National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for near-surface leakage monitoring

  1. Leakage and Seepage in the Near-Surface Environment: An Integrated Approach to Monitoring and Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

    2003-01-01

    SURFACE ENVIRONMENT: AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO MONITORINGand monitoring CO 2 in the near-surface environment.by monitoring and modeling in the near-surface environment

  2. Near Surface Leakage Monitoring for the Verification and Accounting of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Using a Field Ready {sup 14}C Isotopic Analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marino, Bruno

    2014-04-14

    Results for the development of a field ready multi-isotopic analyzer for {sup 12}CO{sub 2}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2} and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and applications for carbon capture and storage (CCS) containment performance are described. A design goal of the field platform was to provide isotopic data with a high data rate, a standardized reference baseline and acceptable precision (e.g., ~ ±50 per mil D{sup 14}CO{sub 2}) for detection and quantification of fossil-fuel CO{sub 2} CCS leakage scenarios. The instrument platform was not designed to replace high precision accelerator mass spectrometry. An additional goal was to combine project scale isotopic data and associated fluxes with unique financial instruments linking CCS containment performance to a publicly traded security providing project revenue to stakeholders. While the primary goals of the project were attained additional work is needed for the instrument platform and deployment within a full scale CCS site that was not available during the project timeframe.

  3. Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoring and Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2008-01-01

    1977. Chemistry and Geothermal Systems. Academic Press, Newfor detecting hidden geothermal systems by near-surface gasto Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoring and

  4. Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-01-19

    ''Hidden'' geothermal systems are systems devoid of obvious surface hydrothermal manifestations. Emissions of moderate-to-low solubility gases may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. We investigate the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring below and above ground in the near-surface environment as an approach to exploration targeting hidden geothermal systems. We focus on CO2 because it is the dominant noncondensible gas species in most geothermal systems and has moderate solubility in water. We carried out numerical simulations of a CO2 migration scenario to calculate the magnitude of expected fluxes and concentrations. Our results show that CO2 concentrations can reach high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low geothermal source CO2 fluxes. However, once CO2 seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, winds are effective at dispersing CO2 seepage. In natural ecological systems in the absence of geothermal gas emissions, near-surface CO2 fluxes and concentrations are predominantly controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, microbial decomposition of soil/subsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange with the atmosphere. Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include the infrared gas analyzer, the accumulation chamber method, the eddy covariance method, hyperspectral imaging, and light detection and ranging. To meet the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring techniques with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. The proposed monitoring plan initially focuses on rapid, economical, reliable measurements of CO2 subsurface concentrations and surface fluxes and statistical analysis of the collected data. Based on this analysis, are as with a high probability of containing geothermal CO2 anomalies can be further sampled and analyzed using more expensive chemical and isotopic methods. Integrated analysis of all measurements will determine definitively if CO2 derived from a deep geothermal source is present, and if so, the spatial extent of the anomaly. The suitability of further geophysical measurements, installation of deep wells, and geochemical analyses of deep fluids can then be determined based on the results of the near surface CO2 monitoring program.

  5. Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2004-12-15

    ''Hidden'' geothermal systems are those systems above which hydrothermal surface features (e.g., hot springs, fumaroles, elevated ground temperatures, hydrothermal alteration) are lacking. Emissions of moderate to low solubility gases (e.g., CO2, CH4, He) may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. Detection of anomalous gas emissions related to hidden geothermal systems may therefore be an important tool to discover new geothermal resources. This study investigates the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring in the subsurface and above ground in the near-surface environment to serve as a tool to discover hidden geothermal systems. We focus the investigation on CO2 due to (1) its abundance in geothermal systems, (2) its moderate solubility in water, and (3) the wide range of technologies available to monitor CO2 in the near-surface environment. However, monitoring in the near-surface environment for CO2 derived from hidden geothermal reservoirs is complicated by the large variation in CO2 fluxes and concentrations arising from natural biological and hydrologic processes. In the near-surface environment, the flow and transport of CO2 at high concentrations will be controlled by its high density, low viscosity, and high solubility in water relative to air. Numerical simulations of CO2 migration show that CO2 concentrations can reach very high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low geothermal source CO2 fluxes. However, once CO2 seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, surface winds are effective at dispersing CO2 seepage. In natural ecological systems in the absence of geothermal gas emissions, near-surface CO2 fluxes and concentrations are primarily controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, and microbial decomposition of soil/subsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange with the atmosphere. Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include (1) the infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) for measurement of concentrations at point locations, (2) the accumulation chamber (AC) method for measuring soil CO2 fluxes at point locations, (3) the eddy covariance (EC) method for measuring net CO2 flux over a given area, (4) hyperspectral imaging of vegetative stress resulting from elevated CO2 concentrations, and (5) light detection and ranging (LIDAR) that can measure CO2 concentrations over an integrated path. Technologies currently in developmental stages that have the potential to be used for CO2 monitoring include tunable lasers for long distance integrated concentration measurements and micro-electronic mechanical systems (MEMS) that can make widespread point measurements. To address the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring methodologies with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. Within the area targeted for geothermal exploration, point measurements of soil CO2 fluxes and concentrations using the AC method and a portable IRGA, respectively, and measurements of net surface flux using EC should be made. Also, the natural spatial and temporal variability of surface CO2 fluxes and subsurface CO2 concentrations should be quantified within a background area with similar geologic, climatic, and ecosystem characteristics to the area targeted for geothermal exploration. Statistical analyses of data collected from both areas should be used to guide sampling strategy, discern spatial patterns that may be indicative of geothermal CO2 emissions, and assess the presence (or absence) of geothermal CO2 within the natural background variability with a desired confidence level. Once measured CO2 concentrations and fluxes have been determined to be of anomalous geothermal origin with high confidence, more expensive vertical subsurface gas sampling and chemical and isotopic analyses can be undertaken. Integrated analysis of all measurements will d

  6. Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-01-01

    1977), Chemistry and Geothermal Systems, Academic Press, Newgas species in most geothermal systems and has moderatefor detecting hidden geothermal systems by near-surface gas

  7. Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoring and Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2008-01-01

    in volcanic and geothermal areas. Appl. Geochem. , 13, 543–1977. Chemistry and Geothermal Systems. Academic Press, Newfor detecting hidden geothermal systems by near-surface gas

  8. Functions and requirements for Hanford single-shell tank leakage detection and monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwatate, D.F., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31

    This document applies the System Engineering process to define the functions and requirements for single shell tank (SST) leakage detection, monitoring and mitigation during the initial SST retrieval sequence.

  9. Functions and requirements for Hanford single-shell tank leakage detection and monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruse, J.M.; Ohl, P.C.

    1995-04-19

    This document provides the initial functions and requirements for leakage detection and monitoring applicable to past and potential future leakage from the Hanford Site`s 149 single-shell high-level waste tanks. This mission is a part of the overall mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Waste Remediation System division to remediate the tank waste in a safe and acceptable manner. Systems engineering principles are being applied to this effort. This document reflects the an initial step in the systems engineering approach to decompose the mission into primary functions and requirements. The document is considered approximately 30% complete relative to the effort required to produce a final version that can be used to support demonstration and/or procurement of technologies. The functions and requirements in this document apply to detection and monitoring of below ground leaks from SST containment boundaries and the resulting soil contamination. Leakage detection and monitoring is invoked in the TWRS Program in three fourth level functions: (1) Store Waste, (2) Retrieve Waste, and (3) Disposition Excess Facilities (as identified in DOE/RL-92-60 Rev. 1, Tank Waste Remediation System Functions and Requirements).

  10. Atmospheric and soil-gas monitoring for surface leakage at the San Juan Basin CO{sub 2} pilot test site at Pump Canyon New Mexico, using perfluorocarbon tracers, CO{sub 2} soil-gas flux and soil-gas hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. Rodney; Strazisar, Brian R.; Wilson, Thomas; H Stanko, Dennis C.

    2012-05-01

    Near-surface monitoring and subsurface characterization activities were undertaken in collaboration with the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on their San Juan Basin coal-bed methane pilot test site near Navajo City, New Mexico. Nearly 18,407 short tons (1.670 × 107 kg) of CO{sub 2} were injected into 3 seams of the Fruitland coal between July 2008 and April 2009. Between September 18 and October 30, 2008, two additions of approximately 20 L each of perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracers were mixed with the CO{sub 2} at the injection wellhead. PFC tracers in soil-gas and in the atmosphere were monitored over a period of 2 years using a rectangular array of permanent installations. Additional monitors were placed near existing well bores and at other locations of potential leakage identified during the pre-injection site survey. Monitoring was conducted using sorbent containing tubes to collect any released PFC tracer from soil-gas or the atmosphere. Near-surface monitoring activities also included CO{sub 2} surface flux and carbon isotopes, soil-gas hydrocarbon levels, and electrical conductivity in the soil. The value of the PFC tracers was demonstrated when a significant leakage event was detected near an offset production well. Subsurface characterization activities, including 3D seismic interpretation and attribute analysis, were conducted to evaluate reservoir integrity and the potential that leakage of injected CO{sub 2} might occur. Leakage from the injection reservoir was not detected. PFC tracers made breakthroughs at 2 of 3 offset wells which were not otherwise directly observable in produced gases containing 20–30% CO{sub 2}. These results have aided reservoir geophysical and simulation investigations to track the underground movement of CO{sub 2}. 3D seismic analysis provided a possible interpretation for the order of appearance of tracers at production wells.

  11. Sources for Pu in near surface air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmann, G.; Thom, C.; Baechmann, K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides evidence that most of the Pu in the near surface air today is due to resuspension. Vertical and particle size distribution in near surface air over a period of three years were measured. The seasonal variations of Pu in air and the influence of meteorological parameters on these variations are shown. Samples were taken before the Chernobyl accident in an area where only Pu fallout from the atmospheric nuclear tests of the early sixties occurs. The comparison of the behavior of Pu with other trace elements, which were also measured, showed similar behavior of Pu and elements like Ca, Ti and Fe in near surface air. This confirms that most Pu is resuspended because the main source for these elements in air is the soil surface. Resuspension factors and resuspension rate are estimated for all measured elements. A resuspension factor of 0.8 X 10(-8) m-1 and a resuspension rate of 0.09 X 10(-9) s-1 is calculated for Pu.

  12. Design Support of an Above Cap-rock Early Detection Monitoring System using Simulated Leakage Scenarios at the FutureGen2.0 Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; USA, Richland Washington; Vermuel, Vince R.; USA, Richland Washington; Oostrom, Mart; USA, Richland Washington; Porse, Sean L.; USA, Richland Washington; Thorne, Paul D.; USA, Richland Washington; Szecsody, Jim E.; USA, Richland Washington; Horner, Jake A.; USA, Richland Washington; Gilmore, Tyler J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-31

    The FutureGen 2.0 Project will design and build a first-of-its-kind, near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS). To assess storage site performance and meet the regulatory requirements of the Class VI Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program for CO2 Geologic Sequestration, the FutureGen 2.0 project will implement a suite of monitoring technologies designed to evaluate CO2 mass balance and detect any unforeseen loss in CO2 containment. The monitoring program will include direct monitoring of the reservoir, and early-leak-detection monitoring directly above the primary confining zone. This preliminary modeling study described here focuses on hypothetical leakage scenarios into the first permeable unit above the primary confining zone (Ironton Sandstone) and is used to support assessment of early-leak detection capabilities. Future updates of the model will be used to assess potential impacts on the lowermost underground source of drinking water (Saint Peter Sandstone) for a range of theoretical leakage scenarios. This preliminary modeling evaluation considers both pressure response and geochemical signals in the overlying Ironton Sandstone. This model is independent of the FutureGen 2.0 reservoir model in that it does not simulate caprock discontinuities, faults, or failure scenarios. Instead this modeling effort is based on theoretical, volumetric-rate based leakage scenarios. The scenarios include leakage of 1% of the total injected CO2 mass, but spread out over different time periods (20, 100, and 500 years) with each case yielding a different mass flux (i.e., smaller mass fluxes for longer duration leakage cases]. A brine leakage scenario using a volumetric leakage similar to the 20 year 1% CO2 case was also considered. A framework for the comparison of the various cases was developed based on the exceedance of selected pressure and geochemical thresholds at different distances from the point of leakage and at different vertical positions within the Ironton Sandstone. These preliminary results, and results from an updated models that incorporate additional site-specific characterization data, support development/refinement of the monitoring system design.

  13. Design Support of an Above Cap-rock Early Detection Monitoring System using Simulated Leakage Scenarios at the FutureGen2.0 Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Vermuel, Vince R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Oostrom, Mart [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Porse, Sean L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Thorne, Paul D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Szecsody, Jim E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Horner, Jake A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Gilmore, Tyler J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA

    2014-12-31

    The FutureGen 2.0 Project will design and build a first-of-its-kind, near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS). To assess storage site performance and meet the regulatory requirements of the Class VI Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program for CO2 Geologic Sequestration, the FutureGen 2.0 project will implement a suite of monitoring technologies designed to evaluate CO2 mass balance and detect any unforeseen loss in CO2 containment. The monitoring program will include direct monitoring of the reservoir, and early-leak-detection monitoring directly above the primary confining zone. This preliminary modeling study described here focuses on hypothetical leakage scenarios into the first permeable unit above the primary confining zone (Ironton Sandstone) and is used to support assessment of early-leak detection capabilities. Future updates of the model will be used to assess potential impacts on the lowermost underground source of drinking water (Saint Peter Sandstone) for a range of theoretical leakage scenarios. This preliminary modeling evaluation considers both pressure response and geochemical signals in the overlying Ironton Sandstone. This model is independent of the FutureGen 2.0 reservoir model in that it does not simulate caprock discontinuities, faults, or failure scenarios. Instead this modeling effort is based on theoretical, volumetric-rate based leakage scenarios. The scenarios include leakage of 1% of the total injected CO2 mass, but spread out over different time periods (20, 100, and 500 years) with each case yielding a different mass flux (i.e., smaller mass fluxes for longer duration leakage cases]. A brine leakage scenario using a volumetric leakage similar to the 20 year 1% CO2 case was also considered. A framework for the comparison of the various cases was developed based on the exceedance of selected pressure and geochemical thresholds at different distances from the point of leakage and at different vertical positions within the Ironton Sandstone. These preliminary results, and results from an updated models that incorporate additional site-specific characterization data, support development/refinement of the monitoring system design.

  14. Design Support of an Above Cap-rock Early Detection Monitoring System using Simulated Leakage Scenarios at the FutureGen2.0 Site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Williams, Mark D.; USA, Richland Washington; Vermuel, Vince R.; USA, Richland Washington; Oostrom, Mart; USA, Richland Washington; Porse, Sean L.; USA, Richland Washington; Thorne, Paul D.; USA, Richland Washington; et al

    2014-12-31

    The FutureGen 2.0 Project will design and build a first-of-its-kind, near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS). To assess storage site performance and meet the regulatory requirements of the Class VI Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program for CO2 Geologic Sequestration, the FutureGen 2.0 project will implement a suite of monitoring technologies designed to evaluate CO2 mass balance and detect any unforeseen loss in CO2 containment. The monitoring program will include direct monitoring of the reservoir, and early-leak-detection monitoring directly above the primary confining zone. This preliminary modeling study described here focuses on hypothetical leakage scenarios intomore »the first permeable unit above the primary confining zone (Ironton Sandstone) and is used to support assessment of early-leak detection capabilities. Future updates of the model will be used to assess potential impacts on the lowermost underground source of drinking water (Saint Peter Sandstone) for a range of theoretical leakage scenarios. This preliminary modeling evaluation considers both pressure response and geochemical signals in the overlying Ironton Sandstone. This model is independent of the FutureGen 2.0 reservoir model in that it does not simulate caprock discontinuities, faults, or failure scenarios. Instead this modeling effort is based on theoretical, volumetric-rate based leakage scenarios. The scenarios include leakage of 1% of the total injected CO2 mass, but spread out over different time periods (20, 100, and 500 years) with each case yielding a different mass flux (i.e., smaller mass fluxes for longer duration leakage cases]. A brine leakage scenario using a volumetric leakage similar to the 20 year 1% CO2 case was also considered. A framework for the comparison of the various cases was developed based on the exceedance of selected pressure and geochemical thresholds at different distances from the point of leakage and at different vertical positions within the Ironton Sandstone. These preliminary results, and results from an updated models that incorporate additional site-specific characterization data, support development/refinement of the monitoring system design.« less

  15. The Current Status of Radioactive Waste Management and Planning for Near Surface Disposal in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purnomo, A. S.

    2003-02-24

    Near surface disposal has been practiced for some decades, with a wide variation in sites, types and amounts of wastes, and facility designs employed. Experience has shown that the effective and safe isolation of waste depends on the performance of the overall disposal system, which is formed by three major components or barriers: the site, the disposal facility and the waste form. Near surface disposal also rely on active institutional controls, such as monitoring and maintenance. The objective of radioactive waste disposal is to isolate waste so that it does not result in undue radiation exposure to humans and the environment. The required degree of isolation can be obtained by implementing various disposal methods, of which near surface disposal represents an option commonly used and demonstrated in several countries. In near surface disposal, the disposal facility is located on or below the ground surface, where the protective covering is generally a few meters thick. The se facilities are intended to contain low and intermediate level waste without appreciable quantities of long-lived radionuclides.

  16. NEAR SURFACE WATER CONTENT ESTIMATION USING GPR DATA: INVESTIGATIONS WITHIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    NEAR SURFACE WATER CONTENT ESTIMATION USING GPR DATA: INVESTIGATIONS WITHIN CALIFORNIA VINEYARDS S (sshubbard@lbl.gov) Detailed estimates of water content are necessary for variety of hydrogeological inves to obtain sufficient information about the spatial variation of water content within the root zone using

  17. Stored CO2 and Methane Leakage Risk Assessment and Monitoring Tool Development: CO2 Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Kieki

    2008-09-30

    The primary project goal is to develop and test tools for optimization of ECBM recovery and geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in coalbeds, in addition to tools for monitoring CO{sub 2} sequestration in coalbeds to support risk assessment. Three critical topics identified are (1) the integrity of coal bed methane geologic and engineered systems, (2) the optimization of the coal bed storage process, and (3) reliable monitoring and verification systems appropriate to the special conditions of CO{sub 2} storage and flow in coals.

  18. Persistent Near-Surface Flow Structures from Local Helioseismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howe, R; Baker, D; Harra, L; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L; Bogart, R S

    2015-01-01

    Near-surface flows measured by the ring-diagram technique of local helioseismology show structures that persist over multiple rotations. We examine these phenomena using data from the {\\em Global Oscillation Network Group} (GONG) and the {\\em Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager} (HMI) and show that a correlation analysis of the structures can be used to estimate the rotation rate as a function of latitude, giving a result consistent with the near-surface rate from global helioseismology and slightly slower than that obtained from a similar analysis of the surface magnetic field strength. At latitudes of 60$^{\\circ}$ and above the HMI flow data reveal a strong signature of a two-sided zonal flow structure. This signature may be related to recent reports of "giant cells" in solar convection.

  19. Location of the solar dynamo and near-surface shear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axel Brandenburg

    2005-12-29

    The location of the solar dynamo is discussed in the context of new insights into the theory of nonlinear turbulent dynamos. It is argued that, from a dynamo-theoretic point of view, the bottom of the convection zone is not a likely location and that the solar dynamo may be distributed over the convection zone. The near surface shear layer produces not only east-west field alignment, but it also helps the dynamo disposing of its excess small scale magnetic helicity.

  20. FutureGen 2.0 Monitoring Program: An Overview of the Monitoring Approach and Technologies Selected for Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vince R.; Strickland, Chris E.; Thorne, Paul D.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.; Kelly, Mark E.; Sullivan, Charlotte; Williams, Mark D.; Amonette, James E.; Downs, Janelle L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    The FutureGen 2.0 Project will design and build a first-of-its-kind, near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS). To assess storage site performance and meet the regulatory requirements of the Class VI Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program for CO2 Geologic Sequestration, the FutureGen 2.0 project will implement a suite of monitoring technologies designed to 1) evaluate CO2 mass balance and 2) detect any unforeseen loss in CO2 containment. The monitoring program will include direct monitoring of the injection stream and reservoir, and early-leak-detection monitoring directly above the primary confining zone. It will also implement an adaptive monitoring strategy whereby monitoring results are continually evaluated and the monitoring network is modified as required, including the option to drill additional wells in out-years. Wells will be monitored for changes in CO2 concentration and formation pressure, and other geochemical/isotopic signatures that provide indication of CO2 or brine leakage. Indirect geophysical monitoring technologies that were selected for implementation include passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture logging. Near-surface monitoring approaches that have been initiated include surficial aquifer and surface- water monitoring, soil-gas monitoring, atmospheric monitoring, and hyperspectral data acquisition for assessment of vegetation conditions. Initially, only the collection of baseline data sets is planned; the need for additional near- surface monitoring will be continually evaluated throughout the design and operational phases of the project, and selected approaches may be reinstituted if conditions warrant. Given the current conceptual understanding of the subsurface environment, early and appreciable impacts to near-surface environments are not expected.

  1. Modeling the Near-Surface Using High-Resolution Seismic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Zayer, Ramzy Mohammed

    2010-01-26

    In the Arabian Peninsula, the near-surface represents a major challenge in seismic exploration. For accurate deep subsurface reservoir imaging, an accurate near-surface velocity model is required. In this dissertation, I review the regional geology...

  2. FutureGen 2.0 Monitoring Program: An Overview of the Monitoring Approach and Technologies Selected for Implementation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vermeul, Vince R.; Strickland, Chris E.; Thorne, Paul D.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.; Kelly, Mark E.; Sullivan, Charlotte; Williams, Mark D.; Amonette, James E.; Downs, Janelle L.; et al

    2014-12-31

    The FutureGen 2.0 Project will design and build a first-of-its-kind, near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS). To assess storage site performance and meet the regulatory requirements of the Class VI Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program for CO2 Geologic Sequestration, the FutureGen 2.0 project will implement a suite of monitoring technologies designed to 1) evaluate CO2 mass balance and 2) detect any unforeseen loss in CO2 containment. The monitoring program will include direct monitoring of the injection stream and reservoir, and early-leak-detection monitoring directly above the primary confining zone. It will also implement an adaptive monitoringmore »strategy whereby monitoring results are continually evaluated and the monitoring network is modified as required, including the option to drill additional wells in out-years. Wells will be monitored for changes in CO2 concentration and formation pressure, and other geochemical/isotopic signatures that provide indication of CO2 or brine leakage. Indirect geophysical monitoring technologies that were selected for implementation include passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture logging. Near-surface monitoring approaches that have been initiated include surficial aquifer and surface- water monitoring, soil-gas monitoring, atmospheric monitoring, and hyperspectral data acquisition for assessment of vegetation conditions. Initially, only the collection of baseline data sets is planned; the need for additional near- surface monitoring will be continually evaluated throughout the design and operational phases of the project, and selected approaches may be reinstituted if conditions warrant. Given the current conceptual understanding of the subsurface environment, early and appreciable impacts to near-surface environments are not expected.« less

  3. A SEMI-AUTOMATIC APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING NEAR SURFACE INTERNAL LAYERS FROM SNOW RADAR IMAGERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A SEMI-AUTOMATIC APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING NEAR SURFACE INTERNAL LAYERS FROM SNOW RADAR IMAGERY changing polar ice sheets. Identifying and tracing near surface internal layers in snow radar echograms can developed an approach for semi-automatically esti- mating near surface internal layers in snow radar

  4. Near-surface groundwater responses to injection of geothermal wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, S.C.

    1984-06-01

    Experiences with injecting geothermal fluids have identified technical problems associated with geothermal waste disposal. This report assesses the feasibility of injection as an alternative for geothermal wastewater disposal and analyzes hydrologic controls governing the upward migration of injected fluids. Injection experiences at several geothermal developments are presented, including: Raft River, Salton Sea, East Mesa, Otake and Hatchobaru in Japan, and Ahuachapan in El Salvador. Hydrogeologic and design/operational factors affecting the success of an injection program are identified. Hydrogeologic factors include subsidence, near-surface effects of injected fluids, and seismicity. Design/operational factors include hydrodynamic breakthrough, condition of the injection system and reservoir maintenance. Existing and potential effects of production/injection on these factors are assessed.

  5. The Effects of Realistic Geological Heterogeneity on Seismic Modeling: Applications in Shear Wave Generation and Near-Surface Tunnel Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Christopher Scott

    2014-01-01

    5.1.1 Shear Wave Generation . . . . . 5.1.2 Near SurfaceApplications in Shear Wave Generation and Near-SurfaceApplications in Shear Wave Generation and Near-Surface

  6. Eleana near-surface heater experiment final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lappin, A R; Thomas, R K; McVey, D F

    1981-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a near-surface heater experiment operated at a depth of 23 m in argillite within the Eleana Formation on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The test geometrically simulated emplacement of a single canister of High-Level Waste (HLW) and was operated at a power level of 2.5 kW for 21 days, followed by 3.8 kW to 250 days, when the power was turned off. Below 85 to 100{sup 0}C, there was good agreement between modeled and measured thermal results in the rock and in the emplacement hole, except for transient transport of water in the heater hole. Above 100{sup 0}C, modeled and measured thermal results increasingly diverged, indicating that the in-situ rock-mass thermal conductivity decreased as a result of dehydration more than expected on the basis of matrix properties. Correlation of thermomechanical modeling and field results suggests that this decrease was caused by strong coupling of thermal and mechanical behavior of the argillite at elevated temperatures. No hole-wall decrepitation was observed in the experiment; this fact and the codrrelation of modeled and measured results at lower temperatures indicate that there is no a priori reason to eliminate argillaceous rocks from further consideration as a host rock for nuclear wastes.

  7. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  8. A Semi-Automatic Approach for Estimating Near Surface Internal Layers From Snow Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Semi-Automatic Approach for Estimating Near Surface Internal Layers From Snow Radar Imagery 300 MHz 40 cm 300 m 10 W 20000 ft Patch Array Vivaldi Array Twin-Otter P-3 Snow Radar Snow Cover snow radar echograms #12;Future Work · Improve near surface layer detection algorithms for more data

  9. Elucidating geochemical response of shallow heterogeneous aquifers to CO2 leakage using high-performance computing: Implications for monitoring of CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Siirila, Erica R.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2013-03-01

    Predicting and quantifying impacts of potential carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into shallow aquifers that overlie geologic CO2 storage formations is an important part of developing reliable carbon storage techniques. Leakage of CO2 through fractures, faults or faulty wellbores can reduce groundwater pH, inducing geochemical reactions that release solutes into the groundwater and pose a risk of degrading groundwater quality. In order to help quantify this risk, predictions of metal concentrations are needed during geologic storage of CO2. Here, we present regional-scale reactive transport simulations, at relatively fine-scale, of CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers run on the PFLOTRAN platform using high-performance computing. Multiple realizations of heterogeneous permeability distributions were generated using standard geostatistical methods. Increased statistical anisotropy of the permeability field resulted in more lateral and vertical spreading of the plume of impacted water, leading to increased Pb2+ (lead) concentrations and lower pH at a well down gradient of the CO2 leak. Pb2+ concentrations were higher in simulations where calcite was the source of Pb2+ compared to galena. The low solubility of galena effectively buffered the Pb2+ concentrations as galena reached saturation under reducing conditions along the flow path. In all cases, Pb2+ concentrations remained below the maximum contaminant level set by the EPA. Results from this study, compared to natural variability observed in aquifers, suggest that bicarbonate (HCO3) concentrations may be a better geochemical indicator of a CO2 leak under the conditions simulated here.

  10. Acquisition and processing pitfall associated with the clipping of near-surface seismic reflection traces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Steven D.; Steeples, Don W.; Malin, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    The processing of clipped seismic traces may produce high-frequency wavelets that can be misinterpreted as reflections in filtered shot gathers and common-midpoint (CMP) stacked sections. To illustrate this effect, a near-surface CMP seismic...

  11. Near-Surface imaging of a hydrogeothermal system at Mount Princeton...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Near-Surface imaging of a hydrogeothermal system at Mount Princeton, Colorado using 3D seismic, self-potential, and dc resistivity data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  12. Wavefield Analysis of Rayleigh Waves for Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Chong

    2011-05-18

    Shear (S)-wave velocity is a key property of near-surface materials and is the fundamental parameter for many environmental and engineering geophysical studies. Directly acquiring accurate S-wave velocities from a seismic shot gather is usually...

  13. Determination of leakage areas in nuclear piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keim, E.

    1997-04-01

    For the design and operation of nuclear power plants the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of a piping component has to be shown. This means that the length of a crack resulting in a leak is smaller than the critical crack length and that the leak is safely detectable by a suitable monitoring system. The LBB-concept of Siemens/KWU is based on computer codes for the evaluation of critical crack lengths, crack openings, leakage areas and leakage rates, developed by Siemens/KWU. In the experience with the leak rate program is described while this paper deals with the computation of crack openings and leakage areas of longitudinal and circumferential cracks by means of fracture mechanics. The leakage areas are determined by the integration of the crack openings along the crack front, considering plasticity and geometrical effects. They are evaluated with respect to minimum values for the design of leak detection systems, and maximum values for controlling jet and reaction forces. By means of fracture mechanics LBB for subcritical cracks has to be shown and the calculation of leakage areas is the basis for quantitatively determining the discharge rate of leaking subcritical through-wall cracks. The analytical approach and its validation will be presented for two examples of complex structures. The first one is a pipe branch containing a circumferential crack and the second one is a pipe bend with a longitudinal crack.

  14. Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2004-01-01

    Mahon, Chemistry and Geothermal Systems, Academic Press, NewHidden Geothermal Systems geothermal origin. However, thesefor Detection of Hidden Geothermal Systems Figure 7.4.

  15. Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, microbial decomposition of soilsubsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange...

  16. Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures Ltd Jump to:InformationNdunga Geothermal Power PlantSystems |

  17. Leakage pathway layer for solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luan, Andy; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter; Sun, Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Leakage pathway layers for solar cells and methods of forming leakage pathway layers for solar cells are described.

  18. Near-Surface Eddy Heat and Momentum Fluxes in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in Drake Passage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprintall, Janet

    Near-Surface Eddy Heat and Momentum Fluxes in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in Drake Passage Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) momentum balance. The observations span 7 yr and are compared to eddy Current (ACC) pathway is marked by exceptionally high mesoscale eddy activity (e.g., Stammer 1998; Hughes

  19. Near-Surface Microearthquakes at The Geysers Geothermal Field, California James T. Rutledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to permeability in geothermal reservoirs, the ability to map them at large distance from boreholes has direct-1- Near-Surface Microearthquakes at The Geysers Geothermal Field, California James T. Rutledge# 00-1554 Keywords: Induced seismicity, microearthquake, wellbore deformation, geothermal #12;Near

  20. Geophysical Prospecting 38,621-63 1,199O ALIGNMENT OF NEAR-SURFACE INCLUSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    GEOMETRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL HOT-DRY-ROCK EXPERIMENTS' STUART CRAMPIN AB S T R A C T CRAMPIN, S. 1990. Alignment of near-surface inclusions and appropriate crack geometries for geothermal hot-dry-rock experiments that the EDA-cracks and hydraulic fractures are typically aligned vertically, striking parallel, or subparallel

  1. Near surface stoichiometry in UO2: A density functional theory study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Jianguo; Valderrama, Billy; Henderson, Hunter B.; Manuel, Michele V.; Allen, Todd

    2015-08-01

    The mechanisms of oxygen stoichiometry variation in UO2 at different temperature and oxygen partial pressure are important for understanding the dynamics of microstructure in these crystals. However, very limited experimental studies have been performed to understand the atomic structure of UO2 near surface and defect effects of near surface on stoichiometry in which the system can exchange atoms with the external reservoir. In this study, the near (110) surface relaxation and stoichiometry in UO2 have been studied with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On the basis of the point-defect model (PDM), a general expression for the near surface stoichiometric variationmore »is derived by using DFT total-energy calculations and atomistic thermodynamics, in an attempt to pin down the mechanisms of oxygen exchange between the gas environment and defected UO2. By using the derived expression, it is observed that, under poor oxygen conditions, the stoichiometry of near surface is switched from hyperstoichiometric at 300 K with a depth around 3 nm to near-stoichiometric at 1000 K and hypostoichiometric at 2000 K. Furthermore, at very poor oxygen concentrations and high temperatures, our results also suggest that the bulk of the UO2 prefers to be hypostoichiometric, although the surface is near-stoichiometric.« less

  2. Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake on Earth. We report on new studies of Don Juan Pond (DJP), which exists at the upper limit of ephemeral on Juan Pond (DJP), found at the lowest point in the South Fork of Upper Wright Valley, Antarctica (Figure

  3. Near Surface Stoichiometry in UO 2 : A Density Functional Theory Study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Jianguo; Valderrama, Billy; Henderson, Hunter B.; Manuel, Michele V.; Allen, Todd

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of oxygen stoichiometry variation in UO2at different temperature and oxygen partial pressure are important for understanding the dynamics of microstructure in these crystals. However, very limited experimental studies have been performed to understand the atomic structure of UO2near surface and defect effects of near surface on stoichiometry in which the system can exchange atoms with the external reservoir. In this study, the near (110) surface relaxation and stoichiometry in UO2have been studied with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On the basis of the point-defect model (PDM), a general expression for the near surface stoichiometric variation is derived bymore »using DFT total-energy calculations and atomistic thermodynamics, in an attempt to pin down the mechanisms of oxygen exchange between the gas environment and defected UO2. By using the derived expression, it is observed that, under poor oxygen conditions, the stoichiometry of near surface is switched from hyperstoichiometric at 300?K with a depth around 3?nm to near-stoichiometric at 1000?K and hypostoichiometric at 2000?K. Furthermore, at very poor oxygen concentrations and high temperatures, our results also suggest that the bulk of the UO2prefers to be hypostoichiometric, although the surface is near-stoichiometric.« less

  4. Effect of Missing Data on Estimates of Near-Surface Temperature Change Since 1900

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamath, Chandrika

    Effect of Missing Data on Estimates of Near-Surface Temperature Change Since 1900 P.B. Duffy*, C climate perturbations, the temperature change from globally complete model output is significantly larger integrations, which simulate internal climate variability only (omitting changes in greenhouse gases

  5. Dear Susan, On behalf of the entire Near Surface Geophysics Section (NSGS) of the Society of Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dear Susan, On behalf of the entire Near Surface Geophysics Section (NSGS) of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and Environmental and Engineering Geophysical Society (EEGS), I would like extraordinary leadership in advancing the cause of near surface geophysics through longterm, tireless

  6. AIR LEAKAGE OF NEWLY INSTALLED RESIDENTIAL WINDOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidt, John

    2013-01-01

    Tables 2.0.2a 2.0.2b PAGE Air Leakage Through Sash/FrameOperation Types . . . . . Air Leakage of Installed WindowsComparison of Window Types Air Leakage Performance of

  7. HEATER TEST PLANNING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuBois, A.

    2010-01-01

    A borehole liner. Temperature monitoring equipment. Athermocouples for monitoring the temperature of the can­thermocouple for monitoring the temperature of the borewall,

  8. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  9. Scoping survey of perceived concerns, issues, and problems for near-surface disposal of FUSRAP waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, J.E.; Gilbert, T.L.

    1982-12-01

    This report is a scoping summary of concerns, issues, and perceived problems for near-surface disposal of radioactive waste, based on a survey of the current literature. Near-surface disposal means land burial in or within 15 to 20 m of the earth's surface. It includes shallow land burial (burial in trenches, typically about 6 m deep with a 2-m cap and cover) and some intermediate-depth land burial (e.g., trenches and cap similar to shallow land burial, but placed below 10 to 15 m of clean soil). Proposed solutions to anticipated problems also are discussed. The purpose of the report is to provide a better basis for identifying and evaluating the environmental impacts and related factors that must be analyzed and compared in assessing candidate near-surface disposal sites for FUSRAP waste. FUSRAP wastes are of diverse types, and their classification for regulatory purposes is not yet fixed. Most of it may be characterized as low-activity bulk solid waste, and is similar to mill tailings, but with somewhat lower average specific activity. It may also qualify as Class A segregated waste under the proposed 10 CFR 61 rules, but the parent radionuclides of concern in FUSRAP (primarily U-238 and Th-232) have longer half-lives than do the radionuclides of concern in most low-level waste. Most of the references reviewed deal with low-level waste or mill tailings, since there is as yet very little literature in the public domain on FUSRAP per se.

