Leakage from Sub-national Climate Initiatives: The Case of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    77 Massachusetts Avenue MIT E19-411 Cambridge MA 02139-4307 (USA) Location: 400 Main Street economies, including integration of electricity markets. Measures that will prevent leakage from California electricity and legislation ban- ning "resource shuffling". Under a cap-and-trade policy without measures

  13. Eddy covariance observations of surface leakage during shallow subsurface CO2 releases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilley, George

    of CO2 from underground storage sites along permeable pathways such as well bores or faults is a primary a horizontal well $100 m in length and $2.5 m in depth located in an agricultural field in Bozeman, Montana leakage from geologic storage reservoirs will pose a chal- lenge owing to the large spatial and temporal

  14. Experimental and theoretical rotordynamic coefficients and leakage of straight smooth annular gas seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerr, Bradley Gray

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2004 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL ROTORDYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS AND LEAKAGE OF STRAIGHT SMOOTH ANNULAR GAS SEALS A...: _____________________________ _____________________________ Dara W. Childs Paul G.A. Cizmas (Chair of Committee) (Member) _____________________________ _____________________________ John M. Vance Dennis O?Neal (Member) (Head of Department) December 2004 Major...

  15. Hydraulic barrier design and applicability for managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydraulic barrier design and applicability for managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline modifying the leak hydraulic properties (e.g. permeability) may be unfeasible. An appealing option.e. by creating a hydraulic barrier. The present article presents and discusses the operational and strategic

  16. Seismic Evaluation of the Fruitland Formation with Implications on Leakage Potential of Injected CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Thomas H.

    on the analysis of 3D seismic from the area. 3D seismic interpretation reveals that the Late Cretaceous FruitlandSeismic Evaluation of the Fruitland Formation with Implications on Leakage Potential of Injected CO Basin pilot test include acquisition of geophysical logs, time lapse VSP and analysis of 3D seismic data

  17. Reducing leakage in power-saving capable caches for embedded systems by using a filter cache

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giorgi, Roberto

    Reducing leakage in power-saving capable caches for embedded systems by using a filter cache or switch them off completely (cache decay) in order to save power. Our idea is to adaptively select mostly) improvement of other existing power-saving techniques; iii) providing results to select the most promising

  18. A method of calculating pumping induced leakage Hongbin Zhan *, Aiguo Bian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    A method of calculating pumping induced leakage Hongbin Zhan *, Aiguo Bian Department of Geology; received in revised form 10 January 2006; accepted 17 January 2006 Summary We have discussed pumping is neglected. Both constant-rate and constant- drawdown, fully penetrating vertical pumping wells

  19. Comparison of four composite landfill liner systems considering leakage rate and mass flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems, i.e., Subtitle D com- posite liner system, composite liner system with a geosynthetic clay liner (with a 61 cm (2 feet) or 91.5 cm (3 feet) thick compacted clay liner), were evaluated in termsComparison of four composite landfill liner systems considering leakage rate and mass flux T

  20. Leakage current and dielectric breakdown behavior in annealed SiO2 aerogel films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jo, Moon-Ho

    Leakage current and dielectric breakdown behavior in annealed SiO2 aerogel films Moon-Ho Jo behavior in annealed SiO2 aerogel films for intermetal dielectric applications was investigated in a metal­insulator­semiconductor structure. SiO2 aerogel films with porosities of 70% exhibited Poole­Frenkel conduction both before

  1. Is condensation the cause of plasma leakage in microporous hollow ber membrane oxygenators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, William J.

    , the analysis predicts that the gas heats up to the temperature of blood ¯ow outside of the ®bers after passingIs condensation the cause of plasma leakage in microporous hollow ®ber membrane oxygenators Laura W of the oxygenator. Condensation of water vapor on the pore walls is thought to be a possible precursor to plasma

  2. Ambient-RF-Energy-Harvesting Sensor Node with Capacitor-Leakage-Aware Duty Cycle Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    shortage risk. (2) Adaptive optimal operation point tracking considering harvested energy variability. (3Ambient-RF-Energy-Harvesting Sensor Node with Capacitor-Leakage-Aware Duty Cycle Control Ryo-- In this paper, we present a software control method that maximizes the sensing rate of wireless sensor networks

  3. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a monitoring well which includes an enclosure defining a cavity and a water reservoir enclosed within the cavity and wherein the reservoir has an inlet and an outlet. The monitoring well further includes a porous housing borne by the enclosure and which defines a fluid chamber which is oriented in fluid communication with the outlet of the reservoir, and wherein the porous housing is positioned in an earthen soil location below-grade. A geophysical monitoring device is provided and mounted in sensing relation relative to the fluid chamber of the porous housing; and a coupler is selectively moveable relative to the outlet of reservoir to couple the porous housing and water reservoir in fluid communication. An actuator is coupled in force transmitting relation relative to the coupler to selectively position the coupler in a location to allow fluid communication between the reservoir and the fluid chamber defined by the porous housing.

  4. Studies on reducing leakage current of large-area silicon microstrip sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsay, W.C. [National Central Univ., Chung-Li (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Electrical Engineering]|[Miracle Technology Co., Ltd., Hsin-Chu (Taiwan, Province of China); Chen, Y.A.; Laih, L.H. [National Central Univ., Chung-Li (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [and others

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8 x 4 cm{sup 2} single-sided p{sup +} {minus} i (or {nu}){minus}n{sup +} silicon microstrip sensors with coupling capacitors and polysilicon bias resistors were fabricated with the planar technology, and various techniques used to reduce the leakage currents of sensors and their results are presented. Different gettering processes have been employed to remove the impurities and defects from the sensor active regions, and the Electronic Research and Service Organization (ERSO`s) Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) gettering technique, combined with backside polysilicon and oxide-nitride-oxide (ONO) deposition process, was found to be the most effective and suitable one. From the measurement results of the special p{sup +} {minus} i (or {nu}){minus}n{sup +} junction test structures, it was found that the sensor leakage current mainly came from the side-wall leakage of its p{sup +}-strip. A modified LOCal Oxidation of Silicon (LOCOS) isolation process has been used to reduce this side-wall leakage. Also, the Sirtl-etch analysis of the sensor revealed that the side-wall leakage current has been caused by residual boron-implantation defects after annealing. These defects would concentrate along the edge of p{sup +}-strip and be enhanced to cause dislocations by the film-edge-induced stress effect. Several annealing techniques have also been studied to remove the boron-implantation damages. The fabricated prototype sensors have been tested in a beam at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron area. The test results showed that the sensor concept under study is feasible.

  5. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

  6. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

  7. Calculational and experimental investigations of void effect -- A simple theoretical model for space-dependent leakage treatment of heterogeneous assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benoist, P.; Petrovic, I. (Commissariat a' l'Energie Atomique, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Mondot, J. (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saint Paul lez Durance (France))

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This method, which takes into account the influence of assembly heterogeneity on neutron leakage, is based on the heterogeneous B[sub 1] formalism, which assumes the existence of a fundamental mode in an infinite and regular lattice of heterogeneous assemblies. A simplified formalism, TIBERE, is presented that allows one to define directional space-dependent leakage coefficients. This method, introduced for two-dimensional x-y geometry in the APOLLO-2 multigroup transport code, uses classical and directional first-flight collision probabilities. One can now define leakage cross sections as additional absorption cross sections that have space and energy dependence, as well as all other cross sections. Hence, one obtains perfectly consistent reaction and leakage rates used in an equivalence procedure, determining cell-homogenized parameters for a whole core calculation. The study of this refined heterogeneous leakage treatment was undertaken because of the insufficiency of the homogeneous leakage model, especially in cases when an assembly contain voided zones or almost voided zones, i.e., zones with a long mean free path, so that the streaming effect may become important. The fission rate comparison between the EPICURE reactor experimental results and the results of the corresponding whole reactor calculations were accomplished, with leakages calculated by the homogeneous and the TIBERE procedures of the APOLLO-2 code.

  8. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

  9. Tritium monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

  10. Tritium monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, P.

    1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

  11. Leakage estimation of incompressible fluids in stepped labyrinth seals with swirl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waughtal, Scott Perry

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LEAKAGE ESTIMATION OF INCOMPRESSIBLE FLUIDS IN STEPPED LABYRINTH SEALS WITH SWIRL A Thesis by SCOTT PERRY WAUGHTAL Submitted to the Graduate C o l l e g e of Texas A&M U n i v e r s i t y i n p a r t i a l f u l f i l l m e n... t of the requirement f o r the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Su b j e c t : Mechanical E n g i n e e r i n g LEAKAGE ESTIMATION OF INCOMPRESSIBLE FLUIDS IN STEPPED LABYRINTH SEALS WITH SWIRL A T h e s i s by S c o t t W a u g h t a l A p p r...

  12. Noise-Produced Patterns in Images Constructed from Magnetic Flux Leakage Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pimenova, Anastasiya V; Levesley, Jeremy; Elkington, Peter; Bacciarelli, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic flux leakage measurements help identify the position, size and shape of corrosion-related defects in steel casings used to protect boreholes drilled into oil and gas reservoirs. Images constructed from magnetic flux leakage data contain patterns related to noise inherent in the method. We investigate the patterns and their scaling properties for the case of delta-correlated input noise, and consider the implications for the method's ability to resolve defects. The analytical evaluation of the noise-produced patterns is made possible by model reduction facilitated by large-scale approximation. With appropriate modification, the approach can be employed to analyze noise-produced patterns in other situations where the data of interest are not measured directly, but are related to the measured data by a complex linear transform involving integrations with respect to spatial coordinates.

  13. Method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thermos, Anthony Constantine (Greer, SC); Rahal, Fadi Elias (Easley, SC)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermocouple assembly includes a thermocouple; a plurality of lead wires extending from the thermocouple; an insulating jacket extending along and enclosing the plurality of leads; and at least one internally sealed area within the insulating jacket to prevent fluid leakage along and within the insulating jacket. The invention also provides a method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple including the steps of a) attaching a plurality of lead wires to a thermocouple; b) adding a heat sensitive pseudo-wire to extend along the plurality of lead wires; c) enclosing the lead wires and pseudo-wire inside an insulating jacket; d) locally heating axially spaced portions of the insulating jacket to a temperature which melts the pseudo-wire and fuses it with an interior surface of the jacket.

  14. Leakage estimation of incompressible fluids in stepped labyrinth seals with swirl 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waughtal, Scott Perry

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LEAKAGE ESTIMATION OF INCOMPRESSIBLE FLUIDS IN STEPPED LABYRINTH SEALS WITH SWIRL A Thesis by SCOTT PERRY WAUGHTAL Submitted to the Graduate C o l l e g e of Texas A&M U n i v e r s i t y i n p a r t i a l f u l f i l l m e n... t of the requirement f o r the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Su b j e c t : Mechanical E n g i n e e r i n g LEAKAGE ESTIMATION OF INCOMPRESSIBLE FLUIDS IN STEPPED LABYRINTH SEALS WITH SWIRL A T h e s i s by S c o t t W a u g h t a l A p p r...

  15. Effect of Return Air Leakage on Air Conditioner Performance in Hot/Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, D. L.; Rodriguez, A.; Davis, M.; Kondepudi, S.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    provided rebates to residential customers for purchasing high efficiency air conditioners and heat pumps. The rebates have helped increase the demand for higher efficiency air conditioning units. However, even the most efficient system will not perform... quanm the effect of air leakage in the return air duct from a hot attic space on the high-temperature performance of air conditioners and heat pump systems. Air conditioner performance is quantified in terms of capacity, Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER...

  16. Leakage current models of thin film silicon-on-insulator devices Hank Shin,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroder, Dieter K.

    , as published previously.2 Target device sizes were 25 0.6 and 0.6 0.6 m2 in the active regions. Drain current-gate bias (Id ­Vg) measurements done at a varying drain bias (Vd) both on an automatic tester punchthrough effect, C n-type back channel effect, D defect-induced leakage, and E edge-induced hump

  17. Time dependent annealing of radiation - induced leakage currents in MOS devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrell, J.M. (Booz Allen and Hamilton, Inc. Bethesda, MD (US)); Olkham, T.R.; Lelis, A.J.; Benedetto, J.M. (Harry Diamond Labs., Adelphi, MD (US))

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented showing the radiation response of several unhardened commercial 1.25-{mu}m bulk CMOS processes using LOCOS isolation technology. In all cases studied radiation-induced failure is caused by effects in the field oxide, and the radiation-induced {delta}V{sub T} in the channel region is usually small at the failure dose. Time dependent leakage current data for the field oxides are presented and discussed.

  18. Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Huwart, Laurent, E-mail: huwart.laurent@wanadoo.fr [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology (France)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

  19. Compressibility effects on rotor forces in the leakage path between a shrouded pump impeller and its housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Nhai The

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPRESSIBILITY EFFECTS ON ROTOR FORCES IN THE LEAKAGE PATH BETWEEN A SHROUDED PUMP IMPELLER AND ITS HOUSING A Thesis by NHAI THE CAO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfilltnent... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering COMPRESSIBILITY EFFECTS ON ROTOR FORCES IN THE LEAKAGE PATH BETWEEN A SHROUDED PUMP IMPELLER AND ITS HOUSING A Thesis by NHAI THE CAO Approved...

  20. Fission Product Ratios as Treaty Monitoring Discriminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Harry S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Arthur, Richard J.

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is currently under construction. The IMS is intended for monitoring of nuclear explosions. The radionuclide branch of the IMS monitors the atmosphere for short-lived radioisotopes indicative of a nuclear weapon test, and includes field collection and measurement stations, as well as laboratories to provide reanalysis of the most important samples and a quality control function. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington hosts the United States IMS laboratory, with the designation “RL16.” Since acute reactor containment failures and chronic reactor leakage may also produce similar isotopes, it is tempting to compute ratios of detected isotopes to determine the relevance of an event to the treaty or agreement in question. In this paper we will note several shortcomings of simple isotopic ratios: (1) fractionation of different chemical species, (2) difficulty in comparing isotopes within a single element, (3) the effect of unknown decay times. While these shortcomings will be shown in the light of an aerosol sample, several of the problems extend to xenon isotopic ratios. The result of the difficulties listed above is that considerable human expertise will be required to convert a simple mathematical ratio into a criterion which will reliably categorize an event as ‘reactor’ or ‘weapon’.

  1. Primary beam steering due to field leakage from superconducting SHMS magnets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moore, M.H.; Waidyawansa, B.P.; Covrig, S.; Carlini, R.; Benesch, J.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations of the magnetic fields from the Super High Momentum Spectrometer in Hall C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility show significant field leakage into the region of the primary beam line between the target and the beam dump. Without mitigation, these remnant fields will steer the unscattered beam enough to limit beam operations at small scattering angles. Presented here are magnetic field simulations of the spectrometer magnets and a solution using optimal placement of a minimal amount of shielding iron around the beam line.

  2. A Leakage Current-based Measurement of the Radiation Damage in the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor V. Gorelov; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement has been made of the radiation damage incurred by the ATLAS Pixel Detector barrel silicon modules from the beginning of operations through the end of 2012. This translates to hadronic fluence received over the full period of operation at energies up to and including 8 TeV. The measurement is based on a per-module measurement of the silicon sensor leakage current. The results are presented as a function of integrated luminosity and compared to predictions by the Hamburg Model. This information can be used to predict limits on the lifetime of the Pixel Detector due to current, for various operating scenarios.

  3. Primary Beam Steering Due to Field Leakage from Superconducting SHMS Magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael H. Moore; Buddhini P. Waidyawansa; Silviu Covrig; Roger Carlini; Jay Benesch

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations of the magnetic fields from the Super High Momentum Spectrometer in Hall C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility show significant field leakage into the region of the primary beam line between the target and the beam dump. Without mitigation, these remnant fields will steer the unscattered beam enough to limit beam operations at small scattering angles. Presented here are magnetic field simulations of the spectrometer magnets and a solution using optimal placement of a minimal amount of shielding iron around the beam line.

  4. Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Impact on Carbon Capture and Storage Energy Market Competitiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Catherine; Fitts, Jeffrey; Wilson, Elizabeth; Pollak, Melisa; Bielicki, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Vatsal

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-year project, performed by Princeton University in partnership with the University of Minnesota and Brookhaven National Laboratory, examined geologic carbon sequestration in regard to CO{sub 2} leakage and potential subsurface liabilities. The research resulted in basin-scale analyses of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage in light of uncertainties in the characteristics of leakage processes, and generated frameworks to monetize the risks of leakage interference with competing subsurface resources. The geographic focus was the Michigan sedimentary basin, for which a 3D topographical model was constructed to represent the hydrostratigraphy. Specifically for Ottawa County, a statistical analysis of the hydraulic properties of underlying sedimentary formations was conducted. For plausible scenarios of injection into the Mt. Simon sandstone, leakage rates were estimated and fluxes into shallow drinking-water aquifers were found to be less than natural analogs of CO{sub 2} fluxes. We developed the Leakage Impact Valuation (LIV) model in which we identified stakeholders and estimated costs associated with leakage events. It was found that costs could be incurred even in the absence of legal action or other subsurface interference because there are substantial costs of finding and fixing the leak and from injection interruption. We developed a model framework called RISCS, which can be used to predict monetized risk of interference with subsurface resources by combining basin-scale leakage predictions with the LIV method. The project has also developed a cost calculator called the Economic and Policy Drivers Module (EPDM), which comprehensively calculates the costs of carbon sequestration and leakage, and can be used to examine major drivers for subsurface leakage liabilities in relation to specific injection scenarios and leakage events. Finally, we examined the competiveness of CCS in the energy market. This analysis, though qualitative, shows that financial incentives, such as a carbon tax, are needed for coal combustion with CCS to gain market share. In another part of the project we studied the role of geochemical reactions in affecting the probability of CO{sub 2} leakage. A basin-scale simulation tool was modified to account for changes in leakage rates due to permeability alterations, based on simplified mathematical rules for the important geochemical reactions between acidified brines and caprock minerals. In studies of reactive flows in fractured caprocks, we examined the potential for permeability increases, and the extent to which existing reactive transport models would or would not be able to predict it. Using caprock specimens from the Eau Claire and Amherstburg, we found that substantial increases in permeability are possible for caprocks that have significant carbonate content, but minimal alteration is expected otherwise. We also found that while the permeability increase may be substantial, it is much less than what would be predicted from hydrodynamic models based on mechanical aperture alone because the roughness that is generated tends to inhibit flow.

  5. Design and package of a {sup 14}CO{sub 2} field analyzer The Global Monitor Platform (GMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bright, Michelle; Marino, Bruno D.V.; Gronniger, Glen

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is widely accepted as a means to reduce and eliminate the fossil fuel CO{sub 2} (ff- CO{sub 2}) emissions from coal fired power plants. Success of CCS depends on near zero leakage rates over decadal time scales. Currently no commercial methods to determine leakage of ff-CO{sub 2} are available. The Global Monitor Platform (GMP) field analyzer provides high precision analysis of CO{sub 2} isotopes [12C (99%), 13C (<1%), 14C (1.2x10-10 %)] that can differentiate between fossil and biogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. Fossil fuels contain no {sup 14}C; their combustion should lower atmospheric amounts on local to global scales. There is a clear mandate for monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) of CCS systems nationally and globally to verify CCS integrity, treaty verification (Kyoto Protocol) and to characterize the nuclear fuel cycle. Planetary Emissions Management (PEM), working with the National Secure Manufacturing Center (NSMC), has the goal of designing, ruggedizing and packaging the GMP for field deployment. The system will conduct atmosphere monitoring then adapt the system to monitor water and soil evaluations. Measuring {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in real time will provide quantitative concentration data for ff-CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere and CCS leakage detection. Initial results will be discussed along with design changes for improved detection sensitivity and manufacturability.

  6. Accelerating universe from gravitational leakage into extra dimensions: confrontation with SNeIa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zong-Hong Zhu; Jailson S. Alcaniz

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is mounting observational evidence that the expansion of our universe is undergoing an acceleration. A dark energy component has usually been invoked as the most feasible mechanism for the acceleration. However, it is desirable to explore alternative possibilities motivated by particle physics before adopting such an untested entity. In this work, we focus our attention on an acceleration mechanism: one arising from gravitational leakage into extra dimensions. We confront this scenario with high-$z$ type Ia supernovae compiled by Tonry et al. (2003) and recent measurements of the X-ray gas mass fractions in clusters of galaxies published by Allen et al. (2002,2003). A combination of the two databases gives at a 99% confidence level that $\\Omega_m=0.29^{+0.04}_{-0.02}$, $\\Omega_{rc}=0.21^{+0.08}_{-0.08}$, and $\\Omega_k=-0.36^{+0.31}_{-0.35}$, indicating a closed universe. We then constrain the model using the test of the turnaround redshift, $z_{q=0}$, at which the universe switches from deceleration to acceleration. We show that, in order to explain that acceleration happened earlier than $z_{q=0} = 0.6$ within the framework of gravitational leakage into extra dimensions, a low matter density, $\\Omega_m < 0.27$, or a closed universe is necessary.

