National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ne-id 208-526-5277 208-351-3830

  1. Distribution List: For Action: Joseph A. McBrearty, SC-3 John...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SC-OR Patricia Schuneman, SC-CH Jeffrey C. Armstrong, SR David Hess, EMCBC Diane Snow, CBFO Michael Adams, NE-ID Kelly Gele, FE-4451 Department of Energy M&O CONTRACTOR...

  2. How To Series 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Preparing for Auditing Success Submitted by Robert Blyth, U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (NE-ID) For more information contact Bob Blyth @ Robert.Blyth@nuclear.energy.gov

  3. How To Series 1 PDF

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Preparing for Auditing Success Submitted by Robert Blyth, U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (NE-ID) For more information contact Bob Blyth @ Robert.Blyth@nuclear.energy.gov

  4. Completed EISs

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    171999 BIA 64 FR 7904 Other 411999 DOE 64 FR 15744 ROD Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel NE ID DOEEIS-0306 2221999 DOE 64 FR 8553 NOI 7301999...

  5. Sodium-bearing Waste Treatment Technology Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles M. Barnes; Arlin L. Olson; Dean D. Taylor

    2004-05-01

    Sodium-bearing waste (SBW) disposition is one of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operation Office’s (NE-ID) and State of Idaho’s top priorities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL has been working over the past several years to identify a treatment technology that meets NE-ID and regulatory treatment requirements, including consideration of stakeholder input. Many studies, including the High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), have resulted in the identification of five treatment alternatives that form a short list of perhaps the most appropriate technologies for the DOE to select from. The alternatives are (a) calcination with maximum achievable control technology (MACT) upgrade, (b) steam reforming, (c) cesium ion exchange (CsIX) with immobilization, (d) direct evaporation, and (e) vitrification. Each alternative has undergone some degree of applied technical development and preliminary process design over the past four years. This report presents a summary of the applied technology and process design activities performed through February 2004. The SBW issue and the five alternatives are described in Sections 2 and 3, respectively. Details of preliminary process design activities for three of the alternatives (steam reforming, CsIX, and direct evaporation) are presented in three appendices. A recent feasibility study provides the details for calcination. There have been no recent activities performed with regard to vitrification; that section summarizes and references previous work.