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Sample records for ne ut ct

  1. UT Austin's Energy Poll Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    UT Austin's Energy Poll, a webinar from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

  2. 19Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1939WH02: 19Ne. 1952SC15: 19Ne. 1954JO21: 19Ne. 1954NA29: 19Ne. 1957AL29: 19Ne. 1957PE12: 19Ne. 1958WE25: 19Ne. 1960JA12: 19Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960WA04: 19Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1962EA02: 19Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1964VA23: 19Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1968GO10: 19Ne; measured T1/2. 1972LE33: 19Ne; measured K/β+ ratios.

  3. 17Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne +-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1964MC16: 17Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1966HA22: 17Ne; deduced log ft. 1967ES02: 17Ne; measured not...

  4. 18Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1954GO17: 18Ne. 1961BU05: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1961EC02: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963FR10: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1965FR09: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1968GO05: 18Ne; measured Eγ, Iγ; deduced Iβ, log ft. 18F deduced levels, branching ratios. 1970AL11: 18Ne; measured T1/2; deduced log ft, β-branching. 1970AS06,

  5. UtLA^S^/^'S/^^^

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UtLA^S^/^'S/^^^ r^J Secor^ Progress Report for AEC Contract AT(04-3)34, P. A. 218 MULTIHETEROMACROCYCLES THAT C O M P L E X METAL IONS {^Cl PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Donald J. Cram, Professor of Chemistry INSTITUTIONAL AFFILIATION: Department of Chemistry University of California at Los Angeles 405 Hilgard Avenue Los Angeles, California 90024 REPORTING PERIOD: DATE OF THIS REPORT: 1 May 1975 - 30 April 1976 15 January 1976 Prepared for the ERDA, Division of Physical Research, under Contract

  6. 15Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm for 15Ne Adopted value: 0.59 MeV (2014WA09) Measured Mass Excess for 15Ne Adopted value: 40215 ± 69 keV (2014WA09) Measurements 2014WA09: C(17Ne, 2p)15Ne, E = 500 MeV/nucleon; measured reaction products; deduced fractional energy spectra, J, π, energy levels, atomic mass excess. 15Ne(2p); measured decay products, Ep, Ip; deduced implications for 13O + p + p system. Back to Top Back to Ground-State Decays Data Main Page Back to

  7. Insights from UT Austin Energy Poll

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Insights from UT Austin Energy Poll on U.S. Consumer Attitudes, July 24, 2013, Sheril Kirshenbaum, director of The Energy Poll.

  8. 16Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm for 16Ne Adopted value: 122 ± 37 keV (1993TI07) Measured Mass Excess for 16Ne Adopted value: 23996 ± 20 keV (2003AU02) Measurements 1971MAXQ: 16O(π+, π-); measured particle spectra, σ. 1977HO13: 16O(π+, π-), E = 145 MeV; measured σ; deduced Q. 16Ne deduced mass excess. 1977KEZX: 20Ne(α, 8He), E = 118 MeV; measured σ. 16Ne deduced levels, mass excess. 1978BU09: 16O(π+, π-), E = 145 MeV; measured σ. 16Ne deduced mass

  9. Y-12/UT | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    /UT Y-12/UT The mp4 video format is not supported by this browser. Download video Captions: On Time: 3:33 min. Learn how Y-12 and UT are benefitting by working together

  10. Y-12, UT sign agreement to continue, expand collaborative work...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UT sign agreement to ... Y-12, UT sign agreement to continue, expand collaborative work Posted: December 18, 2014 - 6:22pm UT Chancellor Jimmy G. Cheek (left) and CNS President and...

  11. Category:Salt Lake City, UT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Salt Lake City, UT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total....

  12. Y-12/UT Collaboration | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UT Collaboration Y-12UT Collaboration Y-12's formal partnership with the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is now well into its second year, and the two institutions have made...

  13. Category:Cedar City, UT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KB SVLargeHotel Cedar City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVLargeHotel Cedar Cit... 54 KB SVOutPatient Cedar City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVOutPatient...

  14. Consent Order, UT-Battelle, LLC | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    UT-Battelle, LLC Consent Order, UT-Battelle, LLC May 2015 Nuclear Safety Enforcement Consent Order issued to UT-Battelle, LLC for deficiencies associated with an airborne radiation release and radiological uptake by workers at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. On May 14, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement issued a Consent Order (NCO-2015-01) to UT-Battelle, LLC, for deficiencies associated with an airborne radiation release and radiological uptake by workers

  15. NE-23,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    t:"'. ? - ' y5 NE-23, wk$& Dr. Joseph A. Warburton Chainnan, Radiological and Toxicological Safety Board University of Nevada System DRI/ASC, P.O. Box 60220 Reno, Nevada 89506 Dear Dr. Warburton: The Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), has reviewed information on the Mackay School of M ines facility at the University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada, to determine whether it contains residual radioactivity traceable to activities

  16. NE-23:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 , : -2 rn; NE-23: 4 Whitr%; Ms. Theresa Schaffer 3315 S. Emerald Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60616 Dear Ms. Schaffer: . -. r ;-, .4r.-,. , ' P?;c \ \ ; . EC.. ., . The Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), has reviewed information on the former General Services Administratlon 39th Street Werehouse, Chicago, Illincis, to determine whether it contains residual radioactivity traceable to activities conducted on behalf of the Manhattan

  17. NE-24

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    VW- 50 "id AU6 3 1983 NE-24 .' . _ : ' : R&D Decontamination Projects Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Actlon Program (FUSRAP) '_ F .- ,: 'J,.LaGrone, Manager . Oak Ridge Operations Office As a result of the House-Senate Conference Report and the Energy and Water Appropriations Act for FY 1984, and based on the data in the attached reports indicating radioactive contamination in excess of acceptable guidelines, the sites listed in the attachment and their respective vicinity

  18. BooNE: About BooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About BooNE General Information BooNE Collaboration BooNE Experiment BooNE vs MiniBooNE Interesting Facts Posters Virtual Tour Picture Gallery News Articles BooNE photo montage Technical Information BooNE Proposal Original BooNE proposal (30M ps) Run Plan MiniBooNE Run Plan(3.0M ps.gz) Detector TDR Technical Design Report for the MiniBooNE detector (6.1M .ps.gz) Horn TDR Technical Design Report for the MiniBooNE horn (7.5M .ps.gz) 8GeV Beam TDR Technical Design Report for the primary beam (0.4M

  19. NE-20

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    hi v. !&-2:. /qL lo 1 OCT 2 9 1984 NE-20 -. Authorization for Remedial Action of the Ashland 2 Site, Tonawanda, New York f! Joe LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office Based on the Aerial Radiological Survey (Attachment 1) and a "walk-on" radiologlcal survey (Attachment 2 , excerpted from the ORNL draft report "Ground-Level Investigation of Anomalous Gamma Radiation Levels in the Tonawanda, New York, Area," January 1980), the property identified as Ashland 2 is

  20. Enforcement Notice of Intent to Investigate, UT Battelle | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy UT Battelle Enforcement Notice of Intent to Investigate, UT Battelle January 2015 The DOE Office of Enforcement issued a Notice of Intent to Investigate potential nuclear safety noncompliances associated with an unexpected airborne release and radiological uptake at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. On January 15, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of Enforcement notified UT-Battelle, the operating contractor for DOE's Oak Ridge

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/18-UT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Underground Storage Tank Permit (18-UT-a) Utah Department of Environmental Quality Division of...

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/8-UT-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UT-c < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools...

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/3-UT-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lease (Utah Trust Lands) (3-UT-e) The Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (UTLA) administers the sale, exchange, and lease of state school and institutional...

  4. Y-12, UT, and Stanley Healthcare work to advance technology ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    during the Tennessee Valley Corridor's National Technology Summit at Y-12's New Hope Center in Oak Ridge. (From left) Taylor Eighmy, UT's vice chancellor for research and...

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/14-UT-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Underground Injection Control Permit (14-UT-c) The Safe Drinking Water Act requires Utah to implement technical...

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/3-UT-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us State Encroachment Process (3-UT-c) The Utah Department...

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/6-UT-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UT-c < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools...

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/3-UT-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us State Land Easement (3-UT-b) The Utah Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands...

  9. 1. Hallam Nuclear Power Facility, NE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hallam Nuclear Power Facility, NE 1969 1998 2. Piqua Nuclear Power Facility, OH 1969 1998 3. Bayo Canyon, NM 1982 1998 4. Kellex/Pierpont, NJ 1982 1998 5. University of California, CA 1982 1998 6. Acid/Pueblo Canyons, NM 1984 1999 7. Chupadera Mesa, NM 1984 1999 8. Canonsburg, PA 1986 1999 9.Shiprock, NM 1987 2000 10. Middlesex Municipal Landfill, NJ 1987 2000 11. Niagara Falls Storage Site Vicinity Properties, NY 1987 2001 12. Salt Lake City, UT 1989 2001 13. Spook, WY 1989 2001 14. National

  10. BooNE Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Goals of BooNE BooNE in a Nutshell Making Neutrinos Detecting Neutrinos schematic of BooNE experiment A sample event (3M animated PDF file) A cosmic ray event as displayed by the MiniBooNE detector.

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Bureau of Mines - UT 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    UT 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: U. S. BUREAU OF MINES (UT.01) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Salt Lake City , Utah UT.01-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 UT.01-1 Site Operations: Research and development on uranium recovery from ore in the late 1940s. UT.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria UT.01-1 UT.01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium UT.01-2

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/3-UT-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    linked below for more information on the federal leasing process. Green arrow.PNG 3-FD-a: Federal Land Leasing 3-UT-d.8 - Does the Developer Accept the Addendum to Geothermal...

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/12-UT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    not in range. Flowchart Narrative 12-UT-a.1 - Consult regarding potential impacts on fish and wildlife In order to accurately assess the impacts of the project on Utah's...

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/9-UT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Us Energy Pre-Design Meeting Process (9-UT-a) 09UTAEnergyPreDesignMeetingProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number...

  15. DOI-BLM-UT-C010-????-????-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ????-????-CX Jump to: navigation, search NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-UT-C010-????-????-CX CX at Cove Fort Geothermal Area for GeothermalExploration CX at Cove Fort...

  16. UT-Battelle Consent Order NCO-2015-02

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Office of Enterprise Assessments Enclosure: Consent Order (NCO-2015-01) cc: Johnny Moore, SC-OSO Michele Branton, SC-OSO Debbie Jenkins, UT-Battelle In the matter of ) Report No. ...

  17. BooNE: Picture Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Picture Gallery BooNE Collaboration Members of the BooNE collaboration Civil Construction Pictorial progress of BooNE civil construction work Detector Installation Pictorial...

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Monticello Mill Site - UT 03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mill Site - UT 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Monticello Mill Site (UT.03) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites Documents Related to Monticello Mill Site Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Interim Remedial Action Progress Report July 1999-July 2000.

  19. BooNE Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collaboration The BooNE collaboration consists of approximately sixty-five physicists from 13 institutions. While small on the scale of high energy physics experiments, BooNE thrives from the diversity of its membership. This includes scientists from national laboratories, research universities, predominantly undergraduate institutions, as well as a high school physics teacher. List of Collaborators The BooNE Collaboration The BooNE Collaboration

  20. MicroBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE MicroBooNE Investigating the field of high energy physics through experiments that strengthen our fundamental understanding of matter, energy, space, and time. Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664 Email Bruce Carlsten (505) 667-5657 Email MicroBooNE schematic drawing Figure 1: A schematic drawing of the MicroBooNE liquid argon TPC detector. The main goals of the MicroBooNE experiment are: (1) to demonstrate the capabilities of a liquid argon TPC in the reconstruction of neutrino

  1. SciBooNE/MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particles * p separation using dEdx 2m 4m Used in K2K experiment Used in CHORUS, HARP and K2K Parts recycled from past experiments 31 SciBooNE publications * NuMu...

  2. Climate Action Champions: Salt Lake City, UT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Salt Lake City, UT Climate Action Champions: Salt Lake City, UT Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, blends snowy mountain ranges with an urban downtown. Known historically as the “Crossroads of the West,” Salt Lake City today is a major economic center in the Great Basin and a hub of tourism. │ Photo courtesy of University of Utah Department of Mathematics. Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, blends snowy mountain ranges with an urban downtown. Known historically as the

  3. Preliminary Notice of Violation, UT-Battelle, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UT-Battelle, LLC Preliminary Notice of Violation, UT-Battelle, LLC June 16, 2015 Worker Safety and Health Enforcement Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to UT-Battelle, LLC On June 16, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of Enforcement issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (WEA-2015-05) to UT-Battelle, LLC, the operating contractor for DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for violations of the Department's worker safety and health program

  4. MicroBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    optic transmission of the Resistive Wall Monitor (RWM) beam crossing time to transmit the signal to the detector. In the past, for MiniBooNE, this was done with an RG59 copper...

  5. BooNE: Posters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Posters What's a Neutrino? How neutrinos fit into our understanding of the universe. Recipe for a Neutrino Beam Start with some protons... concocting the MiniBooNE beam. The...

  6. UT-Battelle Consent Order NCO-2015-02

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    14, 2015 Dr. Thomas Mason Laboratory Director UT-Battelle, LLC 1201 Oak Ridge Turnpike Suite 100 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 NCO-2015-01 Dear Dr. Mason: The Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of Enforcement completed its investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with the airborne contamination release and radiological uptake by seven individuals, which occurred on August 25, 2014, during size reduction of uranium metal alloy items in Building 3525 at Oak Ridge National

  7. BooNE versus MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vs MiniBooNE MiniBooNE refers to the first phase of the BooNE experiment and describes the neutrino oscillation measurements that will be made with a single detector. If neutrino oscillations are observed, then MiniBooNE will be upgraded to a second detector. This 2-detector arrangement (BooNE) will fulfill the second and final stage of the experiment. The BooNE experiment sets out to definitively explore the neutrino oscillation signal reported by the Los Alamos LSND experiment. MiniBooNE

  8. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20Ne(α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1983SC17 20Ne(α, γ): deduced S-factor of capture σ 0.55 - 3.2 X4 09/15/2011 1997WI12 20Ne(α, γ): deduced primary transitions yield 1.64 - 2.65 X4 09/15/2011 1999KO34 20Ne(α, γ): γ-ray yield for the transition 1.9 - 2.8 g.s. 01/03/2012 1369 keV g.s. 10917 keV g.s., 1369 keV 11016 keV g.s. 1975KU06 20Ne(α, γ): σ 2.5 - 20 X4 09/15/2011 1968HI02 20Ne(α, γ): σ 3 - 6 X4 09/15/2011

  9. Post-test analysis of semiscale tests S-UT-6 and S-UT-7 using TRAC PF1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyack, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    A posttest study of Semiscale Tests S-UT-6 and S-UT-7 has been completed to assess TRAC-PFl predictions of pressurized water-reactor (PWR) small-break transients. The comparisons of the TRAC calculations and experimental results show that the correct qualitative influence of upper-head injection (UHI) was predicted. The major phenomenological difference predicted was the mode of core voiding. The data show a slow boiloff from the top of the core resulting in a dryout near the top of the core only. TRAC predicted a more extensive voiding with fluid forced from the bottom of the core by a pressure increase in the upper vessel plenum. The pressure increase was the primary consequence of a failure to predict a complete clearance of the seal in the intact-loop pump-suction upflow leg. Further review of the interphasic drag correlations, entrainment correlations, and critical-flow model is recommended. 20 figures.

  10. BooNE: Interesting Facts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interesting Facts About the BooNE experiment: BooNE is the only experiment to search the entire range covered by the LSND oscillation signal. First proposed in 1997, BooNE will be ready to collect data in summer, 2002. The BooNE collaboration is small by high energy physics standards, having 65 physicists from 13 instiutions. If BooNE detects a supernova, it will send an automatic signal to telescopes around the world describing its position. BooNE collaboration - click to enlarge About the

  11. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1981DY03 20Ne(p, p'): for production of -rays threshold - 23 1.63-MeV -rays...

  12. NE - Nuclear Energy - Energy Conservation Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NUCLEAR ENERGY (NE) ENERGY CONSERVATION PLAN NE has heavily emphasized the use of flexiplace, both regular and situational. Since approximately 56 percent of NE staff use ...

  13. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Booster Neutrino Experiment (BooNE) Goals of BooNE BooNE in a Nutshell Making Neutrinos Detecting Neutrinos

  14. CNS contributes to UT's College of Engineering Diversity Program | Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Security Complex contributes to UT's ... CNS contributes to UT's College of Engineering Diversity Program Posted: June 8, 2015 - 5:30pm Mike Beck (center), Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC, Vice President of Mission Engineering, presents a check to Wayne Davis (left), Dean of the College of Engineering, and Travis Griffin (right), Director of UT's Office of Diversity Programs for the College of Engineering. Earlier this year Consolidated Nuclear Security Vice President of Mission

  15. Preliminary Notice of Violation, UT-Battelle, LLC- EA-2003-10

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to UT-Battelle, LLC, related to Work Control Issues at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Garbett Homes, Herriman, UT,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Production Home | Department of Energy Garbett Homes, Herriman, UT, Production Home DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Garbett Homes, Herriman, UT, Production Home Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Herriman, UT, that scored HERS 40 without PV, -1 with PV. This 4,111-square-foot production home has R-23 advanced framed walls, and a vented attic with R-60 blown fiberglass. PDF icon Garbett Homes - Herriman, UT More Documents & Publications DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case

  17. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The DOE Tours MicroBooNE! - Nov. 27, 2012

  18. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Progress in Delivering Beam to MiniBooNE

  19. UPdate THE NE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UPdate THE NE January 2014 Edition U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy University Programs It's not every day graduate students get to meet one of nuclear energy's most important decision makers. Integrated University Program (IUP) Fellows had this opportunity at the 2013 Winter American Nuclear Society (ANS) Meeting this past November in Washington, D.C. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Dr. Pete Lyons, greeted IUP Fellows in a special meeting to discuss

  20. Saltone 2QCY15 TCLP toxicity and UTS results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. H.

    2015-08-01

    A Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the second quarter of calendar year 2015 (2QCY15). After a 28 day cure, a sample of the SDF waste form was collected, and shipped to a certified laboratory for Toxic Characteristic and Universal Treatment Standards (UTS) analysis. The metals analysis is performed using the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP)1. The 2QCY15 saltstone sample results meet South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents (UHC).

  1. Saltstone 1QCY15 TCLP Toxicity and UTS Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.

    2015-07-29

    A Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the first quarter of calendar year 2015 (1QCY15). After a 28 day cure, a sample of the SDF waste form was collected, and shipped to a certified laboratory for Toxic Characteristic and Universal Treatment Standards (UTS) analysis. The metals analysis is performed using the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The 1QCY15 saltstone sample results meet South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents (UHC).

  2. Saltstone 2QCY15 TCLP toxicity and UTS results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. H.

    2015-07-31

    A Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the second quarter of calendar year 2015 (2QCY15). After a 28 day cure, a sample of the SDF waste form was collected, and shipped to a certified laboratory for Toxic Characteristic and Universal Treatment Standards (UTS) analysis. The metals analysis is performed using the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The 2QCY15 saltstone sample results meet South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents (UHC).

  3. Saltstone 3QCY15 TCLP Toxicity and UTS Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.

    2015-12-09

    A Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the third quarter of calendar year 2015 (3QCY15). After a 28 day cure, a sample of the SDF waste form was collected, and shipped to a certified laboratory for Toxic Characteristic and Universal Treatment Standards (UTS) analysis. The metals analysis is performed using the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).1 The 3QCY15 saltstone sample results meet South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents (UHC).

  4. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Picture Gallery BooNE Collaboration Members of the BooNE collaboration Civil Construction Pictorial progress of BooNE civil construction work Detector Installation Pictorial progress of MiniBooNE detector installation BooNE Scrapbook A selection from BooNE

  5. US NE MA Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption

  6. US NE MA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption

  7. Preliminary Notice of Violation, UT-Battelle, LLC - EA-2004-09 | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy 4-09 Preliminary Notice of Violation, UT-Battelle, LLC - EA-2004-09 November 18, 2004 Issued to UT-Battelle, LLC, related to a Hot Cell Radiological Spill Event at Oak Ridge National Laboratory On November 18, 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (EA-2004-09) to UT-Battelle, LLC for violations of 10 C.F.R. Parts 830 and 835 associated with an October 3, 2006, hot cell radiological spill event at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. PDF icon

  8. Preliminary Notice of Violation, UT-Battelle, LLC - EA-2005-06 | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy 5-06 Preliminary Notice of Violation, UT-Battelle, LLC - EA-2005-06 December 16, 2005 Issued to UT-Battelle, LLC, related to Facility Hazard Categorization and Safety Basis Compliance Issues at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, December 16, 2005 On December 16, 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (EA-2005-06) to UT-Battelle, LLC for violations of 10 C.F.R. 830 relating to nuclear facility hazard categorization and safety basis compliance issues

  9. Department of Energy Cites UT-Battelle, LLC, for Worker Safety and Health

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Violations | Department of Energy Energy Cites UT-Battelle, LLC, for Worker Safety and Health Program Violations Department of Energy Cites UT-Battelle, LLC, for Worker Safety and Health Program Violations June 17, 2015 - 3:01pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 DOENews@hq.doe.gov WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to UT-Battelle, LLC, (UTB) for violations of DOE worker safety and health requirements.

  10. MiniBooNE E. D. Zimmerman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SciBooNE Detector TargetHorn SciBooNE constraint reduces error at MiniBooNE * Flux errors become 1-2% level: negligible for this analysis * Cross-section errors reduced, but...

  11. DOI-BLM-UT-W019-2011-0006-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6-CX Jump to: navigation, search NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-UT-W019-2011-0006-CX CX for GeothermalExploration CX for Thermal Gradient Holes at Pavant Valley for...

  12. DOI-BLM-UT-W019-2011-0007-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    7-CX Jump to: navigation, search NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-UT-W019-2011-0007-CX CX for GeothermalExploration, CX for Thermal Gradient Holes at Crater Bench for...

  13. Nicole Benedek > Asst. Professor - UT Austin > Center Alumni > The Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Center at Cornell Nicole Benedek Asst. Professor - UT Austin nicole.benedek@austin.utexas.edu Formerly a member of the Fennie Group, she is now an Assistant Professor at the University of Texas at Austin.

  14. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vs MiniBooNE MiniBooNE is the first phase of the Booster Neutrino Experiment (BooNE); in this phase, neutrino oscillation measurements will be made with a single detector. If oscillations are observed, then MiniBooNE will be upgraded to stage two (BooNE) with a two-detector configuration. The BooNE experiment proposes to definitively explore the neutrino oscillation signal reported by the Los Alamos LSND experiment. MiniBooNE represents the first phase for the BooNE collaboration and consists of

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Green River Mill Site (UT.0-01 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Documents Related to Green River Mill Site Data Validation Package for the June 2009 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Green River, Utah, Disposal

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mexican Hat Mill Site - UT 0-02A

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mill Site - UT 0-02A FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Mexican Hat Mill Site (UT.0-02A) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site Documents Related to Mexican Hat Mill Site 2014 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Mexican

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Salt Lake City Vitro Chemical - UT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    0-04 Vitro Chemical - UT 0-04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Salt Lake City Vitro Chemical (UT.0-04 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Salt Lake City, Utah, Processing Site Documents Related to Salt Lake City Vitro Chemical 2014 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control

  18. Department of Energy Cites UT-Battelle, LLC, for Worker Safety

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Cites UT-Battelle, LLC, for Worker Safety and Health Program Violations WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to UT-Battelle, LLC, (UTB) for violations of DOE worker safety and health requirements. DOE's enforcement program holds contractors accountable for meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining a safe and healthy workplace. The violations are associated with program elements for the assessment and control of

  19. MiniBooNE Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Results and Follow-On Experiments W. C. LOUIS for the MiniBooNE collaboration Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA E-mail: louis@lanl.gov ABSTRACT The MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab was designed to test the LSND evi- dence for neutrino oscillations 1) . The updated MiniBooNE oscillation result in neutrino mode 2) with 6.5E20 protons on target (POT) shows no significant excess of events at higher energies (above 475 MeV), although a sizeable ex- cess

  20. A=14Ne (1981AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1AJ01) (Not illustrated) 14Ne has not been observed. See (1976BE1V

  1. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BooNE General Information BooNE Collaboration Booster Neutrino Experiment (BooNE) BooNE vs MiniBooNE Interesting Facts Posters Virtual Tour Picture Gallery News Articles Technical Information BooNE Proposal Original BooNE proposal (30M ps) Run Plan MiniBooNE Run Plan(3.0M ps.gz) Detector TDR Technical Design Report for the MiniBooNE detector (6.1M .ps.gz) Horn TDR Technical Design Report for the MiniBooNE horn (7.5M .ps.gz) 8GeV Beam TDR Technical Design Report for the primary beam (0.4M .ps.gz)

  2. Djurcic_MiniBooNE_PANIC2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE Neutrino Oscillation Results Neutrino Oscillation Results Zelimir Djurcic Zelimir Djurcic Physics Department Physics Department Columbia University Columbia University The Eighteenth Particle and The Eighteenth Particle and Nuclei International Conference Nuclei International Conference 9-14 November 2008, 9-14 November 2008, Eilat Eilat , ISRAEL , ISRAEL Outline Outline MiniBooNE MiniBooNE Motivation and Description Motivation and Description MiniBooNE MiniBooNE ' ' s s First First

  3. The MicroBooNE Project - Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Home Project Status Reporting Project Reports Monthly Reports Quarterly Reports, pre-CD2 PMG Meetings Project Management Group meetings are held on the 2nd Wednesday of each month, at 1pm CT in the Black Hole meeting room (WH2NW). Presentation materials are posted in the MicroBooNE DocDB, private access user-name is reviewer, password on request. From the DocDB home page, select Calendar, and on the Calendar click on PMG in the appropriate day box to bring up the meeting's Event Page.

  4. CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    kire 7900. 955 L*E,,fa,u PLUG S. W.. Washin@ on. D.C. 20024-2174, Tekphme: (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 CT.05 FL .0-o/ lti.Ob id.Or Dear Mr. Wallo: In/. O-01 flA.05 ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Mbj.o-03 I4 v.o+ The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.o= with your

  5. CNS/UT partnership, who's in the pipeline? | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex CNS/UT partnership, who's ... CNS/UT partnership, who's in the pipeline? Posted: January 13, 2016 - 4:44pm Dustin Giltnane, a University of Tennessee graduate student, is in the CNS pipeline and will become a full time employee in May 2016, upon completion of dual master's degrees. CNS invests in people - sometimes before they join the payroll as full-time employees. Dustin Giltnane is a prime example of that healthy pipeline at work. He graduated from the University of Tennessee

  6. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interesting Facts About the Booster Neutrino Experiment (BooNE): BooNE is the only experiment to search the entire range covered by the LSND oscillation signal. First proposed in 1997, BooNE has been collecting data since August 2002. The BooNE collaboration is small by high energy physics standards, comprising 75 physicists from 16 instiutions. If BooNE detects a supernova, it will send an automatic signal to telescopes around the world describing its position. BooNE collaboration - click to

  7. ICARUS/MicroBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ) ICARUS/MicroBooNE ν ( Φ 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 µ ν µ ν e ν e ν

  8. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Goals of BooNE BooNE's primary goal is to investigate the neutrino oscillation signal reported by the Los Alamos Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND) experiment. In 1995,...

  9. A=19Ne (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78AJ03) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19Ne) GENERAL: See (1972AJ02) and Table 19.24 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1972EN03, 1972NE1B, 1972WE01,...

  10. MiniBooNE Nuebar Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Event Excess in the MiniBooNE Search for bar numu rightarrow bar nue Oscillations", arXiv:1007.1150 hep-ex,Phys.Rev.Lett.105,181801 (2010) The following MiniBooNE...

  11. Y-12, UT sign agreement to continue, expand collaborative work | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration UT sign agreement to continue, expand collaborative work | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters

  12. A=14Ne (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ01) (Not illustrated) 14Ne, 14Na and 14Mg have not been observed. See (1983ANZQ

  13. A=14Ne (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91AJ01) (Not illustrated) 14Ne, 14Na and 14Mg have not been observed. See (1986AN07

  14. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collaboration (*) The MicroBooNE spokespeople are Bonnie Fleming (Yale) and Sam Zeller (FNAL) (+) The MicroBooNE project manager was Gina Rameika Updated collaboration list for presentations: powerpoint pdf map collaboration photo MicroBooNE organizational chart MicroBooNE contact list (password required) (IB) = Insititutional Board representative (PD) = postdoc (GS) = graduate student (UG) = undergraduate student Laboratory for High Energy Physics, University of Bern, Switzerland Martin Auger

  15. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collaboration Find here collaboration lists of MiniBooNE at various stages of the experiment Current MiniBooNE-darkmatter collaboration Original MiniBooNE collaboration From script reading a simple data base, last updated ~2008. from inspirehep.net Booster Neutrino Experiment FNAL-E-0898

  16. A=18Ne (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1959AJ76) (Not illustrated) Theory: See (RA57). 1. 18Ne(β+)18F Qm = 4.227 The maximum energy of the positrons is 3.2 ± 0.2 MeV, the half-life is 1.6 ± 0.2 sec: log ft = 2.9 ± 0.2 (GO54D). See also (DZ56). 2. 16O(3He, n)18Ne Qm = -2.966 See (KU53A). 3. 19F(p, 2n)18Ne Qm = -15.424 See (GO54D). 4. 20Ne(p, t)18Ne Qm = -19.812 Not reported

  17. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 1 Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage Projects NH 32 Awards Support Projects in 24 States 6 11 MA...

  18. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 1 Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage Projects NH 32 Awards Support Projects in 24 States 6 11 MA

  19. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 1 Smart Grid Demonstration Project Locations NH MA 16 Awards Support Projects in 21 States

  20. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 2 1 Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations NH 16 Awards Support Projects in 9 States MA

  1. A=17Ne (1977AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    77AJ02) (See the Isobar Diagram for 17Ne) GENERAL: See also (1971AJ02) and Table 17.20 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory and reviews: (1971HA1Y, 1973HA77, 1973RE17, 1975BE31). Mass of 17Ne: The mass excess of 17Ne, determined from a measurement of the Q-value of 20Ne(3He, 6He)17Ne is 16.48 ± 0.05 MeV (1970ME11, 1972CE1A). Then 17Ne - 17F = 14.53 MeV and Eb for p, 3He and α are, respectively, 1.50, 6.46 and 9.05 MeV. See also (1971AJ02). 1. (a) 17Ne(β+)17F* → 16O + p Qm = 13.93

  2. Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    m er of 2002, the cross sections for an 8 GeV proton beam on Be were m easured by the HARP ex perim ent at CERN. Harp Setup Intro ductio n Im po rtant s te ps s ince las t re v...

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Garbett Homes, Herriman, UT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Garbett Homes Herriman, UT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to give you superior

  4. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact BooNE Spokespersons: E898 (ν running); E944 (anti-ν and beam-dump running) Rex Tayloe rtayloe@indiana.edu (812) 855-3057 Richard Van de Water vdwater@lanl.gov (505) 695 8364 BooNE Experiment: contact-boone@fnal.gov Current Shifter: (505) 500 5511 Detector Enclosure: (630) 840 6881 or 6081 BooNE Collaborators and Associates:

  5. MiniBooNE E. D. Zimmerman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NNN'10 Recent Results from MiniBooNE * MiniBooNE * Neutrino cross-sections * Quasielastic and elastic scattering * Hadron production channels * Neutrino Oscillations * Antineutrino Oscillations Motivating MiniBooNE: LSND Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector * Stopped + beam at Los Alamos LAMPF produces e , , but no e (due to capture). * Neutron thermalizes, captures ➨2.2 MeV -ray * Look for the delayed coincidence. * Major background non-beam (measured, subtracted) * 3.8 standard dev. excess

  6. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scrapbook Page 2 The BooNE collaboration in winter. A tour of the construction site. Working with the BooNE Horn. BooNE in the winter A tour of the construction site. A day with the Horn Janet, Bonnie, and Jen in the Tank. Janet and Bill: the early years. Bill, Richard, Jeff, and Shawn in the midst of discussion. Preparing the tubes Janet and Bill: the early days Discussion in progress The oil tanker arrives. The final stages of oil filling. The BooNE Collaboration in the summer. The oil tanker

  7. Recent Results from MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Results from MiniBooNE and the Future Project LBNE Christopher Mauger 18 December 2009 Los Alamos NaEonal Laboratory Outline * Overview of MiniBooNE * Recent OscillaEon Results * IntroducEon to the Next GeneraEon of Long- Baseline Experiment * SensiEvity PotenEal of LBNE * Conclusions MiniBooNE moEvated by LSND Result * MiniBooNE designed to test LSND result: 3.8σ appearance of electron anEneutrino in muon anEneutrino beam * Use the same L/E but in different energy regime - different

  8. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dominate. For MiniBooNE, the contributions from multi-pion production and deep inelastic scattering (DIS) are small. image: neutrino cross sections vs energy There are...

  9. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Civil Construction Pictures The civil construction required for the MiniBooNE experiment consists of two independent construction projects. The Detector Construction: This project...

  10. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Releases This page provides MiniBooNE data (histograms, error matrices, ntuples, etc) released in association with particular publications. Only the subset of MiniBooNE papers with released data are listed here. Refer to the Publications page for a complete list of MiniBooNE publications. Other MiniBooNE Data Releases: Data Released with A.A. Aguilar-Arevalo et al., "First Measurement of the Muon Antineutrino Double-Differential Charged-Current Quasielastic Cross section",

  11. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE In the News MicroBooNE internal newletters (password protected) The Hidden Neutrino, Symmetry Magazine, 03/01/16 Booster Neutrino Beam Reaches Record Beam Intensity, Fermilab This Week, 02/02/16 MicroBooNE Sees First Accelerator-Born Neutrinos, Fermilab Today, 11/02/15 MicroBooNE Sees First Accelerator-Born Neutrinos, Symmetry Magazine, 11/02/15 Detector Finds its First Ghost Particle, Daily Mail, 11/03/15 First Evidence of Neutrinos, Daily Galaxy, 11/03/15 A Neutrino in a Haystack,

  12. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE Documents and Publications Public Notes See the Public Notes Page for a list of notes with results made public by the MicroBooNE collaboration. Presentations See the Talks Page for copies of slides and posters presented at conferences and workshops. MicroBooNE DocDB Like most experiments at Fermilab, MicroBooNE uses DocDB - a documents database. Much of the contents of the DocDB are restricted to members of the collaboration, but some items are public. Use the link below to enter the

  13. MiniBooNE Pion Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contents: Pion Group Home Pion Group Members Pion References Colin's Cross Section Page MiniBooNE Internal Email M. Tzanov.

