Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Leakage and Seepage in the Near-Surface Environment: An Integrated Approach to Monitoring and Detection  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring and detection of leakage and seepage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the near-surface environment is needed to ensure the safety and effectiveness of geologic carbon sequestration. Large leakage fluxes, e.g., through leaking wells, will be easier to detect and monitor than slow and diffuse leakage and seepage. The challenge of detecting slow leakage and seepage is discerning a leakage or seepage signal from within the natural background variations in CO{sub 2} concentration and flux that are controlled by a variety of coupled processes in soil. Although there are no direct examples of leaking geologic carbon sequestration sites on which to base a proposed verification approach, we have been guided by our prior simulation studies of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage, which showed that large CO{sub 2} concentrations can develop in the shallow subsurface even for relatively small CO{sub 2} leakage fluxes. A variety of monitoring technologies exists for measuring CO{sub 2} concentration and flux, but there is a gap between instrument performance and the detection of a leakage or seepage signal from within large natural background variability. We propose an integrated approach to monitoring and verification. The first part of our proposed approach is to characterize and understand the natural ecosystem before CO{sub 2} injection occurs so that future anomalies can be recognized. Measurements of natural CO{sub 2} fluxes using accumulation chamber (AC) and eddy correlation (EC) approaches, soil CO{sub 2} concentration profiles with depth, and carbon isotope compositions of CO{sub 2} are needed to characterize the natural state of the system prior to CO{sub 2} injection. From this information, modeling needs to be carried out to enhance understanding of carbon sources and sinks so that anomalies can be recognized and subject to closer scrutiny as potential leakage or seepage signals. Long-term monitoring using AC, EC, and soil-gas analyses along with ecosystem and flow and transport modeling should continue after CO{sub 2} injection. The integrated use of multiple measurements and modeling offers a promising approach to discerning and quantifying a small CO{sub 2} leakage or seepage signal from within the expected background variability.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

2

Near-surface monitoring strategies for geologic carbon dioxide storage verification  

SciTech Connect

Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and its storage in deep geologic formations. Geologic CO{sub 2} storage verification will be needed to ensure that CO{sub 2} is not leaking from the intended storage formation and seeping out of the ground. Because the ultimate failure of geologic CO{sub 2} storage occurs when CO{sub 2} seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, and because elevated concentrations of CO{sub 2} near the ground surface can cause health, safety, and environmental risks, monitoring will need to be carried out in the near-surface environment. The detection of a CO{sub 2} leakage or seepage signal (LOSS) in the near-surface environment is challenging because there are large natural variations in CO{sub 2} concentrations and fluxes arising from soil, plant, and subsurface processes. The term leakage refers to CO{sub 2} migration away from the intended storage site, while seepage is defined as CO{sub 2} passing from one medium to another, for example across the ground surface. The flow and transport of CO{sub 2} at high concentrations in the near-surface environment will be controlled by its high density, low viscosity, and high solubility in water relative to air. Numerical simulations of leakage and seepage show that CO{sub 2} concentrations can reach very high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively modest CO{sub 2} leakage fluxes. However, once CO{sub 2} seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, surface winds are effective at dispersing CO{sub 2} seepage. In natural ecological systems with no CO{sub 2} LOSS, near-surface CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations are controlled by CO{sub 2} uptake by photosynthesis, and production by root respiration, organic carbon biodegradation in soil, deep outgassing of CO{sub 2}, and by exchange of CO{sub 2} with the atmosphere. Existing technologies available for monitoring CO{sub 2} in the near-surface environment include (1) the infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) for measuring point concentrations using IR absorption by the CO{sub 2} molecule, (2) the accumulation chamber (AC) method for measuring soil CO{sub 2} fluxes at discrete points, (3) the eddy correlation (EC) tower that measures net flux over a given area, and (4) light distancing and ranging (LIDAR) that can measure CO{sub 2} concentrations over an integrated path. Novel technologies that could potentially be useful for CO{sub 2} concentration and flux measurement include hyperspectral remote sensing of vegetative stress as an indication of elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations, tunable lasers for long distance integrated concentration measurements, microelectronic mechanical systems (MEMS) that can be dispersed to make widespread point measurements, and trained animals such as dogs as used for landmine detection.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hepple, Robert P.

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hidden geothermal systems are systems devoid of obvious surface hydrothermal manifestations. Emissions of moderate-to-low solubility gases may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. We investigate the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring below and above ground in the near-surface environment as an approach to exploration targeting hidden geothermal systems. We focus on CO2 because it is the dominant noncondensible gas species in most geothermal systems and has

4

Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

''Hidden'' geothermal systems are systems devoid of obvious surface hydrothermal manifestations. Emissions of moderate-to-low solubility gases may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. We investigate the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring below and above ground in the near-surface environment as an approach to exploration targeting hidden geothermal systems. We focus on CO2 because it is the dominant noncondensible gas species in most geothermal systems and has moderate solubility in water. We carried out numerical simulations of a CO2 migration scenario to calculate the magnitude of expected fluxes and concentrations. Our results show that CO2 concentrations can reach high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low geothermal source CO2 fluxes. However, once CO2 seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, winds are effective at dispersing CO2 seepage. In natural ecological systems in the absence of geothermal gas emissions, near-surface CO2 fluxes and concentrations are predominantly controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, microbial decomposition of soil/subsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange with the atmosphere. Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include the infrared gas analyzer, the accumulation chamber method, the eddy covariance method, hyperspectral imaging, and light detection and ranging. To meet the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring techniques with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. The proposed monitoring plan initially focuses on rapid, economical, reliable measurements of CO2 subsurface concentrations and surface fluxes and statistical analysis of the collected data. Based on this analysis, are as with a high probability of containing geothermal CO2 anomalies can be further sampled and analyzed using more expensive chemical and isotopic methods. Integrated analysis of all measurements will determine definitively if CO2 derived from a deep geothermal source is present, and if so, the spatial extent of the anomaly. The suitability of further geophysical measurements, installation of deep wells, and geochemical analyses of deep fluids can then be determined based on the results of the near surface CO2 monitoring program.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

5

Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

''Hidden'' geothermal systems are those systems above which hydrothermal surface features (e.g., hot springs, fumaroles, elevated ground temperatures, hydrothermal alteration) are lacking. Emissions of moderate to low solubility gases (e.g., CO2, CH4, He) may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. Detection of anomalous gas emissions related to hidden geothermal systems may therefore be an important tool to discover new geothermal resources. This study investigates the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring in the subsurface and above ground in the near-surface environment to serve as a tool to discover hidden geothermal systems. We focus the investigation on CO2 due to (1) its abundance in geothermal systems, (2) its moderate solubility in water, and (3) the wide range of technologies available to monitor CO2 in the near-surface environment. However, monitoring in the near-surface environment for CO2 derived from hidden geothermal reservoirs is complicated by the large variation in CO2 fluxes and concentrations arising from natural biological and hydrologic processes. In the near-surface environment, the flow and transport of CO2 at high concentrations will be controlled by its high density, low viscosity, and high solubility in water relative to air. Numerical simulations of CO2 migration show that CO2 concentrations can reach very high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low geothermal source CO2 fluxes. However, once CO2 seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, surface winds are effective at dispersing CO2 seepage. In natural ecological systems in the absence of geothermal gas emissions, near-surface CO2 fluxes and concentrations are primarily controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, and microbial decomposition of soil/subsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange with the atmosphere. Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in the near-surface environment include (1) the infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) for measurement of concentrations at point locations, (2) the accumulation chamber (AC) method for measuring soil CO2 fluxes at point locations, (3) the eddy covariance (EC) method for measuring net CO2 flux over a given area, (4) hyperspectral imaging of vegetative stress resulting from elevated CO2 concentrations, and (5) light detection and ranging (LIDAR) that can measure CO2 concentrations over an integrated path. Technologies currently in developmental stages that have the potential to be used for CO2 monitoring include tunable lasers for long distance integrated concentration measurements and micro-electronic mechanical systems (MEMS) that can make widespread point measurements. To address the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring methodologies with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. Within the area targeted for geothermal exploration, point measurements of soil CO2 fluxes and concentrations using the AC method and a portable IRGA, respectively, and measurements of net surface flux using EC should be made. Also, the natural spatial and temporal variability of surface CO2 fluxes and subsurface CO2 concentrations should be quantified within a background area with similar geologic, climatic, and ecosystem characteristics to the area targeted for geothermal exploration. Statistical analyses of data collected from both areas should be used to guide sampling strategy, discern spatial patterns that may be indicative of geothermal CO2 emissions, and assess the presence (or absence) of geothermal CO2 within the natural background variability with a desired confidence level. Once measured CO2 concentrations and fluxes have been determined to be of anomalous geothermal origin with high confidence, more expensive vertical subsurface gas sampling and chemical and isotopic analyses can be undertaken. Integrated analysis of all measurements will d

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Time-windows-based filtering method for near-surface detection of leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.Leakage from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Lehua Pan,of CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites from within

Pan, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Stored CO2 and Methane Leakage Risk Assessment and Monitoring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stored Co 2 and Methane Leakage riSk aSSeSSMent and Monitoring tooL deveLopMent: Co 2 Capture projeCt phaSe 2 Background Unmineable coal seams at depths beyond conventional...

8

Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoring and Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in volcanic and geothermal areas. Appl. Geochem. , 13, 543–1977. Chemistry and Geothermal Systems. Academic Press, Newfor detecting hidden geothermal systems by near-surface gas

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Condition monitoring of internal leakage in modern water hydraulic cylinders using acoustic emission.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research aims to develop a sensitive method for condition monitoring of internal leakage in a modem water hydraulic cylinder by means of acoustic emission… (more)

Chen, Ping.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Functions and requirements for Hanford single-shell tank leakage detection and monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the initial functions and requirements for leakage detection and monitoring applicable to past and potential future leakage from the Hanford Site`s 149 single-shell high-level waste tanks. This mission is a part of the overall mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Waste Remediation System division to remediate the tank waste in a safe and acceptable manner. Systems engineering principles are being applied to this effort. This document reflects the an initial step in the systems engineering approach to decompose the mission into primary functions and requirements. The document is considered approximately 30% complete relative to the effort required to produce a final version that can be used to support demonstration and/or procurement of technologies. The functions and requirements in this document apply to detection and monitoring of below ground leaks from SST containment boundaries and the resulting soil contamination. Leakage detection and monitoring is invoked in the TWRS Program in three fourth level functions: (1) Store Waste, (2) Retrieve Waste, and (3) Disposition Excess Facilities (as identified in DOE/RL-92-60 Rev. 1, Tank Waste Remediation System Functions and Requirements).

Cruse, J.M.; Ohl, P.C.

1995-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

11

Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity  

SciTech Connect

The INEEL Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) program has launched a new R&D project on Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity to increase knowledge and capabilities for using engineering and ecological components to improve the integrity of near-surface barriers used to confine contaminants from the public and the environment. The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions and enable improved solutions for future cleanup decisions. The research is planned to (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms (weathering, biological, geological, chemical, radiological, and catastrophic) in times shorter than service life, (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics, (c) develop sensor systems to identify degradation prior to failure, and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems to increase reliability and reduce the risk of failure. Our project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing and the meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The performance of evapo- transpiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers will be examined.

Piet, Steven James; Breckenridge, Robert Paul; Beller, John Michael; Geesey, Gill Gregroy; Glenn, David Frankie; Jacobson, Jacob Jordan; Martian, Pete; Matthern, Gretchen Elise; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Porro, Indrek; Southworth, Finis Hio; Steffler, Eric Darwin; Stormberg, Angelica Isabel; Stormberg, Gregory John; Versteeg, Roelof Jan; White, Gregory J

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity  

SciTech Connect

The INEEL Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) program has launched a new R and D project on Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity to increase knowledge and capabilities for using engineering and ecological components to improve the integrity of near-surface barriers used to confine contaminants from the public and the environment. The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions and enable improved solutions for future cleanup decisions. The research is planned to (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms (weathering, biological, geological, chemical, radiological, and catastrophic) in times shorter than service life, (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics, (c) develop sensor systems to identify degradation prior to failure, and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems to increase reliability and reduce the risk of failure. Our project combine s selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing and the meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The performance of evapo-transpiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers will be examined.

Piet, S.J.; Breckenridge, R.P.

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface Gas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface Gas Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface Gas Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface Gas Monitoring Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hidden geothermal systems are those systems above which hydrothermal surface features (e.g., hot springs, fumaroles, elevated ground temperatures, hydrothermal alteration) are lacking. Emissions of moderate to low solubility gases (e.g., CO2, CH4, He) may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. Detection of anomalous gas emissions related to hidden geothermal systems may therefore be an important tool to discover new geothermal resources. This study investigates the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring in the

14

An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification ofgeologic carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

To detect and quantify subtle surface CO2 leakage signals, we present a strategy that combines measurements of CO2 fluxes or concentrations in the near-surface environment with an algorithm that enhances temporally- and spatially-correlated leakage signals while suppressing random background noise. The algorithm consists of a filter that highlights spatial coherence in the leakage signal, and temporal stacking (averaging) that reduces noise from temporally uncorrelated background fluxes/concentrations. We assess the performance of our strategy using synthetic data sets in which the surface leakage signal is either specified directly or calculated using flow and transport simulations of leakage source geometries one might expect to be present at sequestration sites. We estimate the number of measurements required to detect a potential CO2 leakage signal of given magnitude and area. Results show that given a rigorous field-sampling program, subtle CO2 leakage may be detected using the algorithm; however, leakage of very limited spatial extent or exceedingly small magnitude may be difficult to detect with a reasonable set of monitoring resources.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hilley, George E.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

15

Impacts of Secondary Waste on Near-Surface Disposal Facility ...  

Impacts of Secondary Waste on Near-Surface Disposal Facility at Hanford ... DOE low-level and mixed low-level waste. 1E-06 1E-05 1E-04 1E-03 1E-02 ...

16

Stored CO2 and Methane Leakage Risk Assessment and Monitoring Tool Development: CO2 Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2)  

SciTech Connect

The primary project goal is to develop and test tools for optimization of ECBM recovery and geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in coalbeds, in addition to tools for monitoring CO{sub 2} sequestration in coalbeds to support risk assessment. Three critical topics identified are (1) the integrity of coal bed methane geologic and engineered systems, (2) the optimization of the coal bed storage process, and (3) reliable monitoring and verification systems appropriate to the special conditions of CO{sub 2} storage and flow in coals.

Dan Kieki

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

A Practical, Hybrid Model for Predicting the Trajectories of Near-Surface Ocean Drifters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid Lagrangian–Eulerian model for calculating the trajectories of near-surface drifters in the ocean is developed in this study. The model employs climatological, near-surface currents computed from a spline fit of all available drifter ...

Nathan Paldor; Yona Dvorkin; Arthur J. Mariano; Tamay Özgökmen; Edward H. Ryan

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

HEATER TEST PLANNING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. C. , 1978. Report on Hydrofracturing Tests for In SituStress Measurements, Near Surface Test Facility, Hole DC-11,Layout for Hanford Near-Surface Test Facility. Submitted to

DuBois, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Near-surface groundwater responses to injection of geothermal wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiences with injecting geothermal fluids have identified technical problems associated with geothermal waste disposal. This report assesses the feasibility of injection as an alternative for geothermal wastewater disposal and analyzes hydrologic controls governing the upward migration of injected fluids. Injection experiences at several geothermal developments are presented, including: Raft River, Salton Sea, East Mesa, Otake and Hatchobaru in Japan, and Ahuachapan in El Salvador. Hydrogeologic and design/operational factors affecting the success of an injection program are identified. Hydrogeologic factors include subsidence, near-surface effects of injected fluids, and seismicity. Design/operational factors include hydrodynamic breakthrough, condition of the injection system and reservoir maintenance. Existing and potential effects of production/injection on these factors are assessed.

Arnold, S.C.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Time-windows-based filtering method for near-surface detection of leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time-Windows-Based Filtering Method for Near-Surfacethat combines a novel time-window splitting scheme, a simpleconsists of a novel time-window splitting scheme, a simple

Pan, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Elucidating geochemical response of shallow heterogeneous aquifers to CO2 leakage using high-performance computing: Implications for monitoring of CO2 sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Predicting and quantifying impacts of potential carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into shallow aquifers that overlie geologic CO2 storage formations is an important part of developing reliable carbon storage techniques. Leakage of CO2 through fractures, faults or faulty wellbores can reduce groundwater pH, inducing geochemical reactions that release solutes into the groundwater and pose a risk of degrading groundwater quality. In order to help quantify this risk, predictions of metal concentrations are needed during geologic storage of CO2. Here, we present regional-scale reactive transport simulations, at relatively fine-scale, of CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers run on the PFLOTRAN platform using high-performance computing. Multiple realizations of heterogeneous permeability distributions were generated using standard geostatistical methods. Increased statistical anisotropy of the permeability field resulted in more lateral and vertical spreading of the plume of impacted water, leading to increased Pb2+ (lead) concentrations and lower pH at a well down gradient of the CO2 leak. Pb2+ concentrations were higher in simulations where calcite was the source of Pb2+ compared to galena. The low solubility of galena effectively buffered the Pb2+ concentrations as galena reached saturation under reducing conditions along the flow path. In all cases, Pb2+ concentrations remained below the maximum contaminant level set by the EPA. Results from this study, compared to natural variability observed in aquifers, suggest that bicarbonate (HCO3) concentrations may be a better geochemical indicator of a CO2 leak under the conditions simulated here.

Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Siirila, Erica R.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Near-Surface Measurements of Quasi-Lagrangian Velocities in Open Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-surface water velocities have been measured in the coastal zone of Lake Huron and Cape Cod Bay by tracking drifters and drogues using acoustic travel time and compass sighting techniques. The near-surface current, defined as the velocity of ...

J. H. Churchill; G. T. Csanady

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Near-Surface Wind over the Global Ocean 1949–1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-surface wind over the ocean is a key variable for studies of climate variability and change. Millions of ship reports of near-surface wind are now held in computerized datasets like the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS). These ...

M. Neil Ward; Brian J. Hoskins

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Shroud leakage flow discouragers  

SciTech Connect

A turbine assembly includes a plurality of rotor blades comprising a root portion, an airfoil having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall, and a top portion having a cap. An outer shroud is concentrically disposed about said rotor blades, said shroud in combination with said tip portions defining a clearance gap. At least one circumferential shroud leakage discourager is disposed within the shroud. The leakage discourager(s) increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the clearance gap to improve overall turbine efficiency.

Bailey, Jeremy Clyde (Middle Grove, NY); Bunker, Ronald Scott (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Lube Oil System Leakage Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lube Oil System Leakage Mitigation is the second in a series of training modules addressing leakage in nuclear power plants. The first planned modules in the leakage reduction series include leakage reduction program management, bolted joints with flat gaskets, valve packing, threaded joints, compression fittings, mechanical seals, and miscellaneous bolting issues.

1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

26

Meeting the Air Leakage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting the Air Leakage Meeting the Air Leakage Requirements of the 2012 IECC The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the enormous potential that exists for improving the energy efficiency, safety and comfort of homes. The newest edition of the International Energy Conservation Code ® (IECC) (2012) sets the bar higher for energy efficiency, and new air sealing requirements are one of the key new provisions. This guide is a resource for understanding the new air leakage requirements in the 2012 IECC and suggestions on how these new measures can be met. It also provides information from Building America's Air Sealing Guide, Best Practices and case studies on homes that are currently meeting the provisions. The 2012 IECC and a few International Residential Code (IRC) requirements are referenced throughout the guide.

27

Characteristics of the Near-Surface Boundary Layer within a Mountain Valley during Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within mountainous regions, estimating the exchange of sensible heat and water vapor between the surface and the atmosphere is an important but inexact endeavor. Measurements of the turbulence characteristics of the near-surface boundary layer in ...

Warren Helgason; John W. Pomeroy

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Eddy-Induced Particle Dispersion in the Near-Surface North Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the anisotropic properties of the eddy-induced material transport in the near-surface North Atlantic from two independent datasets, one simulated from the sea surface height altimetry and one derived from real-ocean surface ...

Irina I. Rypina; Igor Kamenkovich; Pavel Berloff; Lawrence J. Pratt

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

From Near-Surface to Root-Zone Soil Moisture Using Year-Round Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive microwave remote sensing may provide quantitative information about the water content of a shallow near-surface soil layer. However, the variable of interest for applications such as short- and medium-term meteorological modeling and ...

Jean-Christophe Calvet; Joël Noilhan

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A Near-Surface Microstructure Sensor System Used during TOGA COARE. Part II: Turbulence Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New techniques developed for near-surface turbulence measurements during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) employ a difference in spatial scales of turbulence and surface waves. ...

A. Soloviev; R. Lukas; P. Hacker; H. Schoeberlein; M. Baker; A. Arjannikov

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Seasonal and Synoptic Variations in Near-Surface Air Temperature Lapse Rates in a Mountainous Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To accurately estimate near-surface (2 m) air temperatures in a mountainous region for hydrologic prediction models and other investigations of environmental processes, the authors evaluated daily and seasonal variations (with the consideration ...

Troy R. Blandford; Karen S. Humes; Brian J. Harshburger; Brandon C. Moore; Von P. Walden; Hengchun Ye

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

A Practical Approach to Sequential Estimation of Systematic Error on Near-Surface Mesoscale Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical analysis arguments are used to construct an estimation algorithm for systematic error of near-surface temperatures on a mesoscale grid. The systematic error is defined as the observed running-mean error, and an averaging length of 7 ...

Joshua P. Hacker; Daran L. Rife

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Understanding Spatio-Temporal Variability and Associated Physical Controls of Near-Surface Soil Moisture in Different Hydro-Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-surface soil moisture is a key state variable of the hydrologic cycle and plays a significant role in the global water and energy balance by affecting several hydrological, ecological, meteorological, geomorphologic, and other natural processes in the land-atmosphere continuum. Presence of soil moisture in the root zone is vital for the crop and plant life cycle. Soil moisture distribution is highly non-linear across time and space. Various geophysical factors (e.g., soil properties, topography, vegetation, and weather/climate) and their interactions control the spatio-temporal evolution of soil moisture at various scales. Understanding these interactions is crucial for the characterization of soil moisture dynamics occurring in the vadose zone. This dissertation focuses on understanding the spatio-temporal variability of near-surface soil moisture and the associated physical control(s) across varying measurement support (point-scale and passive microwave airborne/satellite remote sensing footprint-scale), spatial extents (field-, watershed-, and regional-scale), and changing hydro-climates. Various analysis techniques (e.g., time stability, geostatistics, Empirical Orthogonal Function, and Singular Value Decomposition) have been employed to characterize near-surface soil moisture variability and the role of contributing physical control(s) across space and time. Findings of this study can be helpful in several hydrological research/applications, such as, validation/calibration and downscaling of remote sensing data products, planning and designing effective soil moisture monitoring networks and field campaigns, improving performance of soil moisture retrieval algorithm, flood/drought prediction, climate forecast modeling, and agricultural management practices.

Joshi, Champa

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

A Model of the Near-Surface Circulation of the Santa Barbara Channel: Comparison with Observations and Dynamical Interpretations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies indicate the importance of wind, wind curl, and density differences in driving the near-surface circulation in the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC). Here model sensitivity experiments and dynamical analyses of the near-surface ...

Lie-Yauw Oey; Clinton Winant; Ed Dever; Walter R. Johnson; Dong-Ping Wang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Condenser In-Leakage Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Condenser In-Leakage Guideline will assist engineers and chemists in identifying and locating air and water in-leakage leaks. It outlines the principles of operation of common condenser air-removal equipment. By keeping the air in-leakage within the capability of the air-removal equipment, condenser back pressure can be maintained. By keeping the water in-leakage as low as possible, condensate chemistry can be maintained.

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Propulsion Laboratory, National Rev. 1.2 Strategies for Detection of Hidden Geothermal Systems Aeronautics and Space

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric dispersion of dense gases, Ann. Rev. Fluidtransport and dispersion capability for dilute gases basedmake a dilute gas assumption. 4.2.4 Dispersion Model For the

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conceptual models of the Dixie Valley, Nevada Geothermaldioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada;by faulting. At the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, USA, CO 2

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada;volcanic system, USA Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, USAProvince system like the Dixie Valley (Nevada) geothermal

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Detection of Hidden Geothermal Systems Figure 7.4.for Detection of Hidden Geothermal Systems Figure 7.5.for Detection of Hidden Geothermal Systems Figure 7.6.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada; relationssurface phenomena and the geothermal reservoir”, Chemicalapplication to volcanic- geothermal areas and landfills”,

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Book Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Isotopic Analysis (Lewicki & Oldenburg) LiDAR (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Modeling-Computer Simulations (Lewicki & Oldenburg)...

43

Effects of Wave Breaking on the Near-Surface Profiles of Velocity and Turbulent Kinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical model for the near-surface velocity profile in the presence of breaking waves is presented. Momentum is accumulated by growing waves and is released upon wave breaking. In effect, such a transition is a process involving a time-...

Arne Melsom; Øyvind SÆtra

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

REASSESSMENT OF NEAR SURFACE CONTAMINATION IN SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) FARMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reassessment of the documentation and information in valuing near-surface contamination and unplanned releases adjacent to the Tank Farms in the 200 Area of the Hanford Site. Information is contained in a Microsoft Access database. 63 new sources of contamination information were identified.

JONES, T.E.

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

45

Slippery Near-Surface Layer of the Ocean Arising Due to Daytime Solar Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements made in the Equatorial Atlantic during the 35th cruise of the R/V Akademic Vernadsky using a free-rising profiler and drifters revealed a near-surface slippery layer of the ocean arising due to daytime solar heating. The solar ...

Vladimir N. Kudryavtsev; Alexander V. Soloviev

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Near-surface air temperature estimation from ASTER data based on neural network algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm based on the radiance transfer model (MODTRAN4) and a dynamic learning neural network for estimation of near-surface air temperature from ASTER data are developed in this paper. MODTRAN4 is used to simulate radiance transfer from the ground ...

K. B. Mao; H. J. Tang; X. F. Wang; Q. B. Zhou; D. L. Wang

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Homogenization and Trend Analysis of Canadian Near-Surface Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-surface wind speeds recorded at 117 stations in Canada for the period from 1953 to 2006 were analyzed in this study. First, metadata and a logarithmic wind profile were used to adjust hourly wind speeds measured at nonstandard anemometer ...

Hui Wan; Xiaolan L. Wang; Val R. Swail

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Ocean Radar Backscatter Relationship with Near-Surface Winds: A Case Study during FASINEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study of ocean radar backscatter dependence on near-surface wind and wind stress is presented using the data obtained on 18 February 1986 during the Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment. Our interest in this case stems from the ...

F. Li; W. Large; W. Shaw; K. Davidson; E. J. Walsh

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

A Near-Surface Microstructure Sensor System Used during TOGA COARE. Part I: Bow Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution probes mounted on the bow of the vessel at a 1.7-m depth in an undisturbed region ahead of the moving vessel were used for microstructure and turbulence measurements in the near-surface layer of the ocean during TOGA COARE. The ...

Alexander Soloviev; Roger Lukas; Sharon DeCarlo; Jefrey Snyder; Anatoli Arjannikov; Vyacheslav Turenko; Mark Baker; Dmitry Khlebnikov

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Regional-scale climate simulations: Improvement in near-surface field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional-scale climate simulations: Improvement in near-surface field Regional-scale climate simulations: Improvement in near-surface field projections with spectral nudging July 30, 2013 EVS researchers have established a new optimal approach for downscaling physically based global climate model projections to the regional scale. The new approach is significant because it preserves both the prescribed large-scale dynamics of the global model and the increased variability of the higher-resolution physics in a regional-scale model. Global-scale climate models have coarse spatial resolution and cannot resolve many local and regional-scale features, such as increased precipitation due to the lake effect in the Chicago region. Specially built models that operate at a higher spatial resolution and can resolve these types of features are referred to as regional-scale climate models. These

51

Corn Stover Impacts on Near-Surface Soil Properties of No-Till Corn In Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn stover is a primary biofuel feedstock and its expanded use could help reduce reliance on fossil fuels and net CO2 emissions. Excessive stover removal may, however, negatively impact near-surface soil properties within a short period after removal. We assessed changes in soil crust strength, bulk density, and water content over a 1-yr period following a systematic removal or addition of stover from three no-till soils under corn in Ohio.

Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Owens, L B.

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

52

Labyrinth Seal Leakage Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seals are basic mechanical devices commonly used in machinery to avoid undesired flow losses of working fluids. To understand the working of these seals specifically those placed between relatively moving parts is still one of the major engineering challenges for the scientific community. Particularly Annular seals are one of the most widely used in rotating machinery comprising turbines, compressors and pumps. They are mounted on the shaft that rotates within a stationary case. These seal designs make an impact on (i) machinery energy conversion efficiency and (ii) rotor dynamic stability due to the interaction between rotor and stator through fluid flow leakage. Among all annular seals straight through rectangular labyrinth seals are the most commonly used ones. Their designs have not changed much a lot since its inception by C.J. Parsons [1] back in 1901. These seals provide resistance to the fluid flow through tortuous path comprising of series of cavities and clearances. The sharp tooth converts the pressure energy to the kinetic which is dissipated through turbulence viscosity interaction in the cavity. To understand the accurate amount of leakage the flow is modeled using the discharge coefficient and for each tooth and the kinetic energy carry over coefficients. This research work is aimed at understanding the fluid flow though labyrinth seals with tooth mounted on the rotor. A matrix of fluid flow simulations has been carried out using commercially available CFD software Fluent® where all parameters effecting the flow field has been studied to understand their effect on the coefficients defining the seal losses. Also the rotor surface speed has been used varied in a step by step manner to understand the fluid flow behavior in high speed turbo-machinery. The carry over coefficient is found to be the function of all the geometric elements defining the labyrinth tooth configuration. A relation between the flow parameters and the carry over coefficient has also been established. The discharge coefficient of the first tooth has been found to be lower and varying in a different manner as compared to a tooth from a multiple cavity seal. Its dependence upon flow parameters and dimensionless geometric constants has been established. The discharge coefficient of the first teeth is found to be increasing with increasing tooth width. Further the compressibility factor has been defined to incorporate the deviation of the performance of seals with compressible fluid to that with the incompressible flow. Its dependence upon pressure ratio and shaft speed has also been established. Using all the above the mentioned relations it would be easy decide upon the tooth configuration for a given rotating machinery or understand the behavior of the seal currently in use.

Chaudhary, Gaurav

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

ENGINEERED NEAR SURFACE DISPOSAL FACILITY OF THE INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX FOR SOLID RADWASTE MANAGEMENT AT CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the turnkey project ''Industrial Complex for Solid Radwaste Management (ICSRM) at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP)'' an Engineered Near Surface Disposal Facility (ENSDF, LOT 3) will be built on the VEKTOR site within the 30 km Exclusion Zone of the ChNPP. This will be performed by RWE NUKEM GmbH, Germany, and it governs the design, licensing support, fabrication, assembly, testing, inspection, delivery, erection, installation and commissioning of the ENSDF. The ENSDF will receive low to intermediate level, short lived, processed/conditioned wastes from the ICSRM Solid Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, LOT 2), the ChNPP Liquid Radwaste Treatment Plant (LRTP) and the ChNPP Interim Storage Facility for RBMK Fuel Assemblies (ISF). The ENSDF has a capacity of 55,000 m{sup 3}. The primary functions of the ENSDF are: to receive, monitor and record waste packages, to load the waste packages into concrete disposal units, to enable capping and closure of the disposal unit s, to allow monitoring following closure. The ENSDF comprises the turnkey installation of a near surface repository in the form of an engineered facility for the final disposal of LILW-SL conditioned in the ICSRM SWPF and other sources of Chernobyl waste. The project has to deal with the challenges of the Chernobyl environment, the fulfillment of both Western and Ukrainian standards, and the installation and coordination of an international project team. It will be shown that proven technologies and processes can be assembled into a unique Management Concept dealing with all the necessary demands and requirements of a turnkey project. The paper emphasizes the proposed concepts for the ENSDF and their integration into existing infrastructure and installations of the VEKTOR site. Further, the paper will consider the integration of Western and Ukrainian Organizations into a cohesive project team and the requirement to guarantee the fulfillment of both Western standards and Ukrainian regulations and licensing requirements. The paper provides information on the output of the Detail Design and will reflect the progress of the design work.

Ziehm, Ronny; Pichurin, Sergey Grigorevich

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

54

Strategies To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based On Monitoring...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Systems Based On Monitoring and Analysis Of CO2 In The Near-Surface Environment Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article:...

55

Application of Body Biasing and Supply Voltage Scaling Techniques for Leakage Reduction and Performance Improvements of CMOS Circuits.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The efficiency of body biasing technique is evaluated in 90-nm process technology for regular and low threshold voltage devices. A new leakage monitor circuit for… (more)

Devasthali, Vinayak Sudhakar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Scoping survey of perceived concerns, issues, and problems for near-surface disposal of FUSRAP waste  

SciTech Connect

This report is a scoping summary of concerns, issues, and perceived problems for near-surface disposal of radioactive waste, based on a survey of the current literature. Near-surface disposal means land burial in or within 15 to 20 m of the earth's surface. It includes shallow land burial (burial in trenches, typically about 6 m deep with a 2-m cap and cover) and some intermediate-depth land burial (e.g., trenches and cap similar to shallow land burial, but placed below 10 to 15 m of clean soil). Proposed solutions to anticipated problems also are discussed. The purpose of the report is to provide a better basis for identifying and evaluating the environmental impacts and related factors that must be analyzed and compared in assessing candidate near-surface disposal sites for FUSRAP waste. FUSRAP wastes are of diverse types, and their classification for regulatory purposes is not yet fixed. Most of it may be characterized as low-activity bulk solid waste, and is similar to mill tailings, but with somewhat lower average specific activity. It may also qualify as Class A segregated waste under the proposed 10 CFR 61 rules, but the parent radionuclides of concern in FUSRAP (primarily U-238 and Th-232) have longer half-lives than do the radionuclides of concern in most low-level waste. Most of the references reviewed deal with low-level waste or mill tailings, since there is as yet very little literature in the public domain on FUSRAP per se.

Robinson, J.E.; Gilbert, T.L.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Modeling the Performance of Engineered Systems for Closure and Near-Surface Disposal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

performance cleanup closure performance cleanup closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange July 13-14, 2009 Modeling the Performance of Engineered Systems for Closure and Near-Surface Disposal - Overview and Focused Discussions David S. Kosson CRESP and Vanderbilt University Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting July 29, 2009 1 safety performance cleanup closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Agenda * Overview of DOE Performance Assessment Practices * Focused Discussions - Role of PA Process in Risk Communication and Decisions - Modeling Improvements - PA Assumption Validation - Uncertainty Evaluation - Evolving EPA Developments - Related IAEA Activities * Looking forward

58

Climatic Variability of Near-Surface Turbulent Kinetic Energy over the United States: Implications for Fire-Weather Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research suggests that high levels of ambient near-surface atmospheric turbulence are often associated with rapid and sometimes erratic wildland fire spread that may eventually lead to large burn areas. Previous research has also examined ...