  10. Method of detecting leakage from geologic formations used to sequester CO.sub.2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Curt (Pittsburgh, PA); Wells, Arthur (Bridgeville, PA); Diehl, J. Rodney (Pittsburgh, PA); Strazisar, Brian (Venetia, PA)

    2010-04-27

    The invention provides methods for the measurement of carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs. Tracer moieties are injected along with carbon dioxide into geological formations. Leakage is monitored by gas chromatographic analyses of absorbents. The invention also provides a process for the early leak detection of possible carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs by measuring methane (CH.sub.4), ethane (C.sub.2H.sub.6), propane (C.sub.3H.sub.8), and/or radon (Rn) leakage rates from the reservoirs. The invention further provides a method for branding sequestered carbon dioxide using perfluorcarbon tracers (PFTs) to show ownership.

  11. Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2012-07-09

    Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

  12. Combined UHV/high-pressure catalysis setup for depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization and catalytic testing of model catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayr, Lukas; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon; Rameshan, Raffael; Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin ; Rameshan, Christoph; Institute of Materials Chemistry, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/BC/01, 1060 Vienna

    2014-05-15

    An ultra-high vacuum (UHV) setup for “real” and “inverse” model catalyst preparation, depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization, and quantification of catalytic activity and selectivity under technologically relevant conditions is described. Due to the all-quartz reactor attached directly to the UHV-chamber, transfer of the catalyst for in situ testing without intermediate contact to the ambient is possible. The design of the UHV-compatible re-circulating batch reactor setup allows the study of reaction kinetics under close to technically relevant catalytic conditions up to 1273 K without contact to metallic surfaces except those of the catalyst itself. With the attached differentially pumped exchangeable evaporators and the quartz-microbalance thickness monitoring equipment, a reproducible, versatile, and standardised sample preparation is possible. For three-dimensional near-surface sample characterization, the system is equipped with a hemispherical analyser for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron-beam or X-ray-excited Auger-electron spectroscopy, and low-energy ion scattering measurements. Due the dedicated geometry of the X-ray gun (54.7°, “magic angle”) and the rotatable sample holder, depth analysis by angle-resolved XPS measurements can be performed. Thus, by the combination of characterisation methods with different information depths, a detailed three-dimensional picture of the electronic and geometric structure of the model catalyst can be obtained. To demonstrate the capability of the described system, comparative results for depth-resolved sample characterization and catalytic testing in methanol steam reforming on PdGa and PdZn near-surface intermetallic phases are shown.

  13. Understanding Spatio-Temporal Variability and Associated Physical Controls of Near-Surface Soil Moisture in Different Hydro-Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Champa

    2013-05-06

    Near-surface soil moisture is a key state variable of the hydrologic cycle and plays a significant role in the global water and energy balance by affecting several hydrological, ecological, meteorological, geomorphologic, ...

  14. Adsorbed sulfur-gas methods for both near-surface exploration and downhole logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farwell, S.O.; Barinaga, C.J.; Dolenc, M.R.; Farwell, G.H.

    1986-08-01

    The use of sulfur-containing gases in petroleum exploration is supported by (1) the idea that sulfur may play a role in petroleum genesis, (2) the corresponding existence of sulfur-containing compounds in petroleum and the potential for vertical migration of the low-molecular-weight sulfur species from these reservoirs, (3) the production of H/sub 2/S by anaerobic microorganism populations that develop in the subsurface areas overlying petroleum reservoirs due to the concomitant supply of hydrocarbon nutrients, (4) the recent discovery of near-surface accumulations of pyrite and marcasite as the source of induction potential anomalies over certain fields, and (5) the strong adsorptive affinities of sulfur gases to solid surfaces, which enhance both the concentration and localization of such sulfur-expressed anomalies. During the past 3 years, numerous near-surface soil samples and well cuttings from the Utah-Wyoming Overthrust belt have been analyzed for adsorbed sulfur-gas content by two novel analytical techniques: thermal desorption/metal foil collection/flash desorption/sulfur-selective detection (TD/MFC/FD/SSD) and thermal desorption/cryogenic preconcentration/high-resolution-gas chromatography/optimized-flame photometry (TD/CP/HRGC/OFP).

  15. Transitions from near-surface to interior redox upon lithiation in conversion electrode materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Kai [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xin, Huolin L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhao, Kejie [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Yu, Xiqian [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Norlund, Dennis [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Weng, Tsu-Chien [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Li, Jing [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Jiang, Yi [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Cadigan, Christopher A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Richards, Ryan M. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Doeff, Marca M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stach, Eric A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Li, Ju [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lin, Feng [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Su, Dong [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2015-02-11

    Nanoparticle electrodes in lithium-ion batteries have both near-surface and interior contributions to their redox capacity, each with distinct rate capabilities. Using combined electron microscopy, synchrotron X-ray methods and ab initio calculations, we have investigated the lithiation pathways that occur in NiO electrodes. We find that the near-surface electroactive (Ni˛??Ni?) sites saturated very quickly, and then encounter unexpected difficulty in propagating the phase transition into the electrode (referred to as a “shrinking-core” mode). However, the interior capacity for Ni˛??Ni? can be accessed efficiently following the nucleation of lithiation “fingers” which propagate into the sample bulk, but only after a certain incubation time. Our microstructural observations of the transition from a slow shrinking-core mode to a faster lithiation finger mode corroborate with synchrotron characterization of large-format batteries, and can be rationalized by stress effects on transport at high-rate discharge. The finite incubation time of the lithiation fingers sets the intrinsic limitation for the rate capability (and thus the power) of NiO for electrochemical energy storage devices. The present work unravels the link between the nanoscale reaction pathways and the C-rate-dependent capacity loss, and provides guidance for the further design of battery materials that favors high C-rate charging.

  16. Transitions from near-surface to interior redox upon lithiation in conversion electrode materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Kai; Xin, Huolin L.; Zhao, Kejie; Yu, Xiqian; Norlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Li, Jing; Jiang, Yi; Cadigan, Christopher A.; Richards, Ryan M.; et al

    2015-01-29

    Nanoparticle electrodes in lithium-ion batteries have both near-surface and interior contributions to their redox capacity, each with distinct rate capabilities. Using combined electron microscopy, synchrotron X-ray methods and ab initio calculations, we have investigated the lithiation pathways that occur in NiO electrodes. We find that the near-surface electroactive (Ni˛??Ni?) sites saturated very quickly, and then encounter unexpected difficulty in propagating the phase transition into the electrode (referred to as a “shrinking-core” mode). However, the interior capacity for Ni˛??Ni? can be accessed efficiently following the nucleation of lithiation “fingers” which propagate into the sample bulk, but only after a certain incubationmore »time. Our microstructural observations of the transition from a slow shrinking-core mode to a faster lithiation finger mode corroborate with synchrotron characterization of large-format batteries, and can be rationalized by stress effects on transport at high-rate discharge. The finite incubation time of the lithiation fingers sets the intrinsic limitation for the rate capability (and thus the power) of NiO for electrochemical energy storage devices. The present work unravels the link between the nanoscale reaction pathways and the C-rate-dependent capacity loss, and provides guidance for the further design of battery materials that favors high C-rate charging.« less

  17. Residual Magnetic Flux Leakage: A Possible Tool for Studying Pipeline Defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clapham, Lynann

    flux leakage (MFL) technique is frequently used for in-service monitoring of oil and gas steel of the pipeline mater- ial, and running conditions such as velocity and stress.(6) A typical peak-to-peak value

  18. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, P.N.

    2011-01-01

    Canada Method Leakage Measurement Units ACH ACH ACH ACH ACHReference Study Leakage Measurement Units ACH ACH ACH ACHKing Reference Leakage Measurement Units ACH ACH ACH ACH ACH

  19. Investigation of stepped labyrinth seal leakage performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Thomas Stanley

    1993-01-01

    Leakage resistance of advanced design, stepped labyrinth seals has been examined based on geometric considerations. Leakage measurements were obtained in an attempt to identify geometric and flow characteristics contributing to a desired seal...

  20. Air leakage of Insulated Concrete Form houses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durschlag, Hannah (Hanna Rebekah)

    2012-01-01

    Air leakage has been shown to increase building energy use due to additional heating and cooling loads. Although many construction types have been examined for leakage, an exploration of a large number of Insulated Concrete ...

  1. STATE OF CALIFORNIA VALVE LEAKAGE TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA VALVE LEAKAGE TEST CEC-MECH-8A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE MECH-8A NA7.5.7 Valve Leakage Test (Page 1 of 3) Project Name/Address: System Name VALVE LEAKAGE TEST CEC-MECH-8A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE

  2. Near-surface neotectonic deformation associated with seismicity in the northeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, S.S.; Gold, D.P.; Gardner, T.W.; Slingerland, R.L.; Thornton, C.P. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA). Dept. of Geosciences)

    1989-10-01

    For the Lancaster, PA seismic zone a multifaceted investigation revealed several manifestations of near-surface, neotectonic deformation. Remote sensing data together with surface geological and geophysical observations, and recent seismicity reveal that the neotectonic deformation is concentrated in a NS-trending fault zone some 50 km in length and 10--20 km in width. Anomalies associated with this zone include distinctive lineament and surface erosional patterns; geologically recent uplift evidenced by elevations of stream terraces along the Susquehanna River; and localized contemporary travertine deposits in streams down-drainage from the inferred active fault zone. In the Moodus seismic zone the frequency of tectonically-controlled lineaments was observed to increase in the Moodus quadrangle compared to adjacent areas and dominant lineament directions were observed that are perpendicular and parallel to the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress direction (N80-85E) recently determined from in-situ stress measurements in a 1.5 km-deep borehole in the seismic zone and from well-constrained earthquake focal mechanisms. 284 refs., 33 figs.

  3. Gas Generation and Release in Near-Surface Repository at Armenian NPP - 13372

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoryan, G.; Amirjanyan, A.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Gondakyan, Y.

    2013-07-01

    The potential nuclear waste repository at Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP) can store Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive waste (LL/ILW). In this kind of near-surface repository for radioactive waste, significant quantities of gases may be generated as a result of microbial degradation and corrosion. A discussion is presented of the microbial and chemical degradation of cellulose. For the release of gas, it is assumed that the complete conversion of cellulosic wastes to gases by the action of microbes, is, in principle, permitted. Released radioactive gases such as {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and {sup 14}CH{sub 4} could have a direct pathway to the atmosphere. The potential impact of gas generation, accumulation and migration on the long-term of repository, should therefore be assessed properly. We present here safety assessment result of gas producing radioactive waste disposal by the inhalation dose to a maximally exposed individual above ground, based on some conservative assumptions about release from waste as well as gas generation calculations. (authors)

  4. Mineral formation and redox-sensitive trace elements in a near-surface hydrothermal alteration system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehring, A.U.; Schosseler, P.M.; Weidler, P.G.

    1999-07-01

    A recent hydrothermal mudpool at the southwestern slope of the Rincon de la Vieja volcano in Northwest Costa Rica exhibits an argillic alteration system formed by intense interaction of sulfuric acidic fluids with wall rock materials. Detailed mineralogical analysis revealed an assemblage with kaolinite, alunite, and opal-C as the major mineral phases. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) showed 3 different redox-sensitive cations associated with the mineral phases, Cu{sup +} is structure-bound in opal-C, whereas VO{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} are located in the kaolinite structure. The location of the redox-sensitive cations in different minerals of the assemblage is indicative of different chemical conditions. The formation of the alteration products can be described schematically as a 2-step process. In a first step alunite and opal-C were precipitated in a fluid with slightly reducing conditions and a low chloride availability. The second step is characterized by a decrease in K{sup +} activity and subsequent formation of kaolinite under weakly oxidizing to oxidizing redox conditions as indicated by structure-bound VO{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}. The detection of paramagnetic trace elements structure-bound in mineral phases by EPR provide direct information about the prevailing redox conditions during alteration and can, therefore, be used as additional insight into the genesis of the hydrothermal, near-surface system.

  5. Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements from Residential Diagnostics Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, W.R.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements from ResidentialType Previous analyses of air leakage data suggest that

  6. Characterization of heterogeneous near-surface materials by joint 2D inversion of dc resistivity and seismic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meju, Max

    multidimensional non- invasive dc resistivity and seismic refraction investigations of the near-surface have and seismic data Luis A. Gallardo1 and Max A. Meju Department of Environmental Science, Lancaster University-gradients of electrical resistivity and seismic velocity as constraints so as to investigate more precisely

  7. NDT&E International 39 (2006) 641651 Iterative inversion method for eddy current profiling of near-surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    NDT&E International 39 (2006) 641­651 Iterative inversion method for eddy current profiling of near-dependent penetration depth, eddy current measurements are capable of mapping the near-surface depth profile-independent intrinsic electric conductivity depth profile from the frequency-dependent apparent eddy current

  8. An Investigation into the Spatial Variability of Near-Surface Air Temperatures in the Detroit, Michigan, Metropolitan Region*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Daniel G.

    An Investigation into the Spatial Variability of Near-Surface Air Temperatures in the Detroit. This study focused on the air temperatures in the Detroit, Michigan, metropolitan region during the summer portions of Detroit experienced decreased temperatures during afternoons. 1. Introduction In 2010, more

  9. Geophys. J. Int. (1995) 121, 301-315 Multicomponent near-surface correction for land VSP data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    1995-01-01

    , vertical seismic profile. 1 I N T R O D U C T I O N Combined seismic analysis of compressional- and shear seismic profile (VSP). Near-surface correction, using a simple matrix operator designed from 1994 March 31 SUMMARY Multicomponent seismic data collected using directional sources are degraded

  10. What influence will future solar activity changes over the 21st century have on projected global near-surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockwood, Mike

    What influence will future solar activity changes over the 21st century have on projected global underestimate the response to solar variations, then there is a potential for a reduction in solar activity will future solar activity changes over the 21st century have on projected global near-surface temperature

  11. Near-surface meteorological conditions associated with active resuspension of dust by wind erosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    The meteorological conditions associated with extreme winds in the lee of the Colorado Rocky Mountains were studied from the viewpoint of dust resuspension and dispersion. Wind, dispersion, temperature, and dew point conditions occurring near the surface were discussed in detail for a selected event. Near-surface wind speeds were compared to observations made at a standard sampling height. These field data were developed to aid in validation and interpretation of wind tunnel observations and application of dispersion models to wind erosion resuspension. Three conclusions can immediately be drawn from this investigation. First, wind storms in nature are quite gusty, with gusts exceeding the mean speed by 50 percent or more. However, wind direction variations are small by comparison. Thus, wind tunnel studies should be able to simulate the large along-flow turbulence, while keeping cross-flow turbulence to a moderate level. This also has an application to the puff modeling of high winds. Puff models normally assume that the along-flow dispersion coefficient is equal to the cross-flow value. This study suggests that the along-flow coefficient should be much larger than its cross-flow counterpart. Another conclusion involves the usual assumption of Pasquill-Gifford stability class D. In the event studied here, the atmosphere was well mixed with near-neutral thermal stability, yet the horizontal dispersion stability class varied from G to A. Thus, an assumption of Class D horizontal dispersion during high winds would not have been valid during this case. A final conclusion involves the widely applied assumption of a logarithmic wind speed profile during high wind events. This study has indicated that such an assumption is appropriate.

  12. Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation Project Near Surface Test Facility 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.; Cadoret, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the development of the reclamation project for the Hanford Site Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF), its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation project is to return disturbed sites as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native species. Gable Mountain is dominated by two plant communities: a big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) -- Sandberg's bluegrass (Poa sandbergii) community and a stiff sagebrush (Artemisia rigida) -- Sandberg's bluegrass community. Disassembly of the site installations began on March 15, 1988, and the site was returned to original contours by December 12, 1988. Two separate revegetation methods were employed at the NSTF to meet differing site constraints. Vegetative cover and density in the revegetation plots were assessed in April 1989 and again in June 1989 and 1990. It is extremely unlikely that the sand pit, borrow pit, box cuts, generator pad area, or ventilation fan area will reach the reclamation objectives set for these areas within the next 50 years without further intervention. These areas currently support few living plants. Vegetation on revegetated native soils appears to be growing as expected. Vegetation growth on the main waterline is well below the objective. To date, no shrubs have grown on the area, growth of native grasses is well below the objective, and much of the area has been covered with the pit run material, which may not support adequate growth. Without further treatments, the areas without the pit run material will likely revert to a nearly pure cheatgrass condition. 44 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Centrifuge modeling of radioactive waste migration through backfill in a near surface disposal facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurumoorthy, C.; Kusakabe, O.

    2007-07-01

    Investigations on the performance of backfill barrier in Near Surface Disposal Facility (NSDF) for radioactive wastes are important to ensure the long term safety of such disposal option. Favorable condition to delay migration of radionuclides from disposed waste to far fields is diffusion process. However, advective dispersion/diffusion mechanism plays an important role due to changes in backfill over a period of time. In order to understand these mechanisms, detailed laboratory experiments are usually conducted for developing mathematical models to assess the behaviour of backfill. However, these experiments are time consuming and suffer with the limitations due to material complexity. Also, there are constraints associated with validation of theoretical predictions due to intricacy of boundary conditions as well as the time scale is quite different as compared to the time required for completion of the processes in the field. Keeping in view these aspects, centrifuge modeling technique has been adopted by various researchers to model and understand various geo-environment problems in order to provide a link between the real life situation termed as the 'Prototype' and its model, which is exposed to a higher gravitational field. An attempt has been made in this paper to investigate the feasibility of this technique to model advective dispersion/diffusion mechanism of radionuclides through saturated Bentonite-Sand (B:S) backfill. Various stages of centrifuge modeling are highlighted. Column tests were conducted in the centrifuge to evaluate the hydraulic conductivity of B:S mixture under prototype NSDF stress conditions. Results showed that steady state hydraulic conductivity under saturated conditions was 2.86 10{sup -11} m/sec. Studies indicate the feasibility of centrifuge modeling technique and usefulness to model advective diffusion of radionuclides through B:S backfill. (authors)

  14. Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-11-23

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  15. Effect of soil erosion on the long-term stability of FUSRAP near-surface waste-burial sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Decontamination of FUSRAP sites could result in the generation of large volumes (in excess of 400,000 m/sup 3/) of low-activity radioactive wastes (primarily contaminated soil and building materials) requiring subsequent disposal. It is likely that near-surface burial will be seriously considered as an option for disposal of these materials. A number of factors - including soil erosion - could adversely affect the long-term stability of a near-surface waste-burial site. The majority of FUSRAP sites are located in the humid eastern United States, where the principal cause of erosion is the action of water. This report examines the effect of soil erosion by water on burial-site stability based on analysis of four hypothetical near-surface burial sites. The Universal Soil Loss Equation was employed to estimate average annual soil loss from burial sites and the 1000-year effects of soil loss on the soil barrier (burial trench cap) placed over low-activity wastes. Results suggest that the land use of the burial site and the slope gradient of the burial trench cap significantly affect the rate of soil erosion. The development of measures limiting the potential land use of a burial site (e.g., mixing large rocks into the burial trench cap) may be required to preserve the integrity of a burial trench for long periods of time.

  16. Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faakye, O.; Arena, L.; Griffiths, D.

    2013-07-01

    The most common method for measuring air leakage is to use a single blower door to pressurize and/or depressurize the test unit. In detached housing, the test unit is the entire home and the single blower door measures air leakage to the outside. In attached housing, this 'single unit', 'total', or 'solo' test method measures both the air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces as well air leakage to the outside. Measuring and minimizing this total leakage is recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce energy losses to the outside, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect. However, two significant limitations of the total leakage measurement in attached housing are: for retrofit work, if total leakage is assumed to be all to the outside, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly over predicted; for new construction, the total leakage values may result in failing to meet an energy-based house tightness program criterion. The scope of this research is to investigate an approach for developing a viable simplified algorithm that can be used by contractors to assess energy efficiency program qualification and/or compliance based upon solo test results.

  17. Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, Armin

    2014-09-01

    This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed.

  18. Evaluation of a New Ramping Technique for Duct Leakage Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 LBNL-61743 Evaluation of a New Ramping Technique for Duct Leakage Testing Iain S. Walker ramping Technique for Duct Leakage Testing Table of contents Introduction

  19. HVAC Cabinet Air Leakage Test Method - Building America Top Innovation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HVAC Cabinet Air Leakage Test Method - Building America Top Innovation HVAC Cabinet Air Leakage Test Method - Building America Top Innovation While HVAC installers have improved...

  20. Inversion Procedure for Eddy Current Profiling of the Near-Surface Residual Stress in Shot-Peened Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, F.; Nagy, P.B. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0070 (United States)

    2005-04-09

    Because of their frequency-dependent penetration depth, eddy current measurements are capable of mapping the near-surface depth profile of the electrical conductivity. This technique can be used to nondestructively characterize the subsurface residual stress distribution in certain types of shot-peened metals, e.g., in nickel-base superalloys. For quantitative evaluation of the experimental results, analytical and computational techniques are needed to solve the direct and inverse problems, i.e., to predict the frequency-dependent apparent eddy current conductivity from the depth profile of the frequency-independent intrinsic electrical conductivity of the specimen and vice versa. Simple analytical approximations are presented for both the direct and inverse eddy current problems by exploiting two specific features of the electrical conductivity variation caused by near-surface residual stresses in shot-peened metals. First, compressive residual stresses are limited to a shallow surface region of depth much less than typical probe coil diameters. Second, the change in electrical conductivity due to residual stresses is always very small, typically less than 1%. The proposed approximations are verified by numerical comparison to much more complicated numerical solutions.

  1. Iterative Inversion Method for Eddy Current Evaluation of Near-Surface Residual Stress Profile in Surface-Treated Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abu-Nabah, Bassam A.; Nagy, Peter B. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0070 (United States)

    2007-03-21

    Because of their frequency-dependent penetration depth, eddy current measurements are capable of mapping the near-surface depth profile of the electric conductivity. This technique can be used to nondestructively characterize the subsurface residual stress distribution in certain types of shot-peened metals, e.g., in nickel-base superalloys. To predict the depth-dependent, but frequency-independent, intrinsic electric conductivity from the frequency-dependent apparent eddy current conductivity (AECC), a highly convergent iterative inversion procedure is presented. The proposed technique exploits three specific features of the subsurface electric conductivity variation caused by near-surface residual stresses in shot-peened metals. First, compressive residual stresses are limited to a shallow surface region of depth much less than typical probe coil diameters. Second, the change in electric conductivity due to residual stresses is always very small, typically less than 1%. Third, the electric conductivity profile is fairly smooth and continuous. The accuracy of the proposed iterative inversion procedure is one order of magnitude better than that of the previously developed simpler method (J. Appl. Phys. 96, 1257 2004)

  2. Dynamic leakage from laboratory safety hoods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Ju-Myon

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate hood leakage by measuring face velocity and turbulence during a volume generating process designed to simulate a hot process, defined here as any operation producing high temperature gases. A...

  3. Initial DAB Argon Storage Dewar Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

    1990-05-30

    Any detectable leakage emanating from the argon storage dewar is undesirable; not only from a safety standpoint (eg, cryogenic burns, asphyxiation, etc.), but also small amounts of air back diffusing through leaks can render the argon unsuitable for the future physics experiments to take place within the cryostats. Whereas leakage through some of the control and manually operated valves on the dewar does not necessarily infroduce any of the above hazards directly, it could be high enough to be an economical, and perhaps an operational nuisance. Contained in the following is a compilation of the final leakage rates associated with the dewar during the period of January through May of 1990 and the raw data from which they were derived from. Also contained is a calculation of the total maximum allowable leakage rate int%ut of the dewar. The general strategy employed while leak checking the dewar was to eliminate all leaks found which could be relatively easily stopped and to reduce the more difficult ones to an acceptable level. Leakage past the seats/plugs of control and main relief valves in addition to leakage past the ball seals in the diverter valve fell into the latter category. Helium mass spectrometer leak detector (HMSLD), rate of rise (ROR) method, and throughput calculations based on effective pumping speeds were the means used to determine leakage rates. Usually the HMSLD method was used to detect the numerous smaller leaks (1 OE-S to 1 OE-1 0 std eels) which were eventually stopped by thread tightening, gasket replacement. redesign, etc. The ROR method helped measure the leakage past valve plugs and establish outgassing rates for volumes deemed as being tight; ie, no detectable leakage using the HMSLD. The throughput calculation was used only to determine the relatively large leak past the plug/seat of the vaporizer valve. A sample calculation of each leakage rate determining method is attached to this note. All leakage rates are given for helium gas at one atm differential.

  4. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In this project, Building Science Corporation worked with production home builder K. Hovnanian to conduct testing at a single-family home in Waldorf, Maryland, constructed in accordance with the 2009 International Residential Code. The team used automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques to conduct a series of 25 tests to measure the garage and house air leakage and pressure relationships and the garage-to-house air leakage.

  5. Use of Strontium Isotopes to Identify Buried Water Main Leakage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Use of Strontium Isotopes to Identify Buried Water Main Leakage Into Groundwater in a Highly water mains. The identification of leakage locations was done by conventional water quality parameters to identify leakage locations especially where the leakage is from drinking water mains because the chemical

  6. Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-09-01

    This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed. For houses employing whole-house supply ventilation (positive pressure) or balanced ventilation (same pressure effect as the Baseline condition), adherence to the EPA Indoor airPLUS house-to-garage air sealing requirements should be sufficient to expect little to no garage-to-house air transfer.

  7. Cycle isolation monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C. [Santee Copper, Moncks Corner, SC (United States)

    2009-07-15

    There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

  8. HARDWARE TROJANS: Data Leakage Using General

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huss, Sorin A.

    devices have at least one LED. These LEDs of various colors are used with the power switch of yourHARDWARE TROJANS: Data Leakage Using General Purpose LEDs Technical Report - TUD-CS-2010.2. LED Drive Settings 12 3.3. Detection & Assessment 13 4............ Analog Detector Design 14 4

  9. ILP based Gate LeakageILP based Gate LeakageILP based Gate LeakageILP based Gate Leakage Optimization using DKCMOSOptimization using DKCMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    Chronological (Year)Chronological (Year) N P 10-6 0 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 ISQED 2008 Mohanty 7 in CMOSLeakages in CMOSgg I1 : reverse bias pn junction (both ON & OFF) I2 : subthreshold leakage (OFF )2 II33

  10. Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements from Residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that are useful as explanatory variables, including floor area, height, vintage, and climate zone. Foundation type IMPACTS Building envelope airtightness is important because heating and cooling accounts for about 50% of the heating and cooling energy. Understanding the current air leakage characteristics and the factors

  11. A Numerical Investigation of the Potential for Negative Emissions Leakage*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to reduce leakage included in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme and draft legislation in the United States

  12. A SOLAR WARMING MODEL (SWarm) TO ESTIMATE DIURNAL CHANGES IN NEAR-SURFACE SNOWPACK TEMPERATURES FOR BACK-COUNTRY AVALANCHE FORECASTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Bruce

    be used to measure incoming solar radiation, but they are not common due to cost and maintenance issuesA SOLAR WARMING MODEL (SWarm) TO ESTIMATE DIURNAL CHANGES IN NEAR-SURFACE SNOWPACK TEMPERATURES. To facilitate use in large forecast areas where representative meteorological data are typically scarce

  13. Interannual Changes in Seasonal Ground Freezing and Near-surface Heat Flow Beneath Bottom-fast Ice in the Near-shore Zone, Mackenzie Delta, NWT, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorman, Brian

    Interannual Changes in Seasonal Ground Freezing and Near-surface Heat Flow Beneath Bottom-fast Ice Resources Canada, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada ABSTRACT Interannual changes in seasonal ground freezing. KEY WORDS: seasonal ground freezing; permafrost; bottom-fast ice; Mackenzie Delta INTRODUCTION Arctic

  14. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  15. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  16. Design and operational considerations of United States commercial near-surface low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birk, S.M.

    1997-10-01

    In accordance with the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, states are responsible for providing for disposal of commercially generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) within their borders. LLW in the US is defined as all radioactive waste that is not classified as spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, or by-product material resulting from the extraction of uranium from ore. Commercial waste includes LLW generated by hospitals, universities, industry, pharmaceutical companies, and power utilities. LLW generated by the country`s defense operations is the responsibility of the Federal government and its agency, the Department of Energy. The commercial LLRW disposal sites discussed in this report are located near: Sheffield, Illinois (closed); Maxey Flats, Kentucky (closed); Beatty, Nevada (closed); West Valley, New York (closed); Barnwell, South Carolina (operating); Richland, Washington (operating); Ward Valley, California, (proposed); Sierra Blanca, Texas (proposed); Wake County, North Carolina (proposed); and Boyd County, Nebraska (proposed). While some comparisons between the sites described in this report are appropriate, this must be done with caution. In addition to differences in climate and geology between sites, LLW facilities in the past were not designed and operated to today`s standards. This report summarizes each site`s design and operational considerations for near-surface disposal of low-level radioactive waste. The report includes: a description of waste characteristics; design and operational features; post closure measures and plans; cost and duration of site characterization, construction, and operation; recent related R and D activities for LLW treatment and disposal; and the status of the LLW system in the US.

  17. Near-surface remote sensing of canopy architecture and land-atmosphere interactions in an oak savanna ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Youngryel

    2010-01-01

    sensor, built with light emitting diodes (LEDs), to monitorSun photometer with light emitting diodes as spectrallySen, C. (2009). Light emitting diode as sensor for miniature

  18. Training toward Advanced 3D Seismic Methods for CO2 Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Liner

    2012-05-31

    The objective of our work is graduate and undergraduate student training related to improved 3D seismic technology that addresses key challenges related to monitoring movement and containment of CO{sub 2}, specifically better quantification and sensitivity for mapping of caprock integrity, fractures, and other potential leakage pathways. We utilize data and results developed through previous DOE-funded CO{sub 2} characterization project (DE-FG26-06NT42734) at the Dickman Field of Ness County, KS. Dickman is a type locality for the geology that will be encountered for CO{sub 2} sequestration projects from northern Oklahoma across the U.S. midcontinent to Indiana and Illinois. Since its discovery in 1962, the Dickman Field has produced about 1.7 million barrels of oil from porous Mississippian carbonates with a small structural closure at about 4400 ft drilling depth. Project data includes 3.3 square miles of 3D seismic data, 142 wells, with log, some core, and oil/water production data available. Only two wells penetrate the deep saline aquifer. In a previous DOE-funded project, geological and seismic data were integrated to create a geological property model and a flow simulation grid. We believe that sequestration of CO{sub 2} will largely occur in areas of relatively flat geology and simple near surface, similar to Dickman. The challenge is not complex geology, but development of improved, lower-cost methods for detecting natural fractures and subtle faults. Our project used numerical simulation to test methods of gathering multicomponent, full azimuth data ideal for this purpose. Our specific objectives were to apply advanced seismic methods to aide in quantifying reservoir properties and lateral continuity of CO{sub 2} sequestration targets. The purpose of the current project is graduate and undergraduate student training related to improved 3D seismic technology that addresses key challenges related to monitoring movement and containment of CO{sub 2}, specifically better quantification and sensitivity for mapping of caprock integrity, fractures, and other potential leakage pathways. Specifically, our focus is fundamental research on (1) innovative narrow-band seismic data decomposition and interpretation, and (2) numerical simulation of advanced seismic data (multi-component, high density, full azimuth data) ideal for mapping of cap rock integrity and potential leakage pathways.

  19. Radiation induced leakage current and stress induced leakage current in ultra-thin gate oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceschia, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Cester, A.; Scarpa, A.; Ghidini, G.

    1998-12-01

    Low-field leakage current has been measured in thin oxides after exposure to ionizing radiation. This Radiation Induced Leakage Current (RILC) can be described as an inelastic tunneling process mediated by neutral traps in the oxide, with an energy loss of about 1 eV. The neutral trap distribution is influenced by the oxide field applied during irradiation, thus indicating that the precursors of the neutral defects are charged, likely being defects associated to trapped holes. The maximum leakage current is found under zero-field condition during irradiation, and it rapidly decreases as the field is enhanced, due to a displacement of the defect distribution across the oxide towards the cathodic interface. The RILC kinetics are linear with the cumulative dose, in contrast with the power law found on electrically stressed devices.

  20. Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoringand Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-03-29

    We investigate the potential for CO2 monitoring in thenear-surface environment as an approach to exploration for hiddengeothermal systems. Numerical simulations of CO2 migration from a modelhidden geothermal system show that CO2 concentrations can reach highlevels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low CO2 fluxes.Therefore, subsurface measurements offer an advantage over above-groundmeasurements which are affected by winds that rapidly disperse CO2. Tomeet the challenge of detecting geothermal CO2 emissions within thenatural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach thatintegrates available detection and monitoring techniques with statisticalanalysis and modeling.

  1. Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain S.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.; Delp, William W.

    2010-03-01

    This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit ? indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called"ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823"Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

  2. Optimizing Monitoring Designs under Alternative Objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Jason A.; USA, Richland Washington; Porter, Ellen A.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-31

    This paper describes an approach to identify monitoring designs that optimize detection of CO2 leakage from a carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) reservoir and compares the results generated under two alternative objective functions. The first objective function minimizes the expected time to first detection of CO2 leakage, the second more conservative objective function minimizes the maximum time to leakage detection across the set of realizations. The approach applies a simulated annealing algorithm that searches the solution space by iteratively mutating the incumbent monitoring design. The approach takes into account uncertainty by evaluating the performance of potential monitoring designs across a set of simulated leakage realizations. The approach relies on a flexible two-tiered signature to infer that CO2 leakage has occurred. This research is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project tasked with conducting risk and uncertainty analysis in the areas of reservoir performance, natural leakage pathways, wellbore integrity, groundwater protection, monitoring, and systems level modeling.