  7. Current leakage relaxation and charge trapping in ultra-porous low-k materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borja, Juan; Plawsky, Joel L., E-mail: plawsky@rpi.edu; Gill, William N. [Howard P. Isermann Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Lu, T.-M. [Department of Physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Bakhru, Hassaram [University at Albany's College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE), Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Time dependent dielectric failure has become a pivotal aspect of interconnect design as industry pursues integration of sub-22?nm process-technology nodes. Literature has provided key information about the role played by individual species such as electrons, holes, ions, and neutral impurity atoms. However, no mechanism has been shown to describe how such species interact and influence failure. Current leakage relaxation in low-k dielectrics was studied using bipolar field experiments to gain insight into how charge carrier flow becomes impeded by defects within the dielectric matrix. Leakage current decay was correlated to injection and trapping of electrons. We show that current relaxation upon inversion of the applied field can be described by the stretched exponential function. The kinetics of charge trapping events are consistent with a time-dependent reaction rate constant, k=k{sub 0}?(t+1){sup ??1}, where 0?

  8. Extremely scaled high-k/In?.??Ga?.??As gate stacks with low leakage and low interface trap densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chobpattana, Varistha; Mikheev, Evgeny; Zhang, Jack Y.; Mates, Thomas E.; Stemmer, Susanne [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly scaled gate dielectric stacks with low leakage and low interface trap densities are required for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology with III-V semiconductor channels. Here, we show that a novel pre-deposition technique, consisting of alternating cycles of nitrogen plasma and tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium, allows for HfO? and ZrO? gate stacks with extremely high accumulation capacitance densities of more than 5 ?F/cm? at 1 MHz, low leakage current, low frequency dispersion, and low midgap interface trap densities (10ą˛cm?˛eV?ąrange). Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that the interface contains TiO? and small quantities of In?O?, but no detectable Ga- or As-oxides, or As-As bonding. The results allow for insights into the microscopic mechanisms that control leakage and frequency dispersion in high-k/III-V gate stacks.

  9. Reduction of surface leakage current by surface passivation of CdZn Te and other materials using hyperthermal oxygen atoms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffbauer, Mark A. (Los Alamos, NM); Prettyman, Thomas H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduction of surface leakage current by surface passivation of Cd.sub.1-x Zn.sub.x Te and other materials using hyperthermal oxygen atoms. Surface effects are important in the performance of CdZnTe room-temperature radiation detectors used as spectrometers since the dark current is often dominated by surface leakage. A process using high-kinetic-energy, neutral oxygen atoms (.about.3 eV) to treat the surface of CdZnTe detectors at or near ambient temperatures is described. Improvements in detector performance include significantly reduced leakage current which results in lower detector noise and greater energy resolution for radiation measurements of gamma- and X-rays, thereby increasing the accuracy and sensitivity of measurements of radionuclides having complex gamma-ray spectra, including special nuclear materials.

  10. Physics of gate leakage current in N-polar InAlN/GaN heterojunction field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, Arunesh; Trew, Robert J.; Bilbro, Griff L. [ECE Department, Box 7911, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7911 (United States)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A physics based model of the gate leakage current in N-polar InAlN/GaN heterojunction field effect transistors is demonstrated. The model is based on the space charge limited current flow dominated by the effects of deep traps in the InAlN surface layer. The model predicts accurately the gate-leakage measurement data of the N-polar InAlN/GaN device with InAlN cap layer. In the pinch-off state, the gate leakage current conduction through the surface of the device in the drain access region dominates the current flow through the two dimensional electron gas channel. One deep trap level and two levels of shallow traps are extracted by fitting the model results with measurement data.

  11. Geomechanical effects on CO{sub 2} leakage through fault zones during large-scale underground injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinaldi, A.P.; Rutqvist, J.; Cappa, F.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of geomechanics—including the potential for faults to reactivate during large scale geologic carbon sequestration operations—has recently become more widely recognized. However, notwithstanding the potential for triggering notable (felt) seismic events, the potential for buoyancy-driven CO{sub 2} to reach potable groundwater and the ground surface is actually more important from public safety and storage-efficiency perspectives. In this context, this work extends the previous studies on the geomechanical modeling of fault responses during underground carbon dioxide injection, focusing on the short-term integrity of the sealing caprock, and hence on the potential for leakage of either brine or CO{sub 2} to reach the shallow groundwater aquifers during active injection. We consider stress/strain-dependent permeability and study the leakage through the fault zone as its permeability changes during a reactivation, also causing seismicity. We analyze several scenarios related to the volume of CO{sub 2} injected (and hence as a function of the overpressure), involving both minor and major faults, and analyze the profile risks of leakage for different stress/strain-permeability coupling functions. We conclude that whereas it is very difficult to predict how much fault permeability could change upon reactivation, this process can have a significant impact on the leakage rate. Moreover, our analysis shows that induced seismicity associated with fault reactivation may not necessarily open up a new flow path for leakage. Results show a poor correlation between magnitude and amount of fluid leakage, meaning that a single event is generally not enough to substantially change the permeability along the entire fault length. Consequently, even if some changes in permeability occur, this does not mean that the CO{sub 2} will migrate up along the entire fault, breaking through the caprock to enter the overlying aquifer.

  12. Transcriptional leakage versus noise: A simple mechanism of conversion between binary and graded response in autoregulated genes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Ochab-Marcinek; Marcin Tabaka

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the response of an autoregulated gene to a range of concentrations of signal molecules. We show that transcriptional leakage and noise due to translational bursting have the opposite effects. In a positively autoregulated gene, increasing the noise converts the response from graded to binary, while increasing the leakage converts the response from binary to graded. Our findings support the hypothesis that, being a common phenomenon, leaky expression may be a relatively easy way for evolutionary tuning of the type of gene response without changing the type of regulation from positive to negative.

  13. FIELD EVALUATION OF IMPROVED METHODS FOR MEASURING THE AIR LEAKAGE OF DUCT SYSTEMS UNDER NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS IN 51 HOMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul W. Francisco; Larry Palmiter; Erin Kruse; Bob Davis

    2003-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Duct leakage in forced-air distribution systems has been recognized for years as a major source of energy losses in residential buildings. Unfortunately, the distribution of leakage across homes is far from uniform, and measuring duct leakage under normal operating conditions has proven to be difficult. Recently, two new methods for estimating duct leakage at normal operating conditions have been devised. These are called the nulling test and the Delta-Q test. Small exploratory studies have been done to evaluate these tests, but previously no large-scale study on a broad variety of homes has been performed to determine the accuracy of these new methods in the field against an independent benchmark of leakage. This sort of study is important because it is difficult in a laboratory setting to replicate the range of leakage types found in real homes. This report presents the results of a study on 51 homes to evaluate these new methods relative to an independent benchmark and a method that is currently used. An evaluation of the benchmark procedure found that it worked very well for supply-side leakage measurements, but not as well on the return side. The nulling test was found to perform well, as long as wind effects were minimal. Unfortunately, the time and difficulty of setup can be prohibitive, and it is likely that this method will not be practical for general use by contractors except in homes with no return ducts. The Delta-Q test was found to have a bias resulting in overprediction of the leakage, which qualitatively confirms the results of previous laboratory, simulation, and small-scale field studies. On average the bias was only a few percent of the air handler flow, but in about 20% of the homes the bias was large. A primary flaw with the Delta-Q test is the assumption that the pressure between the ducts and the house remain constant during the test, as this assumption does not hold true. Various modifications to the Delta-Q method were evaluated as possible improvements. Only one of these modifications provided improved results. This modification requires measuring the duct pressure relative to the house at either every pressure station within the Delta-Q test or at the extremes of the house pressure range involved in the Delta-Q test. If the pressures are only measured at the extremes, then calculated pressures at the other pressure stations are obtained via interpolation. Using these pressures reduced the bias in the Delta-Q test by about one-third.

  14. The marginal leakage of some dental cements in humans: a PIXE-microbeam approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zadro, A.; Passi, P. [Dental School, Department of Dental Materials, University of Padua (Italy); Cavalleri, G. [Dental School, Department of Restorative Dentistry, University of Verona (Italy); Galassini, S.; Moschini, G.; Rossi, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy)

    1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The marginal leakage and water absorption of dental cements and restorative materials has been investigated by many authors with several techniques, some of which led to valid results. However, no technique could give, by itself, information both on leakage and water absorption, as these measurements usually need different investigations. PIXE micro beam offers the possibility of investigating these two aspects at the same time, since it is possible to map a proper marker element. In the present study, cavities were made on 50 extracted human molars, then filled with five different temporary cements (IRM, Cavit W, Kalsogen, Fermit N, SuperEBA). The filled teeth were placed into a 5% silver nitrate solution, and after three days, one, two, three and four weeks were examined. The samples for microPIXE were prepared after embedding the teeth in epoxy resin, and sectioning and grinding them down to a thickness of about 1 mm. The sections were placed on metal holders, and examined with a scanning proton {mu}beam, in Legnaro (Italy) at the AN2000 LAB of INFN National Laboratories. The beam consisted of 2.4 MeV protons, it had a cross section of 1.5 micron in diameter and typical currents of the order of some {mu}A were used. The maps were obtained by an 'ad hoc' software with a McIntosh personal computer. Mapping of silver allowed to evaluate both the marginal leakage and the water absorption for each cement. The samples filled with Cavit W showed a great infiltration, as the tracing element was found in the cement bulk, along the margins and inside the cavity, while those filled with IRM and Kalsogen presented only a deposition of the tracing solution on the cement surface. SuperEBA showed a poor resistance against microleakage, because the marker element was only detected along the cavity margins. Fermit N showed the best marginal integrity, and on its surface no traces of siver were found. In this case the better resistance may be due to the resin present in the composition of the material.

  15. Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, Craig; Sherman, Max

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project addressed two significant deficiencies in air-handling systems for large commercial building: duct leakage and duct static pressure reset. Both constitute significant energy reduction opportunities for these buildings. The overall project goal is to bridge the gaps in current duct performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of air-handling system performance in California large commercial buildings. The purpose of this project is to provide technical support for the implementation of a duct leakage modeling capability in EnergyPlus, to demonstrate the capabilities of the new model, and to carry out analyses of field measurements intended to demonstrate the energy saving potential of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset (SPR) technology. A new duct leakage model has been successfully implemented in EnergyPlus, which will enable simulation users to assess the impacts of leakage on whole-building energy use and operation in a coupled manner. This feature also provides a foundation to support code change proposals and compliance analyses related to Title 24 where duct leakage is an issue. Our example simulations continue to show that leaky ducts substantially increase fan power: 10percent upstream and 10percent downstream leakage increases supply fan power 30percent on average compared to a tight duct system (2.5percent upstream and 2.5percent downstream leakage). Much of this increase is related to the upstream leakage rather than to the downstream leakage. This does not mean, however, that downstream leakage is unimportant. Our simulations also demonstrate that ceiling heat transfer is a significant effect that needs to be included when assessing the impacts of duct leakage in large commercial buildings. This is not particularly surprising, given that ?ceiling regain? issues have already been included in residential analyses as long as a decade ago (e.g., ASHRAE Standard 152); mainstream simulation programs that are used for large commercial building energy analyses have not had this capability until now. Our analyses of data that we collected during our 2005 tests of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset technology show that this technology can substantially reduce fan power (in this case, by about 25 to 30percent). Tempering this assessment, however, is that cooling and heating coil loads were observed to increase or decrease significantly depending on the time window used. Their impact on cooling and heating plant power needs to be addressed in future studies; without translating the coil loads to plant equipment energy use, it is not possible to judge the net impact of this SPR technology on whole-building energy use. If all of the loads had decreased, such a step would not be as necessary.

  16. The Delta Q Method of Testing the Air Leakage of Ducts Walker, I.S., Dickerhoff, D.J. and Sherman, M.H.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in determining energy losses from forced air heating and cooling systems. Several studies (Francisco and Palmiter, and the supply/return leakage split that is difficult and time consuming to obtain from pressurization tests difference between supply and house (Ps), and between the return and the house (Pr), the supply leakage flow

  17. Oxygen-related dielectric relaxation and leakage characteristics of Pt,,Ba,Sr...TiO3 Pt thin-film capacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Oxygen-related dielectric relaxation and leakage characteristics of PtŐ,,Ba,Sr...TiO3 ŐPt thin to the postannealing temperature in oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere. High leakage currents and low-frequency dielectric and subsequently annealed in oxygen at 350 °C. Such results are related to the mobile oxygen ions and oxygen

  18. Correction of "Zhan, H., and Bian, A., A method of calculating pumping induced leakage, Journal of Hydrology 328, 659-667, 2006" (2011-3-22)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    Correction of "Zhan, H., and Bian, A., A method of calculating pumping induced leakage, Journal) as follows: 1. Case 1: Constant-rate pumping well, in the steady-state solution for leakage rate within DDD RKRt - ; 3. Case 2: Constant-drawdown pumping, in the solution for the Non-steady state (in

  19. Applying Decay Strategies to Branch Predictors for Leakage Energy Savings Zhigang Hu y Philo Juang y Kevin Skadron z Doug Clark Margaret Martonosi y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martonosi, Margaret

    Applying Decay Strategies to Branch Predictors for Leakage Energy Savings Zhigang Hu y Philo Juang process, leakage energy starts to become a major concern, especially for large on­chip array structures to consider applying decay techniques, which can reduce leak­ age energy for caches, to the branch

  20. Effect of refrigerant charge, duct leakage, and evaporator air flow on the high temerature performance of air conditioners and heat pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Angel Gerardo

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    evaporator airflow, and return air leakage from hot attic spaces. There were five sets of tests used for this research: two of them for the charging tests, two for the reduced evaporator airflow, and one for the return air leakage tests. For the charging...

  1. HP Steam Trap Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascone, S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STEAM MONITORING HP Steam Trap Monitoring HP Steam Trap Monitoring ? 12-18 months payback! ? 3-5% permanent reduction in consumption ? LEED Pt.? Innovation in Operations EB O&M ? Saved clients over $1,000,000 Annual consumption... Steam Trap Monitoring ? Real-time monitoring for high-pressure critical traps (>15 PSIG) ? Average total system cost $25K - $50K ? Web-Based or Modbus/BMS Integration Basic Installation Wireless Signal Transmitter Receiver Repeater...

  2. Pressure perturbations from geologic carbon sequestration: Area-of-review boundaries and borehole leakage driving forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Bryant, S.L.; Hovorka, S.D.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility that brine could be displaced upward into potable water through wells. Because of the large volumes of CO2 to be injected, the influence of the zone of elevated pressure on potential conduits such as well boreholes could extend many kilometers from the injection site-farther than the CO2 plume itself. The traditional approach to address potential brine leakage related to fluid injection is to set an area of fixed radius around the injection well/zone and to examine wells and other potentially open pathways located in the ''Area-of-Review'' (AoR). This suggests that the AoR eeds to be defined in terms of the potential for a given pressure perturbation to drive upward fluid flow in any given system rather than on some arbitrary pressure rise. We present an analysis that focuses on the changes in density/salinity of the fluids in the potentially leaking wellbore.

  3. On Leakage andSeepage of CO2 from Geologic Storage Sites intoSurface Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Lewicki, J.L.

    2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture ofanthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) and its storage in deep geologicformations. The processes of CO2 seepage into surface water aftermigration through water-saturated sediments are reviewed. Natural CO2 andCH4 fluxes are pervasive in surface-water environments and are goodanalogues to potential leakage and seepage of CO2. Buoyancy-driven bubblerise in surface water reaches a maximum velocity of approximately 30 cms-1. CO2 rise in saturated porous media tends to occur as channel flowrather than bubble flow. A comparison of ebullition versus dispersive gastransport for CO2 and CH4 shows that bubble flow will dominate overdispersion in surface water. Gaseous CO2 solubility in variable-salinitywaters decreases as pressure decreases leading to greater likelihood ofebullition and bubble flow in surface water as CO2 migratesupward.

  4. Radiation-induced back-channel leakage in SiGe CMOS on silicon-on-sapphire (S0S) technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, S.J.; Niu, G.; Clark, S.D.; Cressler, J.D.; Palmer, M.J.; Dubbelday, W.B.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report the first results of a high-energy gamma irradiation experiment on SiGe CMOS on silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) technology. In contrast to bulk Si CMOS, with increasing total dose the pFET's develop a significant off-state leakage, while the nFET's show a reduction in the leakage, which the authors attribute to negative charge trapping at the back Si-sapphire interface. Both the Si and SiGe pFET's showed the enhancement in leakage, suggesting that the leakage mechanism was not related to the SiGe channel. When the devices were cooled to liquid-nitrogen temperature, the leakage disappears completely, suggesting that the trapping mechanism is strongly temperature dependent.

  5. Modeling and Analysis of Loading Effect in Leakage of Nano-Scaled Bulk-CMOS Logic Circuits*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (say, N0) of a gate (say, G) is connected to the input of the other gates (Gout1, Gout2, ..,Goutn as the "loading effect" and it modifies the leakage of the gate G, Gout1, ..., Goutn. In this work, we have

  6. MODELING OF CO2 LEAKAGE UP THROUGH AN ABANDONED WELL FROM DEEP SALINE AQUIFER TO SHALLOW FRESH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 MODELING OF CO2 LEAKAGE UP THROUGH AN ABANDONED WELL FROM DEEP SALINE AQUIFER TO SHALLOW FRESH restricted to: (i) supercritical CO2 injection and storage within the Dogger reservoir aquifer, (ii) CO2 the cement-rock formation interface in the abandoned well (iii) impacts on the Albian aquifer water quality

  7. Power-Performance Trade-offs in Nanometer-Scale Multi-Level Caches Considering Total Leakage Robert Bai1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Power-Performance Trade-offs in Nanometer-Scale Multi-Level Caches Considering Total Leakage Robert, Oregon, nam.sung.kim@intel.com Abstract In this paper, we investigate the impact of Tox and Vth on power performance trade-offs for on-chip caches. We start by examining the optimization of the various components

  8. Self-powered micro-structured solid state neutron detector with very low leakage current and high efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Self-powered micro-structured solid state neutron detector with very low leakage current and high, fabrication, and performance of solid-state neutron detector based on three-dimensional honeycomb-like silicon supply of 3 He gas.2 Solid state neutron detectors (SSND) can overcome many short- comings of gas tube

  9. Leakage-Resilient Client-side Deduplication of Encrypted Data in Cloud Storage Institute for Infocomm Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will have only one copy in the cloud (Single Instance Storage). SNIA white paper [39] reportedLeakage-Resilient Client-side Deduplication of Encrypted Data in Cloud Storage Jia Xu Institute@comp.nus.edu.sg Jianying Zhou Institute for Infocomm Research jyzhou@i2r.a-star.edu.sg Abstract--Cloud storage service

  10. Portal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  11. APS Building Monitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building Monitors For non-401 Building Monitors, select: LOMs Other APS Buildings 401 West WCtr Lab Wing ECtr East 5th Floor Yiying Ge na na na na 4th Floor Rick Fenner Karen...

  12. Corrosion monitoring apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Hugh S. (Shoreham, NY); Weeks, John R. (Stony Brook, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion monitoring device in an aqueous system which includes a formed crevice and monitoring the corrosion of the surfaces forming the crevice by the use of an a-c electrical signal.

  13. Developing a monitoring and verification plan with reference to the Australian Otway CO2 pilot project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodds, K.; Daley, T.; Freifeld, B.; Urosevic, M.; Kepic, A.; Sharma, S.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC) is currently injecting 100,000 tons of CO{sub 2} in a large-scale test of storage technology in a pilot project in southeastern Australia called the CO2CRC Otway Project. The Otway Basin, with its natural CO{sub 2} accumulations and many depleted gas fields, offers an appropriate site for such a pilot project. An 80% CO{sub 2} stream is produced from a well (Buttress) near the depleted gas reservoir (Naylor) used for storage (Figure 1). The goal of this project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} can be safely transported, stored underground, and its behavior tracked and monitored. The monitoring and verification framework has been developed to monitor for the presence and behavior of CO{sub 2} in the subsurface reservoir, near surface, and atmosphere. This monitoring framework addresses areas, identified by a rigorous risk assessment, to verify conformance to clearly identifiable performance criteria. These criteria have been agreed with the regulatory authorities to manage the project through all phases addressing responsibilities, liabilities, and to assure the public of safe storage.