Warren E. Heilman; Xindi Bian

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Near-Surface Transport Pathways in the North Atlantic Ocean: Looking for Throughput from the Subtropical to the Subpolar Gyre  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by discrepancies between Eulerian transport estimates and the behavior of Lagrangian surface drifters, near-surface transport pathways and processes in the North Atlantic are studied using a combination of data, altimetric surface ...

Irina I. Rypina; Lawrence J. Pratt; M. Susan Lozier

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Observing Local-Scale Variability of Near-Surface Temperature and Humidity Using a Wireless Sensor Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the influence of surface type, wind speed, and other environmental conditions on near-surface air temperature, specific humidity, and surface temperature is studied. A wireless sensor network consisting of 13 low-cost meteorological ...

Katharina Lengfeld; Felix Ament

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Examination of Errors in Near-Surface Temperature and Wind from WRF Numerical Simulations in Regions of Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of an advanced research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) in predicting near-surface atmospheric temperature and wind conditions under various terrain and weather regimes is examined. Verification of 2-m ...

Hailing Zhang; Zhaoxia Pu; Xuebo Zhang

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Impact of Breaking Wave Form Drag on Near-Surface Turbulence and Drag Coefficient over Young Seas at High Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of breaking waves on near-surface wind turbulence and drag coefficient are investigated using large-eddy simulation. The impact of intermittent and transient wave breaking events (over a range of scales) is modeled as localized form ...

Nobuhiro Suzuki; Tetsu Hara; Peter P. Sullivan

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Increase in Near-Surface Atmospheric Moisture Content due to Land Use Changes: Evidence from the Observed Dewpoint Temperature Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use change can significantly affect root zone soil moisture, surface energy balance, and near-surface atmospheric temperature and moisture content. During the second half of the twentieth century, portions of the North American Great Plains ...

Rezaul Mahmood; Kenneth G. Hubbard; Ronnie D. Leeper; Stuart A. Foster

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

Method of detecting leakage from geologic formations used to sequester CO.sub.2  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides methods for the measurement of carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs. Tracer moieties are injected along with carbon dioxide into geological formations. Leakage is monitored by gas chromatographic analyses of absorbents. The invention also provides a process for the early leak detection of possible carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs by measuring methane (CH.sub.4), ethane (C.sub.2H.sub.6), propane (C.sub.3H.sub.8), and/or radon (Rn) leakage rates from the reservoirs. The invention further provides a method for branding sequestered carbon dioxide using perfluorcarbon tracers (PFTs) to show ownership.

White, Curt (Pittsburgh, PA); Wells, Arthur (Bridgeville, PA); Diehl, J. Rodney (Pittsburgh, PA); Strazisar, Brian (Venetia, PA)

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

66

Dominant Anomaly Patterns in the Near-Surface Baroclinicity and Accompanying Anomalies in the Atmosphere and Oceans. Part II: North Pacific Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variability in the monthly-mean flow and storm track in the North Pacific basin is examined with a focus on the near-surface baroclinicity. Dominant patterns of anomalous near-surface baroclinicity found from empirical orthogonal function (EOF) ...

Mototaka Nakamura; Shozo Yamane

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Structure of the near-surface layers of the Sun: asphericity and time variation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results on the structure of the near-surface layers of the Sun obtained by inverting frequencies of high-degree solar modes from "ring diagrams". We have results for eight epochs between June 1996 and October 2003. The frequencies for each epoch were obtained from ring diagrams constructed from MDI Dopplergrams spanning complete Carrington rotations. We find that there is a substantial latitudinal variation of both sound speed and the adiabatic index Gamma_1 in the outer 2% of the Sun. We find that both the sound-speed and Gamma_1 profiles change with changes in the level of solar activity. In addition, we also study differences between the northern and southern hemispheres of the Sun and find a small asymmetry that appears to reflect the difference in magnetic activity between the two hemispheres.

Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia; Richard S. Bogart

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

68

Near-surface gas mapping studies of salt geologic features at Weeks Island and other sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field sampling and rapid gas analysis techniques were used to survey near-surface soil gases for geotechnical diagnostic purposes at the Weeks Island Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site and other salt dome locations in southern Louisiana. This report presents the complete data, results and interpretations obtained during 1995. Weeks Island 1994 gas survey results are also briefly summarized; this earlier study did not find a definitive correlation between sinkhole No. 1 and soil gases. During 1995, several hundred soil gas samples were obtained and analyzed in the field by gas chromatography, for profiling low concentrations and gas anomalies at ppm to percent levels. The target gases included hydrogen, methane, ethane and ethylene. To supplement the field data, additional gas samples were collected at various site locations for laboratory analysis of target gases at ppb levels. Gases in the near-surface soil originate predominantly from the oil, from petrogenic sources within the salt, or from surface microbial activity. Surveys were conducted across two Weeks Island sinkholes, several mapped anomalous zones in the salt, and over the SPR repository site and its perimeter. Samples were also taken at other south Louisiana salt dome locations for comparative purposes. Notable results from these studies are that elevated levels of hydrogen and methane (1) were positively associated with anomalous gassy or shear zones in the salt dome(s) and (2) are also associated with suspected salt fracture (dilatant) zones over the edges of the SPR repository. Significantly elevated areas of hydrogen, methane, plus some ethane, were found over anomalous shear zones in the salt, particularly in a location over high pressure gas pockets in the salt, identified in the mine prior to SPR operations. Limited stable isotope ratio analyses, SIRA, were also conducted and determined that methane samples were of petrogenic origin, not biogenic.

Molecke, M.A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carney, K.R.; Autin, W.J.; Overton, E.B. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Air-leakage control manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is for builders and designers who are interested in building energy-efficient homes. The purpose of the manual is to provide the ``how and why`` of controlling air leakage by means of a system called the ``Simple Caulk and Seal`` (SIMPLE{center_dot}CS) system. This manual provides an overview of the purpose and contents of the manual; It discusses the forces that affect air leakage in homes and the benefits of controlling air leakage. Also discussed are two earlier approaches for controlling air leakage and the problems with these approaches. It describes the SIMPLE-{center_dot}CS system. It outlines the standard components of the building envelope that require sealing and provides guidelines for sealing them. It outlines a step-by-step procedure for analyzing and planning the sealing effort. The procedure includes (1) identifying areas to be sealed, (2) determining the most effective and convenient stage of construction in which to do the sealing, and (3) designating the appropriate crew member or trade to be responsible for the sealing.

Maloney, J. [Washington State Energy Office, Olympia, WA (United States)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Air-Leakage Control Manual.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is for builders and designers who are interested in building energy-efficient homes. The purpose of the manual is to provide the how and why'' of controlling air leakage by means of a system called the Simple Caulk and Seal'' (SIMPLE{center dot}CS) system. This manual provides an overview of the purpose and contents of the manual; It discusses the forces that affect air leakage in homes and the benefits of controlling air leakage. Also discussed are two earlier approaches for controlling air leakage and the problems with these approaches. It describes the SIMPLE-{center dot}CS system. It outlines the standard components of the building envelope that require sealing and provides guidelines for sealing them. It outlines a step-by-step procedure for analyzing and planning the sealing effort. The procedure includes (1) identifying areas to be sealed, (2) determining the most effective and convenient stage of construction in which to do the sealing, and (3) designating the appropriate crew member or trade to be responsible for the sealing.

Maloney, Jim; Washington State Energy Office; United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Computing leakage current distributions and determination of minimum leakage vectors for combinational designs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Analyzing circuit leakage and minimizing leakage during the standby mode of oper- ation of a circuit are important problems faced during contemporary circuit design. Analysis… (more)

Gulati, Kanupriya

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Compiler Support for Reducing Leakage Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current trends indicate that leakage energy consumption will be an important concern in upcoming process technologies. In this paper, we propose a compiler-based leakage energy optimization strategy. Our strategy is built upon a data-flow analysis that ...

W. Zhang; M. Kandemir; N. Vijaykrishnan; M. J. Irwin; V. De

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Air leakage of Insulated Concrete Form houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air leakage has been shown to increase building energy use due to additional heating and cooling loads. Although many construction types have been examined for leakage, an exploration of a large number of Insulated Concrete ...

Durschlag, Hannah (Hanna Rebekah)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

AIR LEAKAGE OF NEWLY INSTALLED RESIDENTIAL WINDOWS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through Sash/Frame Cracks . Window Operation Types . . . . .Window Operation Types . . . . .Air Leakage of Installed Windows Scattergram of Field

Weidt, John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Near-surface and bulk behavior of Ag in SiC  

SciTech Connect

The diffusive release of fission products, such as Ag, from TRISO particles at high temperatures has raised concerns regarding safe and economic operation of advanced nuclear reactors. Understanding the mechanisms of Ag diffusion is thus of crucial importance for effective retention of fission products. Two mechanisms, i.e., grain boundary diffusion and vapor or surface diffusion through macroscopic structures such as nano-pores or nano-cracks, remain in debate. In the present work, an integrated computational and experimental study of the near-surface and bulk behavior of Ag in silicon carbide (SiC) has been carried out. The ab initio calculations show that Ag prefers to adsorb on the SiC surface rather than in the bulk, and the mobility of Ag on the surface is high. The energy barrier for Ag desorption from the surface is calculated to be 0.85-1.68 eV, and Ag migration into bulk SiC through equilibrium diffusion process is not favorable. Experimentally, Ag ions are implanted into SiC to produce Ag profiles buried in the bulk and peaked at the surface. High-temperature annealing leads to Ag release from the surface region instead of diffusion into the interior of SiC. It is suggested that surface diffusion through mechanical structural imperfection, such as vapor transport through cracks in SiC coatings, may be a dominating mechanism accounting for Ag release from the SiC in the nuclear reactor.

Xiao, Haiyan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Xue, Haizhou [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Weber, William J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Leakage Mapping: A Systematic Methodology for Assessing the Side-Channel Information Leakage of Cryptographic Implementations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a generalized framework to evaluate the side-channel information leakage of symmetric block ciphers. The leakage mapping methodology enables the systematic and efficient identification and mitigation of problematic information leakages by ... Keywords: Differential power analysis, advanced encryption standard, block cipher, cryptanalysis, cryptography, encryption, hardware security, information leakage, physical-layer security, side-channel analysis

William E. Cobb; Rusty O. Baldwin; Eric D. Laspe

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Geochemical Implications of Gas Leakage Associated with Geologic CO2 Storage - A Qualitative Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is considered the major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of CO2. Different schools of thought exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. We reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of overlying potable aquifers. Results from experimental and modeling studies point to the potential for both beneficial (e.g. contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g. contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion into potable groundwater. However, there are significant discrepancies between studies particularly concerning, what contaminants are of concern and the geochemical processes involved. These discrepancies reflected the lack of a consensus on CO2-induced changes in subsurface geochemical processes and subsequent effects on groundwater chemistry. The development of consistent experimental protocols and the identification of pertinent factors driving CO2-induced geochemical changes in the subsurface were identified as key research needs. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why a standardization of experimental protocols and the consideration of experimental factors such as gas leakage rates, redox status and the influence of co-transported gases are pertinent. The role of analog studies, reactions occurring in the vadose zone, and the influence of organic contaminants are also discussed.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Lee, Gie Hyeon; Amonette, James E.; Brown, Christopher F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Near-Surface and Land Surface Forecast System of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution 2D near-surface and land surface model was developed to produce snow and temperature forecasts over the complex alpine region of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games. The model is driven by downscaled ...

Natacha B. Bernier; Stéphane Bélair; Bernard Bilodeau; Linying Tong

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Numerical modelling of dynamical interaction between seismic radiation and near-surface geological structures: a parallel approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate a faster and easier way to parallelise seismological codes able to simulate the dynamical interaction between seismic radiation and near-surface geological structures. This is important in assessing strong ground motion, in the mitigation ... Keywords: HPF, numerical modelling, openMP, parallel computing, seismic site effects

A. Caserta; V. Ruggiero; P. Lanucara

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Predictability of Soil Moisture and Near-Surface Temperature in Hindcasts of the NCEP Seasonal Forecast Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the NCEP–DOE reanalysis (R-2) soil wetness and the NCEP Seasonal Forecast System, seasonal predictability of the soil moisture and near-surface temperature, and the role of land surface initial conditions are examined. Two sets of forecasts ...

Masao Kanamitsu; Cheng-Hsuan Lu; Jae Schemm; Wesley Ebisuzaki

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Fast, Accurate Method of Computing Near-Surface Longwave Fluxes and Cooling Rates in the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As radiation plays a key role in the determination of the near-surface thermal environment, great accuracy is required in the computation of radiative fluxes, especially because a small error in the fluxes can lead to large errors in estimated ...

Saji Varghese; A. S. Vasudeva Murthy; Roddam Narasimha

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Sharp Frontal Interfaces in the Near-Surface Layer of the Ocean in the Western Equatorial Pacific Warm Pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the TOGA COARE rich horizontal temperature and salinity variability of the near-surface layer of the ocean in the western Pacific warm pool was observed. High-resolution measurements were made by probes mounted on the bow of the vessel in ...

Alexander Soloviev; Roger Lukas

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoring and Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada;volcanic system, USA Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, USAProvince system like the Dixie Valley (Nevada) geothermal

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

INTRODUCTION Daily irradiance in near-surface waters can vary over an intensity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of sciaenid visual systems to respond to colored light stimuli. The output of a Cermax Xenon fiberoptic light of sciaenid visual systems was assessed via flicker fusion frequency (FFF) experiments with the white light monitored the ability of a visual system to track light flickering in logarithmically increasing frequencies

Hartley, Troy W.

85

On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

SciTech Connect

Geologic carbon sequestration is one strategy for reducing the rate of increase of global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2} ) concentrations (IEA, 1997; Reichle, 2000). As used here, the term geologic carbon sequestration refers to the direct injection of supercritical CO{sub 2} deep into subsurface target formations. These target formations will typically be either depleted oil and gas reservoirs, or brine-filled permeable formations referred to here as brine formations. Injected CO{sub 2} will tend to be trapped by one or more of the following mechanisms: (1) permeability trapping, for example when buoyant supercritical CO{sub 2} rises until trapped by a confining caprock; (2) solubility trapping, for example when CO{sub 2} dissolves into the aqueous phase in water-saturated formations, or (3) mineralogic trapping, such as occurs when CO{sub 2} reacts to produce stable carbonate minerals. When CO{sub 2} is trapped in the subsurface by any of these mechanisms, it is effectively sequestered away from the atmosphere where it would otherwise act as a greenhouse gas. The purpose of this report is to summarize our work aimed at quantifying potential CO{sub 2} seepage due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites. The approach we take is to present first the relevant properties of CO{sub 2} over the range of conditions from the deep subsurface to the vadose zone (Section 2), and then discuss conceptual models for how leakage might occur (Section 3). The discussion includes consideration of gas reservoir and natural gas storage analogs, along with some simple estimates of seepage based on assumed leakage rates. The conceptual model discussion provides the background for the modeling approach wherein we focus on simulating transport in the vadose zone, the last potential barrier to CO{sub 2} seepage (Section 4). Because of the potentially wide range of possible properties of actual future geologic sequestration sites, we carry out sensitivity analyses by means of numerical simulation and derive the trends in seepage flux and near-surface CO{sub 2} concentrations that will arise from variations in fundamental hydrogeological properties.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

86

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings  

SciTech Connect

The most common method for measuring air leakage is to use a single blower door to pressurize and/or depressurize the test unit. In detached housing, the test unit is the entire home and the single blower door measures air leakage to the outside. In attached housing, this 'single unit', 'total', or 'solo' test method measures both the air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces as well air leakage to the outside. Measuring and minimizing this total leakage is recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce energy losses to the outside, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect. However, two significant limitations of the total leakage measurement in attached housing are: for retrofit work, if total leakage is assumed to be all to the outside, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly over predicted; for new construction, the total leakage values may result in failing to meet an energy-based house tightness program criterion. The scope of this research is to investigate an approach for developing a viable simplified algorithm that can be used by contractors to assess energy efficiency program qualification and/or compliance based upon solo test results.

Faakye, O.; Arena, L.; Griffiths, D.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Quantifying information leakage in process calculi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building on simple information-theoretic concepts, we study two quantitative models of information leakage in the pi-calculus. The first model presupposes an attacker with an essentially unlimited computational power. The resulting notion of absolute ... Keywords: Information leakage, Information theory, Process calculi, Secrecy

Michele Boreale

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Title Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5553E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Mile Lubliner, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Journal 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings The Climate for efficiency is now Date Published 08/2010 Abstract In recent years, great strides have been made in reducing air leakage in residential and to a lesser extent small commercial forced air duct systems. Several authorities have introduced low leakage limits for thermal distribution systems; for example, the State of California Energy Code for Buildings gives credit for systems that leak less than 6% of the total air flow at 25 Pa.

89

Design and implementation of an economic gas leakage detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas leakage is a major concern with residential, commercial premises and gas powered transportation vehicles. One of the preventive measures to avoid the danger associated with gas leakage is to install a gas leakage detector at vulnerable locations. ... Keywords: LPG, audio-visual alarm, gas leakage detection, leakage exposure limits, safety system

A. Mahalingam; R. T. Naayagi; N. E. Mastorakis

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Reducing Uncertainty for the DeltaQ Duct Leakage Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the DeltaQ duct Leakage Test”. ASHRAE Transactions (inof a new Duct Leakage Test: DeltaQ. LBNL 47308. Walker, I,Uncertainties in the DeltaQ test for Duct Leakage.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Minimizing and exploiting leakage in VLSI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power consumption of VLSI (Very Large Scale Integrated) circuits has been growing at an alarmingly rapid rate. This increase in power consumption, coupled with the increasing demand for portable/hand-held electronics, has made power consumption a dominant concern in the design of VLSI circuits today. Traditionally dynamic (switching) power has dominated the total power consumption of VLSI circuits. However, due to process scaling trends, leakage power has now become a major component of the total power consumption in VLSI circuits. This dissertation explores techniques to reduce leakage, as well as techniques to exploit leakage currents through the use of sub-threshold circuits. This dissertation consists of two studies. In the first study, techniques to reduce leakage are presented. These include a low leakage ASIC design methodology that uses high VT sleep transistors selectively, a methodology that combines input vector control and circuit modification, and a scheme to find the optimum reverse body bias voltage to minimize leakage. As the minimum feature size of VLSI fabrication processes continues to shrink with each successive process generation (along with the value of supply voltage and therefore the threshold voltage of the devices), leakage currents increase exponentially. Leakage currents are hence seen as a necessary evil in traditional VLSI design methodologies. We present an approach to turn this problem into an opportunity. In the second study in this dissertation, we attempt to exploit leakage currents to perform computation. We use sub-threshold digital circuits and come up with ways to get around some of the pitfalls associated with sub-threshold circuit design. These include a technique that uses body biasing adaptively to compensate for Process, Voltage and Temperature (PVT) variations, a design approach that uses asynchronous micro-pipelined Network of Programmable Logic Arrays (NPLAs) to help improve the throughput of sub-threshold designs, and a method to find the optimum supply voltage that minimizes energy consumption in a circuit.

Jayakumar, Nikhil

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Acoustic Tomographic Monitoring of the Atmospheric Surface Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acoustic tomography is proposed as a method for monitoring near-surface atmospheric temperature and wind velocity fields. Basic issues relating to the feasibility and implementation of atmospheric tomography are discussed. Among these issues are ...

D. Keith Wilson; Dennis W. Thomson

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Numerical prediction of basalt response for near-surface test facility heater tests No. 1 and No. 2  

SciTech Connect

This report details the numerical predictions undertaken by Dames and Moore for Rockwell Hanford Operations' Basalt Waste Isolation Project. Predictions are made for the temperatures, stresses, strains and displacements in the basalt around Full-Scale Heater Tests No. 1 and No. 2 at the Near-Surface Test Facility using the finite element code DAMSWEL. The rock around the main heaters was modeled using an axisymmetric idealization in which deformational properties were transversely isotropic with a bilinear stress/strain relationship which was independent of temperature. The selection of the input parameters represents an engineering assessment of their values based on the results of laboratory tests and in situ measurements. The predictive modeling analysis, using the best information available as of April 1980, was completed prior to test startup. Additional information on geology, geological characterization, rock-mass characterization, laboratory properties, and field properties of basalt is being acquired on a regular basis as part of the overall Near-Surface Test Facility test program. An assessment of the effect of additions to the data base upon the predictive modeling and test analysis shall be made on a periodic basis.

Hocking, G.; Williams, J.R.; Boonlualohr, P.; Mathews, I.; Mustoe, G.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings Dianne Griffiths April 30, 2013 Presentation Outline * Objectives * What we accomplished last year * What we plan to do this year Why do we do blower door testing? * Compliance to some standard * Identify opportunity for reducing energy use * Identify opportunity for improving IAQ * Measure implementation verification Total (or Solo) Leakage Test P = 50 Pa P = 50 Pa P = 50 Pa P = 50 Pa Open windows, open doors, same test pressure across whole envelope. If pressure across envelope at any point is different from test pressure by less than 5 Pa, not neccessary. "Fully" Guarded Test P = 0 Pa P = 0 Pa P = 50 Pa P = 0 Pa Isolates exterior leakage What's the big deal? * How we measure depends on why we're

95

Acoustic Tomography as a Remote Sensing Method to Investigate the Near-Surface Atmospheric Boundary Layer in Comparison with In Situ Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The acoustic tomography method is applied in the atmospheric surface layer to observe near-surface temperature fields. Important advantages of this technique are the remote sensing capacity and the possibility of directly deriving area-average ...

Astrid Ziemann; Klaus Arnold; Armin Raabe

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

One-Dimensional Soil Moisture Profile Retrieval by Assimilation of Near-Surface Measurements: A Simplified Soil Moisture Model and Field Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Kalman filter assimilation technique is applied to a simplified soil moisture model for retrieval of the soil moisture profile from near-surface soil moisture measurements. First, the simplified soil moisture model is developed, based on an ...

Jeffrey P. Walker; Garry R. Willgoose; Jetse D. Kalma

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Seasonal Near-Surface Dynamics and Thermodynamics of the Indian Ocean and Indonesian Throughflow in a Global Ocean General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The near-surface dynamics and thermodynamics of the Indian Ocean are examined in a global ocean general circulation model (OGCM) with enhanced tropical resolution. The model uses a Seager-type heat flux formulation (weak relaxation toward a fixed ...

A. Schiller; J. S. Godfrey; P. C. McIntosh; G. Meyers; S. E. Wijffels

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Evaluation of Near-Surface Parameters in the Two Versions of the Atmospheric Model in CESM1 using Flux Station Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the performance of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) versions 4 and 5 in simulating near-surface parameters. CAM is the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Most of the parameterizations in the ...

Jenny Lindvall; Gunilla Svensson; Cecile Hannay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Leakage from sub-national climate initiatives ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper considers leakage from sub-national climate policies using California’s capand-trade program as a representative example. Our analysis is built on a global model of economic activity and energy systems that identifies 15 US regions and 15 regions in the rest of the world. As California’s cap-and-trade policy requires electricity importers to surrender emissions allowances, leakage depends on the ability of out-of-state generators to reconfigure transmission to reduce the carbon intensity of electricity supplied to California. If exporters can dispatch carbon-free electricity to California and carbon-intensive electricity is rerouted to other markets, leakage is 47 % of the decrease in emissions in California. If exporters are unable to adjust the carbon intensity of electricity supplied to California, as imported electricity is relatively carbon intensive, there is negative leakage to regions supplying electricity to California and the aggregate leakage rate is 5%. We also observe negative leakage to some regions due to changes in fossil fuel prices and that the impact of the trading of emissions permits between California and the EU depends on the ability of out-of-state generators to reconfigure electricity supply.

Justin Caron; Sebastian Rausch; Niven Winchester

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Wind-induced contaminant transport in near-surface soils with application to radon entry into buildings  

SciTech Connect

Indoor air exposures to gaseous contaminants originating in soil can cause large human health risks. To predict and control these exposures, the mechanisms that affect vapor transport in near-surface soils need to be understood. In particular, radon exposure is a concern since average indoor radon concentrations lead to much higher risks than are generally accepted for exposure to other environmental contaminants. This dissertation examines an important component of the indoor radon problem: the impacts of wind on soil-gas and radon transport and entry into buildings. The research includes experimental and modeling studies of wind`s interactions with a building`s superstructure and the resulting soil-gas and radon flows in the surrounding soil. In addition to exploring the effects of steady winds, a novel modeling technique is developed to examine the impacts of fluctuating winds on soil-gas and radon transport.

Riley, W.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Monitor for detecting nuclear waste leakage in a subsurface repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remote fiber fluorimetric portion of the program is slightly ahead of schedule and proceeding well technically. Proof of principle has been demonstrated over a 0.2 km path length using an organic tracer material. Performance and design calculations have been made for the fiber optic components of the system. Optimized fibers have been ordered and special jigs and optical couplings are presently being fabricated. Progress on the high-sensitivity analyzer using coprecipitation techniques has proceeded well ahead of schedule with technical results far above expectations. Preliminary measurements in the UO/sub 2//sup 2 +//CaF/sub 2/ detection system has proved sensitivities well beyond the natural background limit. While further improvement of sensitivity (to 10/sup -15/ g) already is planned, emphasis will now be placed on locating and dealing with possible interferences and on determining how to improve and optimize quantitative accuracy. In addition, simplication of the sample preparation procedure and downscaling to use very small (< 1 ml) groundwater samples is planned. In the longer time frame, work on maximum chemical speciation and the possibility of isotopic speciation will be undertaken. Once the coprecipitation procedures, instrumentation, and spectroscopy have been fully refined for uranium, then the process will be repeated for plutonium and perhaps americium and thorium.

Klainer, S.; Hirschfeld, T.; Bowman, H.; Milanovich, F.; Perry, D.; Johnson, D.

1980-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

102

Tor HTTP usage and information leakage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the web browsing behaviour of Tor users. By collecting HTTP requests we show which websites are of interest to Tor users and we determined an upper bound on how vulnerable Tor users are to sophisticated de-anonymization attacks: up ... Keywords: information leakage, privacy, tor

Markus Huber; Martin Mulazzani; Edgar Weippl

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Side-Channel leakage across borders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More and more embedded devices store sensitive information that is protected by means of cryptography. The confidentiality of this data is threatened by information leakage via side channels like the power consumption or the electromagnetic radiation. ... Keywords: I/O pin, microcontroller, optocoupler, power analysis, serial interface

Jörn-Marc Schmidt; Thomas Plos; Mario Kirschbaum; Michael Hutter; Marcel Medwed; Christoph Herbst

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Modeling of cryogen leakage through composite laminates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cryogenic composites ?nd critical application in the manufacture of fuel tanks for reusable launch vehicles due to signi?cant reduction in overall structural weight of the tank. These fuel tanks contain pressurized cryogen such as hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures. Exposure to varying temperatures and mechanical loads resulting from ?ight cycle, containment of pressurized cryogen causes thermo-mechanical loading of the composite. The thermo-mechanical loading cycles combined with anisotropy of the composite and mismatch in the thermal and mechanical properties of ?bers and matrix lead to transverse matrix cracks (TMC) in each ply. TMC in adjacent plies intersect in localized regions at ply interfaces called crack junctions, which open up due to delamination on application of thermo-mechanical load. TMC and crack junctions usually form a network of leakage paths that assists leakage of cryogen through the composite. In this study, the volumetric ?ow rate of cryogen leaking through a damaged cross-ply composite with ?ve plies is determined by estimating the effective conductance of the leakage paths. For a given damage state and applied load, crack junction and TMC openings are obtained by ?nite element analysis. A computational ?uid dynamics model is ?rst used to estimate the effective conductance of a leakage path to hydrogen leakage and then a simplified analytical model is used to compute the effective conductance from individual conductances of each crack junction and TMC through a series-parallel combination. A single phase ?ow model is considered for the numerical analysis of hydrogen ?ow through TMC and crack junctions. The simulations are carried out using a commercial computational ?uid dynamics software, FLUENT. Parametric studies are carried out to investigate the dependence of leak rate of hydrogen on the irregularities of the TMC geometry and TMC, crack junction openings. The simpli?ed model predictions of the effective conductance for the ?ve ply composite show good comparison with numerical simulations.

Peddiraju, Naga Venkata Satya Pravin Kumar

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Thermal-induced leakage power optimization by redundant resource allocation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, at early design stages, leakage power is associated with the number of transistors in a design. Hence, intuitively an implementation with minimum resource usage would be best for low leakage. Such an allocation would generally be followed ...

Min Ni; Seda Ogrenci Memik

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Development of Near-Surface Flow Pattern and Water Mass Distribution in the Somali Basin in Response to the Southwest Monsoon of 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-surface observations of temperature, salinity and current are used to describe the seasonal reversal of the Somali Current during 1979, in response to the onset of the southwest monsoon winds. During April, prior to the reversal of the winds ...

John C. Swallow; Robert L. Molinari; John G. Bruce; Otis B. Brown; Robert H. Evans

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Contribution of Land Use Changes to Near-Surface Air Temperatures during Recent Summer Extreme Heat Events in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of 1973–2005 land use–land cover (LULC) changes on near-surface air temperatures during four recent summer extreme heat events (EHEs) are investigated for the arid Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan area using the Weather Research and ...

Susanne Grossman-Clarke; Joseph A. Zehnder; Thomas Loridan; C. Sue B. Grimmond

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Near-Surface Currents in DeSoto Canyon (1997–99): Comparison of Current Meters, Satellite Observation, and Model Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates a data-assimilated model simulation of near-surface circulation in DeSoto Canyon (DSC), Gulf of Mexico, with emphasis on analyzing moored current-meter observations and comparing them with satellite data and model results. ...

Dong-Ping Wang; Lie-Yauw Oey; Tal Ezer; Peter Hamilton

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Design and operational considerations of United States commercial near-surface low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, states are responsible for providing for disposal of commercially generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) within their borders. LLW in the US is defined as all radioactive waste that is not classified as spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, or by-product material resulting from the extraction of uranium from ore. Commercial waste includes LLW generated by hospitals, universities, industry, pharmaceutical companies, and power utilities. LLW generated by the country`s defense operations is the responsibility of the Federal government and its agency, the Department of Energy. The commercial LLRW disposal sites discussed in this report are located near: Sheffield, Illinois (closed); Maxey Flats, Kentucky (closed); Beatty, Nevada (closed); West Valley, New York (closed); Barnwell, South Carolina (operating); Richland, Washington (operating); Ward Valley, California, (proposed); Sierra Blanca, Texas (proposed); Wake County, North Carolina (proposed); and Boyd County, Nebraska (proposed). While some comparisons between the sites described in this report are appropriate, this must be done with caution. In addition to differences in climate and geology between sites, LLW facilities in the past were not designed and operated to today`s standards. This report summarizes each site`s design and operational considerations for near-surface disposal of low-level radioactive waste. The report includes: a description of waste characteristics; design and operational features; post closure measures and plans; cost and duration of site characterization, construction, and operation; recent related R and D activities for LLW treatment and disposal; and the status of the LLW system in the US.

Birk, S.M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Carbon Leakage in General and Partial Equilibrium August 7, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Leakage in General and Partial Equilibrium Larry Karp August 7, 2012 Abstract The general of leakage, and the magnitude of border tax adjustments (BTAs) needed to offset it. A BTA based on carbon intensity in countries without carbon constraints is an export subsidy and creates negative leakage

Kammen, Daniel M.

111

Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No 52-2013 Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry halshs-00870689,version1-7Oct2013 #12;Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy The efficiency of unilateral climate policies may be hampered by carbon leakage and competitiveness losses

Recanati, Catherine

112

A sink-n-hoist framework for leakage power reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power leakage constitutes an increasing fraction of the total power consumption in modern semiconductor technologies. Recent research efforts have tried to integrate architecture and compiler solutions to employ power-gating mechanisms to reduce leakage ... Keywords: balanced scheduling, compilers for low power, data-flow analysis, leakage power reduction, power-gating mechanisms

Yi-Ping You; Chung-Wen Huang; Jenq Kuen Lee

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Geostock's containment method reduces underground storage leakage  

SciTech Connect

Geostock's hydraulic containment method of safely containing liquid hydrocarbons in unlined underground storage caverns, so that there is no danger of leakage into the surrounding ground makes use of the surrounding ground water, whose static head is kept higher than the pressure of the stored product. For leakage prevention, the static head must be larger than the potential of the stored product plus a safety margin. The safety margin involves a shape factor, dependent on the size and shape of the cavity (examples are given), and a factor which allows for unforeseen conditions. The depth required for the ground water to possess a sufficiently large static head depends on the type and pressure of the stored product, the hydrogeological environment, and the geometry of the facility. Geostock has used the hydraulic containment method in a domestic heating oil facility at May sur Orne, Fr., and also in three propane storage facilities in France.

Not Available

1980-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

114

Coping with qubit leakage in topological codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many physical systems considered promising qubit candidates are not, in fact, two-level systems. Such systems can leak out of the preferred computational states, leading to errors on any qubits that interact with leaked qubits. Without specific methods of dealing with leakage, long-lived leakage can lead to time-correlated errors. We study the impact of such time-correlated errors on topological quantum error correction codes, which are considered highly practical codes, using the repetition code as a representative case study. We show that, under physically reasonable assumptions, a threshold error rate still exists, however performance is significantly degraded. We then describe simple additional quantum circuitry that, when included in the error detection cycle, restores performance to acceptable levels.

Austin G. Fowler

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Wanyu R. Chan, Jeffrey Joh, and Max H. Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720 August 2012 LBNL-5966E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the

116

Home test kit for duct leakage  

SciTech Connect

An inexpensive device whose purpose is to test for duct leakage in the home is described. This device is intended for use by homeowners and others untrained in the art of duct testing. While not as accurate as testing done by professionals, it should be able to give the homeowners enough information to justify a decision whether or not to call on professional assistance for further testing and possible remediation of their duct systems. The device has been reduced to practice.

Andrews, J.W.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Cycle isolation monitoring  

SciTech Connect

There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C. [Santee Copper, Moncks Corner, SC (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

1 The Implications of Alternative Biofuel Policies on Carbon Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how leakage differs, depending on the biofuel policy and market conditions. Carbon leakage is shown to have two components: a market leakage effect and an emissions savings effect. We also distinguish domestic and international leakage and show how omitting the former like the IPCC does can bias leakage estimates. International leakage is always positive, but domestic leakage can be negative. The magnitude of market leakage depends on the domestic and foreign gasoline supply and fuel demand elasticities, and on consumption and production shares of world oil markets for the country introducing the biofuel policy. Being a small country in world oil markets does not automatically imply that leakage is 100 percent or above that of a large country. We show leakage due to a tax credit is always greater than that of a mandate, while the combination of a mandate and subsidy generates greater leakage than a mandate alone. In general, one gallon of ethanol is found to replace only 0.35 gallons of gasoline – not one gallon as assumed by life-cycle accounting. For the United States, this translates into one (gasoline-equivalent) gallon of ethanol emitting 1.13 times more carbon than a gallon of gasoline if indirect land use change (iLUC) is not included in the estimated emissions savings effect and 1.43 times more when iLUC is included.