  3. Optimizing Monitoring Designs under Alternative Objectives

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gastelum, Jason A.; USA, Richland Washington; Porter, Ellen A.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-31

    This paper describes an approach to identify monitoring designs that optimize detection of CO2 leakage from a carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) reservoir and compares the results generated under two alternative objective functions. The first objective function minimizes the expected time to first detection of CO2 leakage, the second more conservative objective function minimizes the maximum time to leakage detection across the set of realizations. The approach applies a simulated annealing algorithm that searches the solution space by iteratively mutating the incumbent monitoring design. The approach takes into account uncertainty by evaluating the performance of potential monitoring designs across amore »set of simulated leakage realizations. The approach relies on a flexible two-tiered signature to infer that CO2 leakage has occurred. This research is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project tasked with conducting risk and uncertainty analysis in the areas of reservoir performance, natural leakage pathways, wellbore integrity, groundwater protection, monitoring, and systems level modeling.« less

  4. Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration reservoirs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carroll, Susan A.; Keating, Elizabeth; Mansoor, Kayyum; Dai, Zhenxue; Sun, Yunwei; Trainor-Guitton, Whitney; Brown, Chris; Bacon, Diana

    2014-09-07

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is developing a science-based toolset for the analysis of potential impacts to groundwater chemistry from CO2 injection (www.netldoe.gov/nrap). The toolset adopts a stochastic approach in which predictions address uncertainties in shallow groundwater and leakage scenarios. It is derived from detailed physics and chemistry simulation results that are used to train more computationally efficient models, referred to here as reduced-order models (ROMs), for each component system. In particular, these tools can be used to help regulators and operators understand the expected sizes and longevity of plumes in pH, TDS, and dissolved metals that could resultmore »from a leakage of brine and/or CO2 from a storage reservoir into aquifers. This information can inform, for example, decisions on monitoring strategies that are both effective and efficient. We have used this approach to develop predictive reduced-order models for two common types of reservoirs, but the approach could be used to develop a model for a specific aquifer or other common types of aquifers. In this paper we describe potential impacts to groundwater quality due to CO2 and brine leakage, discuss an approach to calculate thresholds under which no impact to groundwater occurs, describe the time scale for impact on groundwater, and discuss the probability of detecting a groundwater plume should leakage occur. To facilitate this, multi-phase flow and reactive transport simulations and emulations were developed for two classes of aquifers, considering uncertainty in leakage source terms and aquifer hydrogeology. We targeted an unconfined fractured carbonate aquifer based on the Edwards aquifer in Texas and a confined alluvium aquifer based on the High Plains Aquifer in Kansas, which share characteristics typical of many drinking water aquifers in the United States. The hypothetical leakage scenarios centered on the notion that wellbores are the most likely conduits for brine and CO2 leaks. Leakage uncertainty was based on hypothetical injection of CO2 for 50 years at a rate of 5 million tons per year into a depleted oil/gas reservoir with high permeability and, one or more wells provided leakage pathways from the storage reservoir to the overlying aquifer. This scenario corresponds to a storage site with historical oil/gas production and some poorly completed legacy wells that went undetected through site evaluation, operations, and post-closure. For the aquifer systems and leakage scenarios studied here, CO2 and brine leakage are likely to drive pH below and increase total dissolved solids (TDS) above the “no-impact thresholds;” and the subsequent plumes, although small, are likely to persist for long periods of time in the absence of remediation. In these scenarios, however, risk to human health may not be significant for two reasons. First, our simulated plume volumes are much smaller than the average inter-well spacing for these representative aquifers, so the impacted groundwater would be unlikely to be pumped for drinking water. Second, even within the impacted plume volumes little water exceeds the primary maximum contamination levels.« less

  5. Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Susan A.; Keating, Elizabeth; Mansoor, Kayyum; Dai, Zhenxue; Sun, Yunwei; Trainor-Guitton, Whitney; Brown, Christopher F.; Bacon, Diana H.

    2014-10-01

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is developing a science-based toolset for the analysis of potential impacts to groundwater chemistry from CO2 injection (www.netldoe.gov/nrap). The toolset adopts a stochastic approach in which predictions address uncertainties in shallow groundwater and leakage scenarios. It is derived from detailed physics and chemistry simulation results that are used to train more computationally efficient models, referred to here as reduced-order models (ROMs), for each component system. In particular, these tools can be used to help regulators and operators understand the expected sizes and longevity of plumes in pH, TDS, and dissolved metals that could result from a leakage of brine and/or CO2 from a storage reservoir into aquifers. This information can inform, for example, decisions on monitoring strategies that are both effective and efficient. We have used this approach to develop predictive reduced-order models for two common types of reservoirs, but the approach could be used to develop a model for a specific aquifer or other common types of aquifers. In this paper we describe potential impacts to groundwater quality due to CO2 and brine leakage, discuss an approach to calculate thresholds under which no impact to groundwater occurs, describe the time scale for impact on groundwater, and discuss the probability of detecting a groundwater plume should leakage occur. To facilitate this, multi-phase flow and reactive transport simulations and emulations were developed for two classes of aquifers, considering uncertainty in leakage source terms and aquifer hydrogeology. We targeted an unconfined fractured carbonate aquifer based on the Edwards aquifer in Texas and a confined alluvium aquifer based on the High Plains Aquifer in Kansas, which share characteristics typical of many drinking water aquifers in the United States. The hypothetical leakage scenarios centered on the notion that wellbores are the most likely conduits for brine and CO2 leaks. Leakage uncertainty was based on hypothetical injection of CO2 for 50 years at a rate of 5 million tons per year into a depleted oil/gas reservoir with high permeability and, one or more wells provided leakage pathways from the storage reservoir to the overlying aquifer. This scenario corresponds to a storage site with historical oil/gas production and some poorly completed legacy wells that went undetected through site evaluation, operations, and post-closure. For the aquifer systems and leakage scenarios studied here, CO2 and brine leakage are likely to drive pH below and increase total dissolved solids (TDS) above the “no-impact thresholds;” and the subsequent plumes, although small, are likely to persist for long periods of time in the absence of remediation. In these scenarios, however, risk to human health may not be significant for two reasons. First, our simulated plume volumes are much smaller than the average inter-well spacing for these representative aquifers, so the impacted groundwater would be unlikely to be pumped for drinking water. Second, even within the impacted plume volumes little water exceeds the primary maximum contamination levels.

  6. Nonvolatile memory disturbs due to gate and junction leakage currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroder, Dieter K.

    leakage currents induced by stress due to LOCOS and trap- assisted tunneling (TAT). * Corresponding author Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Solid State Electronics Research, Arizona State) from traps within the gate oxides. Such low gate leakage currents can lead to sufficient charge

  7. Leakage-Resilient Cryptography with Key Derived from Sensitive Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Leakage-Resilient Cryptography with Key Derived from Sensitive Data Konrad Durnoga , Tomasz Kazana subject to adversarial leakage. We propose a method to derive keys for such protocols on-the-fly from the actual keys are derived from. That is, an adversary can hardly gain any knowledge about the private data

  8. The Delta Q method of testing the air leakage of ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, I.S.; Dickerhoff, D.J.; Sherman, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    2001. Development of a new duct leakage test: DeltaQ. L B Nin the DeltaQ test for Duct Leakage. Brookhaven Nationalof the DeltaQ test for Duct Leakage. Proc. A C E E E 2002

  9. Leakage Rate and Hydraulic Head Change Evaluation through Conduits in Deep Storage Aquifers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, Jinia

    2015-04-13

    mathematical model for estimating leakage rate by hydraulic head change evaluation through different conduits or leakage pathways coupled with an injection well. The leakage rate is estimated using Darcy’s law by evaluating hydraulic head change between...

  10. Near-surface density profiling of Fe ion irradiated Si (100) using extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction by variation of the wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanbabaee, B. Pietsch, U.; Facsko, S.; Doyle, S.

    2014-10-20

    In this work, we report on correlations between surface density variations and ion parameters during ion beam-induced surface patterning process. The near-surface density variations of irradiated Si(100) surfaces were investigated after off-normal irradiation with 5 keV Fe ions at different fluences. In order to reduce the x-ray probing depth to a thickness below 5?nm, the extremely asymmetrical x-ray diffraction by variation of wavelength was applied, exploiting x-ray refraction at the air-sample interface. Depth profiling was achieved by measuring x-ray rocking curves as function of varying wavelengths providing incidence angles down to 0°. The density variation was extracted from the deviations from kinematical Bragg angle at grazing incidence angles due to refraction of the x-ray beam at the air-sample interface. The simulations based on the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction revealed that while a net near-surface density decreases with increasing ion fluence which is accompanied by surface patterning, there is a certain threshold of ion fluence to surface density modulation. Our finding suggests that the surface density variation can be relevant with the mechanism of pattern formation.

  11. Leakage characterization of a piloted power operated relief valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ezekoye, L.I. [Westinghouse Electric Corp, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Technology Division; Hess, M.D. [Northeast Utilities, Waterford, CT (United States). Millstone Station

    1995-11-01

    In Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs), power operated relief valves (PORVs) are used to provide overpressure protection of the Pressurizer. The valves are fail closed globe valves which means that power is required to open the valves and, on loss of power, the valves close. There are two ways to operate the PORVs. The more common way is to directly couple the disc to an actuator via a disc-stem assembly. The type of design is not the object of this paper. The other and less common way of operating a PORV is by piloting the main valve such that the opening or closing of a pilot valve opens and closes the main valve. This is the design of interest. In most plants, the PORVs are installed with a water loop seal while in some plants no water loop seals are used. It is generally accepted that loop seal installation minimizes valve seat leakage. In non-loop seal installation, the valve seat is exposed to steam which increases the potential for seat leakage. This paper describes the results of some tests performed with nitrogen and steam to characterize the leakage potential of a pilot operated PORV. The test results were compared with seat leakage tests of check valves to provide insight on the leakage testing of pilot operated valves and check valves. The paper also compares the test data with leakage estimates using the ASME/ANSI OM Code guidance on valve leakage.

  12. Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in California Large

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-53605 Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in California Large Commercial Buildings and for implementing the duct models in a form that could readily be used in this project; and Brian Smith (LBNL

  13. Numerical Simulations of Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Hajime; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    U. Case History: Blowout at an LPG Storage Cavern in Sweden,and Heads at an Underground LPG Storage Cavern Site, Journalof Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns Hajime

  14. Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    injection of CO2 for 50 years at a rate of 5 million tons per year into a depleted oilgas reservoir with high permeability and, one or more wells provided leakage pathways...

  15. Flow visualization and leakage measurements of worn labyrinth seals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Brian Frank

    1997-01-01

    A large-scale flow visualization test facility is used to conduct an experimental investigation into the leakage resistance and flow characteristics of worn labyrinth seals. Wear in labyrinth seals is a consequence of ...

  16. Factories: The Ionising Radiations (Sealed Sources) (Leakage Test) Order, 1961 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hare, John

    1961-01-01

    This Order prescribes the test for leakage of radioactive substance to be made of sealed sources and (the particulars to be contained in registers of every such test, required under Regulation 15 of the Ionising ...

  17. Leakage Prediction of Labyrinth Seals Having Advanced Cavity Shapes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panicker, Sunil M.

    2011-02-22

    Labyrinth seals are widely used in various turbo machines including turbines, compressors and pumps. Their purpose is to prevent the backflow of the working fluid. This backflow is due to the leakage of the seal. This loss ...

  18. Expedient methods of respiratory protection. II. Leakage tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, D.W.; Hinds, W.C.; Price, J.M.; Weker, R.; Yee, H.S.

    1983-07-01

    The following readily-available materials were tested on a manikin connected to a breathing simulator to determine the fraction of an approximately 2-..mu..m-diameter aerosol that would leak around the seal of the materials to the manikin's face: cotton/polyester shirt material, cotton handkerchief material, toweling (a wash cloth), a surgical mask (Johnson and Johnson Co., model HRI 8137), and a NIOSH-approved disposable face mask (3M, model number 8710). The leakage tests were performed to supplement the measurements of penetration through the materials, conducted as the first phase of this investigation. The leakage tests were performed with the materials held on to the face by three methods, leakage fractions being determined from comparisons with the penetration of the same aerosol for the materials fully taped to the face. At a breathing rate of 37 liters per minute, mean leakages ranged from 0.0 percent to 63 percent. Mean penetrations exclusive of leakage ranged from 0.6 percent to 39 percent. Use of nylon hosiery material (panty hose) to hold the handkerchief material or the disposable face mask to the face was found to be very effective in preventing leakage. Such a combination could be expected to reduce leakage around the handkerchief to about ten percent or less in practice, and around the mask to less than one percent, offering substantial protection from accidentally generated aerosols. The reduction in leakage around the mask provided by the hosiery material suggests the adaptation and use of such an approach in regular industrial hygiene practice. The third and final phase of this investigation is underway, in which the penetration of the materials by particles with diameters between 0.05 and 0.5 ..mu..m is being measured and the effectiveness of the methods for dose reduction in the presence of radioactive aerosols is being modeled.

  19. Role of polaron hopping in leakage current behavior of a SrTiO...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CONDITIONS; CAPACITORS; CATHODES; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTROCHEMISTRY; LEAKAGE CURRENT; MONOCRYSTALS; OXIDES; OXYGEN; PERIODICITY; STRONTIUM TITANATES;...

  20. Instantaneous Leakage Evaluation of Metal Cask at Drop Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirofumi Takeda; Norihiro Kageyama; Masumi Wataru; Ryoji Sonobe; Koji Shirai; Toshiari Saegusa

    2006-07-01

    There have been a lot of tests and analyses reported for evaluation of drop tests of metal casks. However, no quantitative measurement has ever been made for any instantaneous leakage through metal gaskets during the drop tests due to loosening of the bolts in the containments and lateral sliding of the lids. In order to determine a source term for radiation exposure dose assessment, it is necessary to obtain fundamental data of instantaneous leakage. In this study, leak tests were performed by using scale models of the lid structure and a full scale cask without impact limiters simulating drop accidents in a storage facility, with aim of measuring and evaluating any instantaneous leakage at drop impact. Prior to drop tests of a full scale metal cask, a series of leakage tests using scale models were carried out to establish the measurement method and to examine a relationship between the amount of the lateral sliding of the lid and the leak rate. It was determined that the leak rate did not depend on the lateral sliding speeds. Drop tests of a full scale metal cask without impact limiters were carried out by simulating drop accidents during handling in a storage facility. The target was designed to simulate a reinforced concrete floor in the facility. The first test was a horizontal drop from a height of 1 m. The second test simulated a rotational impact around an axis of a lower trunnion of the cask from the horizontal status at a height of 1 m. In the horizontal drop test, the amount of helium gas leakage was calculated by integrating the leak rate with time. The total amount of helium gas leakage from the primary and secondary lids was 1.99 x 10{sup -6} Pa.m{sup 3}. This value is 9.61 x 10{sup -9}% of the initially installed helium gas. The amount of leakage was insignificant. In the rotational drop test, the total amount of leakage from the primary and secondary lids was 1.74 x 10{sup -5} Pa.m{sup 3}. This value is 8.45 x 10{sup -8}% of the initially installed helium gas. This value was larger than that of the horizontal drop test. Nevertheless, the amount of leakage was also insignificant. The relationship between the maximum sliding displacement of the lid and the leak rate coincided between the tests of a scale model and a full scale metal cask. (authors)

  1. Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfe, C.E.; Dinc, O.S.; Bagepalli, B.S.; Correia, V.H.; Aksit, M.F.

    1996-04-23

    A gas-path leakage seal is described for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the ``plane`` of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member. 4 figs.

  2. Leakage estimation of incompressible fluids in stepped labyrinth seals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chi, Daesung

    1983-01-01

    Ma-', or Subject: Mecharical Engineering LEAKAGE ESTIMATION OF INCOMPRESSI BL- FLUIDS N STEPPED LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis DAESIJNG CHI Approved as to style and content by: D . G. ~ . Morrison (Chairma of Committee) Dr. J. C. Han (Member) Dr G... Data for AXL0=0. 25 and 2 Throttles 75 76 77 45. Comparison of Empirical Method with Experimental Leakage Data for AXL0=0. 25 and 10 Throttles 78 NOMENCLATURE c = clearance between tooth and sealing surface d = step distance f = friction...

  3. Leakage risk assessment of the In Salah CO2 storage project: Applying the Certification Framework in a dynamic context.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Jordan, P.D.; Nicot, J.-P.; Mazzoldi, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Bryant, S.L.

    2010-08-01

    The Certification Framework (CF) is a simple risk assessment approach for evaluating CO{sub 2} and brine leakage risk at geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. In the In Salah CO{sub 2} storage project assessed here, five wells at Krechba produce natural gas from the Carboniferous C10.2 reservoir with 1.7-2% CO{sub 2} that is delivered to the Krechba gas processing plant, which also receives high-CO{sub 2} natural gas ({approx}10% by mole fraction) from additional deeper gas reservoirs and fields to the south. The gas processing plant strips CO{sub 2} from the natural gas that is then injected through three long horizontal wells into the water leg of the Carboniferous gas reservoir at a depth of approximately 1,800 m. This injection process has been going on successfully since 2004. The stored CO{sub 2} has been monitored over the last five years by a Joint Industry Project (JIP) - a collaboration of BP, Sonatrach, and Statoil with co-funding from US DOE and EU DG Research. Over the years the JIP has carried out extensive analyses of the Krechba system including two risk assessment efforts, one before injection started, and one carried out by URS Corporation in September 2008. The long history of injection at Krechba, and the accompanying characterization, modeling, and performance data provide a unique opportunity to test and evaluate risk assessment approaches. We apply the CF to the In Salah CO{sub 2} storage project at two different stages in the state of knowledge of the project: (1) at the pre-injection stage, using data available just prior to injection around mid-2004; and (2) after four years of injection (September 2008) to be comparable to the other risk assessments. The main risk drivers for the project are CO{sub 2} leakage into potable groundwater and into the natural gas cap. Both well leakage and fault/fracture leakage are likely under some conditions, but overall the risk is low due to ongoing mitigation and monitoring activities. Results of the application of the CF during these different state-of-knowledge periods show that the assessment of likelihood of various leakage scenarios increased as more information became available, while assessment of impact stayed the same. Ongoing mitigation, modeling, and monitoring of the injection process is recommended.

  4. Blower-door techniques for measuring interzonal leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hult, Erin L.; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The standard blower door test methods, such as ASTM E779, describe how to use a single blower door to determine the total leakage of a single-zone structure such as a detached single-family home. There are no standard test methods for measuring interzonal leakage in a two-zone or multi-zone building envelope such as might be encountered in with an attached garage or in a multifamily building. Some practitioners have been using techniques that involve making multiple measurements with a single blower door as well as combined measurements using multiple blower doors. Even for just two zones there are dozens of combinations of one-door and two-door test protocols that could conceivably be used to determine the interzonal air tightness. We examined many of these two-zone configurations using both simulation and measured data to estimate the accuracy and precision of each technique for realistic measurement scenarios. We also considered the impact of taking measurements at a single pressure versus over multiple pressures. We compared the various techniques and evaluated them for specific uses. Some techniques work better in one leakage regime; some are more sensitive to wind and other noise; some are more suited to determining only a subset of the leakage values. This paper makes recommendations on which techniques to use or not use for various cases and provides data that could be used to develop future test methods.

  5. Incomplete Environmental Regulation, Imperfect Competition, and Emissions Leakage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlie, Meredith

    in response to gridlock and policy inaction at higher levels of governance.4 The global nature of the climateIncomplete Environmental Regulation, Imperfect Competition, and Emissions Leakage January 2009 Meredith Fowliey Abstract For political, jurisdictional and technical reasons, environmental regulation

  6. Compromising Tor Anonymity Exploiting P2P Information Leakage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castelluccia, Claude

    communications. Whereas the cryptographic foundations of Tor, based on onion- routing [4,5,6,7], are knownCompromising Tor Anonymity Exploiting P2P Information Leakage Pere Manils, Abdelberi Chaabane attacks targeting BitTorrent users on top of Tor that reveal their real IP addresses. In a second step, we

  7. Leakage-Aware Energy Synchronization for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhi-Li

    beneficial, because energy storage units (e.g., batteries or capacitors) are limited in capacity and leakage batteries), and hazardous or inaccessible environments preclude manual battery replace- ment. Without renewable energy resources, a sensor node can sustain only a few hours at 100% duty cycle. Clearly, existing

  8. Transport of waste leakage in stratified Hongbin Zhan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    , stratified formations. 1 INTRODUCTION Underground waste disposal is used for industrial and domestic wastes management of waste disposal requires a better understanding of contaminant transport in the subsurfaceTransport of waste leakage in stratified formations Hongbin Zhan Department of Geology

  9. Robust Strategy for Intake Leakage Detection in Diesel Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Robust Strategy for Intake Leakage Detection in Diesel Engines Riccardo Ceccarelli , Philippe are provided using advanced Diesel engine developed under AMEsim. I. INTRODUCTION The modern Diesel engine has of the functioning of a air-path in a Diesel engine with exhaust gas recirculation circuit is presented. More

  10. Low Power and Low Leakage Implementation of RNS FIR Filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nannarelli, Alberto

    Low Power and Low Leakage Implementation of RNS FIR Filters Gian Carlo Cardarilli, Andrea Del Re be neglected any longer. In this work, we take advantage of the properties of the Residue Number System (RNS) to implement FIR filters with reduced static and dynamic power consumption. The results show that the RNS

  11. Application of Buckmaster Electrolyte Ion Leakage Test to Woody Biofuel Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broderick, Thomas F; Dooley, James H

    2014-08-28

    In an earlier ASABE paper, Buckmaster reported that ion conductivity of biomass leachate in aqueous solution was directly correlated with activity access to plant nutrients within the biomass materials for subsequent biological or chemical processing. The Buckmaster test involves placing a sample of the particles in a beaker of constant-temperature deionized water and monitoring the change in electrical conductivity over time. We adapted the Buckmaster method to a range of woody biomass and other cellulosic bioenergy feedstocks. Our experimental results suggest differences of electrolyte leakage between differently processed woody biomass particles may be an indicator of their utility for conversion in bioenergy processes. This simple assay appears to be particularly useful to compare different biomass comminution techniques and particle sizes for biochemical preprocessing.

  12. HIGH-RESOLUTION CALCULATION OF THE SOLAR GLOBAL CONVECTION WITH THE REDUCED SPEED OF SOUND TECHNIQUE. II. NEAR SURFACE SHEAR LAYER WITH THE ROTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Yokoyama, T., E-mail: hotta@ucar.edu [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique, we can extend our global convection simulation to 0.99 R {sub ?} and include, near the top of our domain, small-scale convection with short timescales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of an NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range of r = 0.95-0.975 R {sub ?}. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under the weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward-directed meridional flow and an NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the ?v{sub r}{sup ?}v{sub ?}{sup ?}? correlation of turbulent velocities. The origin of the required correlations depends to some degree on latitude. In high latitudes, a positive correlation ?v{sub r}{sup ?}v{sub ?}{sup ?}? is induced in the NSSL by the poleward meridional flow whose amplitude increases with the radius, while a negative correlation is generated by the Coriolis force in bulk of the convection zone. In low latitudes, a positive correlation ?v{sub r}{sup ?}v{sub ?}{sup ?}? results from rotationally aligned convection cells ({sup b}anana cells{sup )}. The force caused by these Reynolds stresses is in balance with the Coriolis force in the NSSL.

  13. Data Tethers: Preventing Information Leakage by Enforcing Environmental Data Access Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Data Tethers: Preventing Information Leakage by Enforcing Environmental Data Access Policies. Data Tethers provides flexible environmental policies, which can be attached to data, specifying better control of information leakage by attaching environmental policies to data to specify conditions

  14. Analytical and experimental evaluation of the leakage and stiffness characteristics of high pressure pocket damper seals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamal Eldin, Ahmed Mohamed

    2004-09-30

    This thesis presents numerical predictions for the leakage and direct stiffness coefficients of pocket damper seals. Modifications made to earlier flow-prediction models are discussed. Leakage and static pressure measurements on straight...

  15. Leakage and rotordynamic effects of pocket damper seals and see-through labyrinth seals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamal Eldin, Ahmed Mohamed

    2009-05-15

    This dissertation discusses research on the leakage and rotordynamic characteristics of pocket damper seals (PDS) and see-through labyrinth seals, presents and evaluates models for labyrinth seal and PDS leakage and PDS ...

  16. Comparison of the Leakage Characteristics of the Straight Annular and Convergent Seals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ustun, Serafettin

    2012-10-19

    Annular seals are devices, which are used in turboMachinery systems to reduce the flow leakage, and to provide better dynamic stability to the system. Leakage flow can strongly affect cooling quality, heating balance, and ...

  17. Leakage Risk Assessment for a Potential CO2 Storage Project in Saskatchewan, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houseworth, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Framework Leakage Risk Assessment for a Potential CO 2Risk Assessment..confidence in the risk assessment. . Potential Sequestration

  18. An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilley, George

    An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration J. L the success of geologic carbon sequestration projects. To detect subtle CO2 leakage signals, we present), An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res

  19. Leakage Risk Assessment of CO2 Transportation by Pipeline at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project, Decatur, Illinois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzoldi, A.

    2014-01-01

    begins with a review of pipeline risk assessment includingPipeline Leakage Risk .We have carried out pipeline leakage risk assessment for the

  20. A complete Randomized Benchmarking Protocol accounting for Leakage Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Chasseur; F. K. Wilhelm

    2015-07-09

    Randomized Benchmarking allows to efficiently and scalably characterize the average error of an unitary 2-design such as the Clifford group $\\mathcal{C}$ on a physical candidate for quantum computation, as long as there are no non-computational leakage levels in the system. We investigate the effect of leakage errors on Randomized Benchmarking induced from an additional level per physical qubit and provide a modified protocol that allows to derive reliable estimates for the error per gate in their presence. We assess the variance of the sequence fidelity corresponding to the number of random sequences needed for valid fidelity estimation. Our protocol allows for gate dependent error channels without being restricted to perturbations. We show that our protocol is compatible with Interleaved Randomized Benchmarking and expand to benchmarking of arbitrary gates. This setting is relevant for superconducting transmon qubits, among other systems.

  1. Simple pulses for elimination of leakage in weakly nonlinear qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Motzoi; J. M. Gambetta; P. Rebentrost; F. K. Wilhelm

    2009-10-22

    In realizations of quantum computing, a two-level system (qubit) is often singled out of the many levels of an anharmonic oscillator. In these cases, simple qubit control fails on short time scales because of coupling to leakage levels. We provide an easy to implement analytic formula that inhibits this leakage from any single-control analog or pixelated pulse. It is based on adding a second control that is proportional to the time-derivative of the first. For realistic parameters of superconducting qubits, this strategy reduces the error by an order of magnitude relative to the state of the art, all based on smooth and feasible pulse shapes. These results show that even weak anharmonicity is sufficient and in general not a limiting factor for implementing quantum gates.

  2. Remote laser detection of natural gas leakages from pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petukhov, V O; Gorobets, V A; Andreev, Yu M; Lanskii, G V

    2010-02-28

    A differential absorption lidar based on a tunable TEA CO{sub 2} laser emitting at 42 lines of the 'hot' 01{sup 1}1 - 11{sup 1}0 band in the range from 10.9 to 11.4 {mu}m is developed for detecting natural gas leakages from oil pipelines by measuring the ethane content in the atmosphere. The ethane detection sensitivity is 0.9 ppm km. The presence of methane does not distort the measurement results. The developed lidar can detect the natural gas leakage from kilometre heights at the flying velocities up to 200 km h{sup -1} and a probe pulse repetition rate of 5 Hz. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Gas-path leakage seal for a turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagepalli, B.S.; Aksit, M.F.; Farrell, T.R.

    1999-08-10

    A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a turbine (such as combustor casing segments of a gas turbine). The seal includes a flexible and generally imperforate metal sheet assemblage having opposing first and second surfaces and two opposing raised edges extending a generally identical distance above and below the surfaces. A first cloth layer assemblage has a thickness generally equal to the previously-defined identical distance and is superimposed on the first surface between the raised edges. A second cloth layer assemblage is generally identical to the first cloth layer assemblage and is superimposed on the second surface between the raised edges. 5 figs.

  4. Turbocharger with sliding piston, and having vanes and leakage dams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Quentin (Nancy, FR); Alnega, Ahmed (Thaon Les Vosges, FR)

    2011-12-06

    A turbocharger having a sliding piston for regulating exhaust gas flow into the turbine wheel includes a set of first vanes mounted on a fixed first wall of the turbine nozzle and projecting axially toward an opposite second wall of the nozzle, and/or a set of second vanes mounted on the end of the piston and projecting in an opposite axial direction toward the first wall of the nozzle. For the/each set of vanes, there are leakage dams formed on the wall that is adjacent the vane tips when the piston is closed. The leakage dams are closely adjacent the vane tips and discourage exhaust gas from leaking in a generally radial direction past the vane tips as the piston just begins to open from its fully closed position.

  5. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2006-06-01

    We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

  6. Experimental observation of signature changes in bulk soil electrical conductivity in response to engineered surface CO2 leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou X.; Wielopolski L.; Lakkaraju, V. R.; Apple, M.; Dobeck, L. M.; Gullickson, K.; Shaw, J. A.; Cunningham, A. B.; Spangler, L. H.

    2012-03-01

    Experimental observations of signature changes of bulk soil electrical conductivity (EC) due to CO{sub 2} leakage were carried out at a field site at Bozeman, Montana, to investigate the change of soil geophysical properties in response to possible leakage of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The dynamic evolution of bulk soil EC was measured during an engineered surface leakage of CO{sub 2} through in situ continuous monitoring of bulk soil EC, soil moisture, soil temperature, rainfall rate, and soil CO{sub 2} concentration to investigate the response of soil bulk EC signature to CO{sub 2} leakage. Observations show that: (1) high soil CO{sub 2} concentration due to CO{sub 2} leakage enhances the dependence of bulk soil EC on soil moisture. The bulk soil EC is a linear multivariate function of soil moisture and soil temperature, the coefficient for soil moisture increased from 2.111 dS for the non-leaking phase to 4.589 dS for the CO{sub 2} leaking phase; and the coefficient for temperature increased from 0.003 dS/C for the non-leaking phase to 0.008 dS/C for the CO{sub 2} leaking phase. The dependence of bulk soil EC on soil temperature is generally weak, but leaked CO{sub 2} enhances the dependence, (2) after the CO{sub 2} release, the relationship between soil bulk EC and soil CO{sub 2} concentration observes three distinct CO{sub 2} decay modes. Rainfall events result in sudden changes of soil moisture and are believed to be the driving forcing for these decay modes, and (3) within each mode, increasing soil CO{sub 2} concentration results in higher bulk soil EC. Comparing the first 2 decay modes, it is found that the dependence of soil EC on soil CO{sub 2} concentration is weaker for the first decay mode than the second decay mode.

  7. Stationary and transient leakage current in the Pauli spin blockade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Qassemi; W. A. Coish; F. K. Wilhelm

    2009-04-22

    We study the effects of cotunneling and a non-uniform Zeeman splitting on the stationary and transient leakage current through a double quantum dot in the Pauli spin blockade regime. We find that the stationary current due to cotunneling vanishes at low temperature and large applied magnetic field, allowing for the dynamical preparation of a pure spin ground state, even at large voltage bias. Additionally, we analyze current that flows between blocking events, characterized, in general, by a fractional effective charge $e^*$. This charge can be used as a sensitive probe of spin relaxation mechanisms and can be used to determine the visibility of Rabi oscillations.

  8. Numerical Simulations of Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Hajime; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-09-01

    To secure a stable supply of petroleum gas, underground storage caverns for liquified petroleum gas (LPG) are commonly used in many countries worldwide. Storing LPG in underground caverns requires that the surrounding rock mass remain saturated with groundwater and that the water pressure be higher than the liquid pressure inside the cavern. In previous studies, gas containment criteria for underground gas storage based on hydraulic gradient and pressure have been discussed, but these studies do not consider the physicochemical characteristics and behavior of LPG such as vaporization and dissolution in groundwater. Therefore, while these studies are very useful for designing storage caverns, they do not provide better understanding of the either the environmental effects of gas contamination or the behavior of vaporized LPG. In this study, we have performed three-phase fluid flow simulations of gas leakage from underground LPG storage caverns, using the multiphase multicomponent nonisothermal simulator TMVOC (Pruess and Battistelli, 2002), which is capable of solving the three-phase nonisothermal flow of water, gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. A two-dimensional cross-sectional model resembling an actual underground LPG facility in Japan was developed, and gas leakage phenomena were simulated for three different permeability models: (1) a homogeneous model, (2) a single-fault model, and (3) a heterogeneous model. In addition, the behavior of stored LPG was studied for the special case of a water curtain suddenly losing its function because of operational problems, or because of long-term effects such as clogging of boreholes. The results of the study indicate the following: (1) The water curtain system is a very powerful means for preventing gas leakage from underground storage facilities. By operating with appropriate pressure and layout, gas containment can be ensured. (2) However , in highly heterogeneous media such as fractured rock and fault zones, local flow paths within which the gas containment criterion is not satisfied could be formed. To eliminate such zones, treatments such as pre/post grouting or an additional installment of water-curtain boreholes are essential. (3) Along highly conductive features such as faults, even partially saturated zones possess certain effects that can retard or prevent gas leakage, while a fully unsaturated fault connected to the storage cavern can quickly cause a gas blowout. This possibility strongly suggests that ensuring water saturation of the rock surrounding the cavern is a very important requirement. (4) Even if an accident should suddenly impair the water curtain, the gas plume does not quickly penetrate the ground surface. In these simulations, the plume takes several months to reach the ground surface.

  9. SETI via Leakage from Light Sails in Exoplanetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillochon, James

    2015-01-01

    The primary challenge of rocket propulsion is the burden of needing to accelerate the spacecraft's own fuel, resulting in only a logarithmic gain in maximum speed as propellant is added to the spacecraft. Light sails offer an attractive alternative in which fuel is not carried by the spacecraft, with acceleration being provided by an external source of light. By artificially illuminating the spacecraft with beamed radiation, speeds are only limited by the area of the sail, heat resistance of its material, and power use of the accelerating apparatus. In this paper, we show that leakage from a light sail propulsion apparatus in operation around a solar system analogue would be detectable. To demonstrate this, we model the launch and arrival of a microwave beam-driven light sail constructed for transit between planets in orbit around a single star, and find an optimal beam frequency on the order of tens of GHz. Leakage from these beams yields transients with flux densities of 0.1 Jy and durations of seconds at 1...

  10. Building America Case Study: Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space, Waldorf, Maryland (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed. For houses employing whole-house supply ventilation (positive pressure) or balanced ventilation (same pressure effect as the Baseline condition), adherence to the EPA Indoor airPLUS house-to-garage air sealing requirements should be sufficient to expect little to no garage-to-house air transfer.

  11. A MONITOR FOR DETECTING NUCLEAR WASTE LEAKAGE IN A SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klainer, S.

    2010-01-01

    using the easily handled uranyl ion, volf, solutions. Itsolution stable species, the uranyl ion, UC>2+), followed byfluorescence behavior of uranyl-doped CaF2 lattices at low

  12. Atmospheric and soil-gas monitoring for surface leakage at the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on their San Juan Basin coal-bed methane pilot test site near Navajo City, New Mexico. Nearly 18,407 short tons...