  14. MiniBooNE Results / MicroBooNE Status! Eric Church, Yale University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at this talk?) 3 Outline MiniBooNE past results future MicroBooNE physics motivation R&D motivation status: (running is imminent) 4 The Booster...

  15. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The BooNE collaboration consists of approximately sixty-five physicists from 13 institutions. While small on the scale of high energy physics experiments, BooNE thrives from the diversity of its membership. This includes scientists from national laboratories, research universities, predominantly undergraduate institutions, as well as a high school physics teacher. List of Collaborators

  16. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Details This page provides information on the MiniBooNE experiment. Images are linked in their own page with captions. Additional resources are the Talks, Slides and Posters page, Publications page, and Data Release page Beamline Flux Detector Cross sections Light Propagation (Optical Model) Calibration Particle Identification BooNE photo montage

  17. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For Physicists These pages provides information (numbers, plots, details) of the MiniBooNE experiment and analysis pieces. Images are linked in their own page with captions. Additional resources are the Talks, Slides and Posters page and the Publications page Experiment Details Data Releases BooNE photo montage

  18. MiniBooNE Collaboration MiniBooNE Collaboration Yale University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Neutrino Oscillation Search Progress on a Neutrino Oscillation Search at MiniBooNE at MiniBooNE B. T. Fleming for the B. T. Fleming for the MiniBooNE Collaboration MiniBooNE Collaboration Yale University Yale University The LSND experiment observed ν e appearance in a ν μ beam MiniBooNE experiment: designed to confirm or rule out the LSND result ν e appearance in a ν μ beam L=540 m (~x20 LSND) E = 800 MeV (~x20 LSND) 8 GeV protons from Fermilab Booster incident on target inside horn π's

  19. A=16Ne (1982AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    82AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 16Ne) GENERAL: See also (1977AJ02) and Table 16.27 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theoretical work: (1978GU10, 1978SP1C, 1981LI1M). Reviews: (1977CE05, 1979AL1J, 1980TR1E). Mass of 16Ne: The Q-values of the 20Ne(α, 8He) and 16O(π+, π-) reactions lead to an atomic mass excess of 24.02 ± 0.04 MeV for 16Ne. 16Ne is then unbound with respect to decay into 14O + 2p by 1.43 MeV and is bound with respect to decay into 15F + p by 0.04 MeV. 1. 16O(π+,

  20. A=17Ne (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 17Ne) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 17.26 preview 17.26 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). 1. (a) 17Ne(β+)17F* → 16O + p Qm = 13.928 (b) 17Ne(β+)17F → 13N + α Qm = 8.711 (c) 17Ne(β+)17F Qm = 14.529 The half-life of 17Ne has been reported as 109.0 ± 1.0 msec (1971HA05) and 109.3 ± 0.6 msec (1988BO39): the weighted mean is 109.2 ± 0.6 and we adopt it. The decay is primarily to the proton unstable states of 17F at 4.65, 5.49, 6.04 and 8.08 MeV

  1. A=17Ne (71AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    71AJ02) (See the Isobar Diagram for 17Ne) GENERAL: See also Table 17.22 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: (WI64E, MA65J, MA66BB). Reviews: (BA60Q, GO60P, BA61F, GO62N, GO64J, GO66J, GO66L, MC66E, CE68A, GA69M). Mass of 17Ne: M - A, determined from the Q-value of the 20Ne(3He, 6He)17Ne reaction, is 16.479 ± 0.050 MeV (ME70E). See also (ES67). Then 17Ne - 17F = 14.53 MeV and Eb for p, 3He and α are, respectively, 1.50, 6.46 and 9.05 MeV. [Eb for an α-particle is calculated using

  2. 2011 APS-DPP Poster Session, Salt Lake City, UT | Princeton Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab APS-DPP Poster Session, Salt Lake City, UT View larger image DSCN 0030 View larger image DSCN 0031 View larger image DSCN 0032 View larger image DSCN 0033 View larger image DSCN 0035 View larger image DSCN 0037 View larger image DSCN 0039 View larger image DSCN 0040 View larger image DSCN 0041 View larger image DSCN 0042 View larger image DSCN 0043 View larger image DSCN 0045 View larger image DSCN 0047 View larger image DSCN 0049 View larger image DSCN 0050 View larger image DSCN 0051

  3. Results of the 2013 UT modeling benchmark obtained with models implemented in CIVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toullelan, Gwnal; Raillon, Raphale; Chatillon, Sylvain; Lonne, Sbastien

    2014-02-18

    The 2013 Ultrasonic Testing (UT) modeling benchmark concerns direct echoes from side drilled holes (SDH), flat bottom holes (FBH) and corner echoes from backwall breaking artificial notches inspected with a matrix phased array probe. This communication presents the results obtained with the models implemented in the CIVA software: the pencilmodel is used to compute the field radiated by the probe, the Kirchhoff approximation is applied to predict the response of FBH and notches and the SOV (Separation Of Variables) model is used for the SDH responses. The comparison between simulated and experimental results are presented and discussed.

  4. TO UT ICA METAIS DIVISIONOF THEUTICADROPFORGEQ TOOT, CORP. NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    UT ICA METAIS DIVISIONOF THEUTICADROPFORGEQ TOOT, CORP. NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO P. 0. BOX 18% MT. HEALTHY WATION CINCINNATI 51. OHIO December 9, 1955 FROM Herbert Davis REFERENCE OBJECTIVEOFlRIF This visit was made to observe the physical equipment and the personnel at Utica Metals Division as a possible source for development work i'n vacuum melting and casting. CONCLU!3IOZG AND RECOMMENDATIOlYS The prime business of this Division of the Utica Drop Forge & Tool Corp. is the production

  5. Automatic UT inspection of economizer at TVA`s Paradise plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brophy, J.W.; Chang, P.

    1995-12-31

    In March 1995, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and Southwest Research Institute (SwRi) conducted testing of a multi-element ultrasonic probe designed to inspect economizer tubing in the Paradise power plant during the spring outage. This evaluation was to determine general loss of wall thickness due to erosion/corrosion and preferential inside diameter (ID) corrosion at butt welds in straight sections of the tube. The erosion/corrosion wall loss occurs during service while the butt weld corrosion occurs out-of-service when water collects in the weld groove during outages and results in localized pitting in the weld groove. The ultrasonic (UT) probe was designed to acquire thickness measurements from the ID of the economizer tubes and to be accurate, very rapid UT inspection. To attain a high rate of speed inside the tubes, an eight-element circular array of transducers were designed into the probe head. Thickness data and location data are collected automatically by a portable computer.

  6. MPO.NE7Summit.120320.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MPO.P4.03 High Fidelity Fuel Performance Model Development: Focus on Benchmark & Validation activities for PCI and CRUD Brian Wirth University of Tennessee-Knoxville (UT-K) Chris Stanek, Brian Kendrick Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Robert Montgomery Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Richard Williamson, Jason Hales, Derek Gaston, Richard Martineau Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Dion Sunderland, Joe Rashid Anatech Michael Short Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

  7. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a Nutshell BooNE will investigate the question of neutrino mass by searching for oscillations of muon neutrinos into electron neutrinos. This will be done by directing a muon neutrino beam into the MiniBooNE detector and looking for electron neutrinos. This experiment is motivated by the oscillation results reported by the LSND experiment at Los Alamos. By changing the muon neutrino beam into a muon anti-neutrino beam, BooNE can explore oscillations from muon anti-neutrinos to electron

  8. MiniBooNE Flux Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Neutrino Flux Prediction at MiniBooNE", arXiv:0806.1449 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. D. 79, 072002 (2009) The following MiniBooNE information from the large flux paper in 2009 is made available to the public: Text files containing flux information for each neutrino species Positive horn polarity (neutrino-enhanced mode) Negative horn polarity (anti neutrino-enhanced mode) Contact Information For clarifications on how to use MiniBooNE public data or for enquiries about additional data not linked

  9. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proceedings This page contains links to conference proceedings submitted by members of the MiniBooNE collaboration New Guidelines for Submitting Proceedings at MiniBooNE: As of June 2007, we have changed the rules on conference proceedings. Proceedings must be read by one other MiniBooNE person (besides the author) of postdoc level or above before being submitted. Proceedings should also be sent to boone-talks@fnal.gov for archiving on this website. back to Talks page Speaker Proceedings Info

  10. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The primary goal of The inside of the MiniBooNE tank is covered with 1280 photomultiplier tubes. (Courtesy: Fermilab Visual Media Services) this experiment is: To test for neutrino mass by searching for neutrino oscillations. Neutrino mass is important because it may lead us to physics beyond the Standard Model. Masses in the range accessible to MiniBooNE will expand our understanding of how the universe has evolved. The BooNE project began in 1997. The first beam induced neutrino events were

  11. About the MicroBooNE Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About MicroBooNE The MicroBooNE collaboration is currently operating a large 170-ton liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) that is located on the Booster neutrino beam line at Fermilab. The experiment will measure low energy neutrino cross sections and investigate the low energy excess events observed by the MiniBooNE experiment. The detector also serves as a next step in a phased program towards the construction of massive kiloton scale LArTPC detectors for future long-baseline neutrino

  12. A=16Ne (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ04) (See the Isobar Diagram for 16Ne) GENERAL: See also (1982AJ01) and Table 16.26 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. See (1981SE1B, 1983ANZQ, 1985AN28, 1985MA1X). Mass of 16Ne: The Q-values of the 20Ne(α, 8He) and 16O(π+, π-) reactions lead to atomic mass excesses of 23.93 ± 0.08 MeV (1978KE06), 23.978 ± 0.024 MeV (1983WO01) and 24.048 ± 0.045 MeV (1980BU15) [recalculated using the (1985WA02) masses for 8He, 16O and 20Ne]. The weighted mean is 23.989 ± 0.020 MeV which is

  13. A=16Ne (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 16Ne) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 16.29 preview 16.29 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 16.32 preview 16.32 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 16Ne: The Q-values of the 20Ne(α, 8He) and 16O(π+, π-) reactions lead to atomic mass excesses of 23.93 ± 0.08 MeV (1978KE06), 23.978 ± 0.024 MeV (1983WO01) and 24.048 ± 0.045 MeV (1980BU15) [recalculated using the (1985WA02) masses for 8He, 16O and 20Ne]. The weighted mean is

  14. A=17Ne (1982AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    82AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 17Ne) GENERAL: See (1977AJ02) and Table 17.22 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory and reviews:(1975BE56, 1977CE05, 1978GU10, 1978WO1E, 1979BE1H). Other topics:(1981GR08). Mass of 17Ne: The mass excess adopted by (1977WA08) is 16.478 ± 0.026 MeV, based on unpublished data. We retain the mass excess 16.48 ± 0.05 MeV based on the evidence reviewed in (1977AJ02). 1. (a) 17Ne(β+)17F* → 16O + p Qm = 13.93 (b) 17Ne(β+)17F Qm = 14.53 The half-life of

  15. A=17Ne (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ04) (See the Isobar Diagram for 17Ne) GENERAL: See (1982AJ01) and Table 17.20 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory and reviews: (1983ANZQ, 1983AU1B, 1985AN28). 1. (a) 17Ne(β+)17F* → 16O + p Qm = 13.93 (b) 17Ne(β+)17F Qm = 14.53 The half-life of 17Ne is 109.0 ± 1.0 msec (1971HA05). Earlier values (see (1971AJ02)) gave a mean value of 108.0 ± 2.7 msec. The decay is primarily to the proton unstable states of 17F at 4.70, 5.52 and 6.04 MeV with Jπ = 3/2-, 3/2- and 1/2-: see

  16. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on a beryllium target. The beam is modeled with measured mean position and angle with Gaussian smearing. MiniBooNE simulates the effects of varying the spread in the beam and...

  17. A=19Ne (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19Ne) GENERAL: See (1978AJ03) and Table 19.23 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1978MA2H, 1978PE09, 1978PI06,...

  18. A=18Ne (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1978AJ03) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18Ne) GENERAL: See also (1972AJ02) and Table 18.22 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1972EN03, 1974LO04)....

  19. A=19Ne (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19Ne) GENERAL: See (1983AJ01) and Table 19.21 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models:(1983BR29, 1983PO02). Special states:...

  20. A=18Ne (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18Ne) GENERAL: See also (1978AJ03) and Table 18.21 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1979DA15, 1979SA31,...

  1. A=18Ne (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18Ne) GENERAL: See (1983AJ01) and Table 18.22 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(1982ZH01, 1983BR29, 1984SA37,...

  2. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact MicroBooNE Spokespeople: Bonnie Fleming, Yale email: bonnie.fleming(AT)yale.edu phone: (203) 432-3235 Sam Zeller, FNAL email: gzeller(AT)fnal.gov phone: (630) 840-6879 Collaboration Members

  3. A=20Ne (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ) elastic scattering. It is interpreted in terms of a quasi-molecular -particle cluster model (CO69S). See also (WA65M). 18. 17O(, n)20Ne Qm 0.588 Angular...

  4. The NeXus data format

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Könnecke, Mark; Akeroyd, Frederick A.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Clausen, Björn; Cottrell, Stephen; Hoffmann, Jens Uwe; Jemian, Pete R.; Männicke, David; et al

    2015-01-30

    NeXus is an effort by an international group of scientists to define a common data exchange and archival format for neutron, X-ray and muon experiments. NeXus is built on top of the scientific data format HDF5 and adds domain-specific rules for organizing data within HDF5 files, in addition to a dictionary of well defined domain-specific field names. The NeXus data format has two purposes. First, it defines a format that can serve as a container for all relevant data associated with a beamline. This is a very important use case. Second, it defines standards in the form of application definitionsmore » for the exchange of data between applications. NeXus provides structures for raw experimental data as well as for processed data.« less

  5. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Posters What's a Neutrino? How neutrinos fit into our understanding of the universe. Recipe for a Neutrino Beam Start with some protons... concocting the MiniBooNE beam. The...

  6. MicroBooNE Detector Move

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Flemming, Bonnie; Rameika, Gina

    2014-07-15

    On Monday, June 23, 2014 the MicroBooNE detector -- a 30-ton vessel that will be used to study ghostly particles called neutrinos -- was transported three miles across the Fermilab site and gently lowered into the laboratory's Liquid-Argon Test Facility. This video documents that move, some taken with time-lapse camerad, and shows the process of getting the MicroBooNE detector to its new home.

  7. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Talks and Proceedings This page contains links to talks and proceedings about the MiniBooNE experiment presented by members of the collaboration. Password protected link to page containing future talks schedule and unassigned talks list. Password protected link to seminar schedule. Conference talks Other talks Proceedings Posters All Experimenters Meeting talks The MiniBooNE Talks Committee is Jon Link (chair), Rex Tayloe, and Morgan Wascko. Conference Talks Speaker Conference Info Material Name

  8. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-04

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  9. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-05-21

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  10. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Public Notes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE Public Notes Page Back to the Publications Page

  11. FY17 NE Budget Request Presentation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7 NE Budget Request Presentation FY17 NE Budget Request Presentation PDF icon FY17 NE Budget Request Presentation More Documents & Publications FY16 NE Budget Request Presentation Office of Nuclear Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Request Before the House Subcommittee on Energy, Committee on Science, Space and Technology

  12. Cross section analyses in MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katori, Teppei

    2015-05-15

    The MiniBooNE experiment (2002-2012) and the SciBooNE experiment (2007-2008) are modern high statistics neutrino experiments, and they developed many new ideas in neutrino cross section analyses. In this note, I discuss selected topics of these analyses.

  13. A=18Ne (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    72AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18Ne) GENERAL: See Table 18.23 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell and cluster model calculations:(WI57H, BE69H, BA70P, EL70D, HA70M, KA72). Electromagnetic transitions:(EL70D, HA70M). Special levels:(MI66C, KA69P, KA72). Pion reactions:(PA65F). Other theoretical calculations:(GO65E, KE66C, BA68EE, BE68V, MU68G, NE68A, VA68E, VA68L, BA69GG, GA69O, KA69P, MU69C, RA69C, SO69A, BA70, DI70F, EL70D, KA72). 1. 18Ne(β+)18F Qm = 4.447 The half-life of

  14. A=19Ne (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19Ne) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 19.26 preview 19.26 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 19.27 preview 19.27 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. μg.s. = -1.88542 (8) nm (1982MA39) μ0.239 = -0.740 (8) nm (1978LEZA) 1. 19Ne(β+)19F Qm = 3.238 We adopt the half-life of 19Ne suggested by (1983AD03): 17.34 ± 0.09 s. See also (1978AJ03). The decay is principally to 19Fg.s.: see Table Prev. Table 19.29 preview 19.29 (in PDF or

  15. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FermiNews A biweekly magazine published by the Fermilab Office of Public Affairs about work and life at Fermilab. 2002: September 20, 2002 - New Neutrino Experiment at Fermilab Goes Live June 14, 2002 - Changing of the Guard: Mike Shaevitz returns to Columbia May 24, 2002 - Beam Me Up: MiniBooNE gets ready to go May 10, 2002 - Dastow 2002: 3D neutrino event simulation Mar. 29, 2002 - Exploring the Invisible Universe Jan. 18, 2002 - A Clear View: MiniBooNE's detector oil 2001: Dec. 14, 2001 -

  16. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detector The MiniBooNE tank is 12 m diameter sphere, filled with approximately 800 tons of mineral oil, CH2, which has a density of 0.845 ± 0.001 g/cm3. 1280 PMTs provide about 10% coverage of the inner tank region, and 240 PMTs cover the outer, optically isolated "veto" region in the last 1.3 m in the tank. Most of the tubes were recovered from LSND, and are 'old' tubes, some additional ones were bought for MiniBooNE, and are 'new'; differences in the new vs the old tube function are

  17. MiniBooNE Nue Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrino Appearance at the Δm2 ~1 eV2 Scale", arXiv:0704.1500 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 231801 (2007) The following MiniBooNE information from the first oscillation paper in 2007 is made available to the public: Energy Range for Default Oscillation Fit (475 MeV - 3000 MeV reconstructed neutrino energy) ntuple file of official MiniBooNE sin2(2theta) sensitivity and upper limit curves as a function of Dm2, for a 2-neutrino muon-to-electron oscillation fit, and 90% and 3sigma confidence

  18. MiniBooNE Nuebar Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search for Electron Anti-Neutrino Appearance at the Δm2 ~1 eV2 Scale", arXiv:0904.1958 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 111801 (2009) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2009 nuebar appearance paper is made available to the public: Energy Range: 475 MeV - 3000 MeV reconstructed neutrino energy ntuple file of MiniBooNE sin2(2theta) sensitivity and upper limit curves as a function of Dm2, for a 2-neutrino muon-to-electron antineutrino oscillation fit, and 90% and 3sigma confidence

  19. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Milestones 2008: January 1 1E21 protons on target recorded by MiniBooNE 2007: April 10 25m absorber repaired 2006: August 23 9e16 protons delivered in a single hour (Booster champagne goal) January 18 first antineutrino beam 2004: April 26 Record week (04/19-04/26) 6.83E18 protons delivered. 2003: March 28 Record day: 9.6E17 protons delivered March 18 Record day: 8.18E17 protons delivered March 06 5.5E17 protons delivered to MiniBooNE in 1 hour. (passed the official BD 5E16 milestone) March 01

  20. MicroBooNE First Cosmic Tracks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Tracks in MicroBooNE (August 6, 2015) On August 6, 2015, we started to turn on the drift high voltage in the MicroBooNE detector for the very first time. We paused at 58 kV (this is about 1/2 of our design voltage) and immediately started to see tracks across the entire TPC. Below are some of our first images of cosmic rays and UV laser tracks (last picture) recorded by the TPC! Collection plane images: And here is one of the first images of a UV laser track in the TPC. You can tell which

  1. MiniBooNE Steve Brice Fermilab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    17 May 2006 1 MiniBooNE Steve Brice Fermilab * Oscillation Analysis * Issues of the Past Year - Normalization - Optical Model -  0 MisIDs * Summary * Future DOE Review 17 May 2006 2 MiniBooNE Goal * Search for  e appearance in a   beam at the ~0.3% level - L=540 m ~10x LSND - E~500 MeV ~10x LSND DOE Review 17 May 2006 3 Particle ID * Identify electrons (and thus candidate  e events) from characteristic hit topology * Non-neutrino background easily removed     n p W

  2. Project Management Plan/Progress Report UT/GTKS Training Program Development for Commercial Building Operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2013-03-31

    Universidad del Turabo (UT), in a collaborative effort with Global Turn Key Services, Inc. (GTKS), proposed to develop a training program and a commercialization plan for the development of Commercial Building Operators (CBOs). The CBOs will operate energy efficient buildings to help maintain existing buildings up to their optimal energy performance level, and ensure that net-zero-energy buildings continuously operate at design specifications, thus helping achieve progress towards meeting BTP Strategic Goals of creating technologies and design approaches that enable net-zero-energy buildings at low incremental costs by 2025. The proposed objectives were then: (1) Develop a Commercial Building Operator (CBO) training program and accreditation that will in turn provide a certification to participants recognized by Accreditation Boards such as the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP) and Leadership in Energy & Environmental Designs (LEED). (2) Develop and implement a commercialization and sustainability plan that details marketing, deployment, financial characterization, job placement, and other goals required for long-term sustainability of the project after the funding period. (3) After program development and deployment, provide potential candidates with the knowledge and skill sets to obtain employment in the commercial building green energy (net-zero-energy building) job market. The developed CBO training program will focus on providing skills for participants, such as displaced and unemployed workers, to enter the commercial building green energy (net-zeroenergy building) job market. This course was designed to allow a participant with minimal to no experience in commercial building green technology to obtain the required skill sets to enter the job market in as little as 12 weeks of intensive multi-faceted learning. After completion of the course, the CBO staff concluded the participant will meet minimum established accreditation standards established by UT and will complete the contact hours required of training to apply to the Certification on Energy Management (CEM) offered by the Association of Energy Engineers (AEE). The CBO training program consists of a combination of theory (classroom), online & computer simulation, laboratory & hands on (onsite) training lessons. The training is addressed four basic learning elements: (1) Learn the Technology; (2) Practice Skills with hands-on the Energy Simulation Builder program; (3) Final Project and Presentation; and, (4) Accreditation and Certifications.

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Seymour CT Site - CT 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Seymour CT Site - CT 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Seymour, CT Alternate Name(s): Bridgeport Brass Company Seymour Specialty Wire Reactive Metals, Inc. National Distillers and Chemical Co. Havens Plant CT.02-2 CT.02-3 CT.02-6 Location: 15 Franklin Street, Seymour, Connecticut CT.02-4 Historical Operations: Procured, processed and stored uranium oxides, salts, and metals for AEC and processed the products by cold-forming or extruding natural uranium metal. CT.02-3 CT.02-9 Eligibility Determination:

  4. MiniBooNE Cross Sections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sections Group e-mail: BOONE-CROSSSECTIONS(AT)fnal.gov convenors: Alessandro Curioni (alessandro.curioni(AT)yale.edu) and Sam Zeller (gzeller(AT)fnal.gov) Cross Sections at MiniBooNE, Meetings, Reference Articles, Conferences, Useful Links Last updated on 07/19/07

  5. A=16Ne (71AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    predicts M - A 25.15 0.6 MeV (CE68A: 16Ne is then unbound with respect to breakup into 14O + 2p by 2.6 MeV. See also (GO60K, GO60P, BA61F, GO61N, GO62N, GO62O, GA64A,...

  6. A=16Ne (1977AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    predicts M - A 25.15 0.6 MeV (1968CE1A); 16Ne is then unbound with respect to breakup into 14O + 2p by 2.6 MeV: see (1971AJ02) for the earlier work. See also (1972WA07)...

  7. NE-23 Disposal of Offsite-Generated Defense Radioactive Waste...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    piL +3 *3L 52. NE-23 Disposal of Offsite-Generated Defense Radioactive Waste, Ventron FUSRAP Site Jill E. Lytle, DP-12 NE-23 The Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology has...

  8. FY16 NE Budget Request Presentation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6 NE Budget Request Presentation FY16 NE Budget Request Presentation PDF icon Office of Nuclear Energy FY16 Budget Request Presentation More Documents & Publications FY17 NE Budget Request Presentation Office of Nuclear Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Request FY 2016 Budget Justification

  9. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Light propagation in mineral oil Though the dominant light observed in MiniBooNE is Cherenkov light, scintillation and fluorescence (here, reabsorbed Cherenkov light re-emitted) account for about 25% of the light. We model: scintillation light (yield, decay times, spectrum), fluorescence, scattering (Rayleigh, Raman), absorption, reflection (off tank walls, PMT faces) and PMT effects (single pe charge response). External measurements Scintillation from p beam (IUCF) Scintillation from cosmic mu

  10. MicroBooNE Proposal Addendum March

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE Proposal Addendum March 3, 2008 H. Chen, G. de Geronimo, J. Farrell, A. Kandasamy, F. Lanni, D. Lissauer, D. Makowiecki, J. Mead, V. Radeka, S. Rescia, J. Sondericker, B. Yu Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY L. Bugel, J. M. Conrad, Z. Djurcic, V. Nguyen, M. Shaevitz, W. Willis ‡ Columbia University, New York, NY C. James, S. Pordes, G. Rameika Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL C. Bromberg, D. Edmunds Michigan State University, Lansing, MI P. Nienaber St.

  11. NE Press Releases | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Press Releases NE Press Releases RSS January 5, 2016 Energy Department selects Battelle team for a deep borehole field test in North Dakota The U.S. Department of Energy has selected a Battelle Memorial Institute-led team to drill a test borehole of over 16,000 feet into a crystalline basement rock formation near Rugby, North Dakota. December 10, 2015 Energy Department Announces New Investments in Supercritical Transformational Electric Power (STEP) Program The U.S. Department of Energy's

  12. M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Deconnnissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordi with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The reconu includes 26 colleges and universities

  13. For the MicroBooNE Collaboration IPA2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Status of MicroBooNE Christina Ignarra (MIT) For the MicroBooNE Collaboration IPA2013 May 14, 2013 Motivation for MicroBooNE: MiniBooNE Motivation for MiniBooNE: LSND * LSND result: Observed an appearance signal consistant with oscillations at a m 2 not consistent with known mass splittings: * A 3 rd mass splitting would solve this problem: P (ν µ → ν e ) = sin 2 2θ sin 2 (1.27∆m 2 L E ) 3 3+1 Sterile Neutrino Model l Assume one more neutrino that doesn't interact through the weak

  14. Djurcic_MiniBooNE_NuFact2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE Results Zelimir Djurcic Zelimir Djurcic Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory NuFact2010: 12th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories, NuFact2010: 12th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories, Superbeams Superbeams and and Beta Beams Beta Beams October 20-25, 2010. Mumbai, India October 20-25, 2010. Mumbai, India Outline Outline * * MiniBooNE MiniBooNE Experiment Description Experiment Description * * MiniBooNE MiniBooNE ' ' s s Neutrino Results Neutrino

  15. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE one of the first neutrino event candidates seen in the MicroBooNE detector see more neutrino images here! see more cosmic tracks here! The MicroBooNE Experiment Located at Fermilab, the MicroBooNE collaboration is currently operating a large 170 ton Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) that is located on the Booster neutrino beam line at Fermilab. The experiment first started collecting neutrino data in October 2015. MicroBooNE will measure low energy neutrino cross sections

  16. MiniBooNE at All Experimenter's Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Year [2002] [2003] [2004] [2005] [2006][2007] [2008] [2009] [2010] [2011] [2012] [2014] 2014 Date Focus Speaker Every Monday @ 4:00 P.M., Curia II 09/08/14 MiniBooNE Status Report Zarko Pavlovic 08/25/14 MiniBooNE Status Report Zarko Pavlovic 08/18/14 MiniBooNE Status Report Zarko Pavlovic 08/11/14 MiniBooNE Status Report Zarko Pavlovic 08/04/14 MiniBooNE Status Report Zarko Pavlovic 07/28/14 MiniBooNE Status Report Zarko Pavlovic 07/21/14 MiniBooNE Status Report Zarko Pavlovic 07/14/14

  17. CT Solar Loan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered...

  18. CT Solar Lease

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CT Solar Lease allows homeowners to lease a photovoltaic (PV) or solar thermal system, with fixed monthly payments, for a term of 20 years, at no upfront down payment.* This program, which takes...

  19. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Author Resources The following is a randomly ordered set of useful resources for people writing MiniBooNE publications:- Have a journal in mind when first putting together the paper. Each journal has LaTeX style files that can be downloaded from their web pages. There is a nice little LaTeX macro that will put line numbers by each line of your document. This makes it much easier for people to feedback comments on the paper. To use it just put \RequirePackage{lineno} just before the

  20. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Goto: refereed publications , theses , related publications, proposals/TDRs. Refereed publications by the MiniBooNE Collaboration: A.A. Aguilar-Arevalo et al., Measurement of the Antineutrino Neutral-Current Elastic Differential Cross Section, arXiv:1309.7257, Phys. Rev. D91, 012004 (2015), Data Release A.A. Aguilar-Arevalo et al., First Measurement of the Muon Antineutrino Double Differential Charged Current Quasi-Elastic Cross Section, arXiv:1301.7067, Phys. Rev. D88, 032001

  1. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Virtual Tour This series of pages about MiniBooNE will help you understand more about the what, why, and how of our experiment. When you begin the tour, a new window will open and you can use the next and back buttons to navigate. You may exit at any time by clicking on the "X" button in the upper right hand corner of the window. Start the tour here... This tour was created by Jessica Falco in 2000 and updated by Kelly O'Hear in 2002. Jessica and Kelly were high school students who

  2. NE Blog Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Blog Archive NE Blog Archive RSS December 21, 2015 The Department of Energy is working toward long-term solutions for nuclear waste storage. | Photo by <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mandj98/">James Marvin Phelps</a>. Finding Long-Term Solutions for Nuclear Waste Find out how we are working with communities, tribes and states to find long-term nuclear waste storage solutions. July 15, 2015 This image of Pluto, taken by New Horizons after a 9 1/2-year journey, is our

  3. CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO 7117-03.B7.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Oepartment of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES zh/ ! o-01 lM!tl5 ML)!o-05 PI 77!0> The attached elimination recoannendation was prepared in accordance . -1 rlL.0~ with your suggestion during our meeting on

  4. Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    300, 955 L'E~~MI Phm.SW.:. Washin@on. LX. 200242174, T~kphonc(202)48ll. 5 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 cA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES M/).0-05 pl 0.0% The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02

  5. Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    9% L'Enfam Plaza, S, W.. Warhin@on, D.C. 2002ijl74j Tekphow (202) 488ddO 7117-03.87.cdy.'i3 23 September 1967 ~ s ~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Oivision of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND IJNIVFRSITIES , The attached elimination reconnnendation was prepar!ad in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September! The recommendation includes 26 colleges and

  6. Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    suite 7900,955 L%l/onr Plaza, S. W., Washingion, D.C. 20024.?174,, Telephone: (202) 488.~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 7117~03.87.dy.43 23 September 1987 I j / Dear Mr. Wallo: I ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UN&ITIES I . The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September!. The recommend includes 26

  7. REPLY TO ATTN OF NE-301

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    N\I&?' d,' g 4 DATE. fdov 2 5 1980 REPLY TO ATTN OF NE-301 .* - memoraadu SUBJECT Remedial Action for Linde Air Products Plant, Tonawanda, New York TO W. E. Mott, EV In view of the General Counsel's reconsideration of the authority to proceed with remedial action on this site and your determination that remedial action is needed to protect the public health and safety, we will include this site in our program for remedial action. of this memorandum. Oak Ridge is requested to do so by copy I

  8. The MicroBooNE Experiment - About the Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Physics Goals MicroBooNE will collect neutrino interactions using the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab and produce the first neutrino cross section measurements on argon in the 1 GeV energy range. MicroBooNE will also explore the currently unexplained excess of low energy electromagnetic events observed in the MiniBooNE experiment. Click here for public plots and physics distributions.

  9. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Getting Started

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Getting Started on MicroBooNE Welcome to MicroBooNE! This page is designed to help new MicroBooNE collaborators find their way around the experiment and Fermilab. Table of Contents Fermilab ID, Computing Accounts, and Required Training Visas for non-US Citizens Traveling to Fermilab Housing/Hotels Getting Around Communication within the Collaboration Software Getting Help Fermilab ID, Computing Accounts, and Required Training Badging changes for non-US visitors Whether obtaining a new Fermilab

  10. A=19Ne (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1959AJ76) (See Energy Level Diagram for 19Ne) GENERAL: See also Table 19.9 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (EL55A, RE55, RE55B, RA57, RE58). 1. 19Ne(β+)19F Qm = 3.256 The positron end point is 2.18 ± 0.03 (SC52A), 2.23 ± 0.05 (AL57), 2.24 ± 0.01 MeV (WE58B). The half-life is 17.4 ± 0.2 sec (HE59), 17.7 ± 0.1 (PE57), 18.3 ± 0.5 (AL57), 18.5 ± 0.5 (SC52A), 19 ± 1 (NA54B), 19.5 ± 1.0 (WE58B), 20.3 ± 0.5 sec (WH39). The absence of low-energy γ-rays (see 19F)

  11. Appearance Results from MiniBooNE Georgia Karagiorgi Columbia...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with 1280 PMT's (10% photocathode) & optically isolated veto (240 PMT's) dominant beam component: (C or H nucleus) 14 Events in the MiniBooNE detector: Dominant neutrino...

  12. CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy ... Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated ...

  13. Djurcic_MiniBooNE_NuFact2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events Rate Flux x Cross-sections x Detector response External measurements (HARP, etc) rate constrained by neutrino data External and MiniBooNE Measurements 0 ,...