Dusan Drabik; Harry De Gorter; David R. Just; Dusan Drabik; Harry De Gorter; David R. Just

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A New Diagnostic for Duct Leakage: DeltaQ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Diagnostic for Duct Leakage: DeltaQ A New Diagnostic for Duct Leakage: DeltaQ Speaker(s): Iain Walker Date: February 21, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Cynthia Tast Duct leakage has been identified as a major contributor to HVAC energy use and building infiltration, particularly in residences. In order to make good estimates of HVAC system energy performance, we need to know how much air leaks between the ducts and outside the building during system operation. Existing methods for determining duct leakage do not perform well due to experimental procedures that produce imprecise results or they require many assumptions to convert measurements into the desired leakage flows. The DeltaQ duct leakage test has been developed by the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at LBNL to determine duct leakage flows by

120

Importance of physical processes on near-surface nutrient distributions in summer in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico chemical oceanography and hydrography study, data on salinity, nutrients, and surface chlorophyll were collected three times per year over the northeastern Gulf of Mexico along 11 cross-shelf (normal to bathymetry) transects from the Mississippi River Delta to Tampa Bay. The transects covered the shelf from the 10-m to the 1000-m isobath. In all three summers of 1998, 1999, and 2000, eddies over the continental margin induced strong, eastward anticyclonic flows over the outer shelf and slope. This flow strongly affected the distribution of coastal water on the shelf in all three years, drawing Mississippi River water into the circulation along the 1000-m isobath and reversing the normal offshore salinity gradient. The entrainment of low salinity river water resulted in anomalously high nutrient and chlorophyll a concentrations in the upper 10-20 m over the outer shelf and upper slope. This is in contrast to the typically low standing stocks of phytoplankton that occur over deep water in subtropical summertime conditions. Vertical nutrient distributions indicated that there was uplift of mid-depth water to shallower depth caused by the presence of either cyclones, regions of diverging flow at eddy peripheries, or bottom Ekman layer transport. Comparison of near-surface nutrient distributions in the low salinity entrainment features with those in the region of uplifted mid-depth water showed that the intrusion of an anticyclonic secondary eddy onto this subtropical continental margin caused deep water rich in nutrients to rise to depths as shallow as 35 or 10 m depending on the location and the intensity of the anticyclonic and cyclonic eddies. Thus, the impact of both Mississippi River water and anticyclonic and cyclonic eddies on nutrient distribution may be important in enhancing productivity over the study region during summer. On average, during each summer, the amount of nitrate reaching the outer shelf and slope in the nutrient-depleted, low-salinity river water transported by eddy circulation, provided 15 to 32 % as much nitrate as came from uplifted mid-depth water from either cyclones, diverging flow at eddy peripheries, or bottom Ekman layer transport.

Belabbassi, Leila

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Dynamic leakage from laboratory safety hoods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate hood leakage by measuring face velocity and turbulence during a volume generating process designed to simulate a hot process, defined here as any operation producing high temperature gases. A hot process has been recognized as a causal factor in the leakage of contaminants from laboratory fume hoods since 1950. A literature search reveals that during the last couple of decades only Johnson et al. reported a quantitative linear relationship between thermal loading and breathing zone trace gas concentrations using the ASHRAE 110-1995 method. Hot processes may well be the most common and least recognized of the operational factors able to cause fume hoods to leak. For hood performance testing, I conducted smoke tests and face velocity tests. Smoke tests were executed by means of smoke tubes and smoke matches as screening tools for hood leakage. Face velocity tests were conducted at 16 points arranged to represent equal areas of the hood face when the sash was fully opened. Face velocity data were indexed in time and space and used to estimate turbulence. By assuming corresponding samples were collected simultaneously, turbulence parameters were computed as both spatial and temporal averages of the velocity pressure. Turbulence is represented by the ratio of the standard deviation to average face velocity at each measurement point. Turbulence is generated by pressure differences occurring between the velocity pressure at the hood face and the volume generating rate that simulates a hot process. Through the average face velocity and turbulence measurements, I found that at a fixed exhaust flow, with a fixed injection volume flow, turbulence is stronger in the open sash position than in the reduced sash position. Further, turbulence associated with a volume generating process is more evident in the space-based data than in the time-based data. Face velocity at each point tends to decrease in a hood when the flow injected by a volume generating process increases. These data suggest that when a hood is operated with a volume generating process, leakage can be minimized by reducing the sash opening, by not positioning any object within six inches of the hood face, and by keeping face velocities stable.

Park, Ju-Myon

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Title Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3383E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords air flow measurement, air leakage, blower power measurement, blowers, energy performance of buildings group, forced air systems, furnaces, indoor environment department, other, public interest energy research (pier) program, residential hvac Abstract This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit - indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called "ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823 "Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

123

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The most common method of measuring air leakage is to perform single (or solo) blower door pressurization and/or depressurization test. In detached housing, the single blower door test measures leakage to the outside. In attached housing, however, this "solo" test method measures both air leakage to the outside and air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces. Although minimizing leakage to neighboring units is highly recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly overpredicted if the solo air leakage number is used in the energy analysis. Guarded blower door testing is more appropriate for isolating and measuring leakage to the outside in attached housing. This method uses multiple blower doors to depressurize adjacent spaces to the same level as the unit being tested. Maintaining a neutral pressure across common walls, ceilings, and floors acts as a "guard" against air leakage between units. The resulting measured air leakage in the test unit is only air leakage to the outside. Although preferred for assessing energy impacts, the challenges of performing guarded testing can be daunting.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Analysis of U.S. residential air leakage database  

SciTech Connect

The air leakage of a building envelope can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. More than 70,000 air leakage measurements have been compiled into a database. In addition to air leakage, the database includes other important characteristics of the dwellings tested, such as floor area, year built, and location. There are also data for some houses on the presence of heating ducts, and floor/basement construction type. The purpose of this work is to identify house characteristics that can be used to predict air leakage. We found that the distribution of leakage normalized with floor area of the house is roughly lognormal. Year built and floor area are the two most significant factors to consider when predicting air leakage: older and smaller houses tend to have higher normalized leakage areas compared to newer and larger ones. Results from multiple linear regression of normalized leakage with respect to these two factors are presented for three types of houses: low-income, energy-efficient, and conventional. We demonstrate a method of using the regression model in conjunction with housing characteristics published by the US Census Bureau to derive a distribution that describes the air leakage of the single-family detached housing stock. Comparison of our estimates with published datasets of air exchange rates suggests that the regression model generates accurate estimates of air leakage distribution.

Chan, Wanyu R.; Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Residential duct system leakage; Magnitude, impacts, and potential for reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the issues associated with leakage in residential air distribution systems, touching on the prevalence of duct leakage, the impacts of duct leakage, and on the techniques available for sealing duct systems. The issues examined in detail are: present techniques for measuring the leakage area of ducts existing data bases of duct leakage area measurements, the impacts of duct leakage on space-conditioning energy consumption and peak demand, and the ventilation impacts of duct leakage. The paper also includes a brief discussion of techniques for sealing duct systems in the field. The results derived from duct leakage are and driving pressure measurements indicate that in regions in which distribution systems pass through unconditioned spaces, air infiltration rates will typically double when the distribution fan is turned on, and that the average annual air infiltration rate is increased by 30% to 70% due to the existence of the distribution system. Estimates based upon a simplified analysis of leakage-induced energy losses also indicate the peak electricity demands due to duct leakage can be as high as 4 kW in Sacramento, California, and West Palm Beach, Florida, and that peak loads on the order of 1 to 2 kW are highly likely in these locations. Both peak loads and annual energy impacts are found to be strongly dependent on the location of the return duct, and attic return costing approximately 1500 kWh more energy than a crawlspace return in the two climates examined.

Modera, M.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Mapping of Near-Surface Winds in Hurricane Rita Using Finescale Radar, Anemometer, and Land-Use Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data collected from a Doppler on Wheels (DOW) mobile radar deployed in Port Arthur, Texas, near the point of landfall of Hurricane Rita (2005) and from two Florida Coastal Monitoring Program 10-m weather stations (FCMP-WSs) are used to ...

Karen Kosiba; Joshua Wurman; Forrest J. Masters; Paul Robinson

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

SciTech Connect

This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit ? indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called"ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823"Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

Walker, Iain S.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.; Delp, William W.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

duct leakage testing”.   ASHRAE Transactions, June 2008.   ASHRAE, Atlanta, GA.    LBNL 62262.   Walker, I.S.  (Institute, Arlington, VA.   ASHRAE Standard 103.  (2007).  

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Special Issue On Estimation Of Baselines And Leakage In CarbonMitigation Forestry Projects  

SciTech Connect

There is a growing acceptance that the environmentalbenefits of forests extend beyond traditional ecological benefits andinclude the mitigation of climate change. Interest in forestry mitigationactivities has led to the inclusion of forestry practices at the projectlevel in international agreements. Climate change activities place newdemands on participating institutions to set baselines, establishadditionality, determine leakage, ensure permanence, and monitor andverify a project's greenhouse gas benefits. These issues are common toboth forestry and other types of mitigation projects. They demandempirical evidence to establish conditions under which such projects canprovide sustained long term global benefits. This Special Issue reportson papers that experiment with a range of approaches based on empiricalevidence for the setting of baselines and estimation of leakage inprojects in developing Asia and Latin America.

Sathaye, Jayant A.; Andrasko, Kenneth

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Training toward Advanced 3D Seismic Methods for CO2 Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting  

SciTech Connect

The objective of our work is graduate and undergraduate student training related to improved 3D seismic technology that addresses key challenges related to monitoring movement and containment of CO{sub 2}, specifically better quantification and sensitivity for mapping of caprock integrity, fractures, and other potential leakage pathways. We utilize data and results developed through previous DOE-funded CO{sub 2} characterization project (DE-FG26-06NT42734) at the Dickman Field of Ness County, KS. Dickman is a type locality for the geology that will be encountered for CO{sub 2} sequestration projects from northern Oklahoma across the U.S. midcontinent to Indiana and Illinois. Since its discovery in 1962, the Dickman Field has produced about 1.7 million barrels of oil from porous Mississippian carbonates with a small structural closure at about 4400 ft drilling depth. Project data includes 3.3 square miles of 3D seismic data, 142 wells, with log, some core, and oil/water production data available. Only two wells penetrate the deep saline aquifer. In a previous DOE-funded project, geological and seismic data were integrated to create a geological property model and a flow simulation grid. We believe that sequestration of CO{sub 2} will largely occur in areas of relatively flat geology and simple near surface, similar to Dickman. The challenge is not complex geology, but development of improved, lower-cost methods for detecting natural fractures and subtle faults. Our project used numerical simulation to test methods of gathering multicomponent, full azimuth data ideal for this purpose. Our specific objectives were to apply advanced seismic methods to aide in quantifying reservoir properties and lateral continuity of CO{sub 2} sequestration targets. The purpose of the current project is graduate and undergraduate student training related to improved 3D seismic technology that addresses key challenges related to monitoring movement and containment of CO{sub 2}, specifically better quantification and sensitivity for mapping of caprock integrity, fractures, and other potential leakage pathways. Specifically, our focus is fundamental research on (1) innovative narrow-band seismic data decomposition and interpretation, and (2) numerical simulation of advanced seismic data (multi-component, high density, full azimuth data) ideal for mapping of cap rock integrity and potential leakage pathways.

Christopher Liner

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Circuit and microarchitectural techniques for reducing cache leakage power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-chip caches represent a sizable fraction of the total power consumption of microprocessors. As feature sizes shrink, the dominant component of this power consumption will be leakage. However, during a fixed period of time, the activity in a data cache ... Keywords: L1 caches, dynamic voltage scaling, low power, subthreshold leakage power

Nam Sung Kim; Krisztian Flautner; David Blaauw; Trevor Mudge

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Formation of ordered one-dimensional microstructures of dislocations in near-surface layer of semiconductor, under laser radiation with microstructured distribution of intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the results of investigation the process of formation of the ordered microstructures of dislocations in the near-surface layer a single-crystal plate of silicon under the action of pulsed laser radiation with microstructured distribution intensity. It has been found that generation of the ordered one-dimensional microstructures of dislocations takes place. The period of these ordered microstructures is d{approx_equal}3 divide 4 {mu}m. A combination of one-dimensional structures of dislocations produces ordered two-dimensional structure of dislocations.

Banishev, A. F.; Banishev, A. A. [Institute on Laser and Information Technologies RAS (ILIT RAS), Svyatoozerskaya Str.1, 140700 Shatura, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Reducing Uncertainty for the DeltaQ Duct Leakage Test  

SciTech Connect

The thermal distribution system couples the HVAC components to the building envelope, and shares many properties of the buildings envelope including moisture, conduction and most especially air leakage performance. Duct leakage has a strong influence on air flow rates through building envelopes (usually resulting in much greater flows than those due to natural infiltration) because unbalanced duct air flows and leaks result in building pressurization and depressurization. As a tool to estimate this effect, the DeltaQ duct leakage test has been developed over the past several years as an improvement to existing duct pressurization tests. It focuses on measuring the air leakage flows to outside at operating conditions that are required for envelope infiltration impacts and energy loss calculations for duct systems. The DeltaQ test builds on the standard envelope tightness blower door measurement techniques by repeating the tests with the system air handler off and on. The DeltaQ test requires several assumptions to be made about duct leakage and its interaction with the duct system and building envelope in order to convert the blower door results into duct leakage at system operating conditions. This study examined improvements to the DeltaQ test that account for some of these assumptions using a duct system and building envelope in a test laboratory. The laboratory measurements used a purpose-built test chamber coupled to a duct system typical of forced air systems in US homes. Special duct leaks with controlled air-flow were designed and installed into an airtight duct system. This test apparatus allowed the systematic variation of the duct and envelope leakage and accurate measurement of the duct leakage flows for comparison to DeltaQ test results. This paper will discuss the laboratory test apparatus design, construction and operation, the various analysis techniques applied to the calculation procedure and present estimates of uncertainty in measured duct leakage.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Particles of Outdoor Origin Title Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Particles of Outdoor Origin Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Hering, Susanne V., Melissa M. Lunden, Marc L. Fischer, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Tracy L. Thatcher, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 41 Pagination 639-654 Abstract Time-resolved fine particle concentrations of nitrate, sulfate, and black carbon were examined to assess the appropriateness of using regional data and calculated air exchange rates to model indoor concentrations of particles from outdoor sources. The data set includes simultaneous, sub-hourly aerosol composition measurements at three locations: a regional monitoring site in Fresno, California, inside of an unoccupied residence in Clovis, California, located 6 km northeast of the regional site, and immediately outside of this same residence. Indoor concentrations of PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and black carbon were modeled using varying sets of inputs to determine the influence of three factors on model accuracy: the constraints of the simplified indoor-outdoor model, measured versus modeled air exchange rates, and local versus regional outdoor measurements.

135

Building Energy Code Resource Guide: Air Leakage Guide | Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage Guide Air Leakage Guide The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the enormous potential that exists for improving the energy efficiency, safety and comfort of homes. The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) sets the bar for energy efficiency, and air sealing requirements are one of the key provisions. This guide is a resource for understanding the air leakage requirements in the 2012 IECC and suggestions on how these measures can be met. It also provides information from Building America's Air Sealing Guide, best Practices and case studies on homes that are currently meeting the provisions. The 2012 IECC and a few International Residential Code requirements are referenced throughout the guide. Publication Date: Friday, September 30, 2011 BECP_Buidling Energy Code Resource Guide Air Leakage

136

Agulhas Leakage Predominantly Responds to the Southern Hemisphere Westerlies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Agulhas Current plays a crucial role in the thermohaline circulation through its leakage into the South Atlantic Ocean. Under both past and present climates, the trade winds and westerlies could have the ability to modulate the amount of ...

Jonathan V. Durgadoo; Benjamin R. Loveday; Chris J. C. Reason; Pierrick Penven; Arne Biastoch

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

SRAM leakage suppression by minimizing standby supply voltage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suppressing the leakage current in memories is critical in low-power design. By reducing the standby supply voltage (VDD) to its limit, which is the Data Retention Voltage (DRV), leakage power can be substantially reduced. This paper explores how low DRV can be in a standard low leakage SRAM module and analyzes how DRV is affected by parameters such as process variations, chip temperature, and transistor sizing. An analytical model for DRV as a function of process and design parameters is presented, and forms the base for further design space explorations. This model is verified using simulations as well as measurements from a 4KB SRAM chip in a 0.13?m technology. It is demonstrated that an SRAM cell state can be preserved at sub-300mV standby V DD, with more than 90 % leakage power savings. 1.

Huifang Qin; Yu Cao; Dejan Markovic; Andrei Vladimirescu; Jan Rabaey

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential ACM Manual, Section  3.12.5 Duct/Air Handler Residential ACM Manual, Section 3.12.5 Duct/Air  Handler leakage of air handlers for the purposes of the ACM.  Based 

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Agulhas Leakage Predominantly Responds to the Southern Hemisphere Westerlies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Agulhas Current plays a crucial role in the thermohaline circulation through its leakage into the South Atlantic. Under both past and present climates, the trade winds and westerlies could have the ability to modulate the amount of Indian-...

Jonathan V. Durgadoo; Benjamin R. Loveday; Chris J. C. Reason; Pierrick Penven; Arne Biastoch

140

Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Title Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5887E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hult, Erin L., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and Phillip N. Price Date Published 09/2012 Keywords infiltration, leakage, residential ventilation Abstract Air leakage between adjacent zones of a building can lead to indoor air quality and energy efficiency concerns, however there is no existing standard for measuring inter-zonal leakage.In this study, synthesized data and field measurements are analyzed in order to explore the uncertainty associated with different methods for collecting and analyzing fan pressurization measurements to calculate inter- zone leakage. The best of the measurement and analysis methods was a method that uses two blower doors simultaneously based on the methods of Herrlin and Modera (1988) to determine the inter-zone leakage to within 16% of the inter-zone leakage flow at 4Pa, over the range of expected conditions for a house and attached garage. Methods were also identified that use a single blower door to determine the inter-zone leakage to within 30% of its value. The test configuration selected can have a large impact on the uncertainty of the results and there are testing configurations and methods that should definitely be avoided. The most rigorous calculation method identified assumes a fixed value for the pressure exponent for the interface between the two zones (rather than determining the interface pressure exponent from the measured data) and then uses an optimization routine to fit a single set of air leakage coefficients and pressure exponents for each of three wall interfaces using both pressurization and depressurization data. Multiple pressure station tests have much less uncertainty than single pressure station approaches. Analyses of field data sets confirm a similar level of variation between test methods as was expected from the analysis of synthesized data sets and confirm the selection of specific test methods to reduce experimental uncertainty.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Title Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-47308 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Walker, Iain S., Max H. Sherman, J. Wempen, Duo Wang, Jennifer A. McWilliams, and Darryl J. Dickerhoff Abstract Several studies (Francisco and Palmiter 1997 and 1999, Andrews et al. 1998, and Siegel et al. 2001) have shown that the duct system efficiency cannot be reliably determined without good estimates of duct leakage. Specifically, for energy calculations, it is the duct leakage air flow to outside at operating conditions that is required. Existing test methods either precisely measure the size of leaks (but not the flow through them at operating conditions), or measure these flows with insufficient accuracy. The DeltaQ duct leakage test method was developed to provide improved estimates of duct leakage during system operation. In this study we developed the analytical calculation methods and the test procedures used in the DeltaQ test. As part of the development process, we have estimated uncertainties in the test method (both analytically and based on field data) and designed automated test procedures to increase accuracy and reduce the contributions of operator errors in performing field tests. In addition, the test has been evaluated in over 100 houses by several research teams to show that it can be used in a wide range of houses and to aid in finding limits or problems in field applications. The test procedure is currently being considered by ASTM as an update of an existing duct leakage standard

142

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Large Flange and Casing Leakage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experience has shown that as flange size increases, the likelihood for leakage increases. The reasons for this phenomenon are not clear. Some factors that have been suggested involve a more difficult design process, degradation in gasket performance, and the increased difficulty of the assembly process. Plant leakage has been the subject of several Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports including Assembling Bolted Connections Using Sheet Gaskets (1000922) and Assembling Bolted Connections Using...

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

143

Development of a new duct leakage test: DeltaQ  

SciTech Connect

Duct leakage is a key factor in determining energy losses from forced air heating and cooling systems. Several studies (Francisco and Palmiter 1997 and 1999, Andrews et al. 1998, and Siegel et al. 2001) have shown that the duct system efficiency cannot be reliably determined without good estimates of duct leakage. Specifically, for energy calculations, it is the duct leakage air flow to outside at operating conditions that is required. Existing test methods either precisely measure the size of leaks (but not the flow through them at operating conditions), or measure these flows with insufficient accuracy. The DeltaQ duct leakage test method was developed to provide improved estimates of duct leakage during system operation. In this study we developed the analytical calculation methods and the test procedures used in the DeltaQ test. As part of the development process, we have estimated uncertainties in the test method (both analytically and based on field data) and designed automated test procedures to increase accuracy and reduce the contributions of operator errors in performing field tests. In addition, the test has been evaluated in over 100 houses by several research teams to show that it can be used in a wide range of houses and to aid in finding limits or problems in field applications. The test procedure is currently being considered by ASTM as an update of an existing duct leakage standard.

Walker,I.S.; Sherman,M.H.; Wempen, J.; Wang, D.; McWilliams, J.A.; Dickerhoff, D.J.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Leakage Current Reduction Techniques for 7T SRAM Cell in 45 nm Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the impact of gate leakage on 7T static random access memory (SRAM) is described and three techniques for reducing gate leakage currents and sub threshold leakage currents are examined. In first technique, the supply voltage is decreased. ... Keywords: CMOS, Gate leakage current, SRAM, Stand-by power, Sub threshold current, Voltage level switch

Shyam Akashe, Sanjay Sharma

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Location, Air Leakage and Insulation Iain S. Walker Energy4 Duct Insulation, Location and Leakageinsulation

Walker, Iain

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Research on Crude Oil Pipeline Leakage Detection and Location Based on Information Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the pipeline leakage detection and location, what we need to know is whether the pipe is leaky and where the leakage point is. In addition, we are very concerned about the extent of leakage, false alarm rate and missing alarm rate. Both correlation ... Keywords: information fusion, fuzzy variable weight, correlation analysis, sequential probability ratio test, leakage detection and location

Zhao Jiang; Hao Chongqing; Zhao Yingbao; Wang Yanying

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses Title Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Chan, Wanyu R., Jeffrey Joh, and Max H. Sherman Journal Energy and Buildings Start Page 616 Pagination 616-625 Date Published 08/2013 Abstract Building envelope airtightness is important for residential energy use, occupant health and comfort. Weanalyzed the air leakage measurements of 134,000 single-family detached homes in US, using normalizedleakage (NL) as the metric. Weatherization assistance programs (WAPs) and residential energy efficiencyprograms contributed most of the data. We performed regression analyses to examine the relationshipbetween NL and various house characteristics. Explanatory variables that are correlated with NL includeyear built, climate zone, floor area, house height, and whether homes participated in WAPs or if theyare energy efficiency rated homes. Foundation type and whether ducts are located outside or inside theconditioned space are also found to be useful parameters for predicting NL. We developed a regressionmodel that explains approximately 68% of the observed variability across US homes. Of these variablesconsidered, year built and climate zone are the two that have the largest influence on NL. The regressionmodel can be used to predict air leakage values for individual homes, and distributions for groups ofhomes, based on their characteristics. Using RECS 2009 data, the regression model predicts 90% of UShouses have NL between 0.22 and 1.95, with a median of 0.67.

148

Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the "plane" of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member.

Wolfe, Christopher E. (Schenectady, NY); Dinc, Osman S. (Troy, NY); Bagepalli, Bharat S. (Schenectady, NY); Correia, Victor H. (New Lebanon, NY); Aksit, Mahmut F. (Troy, NY)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-path leakage seal is described for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the ``plane`` of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member. 4 figs.

Wolfe, C.E.; Dinc, O.S.; Bagepalli, B.S.; Correia, V.H.; Aksit, M.F.

1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

150

Valve Packing Performance Improvement: Sealing Technology and Plant Leakage Reduction Series  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Valve Packing Performance Improvement" is the seventh in a series of training modules addressing leakage at nuclear power plants. The first six modules in this series address: o Leakage management programs o Assembling bolted joints with spiral-wound gaskets o Preload requirements for bolted joints with spiral-wound gaskets o Lube oil system leakage mitigation o Leakage reduction from threaded joints o Leakage reduction from bolted joints with sheet gaskets

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

Strategies To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based On Monitoring and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based On Monitoring and To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based On Monitoring and Analysis Of CO2 In The Near-Surface Environment Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Strategies To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based On Monitoring and Analysis Of CO2 In The Near-Surface Environment Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We investigate the potential for CO2 monitoring in thenear-surface environment as an approach to exploration for hiddengeothermal systems. Numerical simulations of CO2 migration from a modelhidden geothermal system show that CO2 concentrations can reach highlevels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low CO2 fluxes.Therefore, subsurface measurements offer an advantage over above-groundmeasurements which are affected by winds that rapidly disperse

152

What can be learned from natural analogues studies in view of CO2 leakage issues in1 Carbon Capture and Storage applications? Geochemical case study of Sainte-2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.34 35 Keywords36 Natural analogue37 Carbon Capture and Storage38 Soil gas monitoring39 Water monitoring of Greenhouse Gas Control 10 (2012) 470-485" DOI : 10.1016/j.ijggc.2012.07.015 #12;Abstract18 Natural analogues. In this paper we focus on one natural analogue in leakage20 situation in order to describe the nature of the gas

153

Air Leakage of U.S. Homes: Model Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air tightness is an important property of building envelopes. It is a key factor in determining infiltration and related wall-performance properties such as indoor air quality, maintainability and moisture balance. Air leakage in U.S. houses consumes roughly 1/3 of the HVAC energy but provides most of the ventilation used to control IAQ. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been gathering residential air leakage data from many sources and now has a database of more than 100,000 raw measurements. This paper uses a model developed from that database in conjunction with US Census Bureau data for estimating air leakage as a function of location throughout the US.

Sherman, Max H.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Buildings Title Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-53605 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Wray, Craig P., and Nance Matson Abstract The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the air-handler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

155

Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Title Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2006 Authors Price, Phillip N., Arman Shehabi, Wanyu R. Chan, and Ashok J. Gadgil Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

156

Leakage resilient strong key-insulated signatures in public channel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Key-insulation aims at minimizing (i.e., compartmentalizing) the damage of users from key exposures, and traditionally requires a private channel of communication between a user and a semi-trusted party called a helper to refresh the private keys. The ... Keywords: continual key leakage, key-insulation, public channel, signatures

Le Trieu Phong; Shin'ichiro Matsuo; Moti Yung

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Near-Surface Vortex Structure in a Tornado and in a Sub-Tornado-Strength, Convective-Storm Vortex Observed by a Mobile, W-Band Radar During VORTEX2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the VORTEX2 field campaign, a very high-resolution, mobile, W-band Doppler radar collected near-surface (?200 m AGL) observations in an EF-0 tornado near Tribune, Kansas on 25 May 2010 and in sub-tornado-strength vortices near Prospect ...

Robin L. Tanamachi; Howard B. Bluestein; Ming Xue; Wen-Chau Lee; Krzysztof A. Orzel; Stephen J. Frasier; Roger M. Wakimoto

158

Leakage risk assessment of the In Salah CO2 storage project: Applying the Certification Framework in a dynamic context.  

SciTech Connect

The Certification Framework (CF) is a simple risk assessment approach for evaluating CO{sub 2} and brine leakage risk at geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. In the In Salah CO{sub 2} storage project assessed here, five wells at Krechba produce natural gas from the Carboniferous C10.2 reservoir with 1.7-2% CO{sub 2} that is delivered to the Krechba gas processing plant, which also receives high-CO{sub 2} natural gas ({approx}10% by mole fraction) from additional deeper gas reservoirs and fields to the south. The gas processing plant strips CO{sub 2} from the natural gas that is then injected through three long horizontal wells into the water leg of the Carboniferous gas reservoir at a depth of approximately 1,800 m. This injection process has been going on successfully since 2004. The stored CO{sub 2} has been monitored over the last five years by a Joint Industry Project (JIP) - a collaboration of BP, Sonatrach, and Statoil with co-funding from US DOE and EU DG Research. Over the years the JIP has carried out extensive analyses of the Krechba system including two risk assessment efforts, one before injection started, and one carried out by URS Corporation in September 2008. The long history of injection at Krechba, and the accompanying characterization, modeling, and performance data provide a unique opportunity to test and evaluate risk assessment approaches. We apply the CF to the In Salah CO{sub 2} storage project at two different stages in the state of knowledge of the project: (1) at the pre-injection stage, using data available just prior to injection around mid-2004; and (2) after four years of injection (September 2008) to be comparable to the other risk assessments. The main risk drivers for the project are CO{sub 2} leakage into potable groundwater and into the natural gas cap. Both well leakage and fault/fracture leakage are likely under some conditions, but overall the risk is low due to ongoing mitigation and monitoring activities. Results of the application of the CF during these different state-of-knowledge periods show that the assessment of likelihood of various leakage scenarios increased as more information became available, while assessment of impact stayed the same. Ongoing mitigation, modeling, and monitoring of the injection process is recommended.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Jordan, P.D.; Nicot, J.-P.; Mazzoldi, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Bryant, S.L.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Duct Systems in large commercial buildings: Physical characterization, air leakage, and heat conduction gains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Leakage, and Heat Conduction Gains William 1. Fisk,0.75 to 0.90; thus, heat conduction decreased the coolingby air leakage or heat conduction, because these ducts are

Fisk, W.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Gated-Vdd: a circuit technique to reduce leakage in deep-submicron cache memories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep-submicron CMOS designs have resulted in large leakage energy dissipation in microprocessors. While SRAM cells in on-chip cache memories always contribute to this leakage, there is a large variability in active cell usage both within ...

Michael Powell; Se-Hyun Yang; Babak Falsafi; Kaushik Roy; T. N. Vijaykumar

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Efficient tail estimation for massive correlated log-normal sums: with applications in statistical leakage analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing approaches to statistical leakage analysis focus only on calculating the mean and variance of the total leakage. In practice, however, what concerns most is the tail behavior of the sum distribution, as it tells that to what extent the design ... Keywords: comonotonicity, fast correlation transform, statistical leakage analysis, tail behavior

Mingzhi Gao; Zuochang Ye; Yan Wang; Zhiping Yu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Detailed placement for leakage reduction using systematic through-pitch variation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel detailed placement technique that accounts for systematic through-pitch variations to reduce leakage. Leakage depends nearly exponentially on linewidth (gate length), and even small variations in linewidth introduce large variability ... Keywords: aCLV, detailed placement, leakage, lithography, through-pitch

Andrew B. Kahng; Swamy Muddu; Puneet Sharma

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Turbocharger with sliding piston, and having vanes and leakage dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A turbocharger having a sliding piston for regulating exhaust gas flow into the turbine wheel includes a set of first vanes mounted on a fixed first wall of the turbine nozzle and projecting axially toward an opposite second wall of the nozzle, and/or a set of second vanes mounted on the end of the piston and projecting in an opposite axial direction toward the first wall of the nozzle. For the/each set of vanes, there are leakage dams formed on the wall that is adjacent the vane tips when the piston is closed. The leakage dams are closely adjacent the vane tips and discourage exhaust gas from leaking in a generally radial direction past the vane tips as the piston just begins to open from its fully closed position.

Roberts, Quentin (Nancy, FR); Alnega, Ahmed (Thaon Les Vosges, FR)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

164

Gas-path leakage seal for a turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a turbine (such as combustor casing segments of a gas turbine). The seal includes a flexible and generally imperforate metal sheet assemblage having opposing first and second surfaces and two opposing raised edges extending a generally identical distance above and below the surfaces. A first cloth layer assemblage has a thickness generally equal to the previously-defined identical distance and is superimposed on the first surface between the raised edges. A second cloth layer assemblage is generally identical to the first cloth layer assemblage and is superimposed on the second surface between the raised edges. 5 figs.

Bagepalli, B.S.; Aksit, M.F.; Farrell, T.R.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

165

Gas-path leakage seal for a turbine  

SciTech Connect

A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a turbine (such as combustor casing segments of a gas turbine). The seal includes a flexible and generally imperforate metal sheet assemblage having opposing first and second surfaces and two opposing raised edges extending a generally identical distance above and below the surfaces. A first cloth layer assemblage has a thickness generally equal to the previously-defined identical distance and is superimposed on the first surface between the raised edges. A second cloth layer assemblage is generally identical to the first cloth layer assemblage and is superimposed on the second surface between the raised edges.

Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Aksit, Mahmut Faruk (Troy, NY); Farrell, Thomas Raymond (Simpsonville, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Analysis of air leakage measurements of US houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings 66 (2013) 616-625 Buildings 66 (2013) 616-625 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Energy and Buildings j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / e n b u i l d Analysis of air leakage measurements of US houses Wanyu R. Chan ∗ , Jeffrey Joh, Max H. Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 90R3058, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November 2012 Received in revised form 4 March 2013 Accepted 16 July 2013 Keywords: Blower door Fan pressurization test Normalized leakage Air infiltration Building envelope airtightness a b s t r a c t Building envelope airtightness is important for residential energy use, occupant health and comfort. We analyzed the air leakage measurements of 134,000 single-family detached homes in US, using normalized

167

Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A Residential Duct Leakage Case Study on 'Good Cents' Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The “Good Cents” program has been adopted by many cities across the United States and has encouraged builders to employ aggressive energy conservation building techniques in residential applications. The program is well established and has been recognized for the added value it brings to homeowners. The primary energy using system in a residence is the heating and cooling system and in the hot and humid Southeast Texas climate, cooling is the predominant mode of operation for the HVAC system. This makes the system particularly susceptible to degraded performance if there are leaks in the air distribution system. Nine Good Cents homes in the College Station, Texas area were chosen for a study to determine the extent of HVAC air distribution leakage in the HVAC system. It was found that all the homes had significant measured leakage for the return-air side of the system. Houses with vertical sheet-rock lined plenums had significantly higher rates of return air leakage than homes with ducted returns.