  13. A MONITOR FOR DETECTING NUCLEAR WASTE LEAKAGE IN A SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klainer, S.

    2010-01-01

    uranium analysis, laser-induced fluorescence, selective laser excitation, fluorescence (Submitted to Analytical Chemistry,Chemistry and Environmental Science Divisions Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA 94550 ULTRA-TRACE DETECTION OF URANIUM

  14. Atmospheric and soil-gas monitoring for surface leakage at the San Juan

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect AssessingBasin CO{sub 2} pilot test

  15. Joint and Conflat Leakage, March 2007 Tests P. Titus, MIT (Mar. 7,2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Joint and Conflat Leakage, March 2007 Tests P. Titus, MIT (Mar. 7,2007) · Problems feed closure valve that was "found equipment" · Cobbled together cryogenic system does not represent detected from the center terminal assembly. #12;Joint and Conflat Leakage, March 2007 Tests · During March

  16. Using Big Data and Smart Field Technology for Detecting Leakage in a CO2 Storage Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    of the underground carbon dioxide storage to confine and sustain the injected CO2 for very long time. If a leakageSPE 166137 Using Big Data and Smart Field Technology for Detecting Leakage in a CO2 Storage sequestration of carbon dioxide is one of the most fascinating developing technologies in order to reduce

  17. Tradeoffs between Gate Oxide Leakage and Delay for Dual ToxToxTox Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    lead to gate oxide leakage current (Igate), are coming into play from the 90nm node onwards. AccordingTradeoffs between Gate Oxide Leakage and Delay for Dual ToxToxTox Circuits Anup Kumar Sultania Department of ECE University of Minnesota Minneapolis, MN 55455. sachin@ece.umn.edu ABSTRACT Gate oxide

  18. Tamper and Leakage Resilience in the Split-State Model Feng-Hao Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Tamper and Leakage Resilience in the Split-State Model Feng-Hao Liu Brown University fenghao to create hardware that is immune from side channel and tampering attacks. A lot of recent literature to algorithmically secure any cryptographic functionality from continual split-state leakage and tampering attacks

  19. Leakage Evaluated and Controlled from Industrial Process Pipeline by Optimum Gasket Assembly Stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Ching

    0 Leakage Evaluated and Controlled from Industrial Process Pipeline by Optimum Gasket Assembly and vehicles), but they have ignore the leakage between pipelines in process industries. When hazardous materials leak imperceptibly, they increase the pathogenic risk to the workers at the workplace. Since 1937

  20. USE OF GCLS TO CONTROL LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOMEMBRANE DEFECTS UNDER HIGH HYDRAULIC HEADS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    USE OF GCLS TO CONTROL LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOMEMBRANE DEFECTS UNDER HIGH HYDRAULIC HEADS Christine T liners under conditions representative of dams (i.e., high hydraulic heads). Specifically, the objective of interface contact, hydraulic head, and GCL hydration procedures on the leakage rate were considered

  1. Leakage Power Optimization With Dual-Vth Library In High-Level Synthesis*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Hai

    algorithm for leakage power optimization based on the maximum weight independent set problem. A dual as the maximum weight independent set (MWIS) problem. The solution is weighed and the objective is to produce13.2 202 Leakage Power Optimization With Dual-Vth Library In High-Level Synthesis* Xiaoyong Tang

  2. Implementation and Evaluation of a Leakage-Resilient ElGamal Key Encapsulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    of the leakage functions in these models and only insist that the inputs to the leakage functions have sufficient and Tibouchi. Thirdly, we present a software implementation of BEG-KEM+ based on the Miracl library and provide proof, public-key encryption, pairings 1 Introduction How to secure cryptographic algorithms embedded

  3. Statistical Estimation of Leakage-Induced Power Grid Voltage Drop Considering Within-Die Process Variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    Statistical Estimation of Leakage-Induced Power Grid Voltage Drop Considering Within-Die Process the power grid, the grid develops large voltage drops, which is an unavoidable background level of noise on the grid. We develop techniques for estimation of the statistics of the leakage-induced power grid voltage

  4. Statistical Estimation of LeakageInduced Power Grid Voltage Drop Considering WithinDie Process Variations #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    Statistical Estimation of Leakage­Induced Power Grid Voltage Drop Considering Within­Die Process the power grid, the grid develops large voltage drops, which is an unavoidable background level of noise on the grid. We develop techniques for estimation of the statistics of the leakage­induced power grid voltage

  5. Circumstances of leakage related to low urethral closure pressure Xavier Fritel, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with no obvious reason were all associated with ISD, while leakage on coughing or sneezing was not. Conclusions;Introduction Classically, the circumstances of urinary leakage (coughing, sneezing, running, walking, upright during coughing or Valsalva maneuvers.2 This proportional relation between severity of incontinence

  6. Moisture Risk in Unvented Attics Due to Air Leakage Paths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, D.; Shaffer, M.

    2014-11-01

    IBACOS completed an initial analysis of moisture damage potential in an unvented attic insulated with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam. To complete this analysis, the research team collected field data, used computational fluid dynamics to quantify the airflow rates through individual airflow (crack) paths, simulated hourly flow rates through the leakage paths with CONTAM software, correlated the CONTAM flow rates with indoor humidity ratios from Building Energy Optimization software, and used Warme und Feuchte instationar Pro two-dimensional modeling to determine the moisture content of the building materials surrounding the cracks. Given the number of simplifying assumptions and numerical models associated with this analysis, the results indicate that localized damage due to high moisture content of the roof sheathing is possible under very low airflow rates. Reducing the number of assumptions and approximations through field studies and laboratory experiments would be valuable to understand the real-world moisture damage potential in unvented attics.

  7. Moisture Risk in Unvented Attics Due to Air Leakage Paths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, D.; Shaffer, M.

    2014-11-01

    IBACOS completed an initial analysis of moisture damage potential in an unvented attic insulated with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam. To complete this analysis, the research team collected field data, used computational fluid dynamics to quantify the airflow rates through individual airflow (crack) paths, simulated hourly flow rates through the leakage paths with CONTAM software, correlated the CONTAM flow rates with indoor humidity ratios from Building Energy Optimization software, and used Wärme und Feuchte instationär Pro two-dimensional modeling to determine the moisture content of the building materials surrounding the cracks. Given the number of simplifying assumptions and numerical models associated with this analysis, the results indicate that localized damage due to high moisture content of the roof sheathing is possible under very low airflow rates. Reducing the number of assumptions and approximations through field studies and laboratory experiments would be valuable to understand the real-world moisture damage potential in unvented attics.

  8. On Leakage from Geologic Storage Reservoirs of CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-02-14

    Large amounts of CO2 would need to be injected underground to achieve a significant reduction of atmospheric emissions. The large areal extent expected for CO2 plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered, such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape from the primary storage reservoir. Leakage of CO2 could also occur along wellbores. Concerns with escape of CO2 from a primary geologic storage reservoir include (1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard when leaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase in atmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy, eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In order to gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology for reducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address these issues and demonstrate that CO2 can be injected and stored safely in geologic formations.

  9. Monitoring arrangement for vented nuclear fuel elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campana, Robert J. (Solana Beach, CA)

    1981-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel reactor core, fuel elements are arranged in a closely packed hexagonal configuration, each fuel element having diametrically opposed vents permitting 180.degree. rotation of the fuel elements to counteract bowing. A grid plate engages the fuel elements and forms passages for communicating sets of three, four or six individual vents with respective monitor lines in order to communicate vented radioactive gases from the fuel elements to suitable monitor means in a manner readily permitting detection of leakage in individual fuel elements.

  10. Dynamic leakage of faults during differential depletion: Theory, models, and examples from the Niger delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, N.L.; Kaars Sijpestein, C.H.; Osai, L.N.; Okoli, O.C. (Shell Petroleum Development Co. of Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria))

    1991-08-01

    Previous studies of fault sealing have addressed possible fault leakage during secondary migration due to the effects of increased hydrocarbon-water capillary pressure, fracturing, or small-scale incremental fault movements. Of equal importance to production geologists is the failure and leakage of faults during field development due to differential depletion of adjacent fault blocks. This paper examines the unique problems associated with this dynamic leakage of faults. It is theoretically shown that the fault sealing mechanism, and the extent of the seal, directly influences the failure process which in turn results in a variety of favorable and unfavorable effects on field development. The qualitative models give considerable insight into such aspects as oil-column expansion and resaturation losses, interfault block aquifer support (with important implications to material balance calculations), possible leakage or spillage of oil across faults, and potential fault failure during (re)injection projects. Examples of dynamic fault leakage are presented from selected fields of the Niger delta.

  11. Gas Seal Leakage at High Temperature: A Labyrinth Seal and an All-Metal Complaint Seal of Similar Clearance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Alain

    2013-07-31

    Reducing secondary leakage is a common challenge in numerous machines, particularly in steam and gas turbines. Too large leakage in seals produces a substantial loss in efficiency and power delivery with an increase in specific fuel consumption...

  12. Performance Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimization Performance Monitoring Performance Monitoring A redirector page has been set up without anywhere to redirect to. Last edited: 2014-08-25 14:37:27...

  13. Monitoring materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques for effectively implementing alpha and/or beta and/or gamma monitoring of items or locations as desired. Indirect alpha monitoring by detecting ions generated by alpha emissions, in conjunction with beta and/or gamma monitoring is provided. The invention additionally provides for screening of items prior to alpha monitoring using beta and/or gamma monitoring, so as to ensure that the alpha monitoring apparatus is not contaminated by proceeding direct to alpha monitoring of a heavily contaminated item or location. The invention provides additional versatility in the emission forms which can be monitored, whilst maintaining accuracy and avoiding inadvertent contamination.

  14. Taxes and Trading versus Intensity Standards: Second-Best Environmental Policies with Incomplete Regulation (Leakage) or Market Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Stephen P.

    2009-01-01

    trading) have not been compared under leakage or market power.and Trading versus Intensity Standards: Second-Best Environmental Policies with Incomplete Regulation (Leakage) or Market Powerand Trading versus Intensity Standards: Second-Best Environmental Policies with Incomplete Regulation (Leakage) or Market Power

  15. Active Leakage Power Optimization for FPGAs Jason H. Anderson, Student Member, IEEE, and Farid N. Najm, Fellow, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    are with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineer- ing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Jason H leakage and gate leakage. Subthreshold leakage power is due to a non-zero current between the source- search Council of Canada Postgraduate Scholarship and an Ontario Graduate Scholarship. The authors

  16. Influence of halo implant on leakage current and sheet resistance of ultrashallow p-n junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroder, Dieter K.

    generation in the near-surface end-of-range damaged layer enhanced by trap-assisted tunneling. The reduced increase for USJs formed in halo-implanted profiles is explained by high electron and hole recombination should be addressed; electronic mail: vladimirf@frontiersemi.com 1588 1588J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 25

  17. Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor Inhibition Reverses the Vascular Leakage that Causes Malignant Ascites in Late-Stage Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moughon, Diana Louise

    2015-01-01

    inhibits ascites, and causes dramatic vascular remodeling inthe Vascular Leakage that Causes Malignant Ascites in Late-the Vascular Leakage that Causes Malignant Ascites in Late-

  18. A new method for determining the armature leakage reactance of synchronous machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Serafi, A.M.; Wu, J. (Power Systems Research Group, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (CA))

    1991-03-01

    This paper presents a new method for determining the armature leakage reactance of synchronous machines. In this method, the terminal voltage/armature current characteristic with the machine unloaded and unexcited is needed together with the open-circuit characteristic of the machine. The armature leakage reactance is derived from these two curves using iterative technique. The armature leakage reactances of five synchronous machines of different designs are obtained using the proposed method. Their values are compared with those of the Potier reactance of these machines measured at various terminal voltages.

  19. Urban leakage of liquefied petroleum gas and its impact on Mexico City air quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, D.R.; Rowland, F.S.

    1995-08-18

    Alkane hydrocarbons (propane, isobutane, and n-butane) from liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are present in major quantities throughout Mexico City air because of leakage of the unburned gas from numerous urban sources. These hydrocarbons, together with olefinic minor LPG components, furnish substantial amounts of hydroxyl radical reactivity, a major precursor to formation of the ozone component of urban smog. The combined processes of unburned leakage and incomplete combustion of LPG play significant role in causing the excessive ozone characteristic of Mexico City. Reductions in ozone levels should be possible through changes in LPG composition and lowered rates of leakage. 23 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Sedimentological and geophysical studies of clastic reservoir analogs: Methods, applications and developments of ground-penetrating radar for determination of reservoir geometries in near-surface settings. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMechan, G.A.; Soegaard, K.

    1998-05-25

    An integrated sedimentologic and GPR investigation has been carried out on a fluvial channel sandstone in the mid-Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone at Coyote Basin along the southwestern flank of the San Rafael Uplift in east-central Utah. This near-surface study, which covers a area of 40 {times} 16.5 meters to a depth of 15 meters, integrates detailed stratigraphic data from outcrop sections and facies maps with multi-frequency 3-D GPR surveys. The objectives of this investigation are two-fold: (1) to develop new ground-penetrating radar (GPR) technology for imaging shallow subsurface sandstone bodies, and (2) to construct an empirical three-dimensional sandstone reservoir model suitable for hydrocarbon flow-simulation by imaging near-surface sandstone reservoir analogs with the use of GPR. The sedimentological data base consists of a geologic map of the survey area and a detailed facies map of the cliff face immediately adjacent to the survey area. Five vertical sections were measured along the cliff face adjacent to the survey area. In addition, four wells were cored within the survey area from which logs were recorded. In the sections and well logs primary sedimentary structures were documented along with textural information and permeability data. Gamma-ray profiles were also obtained for all sections and core logs. The sedimentologic and stratigraphic information serves as the basis from which much of the processing and interpretation of the GPR data was made. Three 3-D GPR data sets were collected over the survey area at frequencies of 50 MHZ, 100 MHZ, and 200 MHZ.

  1. Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon SequestrationSites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

    2005-06-17

    Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and its storage in deep geologic formations. One of the concerns of geologic carbon sequestration is that injected CO{sub 2} may leak out of the intended storage formation, migrate to the near-surface environment, and seep out of the ground or into surface water. In this research, we investigate the process of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage into saturated sediments and overlying surface water bodies such as rivers, lakes, wetlands, and continental shelf marine environments. Natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are well studied and provide insight into the expected transport mechanisms and fate of seepage fluxes of similar magnitude. Also, natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are pervasive in surface water environments at levels that may mask low-level carbon sequestration leakage and seepage. Extreme examples are the well known volcanic lakes in Cameroon where lake water supersaturated with respect to CO{sub 2} overturned and degassed with lethal effects. Standard bubble formation and hydrostatics are applicable to CO{sub 2} bubbles in surface water. Bubble-rise velocity in surface water is a function of bubble size and reaches a maximum of approximately 30 cm s{sup -1} at a bubble radius of 0.7 mm. Bubble rise in saturated porous media below surface water is affected by surface tension and buoyancy forces, along with the solid matrix pore structure. For medium and fine grain sizes, surface tension forces dominate and gas transport tends to occur as channel flow rather than bubble flow. For coarse porous media such as gravels and coarse sand, buoyancy dominates and the maximum bubble rise velocity is predicted to be approximately 18 cm s{sup -1}. Liquid CO{sub 2} bubbles rise slower in water than gaseous CO{sub 2} bubbles due to the smaller density contrast. A comparison of ebullition (i.e., bubble formation) and resulting bubble flow versus dispersive gas transport for CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} at three different seepage rates reveals that ebullition and bubble flow will be the dominant form of gas transport in surface water for all but the smallest seepage fluxes or shallowest water bodies. The solubility of the gas species in water plays a fundamental role in whether ebullition occurs. We used a solubility model to examine CO{sub 2} solubility in waters with varying salinity as a function of depth below a 200 m-deep surface water body. In this system, liquid CO{sub 2} is stable between the deep regions where supercritical CO{sub 2} is stable and the shallow regions where gaseous CO{sub 2} is stable. The transition from liquid to gaseous CO{sub 2} is associated with a large change in density, with corresponding large change in bubble buoyancy. The solubility of CO{sub 2} is lower in high-salinity waters such as might be encountered in the deep subsurface. Therefore, as CO{sub 2} migrates upward through the deep subsurface, it will likely encounter less saline water with increasing capacity to dissolve CO{sub 2} potentially preventing ebullition, depending on the CO{sub 2} leakage flux. However, as CO{sub 2} continues to move upward through shallower depths, CO{sub 2} solubility in water decreases strongly leading to greater likelihood of ebullition and bubble flow in surface water. In the case of deep density-stratified lakes in which ebullition is suppressed, enhanced mixing and man-made degassing schemes can alleviate the buildup of CO{sub 2} and related risk of dangerous rapid discharges. Future research efforts are needed to increase understanding of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage in surface water and saturated porous media. For example, we recommend experiments and field tests of CO{sub 2} migration in saturated systems to formulate bubble-driven water-displacement models and relative permeability functions that can be used in simulation models.

  2. Effect of Return Air Leakage on Air Conditioner Performance in Hot/Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, D. L.; Rodriguez, A.; Davis, M.; Kondepudi, S.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of return air leakage from hot/humid attic spaces on the performance of a residential air conditioner. Tests were conducted in psychrometric facilities where temperatures and humidities...

  3. Leakage Assessment Methodology a clear roadmap for side-channel evaluations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Leakage Assessment Methodology ­ a clear roadmap for side-channel evaluations ­ Tobias Schneider flavors, and present a roadmap which can be followed by the evaluation labs to efficiently and correctly

  4. Natural CO? Fluids in Italy: Implications for the leakage of geologically stored CO? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jennifer Jean

    2013-07-01

    A principle concern for engineered CO2 storage is long-term security. Surface leakage (‘seepage’) of injected CO2 to the surface is economically and environmentally undesirable. Italy is a region of intense natural CO2 ...

  5. CFD based rotordynamic coefficients for labyrinth seals and impeller leakage paths 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Avijit

    1997-01-01

    accurately using simple flow model like bulk flow. CFD approach is employed since it can accurately predict and capture recirculating zones using proper mesh distribution. The Impeller Leakage paths and Labyrinth Seals, typically, have a recirculation zone...

  6. Regulation, Allocation, and Leakage in Cap-and-Trade Markets for CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B; Chen, Yihsu

    2009-01-01

    and Philippe Quirion. Co2 abatement, competitiveness andDaniel Kahn. Allocation of co2 emissions al- lowances in theA short-run case analysis of co2 leakage and nox and so2

  7. Surface CO2 leakage during the first shallow subsurface CO2 release experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, J.L.; Oldenburg, C.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2008-01-01

    numbered 0-6. Plots of F CO2 measured along the surface wellin Figure 2. Figure 2. Log F CO2 maps for measurements madeof soil CO 2 flux (F CO2 ). The surface leakage onset,

  8. Effects of operating damage of labyrinth seal on seal leakage and wheelspace hot gas ingress 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jinming

    2007-09-17

    The labyrinth seal is widely used in turbomachinery to minimize or control leakage between areas of different pressure. The present investigation numerically explored the effect of damage and wear of the labyrinth seal on ...

  9. Measurements of leakage, power loss and rotordynamic force coefficients in a hybrid brush seal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jose Enrique

    2009-05-15

    This thesis presents measurements of power loss and leakage in a hybrid brush seal (HBS) for increasing pressure differentials and over a range of rotor speeds. The test HBS, Haynes-25 bristle pack [~850 bristles/cm] and ...

  10. Leakage Risk Assessment for a Potential CO2 Storage Project in Saskatchewan, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houseworth, J.E.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Mazzoldi, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Nicot, J.-P.; Bryant, S.L.

    2011-05-01

    A CO{sub 2} sequestration project is being considered to (1) capture CO{sub 2} emissions from the Consumers Cooperative Refineries Limited at Regina, Saskatchewan and (2) geologically sequester the captured CO{sub 2} locally in a deep saline aquifer. This project is a collaboration of several industrial and governmental organizations, including the Petroleum Technology Research Centre (PTRC), Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC), SaskEnvironment Go Green Fund, SaskPower, CCRL, Schlumberger Carbon Services, and Enbridge. The project objective is to sequester 600 tonnes CO{sub 2}/day. Injection is planned to start in 2012 or 2013 for a period of 25 years for a total storage of approximately 5.5 million tonnes CO{sub 2}. This report presents an assessment of the leakage risk of the proposed project using a methodology known as the Certification Framework (CF). The CF is used for evaluating CO{sub 2} leakage risk associated with geologic carbon sequestration (GCS), as well as brine leakage risk owing to displacement and pressurization of brine by the injected CO{sub 2}. We follow the CF methodology by defining the entities (so-called Compartments) that could be impacted by CO{sub 2} leakage, the CO{sub 2} storage region, the potential for leakage along well and fault pathways, and the consequences of such leakage. An understanding of the likelihood and consequences of leakage forms the basis for understanding CO{sub 2} leakage risk, and forms the basis for recommendations of additional data collection and analysis to increase confidence in the risk assessment.

  11. Assessment Of Carbon Leakage In Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: ACase Study In Jambi Province, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boer, Rizaldi; Wasrin, Upik R.; Hendri, Perdinan; Dasanto,Bambang D.; Makundi, Willy; Hero, Julius; Ridwan, M.; Masripatin, Nur

    2007-06-01

    Rehabilitation of degraded forest land throughimplementation of carbon sink projects can increase terrestrial carbonstock. However, carbon emissions outside the project boundary, which iscommonly referred to as leakage, may reduce or negate the sequestrationbenefits. This study assessed leakage from carbon sink projects thatcould potentially be implemented in the study area comprised of elevensub-districts in the Batanghari District, Jambi Province, Sumatra,Indonesia. The study estimates the probability of a given land use/coverbeing converted into other uses/cover, by applying a logit model. Thepredictor variables were: proximity to the center of the land use area,distance to transportation channel (road or river), area of agriculturalland, unemployment (number of job seekers), job opportunities, populationdensity and income. Leakage was estimated by analyzing with and withoutcarbon sink projects scenarios. Most of the predictors were estimated asbeing significant in their contribution to land use cover change. Theresults of the analysis show that leakage in the study area can be largeenough to more than offset the project's carbon sequestration benefitsduring the period 2002-2012. However, leakage results are very sensitiveto changes of carbon density of the land uses in the study area. Byreducing C-density of lowland and hill forest by about 10 percent for thebaseline scenario, the leakage becomes positive. Further data collectionand refinement is therefore required. Nevertheless, this study hasdemonstrated that regional analysis is a useful approach to assessleakage.

  12. Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondaryaccumulation at shallow depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.

    2007-05-31

    Geologic storage of CO2 can be a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases only if it can bedemonstrated that leakage from proposed storage reservoirs and associatedhazards are small or can be mitigated. Risk assessment must evaluatepotential leakage scenarios and develop a rational, mechanisticunderstanding of CO2 behavior during leakage. Flow of CO2 may be subjectto positive feedbacks that could amplify leakage risks and hazards,placing a premium on identifying and avoiding adverse conditions andmechanisms. A scenario that is unfavorable in terms of leakage behavioris formation of a secondary CO2 accumulation at shallow depth. This paperdevelops a detailed numerical simulation model to investigate CO2discharge from a secondary accumulation, and evaluates the role ofdifferent thermodynamic and hydrogeologic conditions. Our simulationsdemonstrate self-enhancing as well as self-limiting feedbacks.Condensation of gaseous CO2, 3-phase flow of aqueous phase -- liquid CO2-- gaseous CO2, and cooling from Joule-Thomson expansion and boiling ofliquid CO2 are found to play important roles in the behavior of a CO2leakage system. We find no evidence that a subsurface accumulation of CO2at ambient temperatures could give rise to a high-energy discharge, aso-called "pneumatic eruption."

  13. Ionizing radiation induced leakage current on ultra-thin gate oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarpa, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Montera, F.; Ghibaudo, G.; Pananakakis, G.; Fuochi, P.G.

    1997-12-01

    MOS capacitors with a 4.4 nm thick gate oxide have been exposed to {gamma} radiation from a Co{sup 60} source. As a result, the authors have measured a stable leakage current at fields lower than those required for Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. This Radiation Induced Leakage Current (RILC) is similar to the usual Stress Induced Leakage Currents (SILC) observed after electrical stresses of MOS devices. They have verified that these two currents share the same dependence on the oxide field, and the RILC contribution can be normalized to an equivalent injected charge for Constant Current Stresses. They have also considered the dependence of the RILC from the cumulative radiation dose, and from the applied bias during irradiation, suggesting a correlation between RILC and the distribution of trapped holes and neutral levels in the oxide layer.

  14. Investigation of leakage current paths in n-GaN by conductive atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Bumho; Park, Yongjo, E-mail: yp0520@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: eyoon@snu.ac.kr [Energy Semiconductor Research Center, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)] [Energy Semiconductor Research Center, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Daeyoung; Nanishi, Yasushi [WCU Hybrid Materials Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)] [WCU Hybrid Materials Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Kisu [Energy Semiconductor Research Center, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of) [Energy Semiconductor Research Center, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sewoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Kuk [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Euijoon, E-mail: yp0520@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: eyoon@snu.ac.kr [Energy Semiconductor Research Center, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of) [Energy Semiconductor Research Center, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); WCU Hybrid Materials Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-10

    We have investigated electrical characteristics of leakage current paths in n-GaN layer grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition with conductive-atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). The C-AFM mapping shows two kinds of leakage current paths existing in the n-GaN layer: open-core dislocation and pure screw dislocation. From the localized I-V curves measured by C-AFM, we confirmed that the open-core screw dislocation shows more significant leakage current. We explained these results in terms of a modified Schottky band model based on donor states formed by oxygen segregation at the (10?10) sidewall of the open-core screw dislocation.

  15. Ion Monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-11-18

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

  16. Power Supply Optimization in Sub-130 nm Leakage Dominant Technologies Man L Mui Kaustav Banerjee Amit Mehrotra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Supply Optimization in Sub-130 nm Leakage Dominant Technologies Man L Mui Kaustav Banerjee a methodology for systematically optimizing the power supply voltage for maximizing the performance of VLSI cir- cuits in technologies where leakage power is not an insignificant fraction of the total power

  17. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 88, 062329 (2013) Understanding the effects of leakage in superconducting quantum-error-detection circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinis, John M.

    2013-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A 88, 062329 (2013) Understanding the effects of leakage in superconducting quantum of leakage in a two-qubit superconducting stabilizer measurement circuit. We simulate the repeated ancilla is important for superconducting qubits not only because higher-energy states |2 ,|3 , . . . are present [4

  18. A Low Leakage 9T SRAM Cell for Ultra-Low Power Operation Department of Electrical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayers, Joseph

    A Low Leakage 9T SRAM Cell for Ultra-Low Power Operation Sheng Lin Department of Electrical SRAM cell, low power, nanotechnology, leakage power, static noise margin 1. INTRODUCTION Advances on designing SRAM cells for low power operation in the deep sub-micron/nano ranges [2] [3] [4]. The common

  19. An Integrated Circuit/Architecture Approach to Reducing Leakage in Deep-Submicron High-Performance I-Caches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijaykumar, T. N.

    battery life and diminishes the utility of por- table systems. Historically, the primary source of energy] estimates a factor of 7.5 increase in leakage current and a five-fold increase in total leakage energy- ing speeds by scaling down the supply voltage and proportionately reducing the transistor threshold

  20. Electrostatic monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Cumbria, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Cumbria, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Cumbria, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for more simply measuring alpha and/or beta emissions arising from items or locations. The technique uses indirect monitoring of the emissions by detecting ions generated by the emissions, the ions being attracted electrostatically to electrodes for discharge of collection. The apparatus and method employ a chamber which is sealed around the item or location during monitoring with no air being drawn into or expelled from the chamber during the monitoring process. A simplified structure and operations arises as a result, but without impairing the efficiency and accuracy of the detection technique.

  1. Leakage from Sub-national Climate Initiatives: The Case of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    77 Massachusetts Avenue MIT E19-411 Cambridge MA 02139-4307 (USA) Location: 400 Main Street economies, including integration of electricity markets. Measures that will prevent leakage from California electricity and legislation ban- ning "resource shuffling". Under a cap-and-trade policy without measures

  2. Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database Wanyu R. Chan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database Wanyu R. Chan , Phillip N. Price, Michael D Road Berkeley, California 94720-8132 Corresponding author (Mail Stop: 90R3058; Tel: 510-495-2459; Fax to these two factors are presented for three types of houses: low-income, energy-efficient, and conventional

  3. Hydraulic barrier design and applicability for managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydraulic barrier design and applicability for managing the risk of CO2 leakage from deep saline modifying the leak hydraulic properties (e.g. permeability) may be unfeasible. An appealing option.e. by creating a hydraulic barrier. The present article presents and discusses the operational and strategic

  4. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: HVAC Cabinet Air Leakage Test Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This 2014 Top Innovation profile describes Building America-funded research by teams and national laboratories that resulted in the development of an ASHRAE standard and a standardized testing method for testing the air leakage of HVAC air handlers and furnace cabinets and has spurred equipment manufacturers to tighten the cabinets they use for residential HVAC systems.

  5. Elimination of Adverse Leakage Flow in a Miniature Pediatric Centrifugal Blood Pump by Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paden, Brad

    Elimination of Adverse Leakage Flow in a Miniature Pediatric Centrifugal Blood Pump levitated centrifugal blood pump intended to deliver 0.3­1.5 l/min of support to neo- nates and infants by centrifugal force to flow radially outwards toward the outlet of the impeller against an unfavorable pressure

  6. Carbon Leakage in the Primary Aluminium Sector: What evidence after 6 years of the EU ETS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS). The findings suggest that while rising electricity prices. Keywords: carbon leakage, European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS), CO2 pricing 1 1 #12;32 2 1 - Introduction Since the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) began pricing CO2 emissions within

  7. Studying Potential Side Channel Leakages on an Embedded Biometric Comparison System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Studying Potential Side Channel Leakages on an Embedded Biometric Comparison System Ma¨el Berthier1 of a hardware biometric comparison system that has been designed for fingerprints. An embedded biometric system the stored biometric data outside the system. Here one may try to retrieve the stored data via side channel

  8. NASA VLSI 2007 Mohanty & Kougianos 1 Impact of Gate Leakage on Mixed Signal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    NASA VLSI 2007 Mohanty & Kougianos 1 Impact of Gate Leakage on Mixed Signal Design and Simulation dhruva@unt.edu #12;NASA VLSI 2007 Mohanty & Kougianos 2 Outline of the Talk Introduction Related works Remedy Conclusions #12;NASA VLSI 2007 Mohanty & Kougianos 3 Introduction Characterization of mixed signal

  9. Mind Your Coins: Fully Leakage-Resilient Signatures with Graceful Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    . Part of the work done while at Aarhus University. Partially supported by Danish Council so-called side-channel attacks exploiting physical characteristics of a crypto-device, such as power on the secrets used within the system. A common way to model leakage attacks, is to empower the adversary

  10. Leakage current models of thin film silicon-on-insulator devices Hank Shin,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroder, Dieter K.

    of excellent isolation due to the buried oxide layer leading to reduced capacitance coupling and no latchup in complementary metal-oxide-silicon circuits compared with bulk silicon devices. Reduced junction area should lead to lower leakage for a given device. However, because of the buried oxide, stress is built up in the Si

  11. Generalized External Interaction with Tamper-Resistant Hardware with Bounded Information Leakage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    Generalized External Interaction with Tamper-Resistant Hardware with Bounded Information Leakage of Technology devadas@mit.edu ABSTRACT This paper investigates secure ways to interact with tamper- resistant on top of a recently- proposed secure processor Ascend [11]. Ascend is chosen because unlike other tamper

  12. Weak Leakage-Resilient Client-side Deduplication of Encrypted Data in Cloud Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ee-Chien

    and efficient way, in the bounded leakage setting where a certain amount of efficiently-extractable information by some user previously), and saves the uploading process if it is already in the cloud storage paper [34] reported that the deduplication technique can save up to 90% storage, dependent

  13. Reducing leakage in power-saving capable caches for embedded systems by using a filter cache

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giorgi, Roberto

    Reducing leakage in power-saving capable caches for embedded systems by using a filter cache or switch them off completely (cache decay) in order to save power. Our idea is to adaptively select mostly) improvement of other existing power-saving techniques; iii) providing results to select the most promising

  14. Managing Static Leakage Energy in Microprocessor Functional Units Steven Dropsho, Volkan Kursun, David H. Albonesi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Eby G.

    Managing Static Leakage Energy in Microprocessor Functional Units ÂŁ Steven DropshoĂť, Volkan Kursun of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Rochester Rochester, NY 14627 Abstract Static energy due structures. In this study, static energy is reduced in the integer functional units by leveraging the unique

  15. Mechanical damage detection using magnetic flux leakage tools: modeling the effect of dent geometry and stresses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clapham, Lynann

    The Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL) inspection method is the most cost effective technique for detecting corrosion and metal loss in in-service pipelines. The principle of the technique is relatively straightforward) has become a powerful modeling tool for studying MFL signals from corrosion defects [1

  16. Thermal Image Analysis for Detecting Facemask Leakage Jonathan Dowdall*, Ioannis Pavlidis*, and James Levine#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syndrome (SARS), an area of overt concern has been the transmission of infection through respiratory leakage in masks based on the principles of heat transfer and thermodynamics. The advantage with elevated levels of transmission risk such as hospital clinics, border check points, and airports. Keywords

  17. Ambient-RF-Energy-Harvesting Sensor Node with Capacitor-Leakage-Aware Duty Cycle Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    Ambient-RF-Energy-Harvesting Sensor Node with Capacitor-Leakage-Aware Duty Cycle Control Ryo (WSN) that are solely powered by ambient RF power. Different from all other energy harvesting WSN systems, RF powered systems present a new challenge for the energy management. A WSN node repeatedly

  18. Efficient, Context-Aware Privacy Leakage Confinement for Android Applications without Firmware Modding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Heng

    Efficient, Context-Aware Privacy Leakage Confinement for Android Applications without Firmware of EECS Syracuse University Syracuse, USA heyin@syr.edu ABSTRACT As Android has become the most prevalent operating system in mo- bile devices, privacy concerns in the Android platform are increas- ing. A mechanism

  19. Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    normalized leakage and a number of explanatory variables: IECC climate zone, floor area, height, year built airtightness is important because heating and cooling accounts for about 50% of the total energy consumption are commonly performed in a retrofit. In the US, the expected energy saving in heating and cool

  20. Statistical Estimation of Circuit Timing Vulnerability Due to Leakage-Induced Power Grid Voltage Drop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    Statistical Estimation of Circuit Timing Vulnerability Due to Leakage-Induced Power Grid Voltage voltage drops on the power grid that can affect circuit timing. We propose a statistical analysis supply voltage to circuit devices is referred to as the power grid. The consequences of power grid

  1. Hybrid Leakage and Voltage Reduction under EDF Scheduling Yifan Zhu Frank Mueller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Frank

    Hybrid Leakage and Voltage Reduction under EDF Scheduling Yifan Zhu Frank Mueller Department fabrication have resulted in an increasing need to conserve power of processors. While dynamic voltage scaling power. For such processors, voltage/frequency pairs below a critical speed result in higher power

  2. Leakage-Aware Energy Minimization using Dynamic Voltage Scaling and Cache

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Prabhat

    takes the advantage of the fact that linear reduction in the supply voltage can quadrati- cally reduceLeakage-Aware Energy Minimization using Dynamic Voltage Scaling and Cache Reconfiguration in Real are widely used to improve energy efficiency as well as overall performance. Dynamic voltage scaling (DVS

  3. DVSleak: Combining Leakage Reduction and Voltage Scaling in Feedback EDF Scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Frank

    DVSleak: Combining Leakage Reduction and Voltage Scaling in Feedback EDF Scheduling Yifan Zhu Recent trends in CMOS fabrication have the demand to conserve power of processors. While dynamic voltage fabrication processes are increasingly dominated by static power. For such processors, voltage/frequency pairs

  4. Leakage current and dielectric breakdown behavior in annealed SiO2 aerogel films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jo, Moon-Ho

    Leakage current and dielectric breakdown behavior in annealed SiO2 aerogel films Moon-Ho Jo behavior in annealed SiO2 aerogel films for intermetal dielectric applications was investigated in a metal­insulator­semiconductor structure. SiO2 aerogel films with porosities of 70% exhibited Poole­Frenkel conduction both before

  5. Quantifying Location Privacy Leakage from Transaction Prices Arthur Gervais, Hubert Ritzdorf, Mario Lucic, Srdjan Capkun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Quantifying Location Privacy Leakage from Transaction Prices Arthur Gervais, Hubert Ritzdorf, Mario potential privacy risks that are difficult to foresee. In this paper we study the impact that the prices a small set of low-priced product prices from the consumers' purchase histories, an adversary can de

  6. LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS Christine T. Weber, The University of Texas at Austin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS Christine T. Weber, The University of Texas for a range of conditions representative of dams, including representative hydraulic heads and soil hydraulic liner as a redundant lining system for earth dams. Introduction Embankment dams are susceptible

  7. Seismic Evaluation of the Fruitland Formation with Implications on Leakage Potential of Injected CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Thomas H.