  14. A=20Ne (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20Ne) GENERAL: See also (1978AJ03) and Table 20.17 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1977GR16, 1977HA1Z, 1977SC27, 1978AR1H, 1978CH26, 1978HA2C, 1978HE04, 1978MA2H, 1978RA1B, 1978TO07, 1979DA15, 1979EL04, 1979HA50, 1979HA59, 1979SI12, 1979WU06, 1980CA12, 1980MC1D, 1980RO11, 1980TE02, 1981ER03, 1981GR06, 1981KR1G, 1981SC12, 1982KA1K, 1982KI02). Collective, deformed and rotational models: (1977FO1E, 1977HA1Z, 1978HO1E, 1978PE09, 1978PI08,

  15. A=20Ne (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20Ne) GENERAL: See (1983AJ01) and Table 20.13 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1978WI1B, 1982BR08, 1982FL04, 1982RA1N, 1982SH30, 1983BR29, 1983DR04, 1983DR03, 1984JA15, 1984PA04, 1984RA13, 1985AN16, 1985HA15, 1985HU08, 1985MI23, 1985MU10, 1986CH28, 1986COZZ, 1986HU1G, 1986WA1R, 1987PR01). Collective, deformed and rotational models: (1981OK02, 1982BR08, 1982RA1N, 1982RO06, 1982SC20, 1983DR04, 1983DR03, 1983LO05, 1983MA29, 1983MA68,

  16. MiniBooNE darkmatter collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE-DM Collaboration A.A. Aguilar-Arevalo,1 B. Batell,2 B.C. Brown,3 R. Carr,4 R. Cooper,5 P. deNiverville,6 R. Dharmapalan,7 R. Ford,3 F.G. Garcia,3 G. T. Garvey,8 J. Grange,9 W. Huelsnitz,8 I. L. de Icaza Astiz,1 R.A. Johnson,10 G. Karagiorgi,4 T. Katori,11 T. Kobilarcik,3 W. Ketchum,8 Q. Liu,8 W.C. Louis,8 C. Mariani,12 W. Marsh,3 D. McKeen,13 C.D. Moore,3 G.B. Mills,8 J. Mirabal,8 P. Nienaber,14 Z. Pavlovic,8 D. Perevalov,3 M. Pospelov,6 H. Ray,9 A. Ritz,6 B.P. Roe,15 M.H. Shaevitz,4

  17. Microsoft Word - NEAC International Subcommittee Recomendations List for NE and NE6.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee International Subcommittee Report Recommendations Specifically NE Related December 8 th , 2013 (Prepared for the December 19 th , 2013 NEAC Meeting) Introduction There is a broad array of U.S. policy objectives in which nuclear energy plays a role, including: prevention of nuclear terrorism; nonproliferation; nuclear safety; energy security; climate change and environmental protection; and exports of American nuclear products with increased jobs to strengthen

  18. NE-23 List of California Sites NE-23 Hattie Car-well, SAN/NSQA Division

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NE-23 Hattie Car-well, SAN/NSQA Division Attached for your information is the list of California sites we identified in our search of Manhattdn Engineer District records for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). None of the facilities listed qualified"fbr'FUSRAP:'~- The only site in California,that was included in FUSRAP was Gilman Hall on the University of California-Berkeley Campus. All California sites that are in our Surplus Facilities Management Prcgram are

  19. Audit of Incurred Costs for UT-Battelle under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 during Fiscal Year 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Audit Report Audit of Incurred Costs for UT- Battelle under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 during Fiscal Year 2012 OAS-M-14-05 April 2014 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 21, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE OFFICE FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Audit of Incurred Costs for UT- Battelle under Department of Energy

  20. Neutrino Scattering Results from MiniBooNE R. Tayloe, Indiana...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrino Scattering Results from MiniBooNE R. Tayloe, Indiana U. ECT workshop Trento, Italy, 1211 Outline: introduction, motivation MiniBooNE experiment MiniBooNE ...

  1. MiniBooNE Numu/Numubar Disappearance Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Search for muon neutrino and antineutrino disappearance in MiniBooNE", arXiv:0903.2465 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 061802 (2009) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2009 numu and numubar disappearance paper is made available to the public: Numu Disappearance ntuple file of MiniBooNE numu 90% confidence level sensitivity as a function of Dm2, for a 2-neutrino numu -> nux ocillation fit. The file contains 141 rows, with two columns: Dm2 value in the range 0.4 < Dm2 (eV2)

  2. MiniBooNE QE Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic Double Differential Cross section", arXiv:1002:2680 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. D81, 092005 (2010) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2010 CCQE cross section paper is made available to the public: νμ CCQE cross sections: MiniBooNE flux table of predicted MiniBooNE muon neutrino flux (Table V) flux-integrated double differential cross section (Figure 13) 1D array of bin boundaries partitioning the muon kinetic energy (top) and the cosine of the muon

  3. MiniBooNE Requires a LOT of Protons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requires a LOT of Protons Our goal is 1 X 10 21 to be exact! In fact the Booster has been running at record intensities for over a year now delivering protons to MiniBooNE. But for MiniBooNE we actually need more, so we continue to work with our colleagues in Accelerator Division to improve the Booster performance. More protons leads directly to better coverage of the LSND allowed regions as MiniBooNE is statistically limited. Booster Monitoring and Improvement Projects This figure shows

  4. Neutral Current Elastic Interactions at MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Elastic Interactions at MiniBooNE -Ranjan Dharmapalan for the MiniBooNE collaboration NuInt '11 Dehradun, India. 2 Outline: 1. The MiniBooNE Experiment 2. Neutral current Elastic scattering (theory) 3. Neutral current Elastic scattering in MiniBooNE (expt) 4. mode results 5. First look at data 6. Future plans and conclusion 3 B o o s t e r t a r g e t a n d h o r n d e t e c t o r d i r t d e c a y r e g i o n a b s o r b e r p r i m a r y b e a m t e r t i a r y b e a m s e c o n d a r

  5. MicroBooNE Project Critical Decision Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Decisions for MicroBooNE Documents CD-0 Mission Need CD-1 Selection of Alternatives CD-2/3a Performance Baseline and Long Lead Procurements CD-3b Start of Construction

  6. MiniBooNE/LSND Neutrino Oscillation Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE/LSND Neutrino Oscillation Results 1 M. Sorel (IFIC - CSIC & U. Valencia) Workshop on Beyond Three Family Neutrino Oscillations May 3-4, 2011, LNGS (Italy) 1. LSND ν̅ μ →ν̅ e (1993-2001) 2. MiniBooNE ν μ →ν e (2001-2007) 3. MiniBooNE ν̅ μ →ν̅ e (2006-2010) 5. Light sterile neutrino oscillations: where we stand (2011) Outline of this talk 2 4. MiniBooNE ν μ →ν μ and ν̅ μ →ν̅ μ (2001-2011) 3 LSND ν̅ μ →ν̅ e The LSND Experiment 4 Stopped pion

  7. New Oscillation Results From MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intrinsic e 20 Background prediction Intrinsic nue External measurements - HARP p+Be for - Sanford-Wang fits to world K + K 0 data MiniBooNE data...

  8. {alpha}-cluster states in N{ne}Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, V. Z.; Rogachev, G. V.

    2012-10-20

    The importance of studies of {alpha}-Cluster structure in N{ne}Z light nuclei is discussed. Spin-parity assignments for the low-lying levels in {sup 10}C are suggested.

  9. High Precision Measurement of the 19Ne Lifetime

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Precision Measurement of the 19 Ne Lifetime by Leah Jacklyn Broussard Department of Physics Duke University Date: Approved: Albert Young Calvin Howell Kate Scholberg Berndt Mueller John Thomas Dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Physics in the Graduate School of Duke University 2012 Abstract (Nuclear physics) High Precision Measurement of the 19 Ne Lifetime by Leah Jacklyn Broussard Department of Physics

  10. DOE NE Used Fuel Disposition FY2015 Working Group Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NE Used Fuel Disposition FY2015 Working Group Presentations http://energy.sandia.gov/energy/nuclear-energy/ne-workshops/ufd-working-group-2015/ FOLDER NAME PRESENTATION TITLE AUTHOR Tuesday, June 9, 2015 UFD WG 2015-06-09 Tue Auditorium Afternoon - 1 Quantification of Cation Sorption to Engineered Barrier Materials Under Extreme Conditions Powell UFD WG 2015-06-09 Tue Auditorium Afternoon - 1 Development and Experimental Benchmark of Simulations to Predict Used Nuclear Fuel Cladding Temperatures

  11. CT Offshore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: CT Offshore Place: Otterup, Denmark Zip: 5450 Sector: Wind energy Product: Denmark-based consultancy which provides assistance for project...

  12. CT NC0

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    x-L* d! CT NC0 - i , ,. i, .' i :.:(e.!' ,A\~, L.,t, - (iI :i' , . y- 2 .L i ._ 1 c\ :- i;! Ii $ 4. Ci:lc:i.nnati. 39, t>:::i.f> (J&l3 q-1 -3 sui3 Jrn T3 FRCM .I iirz 1 ?j ~ 1.3 bL1 T:' IP !REFOI?T TC 5YC?CZCiC~ :EWllIFl;j",tsSS L' I"JIsIc:;. .:;xli3;. iCAN !fA(=;-fL,yg-j L' sc,, E. $.iCLX:i?, -iIJ,x:q()Is. ON hL4X 24 - 25 ) 1.9tic ;i. A. Quiglel;, A.3, 3, M. ChenauEt gpxrIvB OF TP.~ The purpose of t3is trip was tc observe a proposed method for the dchy- dratim of green salt

  13. Siemens Corporate Technology CT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporate Technology CT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Siemens Corporate Technology (CT) Place: Erlangan, Germany Sector: Solar Product: R&D lab for Siemens AG. Currently...

  14. Exclusive Neutrino Cross Sections From MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exclusive Neutrino Cross Sections From MiniBooNE Martin Tzanov University of Colorado PANIC 2008, 9-14 November, Eilat, ISRAEL Martin Tzanov, PANIC 2008 Neutrino Cross Sections Today * Precise knowledge needed for precise oscillation measurements. * Cross section well measured above 20 GeV. * Few measurements below 20 GeV. * 20-30 years old bubble chamber experiments (mostly H 2 , D 2 ). * Neutral current cross sections are even less understood. ν CC world data CC world data ν T2K, BooNE K2K,

  15. The MicroBooNE Experiment - At Work

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE at Work At Work Now The Getting Started Page holds links to help find your way around Fermilab services and prepare for working on the experiment. The MicroBooNE Contact List contains contact information for collaboration members. The Working Groups Page is a portal to these sub-sites. The Operations Page is a portal to the running detector. The Meetings Page lists the current regular meeting time slots, and also lists the collaboration meeting dates with links to the DocDB for past

  16. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Conference Talks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Talks and Posters Once you have given a MicroBooNE presentation, please send your talk to Ben Carls so it can be archived. If you have written proceedings to accompany your talk, please upload them to the MicroBooNE DocDB and send the document number to Ben. Also, remember that conference proceedings are required by Fermilab policy to be submitted to the Fermilab Technical Publications archive. Instructions for doing that appear here. Click here for Future talks. Conference Presentations Speaker

  17. MiniBooNE Antineutrino Data Van Nguyen Columbia University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moriond EW 2008 Coherent NC π 0 Production in the MiniBooNE Antineutrino Data Van Nguyen Columbia University for the MiniBooNE collaboration Moriond EW 2008 2 Moriond EW 2008 At low energy, NC π 0 's can be created through resonant and coherent production:  Resonant NC π 0 production:  Coherent NC π 0 production: (Signature: π 0 which is highly forward-going) NC π 0 Production 3 Moriond EW 2008 Why study coherent NC π 0 production? ➔ NC π 0 events are the dominant bgd to osc

  18. MiniBooNE at First Physics E. D. Zimmerman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at First Physics E. D. Zimmerman University of Colorado NBI 2003 KEK, Tsukuba November 7, 2003 MiniBooNE at First Physics Physics motivation: LSND MiniBooNE overview ¡ Beam ¡ Detector ¡ Reconstruction and particle ID First physics results Status and near future LSND decay-at-rest neutrino source ν µ -> ν e appearance search Decay-at-rest E ν <53 MeV Baseline 30 meters Energy E<53 MeV L/E ~ 1-1.5 km/GeV . . LSND oscillation signature From µ + decay at rest: Reconstruct e + and γ

  19. SHORT-BASELINE NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MiniBooNE E. D. Zimmerman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MiniBooNE E. D. Zimmerman University of Colorado PANIC 2011 Cambridge, Mass. 25 July 2011 Short-Baseline Neutrino Physics at MiniBooNE * MiniBooNE * Neutrino cross-sections * Hadron production channels * Oscillation physics * Antineutrino Oscillations * MiniBooNE-SciBooNE joint result Motivating MiniBooNE: LSND Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector * Stopped + beam at Los Alamos LAMPF produces e , , ̅ but no ̅ e (due to capture). * Look for delayed coincidence of positron

  20. Oscillations results from the MiniBooNE experiment Alexis Aguilar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (ICN-UNAM) SILAFAE 2010, Valparaso, Chile December 6-12, 2010 Input from HARP production data 10 and interactions MiniBooNE MiniBooNE CCQE (MB...

  1. Analysis of Neutral Current 0 Events at MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutral Current 0 Events at MiniBooNE Colin Anderson April 14, 2008 The Experiment Analysis Outline Experiment MiniBooNE Description NC 0 Overview Analysis Selection and...

  2. RESULTS OF THE MiniBooNE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION SEARCH E. D. Zimmerman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RESULTS OF THE MiniBooNE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION SEARCH E. D. Zimmerman University of Colorado American Physical Society Meeting Jacksonville, April 16, 2007 Results of the MiniBooNE Neutrino Oscillation Search * Introduction to MiniBooNE * The oscillation analysis * The initial results and their implications * The next steps MiniBooNE: E898 at Fermilab * Purpose is to test LSND with: * Higher energy * Different beam * Different oscillation signature * Different systematics * L=500 meters, E=0.5-1

  3. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Nuclear Energy (NE) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Energy (NE) 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Nuclear Energy (NE) The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Nuclear Energy (NE). PDF icon 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Nuclear Energy (NE) More Documents & Publications 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, RMOTC, and Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office 2011 Annual Planning Summary for NNSA Service Center

  4. Morgan Wascko Imperial College London MiniBooNE's First Neutrino Oscillation Result

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wascko Imperial College London MiniBooNE's First Neutrino Oscillation Result Morgan Wascko CalTech Physics Research Conference 26 April, 2007 Outline * A short course in the physics of ν oscillations * What are neutrinos? Oscillations? * ν oscillation landscape * MiniBooNE * Experiment description * MiniBooNE's First Results * Neutrino Physics Big Picture * Next Steps for the Field * What has MiniBooNE told us? 2 Morgan Wascko CalTech Physics Research Conference 26 April, 2007 * Particle

  5. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI- NE New

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    England Clean Power Link Project | Department of Energy NE New England Clean Power Link Project Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI- NE New England Clean Power Link Project Response to TDI - NE application from State Department to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. PDF icon State Department Concurrence.pdf More Documents & Publications Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI-NE New

  6. Overview of DOE-NE Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadasivan, Pratap

    2012-08-24

    Research objectives are: (1) Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; (2) Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy; (3) Develop Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycles; and (4) Understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The goal is to enable the use of risk information to inform NE R&D program planning. The PTRA program supports DOE-NE's goal of using risk information to inform R&D program planning. The FY12 PTRA program is focused on terrorism risk. The program includes a mix of innovative methods that support the general practice of risk assessments, and selected applications.

  7. F-5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Figure F4. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Atlantic WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE...

  8. MICROBOONE PHYSICS Ben Carls Fermilab MicroBooNE Physics Outline

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PHYSICS Ben Carls Fermilab MicroBooNE Physics Outline * The detector and beam - MicroBooNE TPC - Booster and NuMI beams at Fermilab * Oscillation physics - Shed light on the MiniBooNE low energy excess * Low energy neutrino cross sections * Non-accelerator topics - Supernova neutrino detection - Proton decay backgrounds 2 B. Carls, Fermilab MicroBooNE Physics MicroBooNE Detector * 60 ton fiducial volume (of 170 tons total) liquid Argon TPC * TPC consists of 3 planes of wires; vertical Y, ±60°

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - TAUP_07_MiniBooNE.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MinibooNE Oscillation Results and Implications Mike Shaevitz Columbia University for the MiniBooNE Collaboration 2 Outline * MiniBooNE Experiment and Analysis Techniques * MiniBooNE First Oscillation Result * Going Beyond the First Result * Future Plans and Prospects 3 LSND observed a (~3.8σ) excess of⎯ν e events in a pure⎯ν μ beam: 87.9 ± 22.4 ± 6.0 events MiniBooNE was Prompted by the Positive LSND Result Oscillation Probability: ( ) (0.264 0.067 0.045)% e P μ ν ν → = ± ± The

  10. Category:Bridgeport, CT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 64 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT...

  11. CT Investment Partners LLP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CT Investment Partners LLP Jump to: navigation, search Name: CT Investment Partners LLP Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: WC2A 2AZ Sector: Carbon Product: Venture capital arm of...

  12. Migration of Nuclear Shell Gaps Studied in the d({sup 24}Ne,p{gamma}){sup 25}Ne Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catford, W. N.; Timis, C. N.; Baldwin, T. D.; Gelletly, W.; Pain, S. D.; Lemmon, R. C.; Pucknell, V. P. E.; Warner, D. D.; Labiche, M.; Orr, N. A.; Achouri, N. L.; Chapman, R.; Amzal, N.; Burns, M.; Liang, X.; Spohr, K.; Freer, M.; Ashwood, N. I.

    2010-05-14

    The transfer of neutrons onto {sup 24}Ne has been measured using a reaccelerated radioactive beam of {sup 24}Ne to study the (d,p) reaction in inverse kinematics. The unusual raising of the first 3/2{sup +} level in {sup 25}Ne and its significance in terms of the migration of the neutron magic number from N=20 to N=16 is put on a firm footing by confirmation of this state's identity. The raised 3/2{sup +} level is observed simultaneously with the intruder negative parity 7/2{sup -} and 3/2{sup -} levels, providing evidence for the reduction in the N=20 gap. The coincident gamma-ray decays allowed the assignment of spins as well as the transferred orbital angular momentum. The excitation energy of the 3/2{sup +} state shows that the established USD shell model breaks down well within the sd model space and requires a revised treatment of the proton-neutron monopole interaction.

  13. MiniBooNE LowE Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unexplained Excess of Electron-Like Events From a 1 GeV Neutrino Beam", arXiv:0812.2243 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 101802 (2009) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2009 updated nue oscillation paper is made available to the public: Energy Range for Default Oscillation Fit (475 MeV - 3000 MeV reconstructed neutrino energy) 1D array of bin boundaries in electron neutrino reconstructed neutrino energy 1D array of observed electron neutrino candidate events per reconstructed

  14. MiniBooNE Nue & Nuebar Data Release 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Combined Neutrino and Antineutrino fit in 200 MeV - 3000 MeV reconstructed neutrino energy range 90% sensitivity contour, 1 sigma limit contour, 90% limit contour, 99% limit contour and 3 sigma limit contour. Sensitivity and limit curves for a 2-neutrino muon-to-electron neutrino and antineutrino oscillation fit. Frequentist studies were performed to determine the proper coverage. Each file contains a set of (sin2(2theta), Dm2 ) points on a given contour. ntuple file of MiniBooNE 2-dimensional

  15. MiniBooNE Nue & Nuebar Data Release 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Antineutrino mode fit in 200 MeV - 3000 MeV reconstructed neutrino energy range 90% sensitivity contour, 1 sigma limit contour, 90% limit contour and 99% limit contour. Sensitivity and limit curves for a 2-neutrino muon-to-electron antineutrino oscillation fit. Only anti-neutrinos were assumed to oscillate. Frequentist studies were performed to determine the proper coverage. Each file contains a set of (sin2(2theta), Dm2 ) points on a given contour. ntuple file of MiniBooNE 2-dimensional

  16. MiniBooNE Nue & Nuebar Data Release 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrino mode fit in 200 MeV - 3000 MeV reconstructed neutrino energy range 90% sensitivity contour, 1 sigma limit contour, 90% limit contour and 99% limit contour. Sensitivity and limit curves for a 2-neutrino muon-to-electron neutrino and antineutrino oscillation fit. Frequentist studies were performed to determine the proper coverage. Each file contains a set of (sin2(2theta), Dm2 ) points on a given contour. ntuple file of MiniBooNE 2-dimensional likelihood surface as a function of ( Dm2,

  17. NE-24 Unlverslty of Chicayo Remedial Action Plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    (YJ 4 tlsj .?I2 416 17 1983 NE-24 Unlverslty of Chicayo Remedial Action Plan 22&d 7 IA +-- E. I.. Keller, Director Technical Services Division Oak Ridge Operations Ufflce In response to your memorandum dated July 29, 1983, the Field Task Proposal/Agreement (FTP/A) received frw Aryonne National Laboratory (ANL) appears to be satisfactory, and this office concurs in the use of ANL to provide the decontamination effort as noted in the FTP/A. The final decontaminatton report should Include the

  18. Office of Nuclear Energy Doe/ne-0143

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Doe/ne-0143 Table of Contents Lesson 1 - Energy Basics Lesson 2 - Electricity Basics Lesson 3 - Atoms and Isotopes Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson 5 - Fission, Chain Reactions Lesson 6 - Atom to Electricity Lesson 7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants Lesson 8 - Concerns Lesson 9 - Energy and You 1 Lesson 1 Energy Basics ENERGY BASICS What is energy? Energy is the ability to do work. But what does that really mean? You might think of work as cleaning your room, cutting the grass, or studying

  19. Idaho National Laboratory DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability-

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    -2023 Idaho National Laboratory DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure TEN-YEAR SITE PLAN DOE/ID-11474 Final June 2012 Sustainable INL continues to exceed DOE goals for reduction in the use of petroleum fuels - running its entire bus fleet on biodiesel while converting 75% of its light-duty fleet to E85 fuel. The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL), slated for completion this year, will be a state-of-the-art laboratory with high-bay lab space where

  20. CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    i900,9SS L%nfam Phm, S. W.. Washington. D.C. 20024.2174, Tlkphme: (20.7) 4S.S-M)o 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES I - The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance M1.oS with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation nO.O-02

  1. CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    i5W 95.5 L' E&nt plom. S. W.:. Washingr on. D.C. ZOOX2i74, Tekphm: (202) 488-6OGb 7II7-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987. Ii CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES pqq.0' 05 PI ;p.03- The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ,I ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The

  2. Dual energy CT for attenuation correction with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the energy dependent noise and bias properties of monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisitions. These monoenergetic images can be used to estimate attenuation coefficients at energies suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This is becoming more relevant with the increased use of quantitative imaging by PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners. There are, however, potential variations in the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images as a function of energy. Methods: The authors used analytic approximations and simulations to estimate the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images of water-filled cylinders with different shapes and the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom from 40 to 520 keV, the range of SPECT and PET energies. The dual-kVp spectra were based on the GE Lightspeed VCT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp with added filtration of 0.5 mm Cu. The authors evaluated strategies of noise suppression with sinogram smoothing and dose minimization with reduction of tube currents at the two kVp settings. The authors compared the impact of DECT-based attenuation correction with single-kVp CT-based attenuation correction on PET quantitation for the NCAT phantom for soft tissue and high-Z materials of bone and iodine contrast enhancement. Results: Both analytic calculations and simulations displayed the expected minimum noise value for a synthesized monoenergetic image at an energy between the mean energies of the two spectra. In addition the authors found that the normalized coefficient of variation in the synthesized attenuation map increased with energy but reached a plateau near 160 keV, and then remained constant with increasing energy up to 511 keV and beyond. The bias was minimal, as the linear attenuation coefficients of the synthesized monoenergetic images were within 2.4% of the known true values across the entire energy range. Compared with no sinogram smoothing, sinogram smoothing can dramatically reduce noise in the DECT-derived attenuation map. Through appropriate selection of tube currents for high and low kVp scans, DECT can deliver roughly the same amount of radiation dose as that of a single kVp CT scan, but could be used for PET attenuation correction with reduced bias in contrast agent regions by a factor of ?2.6 and slightly reduced RMSE for the total image. Conclusions: When DECT is used for attenuation correction at higher energies, there is a noise amplification that is dependent on the energy of the synthesized monoenergetic image of linear attenuation coefficients. Sinogram smoothing reduces the noise amplification in DECT-derived attenuation maps without increasing bias. With an appropriate selection of CT techniques, a DECT scan with the same radiation dose as a single CT scan can result in a PET image with improved quantitative accuracy.

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dorr Corp - CT 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Dorr Corp - CT 14 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Dorr Corp. (CT.14 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to NRC Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Dorr - Oliver Corporation CT.14-2 Location: 737 Canal Street , Stamford , Connecticut CT.14-2 Evaluation Year: 1990 CT.14-3 Site Operations: Conducted heat treatment tests of source material using depleted uranium in an enclosed calciner CT.14-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - AEC licensed CT.14-3

  4. Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: NE Cully Blvd., Portland, OR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, M. P.; Poplawski, M. E.; Tuenge, J. R.

    2012-08-01

    GATEWAY program report on a demonstration of LED roadway lighting on NE Cully Boulevard in Portland, OR, a residential collector road.

  5. 2014 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting 2014 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting 2014 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting The 2014 Annual Face-to-Face Meeting of the Environmental Management (EM), Nuclear Energy (NE), and Science (SC) Software Quality Assurance (SQA) Support Group (SG) was held May 6-8, 2014. This meeting was hosted by the Office of Safeguards, Security and Emergency Services (OSSES) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) sponsors

  6. 2015 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting 2015 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting 2015 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting The Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) formed the Environmental Management (EM), Nuclear Energy (NE), and Science (SC) Software Quality Assurance (SQA) Support Group (SG) in March 2007. The first Annual Meeting was held August 2008. The 8th Annual Meeting will be held May 11-14, 2015. This year the Annual Meeting will be hosted by EM's Office of River Protection in

  7. High-energy physics detector MicroBooNE sees first accelerator-born

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    neutrinos MicroBooNE sees first accelerator-born neutrinos High-energy physics detector MicroBooNE sees first accelerator-born neutrinos The principal purpose of the detector is to confirm or deny the existence of a hypothetical particle known as the sterile neutrino. November 2, 2015 An accelerator-born neutrino candidate, spotted with the MicroBooNE detector. Image courtesy Fermilab. An accelerator-born neutrino candidate, spotted with the MicroBooNE detector. Image courtesy Fermilab.

  8. Kaon Monitoring in MiniBooNE: The LMC Detector E. D. Zimmerman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kaon Monitoring in MiniBooNE: The LMC Detector E. D. Zimmerman University of Colorado NBI 2003 KEK, Tsukuba November 10, 2003 Kaon Monitoring at MiniBooNE 1) K-decay ν e background at BooNE K production estimates 2) Decay kinematics 3) The "Little Muon Counter" (LMC) Concept/Placement Civil construction/infrastructure Collimator Fiber Tracker Temporary detector Status K-decay ν e background MiniBooNE will see ~200-400 ν e from K + and K 0 L decays each year -- comparable to the

  9. 14-07-09 MicroBooNE calibrations.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cloud disperse: Diffusion* * Charge loss due to impurities** * Signal on wires * Induction * Collection 090714 MicroBooNE Calibrations, T. Strauss 4 First we need to...

  10. MiniBooNE as realated to "Window's on the Universe"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Windows on the Universe" Ray Stefanski Fermilab Blois 2009 Windows on the Universe June 22, 2009 Outline: Introduction Current Status New Results Expectations Summary June 22, 2009 Blois 2009 Windows on the Universe 2 Introduction                 : nce disappeara : appearance s experiment n oscillatio e e   MiniBooNE   SciBooNE accelerator sources stopped muons @ LANL -> LSND BNB @ FNAL -> MiniBooNE -> SciBooNE NuMI

  11. MiniBooNE's First Oscillation Result Morgan Wascko Imperial College...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 July, 2007 Meson Production 9 MiniBooNE Overview * External meson production data * HARP data (CERN) * Parametrisation of cross- sections * Sanford-Wang for pions * Feynman...

  12. I. Neutrino Oscillations with the MiniBooNE Experiment at FNAL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E QE Events Flux x Cross-section x Detector response External measurements (HARP, etc) rate constrained by neutrino data External and MiniBooNE...

  13. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI-NE New England

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Clean Power Link Project | Department of Energy New England Clean Power Link Project Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI-NE New England Clean Power Link Project Response for TDI-NE from Department of Defense to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. PDF icon PP-400 TDI-NE - Response Letter from DOD.pdf More Documents & Publications Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI- NE New England

  14. DOE-NE Small Business Voucher Program Launched | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE-NE Small Business Voucher Program Launched DOE-NE Small Business Voucher Program Launched March 1, 2016 - 9:48am Addthis News Media Contact Danielle Miller, 208-569-7806 millerdc@id.doe.gov WASHINGTON - The DOE-NE Voucher Program for eligible small businesses is open for applications. As part of the Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN) initiative, the NE Voucher program will provide up to $2 million in this pilot year for access to expertise, knowledge, and facilities of the

  15. THE GENESIS SOLAR WIND CONCENTRATOR TARGET: MASS FRACTIONATION CHARACTERISED BY NE ISOTOPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WIENS, ROGER C.; OLINGER, C.; HEBER, V.S.; REISENFELD, D.B.; BURNETT, D.S.; ALLTON, J.H.; BAUR, H.; WIECHERT, U.; WIELER, R.

    2007-01-02

    The concentrator on Genesis provides samples of increased fluences of solar wind ions for precise determination of the oxygen isotopic composition of the solar wind. The concentration process caused mass fractionation as function of the radial target position. They measured the fractionation using Ne released by UV laser ablation along two arms of the gold cross from the concentrator target to compare measured Ne with modeled Ne. The latter is based on simulations using actual conditions of the solar wind during Genesis operation. Measured Ne abundances and isotopic composition of both arms agree within uncertainties indicating a radial symmetric concentration process. Ne data reveal a maximum concentration factor of {approx} 30% at the target center and a target-wide fractionation of Ne isotopes of 3.8%/amu with monotonously decreasing {sup 20}Ne/{sup 22}Ne ratios towards the center. The experimentally determined data, in particular the isotopic fractionation, differ from the modeled data. They discuss potential reasons and propose future attempts to overcome these disagreements.

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Fenn Machinery Co. (CT.11 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Britain , Connecticut CT.11-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.11-1 Site Operations: Performed short-term tests on small quantities of uranium metal to explore potential for swaging, circa mid-1950 CT.11-1 CT.11-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited scope of

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Canaan Site - CT 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Canaan Site - CT 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NEW CANAAN SITE (CT.08) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Canaan , Connecticut CT.08-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 CT.08-2 Site Operations: None; Investigation of area prompted by public query; no site found in New Canaan. CT.08-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No AEC site located in this city CT.08-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: No Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Torrington Co - CT 09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Torrington Co - CT 09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TORRINGTON CO. (CT.09 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Torrington Co. - Specialties Division CT.09-1 Location: Torrington , Connecticut CT.09-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.09-1 Site Operations: Performed swaging experiments on small quantities of uranium rods circa 1951 to 1953 as a subcontractor to Bridgeport Brass Co. CT.09-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Brass Co - CT 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Brass Co - CT 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Brass Co (CT.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Anaconda Company Brass Division CT.01-1 Location: 414 Meadow Street , Waterbury , Connecticut CT.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 CT.01-2 Site Operations: Limited work with copper clad uranium billets during the 1950s. CT.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based upon the limited scope of

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Cyanamid Co - CT 13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Cyanamid Co - CT 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Cyanamid Co (CT.13 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Stamford , Connecticut CT.13-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.13-1 Site Operations: Produced boron and possibly handled small amounts of refined radioactive source material circa 1940's. Also possibly performed research work on irradiated "J" slugs in 1952 and 1953. CT.13-1 CT.13-3 Site Disposition:

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Combustion Engineering Co - CT 03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Combustion Engineering Co - CT 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Combustion Engineering, CT (CT.03 ) Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Designated Name: Combustion Engineering Alternate Name: CE Site Asea Brown Boveri S1C Prototype CT.03-1 Location: 1000 Prospect Hill Road, Windsor, Connecticut CT.03-2 Evaluation Year: 1994 CT.03-1 Site Operations: Used natural, enriched, and highly enriched uranium to make fuel assemblies for the AEC. CT.03-3 CT.03-4 Site Disposition: Eligible

  2. The Ne-to-O abundance ratio of the interstellar medium from IBEX-Lo observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.; Kucharek, H.; Mbius, E.; Leonard, T.; Bzowski, M.; Sok?, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we report on a two-year study to estimate the Ne/O abundance ratio in the gas phase of the local interstellar cloud (LIC). Based on the first two years of observations with the Interstellar Boundary Explorer, we determined the fluxes of interstellar neutral (ISN) O and Ne atoms at the Earth's orbit in spring 2009 and 2010. A temporal variation of the Ne/O abundance ratio at the Earth's orbit could be expected due to solar cycle-related effects such as changes of ionization. However, this study shows that there is no significant change in the Ne/O ratio at the Earths orbit from 2009 to 2010. We used time-dependent survival probabilities of the ISNs to calculate the Ne/O abundance ratio at the termination shock. Then we estimated the Ne/O abundance ratio in the gas phase of the LIC with the use of filtration factors and the ionization fractions. From our analysis, the Ne/O abundance ratio in the LIC is 0.33 0.07, which is in agreement with the abundance ratio inferred from pickup-ion measurements.