Bryant, J. A.; Perez, R.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

An Improved Model To Forecast Co2 Leakage Rates Along A Wellbore | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model To Forecast Co2 Leakage Rates Along A Wellbore Model To Forecast Co2 Leakage Rates Along A Wellbore Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Improved Model To Forecast Co2 Leakage Rates Along A Wellbore Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Large-scale geological storage of CO2 is likely to bring CO2 plumes into contact with a large number of existing wellbores. Wellbores that no longer provide proper zonal isolation establish a primary pathway for a buoyant CO2-rich phase to escape from the intended storage formation. The hazard of CO2 leakage along these pathways will depend on the rate of leakage. Thus a useful component of a risk assessment framework is a model of CO2 leakage. Predicting the flux of CO2 along a leaking wellbore requires a model of fluid properties and of transport along the leakage

170

What are the requirements for duct leakage testing? | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

requirements for duct leakage testing? requirements for duct leakage testing? Both the 2009 and 2012 IECC require duct tightness to be verified. Verification can take place via either a post-construction test or a rough-in test. For the post-construction test, leakage measurement must be made across the entire system, including the manufacturer's air handler enclosure, with all register boots taped or sealed at a test pressure of 0.1 inches w.g. (25 Pa). The 2009 IECC limits the leakage to outdoors to less than or equal to 8 cfm per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area or total leakage less than or equal to 12 cfm per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area. The 2012 IECC only contains a requirement for total leakage of less than or equal to 4 cfm per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area. For the rough-in test, leakage measurement is made across the system, with

171

Model Code for the Control of Residential HVAC Distribution System Leakage and HVAC-Induced Building Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modifications to local and state codes are seen as an appropriate strategy for the prevention of residential air distribution system leakage and its impacts. A model code element has been developed to assist this strategy. Recent field studies of Florida residences by Cummings, Tooley and Moyer have revealed a mean leakage of 11 percent for the air distribution systems of central, fan-force heating and air conditioning systems. Such leakage may cause an estimated 20 percent increase in energy consumption for air conditioning, as well as a 50 percent increase in peak cooling load and an 80 percent increase in peak heating load. In addition, building air leakage may be expected to be several times greater when duct leakage is present or when avenues of air egress from closeable rooms are absent. The model duct construction element presented here contains all of the standards, definitions and code language needed to replace the current duct construction element of the local or state code. The content of this paper was used as a principal source for language adopted for the 1991 Florida Energy Efficiency Code For Building Construction. Addressed are the most appropriate standards required for the closure and sealing of metal duct, rigid fibrous glass duct, and nonmetallic flexible duct. Also addressed are (1) detailed requirements for the sealing of mechanical closets when they function as plenum chambers, (2) detailed requirements for the sealing of enclosed support platforms or air handlers and furnaces when they function as return duct, (3) detailed requirements for the sealing of uninhabitable cavities of the building structure, when they function as duct, and (4) detailed requirements for the egress of air from enclosed rooms which receive supply air. Where necessary, commentary is provided to explain the options available for implementing the model code provision as well as its ramifications. All provisions of this model code are compatible with the requirements, standards and guidelines contained in related documents published by the following organizations: the Southern Building Code Congress International, Inc., the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air conditioning Engineers, Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., the Air Conditioning Contractors Of America, the Thermal Insulation Manufacturers Association, the National Fire Protection Association, and the Gypsum Association.

Wemhoff, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Numerical Simulations of Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns  

SciTech Connect

To secure a stable supply of petroleum gas, underground storage caverns for liquified petroleum gas (LPG) are commonly used in many countries worldwide. Storing LPG in underground caverns requires that the surrounding rock mass remain saturated with groundwater and that the water pressure be higher than the liquid pressure inside the cavern. In previous studies, gas containment criteria for underground gas storage based on hydraulic gradient and pressure have been discussed, but these studies do not consider the physicochemical characteristics and behavior of LPG such as vaporization and dissolution in groundwater. Therefore, while these studies are very useful for designing storage caverns, they do not provide better understanding of the either the environmental effects of gas contamination or the behavior of vaporized LPG. In this study, we have performed three-phase fluid flow simulations of gas leakage from underground LPG storage caverns, using the multiphase multicomponent nonisothermal simulator TMVOC (Pruess and Battistelli, 2002), which is capable of solving the three-phase nonisothermal flow of water, gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. A two-dimensional cross-sectional model resembling an actual underground LPG facility in Japan was developed, and gas leakage phenomena were simulated for three different permeability models: (1) a homogeneous model, (2) a single-fault model, and (3) a heterogeneous model. In addition, the behavior of stored LPG was studied for the special case of a water curtain suddenly losing its function because of operational problems, or because of long-term effects such as clogging of boreholes. The results of the study indicate the following: (1) The water curtain system is a very powerful means for preventing gas leakage from underground storage facilities. By operating with appropriate pressure and layout, gas containment can be ensured. (2) However , in highly heterogeneous media such as fractured rock and fault zones, local flow paths within which the gas containment criterion is not satisfied could be formed. To eliminate such zones, treatments such as pre/post grouting or an additional installment of water-curtain boreholes are essential. (3) Along highly conductive features such as faults, even partially saturated zones possess certain effects that can retard or prevent gas leakage, while a fully unsaturated fault connected to the storage cavern can quickly cause a gas blowout. This possibility strongly suggests that ensuring water saturation of the rock surrounding the cavern is a very important requirement. (4) Even if an accident should suddenly impair the water curtain, the gas plume does not quickly penetrate the ground surface. In these simulations, the plume takes several months to reach the ground surface.

Yamamoto, Hajime; Pruess, Karsten

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Effect of Return Air Leakage on Air Conditioner Performance in Hot/Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of return air leakage from hot/humid attic spaces on the performance of a residential air conditioner. Tests were conducted in psychrometric facilities where temperatures and humidities could be controlled closely. Return air leakage from hot attic spaces was simulated by assuming adiabatic mixing of the indoor air at normal conditions with the attic air at high temperatures. Effective capacity and Energy Efficiency Ratio both decreased with increased return air leakage. However, power consumption was relatively constant for all variables except outdoor temperature, which meant that for the same power consumption, the unit delivered much lower performance when there was return air leakage. The increase in sensible heat ratio (SHR) with increasing leakage showed one of the most detrimental effects of return air leakage on performance.

O'Neal, D. L.; Rodriguez, A.; Davis, M.; Kondepudi, S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Technology Scaling Behavior of Optimum Reverse Body Bias for Standby Leakage Power Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate that, there is an optimum reverse body bias, unique to any technology generation, that minimizes the standby leakage power consumption of an IC design implemented in that technology. We also show: (1) the optimum reverse body bias value reduces by-2X per technology generation, and (2) the maximum achievable leakage power reduction by reverse body biasing diminishes by-4X per generation under constant field technology scaling scenario. Optimum point occurs as a result of reduction in subthreshold leakage and an increase in junction band-to-hand tunneling leakage with applied reverse bias. Therefore, new junction engineering techniques to reduce the hulk band-to-hand tunneling leakage current component across the junction are needed to preserve the effectiveness of reverse body biasing for standby leakage control in future technologies. 1.

Ali Keshavarzi; Siva Narendra; Shekhar Borkar; Charles Hawkind; Kaushik Roy; Vivek De

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Banked scratch-pad memory management for reducing leakage energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current trends indicate that leakage energy consumption will be an important concern in upcoming process technologies. In this paper, we propose a compiler-based leakage energy optimization strategy for on-chip scratch-pad memories (SPMs). The idea is to divide SPM into banks and use compiler-guided data layout optimization and data migration to maximize SPM bank idleness, thereby increasing the chances of placing banks into low-power (low-leakage) state.

M. J. Irwin; G. Chen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Sealing Technology and Plant Leakage Reduction (ICSTPLR-99)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maintaining plant reliability, availability, and material condition represents not only a core challenge to successful plant management and operation, but also a key to economic success. A critical factor that can strongly influence relative success in these areas is the ability to minimize plant process piping system leakage, leakage events, and the resulting related issues. Plant piping system leakage conservatively costs each process industry hundreds of millions of dollars annually in lost profits as...

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

177

Duct Systems in large commercial buildings: Physical characterization, air leakage, and heat conduction gains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of methods of sealing supply-air registers wereand sealing practices when leakage at connections to duct-mounted equipment is not considered. The measured air-

Fisk, W.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air leakage rate, then proposed buildings will be rewarded for sealingduct sealing even more cost-effective. Table 5. TRNSYS Air-

Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Methodology for Standby Leakage Power Reduction in Nanometer-Scale CMOS Circuits.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In nanometer-scale CMOS technology, leakage power has become a major component of the total power dissipation due to the downscaling of threshold voltage and gate… (more)

Chun, Jae Woong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A MONITOR FOR DETECTING NUCLEAR WASTE LEAKAGE IN A SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uranium in Surface or Ground Water (1) No. Method Enrichmenturanium have been reported In the chemical literature (1), many of which Involve initial separation or enrichment

Klainer, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Microsoft Word - Hult-GarageLeakage_9_19 (1)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"""! """! Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Erin L. Hult, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, Phillip N. Price Environmental Energy Technologies Division September 2012 LBNL-5887E    Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

182

Monitor Worldwide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRC guidance on the need for integration of performance assessment and data collection NUREG-1573 Monitor Scientific Monitoring Monitoring * Two distinct situations - A proposed...

183

Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Title Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5966E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Chan, Wanyu R., Jeffrey Joh, and Max H. Sherman Date Published 08/2012 Keywords air infiltration, blower door, fan pressurization measurements, retrofit, weatherization Abstract LBNL Residential Diagnostics Database (ResDB) contains blower door measurements and other diagnostic test results of homes in United States. Of these, approximately 134,000 single-family detached homes have sufficient information for the analysis of air leakage in relation to a number of housing characteristics. We performed regression analysis to consider the correlation between normalized leakage and a number of explanatory variables: IECC climate zone, floor area, height, year built, foundation type, duct location, and other characteristics. The regression model explains 68% of the observed variability in normalized leakage. ResDB also contains the before and after retrofit air leakage measurements of approximately 23,000 homes that participated in weatherization assistant programs (WAPs) or residential energy efficiency programs. The two types of programs achieve rather similar reductions in normalized leakage: 30% for WAPs and 20% for other energy programs.

184

An optimal leakage detection strategy for underground pipelines using magnetic induction-based sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is difficult to detect small leakages in underground pipelines with high accuracy and low-energy cost due to the inaccessible underground environments. To this end, the Magnetic Induction (MI)-based wireless sensor network for underground pipeline ... Keywords: deployment and activation of sensors, energy consumption, estimation accuracy, leakage detection and localization, underground pipelines

Xin Tan, Zhi Sun

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Modelling well leakage in multilayer aquifer systems using the extended finite element method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extended finite element method (XFEM) is applied to the problem of predicting the steady-state leakage from layered sedimentary aquifer systems perforated by abandoned wells. Multi-aquifer systems are modelled using a quasi-three-dimensional model ... Keywords: Extended finite element method, GFEM, Generalised finite element method, Leakage, Multi-aquifer systems, XFEM

Robert Gracie; James R. Craig

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Interferometeric Fibre Optic Signal Processing Based on Wavelet Transform for Subsea Gas Pipeline Leakage Inspection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fiber-optic interferometric method for subsea gas pipeline leakage detection simulation test was conducted in underwater waveguide lab. The leakage signal with simultaneous phase variation is interferometrically measured based on Sagnac interferometer ... Keywords: Subsea pipe, Fiber optic, Interferometeric phase, Null frequency, Wavelet transform

Qiang Wang; Xiaowei Wang

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Understanding the effects of leakage in superconducting quantum error detection circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The majority of quantum error detection and correction protocols assume that the population in a qubit does not leak outside of its computational subspace. For many existing approaches, however, the physical qubits do possess more than two energy levels and consequently are prone to such leakage events. Analyzing the effects of leakage is therefore essential to devise optimal protocols for quantum gates, measurement, and error correction. In this work, we present a detailed study of leakage in a two-qubit superconducting stabilizer measurement circuit. We simulate the repeated ancilla-assisted measurement of a single $\\sigma^z$ operator for a data qubit, record the outcome at the end of each measurement cycle, and explore the signature of leakage events in the obtained readout statistics. An analytic model is also developed that closely approximates the results of our numerical simulations. We find that leakage leads to destructive features in the quantum error detection scheme, making additional hardware and software protocols necessary.

Joydip Ghosh; Austin G. Fowler; John M. Martinis; Michael R. Geller

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

188

CO2 leakage through existing wells: current technology and regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preexisting wells and well bores are high-permeability pathways through the crust, and as such present zones of elevated risk to CO2 storage projects. Although current well closure and abandonment technology appears sufficient to contain CO2 at most sites, individual wells may suffer from a variety of factors that limit their integrity, including improper cementation, improper plugging, overpressure, corrosion, and other failure conditions. As a whole, wells in the US can be subdivided into three categories: wells that are not plugged, wells plugged before 1952, and those plugged after 1952 (when the American Petroleum Institute standardized plugging procedure and cement composition). After use, wells may be plugged and abandoned, with the liability of leakage remaining with the parent company. However, in some cases wells are orphaned and have no current parent company, leaving liability with the state. Current regulatory frameworks for well completion, plugging, and abandonment may not suffice in accounting for the most likely features, events and processes that affect well integrity after initial CO2 injection. Keywords:

S. Taku Ide; S. Julio Friedmann; Howard J. Herzog

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to satisfy manage and dispose of the waste currently stored in the underground storage tanks. The retrieval element of TWRS includes a work scope to develop subsurface impermeable barriers beneath SSTs. The barriers could serve as a means to contain leakage that may result from waste retrieval operations and could also support site closure activities by facilitating cleanup. Three types of subsurface barrier systems have emerged for further consideration: (1) chemical grout, (2) freeze walls, and (3) desiccant, represented in this feasibility study as a circulating air barrier. This report contains analyses of the costs and relative risks associated with combinations retrieval technologies and barrier technologies that from 14 alternatives. Eight of the alternatives include the use of subsurface barriers; the remaining six nonbarrier alternative are included in order to compare the costs, relative risks and other values of retrieval with subsurface barriers. Each alternative includes various combinations of technologies that can impact the risks associated with future contamination of the groundwater beneath the Hanford Site to varying degrees. Other potential risks associated with these alternatives, such as those related to accidents and airborne contamination resulting from retrieval and barrier emplacement operations, are not quantitatively evaluated in this report.

Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J.; McCormak, W.D.; Trenkler, T.; Walters, M.F. [Ensearch Environmental, Inc. (United States); Rouse, J.K.; McLaughlin, T.J. [Bovay Northwest, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Cruse, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

190

Preliminary Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database v.2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preliminary Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database v.2011 Preliminary Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database v.2011 Title Preliminary Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database v.2011 Publication Type Conference Proceedings LBNL Report Number LBNL-5552E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Chan, Wanyu R., and Max H. Sherman Conference Name 2011 32nd AIVC Conference and 1st TightVent Conference: Towards Optimal Airtightness Performance Date Published 10/2011 Conference Location Brussels, Belgium. Keywords air leakage, blower door, fan pressurization measurements, infiltration Abstract Air leakage and other diagnostic measurements are being added to LBNL's Residential Diagnostics Database (ResDB). We describe the sources of data that amount to more than 80,000 blower door measurements. We present summary statistics of selected parameters, such as floor area and year built. We compare the house characteristics of new additions to ResDB with prior data. Distributions of normalized leakage are computed for income-qualified homes that were weatherized, homes that were participants of various residential energy efficiency programs, and new constructions built between 2006 and 2011. Further work is underway to relate air leakage to house characteristics utilizing the full database for predictive modeling of air infiltration and to support studies of energy efficiency. Current status of ResDB can be found at http://resdb.lbl.gov/.

191

Mitigating the risk of information leakage in a two-level supply chain through optimal supplier selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information leakage in supply chains is drawing more and more attention in supply chain management. Unlike existing research, which usually focuses on the effect of information leakage on the supply chain's material and information flow, this paper aims ... Keywords: Inference, Information leakage, Information sharing, Optimal supplier selection, Risk mitigation

Da Yong Zhang; Xinlin Cao; Lingyu Wang; Yong Zeng

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Leakage and rotordynamic effects of pocket damper seals and see-through labyrinth seals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation discusses research on the leakage and rotordynamic characteristics of pocket damper seals (PDS) and see-through labyrinth seals, presents and evaluates models for labyrinth seal and PDS leakage and PDS force coefficients, and compares these seals to other annular gas seals. Low-pressure experimental results are used alongside previously-published high-pressure labyrinth and PDS data to evaluate the models. Effects of major seal design parameters; blade thickness, blade spacing, blade profile, and cavity depth; on seal leakage, as well as the effect of operating a seal in an off-center position, are examined through a series of non-rotating tests. Two reconfigurable seal designs were used, which enabled testing labyrinth seals and PDS with two to six blades. Leakage and pressure measurements were made with air as the working fluid on twenty-two seal configurations. Increasing seal blade thickness reduced leakage by the largest amount. Blade profile results were more equivocal, indicating that both profile and thickness affected leakage, but that the influence of one factor partially negated the influence of the other. Seal leakage increased with increased eccentricity at lower supply pressures, but that this effect was attenuated for higher pressure drops. While cavity depth effects were minor, reducing depths reduced leakage up to a point beyond which leakage increased, indicating that an optimum cavity depth existed. Changing blade spacing produced results almost as significant as those for blade thickness, showing that reducing spacing can detrimentally affect leakage to the point of negating the benefit of inserting additional blades. Tests to determine the effect of PDS partition walls showed that they reduce axial leakage. The pressure drop was found to be highest across the first blade of a seal for low pressure drops, but the pressure drop distribution became parabolic for high pressure drops with the largest drop across the last blade. Thirteen leakage equations made up of a base equations, a flow factor, and a kinetic energy carryover factor were examined. The importance of the carryover coefficient was made evident and a modified carryover coefficient is suggested. Existing fullypartitioned PDS models were expanded to accommodate seals of various geometries.

Gamal Eldin, Ahmed Mohamed

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Urban leakage of liquefied petroleum gas and its impact on Mexico City air quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alkane hydrocarbons (propane, isobutane, and n-butane) from liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are present in major quantities throughout Mexico City air because of leakage of the unburned gas from numerous urban sources. These hydrocarbons, together with olefinic minor LPG components, furnish substantial amounts of hydroxyl radical reactivity, a major precursor to formation of the ozone component of urban smog. The combined processes of unburned leakage and incomplete combustion of LPG play significant role in causing the excessive ozone characteristic of Mexico City. Reductions in ozone levels should be possible through changes in LPG composition and lowered rates of leakage. 23 refs., 3 tabs.

Blake, D.R.; Rowland, F.S. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

1995-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

194

Monitoring arrangement for vented nuclear fuel elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a nuclear fuel reactor core, fuel elements are arranged in a closely packed hexagonal configuration, each fuel element having diametrically opposed vents permitting 180.degree. rotation of the fuel elements to counteract bowing. A grid plate engages the fuel elements and forms passages for communicating sets of three, four or six individual vents with respective monitor lines in order to communicate vented radioactive gases from the fuel elements to suitable monitor means in a manner readily permitting detection of leakage in individual fuel elements.

Campana, Robert J. (Solana Beach, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

A Simple Energy Model for the Harvesting and Leakage in a Supercapacitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Simple Energy Model for the Harvesting and Leakage in a Supercapacitor Aravind Kailas Dept.brunelli@disi.unitn.it Abstract--The modeling of energy storage devices such as supercapacitors for wireless sensor networks

Ingram, Mary Ann

196

Physical-aware simulated annealing optimization of gate leakage in nanoscale datapath circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For CMOS technologies below 65nm, gate oxide direct tunneling current is a major component of the total power dissipation. This paper presents a simulated annealing based algorithm for the gate leakage current reduction by simultaneous scheduling, allocation ...

Saraju P. Mohanty; Ramakrishna Velagapudi; Elias Kougianos

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Compilation of current literature on seals, closures, and leakage for radioactive material packagings  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an overview of the features that affect the sealing capability of radioactive material packagings currently certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The report is based on a review of current literature on seals, closures, and leakage for radioactive material packagings. Federal regulations that relate to the sealing capability of radioactive material packagings, as well as basic equations for leakage calculations and some of the available leakage test procedures are presented. The factors which affect the sealing capability of a closure, including the properties of the sealing surfaces, the gasket material, the closure method and the contents are discussed in qualitative terms. Information on the general properties of both elastomer and metal gasket materials and some specific designs are presented. A summary of the seal material, closure method, and leakage tests for currently certified packagings with large diameter seals is provided. 18 figs., 9 tabs.

Warrant, M.M.; Ottinger, C.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Evaluation of the leakage behavior of pressure-unseating equipment hatches and drywell heads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a recent research program to investigate the leakage behavior of pressure unseating equipment hatches. A total of thirteen tests have been conducted under various conditions to determine the pressure and temperature at which leakage through unseating equipment hatches would occur. A simple analytical model is presented that provides a good estimate of the leakage onset pressure for these tests. Because of the similarity in the sealing mechanism between unseating equipment hatches and drywell heads, the results of this program also provide insight into the leakage behavior of drywell heads. The research activities described herein are a part of the Containment Integrity Programs, which are managed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. 16 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Parks, M.B.; Walther, H.P.; Lambert, L.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Impact of Agulhas Leakage on the Atlantic Overturning Circulation in the CCSM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of Agulhas leakage variability on the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) in the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) is investigated. In this model an advective connection exists that ...

Wilbert Weijer; Erik van Sebille

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Adaptive noise cancellation schemes for magnetic flux leakage signals obtained from gas pipeline inspection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nondestructive evaluation of the gas pipeline system is most commonly performed using magnetic flux leakage (MFL) techniques. A major segment of this network employs seamless pipes. The data obtained From MFL inspection of seamless pipes is contaminated ...

M. Afzal; R. Polikar; L. Udpa; S. Udpa

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Leakage Risk Assessment for a Potential CO2 Storage Project in Saskatchewan, Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A CO{sub 2} sequestration project is being considered to (1) capture CO{sub 2} emissions from the Consumers Cooperative Refineries Limited at Regina, Saskatchewan and (2) geologically sequester the captured CO{sub 2} locally in a deep saline aquifer. This project is a collaboration of several industrial and governmental organizations, including the Petroleum Technology Research Centre (PTRC), Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC), SaskEnvironment Go Green Fund, SaskPower, CCRL, Schlumberger Carbon Services, and Enbridge. The project objective is to sequester 600 tonnes CO{sub 2}/day. Injection is planned to start in 2012 or 2013 for a period of 25 years for a total storage of approximately 5.5 million tonnes CO{sub 2}. This report presents an assessment of the leakage risk of the proposed project using a methodology known as the Certification Framework (CF). The CF is used for evaluating CO{sub 2} leakage risk associated with geologic carbon sequestration (GCS), as well as brine leakage risk owing to displacement and pressurization of brine by the injected CO{sub 2}. We follow the CF methodology by defining the entities (so-called Compartments) that could be impacted by CO{sub 2} leakage, the CO{sub 2} storage region, the potential for leakage along well and fault pathways, and the consequences of such leakage. An understanding of the likelihood and consequences of leakage forms the basis for understanding CO{sub 2} leakage risk, and forms the basis for recommendations of additional data collection and analysis to increase confidence in the risk assessment.

Houseworth, J.E.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Mazzoldi, A.; Gupta, A.K.; Nicot, J.-P.; Bryant, S.L.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Development of iteration strategies for a practical implementation of a higher order transverse leakage approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transverse integrated nodal diffusion methods currently represent the standard in full core neutronic simulation. The primary shortcoming in this approach is the utilization of the quadratic transverse leakage approximation. This approach, although proven to work well for typical LWR problems, is not consistent with the formulation of nodal methods and can cause accuracy and convergence problems. In previous work, an improved, consistent quadratic leakage approximation was formulated, which derived from the class of higher order nodal methods developed some years ago. In this paper a number of iteration schemes are developed around this consistent quadratic leakage approximation which yield accurate node average results in much improved calculational times. The developed consistent leakage approximation is extended in this work via a number of numerical schemes, the most promising of which results from utilizing the consistent leakage approximation as a correction method to the standard quadratic leakage approximation. Numerical results are demonstrated on a set of benchmark problems, such as the 3D IAEA LWR and MOX C5 problems. (authors)

Prinsloo, R. H.; Tomasevic, D. I. [Necsa, PO Box 582, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Assessment Of Carbon Leakage In Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: ACase Study In Jambi Province, Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rehabilitation of degraded forest land throughimplementation of carbon sink projects can increase terrestrial carbonstock. However, carbon emissions outside the project boundary, which iscommonly referred to as leakage, may reduce or negate the sequestrationbenefits. This study assessed leakage from carbon sink projects thatcould potentially be implemented in the study area comprised of elevensub-districts in the Batanghari District, Jambi Province, Sumatra,Indonesia. The study estimates the probability of a given land use/coverbeing converted into other uses/cover, by applying a logit model. Thepredictor variables were: proximity to the center of the land use area,distance to transportation channel (road or river), area of agriculturalland, unemployment (number of job seekers), job opportunities, populationdensity and income. Leakage was estimated by analyzing with and withoutcarbon sink projects scenarios. Most of the predictors were estimated asbeing significant in their contribution to land use cover change. Theresults of the analysis show that leakage in the study area can be largeenough to more than offset the project's carbon sequestration benefitsduring the period 2002-2012. However, leakage results are very sensitiveto changes of carbon density of the land uses in the study area. Byreducing C-density of lowland and hill forest by about 10 percent for thebaseline scenario, the leakage becomes positive. Further data collectionand refinement is therefore required. Nevertheless, this study hasdemonstrated that regional analysis is a useful approach to assessleakage.

Boer, Rizaldi; Wasrin, Upik R.; Hendri, Perdinan; Dasanto,Bambang D.; Makundi, Willy; Hero, Julius; Ridwan, M.; Masripatin, Nur

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondaryaccumulation at shallow depth  

SciTech Connect

Geologic storage of CO2 can be a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases only if it can bedemonstrated that leakage from proposed storage reservoirs and associatedhazards are small or can be mitigated. Risk assessment must evaluatepotential leakage scenarios and develop a rational, mechanisticunderstanding of CO2 behavior during leakage. Flow of CO2 may be subjectto positive feedbacks that could amplify leakage risks and hazards,placing a premium on identifying and avoiding adverse conditions andmechanisms. A scenario that is unfavorable in terms of leakage behavioris formation of a secondary CO2 accumulation at shallow depth. This paperdevelops a detailed numerical simulation model to investigate CO2discharge from a secondary accumulation, and evaluates the role ofdifferent thermodynamic and hydrogeologic conditions. Our simulationsdemonstrate self-enhancing as well as self-limiting feedbacks.Condensation of gaseous CO2, 3-phase flow of aqueous phase -- liquid CO2-- gaseous CO2, and cooling from Joule-Thomson expansion and boiling ofliquid CO2 are found to play important roles in the behavior of a CO2leakage system. We find no evidence that a subsurface accumulation of CO2at ambient temperatures could give rise to a high-energy discharge, aso-called "pneumatic eruption."

Pruess, K.

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

Atomic multipole relaxation rates near surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spontaneous relaxation rates for an atom in free space and close to an absorbing surface are calculated to various orders of the electromagnetic multipole expansion. The spontaneous decay rates for dipole, quadrupole and octupole transitions are calculated in terms of their respective primitive electric multipole moments and the magnetic relaxation rate is calculated for the dipole and quadrupole transitions in terms of their respective primitive magnetic multipole moments. The theory of electromagnetic field quantization in magnetoelectric materials is used to derive general expressions for the decay rates in terms of the dyadic Green function. We focus on the decay rates in free space and near an infinite half space. For the decay of atoms near to an absorbing dielectric surface we find a hierarchy of scaling laws depending on the atom-surface distance z.

Crosse, J A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Atomic multipole relaxation rates near surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spontaneous relaxation rates for an atom in free space and close to an absorbing surface are calculated to various orders of the electromagnetic multipole expansion. The spontaneous decay rates for dipole, quadrupole and octupole transitions are calculated in terms of their respective primitive electric multipole moments and the magnetic relaxation rate is calculated for the dipole and quadrupole transitions in terms of their respective primitive magnetic multipole moments. The theory of electromagnetic field quantization in magnetoelectric materials is used to derive general expressions for the decay rates in terms of the dyadic Green function. We focus on the decay rates in free space and near an infinite half space. For the decay of atoms near to an absorbing dielectric surface we find a hierarchy of scaling laws depending on the atom-surface distance z.

J. A. Crosse; Stefan Scheel

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

207

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR EXAMINING FUEL ELEMENTS FOR LEAKAGE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and a device for the continuous monitoring of fuel elements while in use in a liquid-metal-cooled, argonblanketed nuclear reactor are presented. A fraction of the argon gas is withdrawn, contacted with a negative electrical charge for attraction of any alkali metal formed from argon by neutron reaction, and recycled into the reactor. The electrical charge is introduced into water, and the water is examined for radioactive alkali metals. (AEC)

Smith, R.R.; Echo, M.W.; Doe, C.B.

1963-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Natural and industrial analogues for leakage of CO2 from storagereservoirs: identification of features, events, and processes and lessonslearned  

SciTech Connect

The injection and storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deepgeologic formations is a potentially feasible strategy to reduce CO2emissions and atmospheric concentrations. While the purpose of geologiccarbon storage is to trap CO2 underground, CO2 could migrate away fromthe storage site into the shallow subsurface and atmosphere if permeablepathways such as well bores or faults are present. Large-magnitudereleases of CO2 have occurred naturally from geologic reservoirs innumerous volcanic, geothermal, and sedimentary basin settings. Carbondioxide and natural gas have also been released from geologic CO2reservoirs and natural gas storage facilities, respectively, due toinfluences such as well defects and injection/withdrawal processes. Thesesystems serve as natural and industrial analogues for the potentialrelease of CO2 from geologic storage reservoirs and provide importantinformation about the key features, events, and processes (FEPs) that areassociated with releases, as well as the health, safety, andenvironmental consequences of releases and mitigation efforts that can beapplied. We describe a range of natural releases of CO2 and industrialreleases of CO2 and natural gas in the context of these characteristics.Based on this analysis, several key conclusions can be drawn, and lessonscan be learned for geologic carbon storage. First, CO2 can bothaccumulate beneath, and be released from, primary and secondaryreservoirs with capping units located at a wide range of depths. Bothprimary and secondary reservoir entrapments for CO2 should therefore bewell characterized at storage sites. Second, many natural releases of CO2have been correlated with a specific event that triggered the release,such as magmatic fluid intrusion or seismic activity. The potential forprocesses that could cause geomechanical damage to sealing cap rocks andtrigger the release of CO2 from a storage reservoir should be evaluated.Third, unsealed fault and fracture zones may act as fast and directconduits for CO2 flow from depth to the surface. Risk assessment shouldtherefore emphasize determining the potential for and nature of CO2migration along these structures. Fourth, wells that are structurallyunsound have the potential to rapidly release large quantities of CO2 tothe atmosphere. Risk assessment should therefore be focused on thepotential for both active and abandoned wells at storage sites totransport CO2 to the surface, particularly at sites with depleted oil orgas reservoirs where wellsare abundant. Fifth, the style of CO2 releaseat the surface varies widely between and within different leakage sites.In rare circumstances, the release of CO2 can be a self-enhancing and/oreruptive process; this possibility should be assessed in the case of CO2leakage from storage reservoirs. Sixth, the hazard to human health hasbeen small in most cases of large surface releases of CO2. This could bedue to implementation of public education and CO2 monitoring programs;these programs should therefore be employed to minimize potential health,safety, and environmental effects associated with CO2 leakage. Finally,while changes in groundwater chemistry were related to CO2 leakage due toacidification and interaction with host rocks along flow paths, watersremained potable in most cases. Groundwaters should be monitored forchanges that may be associated with storage reservoirleakage.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

209

Isotopic identification of leakage gas from underground storage reservoirs. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Illinois State Geological Survey reports that in areas where bacteriogenic methane occurs in the near-surface groundwater, isotopic analysis of methane reliably distinguishes this gas from gas that has leaked from underground storage reservoirs. Bacteriogenic methane generally has an isotopic-carbon composition of -64 to -90 per mil, whereas the pipeline and reservoir gases analyzed thus far have all had isotopic-carbon compositions in the range of -40 to -46 per mil.

Coleman, D.D.; Meents, W.F.; Liu, C.L.; Keogh, R.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM Title Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3525E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Wray, Craig P., and Max H. Sherman Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords airflow, building, duct, energy, energy performance of buildings group, fan, hvac, indoor environment department, other, power, retrofits, simulation, system Abstract This project addressed two significant deficiencies in air-handling systems for large commercial building: duct leakage and duct static pressure reset. Both constitute significant energy reduction opportunities for these buildings. The overall project goal is to bridge the gaps in current duct performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of air-handling system performance in California large commercial buildings. The purpose of this project is to provide technical support for the implementation of a duct leakage modeling capability in EnergyPlus, to demonstrate the capabilities of the new model, and to carry out analyses of field measurements intended to demonstrate the energy saving potential of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset (SPR) technology.A new duct leakage model has been successfully implemented in EnergyPlus, which will enable simulation users to assess the impacts of leakage on whole-building energy use and operation in a coupled manner. This feature also provides a foundation to support code change proposals and compliance analyses related to Title 24 where duct leakage is an issue. Our example simulations continue to show that leaky ducts substantially increase fan power: 10% upstream and 10% downstream leakage increases supply fan power 30% on average compared to a tight duct system (2.5% upstream and 2.5% downstream leakage). Much of this increase is related to the upstream leakage rather than to the downstream leakage. This does not mean, however, that downstream leakage is unimportant. Our simulations also demonstrate that ceiling heat transfer is a significant effect that needs to be included when assessing the impacts of duct leakage in large commercial buildings. This is not particularly surprising, given that "ceiling regain" issues have already been included in residential analyses as long as a decade ago (e.g., ASHRAE Standard 152); mainstream simulation programs that are used for large commercial building energy analyses have not had this capability until now. Our analyses of data that we collected during our 2005 tests of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset technology show that this technology can substantially reduce fan power (in this case, by about 25 to 30%). Tempering this assessment, however, is that cooling and heating coil loads were observed to increase or decrease significantly depending on the time window used. Their impact on cooling and heating plant power needs to be addressed in future studies; without translating the coil loads to plant equipment energy use, it is not possible to judge the net impact of this SPR technology on whole-building energy use. If all of the loads had decreased, such a step would not be as necessary.

211

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Assessment Of Carbon Leakage In Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: A Case Study In Jambi Province, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-61463 Assessment Of Carbon LeakageIn Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: A Case Study In Jambithrough implementation of carbon sink projects can increase

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Reflred - Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power bumps due to weather conditions affecting the electrical supply), so use with caution. Be careful when mixing monitor and time data in the ...

214

CO2 leakage through existing wells: current technology and regulations S. Taku Ide1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 leakage through existing wells: current technology and regulations S. Taku Ide1 , S. Julio Cambridge MA 02139 Abstract Preexisting wells and well bores are high-permeability pathways through the crust, and as such present zones of elevated risk to CO2 storage projects. Although current well closure

215

Ambient-RF-Energy-Harvesting Sensor Node with Capacitor-Leakage-Aware Duty Cycle Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of harvested energy. Thanks to these energy managements, we achieve efficient energy usage and maximize. Software energy managements for WSNs are typically realized by exploiting this feature and thus the goal by aggregation of the capacitor leakage characteristics and energy shortage risk. Table 1. Energy usage in long

Tentzeris, Manos

216

Dual-K Versus Dual-T Technique for Gate Leakage Reduction: A Comparative Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of aggressive technology scaling, gate leakage (gate oxide direct tunneling) has become a major component of total power dissipation. Use of dielectrics of higher permittivity (Dual-K) or use of silicon dioxide of higher thicknesses (Dual-T ...