    Seismic Evaluation of the Fruitland Formation with Implications on Leakage Potential of Injected CO Basin pilot test include acquisition of geophysical logs, time lapse VSP and analysis of 3D seismic data on the analysis of 3D seismic from the area. 3D seismic interpretation reveals that the Late Cretaceous Fruitland

  8. CO2 leakage through existing wells: current technology and regulations S. Taku Ide1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO2 leakage through existing wells: current technology and regulations S. Taku Ide1 , S. Julio the crust, and as such present zones of elevated risk to CO2 storage projects. Although current well closure and abandonment technology appears sufficient to contain CO2 at most sites, individual wells may suffer from

  9. A Simple Energy Model for the Harvesting and Leakage in a Supercapacitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingram, Mary Ann

    energy future. In this paper, we present a circuit- based model (CBM), which is a good fit of storage medium, the supercapcitor (SC), offers an attractive alternative. SCs do not hold as much energyA Simple Energy Model for the Harvesting and Leakage in a Supercapacitor Aravind Kailas Dept

  10. Leakage through Liners under High Hydraulic Heads C.T. Weber1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    of this project is to contribute towards the use of geosynthetics in the design of dams and other hydraulic of geomembrane and composite liners for hydraulic systems such as dams involves heads several hundreds largerLeakage through Liners under High Hydraulic Heads C.T. Weber1 and J.G. Zornberg2 1 Civil

  11. Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. Based on our analyses of the 54 simulation cases, the increase in annual fan energy is estimated to be 40 to 50% for a system with a total leakage of 19% at design conditions compared to a tight system with 5% leakage. Annual cooling plant energy also increases by about 7 to 10%, but reheat energy decreases (about 3 to 10%). In combination, the increase in total annual HVAC site energy is 2 to 14%. The total HVAC site energy use includes supply and return fan electricity consumption, chiller and cooling tower electricity consumption, boiler electricity consumption, and boiler natural gas consumption. Using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in 9 to 18% ($7,400 to $9,500) increases in HVAC system annual operating costs. Normalized by duct surface area, the increases in annual operating costs are 0.14 to 0.18 $/ft{sup 2}. Using a suggested one-time duct sealing cost of $0.20 per square foot of duct surface area, these results indicate that sealing leaky ducts in VAV systems has a simple payback period of about 1.3 years. Even with total leakage rates as low as 10%, duct sealing is still cost effective. This suggests that duct sealing should be considered at least for VAV systems with 10% or more total duct leakage. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the airhandler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

  12. Reduced order models for prediction of groundwater quality impacts from CO? and brine leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Liange; Carroll, Susan; Bianchi, Marco; Mansoor, Kayyum; Sun, Yunwei; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-12-31

    A careful assessment of the risk associated with geologic CO? storage is critical to the deployment of large-scale storage projects. A potential risk is the deterioration of groundwater quality caused by the leakage of CO? and brine leakage from deep subsurface reservoirs. In probabilistic risk assessment studies, numerical modeling is the primary tool employed to assess risk. However, the application of traditional numerical models to fully evaluate the impact of CO? leakage on groundwater can be computationally complex, demanding large processing times and resources, and involving large uncertainties. As an alternative, reduced order models (ROMs) can be used as highly efficient surrogates for the complex process-based numerical models. In this study, we represent the complex hydrogeological and geochemical conditions in a heterogeneous aquifer and subsequent risk by developing and using two separate ROMs. The first ROM is derived from a model that accounts for the heterogeneous flow and transport conditions in the presence of complex leakage functions for CO? and brine. The second ROM is obtained from models that feature similar, but simplified flow and transport conditions, and allow for a more complex representation of all relevant geochemical reactions. To quantify possible impacts to groundwater aquifers, the basic risk metric is taken as the aquifer volume in which the water quality of the aquifer may be affected by an underlying CO? storage project. The integration of the two ROMs provides an estimate of the impacted aquifer volume taking into account uncertainties in flow, transport and chemical conditions. These two ROMs can be linked in a comprehensive system level model for quantitative risk assessment of the deep storage reservoir, wellbore leakage, and shallow aquifer impacts to assess the collective risk of CO? storage projects.

  13. Reduced order models for prediction of groundwater quality impacts from CO? and brine leakage

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Liange; Carroll, Susan; Bianchi, Marco; Mansoor, Kayyum; Sun, Yunwei; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-12-31

    A careful assessment of the risk associated with geologic CO? storage is critical to the deployment of large-scale storage projects. A potential risk is the deterioration of groundwater quality caused by the leakage of CO? and brine leakage from deep subsurface reservoirs. In probabilistic risk assessment studies, numerical modeling is the primary tool employed to assess risk. However, the application of traditional numerical models to fully evaluate the impact of CO? leakage on groundwater can be computationally complex, demanding large processing times and resources, and involving large uncertainties. As an alternative, reduced order models (ROMs) can be used as highlymore »efficient surrogates for the complex process-based numerical models. In this study, we represent the complex hydrogeological and geochemical conditions in a heterogeneous aquifer and subsequent risk by developing and using two separate ROMs. The first ROM is derived from a model that accounts for the heterogeneous flow and transport conditions in the presence of complex leakage functions for CO? and brine. The second ROM is obtained from models that feature similar, but simplified flow and transport conditions, and allow for a more complex representation of all relevant geochemical reactions. To quantify possible impacts to groundwater aquifers, the basic risk metric is taken as the aquifer volume in which the water quality of the aquifer may be affected by an underlying CO? storage project. The integration of the two ROMs provides an estimate of the impacted aquifer volume taking into account uncertainties in flow, transport and chemical conditions. These two ROMs can be linked in a comprehensive system level model for quantitative risk assessment of the deep storage reservoir, wellbore leakage, and shallow aquifer impacts to assess the collective risk of CO? storage projects.« less

  14. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a monitoring well which includes an enclosure defining a cavity and a water reservoir enclosed within the cavity and wherein the reservoir has an inlet and an outlet. The monitoring well further includes a porous housing borne by the enclosure and which defines a fluid chamber which is oriented in fluid communication with the outlet of the reservoir, and wherein the porous housing is positioned in an earthen soil location below-grade. A geophysical monitoring device is provided and mounted in sensing relation relative to the fluid chamber of the porous housing; and a coupler is selectively moveable relative to the outlet of reservoir to couple the porous housing and water reservoir in fluid communication. An actuator is coupled in force transmitting relation relative to the coupler to selectively position the coupler in a location to allow fluid communication between the reservoir and the fluid chamber defined by the porous housing.

  15. Monitoring Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7ModificationsMonitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs This page

  16. Monitoring Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7ModificationsMonitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs This

  17. Monitoring Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7ModificationsMonitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs

  18. Method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thermos, Anthony Constantine (Greer, SC); Rahal, Fadi Elias (Easley, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A thermocouple assembly includes a thermocouple; a plurality of lead wires extending from the thermocouple; an insulating jacket extending along and enclosing the plurality of leads; and at least one internally sealed area within the insulating jacket to prevent fluid leakage along and within the insulating jacket. The invention also provides a method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple including the steps of a) attaching a plurality of lead wires to a thermocouple; b) adding a heat sensitive pseudo-wire to extend along the plurality of lead wires; c) enclosing the lead wires and pseudo-wire inside an insulating jacket; d) locally heating axially spaced portions of the insulating jacket to a temperature which melts the pseudo-wire and fuses it with an interior surface of the jacket.

  19. Leakage estimation of incompressible fluids in stepped labyrinth seals with swirl 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waughtal, Scott Perry

    1986-01-01

    LEAKAGE ESTIMATION OF INCOMPRESSIBLE FLUIDS IN STEPPED LABYRINTH SEALS WITH SWIRL A Thesis by SCOTT PERRY WAUGHTAL Submitted to the Graduate C o l l e g e of Texas A&M U n i v e r s i t y i n p a r t i a l f u l f i l l m e n... t of the requirement f o r the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Su b j e c t : Mechanical E n g i n e e r i n g LEAKAGE ESTIMATION OF INCOMPRESSIBLE FLUIDS IN STEPPED LABYRINTH SEALS WITH SWIRL A T h e s i s by S c o t t W a u g h t a l A p p r...

  20. Noise-Produced Patterns in Images Constructed from Magnetic Flux Leakage Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pimenova, Anastasiya V; Levesley, Jeremy; Elkington, Peter; Bacciarelli, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic flux leakage measurements help identify the position, size and shape of corrosion-related defects in steel casings used to protect boreholes drilled into oil and gas reservoirs. Images constructed from magnetic flux leakage data contain patterns related to noise inherent in the method. We investigate the patterns and their scaling properties for the case of delta-correlated input noise, and consider the implications for the method's ability to resolve defects. The analytical evaluation of the noise-produced patterns is made possible by model reduction facilitated by large-scale approximation. With appropriate modification, the approach can be employed to analyze noise-produced patterns in other situations where the data of interest are not measured directly, but are related to the measured data by a complex linear transform involving integrations with respect to spatial coordinates.

  1. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

  2. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

    1999-06-29

    A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

  3. Leakage radiation microscopy of surface plasmons launched by a nanodiamond-based tip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mollet, O; Drezet, A; Huant, S; 10.1016/j.diamond.2011.05.012

    2011-01-01

    Leakage-radiation microscopy of a thin gold film demonstrates the ability of an ensemble of fluorescent diamond nanoparticles attached onto the apex of an optical tip to serve as an efficient near-field surface-plasmon polariton launcher. The implementation of the nanodiamond-based tip in a near-field scanning optical microscope will allow for an accurate control on the launching position, thereby opening the way to scanning plasmonics.

  4. Experimental and theoretical rotordynamic coefficients and leakage of straight smooth annular gas seals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerr, Bradley Gray

    2005-02-17

    influenced by other operating parameters, whereas direct damping is nearly unaffected by changes in operating parameters. Effective damping, a good indicator of stability, is highly affected by fluid preswirl. Although rotordynamic coefficients... and direct iv damping are predicted reasonably well. Leakage is also consistently under-predicted. Theory predicts a slight frequency dependent nature for a limited number of test configurations. v ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank...

  5. CO2watermineral reactions during CO2 leakage: Geochemical and isotopic monitoring of a CO2 injection field test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be addressed during the selection and characterization of suitable CO2 storage sites (IEA-GHG, 2011; Lemieux., 2007; IEA-GHG, 2011). Considering a sce- nario where CO2 ­ or brine or both ­ escapes from the storage., 2010; Kharaka et al., 2010; Humez et al., 2011a, 2011b; IEA-GHG, 2011; Lemieux, 2011; Keating et al

  6. Universality of Non-Ohmic Shunt Leakage in Thin-Film Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dongaonkar, S.; Servaites, J. D.; Ford, G. M.; Loser, Stephen; Moore, J.; Gelfand, R. M.; Mohseni, H. W.; Agrawal, R.; Ratner, Mark A.; Marks, Tobin J.; Lundstrom, M. S.; Alam, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    We compare the dark current-voltage (IV) characteristics of three different thin-film solar cell types: hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) p-i-n cells, organic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) cells, and Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) cells. All three device types exhibit a significant shunt leakage current at low forward bias (Vleakage (I{sub sh} ) , across all three solar cell types considered, is characterized by the following common phenomenological features: (a) voltage symmetry about V=0 , (b) nonlinear (power law) voltage dependence, and (c) extremely weak temperature dependence. Based on this analysis, we provide a simple method of subtracting this shunt current component from the measured data and discuss its implications on dark IV parameter extraction. We propose a space charge limited (SCL) current model for capturing all these features of the shunt leakage in a consistent framework and discuss possible physical origin of the parasitic paths responsible for this shunt current mechanism.

  7. Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoretti, Nicolas Huwart, Laurent

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

  8. TabuTabu Search Based Gate LeakageSearch Based Gate Leakagegg Optimization using DKCMOSOptimization using DKCMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    Normaliz Physica 10-4 50 No P Chronological (Year) Chronological (Year) N P 10-6 0 1990 1995 2000 2005) #12;Leakages in CMOSLeakages in CMOSgg I1 : reverse bias pn junction (both ON & OFF) I2 : subthreshold

  9. An improved suppression method of the transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage with two reflectors in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhang, Qiang; Zhu, Danni [College of Optoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Suppression of the transverse-electromagnetic (TEM) mode leakage is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier with high gain, because a small microwave leakage from the buncher or the output cavity could overwhelm the input signal with low power. In this paper, a specially designed reflector is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage, whose axial electric field is approximately zero at the beam radial position. Theoretical analysis indicates that the reflector introduces little influence on the normal modulation of the beam while keeping a high reflection coefficient. By using two such reflectors with different eigen frequencies located in front of the buncher cavity and the output cavity, respectively, an improved triaxial klystron amplifier is presented. The simulation results show that the reflectors substantially decrease the TEM mode leakage power and achieve very good isolation among the cavities. The improved triaxial klystron amplifier can operate normally with 10's kW microwave injection without self-oscillations.

  10. Leakage risk assessment of the In Salah CO2 storage project: Applying the Certification Framework in a dynamic context.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Leakage risk assessment of the In Salah CO 2 storageCF) is a simple risk assessment approach for evaluating CO 2system including two risk assessment efforts, one before

  11. High Temperature Leakage Performance of a Hybrid Brush Seal Compared to a Standard Brush Seal and a Labyrinth Seal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashton, Zachary

    2010-01-14

    Adequate sealing in turbomachinery reduces secondary leakage and results in more efficient and stable systems. Labyrinth seals are most common, although brush seals are popular in specialized applications. The Hybrid Brush Seal (HBS) is a novel...

  12. Measurements versus predictions for rotordynamic coefficients and leakage rates for a novel hole-pattern gas seal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seifert, Brent Alan

    2007-04-25

    Results are presented for measured and predicted rotordynamic coefficients and leakage for hole-pattern seals with a hole depth that varies axially along the seal. Testing was done to discover how pressure ratio, inlet ...

  13. Sandia Energy - Monitoring Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring Systems Home Climate & Earth Systems Climate Measurement & Modeling Arctic Climate Measurements Monitoring Systems Monitoring Systemscwdd2015-06-02T22:40:49+00:00...

  14. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Health Monitoring Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring Structural Health Monitoring is the process of implementing a damage detection strategy for...

  15. Tritium monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01

    A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

  16. Tritium monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, P.

    1994-06-14

    A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

  17. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Collaborations Past Collaborations NSEC Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring- Test Structures &...

  18. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Collaborations Past Collaborations NSEC Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring- Statistical Pattern...

  19. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Collaborations Past Collaborations NSEC Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring- Methodology Contact...

  20. Environmental Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy Services » ProgramEnvironmental Monitoring

  1. Primary beam steering due to field leakage from superconducting SHMS magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, M. H. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Waidyawansa, B. P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Covrig, S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Carlini, R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Benesch, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Simulations of the magnetic fields from the Super High Momentum Spectrometer in Hall C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility show significant field leakage into the region of the primary beam line between the target and the beam dump. Without mitigation, these remnant fields will steer the unscattered beam enough to limit beam operations at small scattering angles. Presented here are magnetic field simulations of the spectrometer magnets and a solution using optimal placement of a minimal amount of shielding iron around the beam line.

  2. Advanced CO2 Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralization Sealing Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangler, Lee; Cunningham, Alfred; Phillips, Adrienne

    2015-03-31

    This research project addresses one of the goals of the DOE Carbon Sequestration Program (CSP). The CSP core R&D effort is driven by technology and is accomplished through laboratory and pilot scale research aimed at new technologies for greenhouse gas mitigation. Accordingly, this project was directed at developing novel technologies for mitigating unwanted upward leakage of carbon dioxide (CO2) injected into the subsurface as part of carbon capture and storage (CCS) activities. The technology developed by way of this research project is referred to as microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP).

  3. A Leakage Current-based Measurement of the Radiation Damage in the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor V. Gorelov; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-02-12

    A measurement has been made of the radiation damage incurred by the ATLAS Pixel Detector barrel silicon modules from the beginning of operations through the end of 2012. This translates to hadronic fluence received over the full period of operation at energies up to and including 8 TeV. The measurement is based on a per-module measurement of the silicon sensor leakage current. The results are presented as a function of integrated luminosity and compared to predictions by the Hamburg Model. This information can be used to predict limits on the lifetime of the Pixel Detector due to current, for various operating scenarios.

  4. Observations on Characterization of Defects in Coiled Tubing From Magnetic-Flux-Leakage Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy R. McJunkin; Karen S. Miller; Charles R. Tolle

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents observations on the sizing of automatically detected artificial flaws in coiled tubing samples using magnetic-flux-leakage data. Sixty-six artificial flaws of various shapes and types, ranging from 0.30 mm deep pits to slots with length of 9.5 mm, in 44.45 mm outer diameter pipe were analyzed. The detection algorithm and the information automatically extracted from the data are described. Observations on the capabilities and limitations for determining the size and shape of the flaws are discussed.

  5. Primary Beam Steering Due to Field Leakage from Superconducting SHMS Magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael H. Moore; Buddhini P. Waidyawansa; Silviu Covrig; Roger Carlini; Jay Benesch

    2014-08-26

    Simulations of the magnetic fields from the Super High Momentum Spectrometer in Hall C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility show significant field leakage into the region of the primary beam line between the target and the beam dump. Without mitigation, these remnant fields will steer the unscattered beam enough to limit beam operations at small scattering angles. Presented here are magnetic field simulations of the spectrometer magnets and a solution using optimal placement of a minimal amount of shielding iron around the beam line.

  6. Primary beam steering due to field leakage from superconducting SHMS magnets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moore, Michael H.; Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA; Waidyawansa, Buddhini P.; Covrig, Silviu; Carlini, Roger; Benesch, Jay

    2014-11-05

    In this study, simulations of the magnetic fields from the Super High Momentum Spectrometer in Hall C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility show significant field leakage into the region of the primary beam line between the target and the beam dump. Without mitigation, these remnant fields will steer the unscattered beam enough to limit beam operations at small scattering angles. Presented here are magnetic field simulations of the spectrometer magnets and a solution using optimal placement of a minimal amount of shielding iron around the beam line.

  7. Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Impact on Carbon Capture and Storage Energy Market Competitiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Catherine; Fitts, Jeffrey; Wilson, Elizabeth; Pollak, Melisa; Bielicki, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Vatsal

    2013-03-13

    This three-year project, performed by Princeton University in partnership with the University of Minnesota and Brookhaven National Laboratory, examined geologic carbon sequestration in regard to CO{sub 2} leakage and potential subsurface liabilities. The research resulted in basin-scale analyses of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage in light of uncertainties in the characteristics of leakage processes, and generated frameworks to monetize the risks of leakage interference with competing subsurface resources. The geographic focus was the Michigan sedimentary basin, for which a 3D topographical model was constructed to represent the hydrostratigraphy. Specifically for Ottawa County, a statistical analysis of the hydraulic properties of underlying sedimentary formations was conducted. For plausible scenarios of injection into the Mt. Simon sandstone, leakage rates were estimated and fluxes into shallow drinking-water aquifers were found to be less than natural analogs of CO{sub 2} fluxes. We developed the Leakage Impact Valuation (LIV) model in which we identified stakeholders and estimated costs associated with leakage events. It was found that costs could be incurred even in the absence of legal action or other subsurface interference because there are substantial costs of finding and fixing the leak and from injection interruption. We developed a model framework called RISCS, which can be used to predict monetized risk of interference with subsurface resources by combining basin-scale leakage predictions with the LIV method. The project has also developed a cost calculator called the Economic and Policy Drivers Module (EPDM), which comprehensively calculates the costs of carbon sequestration and leakage, and can be used to examine major drivers for subsurface leakage liabilities in relation to specific injection scenarios and leakage events. Finally, we examined the competiveness of CCS in the energy market. This analysis, though qualitative, shows that financial incentives, such as a carbon tax, are needed for coal combustion with CCS to gain market share. In another part of the project we studied the role of geochemical reactions in affecting the probability of CO{sub 2} leakage. A basin-scale simulation tool was modified to account for changes in leakage rates due to permeability alterations, based on simplified mathematical rules for the important geochemical reactions between acidified brines and caprock minerals. In studies of reactive flows in fractured caprocks, we examined the potential for permeability increases, and the extent to which existing reactive transport models would or would not be able to predict it. Using caprock specimens from the Eau Claire and Amherstburg, we found that substantial increases in permeability are possible for caprocks that have significant carbonate content, but minimal alteration is expected otherwise. We also found that while the permeability increase may be substantial, it is much less than what would be predicted from hydrodynamic models based on mechanical aperture alone because the roughness that is generated tends to inhibit flow.

  8. A study on leakage radiation dose at ELV-4 electron accelerator bunker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chulan, Mohd Rizal Md E-mail: redzuwan@ukm.my; Yahaya, Redzuwan E-mail: redzuwan@ukm.my; Ghazali, Abu BakarMhd

    2014-09-03

    Shielding is an important aspect in the safety of an accelerator and the most important aspects of a bunker shielding is the door. The bunker’s door should be designed properly to minimize the leakage radiation and shall not exceed the permitted limit of 2.5?Sv/hr. In determining the leakage radiation dose that passed through the door and gaps between the door and the wall, 2-dimensional manual calculations are often used. This method is hard to perform because visual 2-dimensional is limited and is also very difficult in the real situation. Therefore estimation values are normally performed. In doing so, the construction cost would be higher because of overestimate or underestimate which require costly modification to the bunker. Therefore in this study, two methods are introduced to overcome the problem such as simulation using MCNPX Version 2.6.0 software and manual calculation using 3-dimensional model from Autodesk Inventor 2010 software. The values from the two methods were eventually compared to the real values from direct measurements using Ludlum Model 3 with Model 44-9 probe survey meter.

  9. Accelerating universe from gravitational leakage into extra dimensions: confrontation with SNeIa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zong-Hong Zhu; Jailson S. Alcaniz

    2004-11-01

    There is mounting observational evidence that the expansion of our universe is undergoing an acceleration. A dark energy component has usually been invoked as the most feasible mechanism for the acceleration. However, it is desirable to explore alternative possibilities motivated by particle physics before adopting such an untested entity. In this work, we focus our attention on an acceleration mechanism: one arising from gravitational leakage into extra dimensions. We confront this scenario with high-$z$ type Ia supernovae compiled by Tonry et al. (2003) and recent measurements of the X-ray gas mass fractions in clusters of galaxies published by Allen et al. (2002,2003). A combination of the two databases gives at a 99% confidence level that $\\Omega_m=0.29^{+0.04}_{-0.02}$, $\\Omega_{rc}=0.21^{+0.08}_{-0.08}$, and $\\Omega_k=-0.36^{+0.31}_{-0.35}$, indicating a closed universe. We then constrain the model using the test of the turnaround redshift, $z_{q=0}$, at which the universe switches from deceleration to acceleration. We show that, in order to explain that acceleration happened earlier than $z_{q=0} = 0.6$ within the framework of gravitational leakage into extra dimensions, a low matter density, $\\Omega_m < 0.27$, or a closed universe is necessary.

  10. Physics of gate leakage current in N-polar InAlN/GaN heterojunction field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, Arunesh; Trew, Robert J.; Bilbro, Griff L.

    2014-10-28

    A physics based model of the gate leakage current in N-polar InAlN/GaN heterojunction field effect transistors is demonstrated. The model is based on the space charge limited current flow dominated by the effects of deep traps in the InAlN surface layer. The model predicts accurately the gate-leakage measurement data of the N-polar InAlN/GaN device with InAlN cap layer. In the pinch-off state, the gate leakage current conduction through the surface of the device in the drain access region dominates the current flow through the two dimensional electron gas channel. One deep trap level and two levels of shallow traps are extracted by fitting the model results with measurement data.

  11. Extremely scaled high-k/In?.??Ga?.??As gate stacks with low leakage and low interface trap densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chobpattana, Varistha; Mikheev, Evgeny; Zhang, Jack Y.; Mates, Thomas E.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2014-09-28

    Highly scaled gate dielectric stacks with low leakage and low interface trap densities are required for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology with III-V semiconductor channels. Here, we show that a novel pre-deposition technique, consisting of alternating cycles of nitrogen plasma and tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium, allows for HfO? and ZrO? gate stacks with extremely high accumulation capacitance densities of more than 5 ?F/cm? at 1 MHz, low leakage current, low frequency dispersion, and low midgap interface trap densities (10ą˛cm?˛eV?ąrange). Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that the interface contains TiO? and small quantities of In?O?, but no detectable Ga- or As-oxides, or As-As bonding. The results allow for insights into the microscopic mechanisms that control leakage and frequency dispersion in high-k/III-V gate stacks.

  12. Reduction of surface leakage current by surface passivation of CdZn Te and other materials using hyperthermal oxygen atoms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffbauer, Mark A. (Los Alamos, NM); Prettyman, Thomas H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01

    Reduction of surface leakage current by surface passivation of Cd.sub.1-x Zn.sub.x Te and other materials using hyperthermal oxygen atoms. Surface effects are important in the performance of CdZnTe room-temperature radiation detectors used as spectrometers since the dark current is often dominated by surface leakage. A process using high-kinetic-energy, neutral oxygen atoms (.about.3 eV) to treat the surface of CdZnTe detectors at or near ambient temperatures is described. Improvements in detector performance include significantly reduced leakage current which results in lower detector noise and greater energy resolution for radiation measurements of gamma- and X-rays, thereby increasing the accuracy and sensitivity of measurements of radionuclides having complex gamma-ray spectra, including special nuclear materials.

  13. Design and package of a {sup 14}CO{sub 2} field analyzer The Global Monitor Platform (GMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bright, Michelle; Marino, Bruno D.V.; Gronniger, Glen

    2011-08-01

    Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is widely accepted as a means to reduce and eliminate the fossil fuel CO{sub 2} (ff- CO{sub 2}) emissions from coal fired power plants. Success of CCS depends on near zero leakage rates over decadal time scales. Currently no commercial methods to determine leakage of ff-CO{sub 2} are available. The Global Monitor Platform (GMP) field analyzer provides high precision analysis of CO{sub 2} isotopes [12C (99%), 13C (<1%), 14C (1.2x10-10 %)] that can differentiate between fossil and biogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. Fossil fuels contain no {sup 14}C; their combustion should lower atmospheric amounts on local to global scales. There is a clear mandate for monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) of CCS systems nationally and globally to verify CCS integrity, treaty verification (Kyoto Protocol) and to characterize the nuclear fuel cycle. Planetary Emissions Management (PEM), working with the National Secure Manufacturing Center (NSMC), has the goal of designing, ruggedizing and packaging the GMP for field deployment. The system will conduct atmosphere monitoring then adapt the system to monitor water and soil evaluations. Measuring {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in real time will provide quantitative concentration data for ff-CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere and CCS leakage detection. Initial results will be discussed along with design changes for improved detection sensitivity and manufacturability.

  14. Geomechanical effects on CO{sub 2} leakage through fault zones during large-scale underground injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinaldi, A.P.; Rutqvist, J.; Cappa, F.

    2013-09-01

    The importance of geomechanics—including the potential for faults to reactivate during large scale geologic carbon sequestration operations—has recently become more widely recognized. However, notwithstanding the potential for triggering notable (felt) seismic events, the potential for buoyancy-driven CO{sub 2} to reach potable groundwater and the ground surface is actually more important from public safety and storage-efficiency perspectives. In this context, this work extends the previous studies on the geomechanical modeling of fault responses during underground carbon dioxide injection, focusing on the short-term integrity of the sealing caprock, and hence on the potential for leakage of either brine or CO{sub 2} to reach the shallow groundwater aquifers during active injection. We consider stress/strain-dependent permeability and study the leakage through the fault zone as its permeability changes during a reactivation, also causing seismicity. We analyze several scenarios related to the volume of CO{sub 2} injected (and hence as a function of the overpressure), involving both minor and major faults, and analyze the profile risks of leakage for different stress/strain-permeability coupling functions. We conclude that whereas it is very difficult to predict how much fault permeability could change upon reactivation, this process can have a significant impact on the leakage rate. Moreover, our analysis shows that induced seismicity associated with fault reactivation may not necessarily open up a new flow path for leakage. Results show a poor correlation between magnitude and amount of fluid leakage, meaning that a single event is generally not enough to substantially change the permeability along the entire fault length. Consequently, even if some changes in permeability occur, this does not mean that the CO{sub 2} will migrate up along the entire fault, breaking through the caprock to enter the overlying aquifer.

  15. Transcriptional leakage versus noise: A simple mechanism of conversion between binary and graded response in autoregulated genes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Ochab-Marcinek; Marcin Tabaka

    2015-01-16

    We study the response of an autoregulated gene to a range of concentrations of signal molecules. We show that transcriptional leakage and noise due to translational bursting have the opposite effects. In a positively autoregulated gene, increasing the noise converts the response from graded to binary, while increasing the leakage converts the response from binary to graded. Our findings support the hypothesis that, being a common phenomenon, leaky expression may be a relatively easy way for evolutionary tuning of the type of gene response without changing the type of regulation from positive to negative.

  16. The marginal leakage of some dental cements in humans: a PIXE-microbeam approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zadro, A.; Passi, P. [Dental School, Department of Dental Materials, University of Padua (Italy); Cavalleri, G. [Dental School, Department of Restorative Dentistry, University of Verona (Italy); Galassini, S.; Moschini, G.; Rossi, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy)

    1999-06-10

    The marginal leakage and water absorption of dental cements and restorative materials has been investigated by many authors with several techniques, some of which led to valid results. However, no technique could give, by itself, information both on leakage and water absorption, as these measurements usually need different investigations. PIXE micro beam offers the possibility of investigating these two aspects at the same time, since it is possible to map a proper marker element. In the present study, cavities were made on 50 extracted human molars, then filled with five different temporary cements (IRM, Cavit W, Kalsogen, Fermit N, SuperEBA). The filled teeth were placed into a 5% silver nitrate solution, and after three days, one, two, three and four weeks were examined. The samples for microPIXE were prepared after embedding the teeth in epoxy resin, and sectioning and grinding them down to a thickness of about 1 mm. The sections were placed on metal holders, and examined with a scanning proton {mu}beam, in Legnaro (Italy) at the AN2000 LAB of INFN National Laboratories. The beam consisted of 2.4 MeV protons, it had a cross section of 1.5 micron in diameter and typical currents of the order of some {mu}A were used. The maps were obtained by an 'ad hoc' software with a McIntosh personal computer. Mapping of silver allowed to evaluate both the marginal leakage and the water absorption for each cement. The samples filled with Cavit W showed a great infiltration, as the tracing element was found in the cement bulk, along the margins and inside the cavity, while those filled with IRM and Kalsogen presented only a deposition of the tracing solution on the cement surface. SuperEBA showed a poor resistance against microleakage, because the marker element was only detected along the cavity margins. Fermit N showed the best marginal integrity, and on its surface no traces of siver were found. In this case the better resistance may be due to the resin present in the composition of the material.

  17. Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, Craig; Sherman, Max

    2010-03-01

    This project addressed two significant deficiencies in air-handling systems for large commercial building: duct leakage and duct static pressure reset. Both constitute significant energy reduction opportunities for these buildings. The overall project goal is to bridge the gaps in current duct performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of air-handling system performance in California large commercial buildings. The purpose of this project is to provide technical support for the implementation of a duct leakage modeling capability in EnergyPlus, to demonstrate the capabilities of the new model, and to carry out analyses of field measurements intended to demonstrate the energy saving potential of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset (SPR) technology. A new duct leakage model has been successfully implemented in EnergyPlus, which will enable simulation users to assess the impacts of leakage on whole-building energy use and operation in a coupled manner. This feature also provides a foundation to support code change proposals and compliance analyses related to Title 24 where duct leakage is an issue. Our example simulations continue to show that leaky ducts substantially increase fan power: 10percent upstream and 10percent downstream leakage increases supply fan power 30percent on average compared to a tight duct system (2.5percent upstream and 2.5percent downstream leakage). Much of this increase is related to the upstream leakage rather than to the downstream leakage. This does not mean, however, that downstream leakage is unimportant. Our simulations also demonstrate that ceiling heat transfer is a significant effect that needs to be included when assessing the impacts of duct leakage in large commercial buildings. This is not particularly surprising, given that ?ceiling regain? issues have already been included in residential analyses as long as a decade ago (e.g., ASHRAE Standard 152); mainstream simulation programs that are used for large commercial building energy analyses have not had this capability until now. Our analyses of data that we collected during our 2005 tests of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset technology show that this technology can substantially reduce fan power (in this case, by about 25 to 30percent). Tempering this assessment, however, is that cooling and heating coil loads were observed to increase or decrease significantly depending on the time window used. Their impact on cooling and heating plant power needs to be addressed in future studies; without translating the coil loads to plant equipment energy use, it is not possible to judge the net impact of this SPR technology on whole-building energy use. If all of the loads had decreased, such a step would not be as necessary.

  18. Groundwater Monitoring Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Groundwater Monitoring Network Groundwater Monitoring Network The network includes 92 natural sources, 102 regional aquifer wells, 41 intermediate-depth wells and springs, and 67...

  19. Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Health Monitoring Engineering Institute Structural Health Monitoring- The Los Alamos Approach Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI...

  20. Effect of refrigerant charge, duct leakage, and evaporator air flow on the high temerature performance of air conditioners and heat pumps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Angel Gerardo

    1995-01-01

    evaporator airflow, and return air leakage from hot attic spaces. There were five sets of tests used for this research: two of them for the charging tests, two for the reduced evaporator airflow, and one for the return air leakage tests. For the charging...

  1. Magnetic flux leakage inspection of gas pipelines: Experience with a collapsible tool. Final report, July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scrivner, R.W.

    1996-07-01

    The Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL) technique is the most commonly used method to inspect transmission pipelines for corrosion. A typical MFL tool operates in pipelines which have no restrictions. Reduced size valves, a 24 inch valve in a 30 inch pipeline, are one such restriction. A collapsible MFL tool was developed to allow pipelines with reduced size valves to be inspected without expensive valve replacement. The first use, in 1995, of a 30 inch tool succeeded in passing through the valves and inspecting the pipeline. The first use of a 36 inch tool railed due to a partially closed valve, damaging the tool. The tool was ultimately run after some repairs to the tool and most of the reduced size valves were replaced with full size valves. The results of the final run were very good. Additional use of the tools in 1996 has provided excellent results.

  2. DETECTION OF MECHANICAL DAMAGE USING THE MAGNETIC FLUX LEAKAGE TECHNIQUE L. Clapham, V. Babbar, and James Byrne.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clapham, Lynann

    DETECTION OF MECHANICAL DAMAGE USING THE MAGNETIC FLUX LEAKAGE TECHNIQUE L. Clapham, V. Babbar mechanical damage in pipelines. However, MFL application to mechanical damage detection faces hurdles which effects, 2) the stress distribution around a mechanically damaged region is very complex, consisting

  3. Uncertainty Analysis of Capacity Estimates and Leakage Potential for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifers by Yamama Raza Submitted to the Engineering Systems DivisionUncertainty Analysis of Capacity Estimates and Leakage Potential for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifers by Yamama Raza S.B., Engineering Science, Smith College, 2006 Submitted

  4. Analytical solutions for pressure perturbation and fluid leakage through aquitards and wells in multilayered-aquifer systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    Analytical solutions for pressure perturbation and fluid leakage through aquitards and wells not only in the target formation(s), but also in over- and underlying units. Hydraulic communication wells. Existing analytical solutions for pressure perturbation and fluid flow in such systems consider

  5. Universality of non-Ohmic shunt leakage in thin-film solar cells S. Dongaonkar,1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Muhammad A.

    Universality of non-Ohmic shunt leakage in thin-film solar cells S. Dongaonkar,1,a J. D. Servaites thin-film solar cell types: hydrogenated amorphous silicon a-Si:H p-i-n cells, organic bulk understanding of thin film solar cell device physics, including important module performance variability issues

  6. SU-E-T-628: Effect of Dose Rate and Leakage Correction for Dosimetric Leaf Gap Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, W; Chu, A; Chi, Y; Hu, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the dose rate response of Mapcheck and quantify/correct dose rate/leakage effect on IMRT QA. Evaluate the dose rate/leakage effect on dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) measurement. Methods: Varian Truebeam Linac with HD120 MLC was used for all measurement, it is capable to adjust dose rate from 600MU/min to 5MU/min. Fluke Advanced Therapy Doisemter and PTW 30013 Farmer chamber for chamber measurement; SunNuclear Mapcheck2 with 5cm total buildup for diode measurement. DLG was measured with both chamber and diode.Diode response was measured by varies dose rate, while fixed mapcheck setup and total MU. MLC Leakage was measured with both chamber and diode. Mapcheck measurement was saved as movie file (mcm file), which include measurement updated every 50mSec. The difference between intervals can be converted to dose and dose rate and leakage response correction can be applied to them. Results: DLG measurement results with chamber and diode were showed as follows, the DLG value is 0.36 vs. 0.24mm respectively. Diode dose rate response drops from 100% at 600MU/min to 95.5% at 5MU/min as follows. MLC Leakage measured with diode is 1.021%, which is 9% smaller than 1.112% from chamber measurement. By apply the dose rate and leakage correction, the residue error reduced 2/3. Conclusions: Diode has lower response at lower dose rate, as low as 4.5% for 5MU/min; diode has lower energy response for low energy too, 5% lower for Co-60 than 6MV. It partially explains the leakage difference of 9% between chamber and diode. Lower DLG with diode is because of the lower response at narrower gap, in Eclipse however DLG need to increase to makeup lower response, which is over correction for chamber though. Correction can reduce error by 2/3, the rest 1/3 can be corrected by scatter effect, which is under study.