  3. Level-resolved R-matrix calculations for the electron-impact excitation of Ne{sup 3+} and Ne{sup 6+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludlow, J. A.; Lee, T. G.; Ballance, C. P.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2011-08-15

    Large-scale R-matrix calculations are carried out for the electron-impact excitation of Ne{sup 3+} and Ne{sup 6+}. For Ne{sup 3+}, a 581-LSJ-level R-matrix intermediate coupling frame transformation calculation is made for excitations up to the n=4 shell. For some transitions, large effective collision strength differences are found with current 23-jKJ-level Breit-Pauli R-matrix and earlier 22-LSJ-level R-matrix jj omega (JAJOM) calculations. For Ne{sup 6+}, a 171-jKJ-level Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculation is made for excitations up to the n=5 shell. For some transitions, large effective collision strength differences are found with current 46-jKJ-level Breit-Pauli R-matrix and earlier 46-LSJ-level R-matrix JAJOM calculations. Together with existing R-matrix calculations for other ion stages, high-quality excitation data are now available for astrophysical and laboratory plasma modeling along the entire Ne isonuclear sequence.

  4. /Users/jzennamo/Desktop/ObsLimit_MiniSciBooNE_SBN_numuDis.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    µ θ 2 2 sin 3 - 10 2 - 10 1 - 10 1 ] 2 [eV 2 m ∆ 1 - 10 1 10 2 10 POT) 20 10 × POT) and T600 (6.6 21 10 × MicroBooNE (1.3 POT) 20 10 × LAr1-ND (6.6 mode, CC Events ν Stat, Flux, Cross Section Uncerts. Reconstructed Energy Efficiency µ ν 80% Shape and Rate 90% CL CL σ 3 CL σ 5 MiniBooNE + SciBooNE 90% CL

  5. An accumulator/compressor ring for Ne+ ions (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: An accumulator/compressor ring for Ne+ ions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An accumulator/compressor ring for Ne+ ions The primary goal of the High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) program is to create an extremely bright ion beam at low duty cycle. For example, a typical set of parameters is: (1) Particle type = Ne{sup +}; (2) Ion energy = 20.1 MeV; (3) One ion pulse = 1 {micro}C, 1 ns, 1 mm{sup 2}; and (4) Repetition rate = 1 Hz. This would give a volume density of

  6. MiniBooNE: Up and Running Morgan Wascko Morgan Wascko Louisiana State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Up and Running Morgan Wascko Morgan Wascko Louisiana State University Louisiana State University Morgan O. Wascko, LSU Yang Institute Conference 11 October, 2002 MiniBooNE detector at Fermi National Accelerator Lab Outline Motivation MiniBooNE Overview Physics at MiniBooNE Current Status First Data! Morgan O. Wascko, LSU Yang Institute Conference 11 October, 2002 Neutrino Oscillations The Evidence So Far ... Solar Solar ∆ ∆ m m 2 2 ~ ~ 10 10 -(4~5) -(4~5) Atmospheric Atmospheric ∆ ∆ m m

  7. WC_2000_001_CLASS_WAIVER_BETWEEN_DOE_and_EMPLOYEES_OF_THE_NE.pdf |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 2000_001_CLASS_WAIVER_BETWEEN_DOE_and_EMPLOYEES_OF_THE_NE.pdf WC_2000_001_CLASS_WAIVER_BETWEEN_DOE_and_EMPLOYEES_OF_THE_NE.pdf PDF icon WC_2000_001_CLASS_WAIVER_BETWEEN_DOE_and_EMPLOYEES_OF_THE_NE.pdf More Documents & Publications Class_Waiver_W_C-2000-001.pdf WC_1994_010__CLASS_WAIVER_of_the_Governments_Patent_Rights_.pdf WC_1994_001_CLASS_WAIVER_OF_THE_Governments_Patent_Rights_i

  8. EcoCAR: The NeXt Challenge | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EcoCAR: The NeXt Challenge EcoCAR: The NeXt Challenge May 18, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis While most college students' experience with vehicles goes no further than the beater they picked up for a few thousand dollars, students participating in the EcoCAR: The NeXT Challenge competition get to experience the cutting-edge of driving technology. The competition, which was established by the U.S. Department of Energy and General Motors, is a three year advanced vehicle engineering contest. Yesterday, May

  9. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-NE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NE.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Nebraska Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275 pixels,...

  10. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | June 24, 2014: MicroBooNE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jpeg images. When using these images, please credit each photo as indicated. Med Res | Hi Res The 30-ton MicroBooNE neutrino detector was transported across the Fermilab site on...

  11. ARM - Field Campaign - 2001 Philadelphia NE-OPS Air Quality Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Philadelphia NE-OPS Air Quality Experiment ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign...

  12. Application for Presidential Permit PP-400 TDI-NE - New England...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PP-400 TDI-NE - New England Clean Power Link Project - Motion to Intervene and Comments of the Vermont Department of Public Service - August 6, 2014 Application for Presidential...

  13. 2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting 2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting The Reactor Materials element of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program conducted its FY 2013 coordination meeting as a series of four web-conferences to act as a forum for the nuclear materials research community. The purpose of this meeting was to report on current and planned nuclear materials research, identify new areas of collaboration and promote

  14. DOE/NE Sponsors a U.S. - Kazakhstan Civilian Nuclear Energy Workshop at

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Idaho National Laboratory | Department of Energy DOE/NE Sponsors a U.S. - Kazakhstan Civilian Nuclear Energy Workshop at Idaho National Laboratory DOE/NE Sponsors a U.S. - Kazakhstan Civilian Nuclear Energy Workshop at Idaho National Laboratory February 26, 2015 - 12:48pm Addthis U.S. and Kazakhstani participants follow a briefing about modeling and simulation U.S. and Kazakhstani participants follow a briefing about modeling and simulation Kazakhstanis ask questions about computing

  15. NE & EERE Working Together: 5 Facts About the New Energy Innovation Lab at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Idaho National Laboratory | Department of Energy NE & EERE Working Together: 5 Facts About the New Energy Innovation Lab at Idaho National Laboratory NE & EERE Working Together: 5 Facts About the New Energy Innovation Lab at Idaho National Laboratory April 24, 2014 - 5:57pm Addthis The Energy Innovation Laboratory at the Energy Department’s Idaho National Laboratory was dedicated earlier this week. The new facility enables researchers to tackle some of the most pressing

  16. Introduction to MiniBooNE and Charged Current Quasi-Elastic (CCQE) Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE and ν μ Charged Current Quasi-Elastic (CCQE) Results Byron P. Roe University of Michigan For the MiniBooNE collaboration 2 University of Alabama Los Alamos National Laboratory Bucknell University Louisiana State University University of Cincinnati University of Michigan University of Colorado Princeton University Columbia University Saint Mary's University of Minnesota Embry Riddle University Virginia Polytechnic Institute Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Western Illinois

  17. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI-NE - New

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    England Clean Power Link Project: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 131 - July 9, 2014 | Department of Energy - New England Clean Power Link Project: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 131 - July 9, 2014 Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI-NE - New England Clean Power Link Project: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 131 - July 9, 2014 Application from TDI-NE to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada

  18. Application for Presidential Permit PP-400 TDI-NE - New England Clean Power

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Link Project - Motion to Intervene and Comments of the Vermont Department of Public Service - August 6, 2014 | Department of Energy PP-400 TDI-NE - New England Clean Power Link Project - Motion to Intervene and Comments of the Vermont Department of Public Service - August 6, 2014 Application for Presidential Permit PP-400 TDI-NE - New England Clean Power Link Project - Motion to Intervene and Comments of the Vermont Department of Public Service - August 6, 2014 The Vermont Department of

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hallam Nuclear Power Facility - NE 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hallam Nuclear Power Facility - NE 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hallam Nuclear Power Facility (NE.01 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site Documents Related to Hallam Nuclear Power Facility U.S. Department of Energy 2009 Annual Inspection - Hallam, Nebraska June 2009 Page 1

  20. 2015 ANNUAL DOE-NE MATERIALS RESEARCH MEETING | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ANNUAL DOE-NE MATERIALS RESEARCH MEETING 2015 ANNUAL DOE-NE MATERIALS RESEARCH MEETING The Reactor Materials element of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program conducted its FY 2015 coordination meeting as a series of two web-conferences to act as a forum for the nuclear materials research community. The purpose of this meeting was to report on current and planned nuclear materials research, identify new areas of collaboration and promote greater coordination among the various

  1. DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan | Department of Energy DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sperry Products Inc - CT 07

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sperry Products Inc - CT 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SPERRY PRODUCTS, INC. (CT.07) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Danbury , Connecticut CT.07-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 CT.07-2 Site Operations: Performed tests involving non-destructive inspection techniques in the 1950s. CT.07-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited scope of activities performed at the site

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wesleyan University - CT 12

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Wesleyan University - CT 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Wesleyan University (CT.12 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Middletown , Connecticut CT.12-1 Evaluation Year: 1995 CT.12-2 Site Operations: Spectrographic research on small quantities of uranium wire (several inches in length) in Physics Department circa late 1950. CT.12-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the

  4. Beyond standard model searches in the MiniBooNE experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Katori, Teppei; Conrad, Janet M.

    2014-08-05

    Tmore » he MiniBooNE experiment has contributed substantially to beyond standard model searches in the neutrino sector. he experiment was originally designed to test the Δm2~1eV2 region of the sterile neutrino hypothesis by observing νe(ν-e) charged current quasielastic signals from a νμ(ν-μ) beam. MiniBooNE observed excesses of νe and ν-e candidate events in neutrino and antineutrino mode, respectively. o date, these excesses have not been explained within the neutrino standard model (νSM); the standard model extended for three massive neutrinos. Confirmation is required by future experiments such as MicroBooNE. MiniBooNE also provided an opportunity for precision studies of Lorentz violation. he results set strict limits for the first time on several parameters of the standard-model extension, the generic formalism for considering Lorentz violation. Most recently, an extension to MiniBooNE running, with a beam tuned in beam-dump mode, is being performed to search for dark sector particles. In addition, this review describes these studies, demonstrating that short baseline neutrino experiments are rich environments in new physics searches.« less

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - 1996 NARSTO Northeast Field Study (NARSTO-NE)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 NARSTO Northeast Field Study (NARSTO-NE) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 1996 NARSTO Northeast Field Study (NARSTO-NE) 1996.07.01 - 1996.07.28 Lead Scientist : Larry Kleinman For data sets, see below. Abstract The DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed in the New York City metropolitan area as part of the North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone-Northeast effort to determine the

  6. MiniBooNE Charged Current Charged Pion Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Muon Neutrino-Induced Charged-Current Charged Pion Production Cross Sections on Mineral Oil at Enu~1 GeV", arXiv:1011.3572 [hep-ex], submitted to Phys. Rev. D. The following MiniBooNE information for the 2010 CC π+ cross section paper is made available to the public. Tables A root file containing histograms of all of the cross section results in the paper can be found here. A text file of the cross section results can be found here. The MiniBooNE muon neutrino flux distribution can be

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - Oxford_MiniBooNE_and_SterileNus.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxford Seminar June 23, 2004 * Extensions to the Neutrino Standard Model: Sterile Neutrinos * MiniBooNE: Status and Prospects * Future Directions if MiniBooNE Sees Oscillations 2 Theoretical Prejudices before 1995 * Natural scale for ∆m 2 ~ 10 - 100 eV 2 since needed to explain dark matter * Oscillation mixing angles must be small like the quark mixing angles * Solar neutrino oscillations must be small mixing angle MSW solution because it is "cool" * Atmospheric neutrino anomaly must

  8. Numerical Analysis of Parasitic Crossing Compensation with Wires in DA$\\Phi$NE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valishev, A.; Shatilov, D.; Milardi, C.; Zobov, M.

    2015-06-24

    Current-bearing wire compensators were successfully used in the 2005-2006 run of the DAΦNE collider to mitigate the detrimental effects of parasitic beam-beam interactions. A marked improvement of the positron beam lifetime was observed in machine operation with the KLOE detector. In view of the possible application of wire beam-beam compensators for the High Luminosity LHC upgrade, we revisit the DAΦNE experiments. We use an improved model of the accelerator with the goal to validate the modern simulation tools and provide valuable input for the LHC upgrade project.

  9. Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative {sup 99m}Tc SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (?) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (? ? 200400 HU) resulted in low ?-maps noise (? ? 1%3%). Noise levels greater than ?10% in 140 keV ?-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ?15% in {sup 99m}Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 4 ?Gy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected ? values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in ?. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ?100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in ?{sub 140} {sub keV} on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ?10% into the reconstructed {sup 99m}Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because CT dose levels that affect SPECT quantification is low (CTDI{sub vol} ? 4 ?Gy), the low dose limit for the CT exam as part of SPECT/CT will be guided by CT image quality requirements for anatomical localization and artifact reduction. A CT technique with higher kVp in combination with lower mAs is recommended when low-dose CT images are used for AC to minimize beam-hardening artifacts.

  10. Simulation of Crab Waist Collisions In DA$\\Phi$NE With KLOE-2 Interaction Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zobov, M.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Milardi, C.; Shatilov, D.; Valishev, A.

    2015-06-24

    After the successful completion of the SIDDHARTA experiment run with crab waist collisions, the electron-positron collider DAΦNE has started routine operations for the KLOE-2 detector. The new interaction region also exploits the crab waist collision scheme, but features certain complications including the experimental detector solenoid, compensating anti-solenoids, and tilted quadrupole magnets. We have performed simulations of the beam-beam collisions in the collider taking into account the real DAΦNE nonlinear lattice. In particular, we have evaluated the effect of crab waist sextupoles and beam-beam interactions on the DAΦNE dynamical aperture and energy acceptance, and estimated the luminosity that can be potentially achieved with and without crab waist sextupoles in the present working conditions. A numerical analysis has been performed in order to propose possible steps for further luminosity increase in DAΦNE such as a better working point choice, crab sextupole strength optimization, correction of the phase advance between the sextupoles and the interaction region. The proposed change of the e- ring working point was implemented and resulted in a significant performance increase.

  11. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-10-01

    The Nuclear Energy Computational Fluid Dynamics Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-CAMS) system is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Utah State University (USU), and other interested parties with the objective of developing and implementing a comprehensive and readily accessible data and information management system for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) verification and validation (V&V) in support of nuclear energy systems design and safety analysis. The two key objectives of the NE-CAMS effort are to identify, collect, assess, store and maintain high resolution and high quality experimental data and related expert knowledge (metadata) for use in CFD V&V assessments specific to the nuclear energy field and to establish a working relationship with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop a CFD V&V database, including benchmark cases, that addresses and supports the associated NRC regulations and policies on the use of CFD analysis. In particular, the NE-CAMS system will support the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program, which aims to develop and deploy advanced modeling and simulation methods and computational tools for reliable numerical simulation of nuclear reactor systems for design and safety analysis. Primary NE-CAMS Elements There are four primary elements of the NE-CAMS knowledge base designed to support computer modeling and simulation in the nuclear energy arena as listed below. Element 1. The database will contain experimental data that can be used for CFD validation that is relevant to nuclear reactor and plant processes, particularly those important to the nuclear industry and the NRC. Element 2. Qualification standards for data evaluation and classification will be incorporated and applied such that validation data sets will result in well-defined, well-characterized data. Element 3. Standards will be established for the design and operation of experiments for the generation of new validation data sets that are to be submitted to NE-CAMS that addresses the completeness and characterization of the dataset. Element 4. Standards will be developed for performing verification and validation (V&V) to establish confidence levels in CFD analyses of nuclear reactor processes; such processes will be acceptable and recognized by both CFD experts and the NRC.

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - NOW2004_MiniBooNE.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NOW2004 Workshop * Extensions to the Neutrino Standard Model: Sterile Neutrinos * MiniBooNE: Status and Prospects * Future Directions if MiniBooNE Sees Oscillations 2 Three Signal Regions * LSND ∆m 2 = 0.1 - 10 eV 2 , small mixing * Atmospheric ∆m 2 = 2.5×10 -3 eV 2 , large mixing * Solar ∆m 2 = 8.2×10 -5 eV 2 , large mixing ∆m 13 ∆m 12 ∆m 23 2 2 2 ( ) 1 sin 2 sin (1.27 / ) P m L E α α ν ν θ → = - ∆ 2 2 2 2 2 2 21 32 31 Three distinct neutrino oscillation signals, with For

  13. Microsoft Word - MicroBooNE CD-1 appr.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Approve Alternative Selection and Cost Range of the Large Liquid Argon Detector for Neutrino Physics (MicroBooNE) Project at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Office of High Energy Physics Office of Science Purpose The purpose of this paper is to document the review and approval by the Office of Science Energy Systems Acquisition Advisory Board-equivalent for Critical Decision 1 (CD-1) "Approve Alternative Selection and Cost Range" for the Large Liquid Argon Detector for

  14. NE-23 Elimination of the Chupadera Mesa and Los Alamos County Industrial Waste

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AM? 2 2 1986 NE-23 Elimination of the Chupadera Mesa and Los Alamos County Industrial Waste Line Sites from Further Consideration for FUSRAP Inclusion Carlos E. Garcia, Director Environmental Safety and Health Division Albuquerque Operations Office The enclosed material is being provided to you to document the final actions taken under the Department's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) for the Chupadera Mesa area and the Los Alamos County Industrial Waste Lines, New

  15. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI-NE - New

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    England Clean Power Link Project - Comments and Motion to Intervene of Conservation Law Foundation | Department of Energy Project - Comments and Motion to Intervene of Conservation Law Foundation Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI-NE - New England Clean Power Link Project - Comments and Motion to Intervene of Conservation Law Foundation Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) provides the following comments and Motion to Intervene regarding the Application by TDI-New

  16. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI-NE - New

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    England Clean Power Link Project: Motion to Intervene of The Northeast Power Coordinating Council, Inc. | Department of Energy Project: Motion to Intervene of The Northeast Power Coordinating Council, Inc. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI-NE - New England Clean Power Link Project: Motion to Intervene of The Northeast Power Coordinating Council, Inc. Northeast Power Coordinating Council, Inc. (NPCC) submits its Motion to Intervene the New England Clean Power Link

  17. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI-NE New England

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Clean Power Link Project: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 165, August 26, 2014 | Department of Energy New England Clean Power Link Project: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 165, August 26, 2014 Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI-NE New England Clean Power Link Project: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact

  18. ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP EG&G SURVEY REPORT NE-F-003

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    * * * * * * * * * ~n~EGc.G ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP EG&G SURVEY REPORT NE-F-003 FEBRUARY 1983 THE REMOTE SENSING LABORATORY OF THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AN AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF AN AREA SURROUNDING THE FORMER MIDDLESEX SAMPLING PLANT IN MIDDLESEX, NEW JERSEY DATE OF SURVEY: MAY 1978 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of

  19. NE-24 R&D Decontamination Projects Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    " _ ,' ,:.' : NE-24 R&D Decontamination Projects Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) '. * * ,~~'.'J.' L.aGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations O fffce As a result of the House-Senate Conference Report and the Energy and W a ter Appropriations Act for FY 1984, and based on the data in the attached reports indicating radioactive contamination In excess of acceptable guidelines, the sites listed In the attachment and their respectfve vicinity properties

  20. bectso-ct121 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Comprehensive Report to Congress Comprehensive Report to Congress on the Clean Coal Technology Program: Demonstration of Innovative Applications of Technology for the CT-121 FGD ...

  1. Predix and Robots in CT Systems | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robots and Predix make Beijing's CT factory brilliant Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Robots and Predix make Beijing's CT factory brilliant Guoshuang Cai 2015.04.16 GE Healthcare's Beijing plant is one of the largest factories producing computed tomography (CT) systems in the world. More than 1,000 CT

  2. CT. L-2 United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7325.8 (a-a9J - EFG (OMOJ CT. L-2 United States Government 8 ",> I,: Ti -& d .- " * memorandum (' -. r_l DATE: AUG 10 1993 REPLY TO ATTN OF: EM-421 (W. Williams, 903-8149) SUSJECT: Hazard Assessment for Radioactive Contamination at the Seymour Site, Seymour, Connecticut To' L. Price, OR - We have reviewed the Hazard Assessment for the Radioactive Contamination at the Sevmour Site. Sevmour, Connecticut dated May 1993. This hazard assessment is related to residual radioaciive

  3. MCViNE- An object oriented Monte Carlo neutron ray tracing simulation package

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, J. Y. Y.; Smith, Hillary L.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Winn, Barry L.; Aczel, Adam A.; Aivazis, Michael; Fultz, Brent

    2015-11-28

    MCViNE (Monte-Carlo VIrtual Neutron Experiment) is an open-source Monte Carlo (MC) neutron ray-tracing software for performing computer modeling and simulations that mirror real neutron scattering experiments. We exploited the close similarity between how instrument components are designed and operated and how such components can be modeled in software. For example we used object oriented programming concepts for representing neutron scatterers and detector systems, and recursive algorithms for implementing multiple scattering. Combining these features together in MCViNE allows one to handle sophisticated neutron scattering problems in modern instruments, including, for example, neutron detection by complex detector systems, and single and multiplemore » scattering events in a variety of samples and sample environments. In addition, MCViNE can use simulation components from linear-chain-based MC ray tracing packages which facilitates porting instrument models from those codes. Furthermore it allows for components written solely in Python, which expedites prototyping of new components. These developments have enabled detailed simulations of neutron scattering experiments, with non-trivial samples, for time-of-flight inelastic instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. Examples of such simulations for powder and single-crystal samples with various scattering kernels, including kernels for phonon and magnon scattering, are presented. As a result, with simulations that closely reproduce experimental results, scattering mechanisms can be turned on and off to determine how they contribute to the measured scattering intensities, improving our understanding of the underlying physics.« less

  4. Possible shape coexistence and magnetic dipole transitions in {sup 17}C and {sup 21}Ne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagawa, H.; Zhou, X. R.; Suzuki, Toshio; Yoshida, N.

    2008-10-15

    Magnetic dipole (M1) transitions of N=11 nuclei {sup 17}C and {sup 21}Ne are investigated by using shell model and deformed Skyrme Hartree-Fock + blocked BCS wave functions. Shell model calculations predict well observed energy spectra and magnetic dipole transitions in {sup 21}Ne, while the results are rather poor to predict these observables in {sup 17}C. In the deformed HF calculations, the ground states of the two nuclei are shown to have large prolate deformations close to {beta}{sub 2}=0.4. It is also pointed out that the first K{sup {pi}}=1/2{sup +} state in {sup 21}Ne is prolately deformed, while the first K{sup {pi}}=1/2{sup +} state in {sup 17}C is predicted to have a large oblate deformation close to the ground state in energy, We point out that the experimentally observed large hindrance of the M1 transition between I{sup {pi}}=1/2{sup +} and 3/2{sup +} in {sup 17}C can be attributed to a shape coexistence near the ground state of {sup 17}C.

  5. Comparison of GiBUU calculations with MiniBooNE pion production data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalakulich, O.; Mosel, U.

    2015-05-15

    Background: Neutrino-induced pion production can give important informationon the axial coupling to nucleon resonances. Furthermore, pion production represents a major background to quasielastic-like events. one pion production data from the MiniBooNE in charged current neutrino scattering in mineral oil appeared higher than expected within conventional theoretical approaches. Purpose: We aim to investigate which model parameters affect the calculated cross section and how they do this. Method: The Giessen BoltzmannUehlingUhlenbeck (GiBUU) model is used for an investigation of neutrino-nucleus reactions. Results: Presented are integrated and differential cross sections for 1?{sup +} and 1?{sup 0} production before and after final state interactions in comparison with the MiniBooNE data. Conclusions: For the MiniBooNE flux all processes (QE, 1?-background, ?, higher resonance production, DIS) contribute to the observed final state with one pion of a given charge. The uncertainty in elementary pion production cross sections leads to a corresponding uncertainty in the nuclear cross sections. Final state interactions change the shape of the muon-related observables only slightly, but they significantly change the shape of pion distributions.

  6. "EMM Region","PC","IGCC","PC","Conv. CT","Adv. CT","Conv. CC...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CT","Conv. CC","Adv. CC","Adv. CC wCCS","Fuel Cell","Nuclear","Biomass","MSW","On-shore Wind","Off-shore Wind","Solar Thermal","Solar PV" ,,,"wCCS" "1 (ERCT)",0.91,0.92,0.92,0.93...

  7. SU-E-T-70: Commissioning a Multislice CT Scanner for X-Ray CT Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, H; Hilts, M; Jirasek, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To commission a multislice computed tomography (CT) scanner for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD). Methods: Commissioning was performed for a 16-slice CT scanner using images acquired through a 1L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine for comparison purposes. The variability in CT number associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background image subtraction technique. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by comparing image noise and uniformity to that of the single slice machine. The consistency in CT number across slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also evaluated. Finally, the variability in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load was measured for the multislice scanner and compared to the tube load effects observed on the single slice machine. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in CT number across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image quality for the multislice machine was found to be comparable to that of the single slice scanner. Further study showed CT number was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thickness examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to imaging a large volume using a single slice scanner. Conclusion: A multislice CT scanner has been commissioning for CT PGD, allowing images of an entire dose distribution to be acquired in a matter of minutes. Funding support provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)

  8. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Johnson; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01

    NE-KAMS knowledge base will assist computational analysts, physics model developers, experimentalists, nuclear reactor designers, and federal regulators by: (1) Establishing accepted standards, requirements and best practices for V&V and UQ of computational models and simulations, (2) Establishing accepted standards and procedures for qualifying and classifying experimental and numerical benchmark data, (3) Providing readily accessible databases for nuclear energy related experimental and numerical benchmark data that can be used in V&V assessments and computational methods development, (4) Providing a searchable knowledge base of information, documents and data on V&V and UQ, and (5) Providing web-enabled applications, tools and utilities for V&V and UQ activities, data assessment and processing, and information and data searches. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), the Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve computational modeling and simulation (M&S) of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs. In addition, from the outset, NE-KAMS will support the use of computational M&S in the nuclear industry by developing guidelines and recommended practices aimed at quantifying the uncertainty and assessing the applicability of existing analysis models and methods. The NE-KAMS effort will initially focus on supporting the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and thermal hydraulics (T/H) analysis for M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and will later expand to include materials, fuel system performance and other areas of M&S as time and funding allow.

  9. Beyond standard model searches in the MiniBooNE experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katori, Teppei; Conrad, Janet M.

    2014-08-05

    The MiniBooNE experiment has contributed substantially to beyond standard model searches in the neutrino sector. The experiment was originally designed to test the Δm2~1eV2 region of the sterile neutrino hypothesis by observing νe(ν-e) charged current quasielastic signals from a νμ(ν-μ) beam. MiniBooNE observed excesses of νe and ν-e candidate events in neutrino and antineutrino mode, respectively. To date, these excesses have not been explained within the neutrino standard model (νSM); the standard model extended for three massive neutrinos. Confirmation is required by future experiments such as MicroBooNE. MiniBooNE also provided an opportunity for precision studies of Lorentz violation. The results set strict limits for the first time on several parameters of the standard-model extension, the generic formalism for considering Lorentz violation. Most recently, an extension to MiniBooNE running, with a beam tuned in beam-dump mode, is being performed to search for dark sector particles. In addition, this review describes these studies, demonstrating that short baseline neutrino experiments are rich environments in new physics searches.

  10. Explosive Detection in Aviation Applications Using CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martz, H E; Crawford, C R

    2011-02-15

    CT scanners are deployed world-wide to detect explosives in checked and carry-on baggage. Though very similar to single- and dual-energy multi-slice CT scanners used today in medical imaging, some recently developed explosives detection scanners employ multiple sources and detector arrays to eliminate mechanical rotation of a gantry, photon counting detectors for spectral imaging, and limited number of views to reduce cost. For each bag scanned, the resulting reconstructed images are first processed by automated threat recognition algorithms to screen for explosives and other threats. Human operators review the images only when these automated algorithms report the presence of possible threats. The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has requirements for future scanners that include dealing with a larger number of threats, higher probability of detection, lower false alarm rates and lower operating costs. One tactic that DHS is pursuing to achieve these requirements is to augment the capabilities of the established security vendors with third-party algorithm developers. A third-party in this context refers to academics and companies other than the established vendors. DHS is particularly interested in exploring the model that has been used very successfully by the medical imaging industry, in which university researchers develop algorithms that are eventually deployed in commercial medical imaging equipment. The purpose of this paper is to discuss opportunities for third-parties to develop advanced reconstruction and threat detection algorithms.

  11. 18Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  12. 19Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  13. 20Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  14. NE-24

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    the Bureau of Hines Site at Albany, Oregon, for Remedial Action Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program I L@ _I' J.-La&one, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office Based on the data in the attached draft reports, it has been determined that the subject site is contaminated with residual radioactive material ' as a result of Manhattan Engineer District/Atomic Energy Commission operations P * at this site. The contamination is in excess of the acceptable guidelines and warrants

  15. NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday (except Federal holidays), at the DOE Public Document Room located in Room lE-190 of the Forrestal Building, 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W.,...

  16. American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Sector Biomass Facility Type...

  17. MicroCT: Semi-Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

    2011-09-22

    This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to R and D work - for production applications, use [4].

  18. MicroCT: Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

    2011-09-22

    This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to production work - for R and D there are two other semi-automated methods as given in [4, 5].

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New England Lime Co - CT 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    England Lime Co - CT 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NEW ENGLAND LIME CO. (CT.10) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: NELCO (Magnesium Division) CT.10-1 Location: Canaan , Connecticut CT.10-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.10-1 Site Operations: AEC source for magnesium and calcium. Conducted limited tests to evaluate potential for recovery of magnesium from uranium residues. CT.10-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    05 Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator (CT.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Haven , Connecticut CT.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.05-3 Site Operations: Research and development with solvents. CT.05-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited amount of materials handled CT.05-3 Radioactive Materials

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Chain and Cable Co - CT 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Chain and Cable Co - CT 15 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Chain and Cable Co (CT.15 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Bridgeport , Connecticut CT.15-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.15-1 Site Operations: Research and development involving uranium metal reclamation. CT.15-1 CT.15-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited quantity of materials and short duration of

  2. A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Warren G.; Rudko, D. A.; Braam, Nicolas A.; Jirasek, Andrew [University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2 (Canada); Wells, Derek M. [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia V8R 6V5 (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to introduce a prototype fan-beam optical computed tomography scanner for three-dimensional (3D) radiation dosimetry. Methods: Two techniques of fan-beam creation were evaluated: a helium-neon laser (HeNe, {lambda} = 543 nm) with line-generating lens, and a laser diode module (LDM, {lambda} = 635 nm) with line-creating head module. Two physical collimator designs were assessed: a single-slot collimator and a multihole collimator. Optimal collimator depth was determined by observing the signal of a single photodiode with varying collimator depths. A method of extending the dynamic range of the system is presented. Two sample types were used for evaluations: nondosimetric absorbent solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters, each housed in 1 liter cylindrical plastic flasks. Imaging protocol investigations were performed to address ring artefacts and image noise. Two image artefact removal techniques were performed in sinogram space. Collimator efficacy was evaluated by imaging highly opaque samples of scatter-based and absorption-based solutions. A noise-based flask registration technique was developed. Two protocols for gel manufacture were examined. Results: The LDM proved advantageous over the HeNe laser due to its reduced noise. Also, the LDM uses a wavelength more suitable for the PRESAGE{sup TM} dosimeter. Collimator depth of 1.5 cm was found to be an optimal balance between scatter rejection, signal strength, and manufacture ease. The multihole collimator is capable of maintaining accurate scatter-rejection to high levels of opacity with scatter-based solutions (T < 0.015%). Imaging protocol investigations support the need for preirradiation and postirradiation scanning to reduce reflection-based ring artefacts and to accommodate flask imperfections and gel inhomogeneities. Artefact removal techniques in sinogram space eliminate streaking artefacts and reduce ring artefacts of up to {approx}40% in magnitude. The flask registration technique was shown to achieve submillimetre and subdegree placement accuracy. Dosimetry protocol investigations emphasize the need to allow gel dosimeters to cool gradually and to be scanned while at room temperature. Preliminary tests show that considerable noise reduction can be achieved with sinogram filtering and by binning image pixels into more clinically relevant grid sizes. Conclusions: This paper describes a new optical CT scanner for 3D radiation dosimetry. Tests demonstrate that it is capable of imaging both absorption-based and scatter-based samples of high opacities. Imaging protocol and gel dosimeter manufacture techniques have been adapted to produce optimal reconstruction results. These optimal results will require suitable filtering and binning techniques for noise reduction purposes.

  3. MiniBooNE Charged Current Neutral Pion Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Muon Neutrino Induced Charged Current Neutral Pion Cross Sections on Mineral Oil at Enu=0.5-2.0 GeV" , arXiv:1010.3264 [hep-ex] The following MiniBooNE information for the 2010 CC π0 cross section paper is made available to the public. Each of the following tables contains: The bin boundaries and units. The central-value measurement or prediction with its units and multiplicative factor. The statistical uncertainty per bin of each measurement with its units and multiplicative factor. The

  4. Microsoft Word - MicroBooNE CD-3b appr.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3b Approve Start of Full Construction of the Micro Booster Neutrino Project at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Office of High Energy Physics Office of Science A. Purpose The purpose of this document is to record the review and approval by the Office of Science Energy Systems Acquisition Advisory Board-equivalent for Critical Decision (CD) 3b "Approve Start of Full Construction" for the Micro Booster Neutrino (MicroBooNE) Project at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

  5. MiniBooNE H. A. Tanaka Princeton University Neutrino Factory 2004 Osaka, Japan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H. A. Tanaka Princeton University Neutrino Factory 2004 Osaka, Japan The MiniBooNE Collaboration University of Alabama: Y.Liu, I.Stancu Bucknell University: S.Koutsoliotas University of Cincinnati: E.Hawker, R.A.Johnson, J.L.Raaf University of Colorado: T.Hart, R.H.Nelson, M.Wilking, E.D.Zimmerman Columbia University: A.A.Aguilar-Arevalo, L.Bugel, J.M.Conrad, J.Link, J.Monroe, D.Schmitz, M.H.Shaevitz, M.Sorel, G.P.Zeller Embry Riddle Aeronautical University: D.Smith Fermi National Accelerator

  6. DOE-NE Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment: FY12 Plans Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadasivan, Pratap

    2012-06-21

    This presentation provides background information on FY12 plans for the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment program. Program plans, organization, and individual project elements are described. Research objectives are: (1) Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; (2) Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy; (3) Develop Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycles; and (4) Understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism - Goal is to enable the use of risk information to inform NE R&D program planning.