Saraju P. Mohanty; Ramakrishna Velagapudi; Elias Kougianos

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Leakage current and dielectric breakdown behavior in annealed SiO2 aerogel films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Leakage current and dielectric breakdown behavior in annealed SiO2 aerogel films Moon-Ho Jo behavior in annealed SiO2 aerogel films for intermetal dielectric applications was investigated in a metal­insulator­semiconductor structure. SiO2 aerogel films with porosities of 70% exhibited Poole­Frenkel conduction both before

Jo, Moon-Ho

218

Canted Current Sheet Mass Leakage and its Impact on Pulsed Plasma Thruster Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical model of the leakage of the current sheet in a parallel plate pulsed electromagnetic accelerator plate pulsed electromagnetic accelerator. The total impulse of the discharge, including the momentum, and J.W. Berkery. Measurements of current sheet canting in a pulsed electromagnetic accelerator

Choueiri, Edgar

219

Leakage Power Optimization Techniques for Ultra Deep Sub-Micron Multi-Level Caches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-chip L1 and L2 caches represent a sizeable fraction of the totalpower consumption of microprocessors. In deep sub-micron technology,the subthreshold leakage power is becoming the dominantfraction of the total power consumption of those caches. In ...

Nam Sung Kim; David Blaauw; Trevor Mudge

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Statistical Analysis of Steady State Leakage Currents in Nano-CMOS Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical Analysis of Steady State Leakage Currents in Nano-CMOS Devices Jawar Singh, Jimson, UK. Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, USA. jawar also propose a statistical model to characterize nano-scale CMOS device characteristics such as dynamic

Mohanty, Saraju P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. Based on our analyses of the 54 simulation cases, the increase in annual fan energy is estimated to be 40 to 50% for a system with a total leakage of 19% at design conditions compared to a tight system with 5% leakage. Annual cooling plant energy also increases by about 7 to 10%, but reheat energy decreases (about 3 to 10%). In combination, the increase in total annual HVAC site energy is 2 to 14%. The total HVAC site energy use includes supply and return fan electricity consumption, chiller and cooling tower electricity consumption, boiler electricity consumption, and boiler natural gas consumption. Using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in 9 to 18% ($7,400 to $9,500) increases in HVAC system annual operating costs. Normalized by duct surface area, the increases in annual operating costs are 0.14 to 0.18 $/ft{sup 2}. Using a suggested one-time duct sealing cost of $0.20 per square foot of duct surface area, these results indicate that sealing leaky ducts in VAV systems has a simple payback period of about 1.3 years. Even with total leakage rates as low as 10%, duct sealing is still cost effective. This suggests that duct sealing should be considered at least for VAV systems with 10% or more total duct leakage. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the airhandler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Non-Threshold based Event Detection for 3D Environment Monitoring in Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of capturing complex events. For ex- ample, in coal mine monitoring scenarios, gas leakage or water osmosis can motivating scenario comes from the field study in a coal mine, where environment surveillance is carried out. Indicating such areas provides important guidelines for the miners patrolling in the coal mine. Water seepage

Liu, Yunhao

223

Study on Online Insulation Monitoring System for Working DC Power of Power Plants and Substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The measurement of insulation resistance between DC power supply and ground is important in a DC operating power supply system. We proved a new model for measuring insulating resistance between ground and DC system. A lots of actual application shows ... Keywords: Insulation resistance, DC power system, Insulation monitor, Leakage current

Yunqing Liu; Xichao Wang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Effects of operating damage of labyrinth seal on seal leakage and wheelspace hot gas ingress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The labyrinth seal is widely used in turbomachinery to minimize or control leakage between areas of different pressure. The present investigation numerically explored the effect of damage and wear of the labyrinth seal on the turbomachinery flow and temperature fields. Specifically, this work investigated: (1) the effect of rubgroove downstream wall angle on seal leakage, (2) the effect of tooth bending damage on the leakage, (3) the effect of tooth "����mushrooming"��� damage on seal leakage, and (4) the effect of rub-groove axial position and wall angle on gas turbine ingress heating. To facilitate grid generation, an unstructured grid generator named OpenCFD was also developed. The grid generator is written in C++ and generates hybrid grids consisting primarily of Cartesian cells. This investigation of labyrinth seal damage and wear was conducted using the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) to simulate the flows. The high- Reynolds k - Model and the standard wall function were used to model the turbulence. STAR-CD was used to solve the equations, and the grids were generated using the new code OpenCFD. It was found that the damage and wear of the labyrinth seal have a significant effect on the leakage and temperature field, as well as on the flow pattern. The leakage increases significantly faster than the operating clearance increase from the wear. Further, the specific seal configuration resulting from the damage and wear was found to be important. For example, for pure-bending cases, it was found that the bending curvature and the percentage of tooth length that is bent are important, and that the mushroom radius and tooth bending are important for the mushrooming damage cases. When an abradable labyrinth seal was applied to a very large gas turbine wheelspace cavity, it was found that the rub-groove axial position, and to a smaller degree, rub-groove wall angle, alter the magnitude and distribution of the fluid temperature.

Xu, Jinming

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Weld Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Using Infrared Weld Emissions P. G. Sanders, J. S. Keske, G. Kornecki, and K. H. Leong Technology Development Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 USA The submitted manuscript has been authorized by a contractor of the U. S. Government under contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38. Accordingly, the U. S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U. S. Government purposes. Abstract A non-obtrusive, pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld

226

Leakage and paralysis in ancilla-assisted qubit measurement: Consequences for topological error correction in superconducting architectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although topological error-correcting codes offer a promising paradigm for fault-tolerant quantum computation, their robustness in the presence of leakage to non-computational states is unclear. Here we explore the signature and consequences of leakage errors on ancilla-assisted Pauli operator measurement in superconducting devices. We consider a realistic coupled-qutrit model and simulate the repeated measurement of a single Z operator. Typically, a data-qubit leakage event manifests itself by producing a "noisy" ancilla qubit that randomly reads 0 or 1 from cycle to cycle. Although the measurement operation is compromised, the presence of the leakage event is apparent and detectable. However, there is also the possibility of a less typical but more dangerous type of leakage event, where the ancilla becomes paralyzed, rendering it oblivious to data-qubit errors for many consecutive measurement cycles and compromising the fault-tolerance. Certain dynamical phases associated with the entangling gate determine which type of leakage event will occur in practice. Leakage errors occur in most qubit realizations and our model and results are relevant for many stabilizer-based error correction protocols.

Joydip Ghosh; Austin G. Fowler; John M. Martinis; Michael R. Geller

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

227

Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling Units  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling Units Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling Units Speaker(s): Clifford Federspiel Date: December 3, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Nance Matson Fans for moving air in buildings use a significant amount of energy. It is well known that fan energy use in variable-air-volume (VAV) systems can be reduced by resetting the supply duct pressure. The standard way to reset duct pressure is by controlling the most-open terminal damper to a nearly open position. Most systems can't measure terminal damper positions, so pressures are either not reset at all or use ad hoc resetting strategies that are configured sub-optimally. In this seminar I will describe a new method of determining the critical supply duct pressure for VAV systems.

228

Eddy covariance mapping and quantification of surface CO2 leakage fluxes  

SciTech Connect

We present eddy covariance measurements of net CO{sub 2} flux (F{sub c}) made during a controlled release of CO{sub 2} (0.3 t d{sup -1} from 9 July to 7 August 2008) from a horizontal well {approx}100 m in length and {approx}2.5 m in depth located in an agricultural field in Bozeman, MT. We isolated fluxes arising from the release (F{sub cr}) by subtracting fluxes corresponding to a model for net ecosystem exchange from F{sub c}. A least-squares inversion of 611 F{sub cr} and corresponding modeled footprint functions recovered the location, length, and magnitude of the surface CO{sub 2} flux leakage signal, although high wavenumber details of the signal were poorly resolved. The estimated total surface CO{sub 2} leakage rate (0.32 t d{sup ?1}) was within 7% of the release rate.

Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Aerothermal Effects of Interfacial Leakage and Film Cooling Schemes with Endwall and Leading Edge Contouring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerothermal Effects of Interfacial Aerothermal Effects of Interfacial Leakage and Film Cooling Schemes with Endwall and Leading Edge Contouring T.W. Simon and R. J. Goldstein Principal Investigators SCIES Project U/02-01-SR096/DOE PR DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manger, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (5/1/2002, 36 months) $459,007 Total Contract Value ($430,619 DOE) Gas Turbine Technology Needs and Project Objectives * Improved performance and reliability - More effective cooling of turbine first stage passage * Improve schemes for injection of endwall coolant * Realize cooling benefits of leakage flows * Understand effects of component misalignment - Reduced secondary flows * Improve with endwall axial contouring and airfoil/endwall fillets

230

Method of detecting leakage of reactor core components of liquid metal cooled fast reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of detecting the failure of a sealed non-fueled core component of a liquid-metal cooled fast reactor having an inert cover gas. A gas mixture is incorporated in the component which includes Xenon-124; under neutron irradiation, Xenon-124 is converted to radioactive Xenon-125. The cover gas is scanned by a radiation detector. The occurrence of 188 Kev gamma radiation and/or other identifying gamma radiation-energy level indicates the presence of Xenon-125 and therefore leakage of a component. Similarly, Xe-126, which transmutes to Xe-127 and Kr-84, which produces Kr-85.sup.m can be used for detection of leakage. Different components are charged with mixtures including different ratios of isotopes other than Xenon-124. On detection of the identifying radiation, the cover gas is subjected to mass spectroscopic analysis to locate the leaking component.

Holt, Fred E. (Richland, WA); Cash, Robert J. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermocouple assembly includes a thermocouple; a plurality of lead wires extending from the thermocouple; an insulating jacket extending along and enclosing the plurality of leads; and at least one internally sealed area within the insulating jacket to prevent fluid leakage along and within the insulating jacket. The invention also provides a method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple including the steps of a) attaching a plurality of lead wires to a thermocouple; b) adding a heat sensitive pseudo-wire to extend along the plurality of lead wires; c) enclosing the lead wires and pseudo-wire inside an insulating jacket; d) locally heating axially spaced portions of the insulating jacket to a temperature which melts the pseudo-wire and fuses it with an interior surface of the jacket.

Thermos, Anthony Constantine (Greer, SC); Rahal, Fadi Elias (Easley, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Leakage-Aware Reallocation for Periodic Real-Time Tasks on Multicore Processors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is an increasingly important issue to reduce the energy consumption of computing systems. In this paper, we consider partition based energy-aware scheduling of periodic real-time tasks on multicore processors. The scheduling exploits dynamic voltage scaling (DVS) and core sleep scheduling to reduce both dynamic and leakage energy consumption. If the overhead of core state switching is non-negligible, however, the performance of this scheduling strategy in terms of energy efficiency might degrade. To achieve further energy saving, we extend the static task scheduling with run-time task reallocation. The basic idea is to aggregate idle time among cores so that as many cores as possible could be put into sleep in a way that the overall energy consumption is reduced. Simulation results show that the proposed approach results in up to 20% energy saving over traditional leakage-aware DVS.

Huang, Hongtao; Wang, Jijie; Lei, Siyu; Wu, Guowei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Analysis of leakage magnetic problems in shell-form power transformer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principles of minimized magnetic energy and voltage equilibrium have been combined with the finite element method to solve the leakage magnetic field problems coupled with an unknown ampere-turn distribution in the shell-form power transformer. Based on the leakage magnetic field calculated, the eddy current and circulating current losses in the coils are further computed. The calculated results are consistent with measured values for a model of a shell-form transformer. Above principles are applied to the windings design of a 50MVA three-phase prototype shell-form power transformer. The calculated results show that the largest circulating current in strands of the low-voltage coils near two ends of each phase winding is greatly reduced to 11% from 98% of the rated current in each strand by placing the copper-shielding on these ends.

Cui Xiang; Yuan Jinsha [North China Electric Power Univ., Baoding, Hebei (China). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Zhang Guoqiang; Zhang Yuanlu; Hu Qifan [Baoding Tian Wei Group Co., Ltd., Baoding, Hebei (China). Div. of Large Power Transformer

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed Batch Jobs Completed Parallel Jobs Usage Reports Hopper Benchmark Monitoring Edison Benchmark Monitoring Carver Benchmark Monitoring Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems...

235

Final Report for the ZERT Project: Basic Science of Retention Issues, Risk Assessment & Measurement, Monitoring and Verification for Geologic Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) collaborative was formed to address basic science and engineering knowledge gaps relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. Many of the research activities fall between areas normally funded by different directorates at DOE and might be considered too applied for the basic science directorate and too basic in nature for other directorates. An executive committee comprised of institutional leads (and leaders in the field of carbon sequestration) met annually and talked via a monthly scheduled conference call to identify research gaps and research strengths among the ZERT institutions. The executive committee established the following major objectives: (1) Improve computational tools for simulation of CO{sub 2} behavior in the subsurface. This includes adding reactive transport, development of coupled models to include geomechanics, inclusion of hysteretic effects, parallelization, etc. (2) Test efficacy of near-surface detection techniques, help establish detection limits for those techniques, and provide data to assist in development of transport models in the near-surface region. Development of a field site to help accomplish this objective. (3) Develop a comprehensive risk assessment framework that will allow flexible coupling of multiple computational models for different components/processes of the system. (4) Perform gap analysis to determine critical missing data for CO{sub 2} properties in the subsurface including thermodynamic properties of CO{sub 2} - brine mixtures, reaction rates, relative permeabilities, etc. In addition, perform laboratory based experiments to generate that key data. (5) Investigate innovative leakage mitigation strategies. Many of these efforts were multi-institutional. Computational code improvement was undertaken by LBNL, LLANL, PNNL, and NETL, all ZERT institutions participated in the near-surface detection experiments, the systems level risk modeling was lead by LANL, but built to incorporate process level models developed by other ZERT institutions and utilizes information from ZERT investigations of natural analogs for escape mechanisms, and all institutions measured properties of CO2 - brine and/or rock interactions.

Lee Spangler; Alfred Cunningham; David Lageson; Jesse Melick; Mike Gardner; Laura Dobeck; Kevin Repasky; Joseph Shaw; Richard Bajura; B. Peter. McGrail; Curtis M. Oldenburg; Jeff Wagoner; Rajesh Pawar

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Internal leakage detection for feedwater heaters in power plants using neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As interest in safety and performance of power plants becomes more serious and wide-ranging, the significance of research on turbine cycles has attracted more attention. This paper particularly focuses on thermal performance analysis under the conditions ... Keywords: CBM, COP, DCA, DP, Diagnosis, FWBP, FWH, FWP, Feedwater heater, HP FWH, HP TBN, Internal leakage, LP FWH, LP TBN, Neural network, PEPSE, SG, TD, TTD, Thermal performance, Turbine cycle, VWO

Gyunyoung Heo; Song Kyu Lee

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

EPRI Products Can Help Utilities with Leakage Issues for Diesel Generators and Other Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This notification is intended to make members aware of several EPRI products that help prevent problems with fluid leakage on diesel generators and other plant systems to improve component reliability. These reports are focused on fluid joints, and solutions to help plant personnel better maintain systems and reduce component failures due to leaks and increase overall station reliability. This information contained in this update could be useful to members of your organization responsible for the mainten...

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

An evaluation of the leakage potential of a personnel airlock subject to severe accident loads  

SciTech Connect

A systematic investigation of the performance of light water reactor containment buildings subject to severe accident loads must include the consideration of leakage between the sealing surfaces of penetrations. As part of its work on containment integrity for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), Sandia National Laboratories is developing test validated methods for predicting leakage from mechanical penetrations. The primary emphasis has been on large diameter operable penetrations, such as equipment hatches, personnel airlocks, and drywell heads. Several studies conducted for the USNRC have identified leakage from personnel airlocks as a potentially significant failure mode of containment buildings subject to severe accident loads, including Barnes et al. (1984) and Shackelford et al. (1985). Barnes et al (1984) conducted finite element analyses to predict separation of the sealing surfaces on the door and bulkhead, but they did not consider elevated temperature effects and they did not take credit for the performance of the seal material in calculating leak areas. To the author's knowledge, personnel airlock designs with flat bulkhead/door assemblies and seals have never been tested under severe accident conditions, i.e., elevated temperatures and pressure. This paper will describe preliminary analyses and plans for testing a full-size personnel airlock.

Clauss, D.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Huwart, Laurent, E-mail: huwart.laurent@wanadoo.fr [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Leakage Current and Pollutant Properties of Porcelain Insulators from the Geothermal Area*)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This manuscript presents the experimental results of a new-clean and seven geothermal naturally polluted outdoor porcelain insulators. These insulators were tested in a hermetically sealed chamber, where their leakage currents and applied voltages were measured with a storage digital oscilloscope. The measured data could be recorded oscilloscope and transferred to a computer, saved in softcopy forms. FFT was used to analyze the leakage current waveforms, and correlation coefficient matrix and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to analyze the relation among parameters. It was also carried out EDAX tests of insulator adhered pollutant. The results indicated that the power factors and leakage current amplitudes closed to humidity, the phase angle closed to THD, and temperature opposited the humidity. The ratios of insulator impedance on the high and low humidity were ranged from 0.8696 until 0.1343. The small insulator impedance ratios were rearched on the first and seventh withdrawals, i.e. 0.1363 and 0.1343 respectively. On these insulators, THD ratios on the same conditions were 0.3739 and 0.4598 respectively. These phenomena were caused by dry season, which amount of pollutant stuck on the insulator surfaces significantly. On the high humidity, the minimum phase angles ranged between 66.8 and 25.7 degrees. Sulfur chemical element was found in medium composition on the pollutant.

Ngapuli Irmea Sinisuka; Maman Abdurahman Djauhari

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Cylinder Leakage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(breach) occurs and the depleted UF6 is exposed to water vapor in the air, uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) are formed. The uranyl fluoride is a solid that...

242

PDSF Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDSF Monitoring PDSF Monitoring The plot below is a measure of the read and write rates a single user would experience via the PDSF batch system. Jobs are submitted sequentially every hour to the debug queue. If a jobs doesn't finish in 8 minutes, it is killed and a -1 rate is written out. The read rates are calculated by copying a directory containing 2 files totaling 274 MB from the eliza directories to the $TMPDIR on the node running the job. The write rates are calculated by untarring a tarball on the eliza directories. The write rates are typically around a factor of two slower than the read rates, because the data still has to travel to the compute node and then back to the eliza for writing. The I/O rates are taken from the ganglia monitoring and serve as a measure of the amount of

243

Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model to model dense gas dispersion of CO 2 leakage. Themodified to simulate dense gas dispersion appropriate for CO3. Passive vs. dense gas dispersion The behavior of dense

Chow, Fotini K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Use of additional fission sources or scattering sources to model inward axial leakages in fast-reactor analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When calculations of flux are done in less than three dimensions, bucklings are normally used to model leakages (flows) in the dimensions for which the flux is not calculated. If the net leakage for a given energy group is outward (positive), the buckling is positive, and buckling methods work well. However, if the new leakage for a given energy group is inward (negative), the buckling is negative and can lead to numerical instabilities (oscillations in the iterative flux calculation). This report discusses two equivalent nonbuckling methods to model inward leakages. One method (the chi/sub g/ method) models these incoming neutrons by additional fission sources. The other method (the ..sigma../sub s/(1 ..-->.. g) method) models them by increased downscatter sources. The derivation of the two methods is shown, and the flux spectra obtained by their use are compared with those obtained from two-dimensional (RZ) calculations.

Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

An experimental and computational leakage investigation of labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large scale water test facility and a commercial CFD computer program were used to investigate labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape found in aircraft engines. The 2-D test rig cases focused on the effect of tooth position and operating condition for the standard geometry. The computed cases considered tooth axial and radial position, different operating conditions, and several geometric dimensions. This investigation also compares the leakage of the standard geometry to that of a modified convex wall geometry. The test facility is a 33 times enlargement of the actual seal. The pressure drop leakage rate and flow visualization digital images for the standard geometry seal were measured at various Reynolds numbers and at nine different tooth positions. The discharge coefficient and a dimensionless pressure drop number were used to plot the leakage data to make it easier for seal designers to predict the leakage of labyrinth seals. The experimental visualization results show for a given Reynolds number that the closer the labryinth tooth gets to the step the deeper the throughflow jet penetrated into the seal cavity. The decrease of the tooth tip clearance also has a similar effect. Specifically the smaller the tooth tip clearance the deeper the flow path penetrated into the seal cavity. The experimental measurements show that the tooth tip axial position, as well as the minimum-tooth clearance, affect the leakage. A significant improvement in leakage was generally observed when the minimum-distance tooth clearance occurs across the entire tip of the tooth. This occurs only at the most upstream tooth position tested. Similarly, the computed results show that the tooth axial position affects the seal leakage. It was also found that the leakage of the modified convex wall geometry was significantly less than that of the standard geometry.

Ambrosia, Matthew Stanley

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Monitor 1979  

SciTech Connect

The status, improvements, and accomplishments of the Monitor remote-handling system previously reported are updated. It also outlines the goals for the future to improve the efficiency and speed of remote-maintenance operations at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF).

Grisham, D.L.; Ekberg, E.L.; Lambert, J.E.; Meyer, R.E.; Stroik, P.J.; Wickham, M.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

249

Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was performed in order to find suitable efficiency and leakage specifications for Energy Star duct systems and provide recommendations on duct insulation specifications. This analysis looks at a typical house, with a selection of duct locations, climates, duct insulation (R-value), and duct leakage. A set of calculations were performed with reduced capacity and airflow to look at the effect of variable capacity systems. This was done to address concerns regarding the increased efficiency of multi-capacity equipment due to good part load performance and how these efficiency gains may be offset by increased duct losses. The duct system efficiencies were calculated using the procedures in proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P ''Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems'' (ASHRAE 1999). This proposed ASHRAE Standard can be used to calculate duct efficiency for both design and seasonal weather conditions. In this report, the seasonal efficiencies are used for most of the analysis because they are the most appropriate for estimating energy consumption in buildings. The effects at peak conditions are examined for changing duct insulation in order to provide preliminary estimates of the potential responses to time of use pricing. The study was performed in two parts. The first part focused on duct leakage and the second part on duct insulation. The HVAC systems in the two parts share many attributes, however, they differ in detail and so are treated separately here. All the calculation results are summarized in tables in the Appendix, and specific results are given in the text.

Walker, Iain

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Measurements of Accelerator-Produced Leakage Neutron and Photon Transmission through Concrete  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optimum shielding of the radiation from particle accelerators requires knowledge of the attenuation characteristics of the shielding material. The most common material for shielding this radiation is concrete, which can be made using various materials of different densities as aggregates. These different concrete mixes can have very different attenuation characteristics. Information about the attenuation of leakage photons and neutrons in ordinary and heavy concrete is, however, very limited. To increase our knowledge and understanding of the radiation attenuation in concrete of various compositions, we have performed measurements of the transmission of leakage radiation, photons and neutrons, from a Varian Clinac 2100C medical linear accelerator operating at maximum electron energies of 6 and 18 MeV. We also calculated, using Monte Carlo techniques, the leakage neutron spectra and its transmission through concrete. The results of these measurements and calculations extend the information currently available for designing shielding for medical electron accelerators. Photon transmission characteristics depend more on the manufacturer of the concrete than on the atomic composition. A possible cause for this effect is a non-uniform distribution of the high density aggregate, typically iron, in the concrete matrix. Errors in estimated transmission of photons can exceed a factor of three, depending on barrier thickness, if attenuation in high-density concrete is simply scaled from that of normal density concrete. We found that neutron transmission through the high-density concretes can be estimated most reasonably and conservatively by using the linear tenth-value layer of normal concrete if specific values of the tenth-value layer of the high-density concrete are not known. The reason for this is that the neutron transmission depends primarily on the hydrogen content of the concrete, which does not significantly depend on concrete density. Errors of factors of two to more than ten, depending on barrier thickness, in the estimated transmission of neutrons through high-density concrete can be made if the attenuation is scaled by density from normal concrete.

Nelson, Walter R

2002-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

251

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

Chastagner, P.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

253

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

SRNL - Natural Attenuation Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Attenuation Monitor covers Natural Attenuation Monitor Published by the US DOE Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Attenuation for Chlorinated Solvents Technology...

255

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Predicting Envelope Leakage Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings www.carb-swa.com Building Component: Building Envelope Application: New and retrofit; Multi-family Year Tested: 2013 Applicable Climate Zone(s): All POTENTIAl BENEFITs Requires substantially fewer resources in the field-equipment, personnel, and time Does not require simultaneous access to multiple housing units-extremely difficult in occupied housing Provides a more appropriate assessment of envelope leakage and the potential energy benefits of air sealing than the commonly used total leakage test The most common method of measuring air leakage is to perform single (or solo) blower door pressurization and/or depressurization test. In detached hous-

256

Reduction of surface leakage current by surface passivation of CdZn Te and other materials using hyperthermal oxygen atoms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reduction of surface leakage current by surface passivation of Cd.sub.1-x Zn.sub.x Te and other materials using hyperthermal oxygen atoms. Surface effects are important in the performance of CdZnTe room-temperature radiation detectors used as spectrometers since the dark current is often dominated by surface leakage. A process using high-kinetic-energy, neutral oxygen atoms (.about.3 eV) to treat the surface of CdZnTe detectors at or near ambient temperatures is described. Improvements in detector performance include significantly reduced leakage current which results in lower detector noise and greater energy resolution for radiation measurements of gamma- and X-rays, thereby increasing the accuracy and sensitivity of measurements of radionuclides having complex gamma-ray spectra, including special nuclear materials.

Hoffbauer, Mark A. (Los Alamos, NM); Prettyman, Thomas H. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A rugged continuous air monitor for sampling radionuclides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new rugged continuous air monitor (CAM) for sampling radionuclide has been developed. The sampler was designed for analyzing aerosols from occupied environments of laboratories and samples extracted from stacks and ducts. Experiments were conducted to characterize the collection efficiency of the aerosol sampler system and to characterize the uniformity of particulate deposition on the filter surface as affected by variations in particle size and sampler flow rates. An experimental parametric analysis was conducted to determine the best internal geometric flow configuration, in order to achieve optimum aerosol collection. The results showed that at a flow rate of 56.6 L/min, 90% of 10 []m aerodynamic diameter (AD) aerosol particles penetrated through the sampler. The 10% loss was attributed to particle impaction at the location where the aerosol stream is turned from the vertical direction and then enters a 4 mm gap between a sampler filter and a planar detector, both of which are horizontally oriented. The cut point for the sampler was 20 []m AD. Uniformity of aerosol collection on the filter, as characterized by the coefficient of variation of the areal density deposits, was less than 10% for 10 []m AD aerosol particles. The sampler sealing integrity with respect to air leaks was tested by placing the sampler in a pressurized container and operating the sampler with the pressure in the container higher than that in the sampler for in-leakage, and with the pressure in the container less than that in the sampler for out-leakage. The pressure inside the container did not exceed 10 inches of water. For in-leakage tests, sulfur hexafluoride (SF?) was diluted with air and released into the container, external to the sampler. The ratio of the SF? concentration in the sampler to the SF? concentration in the container was calculated to characterize the integrity of the sampler system. For pressure differences of 5 and 10 inches of water, the in-leakage was 0.03% and 0.02%, respectively. The same procedure was repeated for out-leakage except that the diluted SF? was released into the sampler. The leakage results for this procedure were 0.04% and 0.02% for pressure differences of 5 and 10 inches of water, respectively.

Martinez, Joseph Thaddeus

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Sensitivity of Low Sloped Roofs Designs to Initial Water and Air Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid water in low sloped roofs almost always causes problems. Roofs are designed only to control the migration of vapor, if at all. Small amounts of water leakage/penetration, may cause mold growth or catastrophic corrosion in current roofs systems. In a recent paper by the authors the effect of exterior surface emissive and absorptive properties was found to have a significant effect on the moisture performance of a roof that had a leak. Depending on the surface characteristics, roof systems can be designed to effectively manage water penetration, but at an energy cost. In the roofs system examined previously, air leakage was not included. In the present study, the authors reinvestigated the effect of water penetration and the influence of air leakage on the hygrothermal performance of a few selected roofs. The drying potential of a groove ventilated roof is examined. The performance concept is based on the fact that warming up of air in the groove increases it's ability to transport moisture to the outside. Solar radiation raises the temperature of air in the grooves and on average, during a sunny summer day 0.5 L of water can be ventilated out of the roof per 1m width of the roof. In this paper, one climatic condition was investigated; a hot and humid Climate representative of Houston, TX. The specific questions that the paper addresses are: What are the vapor and liquid control dynamic involved in the moisture migration of a roof in Houston TX? and how does airflow influence the performance of a roof that is initially wet ? A state-of-the-art numerical model was used to address these issues. Results showed that the drying potential depends on the ventilation rates. The roof system with ventilation grooves dried out faster from the initially wet stage than the roof without the ventilation grooves. The total increase in heat loss of the roof was found to be between 0 - 5 % depending on the thickness of the insulation. The ventilation can cool down the temperature of the roof in the middle of a hot and sunny day thus reducing the heat load to the inside.

Karagiozis, A.; Desjarlais, A.; Salonvaara, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

DETERMINATION OF MAXIMUM PERMISSIBLE LEAKAGE FROM THE HRT PROCESS STEAM SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Calculations were made to determine the radiation hazard to HRT personnel as a result of leakage to the atmosphere from the process steam system in the event of a heat exchanger tube rupture. These calculations show that with the present four-minute delay before dumping approximately 1020 lb of fuel solution may be transferred to the steam system. The radiation hazard from fission products in the atomosphere will be negligble if the steam killer blower is operating. If this blower is not operatin. a natural convection loop will be set up in the steam killer which will have a condensing capacity of 4 lb/min of steam at atmospheric pressure. In this latter case. the inhalation hazard will be negligible when the leak rate through the steam stop valves is less than 4lb/ min. (auth)

Gift, E.H.

1959-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM  

SciTech Connect

This project addressed two significant deficiencies in air-handling systems for large commercial building: duct leakage and duct static pressure reset. Both constitute significant energy reduction opportunities for these buildings. The overall project goal is to bridge the gaps in current duct performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of air-handling system performance in California large commercial buildings. The purpose of this project is to provide technical support for the implementation of a duct leakage modeling capability in EnergyPlus, to demonstrate the capabilities of the new model, and to carry out analyses of field measurements intended to demonstrate the energy saving potential of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset (SPR) technology. A new duct leakage model has been successfully implemented in EnergyPlus, which will enable simulation users to assess the impacts of leakage on whole-building energy use and operation in a coupled manner. This feature also provides a foundation to support code change proposals and compliance analyses related to Title 24 where duct leakage is an issue. Our example simulations continue to show that leaky ducts substantially increase fan power: 10percent upstream and 10percent downstream leakage increases supply fan power 30percent on average compared to a tight duct system (2.5percent upstream and 2.5percent downstream leakage). Much of this increase is related to the upstream leakage rather than to the downstream leakage. This does not mean, however, that downstream leakage is unimportant. Our simulations also demonstrate that ceiling heat transfer is a significant effect that needs to be included when assessing the impacts of duct leakage in large commercial buildings. This is not particularly surprising, given that ?ceiling regain? issues have already been included in residential analyses as long as a decade ago (e.g., ASHRAE Standard 152); mainstream simulation programs that are used for large commercial building energy analyses have not had this capability until now. Our analyses of data that we collected during our 2005 tests of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset technology show that this technology can substantially reduce fan power (in this case, by about 25 to 30percent). Tempering this assessment, however, is that cooling and heating coil loads were observed to increase or decrease significantly depending on the time window used. Their impact on cooling and heating plant power needs to be addressed in future studies; without translating the coil loads to plant equipment energy use, it is not possible to judge the net impact of this SPR technology on whole-building energy use. If all of the loads had decreased, such a step would not be as necessary.

Wray, Craig; Sherman, Max

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

1486 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 25, NO. 8, AUGUST 2006 Modeling and Analysis of Loading Effect on Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, AUGUST 2006 Modeling and Analysis of Loading Effect on Leakage of Nanoscaled Bulk-CMOS Logic Circuits geometry and the doping profile) and at the circuit level (through the node voltages). Due to the circuit. In this paper, the effect of loading on a leakage of a circuit is analyzed for the first time. The authors have

Bhunia, Swarup

262

INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.

McLaughlin, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Duct Leakage Impacts on Airtightness, Infiltration, and Peak Electrical Demand in Florida Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing for duct leakage was done in 155 homes. Tracer gas tests found that infiltration rates were three times greater when the air handler was operating than when it was off. Infiltration averaged 0.85 air changes per hour (ach) with the air handler (AH) operating continuously and 0.29 ach with the AH off. Return leaks were found to average 10.3% of AH total flow. House airtightness, in 90 of these homes, determined by blower door testing, averaged 12.58 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals (ACHSO). When the duct registers were sealed, ACHSO decreased to 11.04, indicating that 12.2% of the house leaks were in the duct system. Duct leaks have a dramatic impact upon peak electrical demand. Based on theoretical analysis, a fifteen percent return leak from the attic can increase cooling electrical demand by 100%. Duct repairs in a typical. electrically heated Florida home reduce winter peak demand by about 1.6 kW per house at about one-sixth the cost of building new electrical generation capacity.

Cummings, J. B.; Tooley, J. J.; Moyer, N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Geomechanical Simulation of CO{sub 2} Leakage and Cap Rock Remediation  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} sequestration into porous and permeable brine filled aquifers is seen as one of the most likely near-term solutions for reducing greenhouse gases. Safely storing injected CO{sub 2}, which is less dense than water, requires trapping the CO{sub 2} under an impermeable rock which would act as a seal. One of the concerns with CO{sub 2} sequestration is the generation of new fractures or reactivation of existing fractures and faults caused by CO{sub 2} injection into the sealing formation. Mitigation strategies must be developed to remediate potentially leaking faults or fractures. This project evaluated potential storage scenarios in the state of Missouri and developed coupled reservoir and geomechanic simulations to identify storage potential and leakage risks. Further, several injectable materials used to seal discontinuities were evaluated under subsurface conditions. The four sealant materials investigated were paraffin wax, silica based gel, polymer based gel, and micro-cement, which all significantly reduced the fracture permeability. However, the micro-cement was the most effective sealing agent and the only sealant able to withstand the large differential pressure caused by CO{sub 2} or brine injection and create a strong seal to prevent further fracturing.

Nygaard, Runar; Bai, Baojun; Eckert, Andreas

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Reflector modelling of small high leakage cores making use of multi-group nodal equivalence theory  

SciTech Connect

This research focuses on modelling reflectors in typical material testing reactors (MTRs). Equivalence theory is used to homogenise and collapse detailed transport solutions to generate equivalent nodal parameters and albedo boundary conditions for reflectors, for subsequent use in full core nodal diffusion codes. This approach to reflector modelling has been shown to be accurate for two-group large commercial light water reactor (LWR) analysis, but has not been investigated for MTRs. MTRs are smaller, with much larger leakage, environment sensitivity and multi-group spectrum dependencies than LWRs. This study aims to determine if this approach to reflector modelling is an accurate and plausible homogenisation technique for the modelling of small MTR cores. The successful implementation will result in simplified core models, better accuracy and improved efficiency of computer simulations. Codes used in this study include SCALE 6.1, OSCAR-4 and EQUIVA (the last two codes are developed and used at Necsa). The results show a five times reduction in calculational time for the proposed reduced reactor model compared to the traditional explicit model. The calculated equivalent parameters however show some sensitivity to the environment used to generate them. Differences in the results compared to the current explicit model, require more careful investigation including comparisons with a reference result, before its implementation can be recommended. (authors)

Theron, S. A. [South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa), PO Box 582, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Reitsma, F. [Calvera Consultants, PO Box 150, Strubensvallei, 1735 (South Africa)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Modern Performance Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's diverse and decentralized computer world demands new thinking about performance monitoring and analysis.