  7. Calculated in-air leakage spectra and power levels for the ANSI standard minimum accident of concern. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, B.L. Jr.; Dobelbower, M.C.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    This document represents Phase I of a two-phase project. The entire project consists of determining a series of minimum accidents of concern and their associated neutron and photon leakage spectra that may be used to determine Criticality Accident Alarm compliance with ANSI/ANS-8.3. The inadvertent assembly of a critical mass of material presents a multitude of unknown quantities. Depending on the particular process, one can make an educated guess as to fissile material. In a gaseous diffusion cascade, this material is assumed to be uranyl fluoride. However, educated assumptions cannot be readily made for the other variables. Phase I of this project is determining a bounding minimum accident of concern and its associated neutron and photon leakage spectra. To determine the composition of the bounding minimum accident of concern, work was done to determine the effects of geometry, moderation level, and enrichment on the leakage spectra of a critical assembly. The minimum accident of concern is defined as the accident that may be assumed to deliver the equivalent of an absorbed dose in free air of 20 rad at a distance of 2 meters from the reacting material within 60 seconds. To determine this dose, an analyst makes an assumption and choose an appropriate flux to dose response function. The power level required of a critical assembly to constitute a minimum accident of concern depends heavily on the response function chosen. The first step in determining the leakage spectra was to attempt to isolate the effects of geometry, after which all calculations were conducted on critical spheres. The moderation level and enrichment of the spheres were varied and their leakage spectra calculated. These spectra were then multiplied by three different response functions: the Henderson Flux to Dose conversion factors, the ICRU 44 Kerma in Air, and the MCNP Heating Detector. The power level required to produce a minimum accident of concern was then calculated for each combination.

  8. Geomechanical Simulation of CO{sub 2} Leakage and Cap Rock Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nygaard, Runar; Bai, Baojun; Eckert, Andreas

    2012-09-30

    CO{sub 2} sequestration into porous and permeable brine filled aquifers is seen as one of the most likely near-term solutions for reducing greenhouse gases. Safely storing injected CO{sub 2}, which is less dense than water, requires trapping the CO{sub 2} under an impermeable rock which would act as a seal. One of the concerns with CO{sub 2} sequestration is the generation of new fractures or reactivation of existing fractures and faults caused by CO{sub 2} injection into the sealing formation. Mitigation strategies must be developed to remediate potentially leaking faults or fractures. This project evaluated potential storage scenarios in the state of Missouri and developed coupled reservoir and geomechanic simulations to identify storage potential and leakage risks. Further, several injectable materials used to seal discontinuities were evaluated under subsurface conditions. The four sealant materials investigated were paraffin wax, silica based gel, polymer based gel, and micro-cement, which all significantly reduced the fracture permeability. However, the micro-cement was the most effective sealing agent and the only sealant able to withstand the large differential pressure caused by CO{sub 2} or brine injection and create a strong seal to prevent further fracturing.

  9. Building America Case Study: Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    'The cost for blower testing is high, because it is labor intensive, and it may disrupt occupants in multiple units. This high cost and disruption deters program participants, and dissuades them from pursuing energy improvements that would trigger air leakage testing, such as improvements to the building envelope.' This statement found in a 2012 report by Heschong Mahone Group emphasizes the importance of reducing the cost and complexity of blower testing in multifamily buildings. Energy efficiency opportunities are being bypassed. The cost of single blower testing is on the order of $300. The cost for guarded blower door testing, the more appropriate test for assessing energy savings opportunities, could easily be six times that and that's only if you have the equipment and simultaneous access to multiple apartments. Thus, the proper test is simply not performed. The objective of the 2013 research project was to develop the model for predicting fully guarded test results (FGT), using unguarded test data and specific building features of apartment units. The model developed has a coefficient of determination R2 value of 0.53 with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.13. Both statistical metrics indicate that the model is relatively strong. When tested against data that was not included in the development of the model, prediction accuracy was within 19%, which is reasonable given that seasonal differences in blower door measurements can vary by as much as 25%.

  10. Uncertainty analyses of CO2 plume expansion subsequent to wellbore CO2 leakage into aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Bacon, Diana H.; Engel, David W.; Lin, Guang; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Fang, Zhufeng

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we apply an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to CO2 sequestration problems. In one scenario, we look at the risk of wellbore leakage of CO2 into a shallow unconfined aquifer in an urban area; in another scenario, we study the effects of reservoir heterogeneity on CO2 migration. We combine various sampling approaches (quasi-Monte Carlo, probabilistic collocation, and adaptive sampling) in order to reduce the number of forward calculations while trying to fully explore the input parameter space and quantify the input uncertainty. The CO2 migration is simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). For computationally demanding simulations with 3D heterogeneity fields, we combined the framework with a scalable version module, eSTOMP, as the forward modeling simulator. We built response curves and response surfaces of model outputs with respect to input parameters, to look at the individual and combined effects, and identify and rank the significance of the input parameters.

  11. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dai, Zhenxue [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater quality impacts. As part of a system to assess the potential for these impacts a geochemical scaling function has been developed, based on a detailed reactive transport model of CO2 and brine leakage into an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer. Stochastic simulations varying a number of geochemical parameters were used to generate a response surface predicting the volume of aquifer that would be impacted with respect to regulated contaminants. The brine was assumed to contain several trace metals and organic contaminants. Aquifer pH and TDS were influenced by CO2 leakage, while trace metal concentrations were most influenced by the brine concentrations rather than adsorption or desorption on calcite. Organic plume sizes were found to be strongly influenced by biodegradation.

  12. Reduced leakage in epitaxial BiFeO{sub 3} films following oxygen radio frequency plasma treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kothari, Deepti [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India) [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India); Upadhyay, Sanjay K.; Raghavendra Reddy, V. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India)] [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India); Jariwala, C.; Raole, P. M. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-06-07

    Epitaxial BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) films were deposited using pulsed laser deposition method. The prepared films were characterized using x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, ferroelectric loop tracer, and leakage current measurements before and after oxygen plasma treatment. The leakage current of the films, a crucial parameter in device applications, is observed to be reduced by two orders of magnitude with oxygen plasma treatment at room temperature. P-E hysteresis loops were observed in oxygen plasma treated BFO films. The observed results indicate the usefulness of oxygen radio frequency plasma treatment (RF 13.56 MHz), which is an effective and low temperature processing technique, in such lossy ferroelectric thin films.

  13. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Dai, Zhenxue; Zheng, Liange

    2014-12-31

    An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater quality impacts. As part of a system to assess the potential for these impacts a geochemical scaling function has been developed, based on a detailed reactive transport model of CO2 and brine leakage into an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer. Stochastic simulations varying a number of geochemical parameters were used to generate a response surface predicting the volume of aquifer that would be impacted with respect to regulated contaminants. The brine was assumed to contain several trace metals and organic contaminants. Aquifer pH and TDS were influenced by CO2more »leakage, while trace metal concentrations were most influenced by the brine concentrations rather than adsorption or desorption on calcite. Organic plume sizes were found to be strongly influenced by biodegradation.« less

  14. Geophysical Monitoring Methods Evaluation for the FutureGen 2.0 Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickland, Chris E.; USA, Richland Washington; Vermeul, Vince R.; USA, Richland Washington; Bonneville, Alain; USA, Richland Washington; Sullivan, E. Charlotte; USA, Richland Washington; Johnson, Tim C.; USA, Richland Washington; Spane, Frank A.; USA, Richland Washington; Gilmore, Tyler J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-31

    A comprehensive monitoring program will be needed in order to assess the effectiveness of carbon sequestration at the FutureGen 2.0 carbon capture and storage (CCS) field-site. Geophysical monitoring methods are sensitive to subsurface changes that result from injection of CO2 and will be used for: (1) tracking the spatial extent of the free phase CO2 plume, (2) monitoring advancement of the pressure front, (3) identifying or mapping areas where induced seismicity occurs, and (4) identifying and mapping regions of increased risk for brine or CO2 leakage from the reservoir. Site-specific suitability and cost effectiveness were evaluated for a number of geophysical monitoring methods including: passive seismic monitoring, reflection seismic imaging, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, pulsed neutron capture logging, cross-borehole seismic, electrical resistivity tomography, magnetotellurics and controlled source electromagnetics. The results of this evaluation indicate that CO2 injection monitoring using reflection seismic methods would likely be difficult at the FutureGen 2.0 site. Electrical methods also exhibited low sensitivity to the expected CO2 saturation changes and would be affected by metallic infrastructure at the field site. Passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture monitoring were selected for implementation as part of the FutureGen 2.0 storage site monitoring program.

  15. Geophysical Monitoring Methods Evaluation for the FutureGen 2.0 Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickland, Chris E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Vermeul, Vince R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Bonneville, Alain [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Sullivan, E. Charlotte [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Johnson, Tim C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Spane, Frank A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Gilmore, Tyler J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA

    2014-12-31

    A comprehensive monitoring program will be needed in order to assess the effectiveness of carbon sequestration at the FutureGen 2.0 carbon capture and storage (CCS) field-site. Geophysical monitoring methods are sensitive to subsurface changes that result from injection of CO2 and will be used for: (1) tracking the spatial extent of the free phase CO2 plume, (2) monitoring advancement of the pressure front, (3) identifying or mapping areas where induced seismicity occurs, and (4) identifying and mapping regions of increased risk for brine or CO2 leakage from the reservoir. Site-specific suitability and cost effectiveness were evaluated for a number of geophysical monitoring methods including: passive seismic monitoring, reflection seismic imaging, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, pulsed neutron capture logging, cross-borehole seismic, electrical resistivity tomography, magnetotellurics and controlled source electromagnetics. The results of this evaluation indicate that CO2 injection monitoring using reflection seismic methods would likely be difficult at the FutureGen 2.0 site. Electrical methods also exhibited low sensitivity to the expected CO2 saturation changes and would be affected by metallic infrastructure at the field site. Passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture monitoring were selected for implementation as part of the FutureGen 2.0 storage site monitoring program.

  16. Geophysical Monitoring Methods Evaluation for the FutureGen 2.0 Project

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Strickland, Chris E.; USA, Richland Washington; Vermeul, Vince R.; USA, Richland Washington; Bonneville, Alain; USA, Richland Washington; Sullivan, E. Charlotte; USA, Richland Washington; Johnson, Tim C.; USA, Richland Washington; et al

    2014-12-31

    A comprehensive monitoring program will be needed in order to assess the effectiveness of carbon sequestration at the FutureGen 2.0 carbon capture and storage (CCS) field-site. Geophysical monitoring methods are sensitive to subsurface changes that result from injection of CO2 and will be used for: (1) tracking the spatial extent of the free phase CO2 plume, (2) monitoring advancement of the pressure front, (3) identifying or mapping areas where induced seismicity occurs, and (4) identifying and mapping regions of increased risk for brine or CO2 leakage from the reservoir. Site-specific suitability and cost effectiveness were evaluated for a number ofmore »geophysical monitoring methods including: passive seismic monitoring, reflection seismic imaging, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, pulsed neutron capture logging, cross-borehole seismic, electrical resistivity tomography, magnetotellurics and controlled source electromagnetics. The results of this evaluation indicate that CO2 injection monitoring using reflection seismic methods would likely be difficult at the FutureGen 2.0 site. Electrical methods also exhibited low sensitivity to the expected CO2 saturation changes and would be affected by metallic infrastructure at the field site. Passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture monitoring were selected for implementation as part of the FutureGen 2.0 storage site monitoring program.« less

  17. Portal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruse, L.W.

    1982-03-23

    A portal radiation monitor combines .1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  18. Portal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  19. Analysis of main steam isolation valve leakage in design basis accidents using MELCOR 1.8.6 and RADTRAD.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salay, Michael; Kalinich, Donald A.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Radel, Tracy E.

    2008-10-01

    Analyses were performed using MELCOR and RADTRAD to investigate main steam isolation valve (MSIV) leakage behavior under design basis accident (DBA) loss-of-coolant (LOCA) conditions that are presumed to have led to a significant core melt accident. Dose to the control room, site boundary and LPZ are examined using both approaches described in current regulatory guidelines as well as analyses based on best estimate source term and system response. At issue is the current practice of using containment airborne aerosol concentrations as a surrogate for the in-vessel aerosol concentration that exists in the near vicinity of the MSIVs. This study finds current practice using the AST-based containment aerosol concentrations for assessing MSIV leakage is non-conservative and conceptually in error. A methodology is proposed that scales the containment aerosol concentration to the expected vessel concentration in order to preserve the simplified use of the AST in assessing containment performance under assumed DBA conditions. This correction is required during the first two hours of the accident while the gap and early in-vessel source terms are present. It is general practice to assume that at {approx}2hrs, recovery actions to reflood the core will have been successful and that further core damage can be avoided. The analyses performed in this study determine that, after two hours, assuming vessel reflooding has taken place, the containment aerosol concentration can then conservatively be used as the effective source to the leaking MSIV's. Recommendations are provided concerning typical aerosol removal coefficients that can be used in the RADTRAD code to predict source attenuation in the steam lines, and on robust methods of predicting MSIV leakage flows based on measured MSIV leakage performance.

  20. Evaluating the impact of caprock and reservoir properties on potential risk of CO2 leakage after injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Rockhold, Mark L.; Murray, Christopher J.

    2012-01-05

    Numerical models are essential tools for CO2 sequestration projects and should be included in the life cycle of a project. Common practice involves modeling the behavior of CO2 during and after injection using site-specific reservoir and caprock properties. Little has been done to systematically evaluate and compare the effects of a broad but realistic range of reservoir and caprock properties on potential CO2 leakage through caprock. Broad-based research addressing the impacts of caprock properties and their heterogeneity on seal permeation is absent. Efforts along this direction require obtaining information about the physically reasonable range of caprock and reservoir properties, effectively sampling the parameter space to fully explore the range of these properties, and performing flow and transport calculations using reliable numerical simulators. In this study, we identify the most important factors affecting CO2 leakage through intact caprock and try to understand the underlying mechanisms. We use caprock and reservoir properties from various field sites and literature data to identify the range of caprock thickness, permeability, and porosity that might occur. We use a quasi Monte Carlo sampling approach to ensure that the full range of caprock and seal properties is evaluated without bias. For each set of sampled properties, the migration of injected CO2 is simulated for up to 200 years using the water-salt-CO2 operational mode of the STOMP simulator. Preliminary results show that critical factors determining CO2 leakage rate through intact caprock are, in decreasing order of significance, the caprock thickness, caprock permeability, reservoir permeability, caprock porosity, and reservoir porosity. This study provides a function for prediction of potential CO2 leakage risk due to permeation of intact caprock, and identifies a range of acceptable seal thicknesses and permeability for sequestration projects. As a byproduct, the dependence of CO2 injectivity on reservoir properties is also evaluated.

  1. The analysis of leakage current in MIS Au/SiO{sub 2}/n-GaAs at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altuntas, H.; Ozcelik, S.

    2013-10-15

    The aim of this study is to determine the reverse-bias leakage current conduction mechanisms in Au/SiO{sub 2}/n-GaAs metal-insulator-semiconductor type Schottky contacts. Reverse-bias current-voltage measurements (I-V) were performed at room temperature. The using of leakage current values in SiO{sub 2} at electric fields of 1.46-3.53 MV/cm, ln(J/E) vs. {radical}E graph showed good linearity. Rom this plot, dielectric constant of SiO{sub 2} was calculated as 3.7 and this value is perfect agreement with 3.9 which is value of SiO{sub 2} dielectric constant. This indicates, Poole-Frenkel type emission mechanism is dominant in this field region. On the other hand, electric fields between 0.06-0.73 and 0.79-1.45 MV/cm, dominant leakage current mechanisms were found as ohmic type conduction and space charge limited conduction, respectively.

  2. Analysis Of Leakage In Carbon Sequestration Projects In Forestry:A Case Study Of Upper Magat Watershed, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasco, Rodel D.; Pulhin, Florencia B.; Sales, Renezita F.

    2007-06-01

    The role of forestry projects in carbon conservation andsequestration is receiving much attention because of their role in themitigation of climate change. The main objective of the study is toanalyze the potential of the Upper Magat Watershed for a carbonsequestration project. The three main development components of theproject are forest conservation, tree plantations, and agroforestry farmdevelopment. At Year 30, the watershed can attain a net carbon benefit of19.5 M tC at a cost of US$ 34.5 M. The potential leakage of the projectis estimated using historical experience in technology adoption inwatershed areas in the Philippines and a high adoption rate. Two leakagescenarios were used: baseline and project leakage scenarios. Most of theleakage occurs in the first 10 years of the project as displacement oflivelihood occurs during this time. The carbon lost via leakage isestimated to be 3.7 M tC in the historical adoption scenario, and 8.1 MtC under the enhanced adoption scenario.

  3. Electronic Monitoring White Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electronic Monitoring White Papers February 15, 2013 Source: NOAA Fisheries Office of Policy & Electronic Monitoring Working Group U.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration.holliday@noaa.gov #12;B-1 Appendix B - Electronic Monitoring White Paper Existing Technologies National Oceanic

  4. Bird migration monitoring across

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Bird migration monitoring across Europe using weather radar M. de Graaf, H. Leijnse, A. Dokter, J Conference on Radar in Meteorology and Hydrology #12;Bird migration monitoring across Europe using weather-29 June Toulouse Bird Migration Monitoring across Europe ­ M. de Graaf et al.2 #12;Introduction Flysafe 2

  5. Near Surface Water Content Estimation using GPR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    waves can be used to estimate soil water content · Short pulses of High frequency EM energy · Variations) Improved irrigation management; 3) Improved understanding of ecosystem responses and terroir; 4) May assist, evapotranspiration, and groundwater storage From Or and Rubin, 1990 ** Accurate Spatial and Temporal Variations

  6. Determination of Near-Surface Anisotropy From Surface Electromagnetic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Dajani, AbdulFattah

    2001-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) signatures, such as reflection moveout, are sensitive to the presence of azimuthal anisotropy. Azimuthal anisotropy can occur as an intrinsic property of the medium and/or due to the presence ...

  7. Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, and microbial decomposition of soilsubsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange...

  8. NEAR-SURFACE CONTROLLED-SOURCE ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meju, Max

    -D and advanced 3-D forward modeling and inversion for more detailed analyses. Previous reviews. EVERETT Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, Texas A&M University College Station TX 77843 U.S.A. MAX A. MEJU The controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) induction method is emerging as a leading geophysical technique

  9. Geochemical Modeling of the Near-Surface Hydrothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in petrographic studies. Results of this study show that the mineralogy and fluid chemistry observed in the shallow reservoir at Long Valley caldera are formed in an open...

  10. Waste Inventory for Near Surface Repository (NSR) - 13482

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaidotas, Algirdas [Lithuania Enterprise Company Radioactive Waste Management Agency, Luksio 5, Vilnius (Lithuania)] [Lithuania Enterprise Company Radioactive Waste Management Agency, Luksio 5, Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2013-07-01

    The main characteristics, physical, chemical as well as radiological of the waste intended to be disposed of in the planned NSR are described. This description is mainly based on the waste inventory investigations performed by the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP). The four different waste streams to be disposed of in the NSR are described and investigated. (authors)

  11. Evaluation of the Repeatability of the Delta Q Duct Leakage Testing Technique Including Investigation of Robust Analysis Techniques and Estimates of Weather Induced Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerhoff, Darryl

    2008-01-01

    Deve lop m ent of a New Duct Leakage Test: Delta Q.    than a few cfm for tight duct systems as long as at leastHowever houses with leakier duct systems seem to have less

  12. Impacts of Static Pressure Reset on VAV System Air Leakage, Fan Power and Thermal Energy - Part 2: Case Demonstration for a Typical Climate System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Zheng, K.; Wu, L.; Wang, Z.; Johnson, C.

    2007-01-01

    In Part 1 of this paper, the theoretical models, integrating the fan airflow, fan head, air leakage factors, are developed to analyze the impacts of the static pressure reset on both pressure dependent and pressure independent terminal boxes...

  13. Impacts of Static Pressure Reset on VAV System Air Leakage, Fan Power and Thermal Energy - Part I: Theoretical Model and Simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Feng, J.; Wang, Z.; Wu, L.; Zheng, K.; Pang, W.

    2007-01-01

    pressure reset has also applicable advantages over the existing constant static pressure set point and two typical reset methods. This paper present the theoretical models to express the impacts of static pressure reset on fan airflow, fan head, air leakage...

  14. Modeling Leakage through Faults of CO2 Stored in an Aquifer Kyung Won Chang,* Susan E. Minkoff,** and Steven L. Bryant,* SPE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minkoff, Susan E.

    for drinking water. Thus, CO2 leakage along faults will have three behaviors: upward migration from the storage. The difference arises because of preferential flow within the layer (CO2 in the upper part, water below

  15. Test versus predictions for rotordynamic and leakage characteristics of a convergent-tapered, honeycomb-stator/smooth-rotor annular gas seal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Der Velde Alvarez, Daniel Eduardo

    2009-05-15

    This thesis presents the results for measured and predicted rotordynamic coefficients and leakage for a convergent-tapered honeycomb seal (CTHC). The test seals had a diameter of 114.968 mm (4.5263 in) at the entrance, and ...

  16. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie

    2012-07-09

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  17. Quantification of Wellbore Leakage Risk Using Non-destructive Borehole Logging Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duguid, Andrew; Butsch, Robert; Cary, J.; Celia, Michael; Chugunov, Nikita; Gasda, Sarah; Hovorka, Susan; Ramakrishnan, T. S.; Stamp, Vicki; Thingelstad, Rebecca; Wang, James

    2014-08-29

    Well integrity is important at all potential CCS locations and may play a crucial role establishing leakage risk in areas where there is a high density of existing wells that could be impacted by the storage operations including depleted petroleum fields where EOR or CCS will occur. To address a need for risk quantification methods that can be directly applied to individual wells using borehole logging tools a study was conducted using data from five wells in Wyoming. The objectives of the study were: Objective 1: Develop methods to establish the baseline flow parameters (porosity and permeability or mobility) from individual measurements of the material properties and defects in a well. Objective 2: Develop a correlation between field flow-property data and cement logs that can be used to establish the flow-properties of well materials and well features using cement mapping tools. Objective 3: Establish a method that uses the flow-property model (Objective 2) to analyze the statistical uncertainties associated with individual well leakage that can provide basis for uncertainty in risk calculations. The project objectives were met through the logging of five wells in Carbon and Natrona County Wyoming to collect data that was used to estimate individual and average well flow properties and model the results using ultrasonic data collected during the logging. Three of the five wells provided data on point and average flow properties for well annuli. Data from the other two wells were used to create models of cement permeability and test whether information collected in one well could be used to characterize another well. The results of the in-situ point measurements were confirmed by the lab measurements sidewall cores collected near the same depths Objective 1 was met using the data collected through logging, testing, and sampling. The methods were developed that can establish baseline flow parameters of wells by both point and average test methods. The methods to estimate the flow properties modeling of point pressure tests, modeling of vertical interference tests, and laboratory measurement of cased-hole sidewall cores The wells were in sufficiently good shape to allow the development of the characterization methods while still having enough defects to study differences in results as they relate to well integrity. Samples and tests analyzed from three of five wells studied in showed the cements were largely intact and had not degraded from exposure native brines. Log results taken in conjunction with the core measurements indicate that interfaces and/or problems with cement placement due to eccentering provide preferential flow paths for fluids, which can increase the effective permeability of the barrier several orders of magnitude above the permeability of intact cement. The results of the maps created using logging tools indicating that the cement condition and bond are generally good identify a need for more research to understand how logs can be used to predicteffective well permeabilities such as those measured by the VITs in this study.

  18. Monte Carlo and analytical model predictions of leakage neutron exposures from passively scattered proton therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Zhang, Rui; Newhauser, Wayne [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Stray neutron radiation is of concern after radiation therapy, especially in children, because of the high risk it might carry for secondary cancers. Several previous studies predicted the stray neutron exposure from proton therapy, mostly using Monte Carlo simulations. Promising attempts to develop analytical models have also been reported, but these were limited to only a few proton beam energies. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytical model to predict leakage neutron equivalent dose from passively scattered proton beams in the 100-250-MeV interval.Methods: To develop and validate the analytical model, the authors used values of equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose (H/D) predicted with Monte Carlo simulations. The authors also characterized the behavior of the mean neutron radiation-weighting factor, w{sub R}, as a function of depth in a water phantom and distance from the beam central axis.Results: The simulated and analytical predictions agreed well. On average, the percentage difference between the analytical model and the Monte Carlo simulations was 10% for the energies and positions studied. The authors found that w{sub R} was highest at the shallowest depth and decreased with depth until around 10 cm, where it started to increase slowly with depth. This was consistent among all energies.Conclusion: Simple analytical methods are promising alternatives to complex and slow Monte Carlo simulations to predict H/D values. The authors' results also provide improved understanding of the behavior of w{sub R} which strongly depends on depth, but is nearly independent of lateral distance from the beam central axis.

  19. Remote Monitoring Transparency Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukhoruchkin, V.K.; Shmelev, V.M.; Roumiantsev, A.N.; Croessmann, C.D.; Horton, R.D.; Matter, J.C.; Czajkowski, A.F.; Sheely, K.B.; Bieniawski, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of the Remote Monitoring Transparency Program is to evaluate and demonstrate the use of remote monitoring technologies to advance nonproliferation and transparency efforts that are currently being developed by Russia and the US without compromising the national security of the participating parties. Under a lab-to-lab transparency contract between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Kurchatov Institute (KI RRC), the Kurchatov Institute will analyze technical and procedural aspects of the application of remote monitoring as a transparency measure to monitor inventories of direct-use HEU and plutonium (e.g., material recovered from dismantled nuclear weapons). A goal of this program is to assist a broad range of political and technical experts in learning more about remote monitoring technologies that could be used to implement nonproliferation, arms control, and other security and confidence building measures. Specifically, this program will: (1) begin integrating Russian technologies into remote monitoring systems; (2) develop remote monitoring procedures that will assist in the application of remote monitoring techniques to monitor inventories of HEU and Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons; and (3) conduct a workshop to review remote monitoring fundamentals, demonstrate an integrated US/Russian remote monitoring will have on the national security of participating countries.

  20. Single Crystal Diamond Beam Position Monitors with Radiofrequency Electronic Readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solar, B.; Graafsma, H.; Potdevin, G.; Trunk, U. [Hasylab, Deutsches Elektronen Synchroton, Hamburg (Germany); Morse, J.; Salome, M. [Instrumentation Services and Development Division, European Synchroton Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2010-06-23

    Over the energy range 5{approx}30 keV a suitably contacted, thin ({approx}100 {mu}m) diamond plate can be operated in situ as a continuous monitor of X-ray beam intensity and position as the diamond absorbs only a small percentage of the incident beam. Single crystal diamond is a completely homogeneous material showing fast (ns), spatially uniform signal response and negligible (leakage currents. Due to its unsurpassed thermal conductivity, it is the only semiconductor material that can be used in intense synchrotron white beams. We report on tests made at ESRF and DESY using diamond beam position monitors of simple quadrant electrode designs with metal contacts, operated using wideband electronic readout corresponding to the RF accelerator frequency. The instrumentation for these monitors must cover a large range of operating conditions: different beam sizes, fluxes, energies and time structure corresponding to the synchrotron fill patterns. Sophisticated new RF sampling electronics can satisfy most requirements: using a modified Libera Brilliance readout system, we measured the center of gravity position of a 25 {mu}m beam at the DORIS III F4 beam line at a rate of 130 Msample/s with narrowband filtering of a few MHz bandwidth. Digitally averaging the signal further provided a spatial resolution {approx}20 nm.

  1. Comprehensive air monitoring plan: general monitoring report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-31

    Recommendations are provided for general monitoring of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) in ambient air in parts of Colusa, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma counties potentially impacted by emissions from geothermal development projects in the Geysers-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area. Recommendations for types, placement, performance guidelines, and criteria and procedure for triggering establishment and termination of CAMP monitoring equipment were determined after examination of four factors: population location; emission sources; meteorological considerations; and data needs of permitting agencies and applicants. Three alternate financial plans were developed. Locations and equipment for immediate installation are recommended for: two air quality stations in communities where the State ambient air quality standard for H/sub 2/S has been exceeded; three air quality trend stations to monitor progress in reduction of H/sub 2/S emissions; two meteorological observation stations to monitor synoptic wind flow over the area; and one acoustic radar and one rawinsonde station to monitor air inversions which limit the depth of the mixing layer.

  2. HP Steam Trap Monitoring 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascone, S.

    2011-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IC-11-10-61.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2024 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IC-11-10-61.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 STEAM MONITORING HP... Steam Trap Monitoring HP Steam Trap Monitoring ? 12-18 months payback! ? 3-5% permanent reduction in consumption ? LEED Pt.? Innovation in Operations EB O&M ? Saved clients over $1,000,000 Annual consumption Steam Trap Monitoring ? Real...

  3. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and roads The spatial location and boundaries for each Site shown on the Site Monitoring Area maps originate from activities conducted under the Compliance Order on Consent with...

  4. Structural Health Monitoring Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SHMTools SHMTools is a MATLAB package that facilitates the construction of structural health monitoring (SHM) processes. The package provides a set of functions or- ganized into...

  5. Structural Health Monitoring Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Figueiredo, E., Park, G., Figueiras, J., Farrar, C., & Worden, K. (2009). Structural Health Monitoring Algorithm Comparisons using Standard Data Sets. Los Alamos National...

  6. Structural Health Monitoring Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Figueiredo, E., Park, G., Figueiras, J., Farrar, C., and Worden, K. (2009). Structural Health Monitoring Algorithm Comparisons Using Standard Datasets, Los Alamos National...

  7. Power consumption monitoring using additional monitoring device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tru?c?, M. R. C. Albert, ?. Tudoran, C. Soran, M. L. F?rca?, F.; Abrudean, M.

    2013-11-13

    Today, emphasis is placed on reducing power consumption. Computers are large consumers; therefore it is important to know the total consumption of computing systems. Since their optimal functioning requires quite strict environmental conditions, without much variation in temperature and humidity, reducing energy consumption cannot be made without monitoring environmental parameters. Thus, the present work uses a multifunctional electric meter UPT 210 for power consumption monitoring. Two applications were developed: software which carries meter readings provided by electronic and programming facilitates remote device and a device for temperature monitoring and control. Following temperature variations that occur both in the cooling system, as well as the ambient, can reduce energy consumption. For this purpose, some air conditioning units or some computers are stopped in different time slots. These intervals were set so that the economy is high, but the work's Datacenter is not disturbed.

  8. Global nuclear material monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, J.A.; Monlove, H.O.; Goulding, C.A.; Martinez, B.J.; Coulter, C.A.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project provided a detailed systems design for advanced integrated facility monitoring and identified the components and enabling technologies required to facilitate the development of the monitoring system of the future.

  9. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project is to develop a down-hole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole temperature up to 300 °C for measuring motor temperature; pump discharge pressure; and formation temperature and pressure.

  10. Transmission Line Security Monitor

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28

    The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. Transmission Line Security Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  12. Measurement of Leakage Neutron Spectra for Tungsten with D-T Neutrons and Validation of Evaluated Nuclear Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Zhanga; Z. Chen; Y. Nie; R. Wada; X. Ruan; R. Han; X. Liu; W. Lin; J. Liu; F. Shi; P. Ren; G. Tian; F. Luo; J. Ren; J. Bao

    2014-11-20

    Integral neutronics experiments have been investigated at Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMP, CAS) in order to validate evaluated nuclear data related to the design of Chinese Initiative Accelerator Driven Systems (CIADS). In present paper, the accuracy of evaluated nuclear data for Tungsten has been examined by comparing measured leakage neutron spectra with calculated ones. Leakage neutron spectra from the irradiation of D-T neutrons on Tungsten slab sample were experimentally measured at 60$^{\\circ}$ and 120$^{\\circ}$ by using a time-of-flight method. Theoretical calculations are carried out by Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C with evaluated nuclear data of the ADS-2.0, ENDF/B-VII.0, ENDF/B-VII.1, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries. From the comparisons, it is found that the calculations with ADS-2.0 and ENDF/B-VII.1 give good agreements with the experiments in the whole energy regions at 60$^{\\circ}$, while a large discrepancy is observed at 120$^{\\circ}$ in the elastic scattering peak, caused by a slight difference in the oscillation pattern of the elastic angular distribution at angles larger than 20$^{\\circ}$. However, the calculated spectra using data from ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries showed larger discrepancies with the measured ones, especially around 8.5-13.5 MeV. Further studies are presented for these disagreements.

  13. Leakage Risk Assessment of CO{sub 2} Transportation by Pipeline at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project, Decatur, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzoldi, A.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2013-12-17

    The Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) is designed to confirm the ability of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a major regional saline-water-bearing formation in the Illinois Basin, to store 1 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injected over a period of three years. The CO{sub 2} will be provided by Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) from its Decatur, Illinois, ethanol plant. In order to transport CO{sub 2} from the capture facility to the injection well (also located within the ADM plant boundaries), a high-pressure pipeline of length 3,200 ft (975 m) has been constructed, running above the ground surface within the ADM plant footprint. We have qualitatively evaluated risks associated with possible pipeline failure scenarios that lead to discharge of CO{sub 2} within the real-world environment of the ADM plant in which there are often workers and visitors in the vicinity of the pipeline. There are several aspects of CO{sub 2} that make its transportation and potential leakage somewhat different from other substances, most notable is its non-flammability and propensity to change to solid (dry ice) upon strong decompression. In this study, we present numerical simulations using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods of the release and dispersion of CO{sub 2} from individual hypothetical pipeline failures (i.e., leaks). Failure frequency of the various components of a pipeline transportation system over time are taken from prior work on general pipeline safety and leakage modeling and suggest a 4.65% chance of some kind of pipeline failure over the three-years of operation. Following the Precautionary Principle (see below), we accounted for full-bore leakage scenarios, where the temporal evolution of the mass release rate from the high-pressure pipeline leak locations was simulated using a state-of-the-art Pipe model which considers the thermodynamic effects of decompression in the entire pipeline. Failures have been simulated at four representative locations along the pipeline route within the ADM plant. Leakage scenarios at sites along the route of the pipeline, where plant operations (e.g., vehicular and train transportation) seem to present a higher likelihood of accidental failure, for example due to vehicles or equipment crashing into the pipeline and completely severing it, were modeled by allowing them to have a double source consistent with the pipeline releasing high-pressure CO{sub 2} from both ends of the broken pipe after a full-bore offset rupture. Simulation results show that the built environment of the plant plays a significant role in the dispersion of the gas as leaking CO{sub 2} can impinge upon buildings and other infrastructure. In all scenarios simulated, the region of very high-concentration of CO{sub 2} is limited to a small area around the pipeline failure, suggesting the likelihood of widespread harmful CO{sub 2} exposure to plant personnel from pipeline leakage is low. An additional risk is posed by the blast wave that emanates from a high-pressure pipeline when it is breached quickly. We estimate the blast wave risk as low because it occurs only for a short time in the immediate vicinity of the rupture, and requires an instantaneous large-scale rupture to occur. We recommend consideration of signage and guard rails and posts to mitigate the likelihood of vehicles crashing into the pipeline. A standardized emergency response plan applicable to capture plants within industrial sites could be developed based on the IBDP that would be useful for other capture plants. Finally, we recommend carrying out coupled wellbore-reservoir blowout scenario modeling to understand the potential for hazardous conditions arising from an unexpected blowout at the wellhead.