  7. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Charles Thomas Homes, Anna Model, Omaha, NE

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Thomas Homes Anna Model Omaha, NE DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to give

  8. DOE-NE-STD-1004-92; Root Cause Analysis Guidance Document

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NE-STD-1004-92 DOE GUIDELINE ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS GUIDANCE DOCUMENT February 1992 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards Washington, D.C. 20585 ii ABSTRACT DOE Order 5000.3A, "Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information," investigation and reporting of occurrences (including the performance of root cause analysis) requires the and the selection, implementation, and follow-up of corrective actions. The level of

  9. Photoionization-pumped, Ne II, x-ray laser studies project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, M.C.; Hagelstein, P.L.; Eckart, M.J.; Forsyth, J.M.; Gerrassimenko, M.; Soures, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The energetics of this pumping scheme are shown. Short-pulse (50 to 100 ps) laser irradiation of an appropriate x-ray flashlamp medium generates broad-band emission in the range of 300 to 800 eV which preferentially photoionizes Ne to the /sup 2/S state of Ne II creating an inversion at approximately 27 eV. Although this approach does not depend on precise spectral overlap between the x-ray pump radiation and the medium to be pumped, it does require that the x-ray medium remain un-ionized prior to photoionization by the soft x-ray emission. Well-controlled focus conditions are required to ensure that the x-ray medium is not subjected to electron or x-ray preheat prior to irradiation by the soft x-ray source. The magnitude of the population inversion is predicted to be critically dependent upon rapid photoionization of the two states; therefore, ultra-short pulse irradiation of the laser flashlamps is required.

  10. OZONE PRODUCTION IN THE PHILADELPHIA URBAN AREA DURING NE-OPS 99.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KLEINMAN,L.I.; DAUM,P.H.; BRECHTEL,F.; LEE,Y.N.; NUNNERMACKER,L.J.; SPRINGSTON,S.R.; WEINSTEIN-LLOYD,J.

    2001-10-01

    As part of the 1999 NARSTO Northeast Oxidant and Particulate Study (NE-OPS) field campaign, the DOE G-1 aircraft sampled trace gases and aerosols in and around the Philadelphia metropolitan area. Twenty research flights were conducted between July 25 and August 11. The overall goals of these flights were to obtain a mechanistic understanding of O{sub 3} production; to characterize the spatial and temporal behavior of photo-oxidants and aerosols; and to study the evolution of aerosol size distributions, including the process of new particle formation. Within the NE-OPS program, other groups provided additional trace gas, aerosol, and meteorological observations using aircraft, balloon, remote sensing, and surface based instruments (Phillbrick et al., 2000). In this article we provide an overview of the G-1 observations related to O{sub 3} production, focusing on the vertical distribution of pollutants. Ozone production rates are calculated using a box model that is constrained by observed trace gas concentrations. Highest O{sub 3} concentrations were observed on July 31, which we present as a case study. On that day, O{sub 3} concentrations above the 1-hour 120 ppb standard were observed downwind of Philadelphia and also in the plume of a single industrial facility located on the Delaware River south of the city.

  11. Wave packet and statistical quantum calculations for the He + NeH{sup +} → HeH{sup +} + Ne reaction on the ground electronic state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koner, Debasish; Panda, Aditya N.; Barrios, Lizandra; González-Lezana, Tomás

    2014-09-21

    A real wave packet based time-dependent method and a statistical quantum method have been used to study the He + NeH{sup +} (v, j) reaction with the reactant in various ro-vibrational states, on a recently calculated ab initio ground state potential energy surface. Both the wave packet and statistical quantum calculations were carried out within the centrifugal sudden approximation as well as using the exact Hamiltonian. Quantum reaction probabilities exhibit dense oscillatory pattern for smaller total angular momentum values, which is a signature of resonances in a complex forming mechanism for the title reaction. Significant differences, found between exact and approximate quantum reaction cross sections, highlight the importance of inclusion of Coriolis coupling in the calculations. Statistical results are in fairly good agreement with the exact quantum results, for ground ro-vibrational states of the reactant. Vibrational excitation greatly enhances the reaction cross sections, whereas rotational excitation has relatively small effect on the reaction. The nature of the reaction cross section curves is dependent on the initial vibrational state of the reactant and is typical of a late barrier type potential energy profile.

  12. BAIC CT T SK Holdings JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JV Place: Beijing Municipality, China Product: China-based JV to manufacture and sell electric cars. References: BAIC, CT&T & SK Holdings JV1 This article is a stub. You can...

  13. QSO ABSORPTION SYSTEMS DETECTED IN Ne VIII: HIGH-METALLICITY CLOUDS WITH A LARGE EFFECTIVE CROSS SECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meiring, J. D.; Tripp, T. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Werk, J. K.; Prochaska, J. X. [University of California Observatories-Lick Observatory, UC Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)] [University of California Observatories-Lick Observatory, UC Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Howk, J. C. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Jenkins, E. B. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)] [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Lehner, N.; Sembach, K. R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    Using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ultraviolet spectra of the z{sub em} = 0.9754 quasar PG1148+549 obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope, we study the physical conditions and abundances of Ne VIII+O VI absorption line systems at z{sub abs} = 0.68381, 0.70152, 0.72478. In addition to Ne VIII and O VI, absorption lines from multiple ionization stages of oxygen (O II, O III, O IV) are detected and are well aligned with the more highly ionized species. We show that these absorbers are multiphase systems including hot gas (T Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 5.7} K) that produces Ne VIII and O VI, and the gas metallicity of the cool phase ranges from Z = 0.3 Z{sub Sun} to supersolar. The cool ( Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 4} K) phases have densities n{sub H} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} and small sizes (<4 kpc); these cool clouds are likely to expand and dissipate, and the Ne VIII may be within a transition layer between the cool gas and a surrounding, much hotter medium. The Ne VIII redshift density, dN/dz{approx}7{sup +7}{sub -3}, requires a large number of these clouds for every L > 0.1 L* galaxy and a large effective absorption cross section ({approx}> 100 kpc), and indeed, we find a star-forming {approx}L {sup *} galaxy at the redshift of the z{sub abs} = 0.72478 system, at an impact parameter of 217 kpc. Multiphase absorbers like these Ne VIII systems are likely to be an important reservoir of baryons and metals in the circumgalactic media of galaxies.

  14. Ozone contactor hydraulic considerations in meeting CT disinfection

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    requirements (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Ozone contactor hydraulic considerations in meeting CT disinfection requirements Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ozone contactor hydraulic considerations in meeting CT disinfection requirements Tracer studies were performed in bench and pilot scale ozone diffusion contactors to determine actual contact times for the bench and pilot scale units and to characterize the flow pattern through these reactors. It was recognized that the

  15. CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots Simulations Run at NERSC Show How Seismic Waves Travel Through Mantle September 2, 2015 Robert Sanders, rlsanders@berkeley.edu, (510) 643-6998 NERSC PI: Barbara Romanowicz Lead Institution: University of California, Berkeley Project Title: Imaging and Calibration of Mantle Structure at Global and Regional Scales Using Full-Waveform Seismic Tomography NERSC Resources Used:

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Selling Corp - CT 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Selling Corp - CT 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: METALS SELLING CORP. (CT.0-01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Putnam , Connecticut CT.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 CT.0-01-1 Site Operations: Performed grinding of (non-radioactive) magnesium circa 1950 -1952 as a sub-contractor to Mallinckrodt Corp. CT.0-01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive materials were handled at this location

  17. CT reconstruction techniques for improved accuracy of lung CT airway measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, A.; Ranallo, F. N.; Judy, P. F.; Gierada, D. S.; Fain, S. B.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of constrained reconstruction techniques on quantitative CT (qCT) of the lung parenchyma and airways for low x-ray radiation dose. Methods: Measurement of small airways with qCT remains a challenge, especially for low x-ray dose protocols. Images of the COPDGene quality assurance phantom (CTP698, The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) were obtained using a GE discovery CT750 HD scanner for helical scans at x-ray radiation dose-equivalents ranging from 1 to 4.12 mSv (12100 mA s currenttime product). Other parameters were 40 mm collimation, 0.984 pitch, 0.5 s rotation, and 0.625 mm thickness. The phantom was sandwiched between 7.5 cm thick water attenuating phantoms for a total length of 20 cm to better simulate the scatter conditions of patient scans. Image data sets were reconstructed using STANDARD (STD), DETAIL, BONE, and EDGE algorithms for filtered back projection (FBP), 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and Veo reconstructions. Reduced (half) display field of view (DFOV) was used to increase sampling across airway phantom structures. Inner diameter (ID), wall area percent (WA%), and wall thickness (WT) measurements of eight airway mimicking tubes in the phantom, including a 2.5 mm ID (42.6 WA%, 0.4 mm WT), 3 mm ID (49.0 WA%, 0.6 mm WT), and 6 mm ID (49.0 WA%, 1.2 mm WT) were performed with Airway Inspector (Surgical Planning Laboratory, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston, MA) using the phase congruency edge detection method. The average of individual measures at five central slices of the phantom was taken to reduce measurement error. Results: WA% measures were greatly overestimated while IDs were underestimated for the smaller airways, especially for reconstructions at full DFOV (36 cm) using the STD kernel, due to poor sampling and spatial resolution (0.7 mm pixel size). Despite low radiation dose, the ID of the 6 mm ID airway was consistently measured accurately for all methods other than STD FBP. Veo reconstructions showed slight improvement over STD FBP reconstructions (4%9% increase in accuracy). The most improved ID and WA% measures were for the smaller airways, especially for low dose scans reconstructed at half DFOV (18 cm) with the EDGE algorithm in combination with 100% ASIR to mitigate noise. Using the BONE + ASIR at half BONE technique, measures improved by a factor of 2 over STD FBP even at a quarter of the x-ray dose. Conclusions: The flexibility of ASIR in combination with higher frequency algorithms, such as BONE, provided the greatest accuracy for conventional and low x-ray dose relative to FBP. Veo provided more modest improvement in qCT measures, likely due to its compatibility only with the smoother STD kernel.

  18. Effect of supplementation on vitamin A and zinc nutriture of children in northeast (NE) Thailand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Udomkesmalee, E.; Dhanamitta, S.; Charoenklatkul, S.; Tantipopipat, S.; Banjong, O.; Rojroongwasinkul, N.; Kramer, T.R.; Smith, J.C. Jr. USDA, Beltsville, MD )

    1991-03-11

    Previous surveys of the nutritional status of young children in NE Thailand suggested that they may benefit from vitamin A (VA) and/or zinc (Zn) supplementation. 140 children, with low plasma retinol concentrations were entered in a double-blind study. They were randomized and supplemented with either VA, Zn, VA + Zn or placebo each weekday for 6 mos. All subjects consumed their usual diet that provided adequate protein, less than recommended calories, fat, Zn and VA. Biochemical indices of VA and Zn status increased significantly. The children had adequate VA liver stores as assessed by relative dose response. Zn supplementation resulted in improvement of vision restoration time in dim light using rapid dark adaptometry. VA and Zn synergistically normalized conjunctival epithelium after a 6 mo supplementation. Data suggest that functional improvements of populations with suboptimal VA and Zn nutriture can be accomplished by supplementation with {lt}2 times of RDA of these nutrients.

  19. MiniBooNE NC 1π0 Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    νμ and ν̅μ induced neutral current single π0 production cross sections on mineral oil at Eν~O(1 GeV)", arXiv:0911.2063 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. D81, 013005 (2010) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2009 NC 1π0 cross section paper is made available to the public: Neutrino Mode Running νμ NC 1π0 pπ0 Differential Cross Section 1D array of bin boundaries partitioning the momentum of the π0 1D array of the value of the differential cross section in each bin in units of 10-40

  20. Test of ''Crab-Waist'' Collisions at the DA{Phi}NE {Phi} Factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zobov, M.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M. E.; Biscari, C.; Bocci, A.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G. O.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.

    2010-04-30

    The electron-positron collider DA{Phi}NE, the Italian {Phi} factory, has been recently upgraded in order to implement an innovative collision scheme based on large crossing angle, small beam sizes at the crossing point, and compensation of beam-beam interaction by means of sextupole pairs creating a ''crab-waist'' configuration in the interaction region. Experimental tests of the novel scheme exhibited an increase by a factor of 3 in the peak luminosity of the collider with respect to the performances reached before the upgrade. In this Letter we present the new collision scheme, discuss its advantages, describe the hardware modifications realized for the upgrade, and report the results of the experimental tests carried out during commissioning of the machine in the new configuration and standard operation for the users.

  1. UT gets involved at Oak Ridge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The struggle to maintain the momentum built up winning World War II and to keep the scientific brain trust at the Clinton Laboratories built during that amazing world changing ...

  2. Characterization of the nanoDot OSLD dosimeter in CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarboro, Sarah B.; Cody, Dianna; Followill, David; Court, Laurence; Stingo, Francesco C.; Kry, Stephen F.; Alvarez, Paola; Zhang, Di; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The extensive use of computed tomography (CT) in diagnostic procedures is accompanied by a growing need for more accurate and patient-specific dosimetry techniques. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) offer a potential solution for patient-specific CT point-based surface dosimetry by measuring air kerma. The purpose of this work was to characterize the OSLD nanoDot for CT dosimetry, quantifying necessary correction factors, and evaluating the uncertainty of these factors. Methods: A characterization of the Landauer OSL nanoDot (Landauer, Inc., Greenwood, IL) was conducted using both measurements and theoretical approaches in a CT environment. The effects of signal depletion, signal fading, dose linearity, and angular dependence were characterized through direct measurement for CT energies (80140 kV) and delivered doses ranging from ?5 to >1000 mGy. Energy dependence as a function of scan parameters was evaluated using two independent approaches: direct measurement and a theoretical approach based on Burlin cavity theory and Monte Carlo simulated spectra. This beam-quality dependence was evaluated for a range of CT scanning parameters. Results: Correction factors for the dosimeter response in terms of signal fading, dose linearity, and angular dependence were found to be small for most measurement conditions (<3%). The relative uncertainty was determined for each factor and reported at the two-sigma level. Differences in irradiation geometry (rotational versus static) resulted in a difference in dosimeter signal of 3% on average. Beam quality varied with scan parameters and necessitated the largest correction factor, ranging from 0.80 to 1.15 relative to a calibration performed in air using a 120 kV beam. Good agreement was found between the theoretical and measurement approaches. Conclusions: Correction factors for the measurement of air kerma were generally small for CT dosimetry, although angular effects, and particularly effects due to changes in beam quality, could be more substantial. In particular, it would likely be necessary to account for variations in CT scan parameters and measurement location when performing CT dosimetry using OSLD.

  3. Realistic simulation of reduced-dose CT with noise modeling and sinogram synthesis using DICOM CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Won Kim, Chang; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Reducing the patient dose while maintaining the diagnostic image quality during CT exams is the subject of a growing number of studies, in which simulations of reduced-dose CT with patient data have been used as an effective technique when exploring the potential of various dose reduction techniques. Difficulties in accessing raw sinogram data, however, have restricted the use of this technique to a limited number of institutions. Here, we present a novel reduced-dose CT simulation technique which provides realistic low-dose images without the requirement of raw sinogram data. Methods: Two key characteristics of CT systems, the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) and the algorithmic modulation transfer function (MTF), were measured for various combinations of object attenuation and tube currents by analyzing the noise power spectrum (NPS) of CT images obtained with a set of phantoms. Those measurements were used to develop a comprehensive CT noise model covering the reduced x-ray photon flux, object attenuation, system noise, and bow-tie filter, which was then employed to generate a simulated noise sinogram for the reduced-dose condition with the use of a synthetic sinogram generated from a reference CT image. The simulated noise sinogram was filtered with the algorithmic MTF and back-projected to create a noise CT image, which was then added to the reference CT image, finally providing a simulated reduced-dose CT image. The simulation performance was evaluated in terms of the degree of NPS similarity, the noise magnitude, the bow-tie filter effect, and the streak noise pattern at photon starvation sites with the set of phantom images. Results: The simulation results showed good agreement with actual low-dose CT images in terms of their visual appearance and in a quantitative evaluation test. The magnitude and shape of the NPS curves of the simulated low-dose images agreed well with those of real low-dose images, showing discrepancies of less than +/?3.2% in terms of the noise power at the peak height and +/?1.2% in terms of the spatial frequency at the peak height. The magnitudes of the noise measured for 12 different combinations the phantom size, tube current, and reconstruction kernel for the simulated and real low-dose images were very similar, with differences of 0.1 to 4.7%. Thep value for a statistical testing of the difference in the noise magnitude ranged from 0.99 to 0.11, showing that there was no difference statistically between the noise magnitudes of the real and simulated low-dose images using our method. The strength and pattern of the streak noise in an anthropomorphic phantom was also consistent with expectations. Conclusions: A novel reduced-dose CT simulation technique was developed which uses only CT images while not requiring raw sinogram data. Our method can provide realistic simulation results under reduced-dose conditions both in terms of the noise magnitude and the textual appearance. This technique has the potential to promote clinical research for patient dose reductions.

  4. Evolution of spatial resolution in breast CT at UC Davis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazi, Peymon M.; Yang, Kai; Burkett, George W.; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi; Anthony Seibert, J.; Boone, John M.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) technology for the purpose of breast cancer screening has been a focus of research at UC Davis since the late 1990s. Previous studies have shown that improvement in spatial resolution characteristics of this modality correlates with greater microcalcification detection, a factor considered a potential limitation of bCT. The aim of this study is to improve spatial resolution as characterized by the modulation transfer function (MTF) via changes in the scanner hardware components and operational schema. Methods: Four prototypes of pendant-geometry, cone-beam breast CT scanners were designed and developed spanning three generations of design evolution. To improve the system MTF in each bCT generation, modifications were made to the imaging components (x-ray tube and flat-panel detector), system geometry (source-to-isocenter and detector distance), and image acquisition parameters (technique factors, number of projections, system synchronization scheme, and gantry rotational speed). Results: Characterization of different generations of bCT systems shows these modifications resulted in a 188% improvement of the limiting MTF properties from the first to second generation and an additional 110% from the second to third. The intrinsic resolution degradation in the azimuthal direction observed in the first generation was corrected by changing the acquisition from continuous to pulsed x-ray acquisition. Utilizing a high resolution detector in the third generation, along with modifications made in system geometry and scan protocol, resulted in a 125% improvement in limiting resolution. An additional 39% improvement was obtained by changing the detector binning mode from 2 2 to 1 1. Conclusions: These results underscore the advancement in spatial resolution characteristics of breast CT technology. The combined use of a pulsed x-ray system, higher resolution flat-panel detector and changing the scanner geometry and image acquisition logic resulted in a significant fourfold improvement in MTF.

  5. Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: NE Cully Boulevard Portland, OR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Tuenge, Jason R.

    2012-06-29

    A new roadway lighting demonstration project was initiated in late 2010, which was planned in conjunction with other upgrades to NE Cully Boulevard, a residential collector road in the northeast area of Portland, OR. With the NE Cully Boulevard project, the Portland Bureau of Transportation hoped to demonstrate different light source technologies and different luminaires side-by-side. This report documents the initial performance of six different newly installed luminaires, including three LED products, one induction product, one ceramic metal halide product, and one high-pressure sodium (HPS) product that represented the baseline solution. It includes reported, calculated, and measured performance; evaluates the economic feasibility of each of the alternative luminaires; and documents user feedback collected from a group of local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) members that toured the site. This report does not contain any long-term performance evaluations or laboratory measurements of luminaire performance. Although not all of the installed products performed equally, the alternative luminaires generally offered higher efficacy, more appropriate luminous intensity distributions, and favorable color quality when compared to the baseline HPS luminaire. However, some products did not provide sufficient illumination to all areas—vehicular drive lanes, bicycle lanes, and sidewalks—or would likely fail to meet design criteria over the life of the installation due to expected depreciation in lumen output. While the overall performance of the alternative luminaires was generally better than the baseline HPS luminaire, cost remains a significant barrier to widespread adoption. Based on the cost of the small quantity of luminaires purchased for this demonstration, the shortest calculated payback period for one of the alternative luminaire types was 17.3 years. The luminaire prices were notably higher than typical prices for currently available luminaires purchased in larger quantities. At prices that are more typical, the payback would be less than 10 years. In addition to the demonstration luminaires, a networked control system was installed for additional evaluation and demonstration purposes. The capability of control system to measure luminaire input power was explored in this study. A more exhaustive demonstration and evaluation of the control system will be the subject of future GATEWAY report(s).

  6. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Regional maps Figure F7. Coal demand regions Figure F7. Coal Demand Regions CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP Region Content Region Code NY,PA,NJ VA,NC,SC GA,FL IN,IL,MI,WI Region Content Region Code 14. CU 13. MT 16. PC 15. ZN 12. WS 11. C2 9. AM 5. GF 8. KT 4. S2 7. EN 6. OH 2. YP 1. NE 3. S1 10. C1 KY,TN 8. KT 16. PC AK,HI,WA,OR,CA 10. C1

  7. bectso-ct121 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Demonstration of Innovative Applications of Technology for the CT-121 FGD Process - Project Brief [PDF-265KB] Southern Company Services, Newnan, GA PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Demonstration of Innovative Applications of Technology for the CT-121 FGD Process, Final Report (Jan 1997) Volume 1, Executive Summary [PDF-4.6MB] Volume 2, Operation [PDF-32.8MB] Volume 2 Appendices [PDF-6.3MB] Volume 3, Equipment Vol 3a, Materials and Maintenance [PDF-34.6MB] Vol 3b, Instrumentation and Control

  8. Automatic CT simulation optimization for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hua Chen, Hsin-Chen; Tan, Jun; Gay, Hiram; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa; Yu, Lifeng; Anastasio, Mark A.; Low, Daniel A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: In radiation therapy, x-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation protocol specifications should be driven by the treatment planning requirements in lieu of duplicating diagnostic CT screening protocols. The purpose of this study was to develop a general strategy that allows for automatically, prospectively, and objectively determining the optimal patient-specific CT simulation protocols based on radiation-therapy goals, namely, maintenance of contouring quality and integrity while minimizing patient CT simulation dose. Methods: The authors proposed a general prediction strategy that provides automatic optimal CT simulation protocol selection as a function of patient size and treatment planning task. The optimal protocol is the one that delivers the minimum dose required to provide a CT simulation scan that yields accurate contours. Accurate treatment plans depend on accurate contours in order to conform the dose to actual tumor and normal organ positions. An image quality index, defined to characterize how simulation scan quality affects contour delineation, was developed and used to benchmark the contouring accuracy and treatment plan quality within the predication strategy. A clinical workflow was developed to select the optimal CT simulation protocols incorporating patient size, target delineation, and radiation dose efficiency. An experimental study using an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom with added-bolus layers was used to demonstrate how the proposed prediction strategy could be implemented and how the optimal CT simulation protocols could be selected for prostate cancer patients based on patient size and treatment planning task. Clinical IMRT prostate treatment plans for seven CT scans with varied image quality indices were separately optimized and compared to verify the trace of target and organ dosimetry coverage. Results: Based on the phantom study, the optimal image quality index for accurate manual prostate contouring was 4.4. The optimal tube potentials for patient sizes of 38, 43, 48, 53, and 58 cm were 120, 140, 140, 140, and 140 kVp, respectively, and the corresponding minimum CTDIvol for achieving the optimal image quality index 4.4 were 9.8, 32.2, 100.9, 241.4, and 274.1 mGy, respectively. For patients with lateral sizes of 43–58 cm, 120-kVp scan protocols yielded up to 165% greater radiation dose relative to 140-kVp protocols, and 140-kVp protocols always yielded a greater image quality index compared to the same dose-level 120-kVp protocols. The trace of target and organ dosimetry coverage and the γ passing rates of seven IMRT dose distribution pairs indicated the feasibility of the proposed image quality index for the predication strategy. Conclusions: A general strategy to predict the optimal CT simulation protocols in a flexible and quantitative way was developed that takes into account patient size, treatment planning task, and radiation dose. The experimental study indicated that the optimal CT simulation protocol and the corresponding radiation dose varied significantly for different patient sizes, contouring accuracy, and radiation treatment planning tasks.

  9. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaofeng Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian; Mao, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 13 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUSCT image fusion. After TRUSCT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% 0.86%, and the prostate volume Dice overlap coefficient was 91.89% 1.19%. Conclusions: The authors have developed a novel approach to improve prostate contour utilizing intraoperative TRUS-based prostate volume in the CT-based prostate HDR treatment planning, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with MRIs. The proposed segmentation method would improve prostate delineations, enable accurate dose planning and treatment delivery, and potentially enhance the treatment outcome of prostate HDR brachytherapy.

  10. Test of 3D CT reconstructions by EM + TV algorithm from undersampled data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evseev, Ivan; Ahmann, Francielle; Silva, Hamilton P. da

    2013-05-06

    Computerized tomography (CT) plays an important role in medical imaging for diagnosis and therapy. However, CT imaging is connected with ionization radiation exposure of patients. Therefore, the dose reduction is an essential issue in CT. In 2011, the Expectation Maximization and Total Variation Based Model for CT Reconstruction (EM+TV) was proposed. This method can reconstruct a better image using less CT projections in comparison with the usual filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Thus, it could significantly reduce the overall dose of radiation in CT. This work reports the results of an independent numerical simulation for cone beam CT geometry with alternative virtual phantoms. As in the original report, the 3D CT images of 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 virtual phantoms were reconstructed. It was not possible to implement phantoms with lager dimensions because of the slowness of code execution even by the CORE i7 CPU.

  11. Proposal of a new generation of Laser Beacon for time calibration in the KM3NeT neutrino telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Real, Diego [IFIC, Instituto de Fsica Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, C Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The KM3NeT collaboration aims at the construction of a multi-km3 high-energy neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea consisting of a matrix of pressure resistant glass spheres holding each a set (31) of small area photomultipliers. The main motivation of the telescope is to observe cosmic neutrinos through the Cherenkov light induced in sea water by charged particles produced in neutrino interactions with the surrounding medium. A relative time calibration between photomultipliers of the order of 1 ns is required to achieve an optimal performance. To this end, several time calibration subsystems have been developed. In this article, the proposal of a last generation Laser Beacon, to be used in KM3NeT and developed to measure and monitor the relative time offsets between photomultipliers, is presented.

  12. High Level Requirements for the Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Johnson; Hyung Lee; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-09-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), has been tasked with the important mission of ensuring that nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy source in the U.S. The motivations behind this mission include cost-effectively meeting the expected increases in the power needs of the country, reducing carbon emissions and reducing dependence on foreign energy sources. In the near term, to ensure that nuclear power remains a key element of U.S. energy strategy and portfolio, the DOE-NE will be working with the nuclear industry to support safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants. In the long term, to meet the increasing energy needs of the U.S., the DOE-NE will be investing in research and development (R&D) and working in concert with the nuclear industry to build and deploy new, safer and more efficient nuclear power plants. The safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants and designing, licensing and deploying new reactor designs, however, will require focused R&D programs as well as the extensive use and leveraging of advanced modeling and simulation (M&S). M&S will play a key role in ensuring safe and efficient operations of existing and new nuclear reactors. The DOE-NE has been actively developing and promoting the use of advanced M&S in reactor design and analysis through its R&D programs, e.g., the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) and Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) programs. Also, nuclear reactor vendors are already using CFD and CSM, for design, analysis, and licensing. However, these M&S tools cannot be used with confidence for nuclear reactor applications unless accompanied and supported by verification and validation (V&V) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) processes and procedures which provide quantitative measures of uncertainty for specific applications. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base that will provide technical services and resources for V&V and UQ of M&S in nuclear energy sciences and engineering. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the CASL, NEAMS, Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs.

  13. Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (NMR) Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Resources with Additional Information Computed Tomography (CT) Scanner CT Scanner - Courtesy Stanford University Department of Energy Resources Engineering Computed tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) have been used to resolve industrial problems, for materials characterizations, and to provide non-destructive evaluations for discovering flaws in parts before their use, resulting in

  14. Rotational and angular distributions of NO products from NO-Rg(Rg = He, Ne, Ar) complex photodissociation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heather L. Holmes-Ross; Hall, Gregory E.; Valenti, Rebecca J.; Yu, Hua -Gen; Lawrance, Warren D.

    2016-01-29

    In this study, we present the results of an investigation into the rotational and angular distributions of the NO A~ state fragment following photodissociation of the NO-He, NO-Ne and NO-Ar van der Waals complexed excited via the A~ ← X~ transition. For each complex the dissociation is probed for several values of Ea, the available energy above the dissociation threshold.

  15. REP&V TO ATTNJF: NE-23 SUWECC Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio in Support

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    REP&V TO ATTNJF: NE-23 SUWECC Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio in Support 'of FMPC Operations TO: Robert E. Lynch Procuresnent and CorXracts Division, AD-42 Oak Ridge Operations Office The Division of Facility and Site Decormnissioning Projects (DFSP) is responsible for managing the Department's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The purposes of FUSRAP are (1) to identify facilities formerly operated for or by the Manhattan Engineer District

  16. A measurement of the neutral current neutrino-nucleon elastic cross section at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, David Christopher; /Indiana U.

    2008-02-01

    The neutral current neutrino-nucleon elastic interaction {nu} N {yields} {nu} N is a fundamental process of the weak interaction ideally suited for characterizing the structure of the nucleon neutral weak current. This process comprises {approx}18% of neutrino events in the neutrino oscillation experiment, MiniBooNE, ranking it as the experiment's third largest process. Using {approx}10% of MiniBooNE's available neutrino data, a sample of these events were identified and analyzed to determine the differential cross section as a function of the momentum transfer of the interaction, Q{sup 2}. This is the first measurement of a differential cross section with MiniBooNE data. From this analysis, a value for the nucleon axial mass M{sub A} was extracted to be 1.34 {+-} 0.25 GeV consistent with previous measurements. The integrated cross section for the Q{sup 2} range 0.189 {yields} 1.13 GeV{sup 2} was calculated to be (8.8 {+-} 0.6(stat) {+-} 0.2(syst)) x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}.

  17. Print

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    < 5k 0 < 50k < 100k < 250k < 500k < 1M > 1M > 5M > 10M DE MD DC MA RI NJ AZ UT WY ID OR WA CA TX OK KS CO NE SD ND MN WI IL IA MO AR LA MS AL FL GA TN KY IN OH MI ME NH CT VT NY PA WV VA NC SC MT AK HI NV NM Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Procured Materials and Services 2015 (> $35M) Small business procurements in US: $14.73M

  18. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix B

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Regional maps Figure F4. Oil and gas supply model regions F-5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Regional maps Figure F4. Oil and gas supply model regions Figure F4. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Atlantic WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR OR CA VT East (1) Gulf of Mexico LA Gulf Coast (2)

  19. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI MT NE IA KS MI AZ NM 500 0 SCALE IN MILES APPALACHIA Northern Appalachia Central Appalachia Southern Appalachia INTERIOR NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS Eastern Interior Western Interior Gulf Lignite Dakota Lignite Western Montana Wyoming, Northern Powder River Basin

  20. padd map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FL PADD 4: Rocky Mountain PADD 5: West Coast PADD 2: Midwest PADD 1: East Coast PADD 3: Gulf Coast PADD1A: New England PADD1B: Central Atlantic PADD1C: Lower Atlantic Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts AK HI WA OR CA NV AZ MT WY CO UT ID ND SD NE KS OK MO MN WI MI IL IN OH KY TN IA NM TX AR LA AL MS WV VA NC SC GA FL ME NH VT NY PA NJ MD DE MA CT RI

  1. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program DOE/CESA/TTC Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Webinar December 14, 2010 2 Examples of DOE-funded Partners and Locations - Fuel Cell Technologies Program TX NM AZ NC AR CA CO HI WA IL KY MA MN MO MS AL NV TN UT WV ID FL MI ND OR OH IN MT WY IO NE KS OK AK LA GA WI SC VA PA DE MD DC NJ NY RI CT VT NH ME SD Source: US DOE 12/2010 2 3 Fuel Cells: Addressing Energy Challenges 4

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.9 Educational Facilities

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 2010 Regional New Construction and Renovations Expenditures for Public K-12 Schools ($Million) Region New Schools Additions Renovation Total Region 1 (CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT) Region 2 (NJ, NY, PA) Region 3 (DE, MD, VA, WV) Region 4 (KY, NC, SC, TN) Region 5 (AL, FL, GA, MS) Region 6 (IN, MI, OH) Region 7 (IL, MN, WI) Region 8 (IA, KS, MO, NE) Region 9 (AR, LA, OK, TX) Region 10 (CO, MT, ND, NM, SD, UT, WY) Region 11 (AZ, CA, HI, NV) Region 12 (AK, ID, OR, WA) Total Source(s): School Planning

  3. Monte Carlo calculations for reference dosimetry of electron beams with the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B. R. Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate recommendations for reference dosimetry of electron beams and gradient effects for the NE2571 chamber and to provide beam quality conversion factors using Monte Carlo simulations of the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers. Methods: The EGSnrc code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose-to-water and the dose to the gas in fully modeled ion chambers as a function of depth in water. Electron beams are modeled using realistic accelerator simulations as well as beams modeled as collimated point sources from realistic electron beam spectra or monoenergetic electrons. Beam quality conversion factors are calculated with ratios of the doses to water and to the air in the ion chamber in electron beams and a cobalt-60 reference field. The overall ion chamber correction factor is studied using calculations of water-to-air stopping power ratios. Results: The use of an effective point of measurement shift of 1.55 mm from the front face of the PTW Roos chamber, which places the point of measurement inside the chamber cavity, minimizes the difference betweenR{sub 50}, the beam quality specifier, calculated from chamber simulations compared to that obtained using depth-dose calculations in water. A similar shift minimizes the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth to the practical range and reduces the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors at the reference depth as a function of R{sub 50}. Similarly, an upstream shift of 0.34 r{sub cav} allows a more accurate determination of R{sub 50} from NE2571 chamber calculations and reduces the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth. The determination of the gradient correction using a shift of 0.22 r{sub cav} optimizes the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors if all beams investigated are considered. However, if only clinical beams are considered, a good fit to results for beam quality conversion factors is obtained without explicitly correcting for gradient effects. The inadequacy of R{sub 50} to uniquely specify beam quality for the accurate selection of k{sub Q} factors is discussed. Systematic uncertainties in beam quality conversion factors are analyzed for the NE2571 chamber and amount to between 0.4% and 1.2% depending on assumptions used. Conclusions: The calculated beam quality conversion factors for the PTW Roos chamber obtained here are in good agreement with literature data. These results characterize the use of an NE2571 ion chamber for reference dosimetry of electron beams even in low-energy beams.