Mark Purdy

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the potential impacts of unexpected surface releases of CO{sub 2} is an essential part of risk assessment for geologic carbon sequestration sites. We have extended a mesoscale atmospheric model to model dense gas dispersion of CO{sub 2} leakage. The hazard from CO{sub 2} leakage is greatest in regions with topographic depressions where the dense gas can pool. Simulation of dispersion in idealized topographies shows that CO{sub 2} can persist even under high winds. Simulation of a variety of topographies, winds, and release conditions allows the generation of a catalog of simulation results that can be queried to estimate potential impacts at actual geologic carbon sequestration sites.

Chow, Fotini K.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Reduced leakage in epitaxial BiFeO{sub 3} films following oxygen radio frequency plasma treatment  

SciTech Connect

Epitaxial BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) films were deposited using pulsed laser deposition method. The prepared films were characterized using x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, ferroelectric loop tracer, and leakage current measurements before and after oxygen plasma treatment. The leakage current of the films, a crucial parameter in device applications, is observed to be reduced by two orders of magnitude with oxygen plasma treatment at room temperature. P-E hysteresis loops were observed in oxygen plasma treated BFO films. The observed results indicate the usefulness of oxygen radio frequency plasma treatment (RF 13.56 MHz), which is an effective and low temperature processing technique, in such lossy ferroelectric thin films.

Kothari, Deepti [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India) [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India); Upadhyay, Sanjay K.; Raghavendra Reddy, V. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India)] [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India); Jariwala, C.; Raole, P. M. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

269

Analysis of a rate-adaptive reconciliation protocol and the effect of the leakage on the secret key rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum key distribution performs the trick of growing a secret key in two distant places connected by a quantum channel. The main reason is that the legitimate users can bound the information gathered by the eavesdropper. In practical systems, whether because of finite resources or external conditions, the quantum channel is subject to fluctuations. A rate adaptive information reconciliation protocol, that adapts to the changes in the communication channel, is then required to minimize the leakage of information in the classical postprocessing. We consider here the leakage of a rate-adaptive information reconciliation protocol. The length of the exchanged messages is larger than that of an optimal protocol; however, we prove that the min-entropy reduction is limited. The simulation results, both on the asymptotic and in the finite-length regime, show that this protocol allows to increase the amount of distillable secret key.

David Elkouss; Jesus Martinez-Mateo; Vicente Martin

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

270

Impact of Rotor Surface Velocity, Leakage Models and Real Gas Properties on Rotordynamic Force Predictions of Gas Labyrinth Seals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rotordynamic coefficients of a gas labyrinth seal are assumed to be frequency independent. However, this assumption loses its validity as rotor surface velocity approaches Mach 1. The solution procedure of 1CV model by Childs and Scharrer which assumes frequency independent force coefficients is modified to allow for calculating frequency dependent force coefficients. A comparative study of the impact of using frequency-dependent model and the original frequency-independent model on stability analysis is made. The results indicate that frequency dependency of force coefficients should be accounted for in stability analysis as rotor surface velocity approaches a significant fraction of Mach number. The bulk flow rotordynamic analysis model by Childs and Scharrer is modified to investigate the impact of leakage-flow models on predictions. A number of leakage models are incorporated in the one-control volume model, and a comparative study is made. Kinetic energy carryover factor of a leakage equation is one of the dominant factors in seal cross-force generation. A leakage equation based on a model proposed by Gamal which uses Hodkinson?s kinetic energy carryover factor is found to improve predictions of direct damping and cross-coupled stiffness. A test case is implemented to study the impact of variation of seal axial radial clearance on stability characteristics. The 1CV model by Childs and Scharrer and subsequent bulk flow models are based on the assumption of isothermal flow across the labyrinth seal. The 1CV model by Childs and Scharrer is modified to include energy equation, and the flow process is assumed to be adiabatic. However, predicted cross-coupled stiffness and direct damping coefficients using the new model do not compare well with the experimental results by Picardo as compared to the isothermal model. The impact of using real gas properties on static and rotordynamic characteristics of the seal is studied.

Thorat, Manish R.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Evaluating the impact of caprock and reservoir properties on potential risk of CO2 leakage after injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical models are essential tools for CO2 sequestration projects and should be included in the life cycle of a project. Common practice involves modeling the behavior of CO2 during and after injection using site-specific reservoir and caprock properties. Little has been done to systematically evaluate and compare the effects of a broad but realistic range of reservoir and caprock properties on potential CO2 leakage through caprock. Broad-based research addressing the impacts of caprock properties and their heterogeneity on seal permeation is absent. Efforts along this direction require obtaining information about the physically reasonable range of caprock and reservoir properties, effectively sampling the parameter space to fully explore the range of these properties, and performing flow and transport calculations using reliable numerical simulators. In this study, we identify the most important factors affecting CO2 leakage through intact caprock and try to understand the underlying mechanisms. We use caprock and reservoir properties from various field sites and literature data to identify the range of caprock thickness, permeability, and porosity that might occur. We use a quasi Monte Carlo sampling approach to ensure that the full range of caprock and seal properties is evaluated without bias. For each set of sampled properties, the migration of injected CO2 is simulated for up to 200 years using the water-salt-CO2 operational mode of the STOMP simulator. Preliminary results show that critical factors determining CO2 leakage rate through intact caprock are, in decreasing order of significance, the caprock thickness, caprock permeability, reservoir permeability, caprock porosity, and reservoir porosity. This study provides a function for prediction of potential CO2 leakage risk due to permeation of intact caprock, and identifies a range of acceptable seal thicknesses and permeability for sequestration projects. As a byproduct, the dependence of CO2 injectivity on reservoir properties is also evaluated.

Hou, Zhangshuan; Rockhold, Mark L.; Murray, Christopher J.

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

272

Bubbles in the Near-Surface Ocean: Their Various Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air is entrained by breaking waves to produce bubbles. A highly transient macrobubble cloud is first generated under the breaker, with larger bubbles returning sooner to the sea surface. Those remaining smaller bubbles are then dispersed by near-...

Jin Wu

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Near-Surface Geophysics: Seismic & GRP data for Site Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from unambiguous interpretation. Dispersion curve inversion was attempted via Genetic Algorithms (GAs of Dispersion Curve Inversion Fundamental mode dispersion curve for a 5-layer model was synthetically calculated

Cerveny, Vlastislav

274

Factors Controlling the Near-Surface Wind Field in Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using data from the regional atmospheric climate model RACMO/ANT1 the momentum budget of the Antarctic atmospheric surface layer (SL; taken as the lowest model layer located at 6–7 m above the surface) is presented. In July (winter), the ...

M. R. van den Broeke; N. P. M. van Lipzig

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Correcting Microwave Precipitation Retrievals for near-Surface Evaporation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper compares two methods for correcting passive or active microwave surface precipitation estimates based on hydrometeors sensed aloft that may evaporate before landing. These corrections were derived using two years ...

Surussavadee, Chinnawat

276

Single quantum dot (QD) imaging of fluid flow near surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

water-soluble (CdSe)ZnS QDs with a core size of 6 nm within a region of order 100 nm of a surface . Results are presented for the two in-plane components of ...

277

Near-Surface Turbulence in the Presence of Breaking Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations with a three-axis pulse-to-pulse coherent acoustic Doppler profiler and acoustic resonators reveal the turbulence and bubble field beneath breaking waves in the open ocean at wind speeds up to 14 m s?1. About 55%–80% of velocity ...

Johannes R. Gemmrich; David M. Farmer

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Retrieval of Near-Surface Temperatures from Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Now that satellite retrieval are being used in global forecasts, there is increased interest in using satellite retrievals for use such as mesoscale forecasts and inputs to crop models. These uses require more accurate retrievals near the ground ...

Larry M. McMillin; Kamesh Govindaraju

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Effects of Finescale Debris on Near-Surface Tornado Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Debris clouds provide an important visual signature of tornadoes and can potentially significantly affect the wind structure, damage potential, and Doppler radar measurements of tornado wind speeds. To study such issues, the dynamics of finescale ...

D. C. Lewellen; Baiyun Gong; W. S. Lewellen

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems By Near-Surface...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

stress resulting from elevated CO2 concentrations, and (5) light detection and ranging (LIDAR) that can measure CO2 concentrations over an integrated path. Technologies currently...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

On-line partial discharge monitoring system and data processing using WTST-NST filter for high voltage power cable  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defects inside insulation of HV XLPE cable accessories can lead to partial discharge (PD) activity. When PD activity happens, leakage current may flow through the grounded line. To acquire the PD current signal, one practicable and effective method is ... Keywords: MRD-MRR algorithm, adaptive WTST-NST filter, condition based maintenance(CBM), on-line monitoring, partial discharge, power cable, stationary noise interference

Hui Wang; Chengjun Huang; Li Zhang; Yong Qian; Junhua Liu; Linpeng Yao; Canxin Guo; Xiuchen Jiang

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Effect of nitrogen incorporation on improvement of leakage properties in high-k HfO{sub 2} capacitors treated by N{sub 2}-plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nitrogen incorporation into the HfO{sub 2} films with an EOT (equivalent oxide thickness) of 9 A was performed by N{sub 2}-plasma to improve the electrical properties. The dielectric properties and a leakage current characteristics of the capacitors were investigated as a function of plasma power and plasma treatment temperature. The dielectric constant of the capacitors is not influenced by nitrogen incorporation. The N{sub 2}-plasma treatment at 300 deg. C and 70 W exhibits the most effective influence on improvement of the leakage current characteristics. Leakage current density of the capacitors treated at 300 deg. C and 70 W exhibits a half order of magnitude lower than that without plasma treatment. Nitrogen incorporated into the HfO{sub 2} films possesses the intrinsic effect that drastically reduce the electron leakage current through HfO{sub 2} dielectrics by deactivating the V{sub O} (oxygen vacancy) related gap states.

Seong, Nak-Jin; Yoon, Soon-Gil; Yeom, Seung-Jin; Woo, Hyun-Kyung; Kil, Deok-Sin; Roh, Jae-Sung; Sohn, Hyun-Chul [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daeduk Science Town, 305-764, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Hynix Semiconductor Inc., San 136-1 Ami-ri Bubal-eub Icheon-si Kyoungki-do, 467-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

283

Corrosion monitoring apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosion monitoring device in an aqueous system which includes a formed crevice and monitoring the corrosion of the surfaces forming the crevice by the use of an a-c electrical signal.

Isaacs, Hugh S. (Shoreham, NY); Weeks, John R. (Stony Brook, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Portal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Simulation of CO2 Sequestration at Rock Spring Uplift, Wyoming: Heterogeneity and Uncertainties in Storage Capacity, Injectivity and Leakage  

SciTech Connect

Many geological, geochemical, geomechanical and hydrogeological factors control CO{sub 2} storage in subsurface. Among them heterogeneity in saline aquifer can seriously influence design of injection wells, CO{sub 2} injection rate, CO{sub 2} plume migration, storage capacity, and potential leakage and risk assessment. This study applies indicator geostatistics, transition probability and Markov chain model at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming generating facies-based heterogeneous fields for porosity and permeability in target saline aquifer (Pennsylvanian Weber sandstone) and surrounding rocks (Phosphoria, Madison and cap-rock Chugwater). A multiphase flow simulator FEHM is then used to model injection of CO{sub 2} into the target saline aquifer involving field-scale heterogeneity. The results reveal that (1) CO{sub 2} injection rates in different injection wells significantly change with local permeability distributions; (2) brine production rates in different pumping wells are also significantly impacted by the spatial heterogeneity in permeability; (3) liquid pressure evolution during and after CO{sub 2} injection in saline aquifer varies greatly for different realizations of random permeability fields, and this has potential important effects on hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir rock, reactivation of pre-existing faults and the integrity of the cap-rock; (4) CO{sub 2} storage capacity estimate for Rock Springs Uplift is 6614 {+-} 256 Mt at 95% confidence interval, which is about 36% of previous estimate based on homogeneous and isotropic storage formation; (5) density profiles show that the density of injected CO{sub 2} below 3 km is close to that of the ambient brine with given geothermal gradient and brine concentration, which indicates CO{sub 2} plume can sink to the deep before reaching thermal equilibrium with brine. Finally, we present uncertainty analysis of CO{sub 2} leakage into overlying formations due to heterogeneity in both the target saline aquifer and surrounding formations. This uncertainty in leakage will be used to feed into risk assessment modeling.

Deng, Hailin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dai, Zhenxue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jiao, Zunsheng [Wyoming State Geological Survey; Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Surdam, Ronald C. [Wyoming State Geological Survey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

287

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

288

Developing a monitoring and verification plan with reference to the Australian Otway CO2 pilot project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC) is currently injecting 100,000 tons of CO{sub 2} in a large-scale test of storage technology in a pilot project in southeastern Australia called the CO2CRC Otway Project. The Otway Basin, with its natural CO{sub 2} accumulations and many depleted gas fields, offers an appropriate site for such a pilot project. An 80% CO{sub 2} stream is produced from a well (Buttress) near the depleted gas reservoir (Naylor) used for storage (Figure 1). The goal of this project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} can be safely transported, stored underground, and its behavior tracked and monitored. The monitoring and verification framework has been developed to monitor for the presence and behavior of CO{sub 2} in the subsurface reservoir, near surface, and atmosphere. This monitoring framework addresses areas, identified by a rigorous risk assessment, to verify conformance to clearly identifiable performance criteria. These criteria have been agreed with the regulatory authorities to manage the project through all phases addressing responsibilities, liabilities, and to assure the public of safe storage.

Dodds, K.; Daley, T.; Freifeld, B.; Urosevic, M.; Kepic, A.; Sharma, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2010 7, 2010 CX-000485: Categorical Exclusion Determination Project Number BM-09-111 - Provide Clear Zone Around Bryan Mound CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 01/07/2010 Location(s): Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office January 7, 2010 CX-000723: Categorical Exclusion Determination Near-Surface Leakage Monitoring for the Verification and Accounting of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Using a Field Ready Carbon-14 Isotopic Analyzer (Rutgers University) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/07/2010 Location(s): New Brunswick, New Jersey Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 7, 2010 CX-000724: Categorical Exclusion Determination Near-Surface Leakage Monitoring for the Verification and Accounting of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Using a Field Ready Carbon-14 Isotopic

291

Comprehensive air monitoring plan: general monitoring report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recommendations are provided for general monitoring of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) in ambient air in parts of Colusa, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma counties potentially impacted by emissions from geothermal development projects in the Geysers-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area. Recommendations for types, placement, performance guidelines, and criteria and procedure for triggering establishment and termination of CAMP monitoring equipment were determined after examination of four factors: population location; emission sources; meteorological considerations; and data needs of permitting agencies and applicants. Three alternate financial plans were developed. Locations and equipment for immediate installation are recommended for: two air quality stations in communities where the State ambient air quality standard for H/sub 2/S has been exceeded; three air quality trend stations to monitor progress in reduction of H/sub 2/S emissions; two meteorological observation stations to monitor synoptic wind flow over the area; and one acoustic radar and one rawinsonde station to monitor air inversions which limit the depth of the mixing layer.

Not Available

1980-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Continuous Emissions Monitoring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 2002 update of this manual, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been extremely active in its efforts to expand continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) requirements through a variety of regulatory instruments. Additional monitoring requirements have resulted from EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule and Cross-State Air Pollution Rule. EPA attempted to impose mercury (Hg) monitoring requirements in its now-vacated Clean Air Mercury Rule. Most recently, EPA has proposed mercury, particulate mat...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

293

Edison Benchmark Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edison Benchmark Monitoring Benchmark Results Select Benchmark CAM GAMESS GTC IMPACT-T MAESTRO MILC PARATEC Submit Last edited: 2013-06-25 22:45:11...

294

Simple beam profile monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B. [ASD Inc. Garden Bay, BC (Canada); Best Theratronics Ltd Ottawa Ontario (Canada); PharmaSpect Ltd., Burnaby BC (Canada)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

295

Monitoring Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Edison Batch Jobs The batch system provides the command to monotor your jobs. We are listing the commands commonly used to submit and monitor the jobs. For more informaiton please refer to the man pages of these commands. Job Commands Command Description qsub batch_script Submits batch script to the queue. The output of qsub will be a jobid qdel jobid Deletes a job from the queue qhold jobid Puts a job on hold in the queue. qrls jobid Releases a job from hold. qalter [options] jobid Change attributes of submitted job. (See below.) qmove new_queue jobid Move job to new queue. Remember, the new queue must be one of the submission queues (premium, regular, or low) qstat -a Lists jobs in submission order (more useful than qstat without options) Also takes -u and -f [jobid]> options

296

Operational Area Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE Field Office, Nevada (DOEINV) nuclear and non- nuclear testing activities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These Operational Area Monitoring Plans are prepared by various DOE support contractors, NTS user organizations, and federal or state agencies supporting DOE NTS operations. These plans and the parent

297

PROTECTIVE CLOTHING MONITORING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

An automatic conveyor-type laundry monitoring system, whlch monitors laboratory coats and coveralls for both alpha and beta-gamma contamination, was developed and installed at the Hanford Laundry Facility to improve monitoring efficiency and control. The instrument employs eight alpha and seven beta-gamma scintillation large-area detectors, a garment conveyor, solid state circuitry, and appropriate signaling devices. Oarments are manually placed on hangers which are then placed onto an automatic loading mechanism. Each garment is conveyed past detectors where it is monitored for beta-gamma and alpha contamination. Contaminated garments are rejected and dropped into a special contniner if spot contamination exceeds 1000 disintegrations per minute (dis/min) of alpha or 5000 dis/min of mixed fission products. The garments which are not rejected pass through for folding and distribution. The system, which requires only one attendant, can effectively monitor 500 garments per standard shift. System operation was fully successful for ten months. (auth)

Rankin, M.O.; Spear, W.G.

1963-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Review Functional hemodynamic monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hemodynamic monitoring is a central component of intensive care. Patterns of hemodynamic variables often suggest cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, or distributive (septic) etiologies to cardiovascular insufficiency, thus defining the specific treatments required. Monitoring increases in invasiveness, as required, as the risk for cardiovascular instability-induced morbidity increases because of the need to define more accurately the diagnosis and monitor the response to therapy. Monitoring is also context specific: requirements during cardiac surgery will be different from those in the intensive care unit or emergency department. Solitary hemodynamic values are useful as threshold monitors (e.g. hypotension is always pathological, central venous pressure is only elevated in disease). Some hemodynamic values can only be interpreted relative to metabolic demand, whereas others have multiple meanings. Functional hemodynamic monitoring implies a therapeutic application, independent of diagnosis such as a therapeutic trial of fluid challenge to assess preload responsiveness. Newer methods for assessing preload responsiveness include monitoring changes in central venous pressure during spontaneous inspiration, and variations in arterial pulse pressure, systolic pressure, and aortic flow variation in response to vena caval collapse during positive pressure ventilation or passive leg raising. Defining preload responsiveness using these functional measures, coupled to treatment protocols, can improve outcome from critical illness. Potentially, as these and newer, less invasive hemodynamic measures are validated, they could be incorporated into such protocolized care in a costeffective manner.

Michael R Pinsky; Didier Payen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) The National Ambient Air Quality Standards for airborne fine particles (PM2.5) are based on the mass of PM2.5 measured at outdoor monitoring stations; however, most people spend the majority of their time indoors. In order to fully understand the relationship between ambient PM2.5 and human health effects, it is important to define how ambient PM2.5 concentrations and compositions compare to those actually breathed by humans during normal daily activities. The objective of SCAMP is to measure the concentrations of PM2.5 and other potential air pollutants at ambient monitoring stations in and around Steubenville, OH, and relate them to the pollutant concentrations in air that is actually breathed by people living in the area. Steubenville was chosen by DOE for this study because of the ability to integrate its results with those of the UORVP, and also because Steubenville was one of the six cities where correlations between ambient PM2.5 mass and adverse health effects had been noted. These correlations had been cited by EPA as one of the primary justifications for its 1997 ambient PM2.5 standards. Complete characterization of the relationships between ambient PM2.5 and human exposure, including the chemical components of PM2.5 at various locations, will provide a comprehensive database for use in subsequent epidemiological studies, long-range transport studies, and State Implementation Program development. CONSOL Energy is the primary performer of SCAMP, and will provide the necessary coordination and data integration between the various components of the study.

300

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with DOE operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from DOE activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of the DOE activity. In addition, the EMP addresses the analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of radionuclide samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until recently, environmental monitoring at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was required by DOE Order 5400.1, which was canceled in January 2003. LLNL is in the process of adopting the ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, which contains requirements to perform and document environmental monitoring. The ISO 14001 standard is not as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, which expressly required an EMP. LLNL will continue to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that the work is conducted appropriately. The environmental monitoring addressed by the plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, and effluent and surveillance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of the compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). This EMP does not address the technical requirements for such monitoring.

Althouse, P E; Bertoldo, N A; Bowen, B M; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Gallegos, G M; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Larson, J M; Laycak, D; Mathews, S; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M J; Rueppel, D; Williams, R A; Wilson, K; Woods, N

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

MCO Monitoring activity description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent Nuclear Fuel remaining from Hanford's N-Reactor operations in the 1970s has been stored under water in the K-Reactor Basins. This fuel will be repackaged, dried and stored in a new facility in the 200E Area. The safety basis for this process of retrieval, drying, and interim storage of the spent fuel has been established. The monitoring of MCOS in dry storage is a currently identified issue in the SNF Project. This plan outlines the key elements of the proposed monitoring activity. Other fuel stored in the K-Reactor Basins, including SPR fuel, will have other monitoring considerations and is not addressed by this activity description.

SEXTON, R.A.

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

302

Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures.

Wilt, G.C. [ed.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L. [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Decision support system for water distribution systems based on neural networks and graphs theory for leakage detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an efficient and effective decision support system (DSS) for operational monitoring and control of water distribution systems based on a three layer General Fuzzy Min-Max Neural Network (GFMMNN) and graph theory. The operational monitoring ... Keywords: Decision support system, Graph theory, Loop corrective flows equations, Modeling and simulation, Neural network, Operational control of water distribution systems

Corneliu T. C. Arsene; Bogdan Gabrys; David Al-Dabass

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Low-leakage MIS structures with 1.5-6 nm CaF2 insulating layer on Si(11 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thin high-quality calcium fluorite films are grown on (111) silicon in the low- and middle- temperature molecular-beam epitaxy processes followed by annealing. Metal-insulator-semiconductor structures with such films exhibit much smaller leakage currents ... Keywords: Breakdown field, Calcium fluorite, Current-voltage characteristic, Effective mass, MIS tunnel structure

N. S. Sokolov; I. V. Grekhov; S. Ikeda; A. K. Kaveev; A. V. Krupin; K. Saiki; K. Tsutsui; S. E. Tyaginov; M. I. Vexler

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Monitoring Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Hopper Batch Jobs See the man pages for more options. The Job Information page has more information on current queue status, completed jobs, ALPS logs and job summary statistics. Job Commands Command Description qsub batch_script Submits batch script to the queue. The output of qsub will be a jobid qdel jobid Deletes a job from the queue qhold jobid Puts a job on hold in the queue. To delete a job from the hopper xfer queue users must add an additional parameter @hopper06 Example:6004861.hopper06@hopper06 qrls jobid Releases a job from hold. qalter [options] jobid Change attributes of submitted job. (See below.) qmove new_queue jobid Move job to new queue. Remember, the new queue must be one of the submission queues (premium, regular, or low)

306

What We Monitor & Why  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by monitoring wildlife, plants, water quality, and air quality. June 27, 2012 Raft Trip: rafts on the Rio Grande Workers prepare for the annual Fall sampling campaign on the...

307

WIPP Documents - Environmental Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

issued by the EPA are contained in Title 40 CFR, Part 191, Subpart A. Strategic Plan for Groundwater Monitoring at the WIPP DOEWIPP-03-3230 Describes the groundwater...

308

High Temperature ESP Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ºC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ºC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

309

Effect of refrigerant charge, duct leakage, and evaporator air flow on the high temerature performance of air conditioners and heat pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of several installation items on the high outdoor ambient temperature performance of air conditioners. These installation items were: improper amount of refrigerant charge, reduced evaporator airflow, and return air leakage from hot attic spaces. There were five sets of tests used for this research: two of them for the charging tests, two for the reduced evaporator airflow, and one for the return air leakage tests. For the charging tests, the indoor room conditions were 80'F (27.8'C) dry-bulb and 50% relative humidity. The outdoor conditions ranged from 95'F (350C) all the way up to 120'F (48.9'C). Charge levels ranged from 30% undercharged to 40% overcharged for the short-tube orifice unit. For the thermal expansion valve (TXV) unit, charge levels ranged from-36% charging to +27% charging. Performance was quantified with the following variables: total capacity, energy efficiency ratio (EER), and power. The performance of the orifice unit was more sensitive to charge than it was for the TXV unit. For the TXV unit on the -27% to +27% charging range, the capacity and EER changed little with charge. A TXV unit and a short-tube orifice unit were also tested for reduced evaporator airflow. As evaporator airflow decreased, the capacity and EER both decreased as expected. However, the drop was not as significant as with the charging tests. For the extreme case of 50% reduced evaporator airflow, neither unit's capacity or EER dropped more than 25%. Return air leakage from hot attic spaces was simulated by assuming adiabatic mixing of the indoor air at normal conditions with the attic air at high temperatures. Effective capacity and EER both decreased with increased return air leakage. However, power consumption was relatively constant for all variables except outdoor temperature, which meant that for the same power consumption, the unit delivered much lower performance when there was return air leakage. The increase in sensible heat ratio (SHR) with increasing leakage showed perhaps the most detrimental effect of return air leakage on performance, which was the inability of the unit to absorb moisture from the environment.

Rodriguez, Angel Gerardo

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Effect of Refrigerant Charge, Duct Leakage, and Evaporator Air Flow on the High Temperature Performance of Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of several installation items on the high outdoor ambient temperature performance of air conditioners. These installation items were: improper amount of refrigerant charge, reduced evaporator airflow, and return air leakage from hot attic spaces. There were five sets of tests used for this research: two of them for the charging tests, two for the reduced evaporator airflow, and one for the return air leakage tests. For the charging tests, the indoor room conditions were 80°F (27.8°C) dry-bulb and 50% relative humidity. The outdoor conditions ranged from 95°F (35°C) all the way up to 120°F (48.9°C). Charge levels ranged from 30% undercharged to 40% overcharged for the short-tube orifice unit. For the thermal expansion valve (TXV) unit, charge levels ranged from -36% charging to +27% charging. Performance was quantified with the following variables: total capacity, energy efficiency ratio (EER), and power. The performance of the orifice unit was more sensitive to charge than it was for the TXV unit. For the TXV unit on the -27% to +27% charging range, the capacity and EER changed little with charge. A TXV unit and a short-tube orifice unit were also tested for reduced evaporator airflow. As evaporator airflow decreased, the capacity and EER both decreased as expected. However, the drop was not as significant as with the charging tests. For the extreme case of 50% reduced evaporator airflow, neither unit's capacity or EER dropped more than 25%. Return air leakage from hot attic spaces was simulated by assuming adiabatic mixing of the indoor air at normal conditions with the attic air at high temperatures. Effective capacity and EER both decreased with increased return air leakage. However, power consumption was relatively constant for all variables except outdoor temperature, which meant that for the same power consumption, the unit delivered much lower performance when there was return air leakage. The increase in sensible heat ratio (SHR) with increasing leakage showed perhaps the most detrimental effect of return air leakage on performance, which was the inability of the unit to absorb moisture from the environment.

Rodriguez, Angel Gerardo

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

311

Meteorological Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this technical report is to provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of the meteorological monitoring program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The principle function of the program is to provide current, accurate meteorological data as input for calculating the transport and diffusion of any unplanned release of an atmospheric pollutant. The report is recommended for meteorologists, technicians, or any personnel who require an in-depth understanding of the meteorological monitoring program.

Hancock, H.A. Jr. [ed.; Parker, M.J.; Addis, R.P.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Structure function monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

313

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

The Detector Control Unit An ASIC for the monitoring of the CMS silicon tracker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Detector Control Unit (DCU) is an ASIC developed as the central building block of a monitoring system for the CMS Tracker. Leakage currents in the Silicon detectors, power supply voltages of the readout electronics and local temperatures will be monitored in order to guarantee safe operating conditions during the 10-years lifetime in the LHC environment. All these measurements can be performed by an A/D converter preceded by an analog multiplexer and properly interfaced to the central control system. The requirements in terms of radiation tolerance, low-power dissipation and integration with the rest of the system led to the design of a custom integrated circuit. Its structure and characteristics are described in this paper. (6 refs).

Magazzù, G; Moreira, P

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

VME system monitor board  

SciTech Connect

Much of the machinery throughout the APS will be controlled by VME based computers. In order to increase the reliability of the system, it is necessary to be able to monitor the status of each VME crate. In order to do this, a VME System Monitor was created. In addition to being able to monitor and report the status (watchdog timer, temperature, CPU (Motorola MVME 167) state (status, run, fail), and the power supply), it includes provisions to remotely reset the CPU and VME crate, digital I/O, and parts of the transition module (serial port and ethernet connector) so that the Motorla MVME 712 is not needed. The standard VME interface was modified on the System Monitor so that in conjunction with the Motorola MVME 167 a message based VXI interrupt handler could is implemented. The System Monitor is a single VME card (6U). It utilizes both the front panel and the P2 connector for I/O. The front panel contains a temperature monitor, watchdog status LED, 4 general status LEDs, input for a TTL interrupt, 8 binary inputs (24 volt, 5 volt, and dry contact sense), 4 binary outputs (dry contact, TTL, and 100 mA), serial port (electrical RS-232 or fiber optic), ethernet transceiver (10 BASE-FO or AUI), and a status link to neighbor crates. The P2 connector is used to provide the serial port and ethernet to the processor. In order to abort and read the status of the CPU, a jumper cable must be connected between the CPU and the System Monitor.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

High Temperature Leakage Performance of a Hybrid Brush Seal Compared to a Standard Brush Seal and a Labyrinth Seal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adequate sealing in turbomachinery reduces secondary leakage and results in more efficient and stable systems. Labyrinth seals are most common, although brush seals are popular in specialized applications. The Hybrid Brush Seal (HBS) is a novel design that adds to the bristle brush matrix a number of cantilever pads that rest on the rotor surface. Upon shaft rotation the pads lift due to the generation of a hydrodynamic gas film while the brushes effectively seal an upstream pressure. Hence the HBS has no wear and no local thermal distortion effects. Measurements of leakage versus pressure differential are obtained in a three-teeth labyrinth, a conventional brush seal, and a hybrid brush seal for operation at high temperature (300ºC), with shaft surface speeds to 27 m/s, and at supply pressures to 3.5 bar. Flow measurements are presented in terms of a flow factor to remove dependency on the air temperature and supply pressure. The measurements demonstrate the HBS leaks less (~61%) than a standard brush seal and is significantly better (~38%) than a similarly sized labyrinth seal. Predictions of flow through a labyrinth seal predict well at supply pressures under 1.7 bar but overpredict by as much as 25% at high supply pressures. A porous medium fluid flow model predicts the flow through the HBS and brush seal. The model for the HBS and brush seal underpredicts the flow rate at low supply pressures but match well at high supply pressures. Measurements of the drag torque of the test seals show the HBS has a larger torque when pressurized compared to the brush seal and labyrinth seal. This indicates that the HBS experiences a larger degree of blow-down due to the pads decreasing the clearance. The mechanical parameters of the brush seal and HBS are found based upon the flexibility function from impact load tests. A combined structural and dry friction damping model represent well the measured flexibility. An equivalent damping is found based upon the energy dissipation. Based upon the damping ratio, the HBS has twice of the viscous damping as the brush seal at a supply pressure of 2.0 bar.

Ashton, Zachary

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

High Performance Network Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Network Monitoring requires a substantial use of data and error analysis to overcome issues with clusters. Zenoss and Splunk help to monitor system log messages that are reporting issues about the clusters to monitoring services. Infiniband infrastructure on a number of clusters upgraded to ibmon2. ibmon2 requires different filters to report errors to system administrators. Focus for this summer is to: (1) Implement ibmon2 filters on monitoring boxes to report system errors to system administrators using Zenoss and Splunk; (2) Modify and improve scripts for monitoring and administrative usage; (3) Learn more about networks including services and maintenance for high performance computing systems; and (4) Gain a life experience working with professionals under real world situations. Filters were created to account for clusters running ibmon2 v1.0.0-1 10 Filters currently implemented for ibmon2 using Python. Filters look for threshold of port counters. Over certain counts, filters report errors to on-call system administrators and modifies grid to show local host with issue.

Martinez, Jesse E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

318

Temporal trend analysis of RCRA groundwater monitoring data  

SciTech Connect

Statistical analysis of RCRA groundwater monitoring data at a uranium hexafluoride processing facility showed a statistically significant increase in the concentration of gross beta activity in monitor wells downgradient of surface impounds storing calcium fluoride sludge and high pH water. Because evidence of leakage had not been detected in lysimeters installed beneath the impounds, the operator sought an evaluation of other potential causes of the result, including natural variability. This study determined that all five data sets showed either long-term excursionary (spike-like), or seasonal forms of temporal variation. Gross beta had an upward long-term trend with multiple excursions that almost appeared to be seasonal. Gross alpha had an upward long-term trend with multiple excursions that were clearly not seasonal. Specific conductance had both upward and downward long-term trends but no other variations. pH had a downward long-term trend with multiple excursions that were clearly not seasonal. Fluoride had a downward long-term trend without excursions but with clear seasonal variations. The gross beta result that appeared to be a significant change was a spike event on the upward long-term trend.