  14. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  15. Reflector modelling of small high leakage cores making use of multi-group nodal equivalence theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theron, S. A. [South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa), PO Box 582, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Reitsma, F. [Calvera Consultants, PO Box 150, Strubensvallei, 1735 (South Africa)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on modelling reflectors in typical material testing reactors (MTRs). Equivalence theory is used to homogenise and collapse detailed transport solutions to generate equivalent nodal parameters and albedo boundary conditions for reflectors, for subsequent use in full core nodal diffusion codes. This approach to reflector modelling has been shown to be accurate for two-group large commercial light water reactor (LWR) analysis, but has not been investigated for MTRs. MTRs are smaller, with much larger leakage, environment sensitivity and multi-group spectrum dependencies than LWRs. This study aims to determine if this approach to reflector modelling is an accurate and plausible homogenisation technique for the modelling of small MTR cores. The successful implementation will result in simplified core models, better accuracy and improved efficiency of computer simulations. Codes used in this study include SCALE 6.1, OSCAR-4 and EQUIVA (the last two codes are developed and used at Necsa). The results show a five times reduction in calculational time for the proposed reduced reactor model compared to the traditional explicit model. The calculated equivalent parameters however show some sensitivity to the environment used to generate them. Differences in the results compared to the current explicit model, require more careful investigation including comparisons with a reference result, before its implementation can be recommended. (authors)

  16. Uncertainty analyses of CO2 plume expansion subsequent to wellbore CO2 leakage into aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Bacon, Diana H.; Engel, David W.; Lin, Guang; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Fang, Zhufeng

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we apply an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to CO2 sequestration problems. In one scenario, we look at the risk of wellbore leakage of CO2 into a shallow unconfined aquifer in an urban area; in another scenario, we study the effects of reservoir heterogeneity on CO2 migration. We combine various sampling approaches (quasi-Monte Carlo, probabilistic collocation, and adaptive sampling) in order to reduce the number of forward calculations while trying to fully explore the input parameter space and quantify the input uncertainty. The CO2 migration is simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). For computationally demanding simulations with 3D heterogeneity fields, we combined the framework with a scalable version module, eSTOMP, as the forward modeling simulator. We built response curves and response surfaces of model outputs with respect to input parameters, to look at the individual and combined effects, and identify and rank the significance of the input parameters.

  17. Building America Case Study: Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'The cost for blower testing is high, because it is labor intensive, and it may disrupt occupants in multiple units. This high cost and disruption deters program participants, and dissuades them from pursuing energy improvements that would trigger air leakage testing, such as improvements to the building envelope.' This statement found in a 2012 report by Heschong Mahone Group emphasizes the importance of reducing the cost and complexity of blower testing in multifamily buildings. Energy efficiency opportunities are being bypassed. The cost of single blower testing is on the order of $300. The cost for guarded blower door testing, the more appropriate test for assessing energy savings opportunities, could easily be six times that and that's only if you have the equipment and simultaneous access to multiple apartments. Thus, the proper test is simply not performed. The objective of the 2013 research project was to develop the model for predicting fully guarded test results (FGT), using unguarded test data and specific building features of apartment units. The model developed has a coefficient of determination R2 value of 0.53 with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.13. Both statistical metrics indicate that the model is relatively strong. When tested against data that was not included in the development of the model, prediction accuracy was within 19%, which is reasonable given that seasonal differences in blower door measurements can vary by as much as 25%.

  18. Geomechanical Simulation of CO{sub 2} Leakage and Cap Rock Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nygaard, Runar; Bai, Baojun; Eckert, Andreas

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} sequestration into porous and permeable brine filled aquifers is seen as one of the most likely near-term solutions for reducing greenhouse gases. Safely storing injected CO{sub 2}, which is less dense than water, requires trapping the CO{sub 2} under an impermeable rock which would act as a seal. One of the concerns with CO{sub 2} sequestration is the generation of new fractures or reactivation of existing fractures and faults caused by CO{sub 2} injection into the sealing formation. Mitigation strategies must be developed to remediate potentially leaking faults or fractures. This project evaluated potential storage scenarios in the state of Missouri and developed coupled reservoir and geomechanic simulations to identify storage potential and leakage risks. Further, several injectable materials used to seal discontinuities were evaluated under subsurface conditions. The four sealant materials investigated were paraffin wax, silica based gel, polymer based gel, and micro-cement, which all significantly reduced the fracture permeability. However, the micro-cement was the most effective sealing agent and the only sealant able to withstand the large differential pressure caused by CO{sub 2} or brine injection and create a strong seal to prevent further fracturing.

  19. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

  20. Reduced leakage in epitaxial BiFeO{sub 3} films following oxygen radio frequency plasma treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kothari, Deepti [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India) [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India); Upadhyay, Sanjay K.; Raghavendra Reddy, V. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India)] [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India); Jariwala, C.; Raole, P. M. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Epitaxial BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) films were deposited using pulsed laser deposition method. The prepared films were characterized using x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, ferroelectric loop tracer, and leakage current measurements before and after oxygen plasma treatment. The leakage current of the films, a crucial parameter in device applications, is observed to be reduced by two orders of magnitude with oxygen plasma treatment at room temperature. P-E hysteresis loops were observed in oxygen plasma treated BFO films. The observed results indicate the usefulness of oxygen radio frequency plasma treatment (RF 13.56 MHz), which is an effective and low temperature processing technique, in such lossy ferroelectric thin films.

  1. Sandia Energy - Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Health Monitoring Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Materials, Reliability, & Standards Structural Health Monitoring Structural Health...

  2. Analysis of main steam isolation valve leakage in design basis accidents using MELCOR 1.8.6 and RADTRAD.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salay, Michael (United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.); Kalinich, Donald A.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Radel, Tracy E.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses were performed using MELCOR and RADTRAD to investigate main steam isolation valve (MSIV) leakage behavior under design basis accident (DBA) loss-of-coolant (LOCA) conditions that are presumed to have led to a significant core melt accident. Dose to the control room, site boundary and LPZ are examined using both approaches described in current regulatory guidelines as well as analyses based on best estimate source term and system response. At issue is the current practice of using containment airborne aerosol concentrations as a surrogate for the in-vessel aerosol concentration that exists in the near vicinity of the MSIVs. This study finds current practice using the AST-based containment aerosol concentrations for assessing MSIV leakage is non-conservative and conceptually in error. A methodology is proposed that scales the containment aerosol concentration to the expected vessel concentration in order to preserve the simplified use of the AST in assessing containment performance under assumed DBA conditions. This correction is required during the first two hours of the accident while the gap and early in-vessel source terms are present. It is general practice to assume that at {approx}2hrs, recovery actions to reflood the core will have been successful and that further core damage can be avoided. The analyses performed in this study determine that, after two hours, assuming vessel reflooding has taken place, the containment aerosol concentration can then conservatively be used as the effective source to the leaking MSIV's. Recommendations are provided concerning typical aerosol removal coefficients that can be used in the RADTRAD code to predict source attenuation in the steam lines, and on robust methods of predicting MSIV leakage flows based on measured MSIV leakage performance.

  3. Evaluating the impact of caprock and reservoir properties on potential risk of CO2 leakage after injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Rockhold, Mark L.; Murray, Christopher J.

    2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical models are essential tools for CO2 sequestration projects and should be included in the life cycle of a project. Common practice involves modeling the behavior of CO2 during and after injection using site-specific reservoir and caprock properties. Little has been done to systematically evaluate and compare the effects of a broad but realistic range of reservoir and caprock properties on potential CO2 leakage through caprock. Broad-based research addressing the impacts of caprock properties and their heterogeneity on seal permeation is absent. Efforts along this direction require obtaining information about the physically reasonable range of caprock and reservoir properties, effectively sampling the parameter space to fully explore the range of these properties, and performing flow and transport calculations using reliable numerical simulators. In this study, we identify the most important factors affecting CO2 leakage through intact caprock and try to understand the underlying mechanisms. We use caprock and reservoir properties from various field sites and literature data to identify the range of caprock thickness, permeability, and porosity that might occur. We use a quasi Monte Carlo sampling approach to ensure that the full range of caprock and seal properties is evaluated without bias. For each set of sampled properties, the migration of injected CO2 is simulated for up to 200 years using the water-salt-CO2 operational mode of the STOMP simulator. Preliminary results show that critical factors determining CO2 leakage rate through intact caprock are, in decreasing order of significance, the caprock thickness, caprock permeability, reservoir permeability, caprock porosity, and reservoir porosity. This study provides a function for prediction of potential CO2 leakage risk due to permeation of intact caprock, and identifies a range of acceptable seal thicknesses and permeability for sequestration projects. As a byproduct, the dependence of CO2 injectivity on reservoir properties is also evaluated.

  4. A comparison of experimental and theoretical results for leakage, pressure gradient, and rotordynamic coefficients for tapered annular gas seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elrod, David Alan

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL RESULTS FOR LEAKAGE, PRESSURE GRADIENT, AND ROTORDYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS FOR TAPERED ANNULAR GAS SEALS A Thesis by DAVID ALAN ELROD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... FOR TAPERED ANNULAR GAS SEALS A Thesis by DAVID ALAN ELROD Approved as to style and content by: Dar a Childs (Co-Chair of Committee) Clayton Ne son (C -Chair of Committee) Der aid Hantfiel (Member ) W. D. Tun ner (Head of Department) December 1986...

  5. Power-Performance Trade-Offs in Nanometer-Scale Multi-Level Caches Considering Total Leakage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Robert; Kgil, Tae Ho; Sylvester, Dennis; Mudge, Trevor

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of T_{ox} and Vth on power performance trade-offs for on-chip caches. We start by examining the optimization of the various components of a single level cache and then extend this to two level cache systems. In addition to leakage, our studies also account for the dynamic power expanded as a result of cache misses. Our results show that one can often reduce overall power by increasing the size of the L2 cache if we only allow one pair of Vth/T_{ox} in L2. However, if we allow the memory cells and the peripherals to have their own Vth's and T_{ox}'s, we show that a two-level cache system with smaller L2's will yield less total leakage. We further show that two Vth's and two T_{ox}'s are sufficient to get close to an optimal solution, and that Vth is generally a better design knob than T_{ox} for leakage optimization, thus it is better to restrict the number of T_{ox}'s rather than Vth's if cost is a concern.

  6. Improved leakage current and ferromagnetic properties in magnetic field annealed BiFeO{sub 3}-based ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, L.H.; Zhao, B.C. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei 230031 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei 230031 (China); Fang, J.; Zhang, R.R. [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)] [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Tang, X.W. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei 230031 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei 230031 (China); Song, W.H., E-mail: whsong@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei 230031 (China); Dai, J.M. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei 230031 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei 230031 (China); Sun, Y.P., E-mail: ypsun@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei 230031 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-phase Bi{sub 0.85}La{sub 0.15}FeO{sub 3} ceramics were synthesized under various magnetic fields (H{sub a}=0 T, 3 T, 5 T). Substantially reduced leakage current and hence modified ferroelectric (FE) properties were obtained with magnetic field annealing (MA). The largest magnetization and lowest leakage current with large FE polarization (P{sub r}{approx}33 {mu}C/cm{sup 2}) were found in the sample annealed with H{sub a}=3 T. Great changes were also observed in the Raman spectra. All the observed features originate mainly from the different FE domain wall structures induced by MA. These results demonstrate that MA is an effective way to tune the multiferroic and magnetoelectric properties in BiFeO{sub 3}-based materials. - Graphical abstract: Bright field TEM micrograph of the representative domain structures in the samples (a) BLF0, (b) BLF3 and (c) BLF5. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bi{sub 0.85}La{sub 0.15}FeO{sub 3} ceramics were synthesized under various magnetic fields. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substantially reduced leakage current with improved ferroelectricity were obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced magnetization with moderate annealing magnetic field.

  7. Water quality monitoring at the Hoe Creek test site: review and preliminary conclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, F.T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Post-burn monitoring of the ground water near to the Hoe creek underground coal gasification site showed that a broad range of gasification products had been introduced into the water system. Although many of these contaminants were eventually absorbed by the surrounding coal, some chemicals continued to appear in the water in concentrations higher than pre-test levels for several years after gasification. Possible mechanisms by which the contaminants entered the ground water include: (1) leakage of pyrolysis products; (2) post-burn leaching of coal ash and overburden rubble by returning ground water; and (3) dissolution of minerals outside the cavity by the CO/SUB/2 generated during gasification.

  8. Determination of Near-Surface Anisotropy From Surface Electromagnetic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Dajani, AbdulFattah

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) signatures, such as reflection moveout, are sensitive to the presence of azimuthal anisotropy. Azimuthal anisotropy can occur as an intrinsic property of the medium and/or due to the presence ...

  9. Waste Inventory for Near Surface Repository (NSR) - 13482

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaidotas, Algirdas [Lithuania Enterprise Company Radioactive Waste Management Agency, Luksio 5, Vilnius (Lithuania)] [Lithuania Enterprise Company Radioactive Waste Management Agency, Luksio 5, Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main characteristics, physical, chemical as well as radiological of the waste intended to be disposed of in the planned NSR are described. This description is mainly based on the waste inventory investigations performed by the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP). The four different waste streams to be disposed of in the NSR are described and investigated. (authors)

  10. Near-surface groundwater responses to injection of geothermal wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, S.C.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the feasibility of injection as an alternative for geothermal wastewater disposal and analyzes hydrologic controls governing the upward migration of injected fluids. Injection experiences at several geothermal developments are presented including the following: Raft River Valley, Salton Sea, East Mesa, Otake, Hatchobaru, and Ahuachapan geothermal fields.

  11. Geochemical Modeling of the Near-Surface Hydrothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and non-thermal waters and reaction with wall rock were simulated using the reaction path code EQ36. Mass balance calculations were conducted to estimate the extent of water-rock...

  12. Quantification of Wellbore Leakage Risk Using Non?destructive Borehole Logging Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duguid, Andrew; Butsch, Robert; Cary, J.; Celia, Michael; Chugunov, Nikita; Gasda, Sarah; Hovorka, Susan; Ramakrishnan, T. S.; Stamp, Vicki; Thingelstad, Rebecca; Wang, James

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Well integrity is important at all potential CCS locations and may play a crucial role establishing leakage risk in areas where there is a high density of existing wells that could be impacted by the storage operations including depleted petroleum fields where EOR or CCS will occur. To address a need for risk quantification methods that can be directly applied to individual wells using borehole logging tools a study was conducted using data from five wells in Wyoming. The objectives of the study were: Objective 1 Develop methods to establish the baseline flow parameters (porosity and permeability or mobility) from individual measurements of the material properties and defects in a well. Objective 2 Develop a correlation between field flow?property data and cement logs that can be used to establish the flow?properties of well materials and well features using cement mapping tools. Objective 3 Establish a method that uses the flow?property model (Objective 2) to analyze the statistical uncertainties associated with individual well leakage that can provide basis for uncertainty in risk calculations. The project objectives were met through the logging of five wells in Carbon and Natrona County Wyoming to collect data that was used to estimate individual and average well flow properties and model the results using ultrasonic data collected during the logging. Three of the five wells provided data on point and average flow properties for well annuli. Data from the other two wells were used to create models of cement permeability and test whether information collected in one well could be used to characterize another well. The results of the in?situ point measurements were confirmed by the lab measurements sidewall cores collected near the same depths Objective 1 was met using the data collected through logging, testing, and sampling. The methods were developed that can establish baseline flow parameters of wells by both point and average test methods. The methods to estimate the flow properties modeling of point pressure tests, modeling of vertical interference tests, and laboratory measurement of cased?hole sidewall cores The wells were in sufficiently good shape to allow the development of the characterization methods while still having enough defects to study differences in results as they relate to well integrity. Samples and tests analyzed from three of five wells studied in showed the cements were largely intact and had not degraded from exposure native brines. Log results taken in conjunction with the core measurements indicate that interfaces and/or problems with cement placement due to eccentering provide preferential flow paths for fluids, which can increase the effective permeability of the barrier several orders of magnitude above the permeability of intact cement. The results of the maps created using logging tools indicating that the cement condition and bond are generally good identify a need for more research to understand how logs can be used to predict effective well permeabilities such as those measured by the VITs in this study.

  13. Leakage and slow allostery limit performance of single drug-sensing aptazyme molecules based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Nils G.

    strategy, we monitored by single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and 2-aminopurine (AP) fluorescence the global conformational dynamics and local base (un)stacking, respectively of the aptazyme. In addition, site-specific AP labeling shows that rapid local theophylline binding to the aptamer

  14. Single Crystal Diamond Beam Position Monitors with Radiofrequency Electronic Readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solar, B.; Graafsma, H.; Potdevin, G.; Trunk, U. [Hasylab, Deutsches Elektronen Synchroton, Hamburg (Germany); Morse, J.; Salome, M. [Instrumentation Services and Development Division, European Synchroton Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the energy range 5{approx}30 keV a suitably contacted, thin ({approx}100 {mu}m) diamond plate can be operated in situ as a continuous monitor of X-ray beam intensity and position as the diamond absorbs only a small percentage of the incident beam. Single crystal diamond is a completely homogeneous material showing fast (ns), spatially uniform signal response and negligible (leakage currents. Due to its unsurpassed thermal conductivity, it is the only semiconductor material that can be used in intense synchrotron white beams. We report on tests made at ESRF and DESY using diamond beam position monitors of simple quadrant electrode designs with metal contacts, operated using wideband electronic readout corresponding to the RF accelerator frequency. The instrumentation for these monitors must cover a large range of operating conditions: different beam sizes, fluxes, energies and time structure corresponding to the synchrotron fill patterns. Sophisticated new RF sampling electronics can satisfy most requirements: using a modified Libera Brilliance readout system, we measured the center of gravity position of a 25 {mu}m beam at the DORIS III F4 beam line at a rate of 130 Msample/s with narrowband filtering of a few MHz bandwidth. Digitally averaging the signal further provided a spatial resolution {approx}20 nm.

  15. Advances in fuel management and on-line core monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stout, R.B.; Hansen, L.E.; Patten, T.W.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced Nuclear Fuels Corporation (ANF) has developed and implemented advanced core power distribution monitoring methods for BWRs and PWRs based on the three dimensional nodal simulator codes used for incore fuel management design and analysis. The use of these methods has resulted in a more accurate assessment of the core power distribution and corresponding increased operating margins. These increased margins allow for more economical fuel cycle designs. Since the initial application in 1982, ANF has made enhancements to the incore monitoring system. These enhancements have permitted more rapid analysis of local power changes, power distribution projections during ascent to full power and on-line statistical analysis of the incore detector signal. The on-line analysis implemented in BWRs has also been developed for application PWRs. In the future, reactors are expected to operate with longer fuel cycles, more aggressive low radial leakage loadings, load follow and use higher burnup fuel. These advances will require more burnable neutron absorbers and more sophisticated fuel designs. To accommodate these advances, the fuel management methodologies and measurement system will require improvements. The state-of-the-art methods provided by ANF provide incore monitoring systems compatible with these expected needs.

  16. Global nuclear material monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, J.A.; Monlove, H.O.; Goulding, C.A.; Martinez, B.J.; Coulter, C.A.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a one-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project provided a detailed systems design for advanced integrated facility monitoring and identified the components and enabling technologies required to facilitate the development of the monitoring system of the future.

  17. Transmission Line Security Monitor

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  18. Transmission Line Security Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  19. Simulation of CO2 Sequestration at Rock Spring Uplift, Wyoming: Heterogeneity and Uncertainties in Storage Capacity, Injectivity and Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Hailin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dai, Zhenxue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jiao, Zunsheng [Wyoming State Geological Survey; Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Surdam, Ronald C. [Wyoming State Geological Survey

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many geological, geochemical, geomechanical and hydrogeological factors control CO{sub 2} storage in subsurface. Among them heterogeneity in saline aquifer can seriously influence design of injection wells, CO{sub 2} injection rate, CO{sub 2} plume migration, storage capacity, and potential leakage and risk assessment. This study applies indicator geostatistics, transition probability and Markov chain model at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming generating facies-based heterogeneous fields for porosity and permeability in target saline aquifer (Pennsylvanian Weber sandstone) and surrounding rocks (Phosphoria, Madison and cap-rock Chugwater). A multiphase flow simulator FEHM is then used to model injection of CO{sub 2} into the target saline aquifer involving field-scale heterogeneity. The results reveal that (1) CO{sub 2} injection rates in different injection wells significantly change with local permeability distributions; (2) brine production rates in different pumping wells are also significantly impacted by the spatial heterogeneity in permeability; (3) liquid pressure evolution during and after CO{sub 2} injection in saline aquifer varies greatly for different realizations of random permeability fields, and this has potential important effects on hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir rock, reactivation of pre-existing faults and the integrity of the cap-rock; (4) CO{sub 2} storage capacity estimate for Rock Springs Uplift is 6614 {+-} 256 Mt at 95% confidence interval, which is about 36% of previous estimate based on homogeneous and isotropic storage formation; (5) density profiles show that the density of injected CO{sub 2} below 3 km is close to that of the ambient brine with given geothermal gradient and brine concentration, which indicates CO{sub 2} plume can sink to the deep before reaching thermal equilibrium with brine. Finally, we present uncertainty analysis of CO{sub 2} leakage into overlying formations due to heterogeneity in both the target saline aquifer and surrounding formations. This uncertainty in leakage will be used to feed into risk assessment modeling.

  20. High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7 4.4.4 High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring Presentation Number: 018 Investigator: Dhruva, Brindesh (Schlumberger Technology Corp.) Objectives: To...

  1. Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilt, G.C. [ed.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L. [and others

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures.