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: OLIN MATHIESON (CT.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: United Nuclear Corporation CT.0-02-1 Location: New Haven , Connecticut CT.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.0-02-1 Site Operations: Began fabrication of nuclear reactor fuel elements for AEC circa late-1950s. Later became part of a group forming United Nuclear Corp. and were then licensed by AEC. Performed work for U.S. Navy and

  5. SciThur PM: Imaging 06: Canada's National Computed Tomography (CT) Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardlaw, GM; Martel, N; Blackler, W; Asselin, J-F

    2014-08-15

    The value of computed tomography (CT) in medical imaging is reflected in its' increased use and availability since the early 1990's; however, given CT's relatively larger exposures (vs. planar x-ray) greater care must be taken to ensure that CT procedures are optimised in terms of providing the smallest dose possible while maintaining sufficient diagnostic image quality. The development of CT Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) supports this process. DRLs have been suggested/supported by international/national bodies since the early 1990's and widely adopted elsewhere, but not on a national basis in Canada. Essentially, CT DRLs provide guidance on what is considered good practice for common CT exams, but require a representative sample of CT examination data to make any recommendations. Canada's National CT Survey project, in collaboration with provincial/territorial authorities, has collected a large national sample of CT practice data for 7 common examinations (with associated clinical indications) of both adult and pediatric patients. Following completion of data entry into a common database, a survey summary report and recommendations will be made on CT DRLs from this data. It is hoped that these can then be used by local regions to promote CT practice optimisation and support any dose reduction initiatives.

  6. Utilizing a simple CT dosimetry phantom for the comprehension of the operational characteristics of CT AEC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsalafoutas, Ioannis A.; Varsamidis, Athanasios; Thalassinou, Stella; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of the nested polymethylacrylate (PMMA) phantom (which is available in many CT facilities for CTDI measurements), as a tool for the presentation and comparison of the ways that two different CT automatic exposure control (AEC) systems respond to a phantom when various scan parameters and AEC protocols are modified.Methods: By offsetting the two phantom's components (the head phantom and the body ring) half-way along their longitudinal axis, a phantom with three sections of different x-ray attenuation was created. Scan projection radiographs (SPRs) and helical scans of the three-section phantom were performed on a Toshiba Aquilion 64 and a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanners, with different scan parameter selections [scan direction, pitch factor, slice thickness, and reconstruction interval (ST/RI), AEC protocol, and tube potential used for the SPRs]. The dose length product (DLP) values of each scan were recorded and the tube current (mA) values of the reconstructed CT images were plotted against the respective Z-axis positions on the phantom. Furthermore, measurements of the noise levels at the center of each phantom section were performed to assess the impact of mA modulation on image quality.Results: The mA modulation patterns of the two CT scanners were very dissimilar. The mA variations were more pronounced for Aquilion 64, where changes in any of the aforementioned scan parameters affected both the mA modulations curves and DLP values. However, the noise levels were affected only by changes in pitch, ST/RI, and AEC protocol selections. For Brilliance 64, changes in pitch affected the mA modulation curves but not the DLP values, whereas only AEC protocol and SPR tube potential selection variations affected both the mA modulation curves and DLP values. The noise levels increased for smaller ST/RI, larger weight category AEC protocol, and larger SPR tube potential selection.Conclusions: The nested PMMA dosimetry phantom can be effectively utilized for the comprehension of CT AEC systems performance and the way that different scan conditions affect the mA modulation patterns, DLP values, and image noise. However, in depth analysis of the reasons why these two systems exhibited such different behaviors in response to the same phantom requires further investigation which is beyond the scope of this study.

  7. Upright cone beam CT imaging using the onboard imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fave, Xenia Martin, Rachael; Yang, Jinzhong; Balter, Peter; Court, Laurence; Carvalho, Luis; Pan, Tinsu

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Many patients could benefit from being treated in an upright position. The objectives of this study were to determine whether cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could be used to acquire upright images for treatment planning and to demonstrate whether reconstruction of upright images maintained accurate geometry and Hounsfield units (HUs). Methods: A TrueBeam linac was programmed in developer mode to take upright CBCT images. The gantry head was positioned at 0, and the couch was rotated to 270. The x-ray source and detector arms were extended to their lateral positions. The x-ray source and gantry remained stationary as fluoroscopic projections were taken and the couch was rotated from 270 to 90. The x-ray tube current was normalized to deposit the same dose (measured using a calibrated Farmer ion chamber) as that received during a clinical helical CT scan to the center of a cylindrical, polyethylene phantom. To extend the field of view, two couch rotation scans were taken with the detector offset 15 cm superiorly and then 15 cm inferiorly. The images from these two scans were stitched together before reconstruction. Upright reconstructions were compared to reconstructions from simulation CT scans of the same phantoms. Two methods were investigated for correcting the HUs, including direct calibration and mapping the values from a simulation CT. Results: Overall geometry, spatial linearity, and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright reconstructions. Some artifacts were created and HU accuracy was compromised; however, these limitations could be removed by mapping the HUs from a simulation CT to the upright reconstruction for treatment planning. Conclusions: The feasibility of using the TrueBeam linac to take upright CBCT images was demonstrated. This technique is straightforward to implement and could be of enormous benefit to patients with thoracic tumors or those who find a supine position difficult to endure.

  8. ANL CT Reconstruction Algorithm for Utilizing Digital X-ray

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-05-01

    Reconstructs X-ray computed tomographic images from large data sets known as 16-bit binary sinograms when using a massively parallelized computer architecture such as a Beowuif cluster by parallelizing the X-ray CT reconstruction routine. The algorithm uses the concept of generation of an image from carefully obtained multiple 1-D or 2-D X-ray projections. The individual projections are filtered using a digital Fast Fourier Transform. The literature refers to this as filtered back projection.

  9. Angular momentum exchange by gravitational torques and infall in the circumbinary disk of the protostellar system L1551 NE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Ho, Paul T. P. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Saito, Masao [Joint ALMA Observatory, Ave. Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Saigo, Kazuya [ALMA Project Office, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Matsumoto, Tomoaki [Faculty of Humanity and Environment, Hosei University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8160 (Japan); Lim, Jeremy [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Hanawa, Tomoyuki, E-mail: takakuwa@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Center for Frontier Science, Chiba University, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

    2014-11-20

    We report an ALMA observation of the Class I binary protostellar system L1551 NE in the 0.9 mm continuum, C{sup 18}O (3-2), and {sup 13}CO (3-2) lines at a ?1.6 times higher resolution and a ?6 times higher sensitivity than those of our previous SubMillimeter Array (SMA) observations, which revealed a r ? 300 AU scale circumbinary disk in Keplerian rotation. The 0.9 mm continuum shows two opposing U-shaped brightenings in the circumbinary disk and exhibits a depression between the circumbinary disk and the circumstellar disk of the primary protostar. The molecular lines trace non-axisymmetric deviations from Keplerian rotation in the circumbinary disk at higher velocities relative to the systemic velocity, where our previous SMA observations could not detect the lines. In addition, we detect inward motion along the minor axis of the circumbinary disk. To explain the newly observed features, we performed a numerical simulation of gas orbits in a Roche potential tailored to the inferred properties of L1551 NE. The observed U-shaped dust features coincide with locations where gravitational torques from the central binary system are predicted to impart angular momentum to the circumbinary disk, producing shocks and hence density enhancements seen as a pair of spiral arms. The observed inward gas motion coincides with locations where angular momentum is predicted to be lowered by the gravitational torques. The good agreement between our observation and model indicates that gravitational torques from the binary stars constitute the primary driver for exchanging angular momentum so as to permit infall through the circumbinary disk of L1551 NE.

  10. Quantum dynamics of solid Ne upon photo-excitation of a NO impurity: A Gaussian wave packet approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unn-Toc, W.; Meier, C.; Halberstadt, N.; Uranga-Pina, Ll.; Rubayo-Soneira, J.

    2012-08-07

    A high-dimensional quantum wave packet approach based on Gaussian wave packets in Cartesian coordinates is presented. In this method, the high-dimensional wave packet is expressed as a product of time-dependent complex Gaussian functions, which describe the motion of individual atoms. It is applied to the ultrafast geometrical rearrangement dynamics of NO doped cryogenic Ne matrices after femtosecond laser pulse excitation. The static deformation of the solid due to the impurity as well as the dynamical response after femtosecond excitation are analyzed and compared to reduced dimensionality studies. The advantages and limitations of this method are analyzed in the perspective of future applications to other quantum solids.

  11. Transfer mechanism in /sup 16/O+/sup 24/Mg and /sup 20/Ne+/sup 24/Mg elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NING Ping-Zhi; GAO Cheng-Qun; HE Guo-Zhu

    1985-10-01

    The mechanism of transferring a cluster of nucleons between two colliding nuclei is considered to explain the backward angle oscillatory rise in the differential cross section of the elastic scattering between certain nuclei, such as /sup 16/O+/sup 24/Mg or /sup 20/Ne+/sup 24/Mg. The nuclear molecular orbit approximation theory is applied. For one-step transfer, if the parameter involved is assumed to be adjustable, the numerical calculations can be made to fit the experimental results naturally.

  12. 35 COFibE, Series A. U. S. ATOXIC ENERGY CCMMISSION r'C Cj NE# YORK OPERATIONS OFFICE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    COFibE, Series A. - U. S. ATOXIC ENERGY CCMMISSION r'C Cj NE# YORK OPERATIONS OFFICE HEkLTH AND SAFETY DIVISION (Merril Eicsnbud, Dirsator) MONTHLY REPORT OF FIELD ACTIVITIES (This report%v,rs%~~~nth period) Indusorial Ii~iene Branoh m a . . 0 . . c . . . o W. B. Harris, Chief Radiation Branch . y y e 0e . e . e . . . . e . . . Hanson Blatz, Chief Fi:e and Accident Branch D e a o o . . . ..s . . B. J. Kehoe, Chief Medical Advioer, Dr. J. A. Quiglsy Siometrician, Dr. A. E. Brandt TABLF OF

  13. REPLY TO ATTN OF: NE-24 L SUBJECT: Authorization to Conduct Remedial Action at Vicinity Properties In Lodi,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    HBS. - 2- United States Government '--Department of Energy | memorandum 4 ' It) |1~~~~~ e~~~~0i78 DATE: OCT 9 1984 REPLY TO ATTN OF: NE-24 L SUBJECT: Authorization to Conduct Remedial Action at Vicinity Properties In Lodi, New Jersey TO: J. LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office Based on the designation survey conducted by ORNL (Attachments 1-6), the following properties are being authorized for remedial action. It should be noted that the attached survey data are for designation purposes

  14. REP&V TO ATTNOF: NE-23 SUBJECT: Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio in Support

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    x:Y" . .' 3023 I\ \ 'a' '. Unita? -&&s Coverament , ,Q,.l. ),&, ,(>.. Department of Energy riGmorandum / d6a 2/. $3 DATE: JL(L 2 8 ;;$5 co. /3 .-J/ co,/3 REP&V TO ATTNOF: NE-23 SUBJECT: Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio in Support of FMPC Operations TO: Robert E. Lynch Procuremnent and Contracts Division, AD-42 Oak Ridge Operations Office The Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (DFSD) is responsible for managing the

  15. DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long Term Operation Program … Joint Research & Development Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2-24562 Revision 4 DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan April 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the

  16. Ultralow dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric PET CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Samuel L.; Shulkin, Barry L.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To develop ultralow dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultralow doses (1035 mA s). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for 11 tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% volume computed tomography dose index (0.39/3.64; mGy) from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUV{sub bw}) of various diameter targets (range 837 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the nondose reduced CTAC image for 90% dose reduction. No change in SUV{sub bw}, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols was found down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62% and 86% (3.2/8.30.9/6.2). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from predose-reduced patient images. Conclusions: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CT dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for colocalization of hybrid CT anatomy and PET radioisotope uptake.

  17. Automated matching and segmentation of lymphoma on serial CT examinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan Jiayong; Zhao Binsheng; Curran, Sean; Zelenetz, Andrew; Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    2007-01-15

    In patients with lymphoma, identification and quantification of the tumor extent on serial CT examinations is critical for assessing tumor response to therapy. In this paper, we present a computer method to automatically match and segment lymphomas in follow-up CT images. The method requires that target lymph nodes in baseline CT images be known. A fast, approximate alignment technique along the x, y, and axial directions is developed to provide a good initial condition for the subsequent fast free form deformation (FFD) registration of the baseline and the follow-up images. As a result of the registration, the deformed lymph node contours from the baseline images are used to automatically determine internal and external markers for the marker-controlled watershed segmentation performed in the follow-up images. We applied this automated registration and segmentation method retrospectively to 29 lymph nodes in 9 lymphoma patients treated in a clinical trial at our cancer center. A radiologist independently delineated all lymph nodes on all slices in the follow-up images and his manual contours served as the ''gold standard'' for evaluation of the method. Preliminary results showed that 26/29 (89.7%) lymph nodes were correctly matched; i.e., there was a geometrical overlap between the deformed lymph node from the baseline and its corresponding mass in the follow-up images. Of the matched 26 lymph nodes, 22 (84.6%) were successfully segmented; for these 22 lymph nodes, several metrics were calculated to quantify the method's performance. Among them, the average distance and the Hausdorff distance between the contours generated by the computer and those generated by the radiologist were 0.9 mm (stdev. 0.4 mm) and 3.9 mm (stdev. 2.1 mm), respectively.

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Danbury, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Danbury, CT, that scored HERS 35 without PV. This 2-story, 1,650-ft2 cabin built by a custom home builder for his own family meets Passive House Standards with 5.5-in. of foil-faced polysiocyanurate foam boards lining the outside walls, R-55 of rigid EPS foam under the slab,

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Derby, CT |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Brookside Development, Derby, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Derby, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Derby, CT Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Derby, CT, that achieves a HERS score of 45 without PV or HERS 26 with PV. The production home is one of a development of 7 two-story, 4,000+-ft2 certified homes that have 2x4 walls filled with 1.5 in. closed-cell spray foam, 2-in. fiberglass batt,

  20. Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cancer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer Purpose: ...

  1. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTR.l\CT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTR.l\CT 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. j3. EFFECTIVE DATE 179 I see Block l6C 6.1SSUEDBY CODE 100603 Office of River Protection U~S .. Department of Energy Office of River Protection P.O. Box 450 Richland WA 99352 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street county, State and ZiP Code) WASHINGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS LLC Attn: KAREN VACCA C/0 URS ENERGY & CONSTRUCTION, INC. PO BOX 73 I 720 PARK BLVD BOISE ID 837290073 CODE 806500521 I FACILITY CODE 11. THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIE ,. The

  2. CT Scans of Cores Metadata, Barrow, Alaska 2015

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich

    2015-03-11

    Individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, throughout 2013 and 2014. Cores were drilled along different transects to sample polygonal features (i.e. the trough, center and rim of high, transitional and low center polygons). Most cores were drilled around 1 meter in depth and a few deep cores were drilled around 3 meters in depth. Three-dimensional images of the frozen cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. TIFF files can be uploaded to ImageJ (an open-source imaging software) to examine soil structure and densities within each core.

  3. Forward fitting of experimental data from a NE213 neutron detector installed with the magnetic proton recoil upgraded spectrometer at JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binda, F. Ericsson, G.; Eriksson, J.; Hellesen, C.; Conroy, S.; Sundn, E. Andersson; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Team

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, we present the results obtained from the data analysis of neutron spectra measured with a NE213 liquid scintillator at JET. We calculated the neutron response matrix of the instrument combining MCNPX simulations, a generic proton light output function measured with another detector and the fit of data from ohmic pulses. For the analysis, we selected a set of pulses with neutral beam injection heating (NBI) only and we applied a forward fitting procedure of modeled spectral components to extract the fraction of thermal neutron emission. The results showed the same trend of the ones obtained with the dedicated spectrometer TOFOR, even though the values from the NE213 analysis were systematically higher. This discrepancy is probably due to the different lines of sight of the two spectrometers (tangential for the NE213, vertical for TOFOR). The uncertainties on the thermal fraction estimates were from 4 to 7 times higher than the ones from the TOFOR analysis.

  4. Quant-CT: Segmenting and Quantifying Computed Tomography

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-10-01

    Quant-CT is currently a plugin to ImageJ, designed as a Java-class that provides control mechanism for the user to choose volumes of interest within porous material, followed by the selection of image subsamples for automated tuning of parameters for filters and classifiers, and finally measurement of material geometry, porosity, and visualization. Denoising is mandatory before any image interpretation, and we implemented a new 3D java code that performs bilateral filtering of data. Segmentation of themore » dense material is essential before any quantifications about geological sample structure, and we invented new schemes to deal with over segmentation when using statistical region merging algorithm to pull out grains that compose imaged material. It make uses of ImageJ API and other standard and thirty-party APIs. Quant-CT conception started in 2011 under Scidac-e sponsor, and details of the first prototype were documented in publications below. While it is used right now for microtomography images, it can potentially be used by anybody with 3D image data obtained by experiment or produced by simulation.« less

  5. Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Lubbock, TX); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN)

    2002-01-01

    A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a tracer compound tagged with a .gamma.-ray emitting nuclide; directing an x-ray source toward the subject; rotating the x-ray source around the subject; emitting x-rays during the rotating step; rotating a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) two-sided detector on an opposite side of the subject from the source; simultaneously detecting the position and energy of each pulsed x-ray and each emitted .gamma.-ray captured by the CZT detector; recording data for each position and each energy of each the captured x-ray and .gamma.-ray; and, creating CT and SPECT images from the recorded data. The transmitted energy levels of the x-rays lower are biased lower than energy levels of the .gamma.-rays. The x-ray source is operated in a continuous mode. The method can be implemented at ambient temperatures.

  6. DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program. Joint Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Don

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation’s electrical generation capability. By the end of 2014, about one-third of the existing domestic fleet will have passed their 40th anniversary of power operations, and about one-half of the fleet will reach the same 40-year mark within this decade. Recognizing the challenges associated with pursuing extended service life of commercial nuclear power plants, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have established separate but complementary research and development programs (DOE-NE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability [LWRS] Program and EPRI’s Long-Term Operations [LTO] Program) to address these challenges. To ensure that a proper linkage is maintained between the programs, DOE-NE and EPRI executed a memorandum of understanding in late 2010 to “establish guiding principles under which research activities (between LWRS and LTO) could be coordinated to the benefit of both parties.” This document represents the third annual revision to the initial version (March 2011) of the plan as called for in the memorandum of understanding.

  7. Using the X-FEL to photo-pump X-ray laser transitions in He-like Ne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Rohringer, N

    2011-08-30

    Nearly four decades ago H-like and He-like resonantly photo-pumped laser schemes were proposed for producing X-ray lasers. However, demonstrating these schemes in the laboratory has proved to be elusive because of the difficulty of finding a strong resonant pump line. With the advent of the X-ray free electron laser (X-FEL) at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) we now have a tunable X-ray laser source that can be used to replace the pump line in previously proposed laser schemes and allow researchers to study the physics and feasibility of resonantly photo-pumped laser schemes. In this paper we use the X-FEL at 1174 eV to photo-pump the singly excited 1s2p state of He-like Ne to the doubly excited 2p3p state and model gain on the 2p3p-2p2s transition at 175 eV and the 2p3p-1s3p transition at 1017 eV. One motivation for studying this scheme is to explore possible quenching of the gain due to strong non-linear coupling effects from the intense X-FEL beam We compare this scheme with photo-pumping the He-like Ne ground state to the 1s3p singly excited state followed by lasing on the 3p-2s and 3d-2p transitions at 158 and 151 eV. Experiments are being planned at LCLS to study these laser processes and coherent quantum effects.

  8. Application of the explicitly correlated coupled-cluster models CCSD(F12*) and CC3(F12*) to the hyperpolarizability of the Ne atom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanauer, Matthias; Khn, Andreas

    2015-01-22

    This work demonstrates the performance of the recently proposed explicitly correlated coupled-cluster method CCSD(F12*) and a new method using explicitly correlated triple excitations, CC3(F12*), in the calculation of the static ESHG hyperpolarizability of the Ne atom.

  9. Segmentation-free empirical beam hardening correction for CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schller, Sren; Sawall, Stefan; Stannigel, Kai; Hlsbusch, Markus; Ulrici, Johannes; Hell, Erich; Kachelrie, Marc

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The polychromatic nature of the x-ray beams and their effects on the reconstructed image are often disregarded during standard image reconstruction. This leads to cupping and beam hardening artifacts inside the reconstructed volume. To correct for a general cupping, methods like water precorrection exist. They correct the hardening of the spectrum during the penetration of the measured object only for the major tissue class. In contrast, more complex artifacts like streaks between dense objects need other techniques of correction. If using only the information of one single energy scan, there are two types of corrections. The first one is a physical approach. Thereby, artifacts can be reproduced and corrected within the original reconstruction by using assumptions in a polychromatic forward projector. These assumptions could be the used spectrum, the detector response, the physical attenuation and scatter properties of the intersected materials. A second method is an empirical approach, which does not rely on much prior knowledge. This so-called empirical beam hardening correction (EBHC) and the previously mentioned physical-based technique are both relying on a segmentation of the present tissues inside the patient. The difficulty thereby is that beam hardening by itself, scatter, and other effects, which diminish the image quality also disturb the correct tissue classification and thereby reduce the accuracy of the two known classes of correction techniques. The herein proposed method works similar to the empirical beam hardening correction but does not require a tissue segmentation and therefore shows improvements on image data, which are highly degraded by noise and artifacts. Furthermore, the new algorithm is designed in a way that no additional calibration or parameter fitting is needed. Methods: To overcome the segmentation of tissues, the authors propose a histogram deformation of their primary reconstructed CT image. This step is essential for the proposed algorithm to be segmentation-free (sf). This deformation leads to a nonlinear accentuation of higher CT-values. The original volume and the gray value deformed volume are monochromatically forward projected. The two projection sets are then monomially combined and reconstructed to generate sets of basis volumes which are used for correction. This is done by maximization of the image flatness due to adding additionally a weighted sum of these basis images. sfEBHC is evaluated on polychromatic simulations, phantom measurements, and patient data. The raw data sets were acquired by a dual source spiral CT scanner, a digital volume tomograph, and a dual source micro CT. Different phantom and patient data were used to illustrate the performance and wide range of usability of sfEBHC across different scanning scenarios. The artifact correction capabilities are compared to EBHC. Results: All investigated cases show equal or improved image quality compared to the standard EBHC approach. The artifact correction is capable of correcting beam hardening artifacts for different scan parameters and scan scenarios. Conclusions: sfEBHC generates beam hardening-reduced images and is furthermore capable of dealing with images which are affected by high noise and strong artifacts. The algorithm can be used to recover structures which are hardly visible inside the beam hardening-affected regions.

  10. Investigation of statistical iterative reconstruction for dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makeev, Andrey; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Dedicated breast CT has great potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. Statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) in dedicated breast CT is a promising alternative to traditional filtered backprojection (FBP). One of the difficulties in using SIR is the presence of free parameters in the algorithm that control the appearance of the resulting image. These parameters require tuning in order to achieve high quality reconstructions. In this study, the authors investigated the penalized maximum likelihood (PML) method with two commonly used types of roughness penalty functions: hyperbolic potential and anisotropic total variation (TV) norm. Reconstructed images were compared with images obtained using standard FBP. Optimal parameters for PML with the hyperbolic prior are reported for the task of detecting microcalcifications embedded in breast tissue.Methods: Computer simulations were used to acquire projections in a half-cone beam geometry. The modeled setup describes a realistic breast CT benchtop system, with an x-ray spectra produced by a point source and an a-Si, CsI:Tl flat-panel detector. A voxelized anthropomorphic breast phantom with 280 ?m microcalcification spheres embedded in it was used to model attenuation properties of the uncompressed woman's breast in a pendant position. The reconstruction of 3D images was performed using the separable paraboloidal surrogates algorithm with ordered subsets. Task performance was assessed with the ideal observer detectability index to determine optimal PML parameters.Results: The authors' findings suggest that there is a preferred range of values of the roughness penalty weight and the edge preservation threshold in the penalized objective function with the hyperbolic potential, which resulted in low noise images with high contrast microcalcifications preserved. In terms of numerical observer detectability index, the PML method with optimal parameters yielded substantially improved performance (by a factor of greater than 10) compared to FBP. The hyperbolic prior was also observed to be superior to the TV norm. A few of the best-performing parameter pairs for the PML method also demonstrated superior performance for various radiation doses. In fact, using PML with certain parameter values results in better images, acquired using 2 mGy dose, than FBP-reconstructed images acquired using 6 mGy dose.Conclusions: A range of optimal free parameters for the PML algorithm with hyperbolic and TV norm-based potentials is presented for the microcalcification detection task, in dedicated breast CT. The reported values can be used as starting values of the free parameters, when SIR techniques are used for image reconstruction. Significant improvement in image quality can be achieved by using PML with optimal combination of parameters, as compared to FBP. Importantly, these results suggest improved detection of microcalcifications can be obtained by using PML with lower radiation dose to the patient, than using FBP with higher dose.

  11. SU-E-J-43: Deformed Planning CT as An Electron Density Substitute for Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, K; Godley, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To confirm that deforming the planning CT to the daily Cone-Beam CTs (CBCT) can provide suitable electron density for adaptive planning. We quantify the dosimetric difference between plans calculated on deformed planning CTs (DPCT) and daily CT-on-rails images (CTOR). CTOR is used as a test of the method as CTOR already contains accurate electron density to compare against. Methods: Five prostate only IMRT patients, each with five CTOR images, were selected and re-planned on Panther (Prowess Inc.) with a uniform 5 mm PTV expansion, prescribed 78 Gy. The planning CT was deformed to match each CTOR using ABAS (Elekta Inc.). Contours were drawn on the CTOR, and copied to the DPCT. The original treatment plan was copied to both the CTOR and DPCT, keeping the center of the prostate as the isocenter. The plans were then calculated using the collapsed cone heterogeneous dose engine of Prowess and typical DVH planning parameters used to compare them. Results: Each DPCT was visually compared to its CTOR with no differences observed. The agreement of the copied CTOR contours with the DPCT anatomy further demonstrated the deformation accuracy. The plans calculated using CTOR and DPCT were compared. Over the 25 plan pairs, the average difference between them for prostate D100, D98 and D95 were 0.5%, 0.2%, and 0.2%; PTV D98, D95 and mean dose: 0.3%, 0.2% and 0.3%; bladder V70, V60 and mean dose: 1.1%, 0.7%, and 0.2%; and rectum mean dose: 0.3%. (D100 is the dose covering 100% of the target; V70 is the volume of the organ receiving 70 Gy). Conclusion: We observe negligible difference between the dose calculated on the DPCT and the CTOR, implying that deformed planning CTs are a suitable substitute for electron density. The method can now be applied to CBCTs. Research version of Panther provided by Prowess Inc. Research version of ABAS provided by Elekta Inc.

  12. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor

    2014-11-07

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  13. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumarasiri, Akila Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Kim, Jinkoo

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H and N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Ten H and N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3–4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. Results: All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm{sup 3}. Organs with volumes <3 cm{sup 3} and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼0.5–0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm{sup 3}), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was “clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours.” Conclusions: Use of DIR-based contour propagation in the routine clinical setting is expected to increase the efficiency of H and N replanning, reducing the amount of time needed for manual target and organ delineations.

  14. QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England Regional

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Constraints | Department of Energy Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England Regional Infrastructure Constraints QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England Regional Infrastructure Constraints Meeting Date and Location: April 21, 2014 9:00A.M.. to 1:00 P.M. EST (Providence, RI) - 1:00 P.M. EST to 5:00 P.M. EST (Hartford, CT) Providence: Rhode Island Convention Center, 1 Sabin St., Ballroom B, Providence, RI Hartford: Connecticut Department of

  15. Iterative image-domain decomposition for dual-energy CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, Tianye; Dong, Xue; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) imaging plays an important role in advanced imaging applications due to its capability of material decomposition. Direct decomposition via matrix inversion suffers from significant degradation of image signal-to-noise ratios, which reduces clinical values of DECT. Existing denoising algorithms achieve suboptimal performance since they suppress image noise either before or after the decomposition and do not fully explore the noise statistical properties of the decomposition process. In this work, the authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for noise suppression in DECT, using the full variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated in the form of least-square estimation with smoothness regularization. Based on the design principles of a best linear unbiased estimator, the authors include the inverse of the estimated variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-square term. The regularization term enforces the image smoothness by calculating the square sum of neighboring pixel value differences. To retain the boundary sharpness of the decomposed images, the authors detect the edges in the CT images before decomposition. These edge pixels have small weights in the calculation of the regularization term. Distinct from the existing denoising algorithms applied on the images before or after decomposition, the method has an iterative process for noise suppression, with decomposition performed in each iteration. The authors implement the proposed algorithm using a standard conjugate gradient algorithm. The method performance is evaluated using an evaluation phantom (Catphan600) and an anthropomorphic head phantom. The results are compared with those generated using direct matrix inversion with no noise suppression, a denoising method applied on the decomposed images, and an existing algorithm with similar formulation as the proposed method but with an edge-preserving regularization term. Results: On the Catphan phantom, the method maintains the same spatial resolution on the decomposed images as that of the CT images before decomposition (8 pairs/cm) while significantly reducing their noise standard deviation. Compared to that obtained by the direct matrix inversion, the noise standard deviation in the images decomposed by the proposed algorithm is reduced by over 98%. Without considering the noise correlation properties in the formulation, the denoising scheme degrades the spatial resolution to 6 pairs/cm for the same level of noise suppression. Compared to the edge-preserving algorithm, the method achieves better low-contrast detectability. A quantitative study is performed on the contrast-rod slice of Catphan phantom. The proposed method achieves lower electron density measurement error as compared to that by the direct matrix inversion, and significantly reduces the error variation by over 97%. On the head phantom, the method reduces the noise standard deviation of decomposed images by over 97% without blurring the sinus structures. Conclusions: The authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for DECT. The method combines noise suppression and material decomposition into an iterative process and achieves both goals simultaneously. By exploring the full variance-covariance properties of the decomposed images and utilizing the edge predetection, the proposed algorithm shows superior performance on noise suppression with high image spatial resolution and low-contrast detectability.

  16. Theoretical investigation of HNgNH{sub 3}{sup +} ions (Ng = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Kunqi; Sheng, Li

    2015-04-14

    The equilibrium geometries, harmonic frequencies, and dissociation energies of HNgNH{sub 3}{sup +} ions (Ng = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) were investigated using the following method: Becke-3-parameter-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP), Boese-Matrin for Kinetics (BMK), second-order Mller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and coupled-cluster with single and double excitations as well as perturbative inclusion of triples (CCSD(T)). The results indicate that HHeNH{sub 3}{sup +}, HArNH{sub 3}{sup +}, HKrNH{sub 3}{sup +}, and HXeNH{sub 3}{sup +} ions are metastable species that are protected from decomposition by high energy barriers, whereas the HNeNH{sub 3}{sup +} ion is unstable because of its relatively small energy barrier for decomposition. The bonding nature of noble-gas atoms in HNgNH{sub 3}{sup +} was also analyzed using the atoms in molecules approach, natural energy decomposition analysis, and natural bond orbital analysis.

  17. PETROPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE SECONDARY RECOVERY POTENTIAL IN THE CHERRY CANYON FORMATION NE LEA FIELD LEA COUNTY, NEW MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Scott Hickman

    2002-06-01

    Read and Stevens has proposed the evaluation of the waterflood potential from the Cherry Canyon formation in the NE Lea Field in lea County, New Mexico. Much of the development in this area is approaching primary recovery limitations; additional recovery of remaining oil reserves by waterflood needs to be evaluated. The Cherry Canyon formation is composed of fine grained sandstone, containing clay material which results in high water saturation, and also has the tendency to swell and reduce reservoir permeability--the ability of fluid to flow through the rock pores and fractures. There are also abundant organic materials that interfere with obtaining reliable well logs. These complications have limited oil in place calculations and identification of net pay zones, presenting a challenge to the planned waterflood. Core analysis of the Cherry Canyon should improve the understanding of existing well logs and possibly indicate secondary recovery measures, such as waterflood, to enhance field recovery. Lacking truly representative core to provide accurate analyses, Read and Stevens will obtain and preserve fresh core. The consulting firm of T. Scott Hickman and Associates will then collaborate on special core analyses and obtain additional well logs for a more detailed analysis of reservoir properties. The log interpretation will be compared to the core analysis results, and the entire collected data set will be used to assess the potential and economic viability of successfully waterflooding the identified oil zones. Successful results from the project will improve accuracy of log interpretation and establish a methodology for evaluating secondary recovery by waterflood.

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Danbury, CT, that scored HERS 35 without PV. This 2-story, 1,650-ft2 cabin built by a custom home builder for his own family meets Passive House...

  19. Frequency and patterns of abnormality detected by iodine-123 amine emission CT after cerebral infarction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brott, T.G.; Gelfand, M.J.; Williams, C.C.; Spilker, J.A.; Hertzberg, V.S.

    1986-03-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed in 31 patients with cerebral infarction and 13 who had had transient ischemic attacks, using iodine-123-labeled N,N,N'-trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxyl-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)-1,3-propanediamin e (I-123-HIPDM) as the radiopharmaceutical. SPECT scans were compared with computed tomographic (CT) scans. SPECT was as sensitive as CT in detecting cerebral infarction (94% vs. 84%). The abnormalities were larger on the SPECT scans than on the CT scans in 19 cases, equal in seven, and smaller in five (SPECT abnormalities greater than or equal to CT abnormalities in 86% of cases). Fifteen of 30 patients with hemispheric infarction had decreased perfusion (decreased uptake of I-123-HIPDM) to the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the cerebral hemisphere involved by the infarction (crossed cerebellar diaschisis). Nine of these 15 patients had major motor deficits, while only one of the 15 without crossed cerebellar diaschisis had a major motor deficit.