Need, E.A. (Rust Environment and Infrastructure, Naperville, IL (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Usability in multiple monitor displays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to examine the impact of multiple monitors on user performance and multitasking. Forty-three participants were assigned to two groups - a multi-monitor group and a singlemonitor group - to carry out a series of tasks. ... Keywords: large display monitor, multiple monitors, multitasking, usability, user performance

Jacob M. Truemper; Hong Sheng; Michael G. Hilgers; Richard H. Hall; Morris Kalliny; Basanta Tandon

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

United States Environmental Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPA 60014-91/030 EPA 60014-91/030 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP00539-063 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: 1 - 3 5 Radiation Monitorina Around * / (- P 7 1 United States ~ u c l g a r Test Areas Calendar Year 1990 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90 DOWDP Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1990 Contributors: D.J. Chaloud, B.B. Dicey, D.G. Easterly, C.A. Fontana, R.W. Holloway, A.A. Mullen, V.E. Niemann, W.G. Phillips, D.D. Smith, N.R. Sunderland, D.J. Thome, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy under Interagency Agreement Number DE-A108-86-NV10522

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Overview - WIPP Effluent Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of the WIPP Effluent Monitoring Program Compliance with Title 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart A Environmental Standards for Management and Storage L. Frank-Supka, D. J. Harward, S. C. Casey May 2005 INTRODUCTION This document provides an overview of the effluent air monitoring activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The WIPP Effluent Monitoring Program is designed to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radiation protection standards for management and storage of spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste and transuranic (TRU)-waste at the WIPP. The standards issued by the EPA are contained in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Subpart A. The standards require the

322

Monitoring Jobs on Carver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Overview Please see the man pages of the commands below for more options. The Job Information page has more information on current queue status, completed jobs, and job summary statistics. Command Description qsub batch_script Submit batch script to queue; returns job_id. qdel job_id Delete job from queue. qhold job_id Place job on hold in queue. qrls job_id Release held job. qalter Change attributes of submitted job. qmove new_queue job_id Move job to a different queue. qstat -a List jobs in submission order. qstat -f job_id Produce detailed report about job. qs List jobs in priority order. showq List jobs in priority order, categorized by job state. showstart job_id Produce estimate of start time for job. checkjob job_id Produce scheduling diagnostics for job.

323

Characterization of leakage current in thin gate oxide subjected to 10 KeV X-ray irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Two components of the low-field current have been identified in thin oxides, following 10 KeV X-ray irradiation. The first component, observed in the direct tunneling region, can be removed by a 100 C anneal, and is also greatly suppressed if the irradiation is done in vacuum or in a nitrogen ambient, or if the oxide is preannealed before irradiation. The origin of this current is speculated to be related to adsorbed water molecules on the gate surface. The second component is observed to begin in the pre-Fowler-Nordheim tunneling (FNT) region and extends into the FNT region, only in oxides less than {approximately}8 nm thick, and persists even after several days of anneal at 300 C. This current exhibits a power law dependence on radiation dose. The origin of this second component is believed to be due to the trap-assisted tunneling via neutral electron traps, similar to the leakage current observed in the oxide after high-voltage stress.

Ling, C.H.; Ang, C.H.; Ang, D.S.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

1987 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental monitoring program is to determine whether: facility operations, waste treatment, and control systems functioned as designed to contain environmental pollutants; and the applicable environmental standards and effluents control requirements were met. This annual report for calendar year 1987 follows the recommendations given by the Department of Energy (DOE) but has been broadened to meet site-specific environmental monitoring needs. This program includes the sampling and analysis for radioactivity, water quality indices, metals, and organic compounds. 32 refs., 17 figs., 70 tabs.

Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Fiber optic monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information. 4 figures.

Samborsky, J.K.

1993-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

326

Fiber optic monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

Samborsky, J.K.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Advanced Monitoring systems initiative  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI) actively searches for promising technologies and aggressively moves them from the research bench into DOE/NNSA end-user applications. There is a large unfulfilled need for an active element that reaches out to identify and recruit emerging sensor technologies into the test and evaluation function. Sensor research is ubiquitous, with the seeds of many novel concepts originating in the university systems, but at present these novel concepts do not move quickly and efficiently into real test environments. AMSI is a widely recognized, self-sustaining ''business'' accelerating the selection, development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of advanced monitoring systems and components.

R.J. Venedam; E.O. Hohman; C.F. Lohrstorfer; S.J. Weeks; J.B. Jones; W.J. Haas

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

Vapor concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

Bayly, John G. (Deep River, CA); Booth, Ronald J. (Deep River, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Development of high through-put Sr isotope analysis for monitoring reservoir integrity for CO{sub 2} storage.  

SciTech Connect

Recent innovations in multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) have allowed for rapid and precise measurements of isotope ratios in geological samples. Naturally occurring Sr isotopes has the potential for use in Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) associated with geologic CO2 storage. Sr isotopes can be useful for: Sensitive tracking of brine migration; Determining seal rock leakage; Studying fluid/rock reactions. We have optimized separation chemistry procedures that will allow operators to prepare samples for Sr isotope analysis off site using rapid, low cost methods.

Wall, Andy; Jain, Jinesh; Stewart, Brian; Capo, Rosemary; Hakala, Alexandra J.; Hammack, Richard; Guthrie, George

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Rack Protection Monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

Orr, Stanley G.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

331

Geothermal injection monitoring project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Background information is provided on the geothermal brine injection problem and each of the project tasks is outlined in detail. These tasks are: evaluation of methods of monitoring the movement of injected fluid, preparation for an eventual field experiment, and a review of groundwater regulations and injection programs. (MHR)

Younker, L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Energy monitoring system  

SciTech Connect

A system for monitoring and displaying the consumption of energy by measuring the actual energy consumed and comparing the measured energy consumption with an ideal or desired energy consumption. The desired energy consumption data may be based upon actual operations or may be generated by ideal consumption characteristics. In some instances, the ideal figures may be modified to compensate for variations in external conditions.

Bertolasi, R.B.

1976-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Drought Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Drought Monitor was started in spring 1999 in response to a need for improved information about the status of drought across the United States. It serves as an example of interagency cooperation in a time of limited resources. The Drought ...

Mark Svoboda; Doug LeComte; Mike Hayes; Richard Heim; Karin Gleason; Jim Angel; Brad Rippey; Rich Tinker; Mike Palecki; David Stooksbury; David Miskus; Scott Stephens

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Monitoring informs management  

SciTech Connect

Improved regional monitoring and reporting of greenhouse-gas emissions depends on accurate estimates of emissions from different land-use regimes. An analysis suggests that measuring emissions per crop yield may be an optimum metric for refining land-management decisions.

West, Tristram O.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

335

of seashore Why monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resource Manage ment at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Umeå. The survey of habitats and the field survey, the total area of shore habitats along the coast can be calculated and their overall of seashore monitoring Over an aerial photo of each sample unit, a hexagonal grid is laid. At every crossing

336

Rack protection monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

Orr, Stanley G. (Wheaton, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Leakage diagnostics, sealant longevity, sizing and technologytransfer in residential thermal distribution systems: Part II.Residential thermal Distribution Systesm, Phase VI FinalReport  

SciTech Connect

This report builds on and extends our previous efforts as described in "Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer in Residential Thermal Distribution Systems- CIEE Residential Thermal Distribution Systems Phase V Final Report, October 1997". New developments include defining combined duct and equipment efficiencies in a concept called "Tons At the Register" and on performance issues related to field use of the aerosol sealant technology. Some of the key results discussed in this report include: o Register, boot and air handler cabinet leakage can often represent a significant fraction of the total duct leakage in new construction. Because of the large range of pressures in duct systems an accurate characterization may require separating these components through improved leakage testing. o Conventional duct tape failed our accelerated longevity testing and is not, therefore, considered generally acceptable for use in sealing duct systems. Many other tapes and sealing approaches are available and practical and have passed our longevity tests. o Simulations of summer temperature pull-down time have shown that duct system improvements can be combined with equipment downsizing to save first cost, energy consumption, and peak power and still provide equivalent or superior comfort. o Air conditioner name plate capacity ratings alone are a poor indicator of how much cooling will actually be delivered to the conditioned space. Duct system efficiency can have as large an impact on performance as variations in SEER. o Mechanical duct cleaning techniques do not have an adverse impact on the ducts sealed with the Aerosol sealant. The material typically used in Aerosol sealing techniques does not appear to present a health or safety hazard. Results from this study were used by the California Energy Commission in the formation of the current Energy Efficiency Standards for Low-Rise Residential Buildings (CEC, (1998)), often referred to as Title 24. Current information on ducts and thermal distribution research can be found at http://ducts.lbl.gov

Buchanan, C.; Modera, M.; Sherman, M.; Siegel, J.; Walker, I.; Wang, D.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Gaskets of teflon-bonded EPDM halt leakage from acid lines - low sealing force design eliminates flange distress  

SciTech Connect

The W.R. Grace Chemical Division plant in Lake Charles, LA had to stop producing catalysts for the oil refining industry whenever a piping system for 98% sulfuric acid developed a leak. Gaskets of a nonasbestos material were being used between the flanges of the steel pipe lined with TFE or polypropylene. The flange bolts were kept tight, but the gaskets usually failed to maintain a leaktight seal with the acid at 60 psi for more than a few weeks or months. The acid lines had to be drained before the faulty gasket could be replaced, and production downtime would range from one to three hours. In July 1986, the plant decided to try a chemical resistant gasket of Teflon molded and bonded to a core of Shore A 65-66 durometer EPDM rubber in the acid lines. The resilient gasket also has patented double convex rings on both faces for optimum sealing with only one-eighth the bolt tightening torque commonly required with flat-faced gaskets. The low sealing force requirement prolongs the life of the gasket, eliminates plastic cold flow at the flange of lined steel pipe, and avoids stresses that can damage thermoplastic and fiberglass piping systems. The gasket has a temperature range of {minus}4 to 210{degree}F and is available in 1/2 through 12 inch sizes that conform to ANSI B16.1 flange dimensions. Alternative gasket materials are Kynar PVDF-bonded EPDM and EPDM without a fluoropolymer laminate. The Teflon-bonded EPDM gaskets eliminated unscheduled catalyst production downtime due to leakage from the sulfuric acid piping system. The plant maintains an inventory of the low torque gasket, but has never had to replace any that have been in service since July 1986.

Walker, I.S.; Gaines, A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Monitor well responses at the Raft River, Idaho, Geothermal Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effects of geothermal fluid production and injection on overlying ground-water aquifers have been studied at the Raft River Geothermal Site in southcentral Idaho. Data collected from 13 monitor wells indicate a complex fractured and porous media controlled ground-water flow system affected by natural recharge and discharge, irrigation withdrawal, and geothermal withdrawal and injection. The monitor wells are completed in aquifers and aquitards overlying the principal geothermal aquifers. Potentiometric heads and water quality are significantly affected by natural upward geothermal leakage via faults and matrix seepage. No significant change in water quality data has been observed, but potentiometric head changes resulted due to geothermal resource testing and utilization. Long-term hydrographs for the wells exhibit three distinct patterns, with superimposed responses due to geothermal pumping and injection. Well hydrographs typical of the Shallow aquifer exhibit effects of natural recharge and irrigation withdrawals. For selected wells, pressure declines due to injection and pressure buildup associated with pumping are observed. The latter effect is presumably due to the elastic deformation of geologic material overlying the stressed aquifers. A second distinct pattern occurs in two wells believed to be hydraulically connected to the underlying Intermediate aquifer via faults. These wells exhibit marked buildup effects due to injection as well as responses typical of the Shallow aquifer. The third pattern is demonstrated by three monitor wells near the principal production wells. This group of wells exhibits no seasonal potentiometric head fluctuations. Fluctuations which do occur are due to injection and pumpage. The three distinct hydrograph patterns are composites of the potentiometric head responses occurring in the various aquifers underlying the Raft River Site.

Skiba, P.A.; Allman, D.W.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-460 -460 Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report Third Quarter, 1997 October 1997 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. 1 - I : ~vailablk to DOE and DOE contractors from the. Office of Scientific - and Technical .Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 3783 1 ; prices available from (423) 576-840 1. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22 16 1, telephone (703) 487-4650. RULISON SITE GROUNDWATER MONITORING REPORT THIRD QUARTER, 1997 DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Method for radioactivity monitoring  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to a method for analyzing uranium and/or thorium contents of liquid effluents preferably utilizing a sample containing counting chamber. Basically, 185.7-keV gamma rays following .sup.235 U alpha decay to .sup.231 Th which indicate .sup.235 U content and a 63-keV gamma ray doublet found in the nucleus of .sup.234 Pa, a granddaughter of .sup.238 U, are monitored and the ratio thereof taken to derive uranium content and isotopic enrichment .sup.235 U/.sup.235 U + .sup.238 U) in the liquid effluent. Thorium content is determined by monitoring the intensity of 238-keV gamma rays from the nucleus of .sup.212 Bi in the decay chain of .sup.232 Th.

Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Cowder, Leo R. (Santa Fe, NM)

1976-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

342

Relay contact monitoring system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A switching system for switching on and off heating and air conditioning units in an environmental control system. The switching system includes a thermostat and a relay conductively coupled to the thermostat. The relay has a contact, which is responsive to a change signal for changing its position. The system further includes a programmable monitor having predetermined positions stored in a memory. The monitor is conductively coupled to the contact and to the thermostat for continually determining the position of the contact, and for sending a change signal to the relay for switching the position of the contact, as needed, to be in conformance with a predetermined position stored in the memory. 3 figs.

Mehta, V.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

343

Radiation monitor reporting requirements  

SciTech Connect

Within High-Level Waste Management (HLWM), CAMs and VAMPs are currently considered Class B equipment, therefore, alarm conditions associated with the CAMs and VAMPs result in an Unusual Occurrence or Off-Normal notification and subsequent occurrence reporting. Recent equipment difficulties associated with Continuous Air Monitors (CAMs) and Victoreen Area Radiation Monitors (VAMPs) have resulted in a significant number of notification reports. These notification have the potential to decrease operator sensitivity to the significance of specific CAM and VAMP failures. Additionally, the reports are extremely costly and are not appropriate as a means for tracking and trending equipment performance. This report provides a technical basis for a change in Waste Management occurrence reporting categorization for specific CAM and VAMP failure modes.

Bates, W.F.

1993-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

344

Steam condensate leakage  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is a multi-program research and development center owned by the United States Department of Energy and operated by the University of Chicago. The majority of the buildings on site use steam for heating and other purposes. Steam is generated from liquid water at the site`s central boiler house and distributed around the site by means of large pipes both above and below the ground. Steam comes into each building where it is converted to liquid condensate, giving off heat which can be used by the building. The condensate is then pumped back to the boiler house where it will be reheated to steam again. The process is continual but is not perfectly efficient. A substantial amount of condensate is being lost somewhere on site. The lost condensate has both economic and environmental significance. To compensate for lost condensate, makeup water must be added to the returned condensate at the boiler house. The water cost itself will become significant in the future when ANL begins purchasing Lake Michigan water. In addition to the water cost, there is also the cost of chemically treating the water to remove impurities, and there is the cost of energy required to heat the water, as it enters the boiler house 1000 F colder than the condensate return. It has been estimated that only approximately 60% of ANL`s steam is being returned as condensate, thus 40% is being wasted. This is quite costly to ANL and will become significantly more costly in the future when ANL begins purchasing water from Lake Michigan. This study locates where condensate loss is occurring and shows how much money would be saved by repairing the areas of loss. Shortly after completion of the study, one of the major areas of loss was repaired. This paper discusses the basis for the study, the areas where losses are occurring, the potential savings of repairing the losses, and a hypothesis as to where the unaccounted for loss is occurring.

Midlock, E.B.; Thuot, J.R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Meeting the Air Leakage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Insulating with ENERGY STAR. EPA, May 2008. http: www.energystar.govindex.cfm?cdiy.diyindex www.energystar.govindex.cfm?cdiy.diyindex EPA - 2008b. ENERGY STAR...

346

Statistics and secret leakage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to its usual complexity assumptions, cryptography silently assumes that information can be physically protected in a single location. As one can easily imagine, real-life devices are not ideal and information may leak through different physical ... Keywords: Cryptography, side-channel analysis

Jean-Sebastien Coron; David Naccache; Paul Kocher

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Detection of gas leakage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of detecting leaks and measuring volumes as well as an apparatus, the Power-free Pump Module (PPM), that is a self-contained leak test and volume measurement apparatus that requires no external sources of electrical power during leak testing or volume measurement, where the invention is a portable, pneumatically-controlled instrument capable of generating a vacuum, calibrating volumes, and performing quantitative leak tests on a closed test system or device, all without the use of alternating current (AC) power. Capabilities include the ability is to provide a modest vacuum (less than 10 Torr), perform a pressure rise leak test, measure the gas's absolute pressure, and perform volume measurements. All operations are performed through a simple rotary control valve which controls pneumatically-operated manifold valves.

Thornberg, Steven (Peralta, NM); Brown, Jason (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

Advanced Distribution Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Distribution Automation (ADA) is a concept for a fully controllable and flexible distribution system that will facilitate the exchange of electrical energy AND information between participants and system components. Advances in the monitoring of system parameters like voltages, currents and breaker/switch positions as well as environmental variables like temperature and wind speed will be required in order to fully implement ADA. This report presents background information on distribution monito...

2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

349

Benzene Monitor System report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two systems for monitoring benzene in aqueous streams have been designed and assembled by the Savannah River Technology Center, Analytical Development Section (ADS). These systems were used at TNX to support sampling studies of the full-scale {open_quotes}SRAT/SME/PR{close_quotes} and to provide real-time measurements of benzene in Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) simulant. This report describes the two ADS Benzene Monitor System (BMS) configurations, provides data on system operation, and reviews the results of scoping tests conducted at TNX. These scoping tests will allow comparison with other benzene measurement options being considered for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) laboratory. A report detailing the preferred BMS configuration statistical performance during recent tests has been issued under separate title: Statistical Analyses of the At-line Benzene Monitor Study, SCS-ASG-92-066. The current BMS design, called the At-line Benzene Monitor (ALBM), allows remote measurement of benzene in PHA solutions. The authors have demonstrated the ability to calibrate and operate this system using peanut vials from a standard Hydragard{trademark} sampler. The equipment and materials used to construct the ALBM are similar to those already used in other applications by the DWPF lab. The precision of this system ({+-}0.5% Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) at 1 sigma) is better than the purge & trap-gas chromatograpy reference method currently in use. Both BMSs provide a direct measurement of the benzene that can be purged from a solution with no sample pretreatment. Each analysis requires about five minutes per sample, and the system operation requires no special skills or training. The analyzer`s computer software can be tailored to provide desired outputs. Use of this system produces no waste stream other than the samples themselves (i.e. no organic extractants).

Livingston, R.R.

1992-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

350

Multizone infiltration monitoring system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multizone infiltration monitoring system (MIMS) using a single tracer gas has been developed. MIMS measures zonal infiltration and exfiltration as well as interzonal air movement rates. The system has been used at the 4-zone test house at the SERI interim field site, and this paper presents preliminary results. The present system can determine zonal infiltration rates, and the results show significant differences in infiltration rates for the various zones.

Wortman, D.N.; Burch, J.; Judkoff, R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

1984 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental monitoring program has been designed to ensure that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. A listing, as required by DOE Order 5484.1 of BNL facilities, of environmental agencies and permits is provided in the Environmental Program Information Section 3.0, Table B. Since the aquifer underlying Long Island has been designated a ''sole source'' aquifer, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Drinking Water Standards have been used in the assessment of ground water data. However, the limits prescribed in the regulations are not directly applicable to the monitoring well data since (1) the standards apply to a community water supply system, i.e., one serving more than 25 individuals, and (2) the standards represent an annual average concentration. Since the monitoring wells are not components of the Laboratory's water supply system, the EPA drinking water standards are employed as reference criteria to which the surveillance well data is compared. The standards also serve as guidance levels for any appropriate remedial action. 36 refs., 9 figs., 40 tabs.

Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

5.6 Security Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... monitoring of the cloud-provider infrastructure to demonstrate compliance with cloud-subscriber security policies and auditing requirements. ...

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

353

Adequate monitoring of service compositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring is essential to validate the runtime behaviour of dynamic distributed systems. However, monitors can inform of relevant events as they occur, but by their very nature they will not report about all those events that are not happening. In ... Keywords: Adequacy criteria, Branch coverage, Choreography, Monitoring, Operation coverage

Antonia Bertolino; Eda Marchetti; Andrea Morichetta

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Environmental monitoring via compressive sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring aims to describe the state of the environment. It identifies environmental issues to show us how well our environmental objectives are being met. Traditional large-scale sensor networks for environmental monitoring suffers from ... Keywords: compressive sensing, environmental monitoring, information management, sensor networks

Shulin Yan; Chao Wu; Wei Dai; Moustafa Ghanem; Yike Guo

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Protecting against physical resource monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers the problem of resource monitoring. We consider the scenario where an adversary is physically monitoring on the resource access, such as the electricity line or gas pipeline, of a user in order to learn private information about ... Keywords: differential privacy, resource monitoring, smart grids, smart metering

Gergely Acs; Claude Castelluccia; William Lecat

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

On-line transformer monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are presently many different approaches to transformer monitoring, either on the market or under development. There are also, many different opinions about how on-line monitoring should be accomplished. On the one hand, efforts are being made to develop expert systems that monitor all transformer parameters and generate an estimate of overall transformer condition. On the other hand, a large number of transformer monitors, designed to monitor one or two specific parameters are already on the market. Another important factor to consider in choosing a monitor is who receives the information and how it is transmitted. The ultimate transformer monitor should feed into the supervisory control and data acquisition (Scada) system. This paper discusses the various aspects of this issue including asset protection, cost control, dissolved gases, pinpointing bad bushings and current transformers, hot spot measurement partial discharge, and water-in-oil measurements. 10 figs.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Lithium niobate explosion monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier.

Bundy, Charles H. (Clearwater, FL); Graham, Robert A. (Los Lunas, NM); Kuehn, Stephen F. (Albuquerque, NM); Precit, Richard R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rogers, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Monitoring of tritium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The fluid from a breeder nuclear reactor, which may be the sodium cooling fluid or the helium reactor-cover-gas, or the helium coolant of a gas-cooled reactor passes over the portion of the enclosure of a gaseous discharge device which is permeable to hydrogen and its isotopes. The tritium diffused into the discharge device is radioactive producing beta rays which ionize the gas (argon) in the discharge device. The tritium is monitored by measuring the ionization current produced when the sodium phase and the gas phase of the hydrogen isotopes within the enclosure are in equilibrium.

Corbett, James A. (Turtle Creek, PA); Meacham, Sterling A. (Greensburg, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

PERSONAL RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transistorized, fountain pen type radiation monitor to be worn on the person is described. Radiation produces both light flashes in a small bulb and an audible warning tone, the frequency of both the tone and light flashes being proportional to radiation intensity. The device is powered by a battery and a blocking oscillator step-up power supply The oscillator frequency- is regulated to be proportional to the radiation intensity, to provide adequate power in high radiation fields, yet minimize battery drain at low operating intensities. (AEC)

Dilworth, R.H.; Borkowski, C.J.

1961-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring personnel from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) prepared this ''Environmental Monitoring Plan'' (EMP) to meet the requirements in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' (DOE 1991) and applicable portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 (see WSS B93 and B94 in Appendix B). ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' is followed as a best management practice; under Work Smart Standards, LLNL complies with portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 as shown in Appendix B. This document is a revision of the May 1999 EMP (Tate et al. 1999) and is current as of March 1, 2002. LLNL is one of the nation's premier applied-science national security laboratories. Its primary mission is to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable, and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide. LLNL's programs in advanced technologies, energy, environment, biosciences, and basic science apply LLNL's unique capabilities and enhance the competencies needed for this national security mission. LLNL's mission also involves working with industrial and academic partners to increase national competitiveness and improve science education. LLNL's mission is dynamic and has changed over the years to meet new national needs. In keeping with the Laboratory's mission, the environment, safety, and health (ES&H) have top priority. LLNL's policy is to perform work in a manner that protects the health and safety of employees and the public, preserves the quality of the environment, and prevents property damage. The environment, safety, and health are to be priority considerations in the planning and execution of all work activities at the Laboratory (LLNL 2001). Furthermore, it is the policy of LLNL to comply with applicable ES&H laws, regulations, and requirements. Under Contract 48, Appendix F, the Laboratory commits to minimizing its waste streams and to avoiding adverse impacts to the environment from its operations (UC/DOE 2001).

Althouse, P E; Biermann, A; Brigdon, S L; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Clark, L M; Folks, K J; Gallegos, G M; Gouveia, F J; Grayson, A; Harrach, R J; Hoppes, W G; Jones, H; Mathews, S; Merrigan, J R; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M; Rueppel, D; Sanchez, L; Tate, P J; Vellinger, R J; Ward, B; Williams, R

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

362

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

363

Cat Heart Rate Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cat Heart Rate Monitoring Cat Heart Rate Monitoring Name: Shakti Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: TX Country: USA Date: Summer 2010 Question: What is the best way to find a cat's heart rate using a stethoscope? Because I have tried to hear their heart beat but their purring is all I can hear. If I shouldn't use a stethoscope, then what should I use? Replies: Hi Shakti! If you want to use a stethoscope, the trick is to get your cat to stop purring. Two good ways that I have found to help stop the purring 1. Cover their nose (generally cats don't like this and will stop purring) or 2. Put on the tap to drip or lightly stream water (also, they generally don't like this and will stop purring). Alternatively, you can get their heart rate from feeling their pulse. A good place to try to feel a pulse is right where the leg attaches to the abdomen - in an area called the inguinal region. Now granted there are some heart conditions that will cause an animals pulse and their heart rates don't match up, and it's hard to feel if you have a fat cat, but it's a good place to try if you are really trying to get a heart rate in a healthy kitty!

364

1985 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental monitoring program is designed to determine that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. The data were evaluated using the appropriate environmental regulatory criteria. The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1985 are summarized in this report. Detailed data are not included in the main body of the report, but are tabulated and presented in Appendix D. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the water quality of the potable supply wells; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratoy; concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory; and the 1984 strontium-90 data which was not available for inclusion in the 1984 Environmental Monitoring Report. In 1985, the results of the surveillance program demonstraed that the Laboratory has operated within the applicable environmental standards.

Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

Phelps, J.E.

1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Percutaneous Vertebroplasty and Bone Cement Leakage: Clinical Experience with a New High-Viscosity Bone Cement and Delivery System for Vertebral Augmentation in Benign and Malignant Compression Fractures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of and venous leakage reduction in percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) using a new high-viscosity bone cement (PMMA). PV has been used effectively for pain relief in osteoporotic and malignant vertebral fractures. Cement extrusion is a common problem and can lead to complications. Sixty patients (52 female; mean age, 72.2 {+-} 7.2) suffering from osteoporosis (46), malignancy (12), and angiomas (2), divided into two groups (A and B), underwent PV on 190 vertebrae (86 dorsal, 104 lumbar). In Group A, PV with high-viscosity PMMA (Confidence, Disc-O-Tech, Israel) was used. This PMMA was injected by a proprietary delivery system, a hydraulic saline-filled screw injector. In Group B, a standard low-viscosity PMMA was used. Postprocedural CT was carried out to detect PMMA leakages and complications. Fisher's exact test and Wilcoxon rank test were used to assess significant differences (p PV was feasible, achieving good clinical outcome (p < 0.0001) without major complications. In Group A, postprocedural CT showed an asymptomatic leak in the venous structures of 8 of 98 (8.2%) treated vertebrae; a discoidal leak occurred in 6 of 98 (6.1%). In Group B, a venous leak was seen in 38 of 92 (41.3%) and a discoidal leak in 12 of 92 (13.0%). Reduction of venous leak obtained by high-viscosity PMMA was highly significant (p < 0.0001), whereas this result was not significant (p = 0.14) related to the disc. The high-viscosity PMMA system is safe and effective for clinical use, allowing a significant reduction of extravasation rate and, thus, leakage-related complications.

Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo, E-mail: giovanni.anselmetti@ircc.i [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Zoarski, Gregg [University of Maryland, Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Manca, Antonio [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Radiology Unit (Italy); Masala, Salvatore [University 'Tor Vergata', Radiology Unit and Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Eminefendic, Haris; Russo, Filippo; Regge, Daniele [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Radiology Unit (Italy)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Materials Reliability Program: Safety Evaluation for Boric Acid Wastage of PWR Reactor Vessel Bottom Heads Due to Bottom-Mounted Noz zle Leakage (MRP-167)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This safety assessment addresses one of the potential safety issues associated with aging degradation of reactor vessel bottom head penetrations: bottom mounted nozzles (BMNs). Specifically, this report evaluates the concern that BMN leakage due to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of the Alloy 600 nozzle and/or Alloy 82/182 J-groove attachment weld could lead to significant wastage of the low-alloy steel head shell material due to concentration of the boric acid present in the leaking prim...

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

369

United States Environmental Monitoring EPA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

United United States Environmental Monitoring EPA 600/R-93/141 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory January 1992 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 89193-3478 Research and Development _EPA Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1991 Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientificand Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak ridge,TN 39831; pricesavailablefrom (615) 576-8401 Availableto the publicfrom the NationalTechnicalInformationService, U.S. Departmentof Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161 Price Code: PrintedCopyof MicroficheA01 Frontand back cover: CommunityMonitorStation (front) and Whole BodyLaboratory(back), Craig A. Tsosle EnvironmentalMonitoringSystemsLaboratory-LasVegas, Nevada Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report:

370

Flow cytometer jet monitor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Steam trap monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

Ryan, M.J.

1987-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

372

Monitoring and Mitigation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Mitigation of Sustained Localized Pitting Corrosion FINAL REPORT DOE FEW 49297 YuPo J. Lin, Edward J. St.Martin, and James R. Frank Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 January 2003 Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 Monitoring and Mitigation of Sustained Localized Pitting Corrosion Submitted to: Nancy C. Comstock U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Petroleum Technology Office By: YuPo J. Lin, Edward J. St.Martin, and James R. Frank Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 January 2003 The submitted manuscript has been created by the University of Chicago as Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne") under Contract No. W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on

373

Sidewall, appearance monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a sidewall appearance monitor. It comprises: a frame, a fixed upper chuck and a vertically-movable lower chuck for supporting a tire on the frame, means for inflating the tire, means for rotating the tire when inflated, a tread probe and support therefor depending vertically from the frame, an upper probe mounted and the frame adjacent the upper sidewall of tire, a pair of normally vertical support arms horizontally-spaced from each other and straddling the tread probe and support therefor. The lower prove being mounted between the lower ends of the support arms, means for mounting the upper ends of the support arms to swing the support arms between a vertical operative position and a horizontal inoperative position above the level of the tire, whereby the lower chuck may move downwardly to release the tire and the tire may be moved laterally away from the chucks without interference from the lower probe.

Hayes, R.H.

1990-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

Electron launching voltage monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron launching voltage monitor measures MITL voltage using a relationship between anode electric field and electron current launched from a cathode-mounted perturbation. An electron launching probe extends through and is spaced from the edge of an opening in a first MITL conductor, one end of the launching probe being in the gap between the MITL conductor, the other end being adjacent a first side of the first conductor away from the second conductor. A housing surrounds the launching probe and electrically connects the first side of the first conductor to the other end of the launching probe. A detector detects the current passing through the housing to the launching probe, the detected current being representative of the voltage between the conductors.

Mendel, Clifford W. (Albuquerque, NM); Savage, Mark E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Audible radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

Odell, D.M.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Ammonia Monitor Lab Test Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad-based deployment of postcombustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control systems, such as selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), in response to more stringent NOx control mandates has highlighted the need for continuous ammonia monitoring capabilities. EPRI has investigated the potential that tunable diode laser (TDL) spectroscopy can have in the continuous monitoring of ammonia slip. Field measurement programs for validation of TDL-based monitors, however, have yi...

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

Ammonia Monitor Lab Test Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad-based deployment of post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOX) control systems, such as selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), in response to more stringent NOX control mandates has highlighted the need for continuous ammonia monitoring capabilities. EPRI has investigated the potential that tunable diode laser (TDL) spectroscopy can have in the continuous monitoring of ammonia slip. Field measurement programs for validation of TDL-based monitors, however, have y...

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

378

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The U.S. Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/ frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories: plume and trend tracking, treatment/ storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

MJ Hartman; PE Dresel; JW Lindberg; DR Newcomer; EC Thornton

2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

379

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The US Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories plume and trend tracking, treatment/storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

Newcomer, D.R.; Thornton, E.C.; Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

380

Annual report of monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2010.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Morrill, Kansas, was initially identified in 1985 during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High levels of nitrate were also present in the wells. The city of Morrill is located in Brown County in the northeastern corner of the state, about 7 mi east of Sabetha. The population of Morrill as of the 2000 census was approximately 277. All residents of Morrill now obtain their drinking water from the Sabetha municipal water system via a pipeline constructed in 1991. Starting in 1922, eight different public wells formerly served the Morrill municipal system at some time. Because of poor water quality, including high nitrate levels attributed to numerous animal feeding operations in the vicinity and application of fertilizer on agricultural lands, use of the local groundwater from any public well for municipal supply purposes was terminated in 1991 in favor of obtaining water from the Sabetha municipal water system. Investigations of the carbon tetrachloride and nitrate contamination by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in 1989, 1994, and 1996 (KDHE 1989; GeoCore 1994a-e, 1996) identified a localized plume of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater extending downgradient from a grain storage facility located in the northwestern section of Morrill. The facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), from 1950 to 1971. Since termination of the CCC/USDA grain storage operations in 1971, the property and existing grain bins have been used for private grain storage up to the present time. Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants were commonly used by the CCC/USDA, as well as private and commercial grain storage operations, to preserve grain. Because the identified carbon tetrachloride contamination could in part be linked to historical use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its former facility, in 2003 the CCC/USDA assumed responsibility for the site investigation of the carbon tetrachloride contamination. The CCC/USDA involvement began with development and implementation of a work plan for a Phase I expedited site characterization (Argonne 2003). That investigation and subsequent investigations (Argonne 2004, 2005a) were performed by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne continues to provide technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. The initial investigation by the CCC/USDA in 2003 determined that soils at the former facility have not been impacted by grain fumigation activities. Neither carbon tetrachloride nor chloroform was detected in near-surface soils or in subsurface soils collected to bedrock or to a depth of 15 ft below ground level (BGL). Therefore, no identifiable human health risk is associated with either carbon tetrachloride or chloroform in shallow soils, which additionally pose no further threat of contamination to groundwater. High carbon tetrachloride concentrations in groundwater (maximum 390 {micro}g/L in a sample collected from monitoring well MW3S - located on the former CCC/USDA property - in 1995) have declined significantly during long-term monitoring by the KDHE and currently by the CCC/USDA. Maximum levels within the plume of carbon tetrachloride concentrations exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level of 5.0 {micro}g/L remain. In September 2005, the CCC/USDA initiated periodic sampling of groundwater at Morrill, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the state (KDHE 2005), to monitor carbon tetrachloride concentrations i

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Annual report of monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2010.  