  2. ORISE: Media Analysis and Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Media Analysis and Monitoring The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) uses comprehensive media analysis and monitoring tools to define media interest and the...

  3. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

  4. Multidimensionality of parental monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secrest, Laura A

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    whether the monitoring construct is unitary or multidimensional. The LISREL 8.3 program was used to perform confirmatory factor analyses and structural modeling analyses on the proposed theoretical models. A total of 419 elementary school children...

  5. Monitoring Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eulinger, R. D.

    control systems. Older power plants may have nothing but gauges and dials on a control board. Plants such as these are not typically candidates for a performance monitor unless they ere also being considered for a control system upgrade, including a... planned future control system upgrade. With this method, a utility can have the benefits of a performance monitor prior to a major control system upgrade. When the system is finally upgraded, the data logger can be moved to another unit and reused...

  6. Structure function monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  7. Experimental Evidence for Self-Limiting Reactive Flow through a Fractured Cement Core: Implications for Time-Dependent Wellbore Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huerta, Nicolas J.; Hesse, Marc A.; Bryant, Steven L.; Strazisar, Brian R; Lopano, Christina L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a set of reactive transport experiments in cement fractures. The experiments simulate coupling between flow and reaction when acidic, CO{sub 2}-rich fluids flow along a leaky wellbore. An analog dilute acid with a pH between 2.0 and 3.15 was injected at constant rate between 0.3 and 9.4 cm/s into a fractured cement core. Pressure differential across the core and effluent pH were measured to track flow path evolution, which was analyzed with electron microscopy after injection. In many experiments reaction was restricted within relatively narrow, tortuous channels along the fracture surface. The observations are consistent with coupling between flow and dissolution/precipitation. Injected acid reacts along the fracture surface to leach calcium from cement phases. Ahead of the reaction front, high pH pore fluid mixes with calcium-rich water and induces mineral precipitation. Increases in the pressure differential for most experiments indicate that precipitation can be sufficient to restrict flow. Experimental data from this study combined with published field evidence for mineral precipitation along cemented annuli suggests that leakage of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids along a wellbore may seal the leakage pathway if the initial aperture is small and residence time allows mobilization and precipitation of minerals along the fracture.

  8. Measurement of Leakage Neutron Spectra for Tungsten with D-T Neutrons and Validation of Evaluated Nuclear Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Zhanga; Z. Chen; Y. Nie; R. Wada; X. Ruan; R. Han; X. Liu; W. Lin; J. Liu; F. Shi; P. Ren; G. Tian; F. Luo; J. Ren; J. Bao

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Integral neutronics experiments have been investigated at Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMP, CAS) in order to validate evaluated nuclear data related to the design of Chinese Initiative Accelerator Driven Systems (CIADS). In present paper, the accuracy of evaluated nuclear data for Tungsten has been examined by comparing measured leakage neutron spectra with calculated ones. Leakage neutron spectra from the irradiation of D-T neutrons on Tungsten slab sample were experimentally measured at 60$^{\\circ}$ and 120$^{\\circ}$ by using a time-of-flight method. Theoretical calculations are carried out by Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C with evaluated nuclear data of the ADS-2.0, ENDF/B-VII.0, ENDF/B-VII.1, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries. From the comparisons, it is found that the calculations with ADS-2.0 and ENDF/B-VII.1 give good agreements with the experiments in the whole energy regions at 60$^{\\circ}$, while a large discrepancy is observed at 120$^{\\circ}$ in the elastic scattering peak, caused by a slight difference in the oscillation pattern of the elastic angular distribution at angles larger than 20$^{\\circ}$. However, the calculated spectra using data from ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries showed larger discrepancies with the measured ones, especially around 8.5-13.5 MeV. Further studies are presented for these disagreements.

  9. Leakage Risk Assessment of CO{sub 2} Transportation by Pipeline at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project, Decatur, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzoldi, A.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) is designed to confirm the ability of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a major regional saline-water-bearing formation in the Illinois Basin, to store 1 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injected over a period of three years. The CO{sub 2} will be provided by Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) from its Decatur, Illinois, ethanol plant. In order to transport CO{sub 2} from the capture facility to the injection well (also located within the ADM plant boundaries), a high-pressure pipeline of length 3,200 ft (975 m) has been constructed, running above the ground surface within the ADM plant footprint. We have qualitatively evaluated risks associated with possible pipeline failure scenarios that lead to discharge of CO{sub 2} within the real-world environment of the ADM plant in which there are often workers and visitors in the vicinity of the pipeline. There are several aspects of CO{sub 2} that make its transportation and potential leakage somewhat different from other substances, most notable is its non-flammability and propensity to change to solid (dry ice) upon strong decompression. In this study, we present numerical simulations using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods of the release and dispersion of CO{sub 2} from individual hypothetical pipeline failures (i.e., leaks). Failure frequency of the various components of a pipeline transportation system over time are taken from prior work on general pipeline safety and leakage modeling and suggest a 4.65% chance of some kind of pipeline failure over the three-years of operation. Following the Precautionary Principle (see below), we accounted for full-bore leakage scenarios, where the temporal evolution of the mass release rate from the high-pressure pipeline leak locations was simulated using a state-of-the-art Pipe model which considers the thermodynamic effects of decompression in the entire pipeline. Failures have been simulated at four representative locations along the pipeline route within the ADM plant. Leakage scenarios at sites along the route of the pipeline, where plant operations (e.g., vehicular and train transportation) seem to present a higher likelihood of accidental failure, for example due to vehicles or equipment crashing into the pipeline and completely severing it, were modeled by allowing them to have a double source consistent with the pipeline releasing high-pressure CO{sub 2} from both ends of the broken pipe after a full-bore offset rupture. Simulation results show that the built environment of the plant plays a significant role in the dispersion of the gas as leaking CO{sub 2} can impinge upon buildings and other infrastructure. In all scenarios simulated, the region of very high-concentration of CO{sub 2} is limited to a small area around the pipeline failure, suggesting the likelihood of widespread harmful CO{sub 2} exposure to plant personnel from pipeline leakage is low. An additional risk is posed by the blast wave that emanates from a high-pressure pipeline when it is breached quickly. We estimate the blast wave risk as low because it occurs only for a short time in the immediate vicinity of the rupture, and requires an instantaneous large-scale rupture to occur. We recommend consideration of signage and guard rails and posts to mitigate the likelihood of vehicles crashing into the pipeline. A standardized emergency response plan applicable to capture plants within industrial sites could be developed based on the IBDP that would be useful for other capture plants. Finally, we recommend carrying out coupled wellbore-reservoir blowout scenario modeling to understand the potential for hazardous conditions arising from an unexpected blowout at the wellhead.

  10. Comparison of the measured and calculated time profiles of the leakage current in the magnetically insulated transmission line of the angara-5-1 facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grabovski, E. V.; Gribov, A. N.; Samokhin, A. A.; Shishlov, A. O., E-mail: shishlov@triniti.ru [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the factors limiting the transmission of the electromagnetic pulse to the load in high-power electrophysical facilities is the current leakage in magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). In this paper, the Angara-5-1 eight-module facility with an output power up to 6 TW is considered. The experimental and calculated time profiles of the leakage current for eight-module shots with a dynamic load (cylindrical arrays made of 40 tungsten wires) and single-module shots with a solid cylindrical metal load are compared. When interpreting the results, the contribution of vacuum electrons to the leakage current at the transition from the cylindrical to the conical section of the MITL is taken into account.

  11. Development of high through-put Sr isotope analysis for monitoring reservoir integrity for CO{sub 2} storage.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Andy; Jain, Jinesh; Stewart, Brian; Capo, Rosemary; Hakala, Alexandra J.; Hammack, Richard; Guthrie, George

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent innovations in multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) have allowed for rapid and precise measurements of isotope ratios in geological samples. Naturally occurring Sr isotopes has the potential for use in Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) associated with geologic CO2 storage. Sr isotopes can be useful for: Sensitive tracking of brine migration; Determining seal rock leakage; Studying fluid/rock reactions. We have optimized separation chemistry procedures that will allow operators to prepare samples for Sr isotope analysis off site using rapid, low cost methods.

  12. Monitoring: The missing piece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorkland, Ronald, E-mail: r_bjorkland@hotmail.com

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 heralded in an era of more robust attention to environmental impacts resulting from larger scale federal projects. The number of other countries that have adopted NEPA's framework is evidence of the appeal of this type of environmental legislation. Mandates to review environmental impacts, identify alternatives, and provide mitigation plans before commencement of the project are at the heart of NEPA. Such project reviews have resulted in the development of a vast number of reports and large volumes of project-specific data that potentially can be used to better understand the components and processes of the natural environment and provide guidance for improved and efficient environmental protection. However, the environmental assessment (EA) or the more robust and intensive environmental impact statement (EIS) that are required for most major projects more frequently than not are developed to satisfy the procedural aspects of the NEPA legislation while they fail to provide the needed guidance for improved decision-making. While NEPA legislation recommends monitoring of project activities, this activity is not mandated, and in those situations where it has been incorporated, the monitoring showed that the EIS was inaccurate in direction and/or magnitude of the impact. Many reviews of NEPA have suggested that monitoring all project phases, from the design through the decommissioning, should be incorporated. Information gathered though a well-developed monitoring program can be managed in databases and benefit not only the specific project but would provide guidance how to better design and implement future activities designed to protect and enhance the natural environment. -- Highlights: • NEPA statutes created profound environmental protection legislative framework. • Contrary to intent, NEPA does not provide for definitive project monitoring. • Robust project monitoring is essential for enhanced environmental management. • Adaptive database framework is needed to accommodate project-monitoring data.

  13. Study of the 1991 unaccounted-for gas volume at the Southern California Gas Company. Final report, January 1991-December 1992. Volume 4. Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meshkati, S.; Groot, J.; Bruni, J.; Crebs, S.; Law, E.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a study of unaccounted-for gas (UAF) at the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), volume IV of the six-volume set reports on the UAF leakage volumes associated with the transmission and distribution piping systems, each analyzed separately. Unplanned gas releases in SoCalGas distribution and transmission operations contributed approximately 871,900 thousand cubic feet to the 1991 UAF volume. The study indicated that SoCalGas' current leak detection program has been successful in reducing the number of leaks throughout the distribution system, with the sensitive detection equipment finding leaks earlier in their development and reducing the average leakage rate.

  14. High Performance Network Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, Jesse E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Network Monitoring requires a substantial use of data and error analysis to overcome issues with clusters. Zenoss and Splunk help to monitor system log messages that are reporting issues about the clusters to monitoring services. Infiniband infrastructure on a number of clusters upgraded to ibmon2. ibmon2 requires different filters to report errors to system administrators. Focus for this summer is to: (1) Implement ibmon2 filters on monitoring boxes to report system errors to system administrators using Zenoss and Splunk; (2) Modify and improve scripts for monitoring and administrative usage; (3) Learn more about networks including services and maintenance for high performance computing systems; and (4) Gain a life experience working with professionals under real world situations. Filters were created to account for clusters running ibmon2 v1.0.0-1 10 Filters currently implemented for ibmon2 using Python. Filters look for threshold of port counters. Over certain counts, filters report errors to on-call system administrators and modifies grid to show local host with issue.

  15. Photon beam position monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  16. Wireless Technologies for Structural Wireless Technologies for Structural Health MonitoringHealth Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wireless Technologies for Structural Wireless Technologies for Structural Health MonitoringHealth responses · Structural monitoring structural health monitoring: ­ Very few structural "health" monitoring and buildings · Future directions and technology trends Structural Monitoring SystemsStructural Monitoring

  17. Model-based Adaptive Observers for Intake Leakage Detection in Diesel Riccardo Ceccarelli, Carlos Canudas-de-Wit, Philippe Moulin and Antonio Sciarretta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Model-based Adaptive Observers for Intake Leakage Detection in Diesel Engines Riccardo Ceccarelli of diesel en- gine diagnosis by means of model-based adaptive observers. The problem is motivated Diesel engine testbed. I. INTRODUCTION Modern diesel engine has the potential of a significant reduction

  18. Model-based Adaptive Observers for Intake Leakage Detection in Diesel Riccardo Ceccarelli , Carlos Canudas-de-Wit, Philippe Moulin and Antonio Sciarretta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Model-based Adaptive Observers for Intake Leakage Detection in Diesel Engines Riccardo Ceccarelli of diesel en- gine diagnosis by means of model-based adaptive observers. The problem is motivated diesel engine professional simulator AMEsim. I. INTRODUCTION Modern diesel engine has the potential

  19. 1486 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 25, NO. 8, AUGUST 2006 Modeling and Analysis of Loading Effect on Leakage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhunia, Swarup

    ) of a gate (e.g., G) is connected to the input of other gates (Gout1, Gout2, . . . , Goutn), the gate leakage components in a device. Fig. 2. Illustration of the loading effect for the logic gate G. Gout1, . . . , Goutn

  20. Assessing health impacts of CO2 leakage from a geological storage site into buildings: role of attenuation in the unsaturated zone and building foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a) Title Assessing health impacts of CO2 leakage from a geological storage site into buildings of the greenhouse gas CO2 has the potential to be a widespread and effective option to mitigate climate change. As any industrial activity, CO2 storage may lead to adverse impact on human health and the environment

  1. Experimental assessment of CO2-mineral-toxic ion interactions in a1 simplified freshwater aquifer: Implications for CO2 leakage from deep2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Experimental assessment of CO2-mineral-toxic ion interactions in a1 simplified freshwater aquifer: Implications for CO2 leakage from deep2 geological storage3 4 German Montes-Hernandez*a , François Renarda, b : 10.1021/es3053448 #12;2 Abstract1 The possible intrusion of CO2 into a given freshwater aquifer due

  2. A non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity with suppression of transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun, E-mail: zhangjun-nudt@126.com; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhu, Danni; Qiu, Yongfeng [College of Optoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)] [College of Optoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The triaxial klystron amplifier is an efficient high power relativistic klystron amplifier operating at high frequencies due to its coaxial structure with large radius. However, the coaxial structures result in coupling problems among the cavities as the TEM mode is not cut-off in the coaxial tube. Therefore, the suppression of the TEM mode leakage, especially the leakage from the buncher cavity to the input cavity, is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier. In this paper, a non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage. The cold cavity analysis shows that the non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity can significantly suppress the TEM mode generation compared to a uniform three-gap buncher cavity. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the power leakage to the input cavity is less than 1.5‰ of the negative power in the buncher cavity and the buncher cavity can efficiently modulate an intense relativistic electron beam free of self-oscillations. A fundamental current modulation depth of 117% is achieved by employing the proposed non-uniform buncher cavity into an X-band triaxial amplifier, which results in the high efficiency generation of high power microwave.

  3. Mitigation of air leakage through the goaf of retreat coalfaces Christian Tauzide, Zbigniew Pokryszka -Institut National de l'Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS) (France)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    99-48 Mitigation of air leakage through the goaf of retreat coalfaces Christian Tauziède, Zbigniew coalfield), large amounts of air are used in order to dilute methane in retreat coalfaces. A parasite flow of air exists in the goaf, leading to the risk of spontaneous combustion of remaining coal as well

  4. Test versus predictions for rotordynamic and leakage characteristics of a convergent-tapered, honeycomb-stator/smooth-rotor annular gas seal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Der Velde Alvarez, Daniel Eduardo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the results for measured and predicted rotordynamic coefficients and leakage for a convergent-tapered honeycomb seal (CTHC). The test seals had a diameter of 114.968 mm (4.5263 in) at the entrance, and a diameter of 114.709 mm...

  5. Rack protection monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Stanley G. (Wheaton, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

  6. INTRODUCTION MONITORING SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jantsch, Axel

    , the heat level can be monitored in hotspot regions of the network. This is important for 3D systems consumption per cycle (based on the rate of packet flow) can be measured using the Energy meterC components and a single testbench simulation is performed by reading all input specification. Data samples

  7. Reactor Monitoring with Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cribier

    2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental knowledge on neutrinos acquired in the recent years open the possibility of applied neutrino physics. Among it the automatic and non intrusive monitoring of nuclear reactor by its antineutrino signal could be very valuable to IAEA in charge of the control of nuclear power plants. Several efforts worldwide have already started.

  8. A network security monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heberlein, L.T.; Dias, G.V.; Levitt, K.N.; Mukherjee, B.; Wood, J.; Wolber, D. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of security in computer networks is a rapidly growing area of interest because of the proliferation of networks and the paucity of security measures in most current networks. Since most networks consist of a collection of inter-connected local area networks (LANs), this paper concentrates on the security-related issues in a single broadcast LAN such as Ethernet. Specifically, we formalize various possible network attacks and outline methods of detecting them. Our basic strategy is to develop profiles of usage of network resources and then compare current usage patterns with the historical profile to determine possible security violations. Thus, our work is similar to the host-based intrusion-detection systems such as SRI's IDES. Different from such systems, however, is our use of a hierarchical model to refine the focus of the intrusion-detection mechanism. We also report on the development of our experimental LAN monitor currently under implementation. Several network attacks have been simulated and results on how the monitor has been able to detect these attacks are also analyzed. Initial results demonstrate that many network attacks are detectable with our monitor, although it can surely be defeated. Current work is focusing on the integration of network monitoring with host-based techniques. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices, and associated methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCown, Steven H; Derr, Kurt W; Rohde, Kenneth W

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices include a communications module for receiving wireless communications of a wireless device. Processing circuitry is coupled with the communications module and configured to process the wireless communications to determine whether the wireless device is authorized or unauthorized to be present at the monitored area based on identification information of the wireless device. Methods of monitoring for the presence and identity of wireless devices are also provided.

  10. Rulison Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Project Rulison Monitoring Plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management's mission to protect human health and the environment. The purpose of the plan is to monitor fluids from gas wells for radionuclides that would indicate contamination is migrating from the Rulison detonation zone to producing gas wells, allowing action to be taken before the contamination could pose a risk. The Monitoring Plan (1) lists the contaminants present and identifies those that have the greatest potential to migrate from the detonation zone (radionuclide source term), (2) identifies locations that monitor the most likely transport pathways, (3) identifies which fluids will be sampled (gas and liquid) and why, (4) establishes the frequency of sampling, and (5) specifies the most practical analyses and where the analysis results will be reported. The plan does not affect the long-term hydrologic sampling conducted by DOE since 1972, which will continue for the purpose of sampling shallow groundwater and surface water near the site. The Monitoring Plan was developed in anticipation of gas wells being drilled progressively nearer the Rulison site. DOE sampled 10 gas wells in 1997 and 2005 at distances ranging from 2.7 to 7.6 miles from the site to establish background concentrations for radionuclides. In a separate effort, gas industry operators and the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) developed an industry sampling and analysis plan that was implemented in 2007. The industry plan requires the sampling of gas wells within 3 miles of the site, with increased requirements for wells within 1 mile of the site. The DOE plan emphasizes the sampling of wells near the site (Figure 1), specifically those with a bottom-hole location of 1 mile or less from the detonation, depending on the direction relative to the natural fracture trend of the producing formation. Studies indicate that even the most mobile radionuclides created by the test are unlikely to migrate appreciable distances (hundreds of feet) from the detonation zone (Cooper et al. 2007, 2009). The Monitoring Plan was developed to provide a cautious and comprehensive approach for detecting any potential contaminant migration from the Rulison test site. It also provides an independent confirmation of results from the industry sampling and analysis plan while effectively increasing the sampling frequency of wells near the site.

  11. Condition Monitoring System for Reinforced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    containing dissolved ionic species such as chlorides. Since concrete is a porous material, with timeCondition Monitoring System for Reinforced Concrete Structures PROBLEM THIS TECHNOLOGY SOLVES: Patent pending concrete condition monitoring system providing `real-time' information on temperature

  12. Advanced monitoring of machining operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teti, Roberto; Jemielniak, Krzysztof; O'Donnell, Garret; Dornfeld, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    However, the latest modern open control systems allow accesssystems and paradigms In monitoring and control activities for modern

  13. Advanced monitoring of machining operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teti, Roberto; Jemielniak, Krzysztof; O'Donnell, Garret; Dornfeld, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems and paradigms In monitoring and control activities for modernHowever, the latest modern open control systems allow access

  14. Structural health monitoring by ultrasonic guided waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartoli, Ivan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Viola, E. , “Structural Health Monitoring of Multi-wireEncyclopedia of Structural Health Monitoring, C. Boller, F-D.L. (2001) “Structural health monitoring system based on

  15. Guided wave monitoring of prestressing tendons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nucera, Claudio

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    20] and for structural health monitoring of post-tensionedNDE) and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) purposes [1].NDE) and the structural health monitoring (SHM) of solids

  16. Effective Health Monitoring Strategies for Complex Structures /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haynes, Colin Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Optimization in Structural Health Monitoring, Proc. Worldaxioms of structural health monitoring, Proc. R. Soc. A.the future of structural health monitoring, Phil. Trans. R.

  17. Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Reliable and cost-effective monitoring, verification and accounting...