  20. Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999).

  1. TH-E-17A-01: Internal Respiratory Surrogate for 4D CT Using Fourier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    E-17A-01: Internal Respiratory Surrogate for 4D CT Using Fourier Transform and Anatomical Features Citation Details In-Document Search Title: TH-E-17A-01: Internal Respiratory...

  2. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as replacing, but as complimentary to conventional CT, to be used in specific applications.

  3. Objective assessment of image quality and dose reduction in CT iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaishnav, J. Y. Jung, W. C.; Popescu, L. M.; Zeng, R.; Myers, K. J.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms have the potential to reduce radiation dose in CT diagnostic imaging. As these algorithms become available on the market, a standardizable method of quantifying the dose reduction that a particular IR method can achieve would be valuable. Such a method would assist manufacturers in making promotional claims about dose reduction, buyers in comparing different devices, physicists in independently validating the claims, and the United States Food and Drug Administration in regulating the labeling of CT devices. However, the nonlinear nature of commercially available IR algorithms poses challenges to objectively assessing image quality, a necessary step in establishing the amount of dose reduction that a given IR algorithm can achieve without compromising that image quality. This review paper seeks to consolidate information relevant to objectively assessing the quality of CT IR images, and thereby measuring the level of dose reduction that a given IR algorithm can achieve. Methods: The authors discuss task-based methods for assessing the quality of CT IR images and evaluating dose reduction. Results: The authors explain and review recent literature on signal detection and localization tasks in CT IR image quality assessment, the design of an appropriate phantom for these tasks, possible choices of observers (including human and model observers), and methods of evaluating observer performance. Conclusions: Standardizing the measurement of dose reduction is a problem of broad interest to the CT community and to public health. A necessary step in the process is the objective assessment of CT image quality, for which various task-based methods may be suitable. This paper attempts to consolidate recent literature that is relevant to the development and implementation of task-based methods for the assessment of CT IR image quality.

  4. The effects of mapping CT images to Monte Carlo materials on GEANT4 proton simulation accuracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Samuel; McAuley, Grant; Slater, James; Wroe, Andrew

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations of radiation therapy require conversion from Hounsfield units (HU) in CT images to an exact tissue composition and density. The number of discrete densities (or density bins) used in this mapping affects the simulation accuracy, execution time, and memory usage in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo code. The relationship between the number of density bins and CT noise was examined in general for all simulations that use HU conversion to density. Additionally, the effect of this on simulation accuracy was examined for proton radiation. Methods: Relative uncertainty from CT noise was compared with uncertainty from density binning to determine an upper limit on the number of density bins required in the presence of CT noise. Error propagation analysis was also performed on continuously slowing down approximation range calculations to determine the proton range uncertainty caused by density binning. These results were verified with Monte Carlo simulations. Results: In the presence of even modest CT noise (5 HU or 0.5%) 450 density bins were found to only cause a 5% increase in the density uncertainty (i.e., 95% of density uncertainty from CT noise, 5% from binning). Larger numbers of density bins are not required as CT noise will prevent increased density accuracy; this applies across all types of Monte Carlo simulations. Examining uncertainty in proton range, only 127 density bins are required for a proton range error of <0.1 mm in most tissue and <0.5 mm in low density tissue (e.g., lung). Conclusions: By considering CT noise and actual range uncertainty, the number of required density bins can be restricted to a very modest 127 depending on the application. Reducing the number of density bins provides large memory and execution time savings in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo packages.

  5. Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer Purpose: To develop a delineation tool that refines physician-drawn contours of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in nasopharynx cancer, using combined pixel value

  6. Study of the K{sub stop}{sup -}A{yields}{Sigma}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}A' reaction at DA{Phi}NE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnello, M.; Benussi, L.; Bertani, M.; Fabbri, F. L.; Gianotti, P.; Lucherini, V.; Bhang, H. C.; Bonomi, G.; Moia, F.; Zenoni, A.; Botta, E.; Bressani, T.; Bufalino, S.; Busso, L.; Calvo, D.; De Mori, F.; Feliciello, A.; Filippi, A.; Marcello, S.; Wheadon, R.

    2010-12-28

    This work describes an experimental study of the K{sub stop}{sup -}A{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{Sigma}{sup {+-}}A' reaction performed with the FINUDA spectrometer at the DA{Phi}NE {phi}-factory. The reaction is studied via the detection of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n events on {sup 6,7}Li, {sup 9}Be, {sup 13}C and {sup 16}O.

  7. Measurement of K+ production cross section by 8 GeV protons using high energy neutrino interactions in the SciBooNE detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, G.

    2011-07-28

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports K+ production cross section and rate measurements using high energy daughter muon neutrino scattering data off the SciBar polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE detector. The K+ mesons are produced by 8 GeV protons striking a beryllium target in Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam line (BNB). Using observed neutrino and antineutrino events in SciBooNE, we measure d2σ/dpdΩ = (5.34 ±0.76) mb/(GeV/c x sr) for p + Be =K+ + X at mean K+ energy of 3.9 GeV and angle (with respect to the proton beam direction) of 3.7 degrees, corresponding to the selected K+ sample. Compared tomore » Monte Carlo predictions using previous higher energy K+ production measurements, this measurement, which uses the NUANCE neutrino interaction generator, is consistent with a normalization factor of 0.85 ± 0.12. This agreement is evidence that the extrapolation of the higher energy K+ measurements to an 8 GeV beam energy using Feynman scaling is valid. This measurement reduces the error on the K+ production cross section from 40% to 14%.« less

  8. Measurement of K+ production cross section by 8 GeV protons using high energy neutrino interactions in the SciBooNE detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, G.

    2011-07-28

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports K+ production cross section and rate measurements using high energy daughter muon neutrino scattering data off the SciBar polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE detector. The K+ mesons are produced by 8 GeV protons striking a beryllium target in Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam line (BNB). Using observed neutrino and antineutrino events in SciBooNE, we measure d2σ/dpdΩ = (5.34 ±0.76) mb/(GeV/c x sr) for p + Be =K+ + X at mean K+ energy of 3.9 GeV and angle (with respect to the proton beam direction) of 3.7 degrees, corresponding to the selected K+ sample. Compared tomore »Monte Carlo predictions using previous higher energy K+ production measurements, this measurement, which uses the NUANCE neutrino interaction generator, is consistent with a normalization factor of 0.85 ± 0.12. This agreement is evidence that the extrapolation of the higher energy K+ measurements to an 8 GeV beam energy using Feynman scaling is valid. This measurement reduces the error on the K+ production cross section from 40% to 14%.« less

  9. Two-chord interferometry using 3.39 {mu}m He-Ne laser on a flux-coil-generated FRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gota, H.; Deng, B. H.; Gupta, D.; Kiyashko, V.; Knapp, K.; Mendoza, R.; Morehouse, M.; Bolte, N.; Roche, T.; Wessel, F.

    2010-10-15

    A two-chord {lambda}{sub IR}{approx}3.39 {mu}m He-Ne laser interferometer system was developed for a flux-coil-generated field-reversed configuration to estimate the electron density and the total temperature of the field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. This two-chord heterodyne interferometer system consists of a single {approx}2 mW infrared He-Ne laser, a visible ({lambda}{sub vis}{approx}632.8 nm) He-Ne laser for the alignment, a 40 MHz acousto-optic modulator, photodetectors, and quadrature phase detectors. Initial measurement was performed and the measured average electron densities were 2-10x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at two different radial positions in the midplane. A time shift in density was observed as the FRC expands radially. The time evolution of the line-averaged density agrees with the density estimated from the in situ internal magnetic probes, based on a rigid-rotor profile model.

  10. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-04-29

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0?mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with ?{sup 2} value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with ?{sup 2} value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  11. Improved Search for ν̄μ→ν̄e Oscillations in the MiniBooNE Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Brown, B. C.; Bugel, L.; Cheng, G.; Church, E. D.; Conrad, J. M.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Finley, D. A.; Ford, R.; et al

    2013-04-15

    The MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab reports results from an analysis of ν¯e appearance data from 11.27×10²⁰ protons on target in the antineutrino mode, an increase of approximately a factor of 2 over the previously reported results. An event excess of 78.4±28.5 events (2.8σ) is observed in the energy range 200QEν<1250 MeV. If interpreted in a two-neutrino oscillation model, ν¯μ→ν¯e, the best oscillation fit to the excess has a probability of 66% while the background-only fit has a χ² probability of 0.5% relative to the best fit. The data are consistent with antineutrino oscillations in the 0.01<Δm²<1.0 eV² range and havemore » some overlap with the evidence for antineutrino oscillations from the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector. All of the major backgrounds are constrained by in situ event measurements so nonoscillation explanations would need to invoke new anomalous background processes. The neutrino mode running also shows an excess at low energy of 162.0±47.8 events (3.4σ) but the energy distribution of the excess is marginally compatible with a simple two neutrino oscillation formalism. Expanded models with several sterile neutrinos can reduce the incompatibility by allowing for CP violating effects between neutrino and antineutrino oscillations.« less

  12. MO-E-17A-03: Monte Carlo CT Dose Calculation: A Comparison Between Experiment and Simulation Using ARCHER-CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, T; Du, X; Su, L; Gao, Y; Ji, W; Xu, X; Zhang, D; Shi, J; Liu, B; Kalra, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the CT doses derived from the experiments and GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, using a human cadaver and ATOM phantom. Methods: The cadaver of an 88-year old male and the ATOM phantom were scanned by a GE LightSpeed Pro 16 MDCT. For the cadaver study, the Thimble chambers (Model 105?0.6CT and 106?0.6CT) were used to measure the absorbed dose in different deep and superficial organs. Whole-body scans were first performed to construct a complete image database for MC simulations. Abdomen/pelvis helical scans were then conducted using 120/100 kVps, 300 mAs and a pitch factor of 1.375:1. For the ATOM phantom study, the OSL dosimeters were used and helical scans were performed using 120 kVp and x, y, z tube current modulation (TCM). For the MC simulations, sufficient particles were run in both cases such that the statistical errors of the results by ARCHER-CT were limited to 1%. Results: For the human cadaver scan, the doses to the stomach, liver, colon, left kidney, pancreas and urinary bladder were compared. The difference between experiments and simulations was within 19% for the 120 kVp and 25% for the 100 kVp. For the ATOM phantom scan, the doses to the lung, thyroid, esophagus, heart, stomach, liver, spleen, kidneys and thymus were compared. The difference was 39.2% for the esophagus, and within 16% for all other organs. Conclusion: In this study the experimental and simulated CT doses were compared. Their difference is primarily attributed to the systematic errors of the MC simulations, including the accuracy of the bowtie filter modeling, and the algorithm to generate voxelized phantom from DICOM images. The experimental error is considered small and may arise from the dosimeters. R01 grant (R01EB015478) from National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

  13. A survey of Existing V&V, UQ and M&S Data and Knowledge Bases in Support of the Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyung Lee; Rich Johnson, Ph.D.; Kimberlyn C. Moussesau

    2011-12-01

    The Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Utah State University and others. The objective of this consortium is to establish a comprehensive knowledge base to provide Verification and Validation (V&V) and Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and other resources for advanced modeling and simulation (M&S) in nuclear reactor design and analysis. NE-KAMS will become a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, the national laboratories, the U.S. NRC and the public to help ensure the safe operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. A survey and evaluation of the state-of-the-art of existing V&V and M&S databases, including the Department of Energy and commercial databases, has been performed to ensure that the NE-KAMS effort will not be duplicating existing resources and capabilities and to assess the scope of the effort required to develop and implement NE-KAMS. The survey and evaluation have indeed highlighted the unique set of value-added functionality and services that NE-KAMS will provide to its users. Additionally, the survey has helped develop a better understanding of the architecture and functionality of these data and knowledge bases that can be used to leverage the development of NE-KAMS.

  14. 18Ne.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  15. 18Ne_78.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  16. 19Ne.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  17. 19Ne_78.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  18. 20Ne.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  19. 20Ne_78.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  20. NE Blog Archive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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    The 7th Workshop on Risk Informed Regulation and Safety Culture was one of a series of workshops designed by the Office of Nuclear Energy in...

  1. NE Press Releases

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  2. MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  3. 625 Marion St. NE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dear Dr. Kosson: Oregon appreciates the opportunity to provide comments on the draft methodology for the Hanford Site-Wide Risk Review Project. We especially thank you for your...

  4. MiniBooNE:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monroe, Columbia University Moriond Electroweak, March 21, 2004 From kaons: &24; data from HARP & BNL E910 on production &24; high energy e() events in detector &24; events in the LMC...

  5. MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 GeV KE protons from Fermilab Booster Accelerator 1.7 beryllium target (HARP results coming soon) horn focusses + sign mesons and K Can reverse...

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday (except Federal holidays), at the DOE Public Document Room located in Room lE-1% of the Forrestal Building, 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W.,...

  7. CNS contributes to UT's College of Engineering Diversity Program...

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    the pool of underrepresented students majoring in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. One of the program's goals is to double the number of degrees awarded to...

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/19-UT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Application to Appropriate Utah Geothermal presentation by Dr. R. Gordon Bloomquist, Ph.D Water Right Information webpage Simple Proof Full Proof Water Application Flow Chart...

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/3-UT-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Utility Line Agreement All utilities located within State Highway Right of Way must enter into a license agreement with the Department. The developer should contact UDOT and...

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/18-UT-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    b < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools...

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/6-UT-b | Open Energy Information

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    b < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools...

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/14-UT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools...

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/14-UT-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    e < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools...

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/1-UT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    be collected by local governments, as a condition of development approval, to offset the costs associated with the impact of new development on public infrastructure. An...

  15. RAPID/Roadmap/3-UT-g | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    g < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools...

  16. RAPID/Roadmap/14-UT-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    States through the UPDES system. Point sources are discrete conveyances such as pipes or man-made ditches. Individual homes that are connected to a municipal system, use a septic...

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/8-UT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    corporation, water corporation, sewerage corporation, heat corporation, and independent energy producer, where the service is performed for the general public. Public...

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/7-UT-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    except a power purchase agreement with an electrical corporation. Utah defines an "independent energy producer" as every electrical corporation, person, corporation, or...

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/14-UT-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Level II ADRs are required for any activity that is not temporary and limited in nature and is likely to result in degradation of water quality. The central tenet of these...

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/15-UT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to the DEQ for approval. The Notice of Intent should include: A description of the nature of the processes involved; the nature, procedures for handling and quantities of raw...

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/14-UT-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    application for certification must be provided as described in 40 CFR Section 122.22(a); Name, address, email address and phone number of a contact for the application; List of...

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/4-UT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "natural heat of the earth at temperatures greater than 120 degrees centigrade" and "the energy, in whatever form, created by, or which may be extracted from that natural heat,...

  3. Zhiming Cui > Research Fellow - UT Austin > Center Alumni > The...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formerly a postdoc with the DiSalvo Group, he is now working at the University of Texas - Austin. He joined the Department of Mechanical Engineering in the Summer of 2014...

  4. Enforcement Notice of Intent to Investigate, UT-Battelle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Office of Enforcement issued a Notice of Intent to Investigate potential programmatic deficiencies in implementing requirements for assessing and controlling material handling hazards at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/5-UT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    naturally present in a geothermal system." "Geothermal resource" is defined as the "natural heat of the earth at temperatures greater than 120 degrees centigrade" and "the...

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/3-UT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    if the UDWR finds that the applicant is the geothermal owner and that the proposed extraction of geothermal fluids will not impair existing rights to waters of the state....

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/7-UT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Utah (utility certification issues) Department of Environmental Quality Division of Air Quality Division of Solid & Hazardous Waste Division of Water Quality Department of...

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/11-UT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of scientific rigor. The PLPCO, the state agency, and the SHPO shall also consider as part of the joint analysis: The estimated costs of the alternatives in total and as a...

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/6-UT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    licensed with appropriate endorsements. * Must be in compliance with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs). (49 CFR Parts 382-399) * Must be in compliance...

  10. UTS Biogastechnik GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector: Services Product: Bavaria-based specialist consultancy in the construction of biogas plants as well as selling related components and services. Coordinates: 48.27304,...

  11. Ventilation Effectiveness Research at UT-Typer Lab Houses

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Technical Update meeting on April 29-30, 2013, in Denver, Colorado.

  12. REP&" TO A~NOF: NE-23 SUBJECT: Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio iin Support

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    tifr'itG!'l' &i&s Coverament --_ , ,&,.i +.&r, ,' ,T.L ' Department of Energy / REP&" TO A~NOF: NE-23 SUBJECT: Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio iin Support of FMPC Operations TO: Robert E. Lynch Procuremnent and Contracts Division, AD-42 Oak Ridge Operations Office , / I I The Division of Facility and Site Oecomnissioning Projects (OF%) is responsible for managing the Department's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The

  13. Bowtie filters for dedicated breast CT: Theory and computational implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kontson, Kimberly Jennings, Robert J.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To design bowtie filters with improved properties for dedicated breast CT to improve image quality and reduce dose to the patient. Methods: The authors present three different bowtie filters designed for a cylindrical 14-cm diameter phantom with a uniform composition of 40/60 breast tissue, which vary in their design objectives and performance improvements. Bowtie design #1 is based on single material spectral matching and produces nearly uniform spectral shape for radiation incident upon the detector. Bowtie design #2 uses the idea of basis material decomposition to produce the same spectral shape and intensity at the detector, using two different materials. Bowtie design #3 eliminates the beam hardening effect in the reconstructed image by adjusting the bowtie filter thickness so that the effective attenuation coefficient for every ray is the same. All three designs are obtained using analytical computational methods and linear attenuation coefficients. Thus, the designs do not take into account the effects of scatter. The authors considered this to be a reasonable approach to the filter design problem since the use of Monte Carlo methods would have been computationally intensive. The filter profiles for a cone-angle of 0° were used for the entire length of each filter because the differences between those profiles and the correct cone-beam profiles for the cone angles in our system are very small, and the constant profiles allowed construction of the filters with the facilities available to us. For evaluation of the filters, we used Monte Carlo simulation techniques and the full cone-beam geometry. Images were generated with and without each bowtie filter to analyze the effect on dose distribution, noise uniformity, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) homogeneity. Line profiles through the reconstructed images generated from the simulated projection images were also used as validation for the filter designs. Results: Examples of the three designs are presented. Initial verification of performance of the designs was done using analytical computations of HVL, intensity, and effective attenuation coefficient behind the phantom as a function of fan-angle with a cone-angle of 0°. The performance of the designs depends only weakly on incident spectrum and tissue composition. For all designs, the dynamic range requirement on the detector was reduced compared to the no-bowtie-filter case. Further verification of the filter designs was achieved through analysis of reconstructed images from simulations. Simulation data also showed that the use of our bowtie filters can reduce peripheral dose to the breast by 61% and provide uniform noise and CNR distributions. The bowtie filter design concepts validated in this work were then used to create a computational realization of a 3D anthropomorphic bowtie filter capable of achieving a constant effective attenuation coefficient behind the entire field-of-view of an anthropomorphic breast phantom. Conclusions: Three different bowtie filter designs that vary in performance improvements were described and evaluated using computational and simulation techniques. Results indicate that the designs are robust against variations in breast diameter, breast composition, and tube voltage, and that the use of these filters can reduce patient dose and improve image quality compared to the no-bowtie-filter case.

  14. Technical Note: Measurement of bow tie profiles in CT scanners using radiochromic film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiting, Bruce R.; Dohatcu, Andreea C.; Evans, Joshua D.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Politte, David G.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a noninvasive technique to measure the intensity profile of the fan beam in a computed tomography (CT) scanner that is cost effective and easily implemented without the need to access proprietary scanner information or service modes. Methods: The fabrication of an inexpensive aperture is described, which is used to expose radiochromic film in a rotating CT gantry. A series of exposures is made, each of which is digitized on a personal computer document scanner, and the resulting data set is analyzed to produce a self-consistent calibration of relative radiation exposure. The bow tie profiles were analyzed to determine the precision of the process and were compared to two other measurement techniques, direct measurements from CT gantry detectors and a dynamic dosimeter. Results: The radiochromic film method presented here can measure radiation exposures with a precision of ?6% root-mean-square relative error. The intensity profiles have a maximum 25% root-mean-square relative error compared with existing techniques. Conclusions: The proposed radiochromic film method for measuring bow tie profiles is an inexpensive (?$100 USD + film costs), noninvasive method to measure the fan beam intensity profile in CT scanners.

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Derby, CT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Derby, CT, that achieves a HERS score of 45 without PV or HERS 26 with PV. The production home is one of a development of 7 two-story, 4,000+-ft2...

  16. The feasibility of head motion tracking in helical CT: A step toward motion correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jung-Ha; Nuyts, Johan; Kuncic, Zdenka; Fulton, Roger

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To establish a practical and accurate motion tracking method for the development of rigid motion correction methods in helical x-ray computed tomography (CT). Methods: A commercially available optical motion tracking system provided 6 degrees of freedom pose measurements at 60 Hz. A 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 calibration matrix was determined to convert raw pose data acquired in tracker coordinates to a fixed CT coordinate system with origin at the isocenter of the scanner. Two calibration methods, absolute orientation (AO), and a new method based on image registration (IR), were compared by means of landmark analysis and correlation coefficient in phantom images coregistered using the derived motion transformations. Results: Transformations calculated using the IR-derived calibration matrix were found to be more accurate, with positional errors less than 0.5 mm (mean RMS), and highly correlated image voxel intensities. The AO-derived calibration matrix yielded larger mean RMS positional errors ( Asymptotically-Equal-To 1.0 mm), and poorer correlation coefficients. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of accurate motion tracking for retrospective motion correction in helical CT. Their new IR-based calibration method based on image registration and function minimization was simpler to perform and delivered more accurate calibration matrices. This technique is a useful tool for future work on rigid motion correction in helical CT and potentially also other imaging modalities.

  17. Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Bethesda, Maryland, June 8-12, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-06-08

    Nuclear fusion - the process that powers the sun - offers an environmentally benign, intrinsically safe energy source with an abundant supply of low-cost fuel. It is the focus of an international research program, including the ITE R fusion collaboration, which involves seven parties representing half the world's population. The realization of fusion power would change the economics and ecology of energy production as profoundly as petroleum exploitation did two centuries ago. The 21st century finds fusion research in a transformed landscape. The worldwide fusion community broadly agrees that the science has advanced to the point where an aggressive action plan, aimed at the remaining barriers to practical fusion energy, is warranted. At the same time, and largely because of its scientific advance, the program faces new challenges; above all it is challenged to demonstrate the timeliness of its promised benefits. In response to this changed landscape, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES ) in the US Department of Energy commissioned a number of community-based studies of the key scientific and technical foci of magnetic fusion research. The Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences is a capstone to these studies. In the context of magnetic fusion energy, ReNeW surveyed the issues identified in previous studies, and used them as a starting point to define and characterize the research activities that the advance of fusion as a practical energy source will require. Thus, ReNeW's task was to identify (1) the scientific and technological research frontiers of the fusion program, and, especially, (2) a set of activities that will most effectively advance those frontiers. (Note that ReNeW was not charged with developing a strategic plan or timeline for the implementation of fusion power.) This Report presents a portfolio of research activities for US research in magnetic fusion for the next two decades. It is intended to provide a strategic framework for realizing practical fusion energy. The portfolio is the product of ten months of fusion-community study and discussion, culminating in a Workshop held in Bethesda, Maryland, from June 8 to June 12, 2009. The Workshop involved some 200 scientists from Universities, National Laboratories and private industry, including several scientists from outside the US. Largely following the Basic Research Needs model established by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES ), the Report presents a collection of discrete research activities, here called 'thrusts.' Each thrust is based on an explicitly identified question, or coherent set of questions, on the frontier of fusion science. It presents a strategy to find the needed answers, combining the necessary intellectual and hardware tools, experimental facilities, and computational resources into an integrated, focused program. The thrusts should be viewed as building blocks for a fusion program plan whose overall structure will be developed by OFES , using whatever additional community input it requests. Part I of the Report reviews the issues identified in previous fusion-community studies, which systematically identified the key research issues and described them in considerable detail. It then considers in some detail the scientific and technical means that can be used to address these is sues. It ends by showing how these various research requirements are organized into a set of eighteen thrusts. Part II presents a detailed and self-contained discussion of each thrust, including the goals, required facilities and tools for each. This Executive Summary focuses on a survey of the ReNeW thrusts. The following brief review of fusion science is intended to provide context for that survey. A more detailed discussion of fusion science can be found in an Appendix to this Summary, entitled 'A Fusion Primer.'

  18. TU-F-18C-07: Hardware Advances for MTF Improvement in Dedicated Breast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazi, P; Burkett, G; Yang, K; Boone, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, we have designed and implemented a prototype dedicated breast CT system (bCT) to improve the spatial resolution characteristics, in order to improve detection of micro-calcifications. Methods: A 10.8 kW water-cooled, tungsten anode x-ray tube, running up to 240 mA at 60 kV, coupled with an x-ray generator specifically designed for this application, and 0.3 mm of added copper filter was used to generate x-ray pulses. A CsI CMOS flat panel detector with a pixel pitch of 0.075 mm in native binning mode was used. The system geometry was designed in a way to achieve an FOV on par with similar bCT prototypes, resulting in a magnification factor of 1.39. A 0.013 mm tungsten wire was used to generate point spread functions. Multiple scans were performed with different numbers of projections, different reconstruction kernel sizes and different reconstruction filters to study the effects of each parameter on MTF. The resulting MTFs were then evaluated quantitatively using the generated PFSs. Duplicate scans with the same parameters were performed on two other dedicated breast CT systems to compare the performance of the new prototype. Results: The results of the MTF experiments demonstrate a significant improvement in the spatial resolution characteristics. In the new prototype, using the pulsed x-ray source results in a restoration of the azimuthal MTF degradation, due to motion blurring previously seen in other bCT systems. Moreover, employing the higher resolution x-ray detector considerably improves the MTF. The MTF at 10% of the new system is at 3.5 1/mm, a factor of 4.36 greater than an earlier bCT scanner. Conclusion: The MTF analysis of the new prototype bCT shows that using the new hardware and control results in a significant improvement in visualization of finer detail. This suggests that the visualization of micro-calcifications will be significantly improved.

  19. SU-E-I-58: Detecting Tumors with Extremely Low Contrast in CT Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, K; Gou, S; Kupelian, P; Steiberg, M; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumors such as the prostate focal lesions and the brain metastases have extremely low CT contrast and MRI is usually used for target delineation. The target contours are propagated to the CT for treatment planning and patient positioning. We have employed an advanced denoising method eliminating the noise and allow magnification of subtle contrast of these focal lesions on CT. Methods: Five prostate and two brain metastasis patients with MRI T2, diffusion or dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) images confirmed focal lesions were included. One brain patients had 5 metastases. A block matching 3D (BM3D) algorithm was adapted to reduce the noise of kVCT images used for treatment planning. The gray-level range of the resultant images was narrowed to magnify the tumor-normal tissue contrast. Results: For the prostate patients, denoised kVCT images showed focal regions at 5, 8,11-1, 2, and 8–10 oclock for the 5 patients, this is highly consistent to the radiologist confirmed focal lesions based on MRI at 5, 7, 11-1, 2 and 8–10 oclock in the axial plane. These CT focal regions matched well with the MRI focal lesions in the cranio-caudal position. The average increase in density compared to background prostate glands was 0.86%, which corresponds to ∼50% increase in cellularity and is lower than the average CT noise level of 2.4%. For the brain patients, denoised kVCT showed 5/6 metastases. The high CT-density region of a metastasis is 2-mm off from its corresponding elevated MRI perfusion center. Overall the detecting sensitivity was 91%. Conclusion: It has been preliminarily demonstrated that the higher tumor cellularity can be detected using kVCT. The low contrast-to-noise information requires advanced denoising to reveal. The finding is significant to radiotherapy by providing an additional tool to locate focal lesions for confirming MRI-CT registration and providing a highly accessible outcome assessment tool.

  20. Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in clinical CT systems: Experimental assessment of noise performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Tang, Jie; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To reduce radiation dose in CT imaging, the statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) method has been introduced for clinical use. Based on the principle of MBIR and its nonlinear nature, the noise performance of MBIR is expected to be different from that of the well-understood filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction method. The purpose of this work is to experimentally assess the unique noise characteristics of MBIR using a state-of-the-art clinical CT system. Methods: Three physical phantoms, including a water cylinder and two pediatric head phantoms, were scanned in axial scanning mode using a 64-slice CT scanner (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) at seven different mAs levels (5, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, 300). At each mAs level, each phantom was repeatedly scanned 50 times to generate an image ensemble for noise analysis. Both the FBP method with a standard kernel and the MBIR method (Veo{sup }, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were used for CT image reconstruction. Three-dimensional (3D) noise power spectrum (NPS), two-dimensional (2D) NPS, and zero-dimensional NPS (noise variance) were assessed both globally and locally. Noise magnitude, noise spatial correlation, noise spatial uniformity and their dose dependence were examined for the two reconstruction methods. Results: (1) At each dose level and at each frequency, the magnitude of the NPS of MBIR was smaller than that of FBP. (2) While the shape of the NPS of FBP was dose-independent, the shape of the NPS of MBIR was strongly dose-dependent; lower dose lead to a redder NPS with a lower mean frequency value. (3) The noise standard deviation (?) of MBIR and dose were found to be related through a power law of ????(dose){sup ??} with the component ? ? 0.25, which violated the classical ????(dose){sup ?0.5} power law in FBP. (4) With MBIR, noise reduction was most prominent for thin image slices. (5) MBIR lead to better noise spatial uniformity when compared with FBP. (6) A composite image generated from two MBIR images acquired at two different dose levels (D1 and D2) demonstrated lower noise than that of an image acquired at a dose level of D1+D2. Conclusions: The noise characteristics of the MBIR method are significantly different from those of the FBP method. The well known tradeoff relationship between CT image noise and radiation dose has been modified by MBIR to establish a more gradual dependence of noise on dose. Additionally, some other CT noise properties that had been well understood based on the linear system theory have also been altered by MBIR. Clinical CT scan protocols that had been optimized based on the classical CT noise properties need to be carefully re-evaluated for systems equipped with MBIR in order to maximize the method's potential clinical benefits in dose reduction and/or in CT image quality improvement.

  1. Microsoft Word - figure_99.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual Figure 6. Natural gas processing in the United States and the Gulf of Mexico, 2014 (million cubic feet) None 1-15,000 15,001-100,000 100,001-200,000 200,001-500,000 500,001 and over Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production." IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME RI DE DC NC SC GA FL NJ AL MS LA MO AR TX NM OK CO KS UT AZ WY NE IL IA MN

  2. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    State-Level Energy Consumption Estimates and Estimated Consumption per Capita, 2010 Consumption Consumption per Capita 14 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 TX CA FL LA IL OH PA NY GA IN MI NC VA NJ TN WA KY AL MO MN WI SC OK CO IA MD AZ MA MS KS AR OR NE UT CT WV NM NV AK WY ID ND ME MT SD NH HI DE RI DC VT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 0 2 4 6 8 10

  3. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD curves tended to be steeper. The CHO generated the best quantitative agreement with human observers with its CD curve overlapping with that of human observer. Statistical equivalence between CHO and humans can be claimed within 11% of the human observer results, including both the disk and lesion detection experiments.Conclusions: The model observer method can be used to accurately represent human observer performance with the stochastic DPC-CT noise for SKE tasks with sizes ranging from 8 to 128 pixels. The incorporation of the anatomical noise remains to be studied.

  4. Enhanced T-lymphocyte blastogenic response to tuberculin (PPD) in children of northeast (NE) Thailand supplemented with vitamin A (VA) and zinc (Zn)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, T.R.; Udomkesmalee, E.; Dhanamitta, S.; Sirisinha, S.; Charoenkiatkul, S.; Tantipopipat, S.; Banjong, O.; Rojroongwasinkul, N.; Smith, J.C. Jr. Mahidol Univ., Nakhon Pathom )

    1991-03-15

    Beneficial effects of Va and/or Zn supplementation of children in NE Thailand are described in a companion abstract. In the same study, blastogenic response (BR) of T-lymphocytes to concanavalin-A (ConA) and PPD were assayed in cultures containing mononuclear cells (MNC) or whole blood (WB). Methods were previously described. Children were previously vaccinated with BCG. BR to ConA of MNC or WB from children supplemented with VA, Zn, VA + Zn or placebo were similar. BR to PPD of MNC was higher in children receiving VA + Zn than placebo, but not in children supplemented with VA or Zn alone. Data indicate that children with suboptimal VA and Zn nutriture supplemented with < 2 times RDA of these nutrients showed enhanced cellular immunity to PPD. This observation is relevant to BCG immunization program and thus may benefit public health.

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Ten-year Site Plan (2012 through 2021) -- DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability -- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cal Ozaki

    2010-06-01

    To meet long-term objectives to transform the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), we are providing an integrated, long-term vision of infrastructure requirements that support research, development and demonstration (RD&D) goals outlined in the DOE strategic plans, including the NE Roadmap and reports such as Facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy Research: A Twenty-year Outlook. The goal of the INL Ten-year Site Plan (TYSP) is to clearly link RD&D mission goals and INL core capabilities with infrastructure requirements (single and multi-program), establish the 10-year end-state vision for INL complexes, identify and prioritize infrastructure and capability gaps, as well as the most efficient and economic approaches to closing those gaps.