SciTech Connect

Carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Morrill, Kansas, was initially identified in 1985 during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High levels of nitrate were also present in the wells. The city of Morrill is located in Brown County in the northeastern corner of the state, about 7 mi east of Sabetha. The population of Morrill as of the 2000 census was approximately 277. All residents of Morrill now obtain their drinking water from the Sabetha municipal water system via a pipeline constructed in 1991. Starting in 1922, eight different public wells formerly served the Morrill municipal system at some time. Because of poor water quality, including high nitrate levels attributed to numerous animal feeding operations in the vicinity and application of fertilizer on agricultural lands, use of the local groundwater from any public well for municipal supply purposes was terminated in 1991 in favor of obtaining water from the Sabetha municipal water system. Investigations of the carbon tetrachloride and nitrate contamination by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in 1989, 1994, and 1996 (KDHE 1989; GeoCore 1994a-e, 1996) identified a localized plume of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater extending downgradient from a grain storage facility located in the northwestern section of Morrill. The facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), from 1950 to 1971. Since termination of the CCC/USDA grain storage operations in 1971, the property and existing grain bins have been used for private grain storage up to the present time. Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants were commonly used by the CCC/USDA, as well as private and commercial grain storage operations, to preserve grain. Because the identified carbon tetrachloride contamination could in part be linked to historical use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its former facility, in 2003 the CCC/USDA assumed responsibility for the site investigation of the carbon tetrachloride contamination. The CCC/USDA involvement began with development and implementation of a work plan for a Phase I expedited site characterization (Argonne 2003). That investigation and subsequent investigations (Argonne 2004, 2005a) were performed by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne continues to provide technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. The initial investigation by the CCC/USDA in 2003 determined that soils at the former facility have not been impacted by grain fumigation activities. Neither carbon tetrachloride nor chloroform was detected in near-surface soils or in subsurface soils collected to bedrock or to a depth of 15 ft below ground level (BGL). Therefore, no identifiable human health risk is associated with either carbon tetrachloride or chloroform in shallow soils, which additionally pose no further threat of contamination to groundwater. High carbon tetrachloride concentrations in groundwater (maximum 390 {micro}g/L in a sample collected from monitoring well MW3S - located on the former CCC/USDA property - in 1995) have declined significantly during long-term monitoring by the KDHE and currently by the CCC/USDA. Maximum levels within the plume of < 50 {micro}g/L at present confirm that no continuing soil source remains at the former CCC/USDA facility. Nevertheless, carbon tetrachloride concentrations exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level of 5.0 {micro}g/L remain. In September 2005, the CCC/USDA initiated periodic sampling of groundwater at Morrill, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the state (KDHE 2005), to monitor carbon tetrachloride concentrations i

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

382

Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 458.1, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies.

Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

383

Carbon Sequestration Monitoring Activities  

SciTech Connect

In its 'Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan 2007' the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified as a major objective extended field tests to fully characterize potential carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage sites and to demonstrate the long-term storage of sequestered carbon (p. 5). Among the challenges in this area are 'improved understanding of CO{sub 2} flow and trapping within the reservoir and the development and deployment of technologies such as simulation models and monitoring systems' (p. 20). The University of Wyoming (UW), following consultations with the NETL, the Wyoming State Geological Survey, and the Governor's office, identified potential for geologic sequestration of impure carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep reservoirs of the Moxa Arch. The Moxa Arch is a 120-mile long north-south trending anticline plunging beneath the Wyoming Thrust Belt on the north and bounded on the south by the Uinta Mountains. Several oil and gas fields along the Moxa Arch contain accumulations of natural CO{sub 2}. The largest of these is the La Barge Platform, which encompasses approximately 800 square miles. Several formations may be suitable for storage of impure CO{sub 2} gas, foremost among them the Madison Limestone, Bighorn Dolomite, and Nugget Sandstone. This project responded to the challenges described above by preparing a geological site characterization study on the Moxa Arch. The project included four priority research areas: (A) geological characterization of geologic structure of the Arch, the fault, and fracture patterns of the target formations and caprocks, (B) experimental characterization of carbon dioxide-brine-rock reactions that may occur, (C) optimization of geophysical and numerical models necessary for measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV), and (D) a preliminary performance assessment. Research work to accomplish these goals was coordinated by one administrative task under the direction of Dr. Carol Frost, Professor of Geology and Geophysics (Task 1.0), and one task devoted to designing and creating an interdisciplinary, project-specific carbon cyberinfrastructure to support collaborative carbon dioxide sequestration research among University of Wyoming scientists and their collaborators, performed by Jeff Hammerlinck, Director of the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center at the University of Wyoming (Task 1.5). The results of these tasks are presented in the Introduction and in Chapter 1, respectively.

Carol Frost

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

Monitoring smartphones for anomaly detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we demonstrate how to monitor a smartphone running Symbian operating system and Windows Mobile in order to extract features for anomaly detection. These features are sent to a remote server because running a complex intrusion detection ... Keywords: anomaly detection, monitoring, smartphones

Aubrey-Derrick Schmidt; Frank Peters; Florian Lamour; Christian Scheel; Seyit Ahmet Çamtepe; Sahin Albayrak

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Pantex Plant meteorological monitoring program  

SciTech Connect

The current meteorological monitoring program of the US Department of Energy`s Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas, is described in detail. Instrumentation, meteorological data collection and management, and program management are reviewed. In addition, primary contacts are noted for instrumentation, calibration, data processing, and alternative databases. The quality assurance steps implemented during each portion of the meteorological monitoring program are also indicated.

Snyder, S.F.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Steam trap monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

Ryan, Michael J. (Plainfield, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

AREA RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An improved area radiation dose monitor is designed which is adapted to compensate continuously for background radiation below a threshold dose rate and to give warning when the dose integral of the dose rate of an above-threshold radiation excursion exceeds a selected value. This is accomplished by providing means for continuously charging an ionization chamber. The chamber provides a first current proportional to the incident radiation dose rate. Means are provided for generating a second current including means for nulling out the first current with the second current at all values of the first current corresponding to dose rates below a selected threshold dose rate value. The second current has a maximum value corresponding to that of the first current at the threshold dose rate. The excess of the first current over the second current, which occurs above the threshold, is integrated and an alarm is given at a selected integrated value of the excess corresponding to a selected radiation dose. (AEC)

Manning, F.W.; Groothuis, S.E.; Lykins, J.H.; Papke, D.M.

1962-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

388

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Optical oxygen concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen`s A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2,000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest. 4 figs.

Kebabian, P.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

390

Vapor spill pipe monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

1983-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

391

ORISE: Media Analysis and Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Media Analysis and Monitoring Media Analysis and Monitoring The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) uses comprehensive media analysis and monitoring tools to define media interest and the public's perceptions of a particular issue. ORISE's media analysis process includes analyzing news reports combined with media outlet data, such as circulation, readership, number of viewers and listeners; recording frequency of publication and collecting quotes from subject matter experts. To improve the overall consistency and efficiency of the process, ORISE employs tools, such as AutoINFORM (Auto Immunization News FOR Managers), that enable the monitoring of social media, email and other Web content. On average, ORISE tracks, codes and analyzes more than 17,000 articles daily, monitoring 1,400+ news resources and 1,000+ blogs. Annually, the

392

The LANL/LLNL/AFTAC Black Thunder Coal Mine regional mine monitoring experiment  

SciTech Connect

Cast blasting operations associated with near surface coal recovery provide relatively large explosive sources that generate regional seismograms of interest in monitoring a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). This paper describes preliminary results of a series of experiments currently being conducted at the Black Thunder Coal Mine in northeast Wyoming as part of the DOE CTBT Research and Development Program. These experiments are intended to provide an integrated set of near-source and regional seismic data for the purposes of quantifying the coupling and source characterization of the explosions. The focus of this paper is on the types of data being recovered with some preliminary implications. The Black Thunder experiments are designed to assess three major questions: (1) how many mining explosions produce seismograms at regional distances that will have to be detected, located and ultimately identified by the National Data Center and what are the waveform characteristics of these particular mining explosions; (2) can discrimination techniques based on empirical studies be placed on a firm physical basis so that they can be applied to other regions where there is little monitoring experience; (3) can large scale chemical explosions (possibly mining explosions) be used to calibrate source and propagation path effects to regional stations, can source depth of burial and decoupling effects be studied in such a controlled environment? With these key questions in mind and given the cooperation of the Black Thunder Mine, a suite of experiments have been and are currently being conducted. This paper will describe the experiments and their relevance to CTBT issues.

Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W.; Baker, D.F.; Edwards, C.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Research Institute (SRI), Birmingham, AL, is operating a research station in North Birmingham for monitoring fine particulate matter (PM2.5) that exists in that part of the Deep South. The station will be a core PM2.5 mass monitoring and chemical speciation station in the nationwide EPA PM2.5 network. As such, it will be a complement and supplement to DOE-NETL's other ongoing projects for monitoring fine particulate matter in the upper Ohio River valley. Locating additional monitoring equipment in the Deep South will fill an important gap in the national particulate monitoring effort. The region's topography, weather patterns, and variety of emission sources may affect the chemical make-up and airborne transport of fine particles in ways that are different than in other parts of the country. The project's results will support DOE's comprehensive program to evaluate ambient fine particulate matter through better understanding of the chemical and physical properties of these materials.

394

Essential Grid Workflow Monitoring Elements  

SciTech Connect

Troubleshooting Grid workflows is difficult. A typicalworkflow involves a large number of components networks, middleware,hosts, etc. that can fail. Even when monitoring data from all thesecomponents is accessible, it is hard to tell whether failures andanomalies in these components are related toa given workflow. For theGrid to be truly usable, much of this uncertainty must be elim- inated.We propose two new Grid monitoring elements, Grid workflow identifiersand consistent component lifecycle events, that will make Gridtroubleshooting easier, and thus make Grids more usable, by simplifyingthe correlation of Grid monitoring data with a particular Gridworkflow.

Gunter, Daniel K.; Jackson, Keith R.; Konerding, David E.; Lee,Jason R.; Tierney, Brian L.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Gap and stripline combined monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined gap and stripline monitor device (10) for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions (11a, 11b) with an axial gap (12) therebetween. An outer pipe (14) cooperates with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips (23a-d) cooperate with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

Yin, Yan (Palo Alto, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Gap and stripline combined monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility is disclosed. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length. 4 figs.

Yin, Y.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

397

Test versus predictions for rotordynamic and leakage characteristics of a convergent-tapered, honeycomb-stator/smooth-rotor annular gas seal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the results for measured and predicted rotordynamic coefficients and leakage for a convergent-tapered honeycomb seal (CTHC). The test seals had a diameter of 114.968 mm (4.5263 in) at the entrance, and a diameter of 114.709 mm (4.5161 in) at the exit. The honeycomb cell depth was 3.175 mm (0.125 in), and the cell width was 0.79 mm (0.0311 in). Measurements are reported with air as the test fluid at three different speeds: 10,200, 15,200, and 20,200 rpm; with a supply pressure of 69 bar (1,000 psi), with exit-to-inlet pressure ratios from 20% to 50%, and using two rotors that are 114.3 mm (4.500 in) and 114.5 mm (4.508 in) respectively; this enables the same seals to be tested under two different conditions. The q factor, which is just a simple way to quantify taper is defined as the taperangle seal parameter and is calculated using the inlet and exit radial clearance. Two taper-angles parameters were calculated; q = 0.24 for the 114.3 mm (4.500 in) rotor, and q = 0.386 for the 114.5 mm (4.508 in) rotor. The q = 0.24 condition was compared to a constant clearance honeycomb seal (CCHC q = 0) because both sets of data were taken with the same rotor diameter. The direct stiffness, effective stiffness, and direct damping coefficients were larger for q = 0.24. The CTHC q = 0.24 eliminates the direct negative static stiffness obtained with CCHC ( q = 0). The cross-coupled stiffness and damping also were larger for q = 0.24, especially at low frequencies. Effective damping is one of the best indicators in determining the stability of a roughened stator annular gas seal. The frequency at which it changes sign is called the cross-over frequency. In applications, this frequency needs to be lower than the rotorsystem’s first natural frequency. Otherwise, the seal will be highly destabilizing instead of highly stabilizing. The magnitude of effective damping and the cross-over frequency also increases with q for all frequencies. Constant clearance honeycomb seals have less leakage than convergenttapered honeycomb seals. CTHC ( q = 0.24), has approximately 20 percent more leakage than CCHC ( q = 0). The experimental results for rotordynamic characteristics and leakage were compared to theoretical predictions by the two-control-volume developed by Kleynhans and Childs. All rotordynamic coefficients were reasonably predicted for all cases. The model does a better job predicting the cross-coupled stiffness and damping coefficients rather than the direct stiffness and damping coefficients. Also, the two-control-volume model predicts the dynamic characteristics of CCHC ( q = 0) better, and does not predict well the effective stiffness and damping for CTHC q = 0.386.

Van Der Velde Alvarez, Daniel Eduardo

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Impacts of Static Pressure Reset on VAV System Air Leakage, Fan Power and Thermal Energy - Part 2: Case Demonstration for a Typical Climate System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Part 1 of this paper, the theoretical models, integrating the fan airflow, fan head, air leakage factors, are developed to analyze the impacts of the static pressure reset on both pressure dependent and pressure independent terminal boxes. In this part, a simulated air handling unit (AHU) system in Omaha NE is used to demonstrate the energy savings performance in one typical climate year. This AHU system has a static pressure reset system and two constant static pressure systems, one having pressure dependent terminal boxes and one having pressure independent terminal boxes. These simulated systems were compared mainly on the basis of fan power energy consumption and thermal energy consumption in totally a year. The example presents a good agreement with the theoretical model and simulation results. It was also shown that static pressure reset provides a promising and challenging way for the energy performance in VAV system.

Liu, M.; Zheng, K.; Wu, L.; Wang, Z.; Johnson, C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2  

SciTech Connect

Storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers is intended to be at supercritical pressure and temperature conditions, but CO{sub 2} leaking from a geologic storage reservoir and migrating toward the land surface (through faults, fractures, or improperly abandoned wells) would reach subcritical conditions at depths shallower than 500-750 m. At these and shallower depths, subcritical CO{sub 2} can form two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}, with significant latent heat effects during boiling and condensation. Additional strongly non-isothermal effects can arise from decompression of gas-like subcritical CO{sub 2}, the so-called Joule-Thomson effect. Integrated modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage requires the ability to model non-isothermal flows of brine and CO{sub 2} at conditions that range from supercritical to subcritical, including three-phase flow of aqueous phase, and both liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate comprehensive simulation capabilities that can cope with all possible phase conditions in brine-CO{sub 2} systems. Our model formulation includes: (1) an accurate description of thermophysical properties of aqueous and CO{sub 2}-rich phases as functions of temperature, pressure, salinity and CO{sub 2} content, including the mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O; (2) transitions between super- and subcritical conditions, including phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}; (3) one-, two-, and three-phase flow of brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including heat flow; (4) non-isothermal effects associated with phase change, mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and water, and (de-) compression effects; and (5) the effects of dissolved NaCl, and the possibility of precipitating solid halite, with associated porosity and permeability change. Applications to specific leakage scenarios demonstrate that the peculiar thermophysical properties of CO{sub 2} provide a potential for positive as well as negative feedbacks on leakage rates, with a combination of self-enhancing and self-limiting effects. Lower viscosity and density of CO{sub 2} as compared to aqueous fluids provides a potential for self-enhancing effects during leakage, while strong cooling effects from liquid CO{sub 2} boiling into gas, and from expansion of gas rising towards the land surface, act to self-limit discharges. Strong interference between fluid phases under three-phase conditions (aqueous - liquid CO{sub 2} - gaseous CO{sub 2}) also tends to reduce CO{sub 2} fluxes. Feedback on different space and time scales can induce non-monotonic behavior of CO{sub 2} flow rates.

Pruess, K.

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

monitoring data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

monitoring data monitoring data Dataset Summary Description Freedom Field is a not-for-profit organization formed to facilitate development and commercialization of renewable energy solutions. The organization has installed a variety of renewable energy generating technologies at their facility (located at Rock River Water Reclamation in Rockford, IL), with the intention of serving as a demonstration facility. The facility monitors data (at 5-minute intervals) from a weather station, 12.4 kW of PV panels (56 220-watt panels), a 10kW wind turbine (HAWT), a 1.2 kW wind turbine (VAWT), an absorption cooling system, and biogas burners. Source Freedom Field Date Released July 19th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biogas monitoring data PV radiance solar temperature

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

New technologies for item monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This report responds to the Department of Energy`s request that Sandia National Laboratories compare existing technologies against several advanced technologies as they apply to DOE needs to monitor the movement of material, weapons, or personnel for safety and security programs. The authors describe several material control systems, discuss their technologies, suggest possible applications, discuss assets and limitations, and project costs for each system. The following systems are described: WATCH system (Wireless Alarm Transmission of Container Handling); Tag system (an electrostatic proximity sensor); PANTRAK system (Personnel And Material Tracking); VRIS (Vault Remote Inventory System); VSIS (Vault Safety and Inventory System); AIMS (Authenticated Item Monitoring System); EIVS (Experimental Inventory Verification System); Metrox system (canister monitoring system); TCATS (Target Cueing And Tracking System); LGVSS (Light Grid Vault Surveillance System); CSS (Container Safeguards System); SAMMS (Security Alarm and Material Monitoring System); FOIDS (Fiber Optic Intelligence & Detection System); GRADS (Graded Radiation Detection System); and PINPAL (Physical Inventory Pallet).

Abbott, J.A. [EG & G Energy Measurements, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Waddoups, I.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Advanced nonintrusive load monitoring system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a need for flexible, inexpensive metering technologies that can be deployed in many different monitoring scenarios. Individual loads may be expected to compute information about their power consumption. Utility ...

Wichakool, Warit, 1977-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

ORR Deer Hunt Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose for the initiation of deer hunts on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was deer population control to reduce collisions with vehicles and maintain a healthy herd and habitat. As of 1997, thirteen annual deer hunts have been conducted on the ORR. The deer hunt monitoring program (DHMP) has two components -- a field screening monitoring program and a confirmatory laboratory analysis program of both retained and randomly selected released deer samples.

Scofield, P.A.; Teasley, N.A.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Ammonia Monitor Lab Test Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing use of post combustion NOx control systems such as Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) has heightened the need for reliable continuous monitoring of ammonia slip. This report describes laboratory tests conducted to assess the ability of the Norsk Elektro Optik's (NEO) LaserGas II tunable diode laser monitor to measure ammonia under highly controlled conditions over a typical range of process conditions.

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

405

Condition Monitoring of Wind Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on industry experience, after four years of operation, failures of wind turbine gearboxes, generators, and other major components become common, and each failure typically requires major repairs and/or component replacement. Wind project owners and operators who apply lube oil monitoring, vibration-signature analysis, and other condition monitoring technology can expect to detect subtle changes in machine condition that often lead to major failures if left unrepaired. The estimated cost savings of ...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

406

PEM fuel cell monitoring system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are disclosed for monitoring the performance of H{sub 2}--O{sub 2} PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H{sub 2} sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken. 2 figs.

Meltser, M.A.; Grot, S.A.

1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

407

PEM fuel cell monitoring system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for monitoring the performance of H.sub.2 --O.sub.2 PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H.sub.2 sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken.

Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY); Grot, Stephen Andreas (West Henrietta, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Monitoring Switchyard Electricity | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Switchyard ... Monitoring Switchyard Electricity Monitoring electricity coming in through the switchyard to the Y-12 Plant...

409

Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative “all modes” failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Improved Characterization and Monitoring of Electromagnetic ...  

LLNL's technology is useful in fields such as power systems engineering, security monitoring, and vehicle tracking to identify, locate and monitor a ...

411

Definition: Thermal Overload Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overload Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal Overload Monitoring Technology including sensors, information processors and communications that can detect...

412

Continuous Emission Monitoring Guidelines -- 2002 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 2002 update to the "Continuous Emission Monitoring Guidelines" reflects information learned from current utility continuous emission monitoring (CEM) system (CEMS) installations and practices.

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

Market Monitoring Tools | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Market Monitoring Tools Market Monitoring Tools Use dispatch, profit, revenueoffer price, withholding sensitivities to identify opportunities for local advantage that give some...

414

Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP), Environmental Protection...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Water Chapter 11 - Potable Water Chapter 12 - Groundwater Monitoring Chapter 13 - Landfill Gas and Leachate Monitoring Appendix A - Acronyms and Technical Terms Appendix B...

415

Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that this work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, and DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 450.1A, DOE Order 5400.5, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies. (See LLNL [1992] and LLNL [2008] for information about LLNL's CERCLA activities).

Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

416

Smooth Brome Monitoring at Rocky Flats-2005 Results | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smooth Brome Monitoring at Rocky Flats-2005 Results Smooth Brome Monitoring at Rocky Flats-2005 Results Smooth Brome Monitoring at Rocky Flats-2005 Results Smooth Brome Monitoring...

417

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rulison Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rulison Monitoring Rulison Monitoring Rulison, Colorado, Site Natural Gas Well Monitoring Results Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2013 Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Second Quarter 2013 Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Fourth Quarter 2012 and First Quarter 2013 Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2012. Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison (2nd quarter 2012) Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison (1st quarter 2012) Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison (4th quarter 2011) Project Rulison Monitoring Results for Water Vapor in Gas at the Holmes Mesa Compressor Station, Garfield County, Colorado (3rd quarter

418

Blue LED for RS Monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract We report on a design of RS gain monitor system based on blue LED. Gain of each RS PMT is monitored by a LED, which is mounted in front of the PMT window in its _-metal shield. The blue LED well simulates scintillation light with its short pulse and wavelength. The LED is as small as 3 mmOE. The light yield is stable and has small temperature dependence. These are nice properties to install in present RS system with small modification and to operate without air conditioning. In this note we will present outline of our design and test results which demonstrate its desirable properties. 1 Introduction RS gain monitor has been carried out with K_2 events at E787. They are sat- isfactory to monitor long and medium term stability but it is not satisfactory to monitor short term stability and to check PMT and related electronics quickly and frequently. These capabilities are important to reduce setup time and loss time in long E949 run. For these purpose triggerable and stable light source is required at RS system. We consider two types of monitoring system. One is the system which consists of one light source and its light distribution network, such as a Xe lamp with a optical fiber network. It has the advantage that light intensity of the source itself can be monitored and be corrected. But, practically, it is not easy to estimate light output of individual fiber correctly by checking light source and to handle optical fibers, and we have to think out a solution how we introduce lights to RS or its PMT. Also the system is rather expensive and it will take long time to

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

1999 Environmental Monitoring Program Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the calendar year 1999 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory management and operating contractor Environmental Monitoring Program. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1999 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the expectation of nitrogen in two disposal pond effluent streams iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal well, and coliform bacteria in drinking water systems at two facilities. Maintenance activities were performed on the two drinking water systems and tested prior to putting back into service. The monitoring and surveillance results demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

L. V. Street

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Analyzing harmonic monitoring data using data mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Harmonic monitoring has become an important tool for harmonic management in distribution systems. A comprehensive harmonic monitoring program has been designed and implemented on a typical electrical MV distribution system in Australia. The monitoring ... Keywords: classification, clustering, data mining, harmonics, monitoring system, power quality, segmentation

Ali Asheibi; David Stirling; Danny Soetanto

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation details the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Condition Monitoring program at NREL.

Sheng, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Robustness provided by internet monitoring systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internet applications such as Wealth Management Banking Programs require a very high degree of robustness. To attain this continuous testing - that is monitoring the systems over a period of time - is suggested. The preparation of an appropriate site-monitoring ... Keywords: continuous testing, internet, internet offering, monitoring systems, requirements, robustness, site monitoring, soft launch, test environment, testing recommendation, transitional state

Barry Dellar

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Survey of hydrogen monitoring devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented are results of a survey of commercially available monitoring devices suitable for hydrogen detection in the secondary containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during the post postulated accident period. Available detectors were grouped into the following five classes: combustion, solid state, electrochemical, thermal conductivity, and absorption. The performance of most available sensors is likely to deteriorate when exposed to the postulated conditions which include moisture, which could be at high temperature, and radioactive noncondensibles. Of the commercial devices, those using metallic filament thermal conductivity detectors seem least susceptible to performance change. Absorption detectors are best suited for this monitoring task but the only available device is designed for pipeline corrosion assessment. Initiation of experimental study to assess apparent deficiencies of commercial detectors is recommended. Also recommended is an analytical/experimental effort to determine the optimum detector array for monitoring in the secondary containment vessels.

Lai, W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

INTEC Groundwater Monitoring Report 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes 2006 perched water and groundwater monitoring activities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During 2006, groundwater samples were collected from a total of 22 Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) monitoring wells, plus six aquifer wells sampled for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) monitoring program. In addition, perched water samples were collected from 21 perched wells and 19 suction lysimeters. Groundwater and perched water samples were analyzed for a suite of radionuclides and inorganic constituents. Laboratory results in this report are compared to drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Such comparison is for reference only and it should be noted that the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision does not require that perched water comply with drinking water standards.

J. R. Forbes S. L. Ansley M. Leecaster

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Device for monitoring cell voltage  

SciTech Connect

A device for monitoring a rechargeable battery having a number of electrically connected cells includes at least one current interruption switch for interrupting current flowing through at least one associated cell and a plurality of monitoring units for detecting cell voltage. Each monitoring unit is associated with a single cell and includes a reference voltage unit for producing a defined reference threshold voltage and a voltage comparison unit for comparing the reference threshold voltage with a partial cell voltage of the associated cell. The reference voltage unit is electrically supplied from the cell voltage of the associated cell. The voltage comparison unit is coupled to the at least one current interruption switch for interrupting the current of at least the current flowing through the associated cell, with a defined minimum difference between the reference threshold voltage and the partial cell voltage.

Doepke, Matthias (Garbsen, DE); Eisermann, Henning (Edermissen, DE)

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

426

Monitoring probe for groundwater flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow.

Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Ballard, Sanford (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

AN IONIZATION CHAMBER LAUNDRY MONITOR  

SciTech Connect

The determination of the amount of contamination remaining on a garment after it has been washed is an important part of hot laundry operations. In the past garments were monitored by measuring the contamination concentrated in the crotch with a GM tube probe. This type of spot check does not detect any isolated hot spots on other pants of the garment. To monitor the entire garment with a GM tube instrument is excessively time consuming for a large number of garments. To overcome these difficulties a sensitive, large-volume ionization chamber was constructed. It is rectangular in shape, 5 ft high by 2 1/2 ft wide by 4 in. deep. The center electrode is of a grid type and is mounted halfway between the front window and the back of the chamber. In a 0.5-mr/hr field, 180 v is sufficient to saturate toe chamber. In order to insure beta sensitivity, the front window has an equivalent thickness of approximately 7 mg/cm/sup 2/. The measuring device is a line-operated electrometer circuit equipped with an alarm that may be set at the rejection limit for the type of garment being monitored. A fullscale deflection on the most sensitive range is given by 2 to 3 mu C of liquid mixed fission products deposited on a garment. Since the chamber monitors the entire garment, the results are independent of the location of the contarnination. In practice, garments may be monitored at the rate of 7 per min, while only 3 per min may be completely checked with a GM tube probs. Field tests indicate that this instrument is stable and trouble free. Background causes a meter deflection of about 20 divisions, which is low enough to give reliable accuracy for monitoring garments. (auth)

Chester, J.D.; Handloser, J.S.

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Monitoring Energy Consumption of Smartphones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the rapid development of new and innovative applications for mobile devices like smartphones, advances in battery technology have not kept pace with rapidly growing energy demands. Thus energy consumption has become a more and more important issue of mobile devices. To meet the requirements of saving energy, it is critical to monitor and analyze the energy consumption of applications on smartphones. For this purpose, we develop a smart energy monitoring system called SEMO for smartphones using Android operating system. It can profile mobile applications with battery usage information, which is vital for both developers and users.

Ding, Fangwei; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Xuhai; Ma, Chengchuan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Infrared Interferometric Measurements of the Near-Surface Air Temperature over the Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiometric measurement of the marine air temperature using a Fourier transform infrared spectroradiometer is described. The measurements are taken by the Marine-Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (M-AERI) that has been deployed on ...

P. J. Minnett; K. A. Maillet; J. A. Hanafin; B. J. Osborne

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Continuous Time–Space Sampling of Near-Surface Velocities Using Sound  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A phased-array Doppler sonar (PADS) system is described that uses sound at frequencies near 200 kHz to probe an area several hundred meters on a side with 7–20-m spatial resolution. The area can be sampled every second or less with under 2 cm s–1 ...

Jerome A. Smith

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

2009 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers 487 Near Surface Geophysics, 2009, 487-498  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extend a short distance from the shore. Discontinuities in these patches of transmissive sediments can is useful as a rapid reconnaissance tool for mapping geologic heterogeneity. The results can be used can guide the placement of seepage meters. a fine grid is to make rapid reconnaissance measurements

Toran, Laura

435

1 THE CRITICAL ZONE The critical zone is "the heterogeneous, near surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mechanistic information at smaller scales, i.e. mi- croscopic, molecular, and atomistic is required. Small of environmental conditions. This information then needs to be integrated into field scale hydro- logic are synchrotron-based, one can elucidate reaction mechanisms at a small scale. This has been one of the major

Sparks, Donald L.

436

Near-surface and bulk behavior of Ag in SiC  

SciTech Connect

The diffusive release of fission products, such as Ag, from TRISO particles at high temperatures has raised concerns regarding safe and economic operation of advanced nuclear reactors. Understanding the mechanisms of Ag diffusion is thus of crucial importance for effective retention of fission products. Two mechanisms, i.e., grain boundary diffusion and vapor or surface diffusion through macroscopic structures such as nano-pores or nano-cracks, remain in debate. In the present work, an integrated computational and experimental study of the nearsurface and bulk behavior of Ag in silicon carbide (SiC) has been carried out. The ab initio calculations show that Ag prefers to adsorb on the SiC surface rather than in the bulk, and the mobility of Ag on the surface is high. The energy barrier for Ag desorption from the surface is calculated to be 0.85~1.68 eV, and Ag migration into bulk SiC through equilibrium diffusion process is not favorable. Experimentally, Ag ions are implanted into SiC to produce Ag profiles buried in the bulk and peaked at the surface. High-temperature annealing leads to Ag release from the surface region instead of diffusion into the interior of SiC. It is suggested that surface diffusion through mechanical structural imperfection, such as vapor transport through cracks in 2 SiC coatings, may be a dominating mechanism accounting for Ag release from the SiC in the nuclear reactor.

Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Zhang, Yanwen; Snead, Lance L.; Shutthanandan, V.; Xue, Haizhou; Weber, William J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Optimized U-MOT for experiments with ultracold atoms near surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an integrated wire-based magnetooptical trap for the simplified trapping and cooling of large numbers of neutral atoms near material surfaces. With a modified U-shaped current-carrying Cu structure we collect $>3\\times 10^8$ $^{87}$Rb atoms in a mirror MOT without using quadrupole coils. These atoms are subsequently loaded to a Z-wire trap where they are evaporatively cooled to a Bose-Einstein condensate close to the surface.

S. Wildermuth; P. Krüger; C. Becker; M. Brajdic; S. Haupt; A. Kasper; R. Folman; J. Schmiedmayer

2003-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

438

Scattering Versus Intrinsic Attenuation in the Near Surface: Measurements from Permanent Down-hole Geophones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

special attention in oil and gas exploration, given that theapplicable to oil and gas exploration. Lastly, the resultsbe applicable to oil and gas exploration. Lastly, to verify

Mangriotis, Maria-Daphne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Near-Surface Turbulence and Thermal Structure in a Wind-Driven Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean surface turbulence at high sea states is evaluated using heat as a naturally occurring passive tracer. A freely drifting instrument with a mechanically driven temperature profiler, fixed depth thermistors, and conductivity cells was used to ...

Johannes R. Gemmrich; David M. Farmer

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Near-Surface Characteristics of the Turbulence Structure during a Mountain-Wave Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study of mountain-wave-induced turbulence observed during the Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX) in Owens Valley, California, is presented. During this case study, large spatial and temporal variability in aerosol backscatter ...

Željko Ve?enaj; Stephan F. J. De Wekker; Vanda Grubiši?

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "near-surface leakage monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Near Surface Equatorial Indian Ocean in 1979. Part I: Linear Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different wind field analyses are used to force a one layer adiabatic model of the near equatorial surface circulation in the Indian Ocean in 1979. The model simulates the major features of the observations: eastward jets were present in April-...

Gilles Reverdin; Mark Cane

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Global distribution of near-surface hydrogen on Mars W. C. Feldman,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equatorial regions if the upper 10 g/cm2 of regolith is desiccated, as suggested on average by comparison: Polar regions; 6225 Planetology: Solar System Objects: Mars; KEYWORDS: composition, glaciation, Mars

Polly, David

443

System and method for preparing near-surface heavy oil for extraction using microbial degradation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for enhancing the recovery of heavy oil in an oil extraction environment by feeding nutrients to a preferred microbial species (bacteria and/or fungi). A method is described that includes the steps of: sampling and identifying microbial species that reside in the oil extraction environment; collecting fluid property data from the oil extraction environment; collecting nutrient data from the oil extraction environment; identifying a preferred microbial species from the oil extraction environment that can transform the heavy oil into a lighter oil; identifying a nutrient from the oil extraction environment that promotes a proliferation of the preferred microbial species; and introducing the nutrient into the oil extraction environment.

Busche, Frederick D. (Highland Village, TX); Rollins, John B. (Southlake, TX); Noyes, Harold J. (Golden, CO); Bush, James G. (West Richland, WA)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

444

Detailed Characterization of the Zn/Pd Dilute near Surface Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here, we present a combined scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED) and synchrotron x-ray ...

445

From Near-Surface to Root-Zone Soil Moisture Using Different Assimilation Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Root-zone soil moisture constitutes an important variable for hydrological and weather forecast models. Microwave radiometers like the L-band instrument on board the European Space Agency’s (ESA) future Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) ...

Joaquín Muñoz Sabater; Lionel Jarlan; Jean-Christophe Calvet; François Bouyssel; Patricia De Rosnay

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Variations in Ocean Surface Temperature due to Near-Surface Flow: Straining the Cool Skin Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aqueous thermal boundary layer near to the ocean surface, or skin layer, has thickness O(1 mm) and plays an important role in controlling the exchange of heat between the atmosphere and the ocean. Theoretical arguments and experimental ...

Andrew J. Wells; Claudia Cenedese; J. Thomas Farrar; Christopher J. Zappa

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

HEATER TEST PLANNING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heater Experiment at Hanford. Berkeley, Lawre ;e BerkeleyTest Facility, Hole DC-11, Hanford Reservation. Prepared forof Gable Mountain Basalt Cores, Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

DuBois, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

PRELIMINARY THERMAL AND THERMOMECHANICAL MODELING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY HEATER EXPERIMENTS AT HANFORD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotherms in Vertical Plane, Hanford Full-Scale Experiment:Isotherms in Vertical Plane, Hanford Full-Scale Experiment:Isotherms in Vertical Plane, Hanford Full-Scale Experiment:

chan, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Observations of Near-Surface Oceanic Velocity Strain-Rate Variability during and after Storm Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During August of 1977, a series of repeated profiles of the upper ocean were made at Ocean Station Papa (145°W, 50°N) with a velocity/temperature microstructure profiler. A strong correlation of wind-speed variations with velocity structures in ...

R. Eward Lange

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Multi-dimensional electromagnetic modeling and inversion with application to near-surface earth investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical conductivity of the earth provides information about porosity, water saturation, salinity, clay content, and organic matter that cannot be duplicated by other geophysical methods of investigation. However, there is a complex relationship between ... Keywords: Electrical conductivity, Electromagnetics, Geophysics, Inversion, Modeling

Louise Pellerin; Philip E. Wannamaker

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Objective Maps of Near-Surface Flow States near Point Conception, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective streamfunction and velocity potential maps of three commonly observed flow states near Point Conception, California, are derived from moored current-meter and drifter observations. The states are defined using current-meter data. ...

E. P. Dever<