  14. Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilt, G.C.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L.

    1994-11-01

    This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures.

  15. Integrated structural health monitoring.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, C. R. (Charles R.)

    2001-01-01

    Structural health monitoring is the implementation of a damage detection strategy for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering infrastructure. Typical damage experienced by this infrastructure might be the development of fatigue cracks, degradation of structural connections, or bearing wear in rotating machinery. The goal of the research effort reported herein is to develop a robust and cost-effective structural health monitoring solution by integrating and extending technologies from various engineering and information technology disciplines. It is the authors opinion that all structural health monitoring systems must be application specific. Therefore, a specific application, monitoring welded moment resisting steel frame connections in structures subjected to seismic excitation, is described along with the motivation for choosing this application. The structural health monitoring solution for this application will integrate structural dynamics, wireless data acquisition, local actuation, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, and statistical pattern recognition algorithms. The proposed system is based on an assessment of the deficiencies associated with many current structural health monitoring technologies including past efforts by the authors. This paper provides an example of the integrated approach to structural health monitoring being undertaken at Los Alamos National Laboratory and summarizes progress to date on various aspects of the technology development.

  16. Comparison of the measured and calculated time profiles of the leakage current in the magnetically insulated transmission line of the angara-5-1 facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grabovski, E. V.; Gribov, A. N.; Samokhin, A. A.; Shishlov, A. O., E-mail: shishlov@triniti.ru [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15

    One of the factors limiting the transmission of the electromagnetic pulse to the load in high-power electrophysical facilities is the current leakage in magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). In this paper, the Angara-5-1 eight-module facility with an output power up to 6 TW is considered. The experimental and calculated time profiles of the leakage current for eight-module shots with a dynamic load (cylindrical arrays made of 40 tungsten wires) and single-module shots with a solid cylindrical metal load are compared. When interpreting the results, the contribution of vacuum electrons to the leakage current at the transition from the cylindrical to the conical section of the MITL is taken into account.

  17. Intelligent Radio Frequency (RF) Monitoring 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, B.

    2010-01-01

    ? Regulatory fines Location 8 ?Expect many enjoyable experiences!? David M. Armstrong Continuous RF Monitoring RELIEF VALVE MONITORING The solution?? 9 ?Expect many enjoyable experiences!? David M. Armstrong Continuous RF Monitoring TEMPERATURE...?Armstrong? WiHART?Device Non?Armstrong? WiHART?Device Non?Armstrong? WiHART?Device Open Mesh Wireless Structure STEAM TRAP MONITORING RELIEF VALVE MONITORING TEMPERATURE MONITORING GATEWAY 14 ?Expect many enjoyable experiences!? David M. Armstrong...

  18. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 şC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 şC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

  19. Monitoring Energy Losses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eulinger, R. D.

    1988-01-01

    Industrial power plants using fossil fuel to produce process steam and electrical energy must be operated at peak efficiency to minimize production costs. Monitoring the power plant operation sometimes takes second place to the primary process...

  20. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31

    The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

  1. Structure function monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-24

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  2. Monitoring: The missing piece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorkland, Ronald

    2013-11-15

    The U.S. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 heralded in an era of more robust attention to environmental impacts resulting from larger scale federal projects. The number of other countries that have adopted NEPA's framework is evidence of the appeal of this type of environmental legislation. Mandates to review environmental impacts, identify alternatives, and provide mitigation plans before commencement of the project are at the heart of NEPA. Such project reviews have resulted in the development of a vast number of reports and large volumes of project-specific data that potentially can be used to better understand the components and processes of the natural environment and provide guidance for improved and efficient environmental protection. However, the environmental assessment (EA) or the more robust and intensive environmental impact statement (EIS) that are required for most major projects more frequently than not are developed to satisfy the procedural aspects of the NEPA legislation while they fail to provide the needed guidance for improved decision-making. While NEPA legislation recommends monitoring of project activities, this activity is not mandated, and in those situations where it has been incorporated, the monitoring showed that the EIS was inaccurate in direction and/or magnitude of the impact. Many reviews of NEPA have suggested that monitoring all project phases, from the design through the decommissioning, should be incorporated. Information gathered though a well-developed monitoring program can be managed in databases and benefit not only the specific project but would provide guidance how to better design and implement future activities designed to protect and enhance the natural environment. -- Highlights: • NEPA statutes created profound environmental protection legislative framework. • Contrary to intent, NEPA does not provide for definitive project monitoring. • Robust project monitoring is essential for enhanced environmental management. • Adaptive database framework is needed to accommodate project-monitoring data.

  3. The Delta Q Method of Testing the Air Leakage of Ducts Walker, I.S., Dickerhoff, D.J. and Sherman, M.H.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-49749 The Delta Q Method of Testing the Air Leakage of Ducts Walker, I.S., Dickerhoff, D in energy efficiency calculations and for compliance testing of duct systems. The DeltaQ test combines a model of the house and duct system with the results of house pressurization tests with the air handler

  4. A non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity with suppression of transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun Zhong, Huihuang; Zhu, Danni; Qiu, Yongfeng

    2014-01-15

    The triaxial klystron amplifier is an efficient high power relativistic klystron amplifier operating at high frequencies due to its coaxial structure with large radius. However, the coaxial structures result in coupling problems among the cavities as the TEM mode is not cut-off in the coaxial tube. Therefore, the suppression of the TEM mode leakage, especially the leakage from the buncher cavity to the input cavity, is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier. In this paper, a non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage. The cold cavity analysis shows that the non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity can significantly suppress the TEM mode generation compared to a uniform three-gap buncher cavity. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the power leakage to the input cavity is less than 1.5‰ of the negative power in the buncher cavity and the buncher cavity can efficiently modulate an intense relativistic electron beam free of self-oscillations. A fundamental current modulation depth of 117% is achieved by employing the proposed non-uniform buncher cavity into an X-band triaxial amplifier, which results in the high efficiency generation of high power microwave.

  5. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VERY LARGE SCALE INTEGRATION (VLSI) SYSTEMS, VOL. XX, NO. NN, MMM YYYY 1 System-Wide Leakage-Aware Energy Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Prabhat

    the advantage of the fact that linear reduction in the supply voltage can quadratically reduce the power System-Wide Leakage-Aware Energy Minimization using Dynamic Voltage Scaling and Cache Reconfiguration voltage scaling (DVS) is well studied and known to be successful in reducing processor energy consumption

  6. Compiler-Directed Instruction Cache Leakage Optimization This paper is to appear in Proceedings of the 35th International Symposium on Microarchitecture, Istanbul, Turkey, Nov., 2002.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    reduction in threshold voltages of these transistors, leakage energy con- sumption has become a major at the cache line granu- larity involves the reduction of supply voltages to idle cache lines [5]. Specifically of threshold voltages, the power consumed due to leaky memory cells in on-chip caches will constitute

  7. Proceedings of IMAPS Advanced Technology Workshop on Thermal Management, Oct. 25-27, Palo Alto, CA, 2004 LEAKAGE AND VARIATION AWARE THERMAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings of IMAPS Advanced Technology Workshop on Thermal Management, Oct. 25-27, Palo Alto, CA management of leakage and variation dominant CMOS technologies. The methodology is then applied to provide. INTRODUCTION For nanometer scale VLSI technologies, power dissipation and thermal management have been

  8. Photon beam position monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  9. High Performance Network Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, Jesse E

    2012-08-10

    Network Monitoring requires a substantial use of data and error analysis to overcome issues with clusters. Zenoss and Splunk help to monitor system log messages that are reporting issues about the clusters to monitoring services. Infiniband infrastructure on a number of clusters upgraded to ibmon2. ibmon2 requires different filters to report errors to system administrators. Focus for this summer is to: (1) Implement ibmon2 filters on monitoring boxes to report system errors to system administrators using Zenoss and Splunk; (2) Modify and improve scripts for monitoring and administrative usage; (3) Learn more about networks including services and maintenance for high performance computing systems; and (4) Gain a life experience working with professionals under real world situations. Filters were created to account for clusters running ibmon2 v1.0.0-1 10 Filters currently implemented for ibmon2 using Python. Filters look for threshold of port counters. Over certain counts, filters report errors to on-call system administrators and modifies grid to show local host with issue.

  10. Portable air monitoring laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehntholt, D.J.; Beltis, K.J.; McCullough, J.E.; Valentine, J.R. [Arthur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Arthur D. Little, Inc. was contracted by the US Army to design, fabricate, test and deliver a series of portable air monitoring laboratories which could be used to detect trace levels of toxic chemicals on board cargo ships. The labs were designed to be completely self-sufficient, containing all supplies necessary for a 75-day mission, and to operate under rugged conditions. They were used to monitor for parts-per-billion concentrations of chemical agents in air and to provide information equivalent to high quality fixed laboratory analyses. The mission was successfully completed; independent design awards were received for the laboratories, and they were subsequently diverted to other uses.

  11. Monitoring and Managing Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7ModificationsMonitoring Jobs Monitoring JobsJobs

  12. Monitoring and Managing Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7ModificationsMonitoring Jobs Monitoring

  13. Monitoring jobs with qs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7ModificationsMonitoring Jobs MonitoringJobs »

  14. Wireless Technologies for Structural Wireless Technologies for Structural Health MonitoringHealth Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wireless Technologies for Structural Wireless Technologies for Structural Health MonitoringHealth responses · Structural monitoring structural health monitoring: ­ Very few structural "health" monitoring and buildings · Future directions and technology trends Structural Monitoring SystemsStructural Monitoring

  15. Rack protection monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Stanley G. (Wheaton, IL)

    2000-01-01

    A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

  16. MODELLING AND MONITORING IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    substantially. Also an alternative model for the shrinkage of parts from a multi-cavity mold is suggested. FromMODELLING AND MONITORING IN INJECTION MOLDING Peter Thyregod LYNGBY 2001 IMM-PHD-2001-80 ATV by injection molding. The methods are illustrated with examples from the manufacturing of molded parts

  17. Rack Protection Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, Stanley G.

    1998-10-21

    A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

  18. Reactor Monitoring with Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cribier

    2007-04-06

    The fundamental knowledge on neutrinos acquired in the recent years open the possibility of applied neutrino physics. Among it the automatic and non intrusive monitoring of nuclear reactor by its antineutrino signal could be very valuable to IAEA in charge of the control of nuclear power plants. Several efforts worldwide have already started.

  19. Reactor Monitoring with Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cribier, Michel

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental knowledge on neutrinos acquired in the recent years open the possibility of applied neutrino physics. Among it the automatic and non intrusive monitoring of nuclear reactor by its antineutrino signal could be very valuable to IAEA in charge of the control of nuclear power plants. Several efforts worldwide have already started.

  20. Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices, and associated methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCown, Steven H; Derr, Kurt W; Rohde, Kenneth W

    2014-05-27

    Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices include a communications module for receiving wireless communications of a wireless device. Processing circuitry is coupled with the communications module and configured to process the wireless communications to determine whether the wireless device is authorized or unauthorized to be present at the monitored area based on identification information of the wireless device. Methods of monitoring for the presence and identity of wireless devices are also provided.

  1. Rulison Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    The Project Rulison Monitoring Plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management's mission to protect human health and the environment. The purpose of the plan is to monitor fluids from gas wells for radionuclides that would indicate contamination is migrating from the Rulison detonation zone to producing gas wells, allowing action to be taken before the contamination could pose a risk. The Monitoring Plan (1) lists the contaminants present and identifies those that have the greatest potential to migrate from the detonation zone (radionuclide source term), (2) identifies locations that monitor the most likely transport pathways, (3) identifies which fluids will be sampled (gas and liquid) and why, (4) establishes the frequency of sampling, and (5) specifies the most practical analyses and where the analysis results will be reported. The plan does not affect the long-term hydrologic sampling conducted by DOE since 1972, which will continue for the purpose of sampling shallow groundwater and surface water near the site. The Monitoring Plan was developed in anticipation of gas wells being drilled progressively nearer the Rulison site. DOE sampled 10 gas wells in 1997 and 2005 at distances ranging from 2.7 to 7.6 miles from the site to establish background concentrations for radionuclides. In a separate effort, gas industry operators and the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) developed an industry sampling and analysis plan that was implemented in 2007. The industry plan requires the sampling of gas wells within 3 miles of the site, with increased requirements for wells within 1 mile of the site. The DOE plan emphasizes the sampling of wells near the site (Figure 1), specifically those with a bottom-hole location of 1 mile or less from the detonation, depending on the direction relative to the natural fracture trend of the producing formation. Studies indicate that even the most mobile radionuclides created by the test are unlikely to migrate appreciable distances (hundreds of feet) from the detonation zone (Cooper et al. 2007, 2009). The Monitoring Plan was developed to provide a cautious and comprehensive approach for detecting any potential contaminant migration from the Rulison test site. It also provides an independent confirmation of results from the industry sampling and analysis plan while effectively increasing the sampling frequency of wells near the site.

  2. Structural health monitoring by ultrasonic guided waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartoli, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    and Viola, E. , “Structural Health Monitoring of Multi-wireEncyclopedia of Structural Health Monitoring, C. Boller, F-D.L. (2001) “Structural health monitoring system based on

  3. Guided wave monitoring of prestressing tendons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nucera, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    20] and for structural health monitoring of post-tensionedNDE) and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) purposes [1].NDE) and the structural health monitoring (SHM) of solids

  4. Effective Health Monitoring Strategies for Complex Structures /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haynes, Colin Michael

    2014-01-01

    to Optimization in Structural Health Monitoring, Proc. Worldaxioms of structural health monitoring, Proc. R. Soc. A.the future of structural health monitoring, Phil. Trans. R.

  5. Tritium monitoring techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVore, J.R.; Buckner, M.A.

    1996-05-01

    As part of their operations, the U.S. Navy is required to store or maintain operational nuclear weapons on ships and at shore facilities. Since these weapons contain tritium, there are safety implications relevant to the exposure of personnel to tritium. This is particularly important for shipboard operations since these types of environments can make low-level tritium detection difficult. Some of these ships have closed systems, which can result in exposure to tritium at levels that are below normally acceptable levels but could still cause radiation doses that are higher than necessary or could hamper ship operations. This report describes the state of the art in commercial tritium detection and monitoring and recommends approaches for low-level tritium monitoring in these environments.

  6. Beatty Wind Monitoring Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurt, Rick

    2009-06-01

    The UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER) and Valley Electric Association (VEA) worked with Kitty Shubert of the Beatty Economic Redevelopment Corporation (BERC) to install two wind monitoring stations outside the town of Beatty, Nevada. The following is a description of the two sites. The information for a proposed third site is also shown. The sites were selected from previous work by the BERC and Idaho National Laboratory. The equipment was provided by the BERC and installed by researchers from the UNLV CER.

  7. Benzene Monitor System report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, R.R.

    1992-10-12

    Two systems for monitoring benzene in aqueous streams have been designed and assembled by the Savannah River Technology Center, Analytical Development Section (ADS). These systems were used at TNX to support sampling studies of the full-scale {open_quotes}SRAT/SME/PR{close_quotes} and to provide real-time measurements of benzene in Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) simulant. This report describes the two ADS Benzene Monitor System (BMS) configurations, provides data on system operation, and reviews the results of scoping tests conducted at TNX. These scoping tests will allow comparison with other benzene measurement options being considered for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) laboratory. A report detailing the preferred BMS configuration statistical performance during recent tests has been issued under separate title: Statistical Analyses of the At-line Benzene Monitor Study, SCS-ASG-92-066. The current BMS design, called the At-line Benzene Monitor (ALBM), allows remote measurement of benzene in PHA solutions. The authors have demonstrated the ability to calibrate and operate this system using peanut vials from a standard Hydragard{trademark} sampler. The equipment and materials used to construct the ALBM are similar to those already used in other applications by the DWPF lab. The precision of this system ({+-}0.5% Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) at 1 sigma) is better than the purge & trap-gas chromatograpy reference method currently in use. Both BMSs provide a direct measurement of the benzene that can be purged from a solution with no sample pretreatment. Each analysis requires about five minutes per sample, and the system operation requires no special skills or training. The analyzer`s computer software can be tailored to provide desired outputs. Use of this system produces no waste stream other than the samples themselves (i.e. no organic extractants).

  8. A new approach to investigate leakage current mechanisms in infrared photodiodes from illuminated current-voltage characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopal, Vishnu

    2014-08-28

    This paper presents a new approach to investigate leakage current mechanisms in infrared photodiodes from the illuminated current–voltage characteristics. The example of mid-wave mercury cadmium telluride photodiodes is presented to illustrate the new approach. The new method is suitable for evaluating diodes in an array environment as advance knowledge of any of the material or device parameters are not required. The thermal saturation current is estimated from the observed open circuit voltage and zero-bias current (photo-current) of the diode. The ohmic shunt resistance is estimated from the observed maximum dynamic impedance of the diode. The experimentally observed reverse bias diode current in excess of thermal current, photo-current, and ohmic shunt current is reported to be best described by an exponential function of the type, I{sub excess}?=?I{sub r0}?+?K{sub 1} exp (K{sub 2} V), where I{sub r0}, K{sub 1}, and K{sub 2} are fitting parameters and V is the applied bias voltage. Our investigations reveal a close link between the excess current and the sources of ohmic currents in the diode. Exponential growth of excess current with the applied bias voltage has been interpreted as an indication of soft breakdown of the diodes.

  9. Portal monitoring technology control process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    York, R.L.

    1998-12-31

    Portal monitors are an important part of the material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) programs in Russia and the US. Although portal monitors are only a part of an integrated MPC and A system, they are an effective means of controlling the unauthorized movement of special nuclear material (SNM). Russian technical experts have gained experience in the use of SNM portal monitors from US experts ad this has allowed them to use the monitors more effectively. Several Russian institutes and companies are designing and manufacturing SNM portal monitors in Russia. Interactions between Russian and US experts have resulted in improvements to the instruments. SNM portal monitor technology has been effectively transferred from the US to Russia and should be a permanent part of the Russian MPC and A Program. Progress in the implementation of the monitors and improvements to how they are used are discussed.

  10. A rugged continuous air monitor for sampling radionuclides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Joseph Thaddeus

    2002-01-01

    less than that in the sampler for out-leakage. The pressure inside the container did not exceed 10 inches of water. For in-leakage tests, sulfur hexafluoride (SF?) was diluted with air and released into the container, external to the sampler...

  11. Reservoir-Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optimization with Operational Monitoring for Creation of Enhanced Geothermal Systems Reservoir-Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring for Creation...

  12. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  13. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

  14. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

    1995-01-17

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

  15. Personal continuous air monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, Ronald G. (Los Alamos, NM); Salazar, Samuel A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A personal continuous air monitor capable of giving immediate warning of the presence of radioactivity has a filter/detector head to be worn in the breathing zone of a user, containing a filter mounted adjacent to radiation detectors, and a preamplifier. The filter/detector head is connected to a belt pack to be worn at the waist or on the back of a user. The belt pack contains a signal processor, batteries, a multichannel analyzer, a logic circuit, and an alarm. An air pump also is provided in the belt pack for pulling air through the filter/detector head by way of an air tube.

  16. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bundy, C.H.; Graham, R.A.; Kuehn, S.F.; Precit, R.R.; Rogers, M.S.

    1990-01-09

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier. 8 figs.

  17. Milliwave melter monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniel, William E. (North Augusta, SC); Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Sundaram, Shanmugavelayutham K. (Richland, WA)

    2011-08-16

    A milliwave melter monitoring system is presented that has a waveguide with a portion capable of contacting a molten material in a melter for use in measuring one or more properties of the molten material in a furnace under extreme environments. A receiver is configured for use in obtaining signals from the melt/material transmitted to appropriate electronics through the waveguide. The receiver is configured for receiving signals from the waveguide when contacting the molten material for use in determining the viscosity of the molten material. Other embodiments exist in which the temperature, emissivity, viscosity and other properties of the molten material are measured.

  18. WIPP Documents - Environmental Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopmentat LENA|UpcomingVisit UsNews ThisPrivacyMonitoring

  19. Sandia Energy - Monitoring Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &Water Power&GridMonitoring Systems Home Climate

  20. Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.

    2013-03-31

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) consists of 5 U.S DOE national laboratories collaborating to develop a framework for predicting the risks associated with carbon sequestration. The approach taken by NRAP is to divide the system into components, including injection target reservoirs, wellbores, natural pathways including faults and fractures, groundwater and the atmosphere. Next, develop a detailed, physics and chemistry-based model of each component. Using the results of the detailed models, develop efficient, simplified models, termed reduced order models (ROM) for each component. Finally, integrate the component ROMs into a system model that calculates risk profiles for the site. This report details the development of the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer at PNNL. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer uses a Wellbore Leakage ROM developed at LANL as input. The detailed model, using the STOMP simulator, covers a 5x8 km area of the Edwards Aquifer near San Antonio, Texas. The model includes heterogeneous hydraulic properties, and equilibrium, kinetic and sorption reactions between groundwater, leaked CO2 gas, brine, and the aquifer carbonate and clay minerals. Latin Hypercube sampling was used to generate 1024 samples of input parameters. For each of these input samples, the STOMP simulator was used to predict the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, and the volume, length and width of the aquifer where pH was less than the MCL standard, and TDS, arsenic, cadmium and lead exceeded MCL standards. In order to decouple the Wellbore Leakage ROM from the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM, the response surface was transformed to replace Wellbore Leakage ROM input parameters with instantaneous and cumulative CO2 and brine leakage rates. The most sensitive parameters proved to be the CO2 and brine leakage rates from the well, with equilibrium coefficients for calcite and dolomite, as well as the number of illite and kaolinite sorption sites proving to be of secondary importance. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM was developed using nonlinear regression to fit the response surface with a quadratic polynomial. The goodness of fit was excellent for the CO2 flux to the atmosphere, and very good for predicting the volumes of groundwater exceeding the pH, TDS, As, Cd and Pb threshold values.

  1. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, J.E.

    1988-03-31

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

  2. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

    1997-01-01

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  3. Annual report of monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2011-06-27

    Carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Morrill, Kansas, was initially identified in 1985 during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High levels of nitrate were also present in the wells. The city of Morrill is located in Brown County in the northeastern corner of the state, about 7 mi east of Sabetha. The population of Morrill as of the 2000 census was approximately 277. All residents of Morrill now obtain their drinking water from the Sabetha municipal water system via a pipeline constructed in 1991. Starting in 1922, eight different public wells formerly served the Morrill municipal system at some time. Because of poor water quality, including high nitrate levels attributed to numerous animal feeding operations in the vicinity and application of fertilizer on agricultural lands, use of the local groundwater from any public well for municipal supply purposes was terminated in 1991 in favor of obtaining water from the Sabetha municipal water system. Investigations of the carbon tetrachloride and nitrate contamination by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in 1989, 1994, and 1996 (KDHE 1989; GeoCore 1994a-e, 1996) identified a localized plume of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater extending downgradient from a grain storage facility located in the northwestern section of Morrill. The facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), from 1950 to 1971. Since termination of the CCC/USDA grain storage operations in 1971, the property and existing grain bins have been used for private grain storage up to the present time. Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants were commonly used by the CCC/USDA, as well as private and commercial grain storage operations, to preserve grain. Because the identified carbon tetrachloride contamination could in part be linked to historical use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its former facility, in 2003 the CCC/USDA assumed responsibility for the site investigation of the carbon tetrachloride contamination. The CCC/USDA involvement began with development and implementation of a work plan for a Phase I expedited site characterization (Argonne 2003). That investigation and subsequent investigations (Argonne 2004, 2005a) were performed by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne continues to provide technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. The initial investigation by the CCC/USDA in 2003 determined that soils at the former facility have not been impacted by grain fumigation activities. Neither carbon tetrachloride nor chloroform was detected in near-surface soils or in subsurface soils collected to bedrock or to a depth of 15 ft below ground level (BGL). Therefore, no identifiable human health risk is associated with either carbon tetrachloride or chloroform in shallow soils, which additionally pose no further threat of contamination to groundwater. High carbon tetrachloride concentrations in groundwater (maximum 390 {micro}g/L in a sample collected from monitoring well MW3S - located on the former CCC/USDA property - in 1995) have declined significantly during long-term monitoring by the KDHE and currently by the CCC/USDA. Maximum levels within the plume of < 50 {micro}g/L at present confirm that no continuing soil source remains at the former CCC/USDA facility. Nevertheless, carbon tetrachloride concentrations exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level of 5.0 {micro}g/L remain. In September 2005, the CCC/USDA initiated periodic sampling of groundwater at Morrill, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the state (KDHE 2005), to monitor carbon tetrachloride concentrations i

  4. Passive health monitoring of pressurized sensing lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holbert, K. E.; Lin, K. [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ 85287-5706 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The electrical-hydraulic analogy is employed for the modeling of pressurized lines. Anomalies such as leakage and blockage alter the normal system transfer function in such a manner that fault detection and identification can be performed. An impetus for this work is to incorporate simple algorithms within micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure transducers in order to create an intelligent sensor. (authors)

  5. Advanced monitoring of machining operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teti, Roberto; Jemielniak, Krzysztof; O'Donnell, Garret; Dornfeld, David

    2010-01-01

    processing; and (c) intelligent sensor monitoring. 8.1. Newenabling technologies for ‘‘Intelligent Sensor Technology inimplementation of intelligent sensors and sensorial systems

  6. Well Monitoring System for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EGS well monitoring tools offer a unique set of solutions which will lower costs and increase confidence in future geothermal projects.

  7. Monitoring SERC Technologies — Solar Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar by National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Market Transformation Center electrical engineer Peter McNutt about Solar Photovoltaics and how to properly monitor its installation.

  8. Cylinder monitoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alderson, J.H. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in storage at the Department of Energy (DOE) gaseous diffusion plants, managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are being evaluated to determine their expected storage life. Cylinders evaluated recently have been in storage service for 30 to 40 years. In the present environment, the remaining life for these storage cylinders is estimated to be 30 years or greater. The group of cylinders involved in recent tests will continue to be monitored on a periodic basis, and other storage cylinders will be observed as on a statistical sample population. The program has been extended to all types of large capacity UF{sub 6} cylinders.

  9. LHC Beam Loss Monitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arauzo-Garcia, A; Ferioli, G; Gschwendtner, E

    2001-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a beam loss system will be installed for a continuous surveillance of particle losses. These beam particles deposit their energy in the super-conducting coils leading to temperature increase, possible magnet quenches and damages. Detailed simulations have shown that a set of six detectors outside the cryostats of the quadrupole magnets in the regular arc cells are needed to completely diagnose the expected beam losses and hence protect the magnets. To characterize the quench levels different loss rates are identified. In order to cover all possible quench scenarios the dynamic range of the beam loss monitors has to be matched to the simulated loss rates. For that purpose different detector systems (PIN-diodes and ionization chambers) are compared.

  10. Steam trap monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, M.J.

    1987-05-04

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

  11. Digital ac monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, George W. (Natick, MA); Kern, Jr., Edward C. (Lincoln, MA)

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer.

  12. Digital ac monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, G.W.; Kern, E.C. Jr.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer. 24 figs.

  13. Groundwater monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ames, Kenneth R. (Pasco, WA); Doesburg, James M. (Richland, WA); Eschbach, Eugene A. (Richland, WA); Kelley, Roy C. (Kennewick, WA); Myers, David A. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01

    A groundwater monitoring system includes a bore, a well casing within and spaced from the bore, and a pump within the casing. A water impermeable seal between the bore and the well casing prevents surface contamination from entering the pump. Above the ground surface is a removable operating means which is connected to the pump piston by a flexible cord. A protective casing extends above ground and has a removable cover. After a groundwater sample has been taken, the cord is disconnected from the operating means. The operating means is removed for taking away, the cord is placed within the protective casing, and the cover closed and locked. The system is thus protected from contamination, as well as from damage by accident or vandalism.

  14. Detection of gas leakage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Steven (Peralta, NM); Brown, Jason (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-06-19

    A method of detecting leaks and measuring volumes as well as an apparatus, the Power-free Pump Module (PPM), that is a self-contained leak test and volume measurement apparatus that requires no external sources of electrical power during leak testing or volume measurement, where the invention is a portable, pneumatically-controlled instrument capable of generating a vacuum, calibrating volumes, and performing quantitative leak tests on a closed test system or device, all without the use of alternating current (AC) power. Capabilities include the ability is to provide a modest vacuum (less than 10 Torr), perform a pressure rise leak test, measure the gas's absolute pressure, and perform volume measurements. All operations are performed through a simple rotary control valve which controls pneumatically-operated manifold valves.

  15. Labyrinth Seal Leakage Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inam, Orcun

    2012-10-19

    values of c/s have better kinetic energy dissipation in the cavity. Carryover coefficient is also found to be a function of the Reynolds number and shaft speed. Discharge coefficient of the seal presents the overall efficiency while carryover...

  16. Labyrinth Seal Leakage Equation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan

    2010-07-14

    pressures???????????. ? vs Re for water at diffe r different pressure ratios ?????. ? vs Re for water operating unde ? vs Re for different c/s ratios????????????????... Variation of C 1 and C 2 with c/s ratio?????????????..... Effect... of changing pitch when c/s is held fixed?????????? Effect of tooth height on carry over coefficient?????????? Relationship between carry over coefficient and Reynolds number for different tooth widths ???????????????????... Variation of with tooth...

  17. Labyrinth Seal Leakage Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Gaurav

    2012-10-19

    Seals are basic mechanical devices commonly used in machinery to avoid undesired flow losses of working fluids. To understand the working of these seals specifically those placed between relatively moving parts is still ...

  18. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

    2012-03-02

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 458.1, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies.

  19. INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING: THE VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT of the author. #12;iii ABSTRACT Environmental monitoring is essential to prevent further deterioration of our environment and to learn from past experiences. The implementation of large projects often involves a complex

  20. Optical oxygen concentration monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kebabian, P.

    1997-07-22

    A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen`s A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2,000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest. 4 figs.

  1. Steam trap monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Michael J. (Plainfield, IL)

    1988-01-01

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

  2. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

    1983-06-23

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

  3. Optical oxygen concentration monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

    1997-01-01

    A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

  4. Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Projects NASA White...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Projects NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Projects NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF)...

  5. 300 Area Process Trenches Groundwater Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, Jonathan W.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2001-08-13

    This document is a proposed groundwater monitoring plan for the 300 Area process trenches to comply with RCRA final status, corrective action groundwater monitoring.

  6. ~On-Line Monitoring: Beth A. Schroeder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plale, Beth

    observers are not required to provide computational functionality. Second,the systemsaredesignedto monitor the target soft- ware and respondwhile the target software isoperational. This forcesthe monitoring system

  7. Particle Sensor for Diesel Combustion Monitoring | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensor for Diesel Combustion Monitoring Particle Sensor for Diesel Combustion Monitoring 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: University of...

  8. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review...

  9. Wireless Monitoring of Railway Embankments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dantal, Vishal S.

    2010-07-14

    catastrophic damages. Soil moisture and movement of the soil mass are prime indicators of potential shallow slide movements. This assessment of wireless instruments considers a variety of devices ranging from devices for monitoring tilt and moisture at specific...

  10. Citizen Noise Pollution Monitoring Maisonneuve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TAGora project

    Citizen Noise Pollution Monitoring Nicolas Maisonneuve Sony Computer Science Laboratory Paris pollution involving citizens and built upon the notions of participatory sensing and citizen science. We, Experimentation. Keywords Noise pollution, citizen science, sustainability, participatory sensing, geo

  11. Guidelines for Retrofit Performance Monitoring 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ternes, M. P.

    1987-01-01

    A data specification guideline developed for use in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Single-Family Building Energy Retrofit Research Program is applicable to field monitoring studies of cooling retrofits. The guideline was developed to promote...

  12. Solar Power Systems Web Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Bimal Aklesh

    2011-01-01

    All over the world the peak demand load is increasing and the load factor is decreasing year-by-year. The fossil fuel is considered insufficient thus solar energy systems are becoming more and more useful, not only in terms of installation but monitoring of these systems is very crucial. Monitoring becomes very important when there are a large number of solar panels. Monitoring would allow early detection if the output falls below required level or one of the solar panel out of 1000 goes down. In this study the target is to monitor and control a developed solar panel by using available internet foundation. This web-enabled software will provide more flexibility over the system such as transmitting data from panel to the host computer and disseminating information to relevant stake holders barring any geographical barrier. The software would be built around web server with dynamic HTML and JAVA, this paper presents the preliminary design of the proposed system.

  13. PEM fuel cell monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meltser, M.A.; Grot, S.A.

    1998-06-09

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for monitoring the performance of H{sub 2}--O{sub 2} PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H{sub 2} sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken. 2 figs.

  14. PEM fuel cell monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY); Grot, Stephen Andreas (West Henrietta, NY)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for monitoring the performance of H.sub.2 --O.sub.2 PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H.sub.2 sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken.

  15. Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Shallow CO{sub 2} Injection, Greene County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rovey, Charles; Gouzie, Douglas; Biagioni, Richard

    2013-09-30

    The project titled Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Shallow CO{sub 2} Injection, Greene County, Missouri provided training for three graduate students in areas related to carbon capture and storage. Numerical modeling of CO{sub 2} injection into the St. Francois aquifer at the Southwest Power Plant Site in Greene County, Missouri indicates that up to 4.1 x 10{sup 5} metric tons of CO{sub 2} per year could be injected for 30 years without exceeding a 3 MPa differential injection pressure. The injected CO{sub 2} would remain sequestered below the top of the overlying caprock (St. Francois confining unit) for more than 1000 years. Geochemical modeling indicates that portions of the injected CO{sub 2} will react rapidly with trace minerals in the aquifer to form various solid carbonate mineral phases. These minerals would store significant portions of injected CO{sub 2} over geologic time scales. Finally, a GIS data base on the pore-fluid chemistry of the overlying aquifer system in Missouri, the Ozark aquifer, was compiled from many sources. This data base could become useful in monitoring for leakage from future CO{sub 2} sequestration sites.

  16. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

    2010-01-27

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that this work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, and DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 450.1A, DOE Order 5400.5, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies. (See LLNL [1992] and LLNL [2008] for information about LLNL's CERCLA activities).

  17. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Instructions for preparing occupational exposure data for submittal to the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) repository.

  18. Diffusion Tubes for Ambient NO2 Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    2 Monitoring: Practical Guidance AEA Energy & Environment iii Foreword Palmes-type diffusion tubesDiffusion Tubes for Ambient NO2 Monitoring: Practical Guidance for Laboratories and Users Report Monitoring: Practical Guidance AEA/ENV/R/2504 ­ Issue 1a Title Diffusion Tubes for Ambient NO2 Monitoring

  19. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.

    2011-10-01

    This presentation details the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Condition Monitoring program at NREL.

  20. Grantee Checklist for the Inspection & Monitoring Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document walks Grantees through the Inspection and Monitoring requirement of the Quality Work Plan.

  1. Method & apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane; Ward, Pamela Denise; Stevenson, Joel O'Don

    2004-10-19

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process and, more specifically, to the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates to a plasma monitoring module that may be adjusted in at least some manner so as to re-evaluate a previously monitored plasma process. For instance, optical emissions data on a plasma process that was previously monitored by the plasma monitoring module may be replayed through the plasma monitoring module after making at least one adjustment in relation to the plasma monitoring module.