  18. Sandia Energy - Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Water Monitoring & Treatment Technologyashoter2015-0...

  19. Total Energy Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, S

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The total energy monitor (TE) is a thermal sensor that determines the total energy of each FEL pulse based on the temperature rise induced in a silicon wafer upon absorption of the FEL. The TE provides a destructive measurement of the FEL pulse energy in real-time on a pulse-by-pulse basis. As a thermal detector, the TE is expected to suffer least from ultra-fast non-linear effects and to be easy to calibrate. It will therefore primarily be used to cross-calibrate other detectors such as the Gas Detector or the Direct Imager during LCLS commissioning. This document describes the design of the TE and summarizes the considerations and calculations that have led to it. This document summarizes the physics behind the operation of the Total Energy Monitor at LCLS and derives associated engineering specifications.

  20. Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Russ Braunling

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Corrosion Monitoring System (CMS) program developed and demonstrated a continuously on-line system that provides real-time corrosion information. The program focused on detecting pitting corrosion in its early stages. A new invention called the Intelligent Ultrasonic Probe (IUP) was patented on the program. The IUP uses ultrasonic guided waves to detect small defects and a Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) algorithm to provide an image of the pits. Testing of the CMS demonstrated the capability to detect pits with dimensionality in the sub-millimeter range. The CMS was tested in both the laboratory and in a pulp and paper industrial plant. The system is capable of monitoring the plant from a remote location using the internet.

  1. Tritium monitoring techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVore, J.R.; Buckner, M.A.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of their operations, the U.S. Navy is required to store or maintain operational nuclear weapons on ships and at shore facilities. Since these weapons contain tritium, there are safety implications relevant to the exposure of personnel to tritium. This is particularly important for shipboard operations since these types of environments can make low-level tritium detection difficult. Some of these ships have closed systems, which can result in exposure to tritium at levels that are below normally acceptable levels but could still cause radiation doses that are higher than necessary or could hamper ship operations. This report describes the state of the art in commercial tritium detection and monitoring and recommends approaches for low-level tritium monitoring in these environments.

  2. Texas Rangeland Monitoring: Level Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanselka, C. Wayne; Hart, Charles R.; McGinty, Allan

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    L-5455 10/06 Texas Rangeland Monitoring: Level Three C. Wayne Hanselka, Charles R. Hart and Allan McGinty* Monitoring is an essential tool in rangeland management. Monitoring is the way to determine whether goals are being achieved with current...

  3. Beatty Wind Monitoring Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurt, Rick

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER) and Valley Electric Association (VEA) worked with Kitty Shubert of the Beatty Economic Redevelopment Corporation (BERC) to install two wind monitoring stations outside the town of Beatty, Nevada. The following is a description of the two sites. The information for a proposed third site is also shown. The sites were selected from previous work by the BERC and Idaho National Laboratory. The equipment was provided by the BERC and installed by researchers from the UNLV CER.

  4. Scalable Node Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drotar, Alexander P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quinn, Erin E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sutherland, Landon D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Project description is: (1) Build a high performance computer; and (2) Create a tool to monitor node applications in Component Based Tool Framework (CBTF) using code from Lightweight Data Metric Service (LDMS). The importance of this project is that: (1) there is a need a scalable, parallel tool to monitor nodes on clusters; and (2) New LDMS plugins need to be able to be easily added to tool. CBTF stands for Component Based Tool Framework. It's scalable and adjusts to different topologies automatically. It uses MRNet (Multicast/Reduction Network) mechanism for information transport. CBTF is flexible and general enough to be used for any tool that needs to do a task on many nodes. Its components are reusable and 'EASILY' added to a new tool. There are three levels of CBTF: (1) frontend node - interacts with users; (2) filter nodes - filters or concatenates information from backend nodes; and (3) backend nodes - where the actual work of the tool is done. LDMS stands for lightweight data metric servies. It's a tool used for monitoring nodes. Ltool is the name of the tool we derived from LDMS. It's dynamically linked and includes the following components: Vmstat, Meminfo, Procinterrupts and more. It works by: Ltool command is run on the frontend node; Ltool collects information from the backend nodes; backend nodes send information to the filter nodes; and filter nodes concatenate information and send to a database on the front end node. Ltool is a useful tool when it comes to monitoring nodes on a cluster because the overhead involved with running the tool is not particularly high and it will automatically scale to any size cluster.

  5. Scintillator spent fuel monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, C.E.; Nixon, K.V.; Bernard, W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitor for rapidly measuring the gross gamma-ray flux immediately above spent fuel assemblies in underwater storage racks has been developed. It consists of a plastic scintillator, photomultiplier, collimator, and a small battery-powered electronics package. The crosstalk from an isolated fuel assembly to an adjacent void is only about 2%. The mean difference between the measured gamma-ray flux and the flux estimated from the declared burnup and cooling time with a simple formula is 22%.

  6. Portal monitoring technology control process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    York, R.L.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Portal monitors are an important part of the material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) programs in Russia and the US. Although portal monitors are only a part of an integrated MPC and A system, they are an effective means of controlling the unauthorized movement of special nuclear material (SNM). Russian technical experts have gained experience in the use of SNM portal monitors from US experts ad this has allowed them to use the monitors more effectively. Several Russian institutes and companies are designing and manufacturing SNM portal monitors in Russia. Interactions between Russian and US experts have resulted in improvements to the instruments. SNM portal monitor technology has been effectively transferred from the US to Russia and should be a permanent part of the Russian MPC and A Program. Progress in the implementation of the monitors and improvements to how they are used are discussed.

  7. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bundy, Charles H. (Clearwater, FL); Graham, Robert A. (Los Lunas, NM); Kuehn, Stephen F. (Albuquerque, NM); Precit, Richard R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rogers, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier.

  8. Personal continuous air monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, Ronald G. (Los Alamos, NM); Salazar, Samuel A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal continuous air monitor capable of giving immediate warning of the presence of radioactivity has a filter/detector head to be worn in the breathing zone of a user, containing a filter mounted adjacent to radiation detectors, and a preamplifier. The filter/detector head is connected to a belt pack to be worn at the waist or on the back of a user. The belt pack contains a signal processor, batteries, a multichannel analyzer, a logic circuit, and an alarm. An air pump also is provided in the belt pack for pulling air through the filter/detector head by way of an air tube.

  9. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

    1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

  10. Monitoring of tritium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corbett, James A. (Turtle Creek, PA); Meacham, Sterling A. (Greensburg, PA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluid from a breeder nuclear reactor, which may be the sodium cooling fluid or the helium reactor-cover-gas, or the helium coolant of a gas-cooled reactor passes over the portion of the enclosure of a gaseous discharge device which is permeable to hydrogen and its isotopes. The tritium diffused into the discharge device is radioactive producing beta rays which ionize the gas (argon) in the discharge device. The tritium is monitored by measuring the ionization current produced when the sodium phase and the gas phase of the hydrogen isotopes within the enclosure are in equilibrium.

  11. Milliwave melter monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniel, William E. (North Augusta, SC); Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Sundaram, Shanmugavelayutham K. (Richland, WA)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A milliwave melter monitoring system is presented that has a waveguide with a portion capable of contacting a molten material in a melter for use in measuring one or more properties of the molten material in a furnace under extreme environments. A receiver is configured for use in obtaining signals from the melt/material transmitted to appropriate electronics through the waveguide. The receiver is configured for receiving signals from the waveguide when contacting the molten material for use in determining the viscosity of the molten material. Other embodiments exist in which the temperature, emissivity, viscosity and other properties of the molten material are measured.

  12. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  13. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

  14. Sandia Energy - Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution Grid Integration Permalink Gallery MesaMonitoring Home Carbon

  15. Sandia Energy - Monitoring Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution Grid Integration Permalink Gallery MesaMonitoring Home

  16. WIPP Documents - Environmental Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEureka AnalyticsLarge file sizeMonitoring

  17. Monitoring Jobs on Carver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTIONES2008-54174 This manuscript hasMonitoring

  18. Monitoring Jobs on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTIONES2008-54174 This manuscriptMonitoring Jobs

  19. Monitoring jobs with qs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTIONES2008-54174 This manuscriptMonitoringJobs »

  20. Monitoring your job

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTIONES2008-54174 This manuscriptMonitoringJobs

  1. A rugged continuous air monitor for sampling radionuclides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Joseph Thaddeus

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    less than that in the sampler for out-leakage. The pressure inside the container did not exceed 10 inches of water. For in-leakage tests, sulfur hexafluoride (SF?) was diluted with air and released into the container, external to the sampler...

  2. Low leakage Ru-strontium titanate-Ru metal-insulator-metal capacitors for sub-20?nm technology node in dynamic random access memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popovici, M., E-mail: Mihaela.Ioana.Popovici@imec.be; Swerts, J.; Redolfi, A.; Kaczer, B.; Aoulaiche, M.; Radu, I.; Clima, S.; Everaert, J.-L.; Van Elshocht, S.; Jurczak, M. [Imec, Leuven 3001 (Belgium)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved metal-insulator-metal capacitor (MIMCAP) stacks with strontium titanate (STO) as dielectric sandwiched between Ru as top and bottom electrode are shown. The Ru/STO/Ru stack demonstrates clearly its potential to reach sub-20?nm technology nodes for dynamic random access memory. Downscaling of the equivalent oxide thickness, leakage current density (J{sub g}) of the MIMCAPs, and physical thickness of the STO have been realized by control of the Sr/Ti ratio and grain size using a heterogeneous TiO{sub 2}/STO based nanolaminate stack deposition and a two-step crystallization anneal. Replacement of TiN with Ru as both top and bottom electrodes reduces the amount of electrically active defects and is essential to achieve a low leakage current in the MIM capacitor.

  3. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

  4. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, J.E.

    1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

  5. Suncatcher monitoring project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An intensive microcomputer-based energy monitoring project was conducted on a passively heated and cooled residence in Davis, California. The building performance was estimated in the design phase by both a simplified method and an hourly simulation. In the monitoring phase, more than 75 sensors, located in the building elements, interior spaces, appliances, and the ambient environment provide data about temperatures, energy use and radiation. These data are used to determine the actual solar system contributions, and to validate and improve design calculation tools. Information was gathered on the Suncatcher system for almost three years. Daily min/max temperatures inside and outside of the house and utility use have been reduced and analyzed. From these data we calculate the monthly net heating load and the percentage of that met by solar energy. To date, it has averaged 71%. Hourly data, gathered by the custom-made data acquisition system, show how daily temperature and radiation patterns change. Natural cooling supplied 100% of the cooling need. During the hot summers typical of the Davis area, the house has remained very comfortable virtually all of the time, except for two or three afternoons each summer, where temperatures reached a stuffy 83 or 84F. The other solar energy source, the solar hot water system, has provided 50 to 60% of the hot water needed by the residents, who use less domestic hot water than average.

  6. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  7. An optimized international vehicle monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    York, R.L.; Close, D.A.; Fehlau, P.E.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The security plans for many DOE facilities require the monitoring of pedestrians and vehicles to control the movement of special nuclear material (SNM). Vehicle monitors often provide the outer-most barrier against the theft of SNM. Automatic monitors determine the presence of SNM by comparing the gamma-ray and neutron intensity while occupied, to the continuously updated background radiation level which is measured while the unit is unoccupied. The most important factors in choosing automatic vehicle monitors are sensitivity, cost and in high traffic applications total monitoring time. The two types of automatic vehicle monitors presently in use are the vehicle monitoring station and the drive-through vehicle monitor. These two types have dramatically different cost and sensitivities. The vehicle monitoring station has a worst-case detection sensitivity of 40 g of highly enriched uranium, HEU, and a cost approximately $180k. This type of monitor is very difficult to install and can only be used in low traffic flow locations. The drive-through vehicle portal has a worst-case detection sensitivity of 1 kg of HEU and a cost approximately $20k. The world`s political situation has created a pressing need to prevent the diversion of SNM from FSU nuclear facilities and across international borders. Drive-through vehicle monitors would be an effective and practical nuclear material proliferation deterrent if their sensitivity can be improved to a sufficient level. The goal of this project is to evaluate different detector configurations as a means of improving the sensitivity of these instruments to achieve a vehicle monitor that is economical, practical to install, and has adequate sensitivity to be an effective barrier to illegal transportation of SNM.

  8. Enhanced safeguards via solution monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, T.; Wangen, L.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solution monitoring is defined as the essentially continuous monitoring of solution level, density, and temperature in all tanks in the process that contain, or could contain, safeguards-significant quantities of nuclear material. This report describes some of the enhancements that solution monitoring could make to international safeguards. The focus is on the quantifiable benefits of solution monitoring, but qualitatively, solution monitoring can be viewed as a form of surveillance. Quantitatively, solution monitoring can in some cases improve diversion detection probability. For example, the authors show that under certain assumptions, solution monitoring can be used to reduce the standard deviation of the annual material balance, {sigma}{sub MB}, from approximately 17 kg to approximately 4 kg. Such reduction in {sigma}{sub MB} will not always be possible, as they discuss. However, in all cases, solution monitoring would provide assurance that the measurement error models are adequate so that one has confidence in his estimate of {sigma}{sub MB}. Some of the results in this report were generated using data that were simulated with prototype solution monitoring software that they are developing. An accompanying document describes that software.

  9. Monitoring SERC Technologies — Solar Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar by National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Market Transformation Center electrical engineer Peter McNutt about Solar Photovoltaics and how to properly monitor its installation.

  10. Well Monitoring System for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Peer Review Well Monitoring Systems for EGS Principal Investigator Randy Normann Perma Works LLC May 19, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or...

  11. Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) consists of 5 U.S DOE national laboratories collaborating to develop a framework for predicting the risks associated with carbon sequestration. The approach taken by NRAP is to divide the system into components, including injection target reservoirs, wellbores, natural pathways including faults and fractures, groundwater and the atmosphere. Next, develop a detailed, physics and chemistry-based model of each component. Using the results of the detailed models, develop efficient, simplified models, termed reduced order models (ROM) for each component. Finally, integrate the component ROMs into a system model that calculates risk profiles for the site. This report details the development of the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer at PNNL. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer uses a Wellbore Leakage ROM developed at LANL as input. The detailed model, using the STOMP simulator, covers a 5x8 km area of the Edwards Aquifer near San Antonio, Texas. The model includes heterogeneous hydraulic properties, and equilibrium, kinetic and sorption reactions between groundwater, leaked CO2 gas, brine, and the aquifer carbonate and clay minerals. Latin Hypercube sampling was used to generate 1024 samples of input parameters. For each of these input samples, the STOMP simulator was used to predict the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, and the volume, length and width of the aquifer where pH was less than the MCL standard, and TDS, arsenic, cadmium and lead exceeded MCL standards. In order to decouple the Wellbore Leakage ROM from the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM, the response surface was transformed to replace Wellbore Leakage ROM input parameters with instantaneous and cumulative CO2 and brine leakage rates. The most sensitive parameters proved to be the CO2 and brine leakage rates from the well, with equilibrium coefficients for calcite and dolomite, as well as the number of illite and kaolinite sorption sites proving to be of secondary importance. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM was developed using nonlinear regression to fit the response surface with a quadratic polynomial. The goodness of fit was excellent for the CO2 flux to the atmosphere, and very good for predicting the volumes of groundwater exceeding the pH, TDS, As, Cd and Pb threshold values.

  12. Annual Monitoring Results A REPORT OF THE REGIONAL MONITORING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grainsize 33 Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and Total Nitrogen (TN)33 Trace Metals34 Trace Organics34 Quality Assurance / Quality Control (QA/QC) 37 QA/QC of Percent Solids37 QA/QC of Grain Size 37 QA/QC of TotalAnnual Monitoring Results 2012 A REPORT OF THE REGIONAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR WATER QUALITY

  13. Electron launching voltage monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mendel, C.W.; Savage, M.E.

    1992-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron launching voltage monitor measures MITL voltage using a relationship between anode electric field and electron current launched from a cathode-mounted perturbation. An electron launching probe extends through and is spaced from the edge of an opening in a first MITL conductor, one end of the launching probe being in the gap between the MITL conductor, the other end being adjacent a first side of the first conductor away from the second conductor. A housing surrounds the launching probe and electrically connects the first side of the first conductor to the other end of the launching probe. A detector detects the current passing through the housing to the launching probe, the detected current being representative of the voltage between the conductors. 5 figs.

  14. Cylinder monitoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alderson, J.H. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in storage at the Department of Energy (DOE) gaseous diffusion plants, managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are being evaluated to determine their expected storage life. Cylinders evaluated recently have been in storage service for 30 to 40 years. In the present environment, the remaining life for these storage cylinders is estimated to be 30 years or greater. The group of cylinders involved in recent tests will continue to be monitored on a periodic basis, and other storage cylinders will be observed as on a statistical sample population. The program has been extended to all types of large capacity UF{sub 6} cylinders.

  15. Groundwater monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ames, Kenneth R. (Pasco, WA); Doesburg, James M. (Richland, WA); Eschbach, Eugene A. (Richland, WA); Kelley, Roy C. (Kennewick, WA); Myers, David A. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A groundwater monitoring system includes a bore, a well casing within and spaced from the bore, and a pump within the casing. A water impermeable seal between the bore and the well casing prevents surface contamination from entering the pump. Above the ground surface is a removable operating means which is connected to the pump piston by a flexible cord. A protective casing extends above ground and has a removable cover. After a groundwater sample has been taken, the cord is disconnected from the operating means. The operating means is removed for taking away, the cord is placed within the protective casing, and the cover closed and locked. The system is thus protected from contamination, as well as from damage by accident or vandalism.

  16. Steam trap monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, M.J.

    1987-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

  17. Clark county monitoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, Sheila [Urban Environmental Research, 10100 W. Charleston Boulevard Las Vegas, 89135 (United States); Auger, Jeremy [Applied Analysis, 10100 West Charleston Blvd, Suite 200, Las Vegas, Nevada 89135 (United States); Navies, Irene [Clark County, Department of Comprehensive Planning, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Since 1988, Clark County has been one of the counties designated by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) as an 'Affected Unit of Local Government' (AULG). The AULG designation is an acknowledgement by the federal government that could be negatively impacted to a considerable degree by activities associated with the Yucca Mountain High Level Nuclear Waste Repository. These negative effects would have an impact on residents as individuals and the community as a whole. As an AULG, Clark County is authorized to identify 'any potential economic, social, public health and safety, and environmental impacts' of the potential repository (42 USC Section 10135(C)(1)(B)(1)). Toward this end, Clark County has conducted numerous studies of potential impacts, many of which are summarized in the Clark County's Impact Assessment Report that was submitted by the DOE and the president of the United States in February 2002. Given the unprecedented magnitude and duration of the DoE's proposal, as well as the many unanswered questions about the number of shipments and the modal mix, the estimate of impacts described in these studies are preliminary. In order to refine these estimates, Clark County Comprehensive Planning Department's Nuclear Waste Division is continuing to assess potential impacts. In addition, the County has implemented a Monitoring Program designed to capture changes to the social, environmental, and economic well-being of its residents resulting from the Yucca Mountain project and other significant events within the County. The Monitoring Program acts as an 'early warning system' that allows Clark County decision makers to proactive respond to impacts from the Yucca Mountain Project. (authors)

  18. Successes in School Energy Management - Energy Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbitt, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Successes in School Energy Management ? Energy Monitoring Chad Corbitt, CEM, ATEM Energy Manager, Klein ISD jcorbitt1@kleinisd.net Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Keys to Energy Monitoring ? Develop an Energy Monitoring plan ? Define... the why, what, how and who of the plan ? Implement the Energy Monitoring plan ? Personnel, data system, reporting ? One Experience in Energy Monitoring Developing an Energy Monitoring Plan ? Why do we need to monitor energy? ? What information...

  19. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

    2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 458.1, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies.

  20. Detection of gas leakage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Steven (Peralta, NM); Brown, Jason (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of detecting leaks and measuring volumes as well as an apparatus, the Power-free Pump Module (PPM), that is a self-contained leak test and volume measurement apparatus that requires no external sources of electrical power during leak testing or volume measurement, where the invention is a portable, pneumatically-controlled instrument capable of generating a vacuum, calibrating volumes, and performing quantitative leak tests on a closed test system or device, all without the use of alternating current (AC) power. Capabilities include the ability is to provide a modest vacuum (less than 10 Torr), perform a pressure rise leak test, measure the gas's absolute pressure, and perform volume measurements. All operations are performed through a simple rotary control valve which controls pneumatically-operated manifold valves.

  1. Labyrinth Seal Leakage Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inam, Orcun

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    . The effect of seal geometry is studied by varying clearance, pitch, tooth height, tooth width and upstream side angle. It was found that, amongst other geometrical parameters, tooth clearance and pitch has a strong influence on carryover coefficient. Smaller...

  2. Steam condensate leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Midlock, E.B.; Thuot, J.R.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is a multi-program research and development center owned by the United States Department of Energy and operated by the University of Chicago. The majority of the buildings on site use steam for heating and other purposes. Steam is generated from liquid water at the site`s central boiler house and distributed around the site by means of large pipes both above and below the ground. Steam comes into each building where it is converted to liquid condensate, giving off heat which can be used by the building. The condensate is then pumped back to the boiler house where it will be reheated to steam again. The process is continual but is not perfectly efficient. A substantial amount of condensate is being lost somewhere on site. The lost condensate has both economic and environmental significance. To compensate for lost condensate, makeup water must be added to the returned condensate at the boiler house. The water cost itself will become significant in the future when ANL begins purchasing Lake Michigan water. In addition to the water cost, there is also the cost of chemically treating the water to remove impurities, and there is the cost of energy required to heat the water, as it enters the boiler house 1000 F colder than the condensate return. It has been estimated that only approximately 60% of ANL`s steam is being returned as condensate, thus 40% is being wasted. This is quite costly to ANL and will become significantly more costly in the future when ANL begins purchasing water from Lake Michigan. This study locates where condensate loss is occurring and shows how much money would be saved by repairing the areas of loss. Shortly after completion of the study, one of the major areas of loss was repaired. This paper discusses the basis for the study, the areas where losses are occurring, the potential savings of repairing the losses, and a hypothesis as to where the unaccounted for loss is occurring.

  3. Labyrinth Seal Leakage Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Gaurav

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Seals are basic mechanical devices commonly used in machinery to avoid undesired flow losses of working fluids. To understand the working of these seals specifically those placed between relatively moving parts is still one of the major engineering...

  4. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

    1983-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

  5. Steam trap monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Michael J. (Plainfield, IL)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

  6. Texas Rangeland Monitoring: Level Two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanselka, C. Wayne; Hart, Charles R.; McGinty, Allan

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    are best used for monitoring herbaceous plant communities. Belt transects can be used for monitoring the woody plant commu- nity. Line transect To use a line transect, stretch a 100-foot to 300-foot measuring tape across the monitoring site, carefully... plant rooted closest to each foot mark along the line. If using a 300-foot line, every other foot mark may be used. At least 100 plants should be identi- fied and recorded for each line transect installed. The math for calculating species com...

  7. Essential Grid Workflow Monitoring Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunter, Daniel K.; Jackson, Keith R.; Konerding, David E.; Lee,Jason R.; Tierney, Brian L.

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Troubleshooting Grid workflows is difficult. A typicalworkflow involves a large number of components networks, middleware,hosts, etc. that can fail. Even when monitoring data from all thesecomponents is accessible, it is hard to tell whether failures andanomalies in these components are related toa given workflow. For theGrid to be truly usable, much of this uncertainty must be elim- inated.We propose two new Grid monitoring elements, Grid workflow identifiersand consistent component lifecycle events, that will make Gridtroubleshooting easier, and thus make Grids more usable, by simplifyingthe correlation of Grid monitoring data with a particular Gridworkflow.

  8. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yin, Yan (Palo Alto, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device (10) for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions (11a, 11b) with an axial gap (12) therebetween. An outer pipe (14) cooperates with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips (23a-d) cooperate with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

  9. ~On-Line Monitoring: Beth A. Schroeder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plale, Beth

    observers are not required to provide computational functionality. Second,the systemsaredesignedto monitor the target soft- ware and respondwhile the target software isoperational. This forcesthe monitoring system

  10. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Mission The mission of the FRMAC is to coordinate and manage all federal radiological environmental monitoring and assessment Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment...

  11. SiO2 Passivation Effects on the Leakage Current in Dual-Gate AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Kwang Seok

    was grown on c-plane sapphire substrate by MOCVD. Undoped 30 nm-thick Al0.26Ga0.74N and Fe-doped 3 m GaN substrate 3 nm undoped GaN 0.26 0.74 Source DrainMain-GateSiO2 2DEG SiO2 SiO2 Additional Gate 5 m3 m3 m 3 mSiO2 Passivation Effects on the Leakage Current in Dual-Gate AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility

  12. Solar Power Systems Web Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Bimal Aklesh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All over the world the peak demand load is increasing and the load factor is decreasing year-by-year. The fossil fuel is considered insufficient thus solar energy systems are becoming more and more useful, not only in terms of installation but monitoring of these systems is very crucial. Monitoring becomes very important when there are a large number of solar panels. Monitoring would allow early detection if the output falls below required level or one of the solar panel out of 1000 goes down. In this study the target is to monitor and control a developed solar panel by using available internet foundation. This web-enabled software will provide more flexibility over the system such as transmitting data from panel to the host computer and disseminating information to relevant stake holders barring any geographical barrier. The software would be built around web server with dynamic HTML and JAVA, this paper presents the preliminary design of the proposed system.

  13. Advanced nonintrusive load monitoring system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wichakool, Warit, 1977-

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a need for flexible, inexpensive metering technologies that can be deployed in many different monitoring scenarios. Individual loads may be expected to compute information about their power consumption. Utility ...

  14. New technologies for item monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, J.A. [EG & G Energy Measurements, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Waddoups, I.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report responds to the Department of Energy`s request that Sandia National Laboratories compare existing technologies against several advanced technologies as they apply to DOE needs to monitor the movement of material, weapons, or personnel for safety and security programs. The authors describe several material control systems, discuss their technologies, suggest possible applications, discuss assets and limitations, and project costs for each system. The following systems are described: WATCH system (Wireless Alarm Transmission of Container Handling); Tag system (an electrostatic proximity sensor); PANTRAK system (Personnel And Material Tracking); VRIS (Vault Remote Inventory System); VSIS (Vault Safety and Inventory System); AIMS (Authenticated Item Monitoring System); EIVS (Experimental Inventory Verification System); Metrox system (canister monitoring system); TCATS (Target Cueing And Tracking System); LGVSS (Light Grid Vault Surveillance System); CSS (Container Safeguards System); SAMMS (Security Alarm and Material Monitoring System); FOIDS (Fiber Optic Intelligence & Detection System); GRADS (Graded Radiation Detection System); and PINPAL (Physical Inventory Pallet).

  15. PEM fuel cell monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meltser, M.A.; Grot, S.A.

    1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for monitoring the performance of H{sub 2}--O{sub 2} PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H{sub 2} sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken. 2 figs.

  16. Remote monitoring for international safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupree, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sonnier, C.S. [Jupiter Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote monitoring is not a new technology, and its application to safeguards relevant activities has been examined for a number of years. On behalf of the US Department of Energy and international partners, remote monitoring systems have been emplaced in nuclear facilities and laboratories in various parts of the world. The experience gained from these field trials of remote monitoring systems has shown the viability of the concept of using integrated monitoring systems. Although a wide variety of sensors has been used in the remote monitoring field trials conducted to date, the possible range of instrumentation that might be used has scarcely been touched. As the technology becomes widespread, large amounts of data will become available to inspectors responsible for safeguards activities at the sites. Effective use of remote monitoring will require processing, archiving, presenting, and assessing of these data. To provide reasonable efficiency in the application of this technology, data processing should be done in a careful and organized manner. The problem will be not an issue of poring over scant records but of surviving under a deluge of information made possible by modern technology. Fortunately, modern technology, which created the problem of the data glut, is available to come to the assistance of those inundated by data. Apart from the technological problems, one of the most important aspects of remote monitoring is the potential constraint related to the transmission of data out of a facility or beyond national borders. Remote monitoring across national borders can be seriously considered only in the context of a comprehensive, transparent, and open implementation regime.

  17. Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant – Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

  18. Energy Management Programs- Monitoring Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauls, S. P.; Shamy, M. D.

    ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS - MONITORING PERFORMANCE Stanley P. Pauls Mustafa D. Shamy Merck & Co., Inc. Rahway, N. J. ABSTRACT of the historical energy consumption records. Energy use standards have been established to Steam Model monitor... energy conservation performance in bulk pharmaceutical plants. The model considers The basic steam model for most industrial process, comfort heating, and fixed loads. operations is made up of the following components: As the oil crisis developed...

  19. Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative “all modes” failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

  20. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

    2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that this work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, and DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 450.1A, DOE Order 5400.5, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies. (See LLNL [1992] and LLNL [2008] for information about LLNL's CERCLA activities).

  1. Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Shallow CO{sub 2} Injection, Greene County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rovey, Charles; Gouzie, Douglas; Biagioni, Richard

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The project titled Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Shallow CO{sub 2} Injection, Greene County, Missouri provided training for three graduate students in areas related to carbon capture and storage. Numerical modeling of CO{sub 2} injection into the St. Francois aquifer at the Southwest Power Plant Site in Greene County, Missouri indicates that up to 4.1 x 10{sup 5} metric tons of CO{sub 2} per year could be injected for 30 years without exceeding a 3 MPa differential injection pressure. The injected CO{sub 2} would remain sequestered below the top of the overlying caprock (St. Francois confining unit) for more than 1000 years. Geochemical modeling indicates that portions of the injected CO{sub 2} will react rapidly with trace minerals in the aquifer to form various solid carbonate mineral phases. These minerals would store significant portions of injected CO{sub 2} over geologic time scales. Finally, a GIS data base on the pore-fluid chemistry of the overlying aquifer system in Missouri, the Ozark aquifer, was compiled from many sources. This data base could become useful in monitoring for leakage from future CO{sub 2} sequestration sites.

  2. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation details the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Condition Monitoring program at NREL.

  3. Grantee Checklist for the Inspection & Monitoring Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document walks Grantees through the Inspection and Monitoring requirement of the Quality Work Plan.

  4. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Instructions for preparing occupational exposure data for submittal to the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) repository.

  5. Puna Geothermal Venture Hydrologic Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the basis for the Hydrologic Monitoring Program (HMP) for the Puna Geothermal Venture. The HMP is complementary to two additional environmental compliance monitoring programs also being submitted by Puma Geothermal Venture (PGV) for their proposed activities at the site. The other two programs are the Meteorology and Air Quality Monitoring Program (MAQMP) and the Noise Monitoring Program (NMP), being submitted concurrently.

  6. Method & apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane; Ward, Pamela Denise; Stevenson, Joel O'Don

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process and, more specifically, to the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates to a plasma monitoring module that may be adjusted in at least some manner so as to re-evaluate a previously monitored plasma process. For instance, optical emissions data on a plasma process that was previously monitored by the plasma monitoring module may be replayed through the plasma monitoring module after making at least one adjustment in relation to the plasma monitoring module.

  7. Developments on the CENS Structural Health Monitoring Front

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the CENS Structural Health Monitoring Front D. Skolnik,Introduction: Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Systems

  8. Developments on the CENS Structural Health Monitoring Front

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the CENS Structural Health Monitoring Front D. Skolnik,Introduction: Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Systems

  9. Towards Highly Available ThreeTier Monitoring Applications (Extended Abstract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolev, Danny

    dispatched at the middle tier. They monitor the target agents and other monitoring components accumulating

  10. Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  13. 1999 Environmental Monitoring Program Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. V. Street

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the calendar year 1999 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory management and operating contractor Environmental Monitoring Program. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1999 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the expectation of nitrogen in two disposal pond effluent streams iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal well, and coliform bacteria in drinking water systems at two facilities. Maintenance activities were performed on the two drinking water systems and tested prior to putting back into service. The monitoring and surveillance results demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

  14. Shared performance monitor in a multiprocessor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiu, George; Gara, Alan G; Salapura, Valentina

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A performance monitoring unit (PMU) and method for monitoring performance of events occurring in a multiprocessor system. The multiprocessor system comprises a plurality of processor devices units, each processor device for generating signals representing occurrences of events in the processor device, and, a single shared counter resource for performance monitoring. The performance monitor unit is shared by all processor cores in the multiprocessor system. The PMU is further programmed to monitor event signals issued from non-processor devices.

  15. INTEC Groundwater Monitoring Report 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. R. Forbes

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes 2006 perched water and groundwater monitoring activities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During 2006, groundwater samples were collected from a total of 22 Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) monitoring wells, plus six aquifer wells sampled for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) monitoring program. In addition, perched water samples were collected from 21 perched wells and 19 suction lysimeters. Groundwater and perched water samples were analyzed for a suite of radionuclides and inorganic constituents. Laboratory results in this report are compared to drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Such comparison is for reference only and it should be noted that the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision does not require that perched water comply with drinking water standards.

  16. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, B.B.; Ballard, S.

    1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration is disclosed. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow. 4 figs.

  17. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Ballard, Sanford (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow.

  18. Whole facility energy use monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzucchi, R.P.; Jo, J.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting numerous field monitoring studies of the induces of energy in buildings. Energy use monitoring techniques have been developed to provide reliable empirical measurements of energy consumption according to enduse and time of day. These measurements are analyzed in conjunction with climate and site characteristics data to determine energy use efficiencies and identify energy conservation and load management opportunities. This paper draws upon this experience to advance an approach to minimize the cost and maximize the benefits of field data collection projects for entire facilities.

  19. Process Monitoring for Nuclear Safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehinger, Michael H [ORNL] [ORNL; Pomeroy, George D [ORNL] [ORNL; Budlong-Sylvester, Kory W [ORNL] [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process Monitoring has long been used to evaluate industrial processes and operating conditions in nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. In nuclear applications there is a recognized need to demonstrate the safeguards benefits from using advanced process monitoring on spent fuel reprocessing technologies and associated facilities, as a complement to nuclear materials accounting. This can be accomplished by: defining credible diversion pathway scenarios as a sample problem; using advanced sensor and data analysis techniques to illustrate detection capabilities; and formulating 'event detection' methodologies as a means to quantify performance of the safeguards system. Over the past 30 years there have been rapid advances and improvement in the technology associated with monitoring and control of industrial processes. In the context of bulk handling facilities that process nuclear materials, modern technology can provide more timely information on the location and movement of nuclear material to help develop more effective safeguards. For international safeguards, inspection means verification of material balance data as reported by the operator through the State to the international inspectorate agency. This verification recognizes that the State may be in collusion with the operator to hide clandestine activities, potentially during abnormal process conditions with falsification of data to mask the removal. Records provided may show material is accounted for even though a removal occurred. Process monitoring can offer additional fidelity during a wide variety of operating conditions to help verify the declaration or identify possible diversions. The challenge is how to use modern technology for process monitoring and control in a proprietary operating environment subject to safeguards inspectorate or other regulatory oversight. Under the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, a range of potential safeguards applications for process monitoring are under conceptual development and evaluation. This paper reports on a study of process monitoring for a sample problem involving spent fuel reprocessing with aqueous reprocessing technologies. This includes modeling the processes in the context of a nuclear material diversion scenario and measuring the associated process chemistry. A systems-centric model is applied using actual and simulated plant data, advanced sensors, anomaly detection methods, statistical analysis and data authentication methods, to help illustrate the benefits of process monitoring applications.

  20. Relating to monitoring ion sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John Alan (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide techniques for monitoring the position on alpha contamination in or on items or locations. The technique is particularly applicable to pipes, conduits and other locations to which access is difficult. The technique uses indirect monitoring of alpha emissions by detecting ions generated by the alpha emissions. The medium containing the ions is moved in a controlled manner frog in proximity with the item or location to the detecting unit and the signals achieved over time are used to generate alpha source position information.

  1. An Optimized International Vehicle Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    York, R.L.; Close, D.A.; Fehlau, P.E.

    1999-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project was to evaluate detector configurations to achieve a vehicle monitor that is economical, practical to install, and has adequate sensitivity to be an effective barrier to illegal transportation of special nuclear materials. We designed a new detector configuration that improves the sensitivity of available drive-through vehicle monitors by more than a factor of 5 while not changing the nuisance alarm rate.

  2. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogmo, D.

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system. 6 figs.

  3. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogmo, David (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system.

  4. Monitoring Infrastructure Capacity Presented at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    .S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Cambridge Massachusetts March 30 - April 1, 2000 by David, Cambridge, Massachusetts. http://nexus.umn.edu/Papers/Monitoring.pdf #12;Outline Complexity of Problem be linked to Master plans Capital Improvement Programs Financing System Development Regulation #12

  5. MACHINE MONITORING USING PROBABILITY THRESHOLDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Stephen

    MACHINE MONITORING USING PROBABILITY THRESHOLDS AND SYSTEM OPERATING CHARACTERISTICS Stephen M and Jeffrey M. Alden G.M. R&D Center Warren, MI 48090 IOE Tech Report 95-14 #12;1. Introduction We a discrete-part production machine, with the objective of effectively determining when to shut the machine

  6. ICP (Institutional Conservation Program) monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following pages present the final report of activities undertaken by Carpenter Environmental Associates, Inc. (CEA) in carrying out its contractual obligations for the New York Support Office of the US Department of Energy. The contract calls for the field monitoring/review of DOE grants to schools and hospitals under the Institutional Conservation Program (ICP). This final report is the result of a review of statistics and findings gathered over the period of the contract, which included monitoring visits to 50 grantees in New York State and New Jersey. The report is intended to highlight aspects of the monitoring project and to make recommendations. This report is organized into four sections: Section 1 details the steps taken by CEA in organizing and implementing the review; Section 2 presents program statistics; Section 3 discusses monitoring review concerns, implementation issues and commonly observed problems/accomplishments; and Section 4 lists recommendations. Taken as a whole, this final report is intended to convey a complete picture of CEA's activities under this contract. 25 tabs.,

  7. Applications guide to pedestrian SNM monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehlau, P.E.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The applications guide introduces readers to the pedestrian special nuclear material (SNM) monitors that provide nuclear material control at DOE contractor facilities. It explains the principles of operation, the strong and weak points, and steps for calibration and maintenance of the monitors. Administrators and security specialists will find an overview of pedestrain monitor application and upkeep in Part 1 of the guide and a descriptive catalog of present-day monitors in Part 3. Technically oriented readers will be interested in the more detailed discussion of SNM monitoring physics and SNM monitor design principles found in Part 2. 18 refs., 33 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers is intended to be at supercritical pressure and temperature conditions, but CO{sub 2} leaking from a geologic storage reservoir and migrating toward the land surface (through faults, fractures, or improperly abandoned wells) would reach subcritical conditions at depths shallower than 500-750 m. At these and shallower depths, subcritical CO{sub 2} can form two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}, with significant latent heat effects during boiling and condensation. Additional strongly non-isothermal effects can arise from decompression of gas-like subcritical CO{sub 2}, the so-called Joule-Thomson effect. Integrated modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage requires the ability to model non-isothermal flows of brine and CO{sub 2} at conditions that range from supercritical to subcritical, including three-phase flow of aqueous phase, and both liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate comprehensive simulation capabilities that can cope with all possible phase conditions in brine-CO{sub 2} systems. Our model formulation includes: (1) an accurate description of thermophysical properties of aqueous and CO{sub 2}-rich phases as functions of temperature, pressure, salinity and CO{sub 2} content, including the mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O; (2) transitions between super- and subcritical conditions, including phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}; (3) one-, two-, and three-phase flow of brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including heat flow; (4) non-isothermal effects associated with phase change, mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and water, and (de-) compression effects; and (5) the effects of dissolved NaCl, and the possibility of precipitating solid halite, with associated porosity and permeability change. Applications to specific leakage scenarios demonstrate that the peculiar thermophysical properties of CO{sub 2} provide a potential for positive as well as negative feedbacks on leakage rates, with a combination of self-enhancing and self-limiting effects. Lower viscosity and density of CO{sub 2} as compared to aqueous fluids provides a potential for self-enhancing effects during leakage, while strong cooling effects from liquid CO{sub 2} boiling into gas, and from expansion of gas rising towards the land surface, act to self-limit discharges. Strong interference between fluid phases under three-phase conditions (aqueous - liquid CO{sub 2} - gaseous CO{sub 2}) also tends to reduce CO{sub 2} fluxes. Feedback on different space and time scales can induce non-monotonic behavior of CO{sub 2} flow rates.

  9. 2002 WIPP Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE | facility to prepare an environmental management plan (EMP). This document is | prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment; applicable sections of Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 834, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'' (draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1, which is the driver for the annual Site Environmental Report (SER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP Project is operated by Westinghouse TRU Solutions (WTS) for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of WIPP's effluent and environmental | monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP Project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

  10. Structures, electrical properties, and leakage current behaviors of un-doped and Mn-doped lead-free ferroelectric K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3} films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lingyan, E-mail: l.y.wang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: wren@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Ren, Wei, E-mail: l.y.wang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: wren@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Shi, Peng; Wu, Xiaoqing [Electronic Material Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education and International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead-free ferroelectric un-doped and doped K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3} (KNN) films with different amounts of manganese (Mn) were prepared by a chemical solution deposition method. The thicknesses of all films are about 1.6??m. Their phase, microstructure, leakage current behavior, and electrical properties were investigated. With increasing the amounts of Mn, the crystallinity became worse. Fortunately, the electrical properties were improved due to the decreased leakage current density after Mn-doping. The study on leakage behaviors shows that the dominant conduction mechanism at low electric field in the un-doped KNN film is ohmic mode and that at high electric field is space-charge-limited and Pool-Frenkel emission. After Mn doping, the dominant conduction mechanism at high electric field of KNN films changed single space-charge-limited. However, the introduction of higher amount of Mn into the KNN film would lead to a changed conduction mechanism from space-charge-limited to ohmic mode. Consequently, there exists an optimal amount of Mn doping of 2.0?mol.?%. The 2.0?mol.?% Mn doped KNN film shows the lowest leakage current density and the best electrical properties. With the secondary ion mass spectroscopies and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses, the homogeneous distribution in the KNN films and entrance of Mn element in the lattice of KNN perovskite structure were also confirmed.