  2. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2012-08-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  3. Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2008-04-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanne L. Knight

    2010-10-01

    This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

  5. Towards Highly Available ThreeTier Monitoring Applications (Extended Abstract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolev, Danny

    dispatched at the middle tier. They monitor the target agents and other monitoring components accumulating

  6. Developments on the CENS Structural Health Monitoring Front

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    on the CENS Structural Health Monitoring Front D. Skolnik,Introduction: Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Systems

  7. Developments on the CENS Structural Health Monitoring Front

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    on the CENS Structural Health Monitoring Front D. Skolnik,Introduction: Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Systems

  8. 1999 Environmental Monitoring Program Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. V. Street

    2000-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1999 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory management and operating contractor Environmental Monitoring Program. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1999 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the expectation of nitrogen in two disposal pond effluent streams iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal well, and coliform bacteria in drinking water systems at two facilities. Maintenance activities were performed on the two drinking water systems and tested prior to putting back into service. The monitoring and surveillance results demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

  9. Shared performance monitor in a multiprocessor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiu, George; Gara, Alan G; Salapura, Valentina

    2014-12-02

    A performance monitoring unit (PMU) and method for monitoring performance of events occurring in a multiprocessor system. The multiprocessor system comprises a plurality of processor devices units, each processor device for generating signals representing occurrences of events in the processor device, and, a single shared counter resource for performance monitoring. The performance monitor unit is shared by all processor cores in the multiprocessor system. The PMU is further programmed to monitor event signals issued from non-processor devices.

  10. High detection efficiency micro-structured solid-state neutron detector with extremely low leakage current fabricated with continuous p-n junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Kuan-Chih; Lu, James J.-Q.; Bhat, Ishwara B.; Dahal, Rajendra; Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3522 ; Danon, Yaron

    2013-04-15

    We report the continuous p-n junction formation in honeycomb structured Si diode by in situ boron deposition and diffusion process using low pressure chemical vapor deposition for solid-state thermal neutron detection applications. Optimized diffusion temperature of 800 Degree-Sign C was obtained by current density-voltage characteristics for fabricated p{sup +}-n diodes. A very low leakage current density of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} A/cm{sup 2} at -1 V was measured for enriched boron filled honeycomb structured neutron detector with a continuous p{sup +}-n junction. The neutron detection efficiency for a Maxwellian spectrum incident on the face of the detector was measured under zero bias voltage to be {approx}26%. These results are very encouraging for fabrication of large area solid-state neutron detector that could be a viable alternative to {sup 3}He tube based technology.

  11. Demonstrating 1 nm-oxide-equivalent-thickness HfO{sub 2}/InSb structure with unpinning Fermi level and low gate leakage current density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trinh, Hai-Dang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Lin, Yueh-Chin; Nguyen, Hong-Quan; Luc, Quang-Ho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Nguyen, Minh-Thuy; Duong, Quoc-Van; Nguyen, Manh-Nghia [Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam)] [Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Wang, Shin-Yuan [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Chiao Tung University 1001, University Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Chiao Tung University 1001, University Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Yi Chang, Edward [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, National Chiao Tung University 1001, University Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2013-09-30

    In this work, the band alignment, interface, and electrical characteristics of HfO{sub 2}/InSb metal-oxide-semiconductor structure have been investigated. By using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, the conduction band offset of 1.78 ± 0.1 eV and valence band offset of 3.35 ± 0.1 eV have been extracted. The transmission electron microscopy analysis has shown that HfO{sub 2} layer would be a good diffusion barrier for InSb. As a result, 1 nm equivalent-oxide-thickness in the 4 nm HfO{sub 2}/InSb structure has been demonstrated with unpinning Fermi level and low leakage current of 10{sup ?4} A/cm{sup ?2}. The D{sub it} value of smaller than 10{sup 12} eV{sup ?1}cm{sup ?2} has been obtained using conduction method.

  12. Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.

    2011-05-15

    Storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers is intended to be at supercritical pressure and temperature conditions, but CO{sub 2} leaking from a geologic storage reservoir and migrating toward the land surface (through faults, fractures, or improperly abandoned wells) would reach subcritical conditions at depths shallower than 500-750 m. At these and shallower depths, subcritical CO{sub 2} can form two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}, with significant latent heat effects during boiling and condensation. Additional strongly non-isothermal effects can arise from decompression of gas-like subcritical CO{sub 2}, the so-called Joule-Thomson effect. Integrated modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage requires the ability to model non-isothermal flows of brine and CO{sub 2} at conditions that range from supercritical to subcritical, including three-phase flow of aqueous phase, and both liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate comprehensive simulation capabilities that can cope with all possible phase conditions in brine-CO{sub 2} systems. Our model formulation includes: (1) an accurate description of thermophysical properties of aqueous and CO{sub 2}-rich phases as functions of temperature, pressure, salinity and CO{sub 2} content, including the mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O; (2) transitions between super- and subcritical conditions, including phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}; (3) one-, two-, and three-phase flow of brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including heat flow; (4) non-isothermal effects associated with phase change, mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and water, and (de-) compression effects; and (5) the effects of dissolved NaCl, and the possibility of precipitating solid halite, with associated porosity and permeability change. Applications to specific leakage scenarios demonstrate that the peculiar thermophysical properties of CO{sub 2} provide a potential for positive as well as negative feedbacks on leakage rates, with a combination of self-enhancing and self-limiting effects. Lower viscosity and density of CO{sub 2} as compared to aqueous fluids provides a potential for self-enhancing effects during leakage, while strong cooling effects from liquid CO{sub 2} boiling into gas, and from expansion of gas rising towards the land surface, act to self-limit discharges. Strong interference between fluid phases under three-phase conditions (aqueous - liquid CO{sub 2} - gaseous CO{sub 2}) also tends to reduce CO{sub 2} fluxes. Feedback on different space and time scales can induce non-monotonic behavior of CO{sub 2} flow rates.

  13. ORR Environmental Monitoring Programs 7-1 7. ORR Environmental Monitoring Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    radiation is also measured. Data from environmental monitoring activities are used to assess exposuresORR Environmental Monitoring Programs 7-1 7. ORR Environmental Monitoring Programs Setting Environmental monitoring is a major activity on the ORR. Environmental monitoring encompasses two activities

  14. ORR Environmental Monitoring Programs 7-1 7. ORR Environmental Monitoring Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    and the environment. 7.1 METEOROLOGICAL MONITORING Nine meteorological towers provide data on meteorologicalORR Environmental Monitoring Programs 7-1 7. ORR Environmental Monitoring Programs Environmental monitoring is a major activity on the ORR. Environmental monitoring encompasses two activities

  15. Global change monitoring with lichens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Insarov, G.

    1997-12-31

    Environmental monitoring involves observations and assessment of changes in ecosystems and their components caused by anthropogenetic influence. An ideal monitoring system enables quantification of the contemporary state of the environment and detect changes in it. An important function of monitoring is to assess environment quality of areas that are not affected by local anthropogenic impacts, i.e. background areas. In background areas terrestrial ecosystems are mainly affected by such anthropogenic factors as lowered air pollution and global climate change. Assessment of biotic responses to altered climatic and atmospheric conditions provides an important basis for ecosystem management and environmental decision making. Without the ability to make such assessment, sustainability of ecosystems as a support system for humans remains uncertain.

  16. Condition/damage monitoring methodologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, C. R. (Charles R.); Sohn, Hong Yong

    2001-01-01

    COSMOS, in cooperation with the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS), is sponsoring an invited workshop entitled Strong-Motion Instrumentation of Buildings. The workshop is motivated by the need to obtain broad input from earthquake engineering professionals for the purpose of developing guidelines for strong motion instrumentation of buildings as part of the ANSS instrument installation effort. The ANSS has been authorized capital finding for 6,000 strong-motion instruments. It is expected that funding for purchase and installation of instruments will be appropriated over a period of several years. The instrument installations must meet multiple monitoring objectives including instrumentation of buildings of various types, urban reference stations, and emergency response and recovery actions. An important opportunity therefore, exists to comprehensively define strong-motion monitoring needs as an underpinning basis for developing guidelines for installation of this important monitoring system. This workshop will specifically address instrumentation of buildings.

  17. Device for monitoring cell voltage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doepke, Matthias; Eisermann, Henning

    2012-08-21

    A device for monitoring a rechargeable battery having a number of electrically connected cells includes at least one current interruption switch for interrupting current flowing through at least one associated cell and a plurality of monitoring units for detecting cell voltage. Each monitoring unit is associated with a single cell and includes a reference voltage unit for producing a defined reference threshold voltage and a voltage comparison unit for comparing the reference threshold voltage with a partial cell voltage of the associated cell. The reference voltage unit is electrically supplied from the cell voltage of the associated cell. The voltage comparison unit is coupled to the at least one current interruption switch for interrupting the current of at least the current flowing through the associated cell, with a defined minimum difference between the reference threshold voltage and the partial cell voltage.

  18. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Ballard, Sanford (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow.

  19. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, B.B.; Ballard, S.

    1994-08-23

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration is disclosed. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow. 4 figs.

  20. CO2 leakage impacts on shallow groundwater. Field-scale reactive-transport simulations informed by observations at a natural analog site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keating, Elizabeth H.; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Viswanathan, Hari; Carey, J. William; Pawar, Rajesh; Guthrie, George D.; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna

    2013-03-01

    It is challenging to predict the degree to which shallow groundwater might be affected by leaks from a CO2 sequestration reservoir, particularly over long time scales and large spatial scales. In this study observations at a CO2 enriched shallow aquifer natural analog were used to develop a predictive model which is then used to simulate leakage scenarios. This natural analog provides the opportunity to make direct field observations of groundwater chemistry in the presence of elevated CO2, to collect aquifer samples and expose them to CO2 under controlled conditions in the laboratory, and to test the ability of multiphase reactivemore »transport models to reproduce measured geochemical trends at the field-scale. The field observations suggest that brackish water entrained with the upwelling CO2 are a more significant source of trace metals than in situ mobilization of metals due to exposure to CO2. The study focuses on a single trace metal of concern at this site: U. Experimental results indicate that cation exchange/adsorption and dissolution/precipitation of calcite containing trace amounts of U are important reactions controlling U in groundwater at this site, and that the amount of U associated with calcite is fairly well constrained. Simulations incorporating these results into a 3-D multi-phase reactive transport model are able to reproduce the measured ranges and trends between pH, pCO2, Ca, total C, U and Cl-at the field site. Although the true fluxes at the natural analog site are unknown, the cumulative CO2 flux inferred from these simulations are approximately equivalent to 37.8E-3 MT, approximately corresponding to a .001% leak rate for injection at a large (750 MW) power plant. The leakage scenario simulations suggest that if the leak only persists for a short time the volume of aquifer contaminated by CO2-induced mobilization of U will be relatively small, yet persistent over 100 a.« less

  1. Long-term monitoring of ULF electromagnetic fields at Parkfield, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kappler, K.N.; Morrison, H.F.; Egbert, G.D.

    2009-08-01

    Electric and magnetic fields in the (10{sup -4}-1.0) Hz band were monitored at two sites adjacent to the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield and Hollister, California from 1995 to present. A data window [2002-2005], enclosing the September 28, 2004 M6 Parkfield earthquake, was analyzed to determine if anomalous electric or magnetic fields, or changes in ground conductivity, occurred before the earthquake. The data were edited, removing intervals of instrument malfunction leaving 875 days in the four-year period. Frequent, spike-like disturbances were common, but were not more frequent around the time of the earthquake; these were removed before subsequent processing. Signal to noise amplitude spectra, estimated via magnetotelluric processing showed the behavior of the ULF fields to be remarkably constant over the period of analysis. These first-order plots make clear that most of the recorded energy is coherent over the spatial extent of the array. Three main statistical techniques were employed to separate local anomalous electrical or magnetic fields from the dominant coherent natural fields: transfer function estimates between components at each site were employed to subtract the dominant field, and look deeper at the 'residual' fields; the data were decomposed into principal components to identify the dominant coherent array modes; and the technique of canonical coherences was employed to distinguish anomalous fields which are spatially broad from anomalies which occur at a single site only, and furthermore to distinguish anomalies which are present in both the electric and magnetic fields from those which are present in only one field type. Standard remote reference apparent resistivity estimates were generated daily at Parkfield. A significant seasonal component of variability was observed suggesting local distortion due to variations in near surface resistance. In all cases, high levels of sensitivity to subtle electromagnetic effects were demonstrated, but no effects which can be reasonably characterized as precursors to the Parkfield earthquake were found.

  2. Process Monitoring for Nuclear Safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehinger, Michael H [ORNL] [ORNL; Pomeroy, George D [ORNL] [ORNL; Budlong-Sylvester, Kory W [ORNL] [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Process Monitoring has long been used to evaluate industrial processes and operating conditions in nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. In nuclear applications there is a recognized need to demonstrate the safeguards benefits from using advanced process monitoring on spent fuel reprocessing technologies and associated facilities, as a complement to nuclear materials accounting. This can be accomplished by: defining credible diversion pathway scenarios as a sample problem; using advanced sensor and data analysis techniques to illustrate detection capabilities; and formulating 'event detection' methodologies as a means to quantify performance of the safeguards system. Over the past 30 years there have been rapid advances and improvement in the technology associated with monitoring and control of industrial processes. In the context of bulk handling facilities that process nuclear materials, modern technology can provide more timely information on the location and movement of nuclear material to help develop more effective safeguards. For international safeguards, inspection means verification of material balance data as reported by the operator through the State to the international inspectorate agency. This verification recognizes that the State may be in collusion with the operator to hide clandestine activities, potentially during abnormal process conditions with falsification of data to mask the removal. Records provided may show material is accounted for even though a removal occurred. Process monitoring can offer additional fidelity during a wide variety of operating conditions to help verify the declaration or identify possible diversions. The challenge is how to use modern technology for process monitoring and control in a proprietary operating environment subject to safeguards inspectorate or other regulatory oversight. Under the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, a range of potential safeguards applications for process monitoring are under conceptual development and evaluation. This paper reports on a study of process monitoring for a sample problem involving spent fuel reprocessing with aqueous reprocessing technologies. This includes modeling the processes in the context of a nuclear material diversion scenario and measuring the associated process chemistry. A systems-centric model is applied using actual and simulated plant data, advanced sensors, anomaly detection methods, statistical analysis and data authentication methods, to help illustrate the benefits of process monitoring applications.

  3. Monitoring Energy Consumption of Smartphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Fangwei; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Xuhai; Ma, Chengchuan

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid development of new and innovative applications for mobile devices like smartphones, advances in battery technology have not kept pace with rapidly growing energy demands. Thus energy consumption has become a more and more important issue of mobile devices. To meet the requirements of saving energy, it is critical to monitor and analyze the energy consumption of applications on smartphones. For this purpose, we develop a smart energy monitoring system called SEMO for smartphones using Android operating system. It can profile mobile applications with battery usage information, which is vital for both developers and users.

  4. Energy Management Programs- Monitoring Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauls, S. P.; Shamy, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-85-05-34.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 8017 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-85-05-34.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ENERGY MANAGEMENT... PROGRAMS - MONITORING PERFORMANCE Stanley P. Pauls Mustafa D. Shamy Merck & Co., Inc. Rahway, N. J. ABSTRACT of the historical energy consumption records. Energy use standards have been established to Steam Model monitor energy conservation...

  5. Relating to monitoring ion sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John Alan (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques for monitoring the position on alpha contamination in or on items or locations. The technique is particularly applicable to pipes, conduits and other locations to which access is difficult. The technique uses indirect monitoring of alpha emissions by detecting ions generated by the alpha emissions. The medium containing the ions is moved in a controlled manner frog in proximity with the item or location to the detecting unit and the signals achieved over time are used to generate alpha source position information.

  6. Application of Inverse Models for Long-Term-Energy-Monitoring in the German Enbau: Monitor Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, C.; Herkel, S.; Lohnert, G.; Voss, K.; Wagner, A.

    2006-01-01

    " that supports the planning and evaluation of demonstration projects. enbau:monitor, as the related accompanying project, documents and analyzes these projects on a common platform. in the framework of enbau:monitor, two different monitoring phases were defined...

  7. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogmo, D.

    1997-03-18

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system. 6 figs.

  8. Applying the Continuous Monitoring Technical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by providing technical leadership for the nation's measurement and standards infrastructure. ITL develops tests of technical, physical, administrative, and management standards and guidelines for the cost-effective securityApplying the Continuous Monitoring Technical Reference Model to the Asset, Configuration

  9. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-05-01

    This report for first quarter 1992 contains sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring data for the Savannah River Plant. The data tables presented in this report are copies of draft analytical results and therefore do contain errors. These errors will be corrected when the finalized data is received from the laboratory.

  10. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mullen, Ken I. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  11. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogmo, David (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system.

  12. Climate Analysis, Monitoring, and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Analysis, Monitoring, and Modeling Environmental Research Area PIER Environmental Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ environmental August 2012 The Issue Climate change is a daunting challenge health. The energy sector will not be spared. The potential repercussions of climate change include

  13. ICP (Institutional Conservation Program) monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    The following pages present the final report of activities undertaken by Carpenter Environmental Associates, Inc. (CEA) in carrying out its contractual obligations for the New York Support Office of the US Department of Energy. The contract calls for the field monitoring/review of DOE grants to schools and hospitals under the Institutional Conservation Program (ICP). This final report is the result of a review of statistics and findings gathered over the period of the contract, which included monitoring visits to 50 grantees in New York State and New Jersey. The report is intended to highlight aspects of the monitoring project and to make recommendations. This report is organized into four sections: Section 1 details the steps taken by CEA in organizing and implementing the review; Section 2 presents program statistics; Section 3 discusses monitoring review concerns, implementation issues and commonly observed problems/accomplishments; and Section 4 lists recommendations. Taken as a whole, this final report is intended to convey a complete picture of CEA's activities under this contract. 25 tabs.,

  14. EFM units monitor gas flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This paper describes the radio-controlled pipeline monitoring system established by Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Corp. which was designed to equip all its natural gas purchasing metering facilities with electronic flow measurement computers. The paper describes the actual radio equipment used and the features and reliability of the equipment.

  15. 2002 WIPP Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-09-30

    DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE | facility to prepare an environmental management plan (EMP). This document is | prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment; applicable sections of Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 834, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'' (draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1, which is the driver for the annual Site Environmental Report (SER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP Project is operated by Westinghouse TRU Solutions (WTS) for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of WIPP's effluent and environmental | monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP Project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

  16. A Mountain-Scale Monitoring Network for Yucca Mountain Performance Confirmation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freifeld, Barry; Tsang, Yvonne

    2006-01-01

    multifunction borings, monitoring temperature and pressure,Monitoring Network Parameters. Monitored Parameter Temperaturetemperature and pressure measurement capabilities. Multilevel monitoring

  17. Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 #12;Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 Published: 13 May 2004 Prepared: Michael Bech

  18. Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Transformations Associated with Cr explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological first integrated hydrological wellbore and geophysical tomographic data sets to estimate hydrological

  19. Circuit breaker monitoring application using wireless communication 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ved, Nitin

    2007-04-25

    . A low-cost automated circuit breaker monitoring system is developed to monitor circuit breaker control signals. An interface is designed on top of which different local and system-wide applications can be developed which utilize the data recorded...

  20. Evaluation of continuous glucose monitoring systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Guang, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    There has been much hype in the research and development of continuous glucose monitoring technologies, driven by the enormous and rapidly expanding glucose monitoring market and the large and growing base of diabetes ...

  1. Monitoring of butterflies within a landscape context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monitoring of butterflies within a landscape context Dennis Jonason Arbetsrapport 192 2007 SVERIGES Tfn: 018-671000 #12;#12;Monitoring of butterflies within a landscape context Dennis Jonason................................................................................................. 9 3.1 Impact of environment.................................................................... 9 3

  2. Ultralow-Power Electronics for Cardiac Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turicchia, Lorenzo

    Ultralow-power electronics for cardiac monitoring make possible the development of new light-weight and low-cost devices that are ideal for long-term medical measurements and home-based tele-monitoring services. Nowadays, ...

  3. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring - An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S; Veers, P.

    2011-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of wind turbine drivetrain condition monitoring based on presentations from a condition monitoring workshop organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2009 and on additional references.

  4. Thermal Monitoring Approaches for Energy Savings Verification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBride, J. R.; Bohmer, C. J.; Lippman, R. H.; Zern, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews and summarizes techniques for monitoring thermal energy flows for the purpose of verifying energy savings in industrial and large institutional energy conservation projects. Approaches for monitoring hot and chilled water, steam...

  5. Biomedical System for Monitoring Pressure Ulcer Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Frank Tinghwa

    2013-01-01

    OF C ALIFORNIA Los Angeles Biomedical System for MonitoringOF THE D ISSERTATION Biomedical System for Monitoringto the design of a biomedical sys- tem for the monitoring of

  6. Use of sensors in monitoring civil structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daher, Bassam William, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis surveys the use of sensors and sensor networks in monitoring civil structures, with particular emphasis on the monitoring of bridges and highways using fiber optic sensors. Following a brief review of the most ...

  7. Groundwater Monitoring Well Installation Work Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groundwater Monitoring Well Installation Work Plan CSMRI Site Prepared for: Colorado School;CSMRI Site Groundwater Monitoring Well Installation Work Plan December 6, 2006 Page ii Table of Contents

  8. MEMS Materials and Temperature Sensors for Down Hole Geothermal System Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wodin-Schwartz, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring Geothermal Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .down hole environment monitoring. Harsh environment sensorsfor Geothermal Monitoring Harsh environment MEMS sensors

  9. Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GHG inventory, Policiesdeployment programs Resource Type: Guidemanual Website: www.iea.orgpaperspathwaysmonitoring.pdf Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving...

  10. Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.

    2007-03-09

    Initial scoping calculations of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site were carried out for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to investi¬gate the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer that would result from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. Although impacts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport were quantified based on numerical simulation results, the investigation represented a quali¬tative assessment of the potential lateral recharge that could result in adverse effects on the aquifer. Because the magnitude of the potential leakage is unknown, hypothetical bounding calculations were performed. When a quantitative analysis of the magnitude of the potential recharge from Black Rock Reservoir is obtained, the hydrologic impacts analysis will be revisited. The analysis presented in this report represent initial bounding calculations. A maximum lateral recharge (i.e., upland flux) was determined in the first part of this study by executing steady-state flow simulations that raised the water table no higher than the elevation attained in the Central Plateau during the Hanford operational period. This metric was selected because it assumed a maximum remobilization of contaminants that existed under previous fully saturated conditions. Three steady-state flow fields were then used to analyze impacts to transient contaminant transport: a maximum recharge (27,000 acre-ft/yr), a no additional flux (365 acre-ft/yr), and an intermediate recharge case (16,000 acre-ft/yr). The transport behavior of four radionuclides was assessed for a 300 year simula¬tion period with the three flow fields. The four radionuclides are current contaminants of concern (COCs) in the Central Plateau and include tritium, iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium-238. Transient flow and transport simulations were used to establish hypothetical concentration distributions in the subsurface. Using the simulated concentration distributions in 2005 as initial condi¬tions for steady-state flow runs, simulations were executed to investigate the relative effects on contam¬inant transport from the increased upland fluxes. Contaminant plumes were analyzed for 1) peak concen¬trations and arrival times at downstream points of compliance, 2) the area of the aquifer contaminated at or above the drinking water standard (DWS), and 3) the total activity remaining in the domain at the end of the simulation. In addition to this analysis, unit source release simulations from a hypothetical tracer were executed to determine relative travel times from the Central Plateau. The results of this study showed that increases in the upland boundary fluxes 1) had little impact on regional flow directions and 2) accelerated contaminant transport. Although contaminant concentrations have initially increased for the more mobile contaminants (tritium, technetium-99, and iodine-129), the accelerated transport caused dilution and a more rapid decline in concentrations relative to the Base Case (no additional flux). For the low-mobility uranium-238, higher upland fluxes caused increases in concentration, but these concentrations never exceeded the DWS. No significant effects on contaminant concentrations were identified at the Core Zone, Columbia River, or buffer zone area separating these two compliance boundaries. When lateral recharge at the upland boundaries was increased, more mass was transported out of the aquifer and discharged into the Columbia River. These concentrations, however, were diluted with respect to the Base Case, where no potential leakage from the proposed reservoir was considered.

  11. Vibration-based structural health monitoring of highway bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guan, Hong

    2006-01-01

    Principles of Structural Health Monitoring, Class Notes .Web-Based Structural Health Monitoring of a FRP CompositeA Review of Structural Health Monitoring Literature: 1996-

  12. Passive and Active Sensing Technologies for Structural Health Monitoring /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Richard

    2014-01-01

    variability on structural health monitoring,” Philos. Trans.Sensing Methods in Structural Health Monitoring for Aircraftof guided wave structural health monitoring systems,” Smart

  13. Wind, Thermal, and Earthquake Monitoring of the Watts Towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    English, Jackson

    2013-01-01

    Paradigm for Vibration-Based Structural Health Monitoring.Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, Stanford, CA,Worden, K (2001) “Structural   Health   Monitoring   Using  

  14. Sensor data analysis and information extraction for structural health monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Linjun

    2006-01-01

    Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, StanfordA Review of Structural Health Monitoring Literature: 1996-workshop on structural Health Monitoring: Structural Health

  15. Antineutrino Monitoring of Thorium Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akindele, Oluwatomi A; Norman, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    Various groups have demonstrated that antineutrino monitoring can be successful in assessing the plutonium content in water-cooled nuclear reactors for nonproliferation applications. New reactor designs and concepts incorporate nontraditional fuels types and chemistry. Understanding how these properties affect the antineutrino emission from a reactor can extend the applicability of antineutrino monitoring.Thorium molten salt reactors (MSR) breed U-233, that if diverted constitute an IAEA direct use material. The antineutrino spectrum from the fission of U-233 has been determined, the feasibility of detecting the diversion of a significant quantity, 8 kg of U-233, within the IAEA timeliness goal of 30 days has been evaluated. The antineutrino emission from a thorium reactor operating under normal conditions is compared to a diversion scenario at a 25 meter standoff by evaluating the daily antineutrino count rate and the energy spectrum of the detected antineutrinos. It was found that the diversion of a signifi...

  16. Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Feng, Wei; Lu, Alison; Xia, Jianjun; Yang, Le; Shen, Qi; Im, Piljae; Bhandari, Mahabir

    2013-06-01

    This project aimed to develop a standard methodology for building energy data definition, collection, presentation, and analysis; apply the developed methods to a standardized energy monitoring platform, including hardware and software, to collect and analyze building energy use data; and compile offline statistical data and online real-time data in both countries for fully understanding the current status of building energy use. This helps decode the driving forces behind the discrepancy of building energy use between the two countries; identify gaps and deficiencies of current building energy monitoring, data collection, and analysis; and create knowledge and tools to collect and analyze good building energy data to provide valuable and actionable information for key stakeholders.

  17. Hardware Supported Flexible Monitoring: Early Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhai, Antonia

    Hardware Supported Flexible Monitoring: Early Results Antonia Zhai, Guojin He, and Mats P. Monitoring of software's execution is crucial in numerous software development tasks. Current monitoring software must be studied in its pro- duction environment. To address this fundamental software engineering

  18. Programmable Agents for Active Distributed Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yongge

    distributed throughout the environment. This makes monitoring an intricate task and complicates the managementProgrammable Agents for Active Distributed Monitoring Ehab S. Al-Shaer Multimedia Networking and describes a programmable agents ap- proach for active monitoring as an important attribute for supporting

  19. Underground Structure Monitoring with Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yunhao

    University of Science and Technology {limo, liu}@cse.ust.hk ABSTRACT Environment monitoring in coal mines to better serve people by automatically monitoring and interacting with physical environments. EnvironmentUnderground Structure Monitoring with Wireless Sensor Networks Mo Li, Yunhao Liu Hong Kong

  20. MFR PAPER 1174 Monitoring the Ocean Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1174 Monitoring the Ocean Environment L. E. EBER INTRODUCTION Atmospheric purposes of monitoring the marine environment are to collect synoptic observations adequate for in and oceanographic conditions in the vicinity of the sea sur- face have historically been monitored by mariners

  1. SLAMBOT: Structural Health Monitoring Robot using Lamb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Thomas C.

    SLAMBOT: Structural Health Monitoring Robot using Lamb Waves Wenyi Wang, Thomas C. Henderson of a mobile robot and a computational sensor network ap- proach to perform structural health monitoring of ultrasound propagation through the material is used to define two structural health monitoring meth- ods: (1

  2. Center of Excellence in Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center of Excellence in Structural Health Monitoring Inaugural Meeting April 12­13 2007 Nittany, Aeronautics and As- tronautics, is Editor-in-Chief of the Structural Health Monitoring international journal and the organizer of the International Workshops on Structural Health Monitoring. His research interests include

  3. November 1988 IBM PC MST MONITOR SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    PLP 1039 November 1988 IBM PC MST MONITOR SYSTEM J.C. Sprott E.W. Goetz Plasma Studies University professor. .:. #12;IBM PC MST Monitor System J. C. Sprott and E. W. Goetz I. Introduction Routine tune-up and monitoring of MST is done with an IBM PC, connected to a variety of dedicated diagnostic sensors hardwired

  4. Robotic Sensor Networks: An Application to Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amigoni, Francesco

    carry sensors around an environment to detect phenomena and produce detailed en- vironmental assessments applications require to monitor an environment in order to detect phenomena and produce detailed environmental to monitoring Electro-Magnetic Fields (EMFs). The monitoring of EMF phenomena is extremely im- portant

  5. SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW J. E. Santos1, G. B. Savioli2, J. M. Carcione3, D´e, Argentina SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. I Storage of CO2). SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. II CO2 is separated from natural

  6. SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW J. E. Santos1 1 Department of Mathematics, Purdue University, USA Purdue University, March 1rst, 2013 SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12 (North Sea). SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. II CO2 is separated

  7. Universal Wireless Event Monitoring System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yambem, Lamyanba

    2012-10-19

    stream_source_info YAMBEM-THESIS.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 46015 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name YAMBEM-THESIS.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 UNIVERSAL WIRELESS EVENT... Engineering UNIVERSAL WIRELESS EVENT MONITORING SYSTEM A Thesis by LAMYANBA YAMBEM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  8. Refrigeration monitor and alarm system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branz, M.A.; Renaud, P.F.

    1986-09-23

    A monitor is described for a refrigeration system including a heat reclaiming system coupled therewith, comprising: a sensor positioned to detect the level of liquid state refrigerant in the system and provide an electrical output signal therefrom; a digital display for displaying the refrigerant level; first circuit means coupling the digital display to the sensor for actuating the digital display; and lockout means coupled with the sensor for deactivating the heat reclaiming system when a preselected refrigerant level is reached.

  9. Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyles, Brad; McCurdy, Greg; Chapman, Jenny; Miller, Julianne

    2012-01-01

    A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

  10. Transformative monitoring approaches for reprocessing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cipiti, Benjamin B.

    2011-09-01

    The future of reprocessing in the United States is strongly driven by plant economics. With increasing safeguards, security, and safety requirements, future plant monitoring systems must be able to demonstrate more efficient operations while improving the current state of the art. The goal of this work was to design and examine the incorporation of advanced plant monitoring technologies into safeguards systems with attention to the burden on the operator. The technologies examined include micro-fluidic sampling for more rapid analytical measurements and spectroscopy-based techniques for on-line process monitoring. The Separations and Safeguards Performance Model was used to design the layout and test the effect of adding these technologies to reprocessing. The results here show that both technologies fill key gaps in existing materials accountability that provide detection of diversion events that may not be detected in a timely manner in existing plants. The plant architecture and results under diversion scenarios are described. As a tangent to this work, both the AMUSE and SEPHIS solvent extraction codes were examined for integration in the model to improve the reality of diversion scenarios. The AMUSE integration was found to be the most successful and provided useful results. The SEPHIS integration is still a work in progress and may provide an alternative option.

  11. Tuesday, March 13, 2007 POSTER SESSION I: MARS: POLAR, GLACIAL, AND NEAR-SURFACE ICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    .m. Fitness Center Milkovich S. M. Plaut J. J. Martian South Polar Layered Deposit Stratigraphy and Implications for Accumulation History [#1929] Several correlatable layer sequences are observed in the south polar layered deposits. The distribution of these sequences provide insight into the nature

  12. Metagenomic Characterization of Airborne Viral DNA Diversity in the Near-Surface Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    with seasonal changes in tempera- ture and absolute humidity. Metagenomic analysis of air viromes amplified

  13. Lead distribution in near-surface soils of two Florida cities: Gainesville and Miami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    , arithmetic mean; GM, geometric mean; GSD, geometric standard deviation; OC, organic carbon; SCTL, soil clean, and the widespread past use of alkyl-lead compounds as antiknock addi- tives in gasoline, and Pb-based paint

  14. Scattering Versus Intrinsic Attenuation in the Near Surface: Measurements from Permanent Down-hole Geophones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangriotis, Maria-Daphne

    2009-01-01

    PartII: Prestack depth migration and field examples,”data using prestack depth migration,” Geophysics, Vol. 71,P. “Prestack Kirchhoff depth migration of shallow seismic

  15. Interference-based Investigation of Microscopic Objects Near Surfaces: a View From Below 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contreras Naranjo, Jose Clemente

    2013-11-26

    in the following. 13 2.3.1 Measurement of RICM set-up parameters Light coming through the objective illuminates the focal area with a cone of light, ???? (as measured on the glass side), given by the size of the aperture stop in the microscope....17 aperture where the top inset shows the illumination cone as seen in air. 14 2.3.2 Scale factor between simulated and experimental intensities Prior to observing the specimens under the microscope, a scale factor between experimental and simulated...

  16. Scattering Versus Intrinsic Attenuation in the Near Surface: Measurements from Permanent Down-hole Geophones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangriotis, Maria-Daphne

    2009-01-01

    JR, and Butler, TM. “Seismic Q-Stratigraphy or dissipation,”JR, and Butler, TM. “Seismic Q-Stratigraphy or dissipation,”JR, and Butler, TM. “Seismic Q-Stratigraphy or dissipation,”

  17. UNCORRECTEDPROOF 2 Requirements of a global near-surface soil moisture satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    : accuracy, repeat time, and spatial resolution 4 Jeffrey P. Walker a,b,*, Paul R. Houser a 5 a Hydrological) remote sensing studies, using 53both thermal infrared and microwave (passive and ac- 54tive) electromagnetic radiation. Of these, passive 55microwave soil moisture measurement has been the 56most promising

  18. Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity Measurements in Unlithified Sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rickards, Benjamin Thomas

    2011-05-31

    Shear-wave (S-wave) velocity can be directly correlated to material stiff¬ness making it a valuable physical property that has found uses in construction, engineering, and envi-ronmental projects. This study compares three ...

  19. Piezoresistive Effect for Near-Surface Eddy Current Residual Stress Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, F.; Nagy, P.B. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0070 (United States)

    2005-04-09

    This paper discusses the relationship between isothermal and adiabatic piezoresistive properties of metals. The piezoresistive effect, i.e., stress-dependence of the electrical resistivity, can be exploited for nondestructive residual stress assessment using eddy current measurements. First, the paper establishes the relationship between the familiar isothermal piezoresistivity coefficients measured under uniaxial tension and hydrostatic pressure and the relevant isothermal electroelastic coefficients measured under uniaxial and biaxial stress conditions either by non-directional circular or directional elliptical eddy current coils. In order to quantitatively assess the prevailing residual stress from eddy current conductivity measurements, the electroelastic coefficients must be first determined. These calibration measurements are usually conducted on a reference specimen of the material to be tested using cyclic uniaxial loads between 0.1 and 10 Hz, which is fast enough to produce adiabatic conditions. It is demonstrated that in high-conductivity metals such calibration measurements must be corrected for the thermoelastic effect, which is always positive, i.e., it increases the conductivity in tension, when the material cools down, and reduces it in compression, when the material heats up.

  20. Scattering Versus Intrinsic Attenuation in the Near Surface: Measurements from Permanent Down-hole Geophones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangriotis, Maria-Daphne

    2009-01-01

    DH. “Seismic Wave Attenuation,” Society of ExplorationDH. “Seismic Wave Attenuation,” Society of ExplorationDH. “Seismic Wave Attenuation,” Society of Exploration