  11. Environmental Monitoring Plan: Environmental Monitoring Section. Appendix A, Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents information about the environmental monitoring program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics discussed include: air sampling; air tritium calibrations; storm water discharge; non-storm water discharge; sampling locations; ground water sampling; noise and blast forecasting; analytical laboratory auditing; document retention; procedure writing; quality assurance programs for sampling; soil and sediment sampling; sewage sampling; diversion facility tank sampling; vegetation and foodstuff sampling; and radiological dose assessments.

  12. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring - An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S; Veers, P.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of wind turbine drivetrain condition monitoring based on presentations from a condition monitoring workshop organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2009 and on additional references.

  13. Use of sensors in monitoring civil structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daher, Bassam William, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis surveys the use of sensors and sensor networks in monitoring civil structures, with particular emphasis on the monitoring of bridges and highways using fiber optic sensors. Following a brief review of the most ...

  14. Ultralow-Power Electronics for Cardiac Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turicchia, Lorenzo

    Ultralow-power electronics for cardiac monitoring make possible the development of new light-weight and low-cost devices that are ideal for long-term medical measurements and home-based tele-monitoring services. Nowadays, ...

  15. Evaluation of continuous glucose monitoring systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Guang, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been much hype in the research and development of continuous glucose monitoring technologies, driven by the enormous and rapidly expanding glucose monitoring market and the large and growing base of diabetes ...

  16. Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Transformations Associated with Cr explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological first integrated hydrological wellbore and geophysical tomographic data sets to estimate hydrological

  17. Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 #12;Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 Published: 13 May 2004 Prepared: Michael Bech

  18. Irrigation Monitoring with Soil Water Sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, Juan; Porter, Dana; Peries, Xavier

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring soil water content is essential if growers want to optimize production, conserve water, reduce environmental impacts and save money. This publication illustrates how soil moisture monitoring can improve irrigation decisions and how...

  19. Thermal Monitoring Approaches for Energy Savings Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBride, J. R.; Bohmer, C. J.; Lippman, R. H.; Zern, M. J.

    This paper reviews and summarizes techniques for monitoring thermal energy flows for the purpose of verifying energy savings in industrial and large institutional energy conservation projects. Approaches for monitoring hot and chilled water, steam...

  20. Robotic Platform for Monitoring Underground Cable Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamishev, Alexander

    . to traverse and monitor fiber-optic overhead ground transmission wires (OPGW) above 66kV power transmission

  1. Successes in School Energy Management - Energy Monitoring 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbitt, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the why, what, how and who of the plan ? Implement the Energy Monitoring plan ? Personnel, data system, reporting ? One Experience in Energy Monitoring Developing an Energy Monitoring Plan ? Why do we need to monitor energy? ? What information... is currently available? ? How are we using the information today? Could we be using it more effectively in the future? ? Is there additional information that may be helpful? How would we utilize this information? ? Who is going to manage the information...

  2. Vibration-based structural health monitoring of highway bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guan, Hong

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Principles of Structural Health Monitoring, Class Notes .Web-Based Structural Health Monitoring of a FRP CompositeA Review of Structural Health Monitoring Literature: 1996-

  3. Passive and Active Sensing Technologies for Structural Health Monitoring /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Richard

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    variability on structural health monitoring,” Philos. Trans.Sensing Methods in Structural Health Monitoring for Aircraftof guided wave structural health monitoring systems,” Smart

  4. Wind, Thermal, and Earthquake Monitoring of the Watts Towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    English, Jackson

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paradigm for Vibration-Based Structural Health Monitoring.Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, Stanford, CA,Worden, K (2001) “Structural   Health   Monitoring   Using  

  5. Sensor data analysis and information extraction for structural health monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Linjun

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, StanfordA Review of Structural Health Monitoring Literature: 1996-workshop on structural Health Monitoring: Structural Health

  6. Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Feng, Wei; Lu, Alison; Xia, Jianjun; Yang, Le; Shen, Qi; Im, Piljae; Bhandari, Mahabir

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project aimed to develop a standard methodology for building energy data definition, collection, presentation, and analysis; apply the developed methods to a standardized energy monitoring platform, including hardware and software, to collect and analyze building energy use data; and compile offline statistical data and online real-time data in both countries for fully understanding the current status of building energy use. This helps decode the driving forces behind the discrepancy of building energy use between the two countries; identify gaps and deficiencies of current building energy monitoring, data collection, and analysis; and create knowledge and tools to collect and analyze good building energy data to provide valuable and actionable information for key stakeholders.

  7. SLAMBOT: Structural Health Monitoring Robot using Lamb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Thomas C.

    SLAMBOT: Structural Health Monitoring Robot using Lamb Waves Wenyi Wang, Thomas C. Henderson of a mobile robot and a computational sensor network ap- proach to perform structural health monitoring of ultrasound propagation through the material is used to define two structural health monitoring meth- ods: (1

  8. Center of Excellence in Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center of Excellence in Structural Health Monitoring Inaugural Meeting April 12­13 2007 Nittany, Aeronautics and As- tronautics, is Editor-in-Chief of the Structural Health Monitoring international journal and the organizer of the International Workshops on Structural Health Monitoring. His research interests include

  9. Monitoring and Early Warning for Internet Worms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    of these worms calls for a worm monitoring and early warning system. In this paper we propose the effective algorithms for early warning of the presence of a worm and the correspondent monitoring system. Based1 Monitoring and Early Warning for Internet Worms Cliff C. Zou, Lixin Gao, Weibo Gong, Don Towsley

  10. DATA MONITORING AND ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DATA MONITORING AND ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL LBNL/PUB-5519 (3), Rev. 0 Effective Date: _July 23 Data Monitoring and Analysis Program Manual REVISION HISTORY Revision Date Revision Description #12;LBNL/PUB-5519 (3), Rev. 0 Page 3 of 23 Data Monitoring and Analysis Program Manual TABLE OF CONTENTS

  11. SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW J. E. Santos1, G. B. Savioli2, J. M. Carcione3, D´e, Argentina SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. I Storage of CO2). SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. II CO2 is separated from natural

  12. Refrigeration monitor and alarm system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branz, M.A.; Renaud, P.F.

    1986-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitor is described for a refrigeration system including a heat reclaiming system coupled therewith, comprising: a sensor positioned to detect the level of liquid state refrigerant in the system and provide an electrical output signal therefrom; a digital display for displaying the refrigerant level; first circuit means coupling the digital display to the sensor for actuating the digital display; and lockout means coupled with the sensor for deactivating the heat reclaiming system when a preselected refrigerant level is reached.

  13. Corral Monitoring System assessment results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filby, E.E.; Haskel, K.J.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of a functional and operational assessment of the Corral Monitoring Systems (CMS), which was designed to detect and document accountable items entering or leaving a monitored site. Its development was motivated by the possibility that multiple sites in the nuclear weapons states of the former Soviet Union might be opened to such monitoring under the provisions of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. The assessment was performed at three levels. One level evaluated how well the planned approach addressed the target application, and which involved tracking sensitive items moving into and around a site being monitored as part of an international treaty or other agreement. The second level examined the overall design and development approach, while the third focused on individual subsystems within the total package. Unfortunately, the system was delivered as disassembled parts and pieces, with very poor documentation. Thus, the assessment was based on fragmentary operating data coupled with an analysis of what documents were provided with the system. The system design seemed to be a reasonable match to the requirements of the target application; however, important questions about site manning and top level administrative control were left unanswered. Four weaknesses in the overall design and development approach were detected: (1) poor configuration control and management, (2) inadequate adherence to a well defined architectural standard, (3) no apparent provision for improving top level error tolerance, and (4) weaknesses in the object oriented programming approach. The individual subsystems were found to offer few features or capabilities that were new or unique, even at the conceptual level. The CMS might possibly have offered a unique combination of features, but this level of integration was never realized, and it had no unique capabilities that could be readily extracted for use in another system.

  14. Online circuit breaker monitoring system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djekic, Zarko

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department, Costas N. Georghiades December 2007 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering iii ABSTRACT Online Circuit Breaker Monitoring System. (December 2007) Zarko Djekic, B.S., University of Novi Sad, Serbia Chair of Advisory..., this work would not be possible. I would also like to thank the members of my committee, Dr. Chanan Singh, Dr. Sunil Khatri and Dr. William Lively for their advice and patience. Special thanks also go to Center Point Energy personnel Don Sevcik and John...

  15. Online circuit breaker monitoring system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djekic, Zarko

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department, Costas N. Georghiades December 2007 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering iii ABSTRACT Online Circuit Breaker Monitoring System. (December 2007) Zarko Djekic, B.S., University of Novi Sad, Serbia Chair of Advisory..., this work would not be possible. I would also like to thank the members of my committee, Dr. Chanan Singh, Dr. Sunil Khatri and Dr. William Lively for their advice and patience. Special thanks also go to Center Point Energy personnel Don Sevcik and John...

  16. Transformative monitoring approaches for reprocessing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cipiti, Benjamin B.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The future of reprocessing in the United States is strongly driven by plant economics. With increasing safeguards, security, and safety requirements, future plant monitoring systems must be able to demonstrate more efficient operations while improving the current state of the art. The goal of this work was to design and examine the incorporation of advanced plant monitoring technologies into safeguards systems with attention to the burden on the operator. The technologies examined include micro-fluidic sampling for more rapid analytical measurements and spectroscopy-based techniques for on-line process monitoring. The Separations and Safeguards Performance Model was used to design the layout and test the effect of adding these technologies to reprocessing. The results here show that both technologies fill key gaps in existing materials accountability that provide detection of diversion events that may not be detected in a timely manner in existing plants. The plant architecture and results under diversion scenarios are described. As a tangent to this work, both the AMUSE and SEPHIS solvent extraction codes were examined for integration in the model to improve the reality of diversion scenarios. The AMUSE integration was found to be the most successful and provided useful results. The SEPHIS integration is still a work in progress and may provide an alternative option.

  17. FY 2002 Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Dresel, P Evan; Lindberg, Jonathan W.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Thornton, Edward C.

    2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project and contains: well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders ("surveillance monitoring"); other, established monitoring plans by reference; and a master well/ constituent/frequency matrix for the entire Hanford Site.

  18. Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTIONES2008-54174 This manuscript has

  19. 1990 Weatherization Assistance Program monitoring. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuels, L.S.

    1992-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The fiscal year 1990 DOE weatherization programs were monitored in Indiana, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The focus of the monitoring was on a total of 18 subgrantees. Separate reports on the monitoring completed on each site was submitted as well as the final summary report for each state. The scope of monitoring consisted of a review of current contracts, budgets, program operating procedures, staffing, inventory control, financial and procurement procedures, review of client files and audit reports, inspection of completed dwelling units and assessment of monitoring, training, and technical assistance provided by the grantees. A random sampling of completed units were selected and visits were made to inspect these weatherized dwellings.

  20. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  1. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2010 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, D.J.; Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.; Greger, P.D.; Ostler, W.K.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2010. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2010, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  2. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2011 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, D. J., Anderson, D. C., Hall, D. B., Greger, P. D., Ostler, W. K.

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2011. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2011, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  3. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, W. Kent Ostler

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  4. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2009 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, and W. Kent Ostler

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2009. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2009, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  5. Changes in the chemistry of shallow groundwater related to the 2008 injection of CO2 at the ZERT Field Site, Bozeman, Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharaka, Y.K.; Thordsen, T.T.; Kakouros, E.; Ambats, G.; Herkelrath, W.N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Apps, J.A.; Spycher, N.F.; Zheng, L.; Trautz, R.C.; Rauch, H.W.; Gullickson, K.; Beers, S.R.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 300 kg/day of food-grade CO2 was injected through a perforated pipe placed horizontally 2-2.3 m deep during July 9-August 7, 2008 at the MSU-ZERT field test to evaluate atmospheric and near-surface monitoring and detection techniques applicable to the subsurface storage and potential leakage of CO2. As part of this multidisciplinary research project, 80 samples of water were collected from 10 shallow monitoring wells (1.5 or 3.0 m deep) installed 1-6 m from the injection pipe, at the southwestern end of the slotted section (zone VI), and from two distant monitoring wells. The samples were collected before, during and following CO2 injection. The main objective of study was to investigate changes in the concentrations of major, minor and trace inorganic and organic compounds during and following CO2 injection.

  6. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. Abstract: Infrared (IR) spectroscopy...

  7. Developments on the CENS Structural Health Monitoring Front (SEI 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the CENS Structural Health Monitoring Front M. Kohler, J.framework for structural health monitoring (SHM). hea lth

  8. Mobile sensor network to monitor wastewater collection pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Jungsoo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced pipeline monitoringDesign of mobile pipeline floating sensor “SewerSnortIllustration of mobile pipeline floating sensor monitoring

  9. PASSIVE WIRELESS SURFACE ACOUSTIC WAVE SENSORS FOR MONITORING SEQUESTRATION SITES CO2 EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yizhong; Chyu, Minking; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    University of Pittsburgh’s Transducer lab has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient CO2 measuring technologies for geological sequestration sites leakage monitoring. A passive wireless CO2 sensing system based on surface acoustic wave technology and carbon nanotube nanocomposite was developed. Surface acoustic wave device was studied to determine the optimum parameters. Delay line structure was adopted as basic sensor structure. CNT polymer nanocomposite was fabricated and tested under different temperature and strain condition for natural environment impact evaluation. Nanocomposite resistance increased for 5 times under pure strain, while the temperature dependence of resistance for CNT solely was -1375ppm/?. The overall effect of temperature on nanocomposite resistance was -1000ppm/?. The gas response of the nanocomposite was about 10% resistance increase under pure CO2. The sensor frequency change was around 300ppm for pure CO2. With paralyne packaging, the sensor frequency change from relative humidity of 0% to 100% at room temperature decreased from over 1000ppm to less than 100ppm. The lowest detection limit of the sensor is 1% gas concentration, with 36ppm frequency change. Wireless module was tested and showed over one foot transmission distance at preferred parallel orientation.

  10. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The deep hard rock drilling environment induces severe vibrations into the drillstring, which can cause reduced rates of penetration (ROP) and premature failure of the equipment. The only current means of controlling vibration under varying conditions is to change either the rotary speed or the weight-on-bit (WOB). These changes often reduce drilling efficiency. Conventional shock subs are useful in some situations, but often exacerbate the problems. The objective of this project is development of a unique system to monitor and control drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drilling system. This system has two primary elements: (1) The first is an active vibration damper (AVD) to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations. The hardness of this damper will be continuously adjusted using a robust, fast-acting and reliable unique technology. (2) The second is a real-time system to monitor drillstring vibration, and related parameters. This monitor adjusts the damper according to local conditions. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. The AVD is implemented in a configuration using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. By applying a current to the magnetic coils in the damper, the viscosity of the fluid can be changed rapidly, thereby altering the damping coefficient in response to the measured motion of the tool. Phase I of this program entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. Phase I of the project was completed by the revised end date of May 31, 2004. The objectives of this phase were met, and all prerequisites for Phase II have been completed.

  11. Restoration of the USS Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krop, David (Conservation Project Manager, Mariner' [Conservation Project Manager, Mariner'; s Museum

    2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    David Krop will discuss the ongoing efforts to conserve and exhibit the iconic Civil War ironclad USS Monitor at The Mariners' Museum (http://www.mariner.org/). The presentation will cover past conservation accomplishments by conservators and NOAA specialists, current activities in the lab, and future plans to bring back to life one of the world's most famous warships. Learn about the complex methods and procedures used to treat the ship's revolving gun turret, steam engine, Dahlgren guns and carriages, as well as numerous small artifacts like personal items from the crew.

  12. Radiological Monitoring Continues at WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014 2013 2012Radiological Monitoring

  13. Monitoring and Managing PDSF Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTIONES2008-54174 This manuscriptMonitoring

  14. Final Report: DoE SBIR Phase 2 Low-Cost Small Diameter NMR Technologies for In-Situ Subsurface Characterization and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, David Oliver

    2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Phase 2 SBIR program, Vista Clara successfully developed and field-tested small diameter NNR logging tools for subsurface characterization and monitoring. This effort involved the design and development surface electronics, a winch with 470ft cable, and three interchangeable downhole probes: a 3.5â?ť diameter borehole NMR probe, a 1.67â?ť diameter borehole NMR probe, and a 2.5â?ť diameter NMR probe that can be deployed using a Geoprobe direct push machine. The 3.5â?ť probe was tested extensively over a 6 week period including 4â?ť to 8â?ť boreholes in Washington, Idaho, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, Connecticut and Massachusetts. The field test campaign was highly successful. The 1.67â?ť probe was assembled, tested and calibrated in the laboratory. The 2.5â?ť Geoprobe probe is in final assembly and testing at the time of this report. The completed Phase 2 R&D program has resulted in the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed in boreholes of 4â?ť diameter, the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed in boreholes on 2â?ť diameter, and the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed by a direct push machine. These small diameter tools make NMR logging technically and economically feasible, for the first time. Previously available NMR logging tools were developed for oilfield applications and are prohibitively large and expensive for the majority of near surface groundwater characterization problems.

  15. Acquisition and processing pitfall associated with the clipping of near-surface seismic reflection traces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Steven D.; Steeples, Don W.; Malin, Peter E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TABLE. 10.1190/1.2807051 W1 The first survey was collected using a .22-caliber rifle firing long- rifle ammunition and a shot interval of 20 cm. The second survey was conducted in the same manner using a .223-caliber rifle with a 55-grain bullet... files acquired at the same source location using #2;a#3; a .22-caliber and #2;b#3; a .223-caliber rifle. #2;a#3; Clipped traces are out to 0.6 m from the source. #2;b#3; The clipping reaches as far as 2.0 m. The data are presented without any filtering...

  16. Synoptic analysis of near surface and subsurface temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean following hurricane BETSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Robert Clarence

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pressures Sea Surface Temperature Pattern before Hurricane Betsy 26 Sea Surface Temperature Pattern after Hur ricane Betsy 27 Seven-Day Average Sea Surface Temperatures; 23 - 29 August 1965 28 Seven-Day Average Sea Surface Temperatures; 8 - 14.... SHIIDEO ARE o IS / / / WATER 79'-80' F 73' 72' 71' BT NO. Ie 28 38 48 58 BETSY FIG, IB. SUBSURFACE THERMAL STRUCTURE BEFORE HURRICANE BETSY ALONG SECTION A. 204 21' 22' NORTH LATITUDE 23' 24' 25' 26 27' 28' 82. 5' 80. 5' 100 I 200 IJI IJI IJ...

  17. NEAR-SURFACE HYDROLOGIC RESPONSE FOR A STEEP, UNCHANNELED CATCHMENT NEAR COOS BAY, OREGON: 2.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    con- trolled sprinkling experiments at the Coos Bay 1 (CB1) experimental catchment in the Oregon Coast indicate that the 3D geometry and hydraulic characteris- tics of the layered geologic interfaces at CB1 can-rock hydraulic properties that preclude accurate fracture flow representation. Sensitivity analyses for the CB1

  18. Ring diagram analysis of near-surface flows in the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia; S. C. Tripathy

    1998-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Ring diagram analysis of solar oscillation power spectra obtained from MDI data is carried out to study the velocity fields in the outer part of the solar convection zone. The three dimensional power spectra are fitted to a model which has a Lorentzian profile in frequency and which includes the advection of the wave front by horizontal flows, to obtain the two components of the sub-surface flows as a function of the horizontal wave number and radial order of the oscillation modes. This information is then inverted using OLA and RLS methods to infer the variation in horizontal flow velocity with depth. The average rotation velocity at different latitudes obtained by this technique agrees reasonably with helioseismic estimates made using frequency splitting data. The shear layer just below the solar surface appears to consist of two parts with the outer part up to a depth of 4 Mm, where the velocity gradient does not show any reversal up to a latitude of 60 degrees. In the deeper part the velocity gradient shows reversal in sign around a latitude of 55 degrees. The zonal flow velocities inferred in the outermost layers appears to be similar to those obtained by other measurements. A meridional flow from equator polewards is found. It has a maximum amplitude of about 30 m/s near the surface and the amplitude is nearly constant in the outer shear layer.

  19. Piezoresistive Effect for Near-Surface Eddy Current Residual Stress Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, F.; Nagy, P.B. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0070 (United States)

    2005-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the relationship between isothermal and adiabatic piezoresistive properties of metals. The piezoresistive effect, i.e., stress-dependence of the electrical resistivity, can be exploited for nondestructive residual stress assessment using eddy current measurements. First, the paper establishes the relationship between the familiar isothermal piezoresistivity coefficients measured under uniaxial tension and hydrostatic pressure and the relevant isothermal electroelastic coefficients measured under uniaxial and biaxial stress conditions either by non-directional circular or directional elliptical eddy current coils. In order to quantitatively assess the prevailing residual stress from eddy current conductivity measurements, the electroelastic coefficients must be first determined. These calibration measurements are usually conducted on a reference specimen of the material to be tested using cyclic uniaxial loads between 0.1 and 10 Hz, which is fast enough to produce adiabatic conditions. It is demonstrated that in high-conductivity metals such calibration measurements must be corrected for the thermoelastic effect, which is always positive, i.e., it increases the conductivity in tension, when the material cools down, and reduces it in compression, when the material heats up.

  20. Numerical modeling of elastic wave scattering by near-surface heterogeneities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Muhaidib, Abdulaziz

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A perturbation method for elastic waves and numerical forward modeling are used to calculate the effects of seismic wave scattering from arbitrary shape shallow subsurface heterogeneities. Wave propagation is simulated ...

  1. A model of the near-surface seismic velocity: southern San Joaqin Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferry, James Gerard

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with at Texas A k M. I have learned a great deal from all of these people about life, science and geophysics. Finally, I would like to thank Bill Phelps and the people at Tenneco in Bakersfield for providing the data for this research. TABLE OF CONTENTS... correctional trsveltimes determined with Model B (the inverse model) 44 23. The residual static corrections for the time period from ] 966-1986 . 52 CHAPTER I PROBLEMS AND OBJECTIVES Introduction A preliminary study was done for Tenneco Oil Company...

  2. Interference-based Investigation of Microscopic Objects Near Surfaces: a View From Below 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contreras Naranjo, Jose Clemente

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    in the following. 13 2.3.1 Measurement of RICM set-up parameters Light coming through the objective illuminates the focal area with a cone of light, ???? (as measured on the glass side), given by the size of the aperture stop in the microscope....17 aperture where the top inset shows the illumination cone as seen in air. 14 2.3.2 Scale factor between simulated and experimental intensities Prior to observing the specimens under the microscope, a scale factor between experimental and simulated...

  3. Assessing and Analyzing Near-Surface Radar Snow Accumulation Layers at Summit, Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overly, Thomas Buckmaster

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    depth are compared to physical properties, age-depth relationships, and accumulation rates from ice cores near Summit. Having established the radar horizons as annual accumulation markers, a 350-year record of accumulation rate is derived and analyzed...

  4. PRELIMINARY THERMAL AND THERMOMECHANICAL MODELING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY HEATER EXPERIMENTS AT HANFORD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chan, T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the power generated by a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor)or 1 kW, corresponding to a PWR spent fuel assembly 2.5 andcanister, the heat output of a PWR of spent fuel assembly

  5. Detection of near-surface anisotropy in a weathered metamorphic schist using time-domain electromagnetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Jamie Lynne

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlled-source, azimuthal, time-domain, electromagnetic (TDEM) surveys were conducted over a schist formation with uniformly striking, nearly vertical foliation. Direct current electrical resistivity and seismic refraction surveys provided...

  6. Estimation of Air-Sea Gas and Heat Fluxes from Infrared Imagery Based on Near Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    proposes a simple model of scalar transfer due to stationary two dimensional wind generated turbulent

  7. A Cu/Pt Near-Surface Alloy for Water-Gas Shift Catalysis. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of WGS catalysts could therefore lead to a major leap forward in the realization of hydrogen economy. On the basis of a combination of high-resolution scanning tunneling...

  8. Ion beam modifications of near-surface compositions in ternary alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, N.Q.; Tang, S.; Yacout, A.M.; Rehn, L.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Stubbins, J.F. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA))

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in the surface and subsurface compositions of ternary alloys during elevated-temperature sputtering with inert-gas ions were investigated. Theoretically, a comprehensive kinetic model which includes all the basic processes, such as preferential sputtering, displacement mixing, Gibbsian segregation, radiation-enhanced diffusion and radiation-induced segregation, was developed. This phenomenological approach enabled to predict the effects of each individual process or of a combination of processes on the compositional modification in model alloys. Experimentally, measurements of compositional changes at the surface of a Ag-40at%Au -- 20at%Cu alloy during 3-keV Ne{sup +} bombardment at various temperatures were made, using ion scattering spectroscopy. These measurements were interpreted on the basis of the results of theoretical modeling. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Microgravity exploration for a sediment-filled channel intersecting a near-surface lignite seam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Clifford John

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lignite seam. A 1900 foot line running north and south was located such that 1) the south end was at the location of a core which found 8 feet of lignite at a depth of 60 feet and 2) the north end was at the location of a core which found no nea... of anomalies to the full extent possible with the meter. Selection of the Station Locations A 1900 foot line running north and south was located such that 1) the south end was at the location of a core which found 8 feet of lignite at a depth of 60 feet. 2...

  10. Seasonal dynamics of the near-surface alongshore flow off central Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    for the wind-forcing: the "control run" used long-term monthly mean wind stress and the "no-curl run" used isopycnals upward (downward) toward the east (west) of the wind jet, forcing a northward flow through thermal by predominant equatorward winds, which force upwelling of cold subsurface water near the coast, equatorward

  11. Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Devleena, E-mail: devleenatiwari@ngri.res.in [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India); Kumar, T. Satish [Oil India Limited (India); Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V. [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} < 1), indicating a lack of association of iodine with the surficial organic matter and the possibility of interaction between the seeping hydrocarbons and soil iodine. Further, the distribution pattern of iodine compares well with two surface geochemical indicators: the adsorbed light gaseous hydrocarbons (methane through butane) and the propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

  12. PROBING NEAR-SURFACE ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE WITH LIDAR MEASUREMENTS AND HIGH-RESOLUTION HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. KAO; D. COOPER; ET AL

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As lidar technology is able to provide fast data collection at a resolution of meters in an atmospheric volume, it is imperative to promote a modeling counterpart of the lidar capability. This paper describes an integrated capability based on data from a scanning water vapor lidar and a high-resolution hydrodynamic model (HIGRAD) equipped with a visualization routine (VIEWER) that simulates the lidar scanning. The purpose is to better understand the spatial and temporal representativeness of the lidar measurements and, in turn, to extend their utility in studying turbulence fields in the atmospheric boundary layer. Raman lidar water vapor data collected over the Pacific warm pool and the simulations with the HIGRAD code are used for identifying the underlying physics and potential aliasing effects of spatially resolved lidar measurements. This capability also helps improve the trade-off between spatial-temporal resolution and coverage of the lidar measurements.

  13. Near Surface 2011 17th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    campaigns performed around a housing estate located downstream to an old coke tar site in France. This coke than water, such as chlorinated solvents, wood preservative wastes, coal tar wastes, and pesticides electrical resistivity campaigns performed around a housing estate located downstream an old coke tar site

  14. A synoptic climatology of the near-surface wind along the west coast of South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahn, David A.; Garreaud, René D.

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Prevailing wind along the west coast of South America is equatorward, driven by the southeast Pacific anticyclone. The wind induces strong coastal upwelling that supports one of the most important fisheries in the world. This region lacks a dense...

  15. Scattering Versus Intrinsic Attenuation in the Near Surface: Measurements from Permanent Down-hole Geophones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangriotis, Maria-Daphne

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is a seismic parameter which improves interpretation ofas a seismic parameter to improve the interpretation ofinterpretation of coda-Q measurmenets,” BSSA, Vol. White JE. “Computed seismic

  16. Interference-based Investigation of Microscopic Objects Near Surfaces: a View From Below

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contreras Naranjo, Jose Clemente

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenomena occurring when microscopic objects approach planar surfaces are challenging to probe directly because their dynamics cannot be resolved with a sufficiently high spatial/temporal resolution in a non-invasive way, and suitable techniques...

  17. A comparison of the neuston and near-surface zooplankton in the northwest Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkowitz, Stephen Paul

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was the beli f that the pelagial was homogeneous to a depth of many meters. "Standard" surface tows covered the 0-10 m horizon, of which the 0-10 cm sublayer comprises only 1%. Even when fishing a conical plankton net in a semisubmerged condition... to waves is often exaggerated. " He found that (in the Black Sea) even at wave heights of 2. 5 m the ratio of the numbers of a given species in the 0-5 cm section of a two stage net to the num- bers in the 5-25 cm section (corrected for volume filtered...

  18. Winds of change?: Projections of near-surface winds under climate change scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    that have output available with daily resolution are used here; BCCR-BCM2.0, BCC-CM1, CGCM3.1, CNRM-CM3

  19. Inelastic near-surface interactions. Proceedings of the Werner Brandt workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop is one of an annual series covering penetration phenomena of charged particles in matter. This specific workshop includes electron scattering, ion and atom scattering, stopping powers, and cluster ion impacts on solids. Abstracts were prepared for individual items in the proceedings for inclusion in the data base. (GHT)

  20. HEATER TEST PLANNING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuBois, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the radioactive decay heat of the waste are of crucialused to simulate heat generation from radioactive waste, theheat loads t - be expected from canisters of nuclear waste.

  1. System and method for preparing near-surface heavy oil for extraction using microbial degradation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Busche, Frederick D. (Highland Village, TX); Rollins, John B. (Southlake, TX); Noyes, Harold J. (Golden, CO); Bush, James G. (West Richland, WA)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for enhancing the recovery of heavy oil in an oil extraction environment by feeding nutrients to a preferred microbial species (bacteria and/or fungi). A method is described that includes the steps of: sampling and identifying microbial species that reside in the oil extraction environment; collecting fluid property data from the oil extraction environment; collecting nutrient data from the oil extraction environment; identifying a preferred microbial species from the oil extraction environment that can transform the heavy oil into a lighter oil; identifying a nutrient from the oil extraction environment that promotes a proliferation of the preferred microbial species; and introducing the nutrient into the oil extraction environment.

  2. Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity Measurements in Unlithified Sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rickards, Benjamin Thomas

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    with an average S-wave velocity of 600 ft/sec in the top 30 meters as having a relatively high risk for amplifying destructive earthquake waves (Hunter et al., 2010). S-wave studies have also been used to identify subsidence and liquefaction risks for wind-turbine... the method is more challenging geometrically (Kanli, 2008). In fact, it has become common practice to run geological core samples through CAT scans to help determine composition and image bedforms for oil exploration (Stewart, 1991). Medical...

  3. Analysis of the eect of the coastal discontinuity on near-surface ow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    be frequently violated. Data used herein were collected at an oshore wind farm located at Vindeby, Denmark at a potential oshore wind farm site is not solely dependent on fetch (distance from the coast) but also depends the coast of 1270 and 1630 m (SMS and SMW, respectively). As shown in Fig. 1, the wind farm, which

  4. Modeling and Simulation of Long-Term Performance of Near-Surface Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piet, S. J.; Jacobson, J. J.; Martian, P.; Martineau, R.; Soto, R.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Society has and will continue to generate hazardous wastes whose risks must be managed. For exceptionally toxic, long-lived, and feared waste, the solution is deep burial, e.g., deep geological disposal at Yucca Mtn. For some waste, recycle or destruction/treatment is possible. The alternative for other wastes is storage at or near the ground level (in someone's back yard); most of these storage sites include a surface barrier (cap) to prevent migration of the waste due to infiltration of surface water. The design lifespan for such barriers ranges from 30 to 1000 years, depending on hazard and regulations. In light of historical performance, society needs a better basis for predicting barrier performance over long time periods and tools for optimizing maintenance of barriers while in service. We believe that, as in other industries, better understanding of the dynamics of barrier system degradation will enable improved barriers (cheaper, longer-lived, simpler, easier to maintain) and improved maintenance. We are focusing our research on earthen caps, especially those with evapo-transpiration and capillary breaks. Typical cap assessments treat the barrier's structure as static prior to some defined lifetime. Environmental boundary conditions such as precipitation and temperature are treated as time dependent. However, other key elements of the barrier system are regarded as constant, including engineered inputs (e.g., fire management strategy, irrigation, vegetation control), surface ecology (critical to assessment of plant transpiration), capillary break interface, material properties, surface erosion rate, etc. Further, to be conservative, only harmful processes are typically considered. A more holistic examination of both harmful and beneficial processes will provide more realistic pre-service prediction and in-service assessment of performance as well as provide designers a tool to encourage beneficial processes while discouraging harmful processes. Thus, the INEEL started a new project on long-term barrier integrity in April 2002 that aims to catalyze a Barrier Improvement Cycle (iterative learning and application) and thus enable Remediation System Performance Management (doing the right maintenance neither too early nor too late, prior to system-level failure). This paper describes our computer simulation approach for better understanding the relationships and dynamics between the various components and management decisions in a cap. The simulation is designed to clarify the complex relationships between the various components within the cap system and the various management practices that affect the barrier performance. We have also conceptualized a time-dependent 3-D simulation with rigorous solution to unsaturated flow physics with complex surface boundary conditions.

  5. Modeling and Simulation of Long-Term Performance of Near-Surface Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piet, Steven James; Jacobson, Jacob Jordan; Soto, Rafael; Martian, Pete; Martineau, Richard Charles

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Society has and will continue to generate hazardous wastes whose risks must be managed. For exceptionally toxic, long-lived, and feared waste, the solution is deep burial, e.g., deep geological disposal at Yucca Mtn. For some waste, recycle or destruction/treatment is possible. The alternative for other wastes is storage at or near the ground level (in someone’s back yard); most of these storage sites include a surface barrier (cap) to prevent migration of the waste due to infiltration of surface water. The design lifespan for such barriers ranges from 30 to 1000 years, depending on hazard and regulations. In light of historical performance, society needs a better basis for predicting barrier performance over long time periods and tools for optimizing maintenance of barriers while in service. We believe that, as in other industries, better understanding of the dynamics of barrier system degradation will enable improved barriers (cheaper, longer-lived, simpler, easier to maintain) and improved maintenance. We are focusing our research on earthen caps, especially those with evapo-transpiration and capillary breaks. Typical cap assessments treat the barrier’s structure as static prior to some defined lifetime. Environmental boundary conditions such as precipitation and temperature are treated as time dependent. However, other key elements of the barrier system are regarded as constant, including engineered inputs (e.g., fire management strategy, irrigation, vegetation control), surface ecology (critical to assessment of plant transpiration), capillary break interface, material properties, surface erosion rate, etc. Further, to be conservative, only harmful processes are typically considered. A more holistic examination of both harmful and beneficial processes will provide more realistic pre-service prediction and in-service assessment of performance as well as provide designers a tool to encourage beneficial processes while discouraging harmful processes. Thus, the INEEL started a new project on long-term barrier integrity in April 2002 that aims to catalyze a Barrier Improvement Cycle (iterative learning and application) and thus enable Remediation System Performance Management (doing the right maintenance neither too early nor too late, prior to system-level failure). This paper describes our computer simulation approach for better understanding the relationships and dynamics between the various components and management decisions in a cap. The simulation is designed to clarify the complex relationships between the various components within the cap system and the various management practices that affect the barrier performance. We have also conceptualized a time-dependent 3-D simulation with rigorous solution to unsaturated flow physics with complex surface boundary conditions.

  6. Near-Surface imaging of a hydrogeothermal system at Mount Princeton...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    imaging of a hydrogeothermal system at Mount Princeton, Colorado using 3D seismic, self-potential, and dc resistivity data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  7. PRELIMINARY THERMAL AND THERMOMECHANICAL MODELING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY HEATER EXPERIMENTS AT HANFORD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chan, T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    m from the central heater, distinct steps can be recognizedof the central heater is best described as a series of stepsequential step loading, an array of four secondary heaters

  8. HEATER TEST PLANNING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuBois, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    m from the central heater, distinct steps can be recognizedof sequential step loading, the secondary heaters will beof the central heater is best described as a series of step

  9. Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface Gas

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCityInformationStopwattch

  10. The Near-Surface Hydrothermal Regime of Long Valley Caldera | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformation 2EnergyCityGreen Data

  11. Modeling the Performance of Engineered Systems for Closure and Near-Surface Disposal

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_Cost Estimating35.doc Microsoft2006 |Vehicleof performance cleanup

  12. Near-Surface imaging of a hydrogeothermal system at Mount Princeton,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergy InformationNaturaSystems | Open EnergyColorado

  13. Geochemical Modeling of the Near-Surface Hydrothermal System Beneath the

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas:Webinars/PuestaGenevaGeoLectric Power

  14. Global nuclear material monitoring with NDA and C/S data through integrated facility monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, J.A.; Menlove, H.O.; Argo, P.; Goulding, C.; Klosterbuer, S.; Halbig, J.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on a flexible, integrated demonstration of a monitoring approach for nuclear material monitoring. This includes aspects of item signature identification, perimeter portal monitoring, advanced data analysis, and communication as a part of an unattended continuous monitoring system in an operating nuclear facility. Advanced analysis is applied to the integrated nondestructive assay and containment and surveillance data that are synchronized in time. End result will be the foundation for a cost-effective monitoring system that could provide the necessary transparency even in areas that are denied to foreign nationals of both US and Russia should these processes and materials come under full-scope safeguards or bilateral agreements. Monitoring systems of this kind have the potential to provide additional benefits including improved nuclear facility security and safeguards and lower personnel radiation exposures. Demonstration facilities in this paper include VTRAP-prototype, Los Alamos Critical Assemblies Facility, Kazakhstan BM-350 Reactor monitor, DUPIC radiation monitoring, and JOYO and MONJU radiation monitoring.

  15. Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Feng, Wei; Lu, Alison; Xia, Jianjun; Yang, Le; Shen, Qi; Im, Piljae; Bhandari, Mahabir

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. and China are the world’s top two economics. Together they consumed one-third of the world’s primary energy. It is an unprecedented opportunity and challenge for governments, researchers and industries in both countries to join together to address energy issues and global climate change. Such joint collaboration has huge potential in creating new jobs in energy technologies and services. Buildings in the US and China consumed about 40% and 25% of the primary energy in both countries in 2010 respectively. Worldwide, the building sector is the largest contributor to the greenhouse gas emission. Better understanding and improving the energy performance of buildings is a critical step towards sustainable development and mitigation of global climate change. This project aimed to develop a standard methodology for building energy data definition, collection, presentation, and analysis; apply the developed methods to a standardized energy monitoring platform, including hardware and software, to collect and analyze building energy use data; and compile offline statistical data and online real-time data in both countries for fully understanding the current status of building energy use. This helps decode the driving forces behind the discrepancy of building energy use between the two countries; identify gaps and deficiencies of current building energy monitoring, data collection, and analysis; and create knowledge and tools to collect and analyze good building energy data to provide valuable and actionable information for key stakeholders.

  16. SOUTHERN FINE PARTICULATE MONITORING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report presents results and analysis of continuous onsite ambient fine particulate data at the North Birmingham sampling site during the January-March, 2002 study period. The continuous data include PM{sub 2.5} mass concentrations measured by TEOM, particle sulfate using the R&P 8400S monitor, particle size distributions measured by SMPS and APS monitors, and PM{sub 2.5} light scattering extinction coefficient as measured by nephelometer. Some instrumental issues were noted with the upgrade of the APS model 3320 are described in the report, as well as preliminary performance indications for the upgraded instrument. During the quarter preliminary data analysis and modeling studies were conducted to test the potential of the North Birmingham site data for source attribution analyses. Our initial assessment has continued to be optimistic in this regard due to the location of the site relative to several important classes of local and midrange emission sources. We anticipate that these analyses will provide good separations of the effects of major source classes and spatial source clusters, and will provide useful information relevant to PM{sub 2.5} implementation strategies.

  17. Host Event Based Network Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Chugg

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of INL’s research on this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of a host event based network monitoring tool and the effects on host performance. Current host based network monitoring tools work on polling which can miss activity if it occurs between polls. Instead of polling, a tool could be developed that makes use of event APIs in the operating system to receive asynchronous notifications of network activity. Analysis and logging of these events will allow the tool to construct the complete real-time and historical network configuration of the host while the tool is running. This research focused on three major operating systems commonly used by SCADA systems: Linux, WindowsXP, and Windows7. Windows 7 offers two paths that have minimal impact on the system and should be seriously considered. First is the new Windows Event Logging API, and, second, Windows 7 offers the ALE API within WFP. Any future work should focus on these methods.

  18. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2013 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2013. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed activity sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, and (f) habitat restoration monitoring. During 2013, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  19. Monitoring transients in low inductance circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guilford, R.P.; Rosborough, J.R.

    1985-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The instant invention relates to methods of and apparatus for monitoring transients in low inductance circuits and to a probe utilized to practice said method and apparatus. More particularly, the instant invention relates to methods of and apparatus for monitoring low inductance circuits, wherein the low inductance circuits include a pair of flat cable transmission lines. The instant invention is further directed to a probe for use in monitoring pairs of flat cable transmission lines.

  20. SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    santos

    SEISMIC MONITORING OF. CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW. J. E. Santos. 1. , G. B. Savioli. 2. , J. M. Carcione. 3. , D. Gei. 3. 1. CONICET, IGPUBA, Fac.