  6. Adaptive nonlocal means filtering based on local noise level for CT denoising

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhoubo; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Lake, David S.; Blezek, Daniel J.; Manduca, Armando; Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate an image-domain noise reduction method based on a modified nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm that is adaptive to local noise level of CT images and to implement this method in a time frame consistent with clinical workflow. Methods: A computationally efficient technique for local noise estimation directly from CT images was developed. A forward projection, based on a 2D fan-beam approximation, was used to generate the projection data, with a noise model incorporating the effects of the bowtie filter and automatic exposure control. The noise propagation from projection data to images was analytically derived. The analytical noise map was validated using repeated scans of a phantom. A 3D NLM denoising algorithm was modified to adapt its denoising strength locally based on this noise map. The performance of this adaptive NLM filter was evaluated in phantom studies in terms of in-plane and cross-plane high-contrast spatial resolution, noise power spectrum (NPS), subjective low-contrast spatial resolution using the American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom, and objective low-contrast spatial resolution using a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO). Graphical processing units (GPU) implementation of this noise map calculation and the adaptive NLM filtering were developed to meet demands of clinical workflow. Adaptive NLM was piloted on lower dose scans in clinical practice. Results: The local noise level estimation matches the noise distribution determined from multiple repetitive scans of a phantom, demonstrated by small variations in the ratio map between the analytical noise map and the one calculated from repeated scans. The phantom studies demonstrated that the adaptive NLM filter can reduce noise substantially without degrading the high-contrast spatial resolution, as illustrated by modulation transfer function and slice sensitivity profile results. The NPS results show that adaptive NLM denoising preserves the shape and peak frequency of the noise power spectrum better than commercial smoothing kernels, and indicate that the spatial resolution at low contrast levels is not significantly degraded. Both the subjective evaluation using the ACR phantom and the objective evaluation on a low-contrast detection task using a CHO model observer demonstrate an improvement on low-contrast performance. The GPU implementation can process and transfer 300 slice images within 5 min. On patient data, the adaptive NLM algorithm provides more effective denoising of CT data throughout a volume than standard NLM, and may allow significant lowering of radiation dose. After a two week pilot study of lower dose CT urography and CT enterography exams, both GI and GU radiology groups elected to proceed with permanent implementation of adaptive NLM in their GI and GU CT practices. Conclusions: This work describes and validates a computationally efficient technique for noise map estimation directly from CT images, and an adaptive NLM filtering based on this noise map, on phantom and patient data. Both the noise map calculation and the adaptive NLM filtering can be performed in times that allow integration with clinical workflow. The adaptive NLM algorithm provides effective denoising of CT data throughout a volume, and may allow significant lowering of radiation dose.

  7. Cholecystokinin-Assisted Hydrodissection of the Gallbladder Fossa during FDG PET/CT-guided Liver Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, Sanjit O.; Petre, Elena N.; Osborne, Joseph; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.

    2013-12-15

    A 68-year-old female with colorectal cancer developed a metachronous isolated fluorodeoxyglucose-avid (FDG-avid) segment 5/6 gallbladder fossa hepatic lesion and was referred for percutaneous ablation. Pre-procedure computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated a distended gallbladder abutting the segment 5/6 hepatic metastasis. In order to perform ablation with clear margins and avoid direct puncture and aspiration of the gallbladder, cholecystokinin was administered intravenously to stimulate gallbladder contraction before hydrodissection. Subsequently, the lesion was ablated successfully with sufficient margins, of greater than 1.0 cm, using microwave with ultrasound and FDG PET/CT guidance. The patient tolerated the procedure very well and was discharged home the next day.

  8. SU-E-P-03: Implementing a Low Dose Lung Screening CT Program Meeting Regulatory Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFrance, M; Marsh, S; O'Donnell, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide information pertaining to IROC Houston QA Center's (RPC) credentialing process for institutions participating in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Purpose: Provide guidance to the Radiology Departments with the intent of implementing a Low Dose CT Screening Program using different CT Scanners with multiple techniques within the framework of the required state regulations. Method: State Requirements for the purpose of implementing a Low Dose CT Lung Protocol required working with the Radiology and Pulmonary Department in setting up a Low Dose Screening Protocol designed to reduce the radiation burden to the patients enrolled. Radiation dose measurements (CTDIvol) for various CT manufacturers (Siemens16, Siemens 64, Philips 64, and Neusoft128) for three different weight based protocols. All scans were reviewed by the Radiologist. Prior to starting a low dose lung screening protocol, information had to be submitted to the state for approval. Performing a Healing Arts protocol requires extensive information. This not only includes name and address of the applicant but a detailed description of the disease, the x-ray examination and the population to be examined. The unit had to be tested by a qualified expert using the technique charts. The credentials of all the operators, the supervisors and the Radiologists had to be submitted to the state. Results: All the appropriate documentation was sent to the state for review. The measured results between the Low Dose Protocol versus the default Adult Chest Protocol showed that there was a dose reduction of 65% for small (100-150 lb.) patient, 75% for the Medium patient (151-250 lbs.), and a 55% reduction for the Large patient ( over 250 lbs.). Conclusion: Measured results indicated that the Low Dose Protocol indeed lowered the screening patient's radiation dose and the institution was able to submit the protocol to the State's regulators.

  9. SU-E-I-43: Pediatric CT Dose and Image Quality Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, G; Singh, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To design an approach to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging, and to evaluate expected performance. Methods: A methodology was designed to quantify relative image quality as a function of CT image acquisition parameters. Image contrast and image noise were used to indicate expected conspicuity of objects, and a wide-cone system was used to minimize scan time for motion avoidance. A decision framework was designed to select acquisition parameters as a weighted combination of image quality and dose. Phantom tests were used to acquire images at multiple techniques to demonstrate expected contrast, noise and dose. Anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts were imaged on a 160mm CT system with tube voltage capabilities as low as 70kVp. Previously acquired clinical images were used in conjunction with simulation tools to emulate images at different tube voltages and currents to assess human observer preferences. Results: Examination of image contrast, noise, dose and tube/generator capabilities indicates a clinical task and object-size dependent optimization. Phantom experiments confirm that system modeling can be used to achieve the desired image quality and noise performance. Observer studies indicate that clinical utilization of this optimization requires a modified approach to achieve the desired performance. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging. In addition, the methodology can be used in an automated parameter selection feature that can suggest techniques given a limited number of user inputs. G Stevens and R Singh are employees of GE Healthcare.

  10. Dose reconstruction for real-time patient-specific dose estimation in CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Man, Bruno Yin, Zhye; Wu, Mingye; FitzGerald, Paul; Kalra, Mannudeep

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Many recent computed tomography (CT) dose reduction approaches belong to one of three categories: statistical reconstruction algorithms, efficient x-ray detectors, and optimized CT acquisition schemes with precise control over the x-ray distribution. The latter category could greatly benefit from fast and accurate methods for dose estimation, which would enable real-time patient-specific protocol optimization. Methods: The authors present a new method for volumetrically reconstructing absorbed dose on a per-voxel basis, directly from the actual CT images. The authors’ specific implementation combines a distance-driven pencil-beam approach to model the first-order x-ray interactions with a set of Gaussian convolution kernels to model the higher-order x-ray interactions. The authors performed a number of 3D simulation experiments comparing the proposed method to a Monte Carlo based ground truth. Results: The authors’ results indicate that the proposed approach offers a good trade-off between accuracy and computational efficiency. The images show a good qualitative correspondence to Monte Carlo estimates. Preliminary quantitative results show errors below 10%, except in bone regions, where the authors see a bigger model mismatch. The computational complexity is similar to that of a low-resolution filtered-backprojection algorithm. Conclusions: The authors present a method for analytic dose reconstruction in CT, similar to the techniques used in radiation therapy planning with megavoltage energies. Future work will include refinements of the proposed method to improve the accuracy as well as a more extensive validation study. The proposed method is not intended to replace methods that track individual x-ray photons, but the authors expect that it may prove useful in applications where real-time patient-specific dose estimation is required.

  11. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Singer Village, Derby, CT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Brookside Development Singer Village Derby, CT DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed

  12. STATE OF OHIO, IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT FOR THE .SOUTHERN DIS~CT OF

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  13. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Glastonbury Housesmith, Hickory Drive, South Glastonbury, CT

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Glastonbury Housesmith Hickory Drive South Glastonbury, CT DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies

  14. CT-Guided Interventions Using a Free-Hand, Optical Tracking System: Initial Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, Tilman Jacob, Augustinus L.; Pansini, Michele; Liu, David; Gutzeit, Andreas; Kos, Sebastian

    2013-08-01

    PurposeThe present study was designed to evaluate the geometrical accuracy and clinical applicability of a new, free-hand, CT-guided, optical navigation system.MethodsFifteen procedures in 14 consecutive patients were retrospectively analyzed. The navigation system was applied for interventional procedures on small target lesions, in cases with long needle paths, narrow access windows, or when an out-of-plane access was expected. Mean lesion volume was 27.9 ml, and mean distance to target measured was 107.5 mm. Eleven of 15 needle trajectories were planned as out-of-plane approaches regarding the axial CT plane.ResultsNinety-one percent of the biopsies were diagnostic. All therapeutic interventions were technically successful. Targeting precision was high with a mean distance of the needle tip from planned target of 1.98 mm. Mean intervention time was 1:12 h. A statistically significant correlation between angular needle deviation and intervention time (p = 0.007), respiratory movement of the target (p = 0.008), and body mass index (p = 0.02) was detected. None of the evaluated parameters correlated significantly with the distance from the needle tip to the planned target.ConclusionsThe application of a navigation system for complex CT-guided procedures provided safe and effective targeting within a reasonable intervention time in our series.

  15. Material Science Image Analysis using Quant-CT in ImageJ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ushizima, Daniela M.; Bianchi, Andrea G. C.; DeBianchi, Christina; Bethel, E. Wes

    2015-01-05

    We introduce a computational analysis workflow to access properties of solid objects using nondestructive imaging techniques that rely on X-ray imaging. The goal is to process and quantify structures from material science sample cross sections. The algorithms can differentiate the porous media (high density material) from the void (background, low density media) using a Boolean classifier, so that we can extract features, such as volume, surface area, granularity spectrum, porosity, among others. Our workflow, Quant-CT, leverages several algorithms from ImageJ, such as statistical region merging and 3D object counter. It also includes schemes for bilateral filtering that use a 3D kernel, for parallel processing of sub-stacks, and for handling over-segmentation using histogram similarities. The Quant-CT supports fast user interaction, providing the ability for the user to train the algorithm via subsamples to feed its core algorithms with automated parameterization. Quant-CT plugin is currently available for testing by personnel at the Advanced Light Source and Earth Sciences Divisions and Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC), LBNL, as part of their research on porous materials. The goal is to understand the processes in fluid-rock systems for the geologic sequestration of CO2, and to develop technology for the safe storage of CO2 in deep subsurface rock formations. We describe our implementation, and demonstrate our plugin on porous material images. This paper targets end-users, with relevant information for developers to extend its current capabilities.

  16. Quality assurance for image-guided radiation therapy utilizing CT-based technologies: A report of the AAPM TG-179

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Balter, Peter A.; Dong Lei; Langen, Katja M.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Miften, Moyed; Moseley, Douglas J.; Pouliot, Jean; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Yoo, Sua

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Commercial CT-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) systems allow widespread management of geometric variations in patient setup and internal organ motion. This document provides consensus recommendations for quality assurance protocols that ensure patient safety and patient treatment fidelity for such systems. Methods: The AAPM TG-179 reviews clinical implementation and quality assurance aspects for commercially available CT-based IGRT, each with their unique capabilities and underlying physics. The systems described are kilovolt and megavolt cone-beam CT, fan-beam MVCT, and CT-on-rails. A summary of the literature describing current clinical usage is also provided. Results: This report proposes a generic quality assurance program for CT-based IGRT systems in an effort to provide a vendor-independent program for clinical users. Published data from long-term, repeated quality control tests form the basis of the proposed test frequencies and tolerances.Conclusion: A program for quality control of CT-based image-guidance systems has been produced, with focus on geometry, image quality, image dose, system operation, and safety. Agreement and clarification with respect to reports from the AAPM TG-101, TG-104, TG-142, and TG-148 has been addressed.

  17. The effects of gantry tilt on breast dose and image noise in cardiac CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Michael E.; Gandhi, Diksha; Schmidt, Taly Gilat; Stevens, Grant M.; Foley, W. Dennis

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This study investigated the effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on image noise and glandular breast dose in females during cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans. Reducing the dose to glandular breast tissue is important due to its high radiosensitivity and limited diagnostic significance in cardiac CT scans.Methods: Tilted-gantry acquisition was investigated through computer simulations and experimental measurements. Upon IRB approval, eight voxelized phantoms were constructed from previously acquired cardiac CT datasets. Monte Carlo simulations quantified the dose deposited in glandular breast tissue over a range of tilt angles. The effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on breast dose were measured on a clinical CT scanner (CT750HD, GE Healthcare) using an anthropomorphic phantom with MOSFET dosimeters in the breast regions. In both simulations and experiments, scans were performed at gantry tilt angles of 0°–30°, in 5° increments. The percent change in breast dose was calculated relative to the nontilted scan for all tilt angles. The percent change in noise standard deviation due to gantry tilt was calculated in all reconstructed simulated and experimental images.Results: Tilting the gantry reduced the breast dose in all simulated and experimental phantoms, with generally greater dose reduction at increased gantry tilts. For example, at 30° gantry tilt, the dosimeters located in the superior, middle, and inferior breast regions measured dose reductions of 74%, 61%, and 9%, respectively. The simulations estimated 0%–30% total breast dose reduction across the eight phantoms and range of tilt angles. However, tilted-gantry acquisition also increased the noise standard deviation in the simulated phantoms by 2%–50% due to increased pathlength through the iodine-filled heart. The experimental phantom, which did not contain iodine in the blood, demonstrated decreased breast dose and decreased noise at all gantry tilt angles.Conclusions: Tilting the gantry reduced the dose to the breast, while also increasing noise standard deviation. Overall, the noise increase outweighed the dose reduction for the eight voxelized phantoms, suggesting that tilted gantry acquisition may not be beneficial for reducing breast dose while maintaining image quality.

  18. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Zhao Yunzhe; Huang Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Zhu Chun; Miao Jianwei; Mao Yu; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Osher, Stanley J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. Methods: EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Results: Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest scanner flux setting of 39 mAs produce comparable image quality, resolution, and contrast relative to FBP with the 140 mAs flux setting. Compared to the algebraic reconstruction technique and the expectation maximization statistical reconstruction algorithm, a significant reduction in computation time is achieved with EST. Finally, numerical experiments on helical cone-beam CT data suggest that the combination of EST and ASSR produces reconstructions with higher image quality and lower noise than the Feldkamp Davis and Kress (FDK) method and the conventional ASSR approach. Conclusions: A Fourier-based iterative method has been applied to the reconstruction of fan-bean CT data with reduced x-ray fluence. This method incorporates advantageous features in both real and Fourier space iterative schemes: using a fast and algebraically exact method to calculate forward projection, enforcing the measured data in Fourier space, and applying physical constraints and flexible regularization in real space. Our results suggest that EST can be utilized for radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT via the readily implementable technique of lowering mAs settings. Numerical experiments further indicate that EST requires less computation time than several other iterative algorithms and can, in principle, be extended to helical cone-beam geometry in combination with the ASSR method.

  19. MO-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: Imaging: CT Dose Optimization Technologies I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denison, K; Smith, S

    2014-06-15

    Partners in Solutions is an exciting new program in which AAPM partners with our vendors to present practical hands-on information about the equipment and software systems that we use in our clinics. The imaging topic this year is CT scanner dose optimization capabilities. Note that the sessions are being held in a special purpose room built on the Exhibit Hall Floor, to encourage further interaction with the vendors. Dose Optimization Capabilities of GE Computed Tomography Scanners Presentation Time: 11:15 11:45 AM GE Healthcare is dedicated to the delivery of high quality clinical images through the development of technologies, which optimize the application of ionizing radiation. In computed tomography, dose management solutions fall into four categories: employs projection data and statistical modeling to decrease noise in the reconstructed image - creating an opportunity for mA reduction in the acquisition of diagnostic images. Veo represents true Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBiR). Using high-level algorithms in tandem with advanced computing power, Veo enables lower pixel noise standard deviation and improved spatial resolution within a single image. Advanced Adaptive Image Filters allow for maintenance of spatial resolution while reducing image noise. Examples of adaptive image space filters include Neuro 3-D filters and Cardiac Noise Reduction Filters. AutomA adjusts mA along the z-axis and is the CT equivalent of auto exposure control in conventional x-ray systems. Dynamic Z-axis Tracking offers an additional opportunity for dose reduction in helical acquisitions while SmartTrack Z-axis Tracking serves to ensure beam, collimator and detector alignment during tube rotation. SmartmA provides angular mA modulation. ECG Helical Modulation reduces mA during the systolic phase of the heart cycle. SmartBeam optimization uses bowtie beam-shaping hardware and software to filter off-axis x-rays - minimizing dose and reducing x-ray scatter. The DICOM Radiation Dose Structured Report (RDSR) generates a dose report at the conclusion of every examination. Dose Check preemptively notifies CT operators when scan parameters exceed user-defined dose thresholds. DoseWatch is an information technology application providing vendor-agnostic dose tracking and analysis for CT (and all other diagnostic x-ray modalities) SnapShot Pulse improves coronary CTA dose management. VolumeShuttle uses two acquisitions to increase coverage, decrease dose, and conserve on contrast administration. Color-Coding for Kids applies the Broselow-Luten Pediatric System to facilitate pediatric emergency care and reduce medical errors. FeatherLight achieves dose optimization through pediatric procedure-based protocols. Adventure Series scanners provide a child-friendly imaging environment promoting patient cooperation with resultant reduction in retakes and patient motion. Philips CT Dose Optimization Tools and Advanced Reconstruction Presentation Time: 11:45 12:15 PM The first part of the talk will cover Dose Reduction and Dose Optimization Technologies present in Philips CT Scanners. The main Technologies to be presented include: DoseRight and tube current modulation (DoseRight, Z-DOM, 3D-DOM, DoseRight Cardiac) Special acquisition modes Beam filtration and beam shapers Eclipse collimator and ClearRay collimator NanoPanel detector DoseRight will cover automatic tube current selection that automatically adjusts the dose for the individual patient. The presentation will explore the modulation techniques currently employed in Philips CT scanners and will include the algorithmic concepts as well as illustrative examples. Modulation and current selection technologies to be covered include the Automatic Current Selection component of DoseRight, ZDOM longitudinal dose modulation, 3D-DOM (combination of longitudinal and rotational dose modulation), Cardiac Dose right (an ECG based dose modulation scheme), and the DoseRight Index (DRI) IQ index. The special acquisition modes covers acquisition techniques such as prospective gating that

  20. Development of a dynamic quality assurance testing protocol for multisite clinical trial DCE-CT accreditation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driscoll, B.; Keller, H.; Jaffray, D.; Coolens, C.; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2; Techna Institute, University Health Network, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L5

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Credentialing can have an impact on whether or not a clinical trial produces useful quality data that is comparable between various institutions and scanners. With the recent increase of dynamic contrast enhanced-computed tomography (DCE-CT) usage as a companion biomarker in clinical trials, effective quality assurance, and control methods are required to ensure there is minimal deviation in the results between different scanners and protocols at various institutions. This paper attempts to address this problem by utilizing a dynamic flow imaging phantom to develop and evaluate a DCE-CT quality assurance (QA) protocol.Methods: A previously designed flow phantom, capable of producing predictable and reproducible time concentration curves from contrast injection was fully validated and then utilized to design a DCE-CT QA protocol. The QA protocol involved a set of quantitative metrics including injected and total mass error, as well as goodness of fit comparison to the known truth concentration curves. An additional region of interest (ROI) sensitivity analysis was also developed to provide additional details on intrascanner variability and determine appropriate ROI sizes for quantitative analysis. Both the QA protocol and ROI sensitivity analysis were utilized to test variations in DCE-CT results using different imaging parameters (tube voltage and current) as well as alternate reconstruction methods and imaging techniques. The developed QA protocol and ROI sensitivity analysis was then applied at three institutions that were part of clinical trial involving DCE-CT and results were compared.Results: The inherent specificity of robustness of the phantom was determined through calculation of the total intraday variability and determined to be less than 2.2 1.1% (total calculated output contrast mass error) with a goodness of fit (R{sup 2}) of greater than 0.99 0.0035 (n= 10). The DCE-CT QA protocol was capable of detecting significant deviations from the expected phantom result when scanning at low mAs and low kVp in terms of quantitative metrics (Injected Mass Error 15.4%), goodness of fit (R{sup 2}) of 0.91, and ROI sensitivity (increase in minimum input function ROI radius by 146 86%). These tests also confirmed that the ASIR reconstruction process was beneficial in reducing noise without substantially increasing partial volume effects and that vendor specific modes (e.g., axial shuttle) did not significantly affect the phantom results. The phantom and QA protocol were finally able to quickly (<90 min) and successfully validate the DCE-CT imaging protocol utilized at the three separate institutions of a multicenter clinical trial; thereby enhancing the confidence in the patient data collected.Conclusions: A DCE QA protocol was developed that, in combination with a dynamic multimodality flow phantom, allows the intrascanner variability to be separated from other sources of variability such as the impact of injection protocol and ROI selection. This provides a valuable resource that can be utilized at various clinical trial institutions to test conformance with imaging protocols and accuracy requirements as well as ensure that the scanners are performing as expected for dynamic scans.

  1. Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) Code Verification and Validation Data Standards and Requirements: Fluid Dynamics Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Weirs; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01

    V&V and UQ are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of M&S and, hence, to establish confidence in M&S. Though other industries are establishing standards and requirements for the performance of V&V and UQ, at present, the nuclear industry has not established such standards or requirements. However, the nuclear industry is beginning to recognize that such standards are needed and that the resources needed to support V&V and UQ will be very significant. In fact, no single organization has sufficient resources or expertise required to organize, conduct and maintain a comprehensive V&V and UQ program. What is needed is a systematic and standardized approach to establish and provide V&V and UQ resources at a national or even international level, with a consortium of partners from government, academia and industry. Specifically, what is needed is a structured and cost-effective knowledge base that collects, evaluates and stores verification and validation data, and shows how it can be used to perform V&V and UQ, leveraging collaboration and sharing of resources to support existing engineering and licensing procedures as well as science-based V&V and UQ processes. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base to provide V&V and UQ resources for M&S for nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear power. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors.

  2. Radiation-induced refraction artifacts in the optical CT readout of polymer gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Warren G.; Jirasek, Andrew; Wells, Derek M.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to demonstrate imaging artifacts that can occur during the optical computed tomography (CT) scanning of polymer gel dosimeters due to radiation-induced refractive index (RI) changes in polyacrylamide gels. Methods: A 1 L cylindrical polyacrylamide gel dosimeter was irradiated with 3 3 cm{sup 2} square beams of 6 MV photons. A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner was used to image the dosimeter. Investigative optical CT scans were performed to examine two types of rayline bending: (i) bending within the plane of the fan-beam and (ii) bending out the plane of the fan-beam. To address structured errors, an iterative SavitzkyGolay (ISG) filtering routine was designed to filter 2D projections in sinogram space. For comparison, 2D projections were alternatively filtered using an adaptive-mean (AM) filter. Results: In-plane rayline bending was most notably observed in optical CT projections where rays of the fan-beam confronted a sustained dose gradient that was perpendicular to their trajectory but within the fan-beam plane. These errors caused distinct streaking artifacts in image reconstructions due to the refraction of higher intensity rays toward more opaque regions of the dosimeter. Out-of-plane rayline bending was observed in slices of the dosimeter that featured dose gradients perpendicular to the plane of the fan-beam. These errors caused widespread, severe overestimations of dose in image reconstructions due to the higher-than-actual opacity that is perceived by the scanner when light is bent off of the detector array. The ISG filtering routine outperformed AM filtering for both in-plane and out-of-plane rayline errors caused by radiation-induced RI changes. For in-plane rayline errors, streaks in an irradiated region (>7 Gy) were as high as 49% for unfiltered data, 14% for AM, and 6% for ISG. For out-of-plane rayline errors, overestimations of dose in a low-dose region (?50 cGy) were as high as 13 Gy for unfiltered data, 10 Gy for AM, and 3.1 Gy for ISG. The ISG routine also addressed unrelated artifacts that previously needed to be manually removed in sinogram space. However, the ISG routine blurred reconstructions, causing losses in spatial resolution of ?5 mm in the plane of the fan-beam and ?8 mm perpendicular to the fan-beam. Conclusions: This paper reveals a new category of imaging artifacts that can affect the optical CT readout of polyacrylamide gel dosimeters. Investigative scans show that radiation-induced RI changes can cause significant rayline errors when rays confront a prolonged dose gradient that runs perpendicular to their trajectory. In fan-beam optical CT, these errors manifested in two ways: (1) distinct streaking artifacts caused by in-plane rayline bending and (2) severe overestimations of opacity caused by rays bending out of the fan-beam plane and missing the detector array. Although the ISG filtering routine mitigated these errors better than an adaptive-mean filtering routine, it caused unacceptable losses in spatial resolution.

  3. On two-parameter models of photon cross sections: Application to dual-energy CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Li Sicong; Devic, Slobodan; Whiting, Bruce R.; Lerma, Fritz A.

    2006-11-15

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the theoretically achievable accuracy in estimating photon cross sections at low energies (20-1000 keV) from idealized dual-energy x-ray computed tomography (CT) images. Cross-section estimation from dual-energy measurements requires a model that can accurately represent photon cross sections of any biological material as a function of energy by specifying only two characteristic parameters of the underlying material, e.g., effective atomic number and density. This paper evaluates the accuracy of two commonly used two-parameter cross-section models for postprocessing idealized measurements derived from dual-energy CT images. The parametric fit model (PFM) accounts for electron-binding effects and photoelectric absorption by power functions in atomic number and energy and scattering by the Klein-Nishina cross section. The basis-vector model (BVM) assumes that attenuation coefficients of any biological substance can be approximated by a linear combination of mass attenuation coefficients of two dissimilar basis substances. Both PFM and BVM were fit to a modern cross-section library for a range of elements and mixtures representative of naturally occurring biological materials (Z=2-20). The PFM model, in conjunction with the effective atomic number approximation, yields estimated the total linear cross-section estimates with mean absolute and maximum error ranges of 0.6%-2.2% and 1%-6%, respectively. The corresponding error ranges for BVM estimates were 0.02%-0.15% and 0.1%-0.5%. However, for photoelectric absorption frequency, the PFM absolute mean and maximum errors were 10.8%-22.4% and 29%-50%, compared with corresponding BVM errors of 0.4%-11.3% and 0.5%-17.0%, respectively. Both models were found to exhibit similar sensitivities to image-intensity measurement uncertainties. Of the two models, BVM is the most promising approach for realizing dual-energy CT cross-section measurement.

  4. Measurement of bow tie profiles in CT scanners using a real-time dosimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiting, Bruce R.; Evans, Joshua D.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Dohatcu, Andreea C.; Politte, David G.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Several areas of computed tomography (CT) research require knowledge about the intensity profile of the x-ray fan beam that is introduced by a bow tie filter. This information is considered proprietary by CT manufacturers, so noninvasive measurement methods are required. One method using real-time dosimeters has been proposed in the literature. A commercially available dosimeter was used to apply that method, and analysis techniques were developed to extract fan beam profiles from measurements. Methods: A real-time ion chamber was placed near the periphery of an empty CT gantry and the dose rate versus time waveform was recorded as the x-ray source rotated about the isocenter. In contrast to previously proposed analysis methods that assumed a pointlike detector, the finite-size ion chamber received varying amounts of coverage by the collimated x-ray beam during rotation, precluding a simple relationship between the source intensity as a function of fan beam angle and measured intensity. A two-parameter model for measurement intensity was developed that included both effective collimation width and source-to-detector distance, which then was iteratively solved to minimize the error between duplicate measurements at corresponding fan beam angles, allowing determination of the fan beam profile from measured dose-rate waveforms. Measurements were performed on five different scanner systems while varying parameters such as collimation, kVp, and bow tie filters. On one system, direct measurements of the bow tie profile were collected for comparison with the real-time dosimeter technique. Results: The data analysis method for a finite-size detector was found to produce a fan beam profile estimate with a relative error between duplicate measurement intensities of <5%. It was robust over a wide range of collimation widths (e.g., 1–40 mm), producing fan beam profiles that agreed with a relative error of 1%–5%. Comparison with a direct measurement technique on one system produced agreement with a relative error of 2%–6%. Fan beam profiles were found to differ for different filter types on a given system and between different vendors. Conclusions: A commercially available real-time dosimeter probe was found to be a convenient and accurate instrument for measuring fan beam profiles. An analysis method was developed that could handle a wide range of collimation widths by explicitly considering the finite width of the ion chamber. Relative errors in the profiles were found to be less than 5%. Measurements of five different clinical scanners demonstrate the variation in bow tie designs, indicating that generic bow tie models will not be adequate for CT system research.

  5. Implementation and commissioning of an integrated micro-CT/RT system with computerized independent jaw collimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael D.; Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Jung, Jongho A.; Holdsworth, David W.; Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7; Department of Surgery, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 ; Drangova, Maria; Chen, Jeff; Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7; Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 ; Wong, Eugene; Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7; Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7; Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To design, construct, and commission a set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system to perform conformal image-guided small animal radiotherapy.Methods: The authors designed and evaluated a system of custom-built motorized orthogonal jaws, which allows the delivery of off-axis rectangular fields on a GE eXplore CT 120 preclinical imaging system. The jaws in the x direction are independently driven, while the y-direction jaws are symmetric. All motors have backup encoders, verifying jaw positions. Mechanical performance of the jaws was characterized. Square beam profiles ranging from 2 2 to 60 60 mm{sup 2} were measured using EBT2 film in the center of a 70 70 22 mm{sup 3} solid water block. Similarly, absolute depth dose was measured in a solid water and EBT2 film stack 50 50 50 mm{sup 3}. A calibrated Farmer ion chamber in a 70 70 20 mm{sup 3} solid water block was used to measure the output of three field sizes: 50 50, 40 40, and 30 30 mm{sup 2}. Elliptical target plans were delivered to films to assess overall system performance. Respiratory-gated treatment was implemented on the system and initially proved using a simple sinusoidal motion phantom. All films were scanned on a flatbed scanner (Epson 1000XL) and converted to dose using a fitted calibration curve. A Monte Carlo beam model of the micro-CT with the jaws has been created using BEAMnrc for comparison with the measurements. An example image-guided partial lung irradiation in a rat is demonstrated.Results: The averaged random error of positioning each jaw is less than 0.1 mm. Relative output factors measured with the ion chamber agree with Monte Carlo simulations within 2%. Beam profiles and absolute depth dose curves measured from the films agree with simulations within measurement uncertainty. Respiratory-gated treatments applied to a phantom moving with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 5 mm showed improved beam penumbra (80%20%) from 3.9 to 0.8 mm.Conclusions: A set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system were constructed with position reliably better than a tenth of a millimeter. The hardware system is ready for image-guided conformal radiotherapy for small animals with capability of respiratory-gated delivery.

  6. Model-based PSF and MTF estimation and validation from skeletal clinical CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakdel, Amirreza; Mainprize, James G.; Robert, Normand; Fialkov, Jeffery; Whyne, Cari M.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: A method was developed to correct for systematic errors in estimating the thickness of thin bones due to image blurring in CT images using bone interfaces to estimate the point-spread-function (PSF). This study validates the accuracy of the PSFs estimated using said method from various clinical CT images featuring cortical bones. Methods: Gaussian PSFs, characterized by a different extent in the z (scan) direction than in the x and y directions were obtained using our method from 11 clinical CT scans of a cadaveric craniofacial skeleton. These PSFs were estimated for multiple combinations of scanning parameters and reconstruction methods. The actual PSF for each scan setting was measured using the slanted-slit technique within the image slice plane and the longitudinal axis. The Gaussian PSF and the corresponding modulation transfer function (MTF) are compared against the actual PSF and MTF for validation. Results: The differences (errors) between the actual and estimated full-width half-max (FWHM) of the PSFs were 0.09 0.05 and 0.14 0.11 mm for the xy and z axes, respectively. The overall errors in the predicted frequencies measured at 75%, 50%, 25%, 10%, and 5% MTF levels were 0.06 0.07 and 0.06 0.04 cycles/mm for the xy and z axes, respectively. The accuracy of the estimates was dependent on whether they were reconstructed with a standard kernel (Toshiba's FC68, mean error of 0.06 0.05 mm, MTF mean error 0.02 0.02 cycles/mm) or a high resolution bone kernel (Toshiba's FC81, PSF FWHM error 0.12 0.03 mm, MTF mean error 0.09 0.08 cycles/mm). Conclusions: The method is accurate in 3D for an image reconstructed using a standard reconstruction kernel, which conforms to the Gaussian PSF assumption but less accurate when using a high resolution bone kernel. The method is a practical and self-contained means of estimating the PSF in clinical CT images featuring cortical bones, without the need phantoms or any prior knowledge about the scanner-specific parameters.

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Preferred Builders, Old Greenwich, CT, Custom

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Old Greenwich, CT, that scored HERS 42 without PV or HERS 20 with PV. This 2,700-square-foot custom home has advanced framed walls with R-24 blown cellulose plus R-7.5 EPS rigid foam, membrane-coated OSB, a closed-cell spray foamed attic, R-13 closed-cell spray foam under the slab and on basement walls, an ERV, and a gas boiler for forced air and radiant floor heat.

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: BPC Green Builders, New Fairfield, CT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BPC Green Builders New Fairfi eld, CT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to give you

  9. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Taft School, Watertown, CT

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Taft School Watertown, CT DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to give you

  10. Extraordinary luminous soft X-ray transient MAXI J0158744 as an ignition of a nova on a very massive O-Ne white dwarf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morii, M.; Serino, M.; Mihara, T.; Sugizaki, M.; Tomida, H.; Kimura, M.; Nakahira, S.; Suwa, F.; Negoro, H.; Kennea, J. A.; Pritchard, T.; Page, K. L.; Osborne, J. P.; Curran, P. A.; Walter, F. M.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Hiroi, K.; Usui, R.; Kawai, N.; Gehrels, N.; and others

    2013-12-20

    We present the observation of an extraordinary luminous soft X-ray transient, MAXI J0158744, by the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) on 2011 November 11. This transient is characterized by a soft X-ray spectrum, a short duration (1.3 10{sup 3} s < ?T{sub d} < 1.10 10{sup 4} s), a rapid rise (<5.5 10{sup 3} s), and a huge peak luminosity of 2 10{sup 40} erg s{sup 1} in 0.7-7.0 keV band. With Swift observations and optical spectroscopy from the Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System, we confirmed that the transient is a nova explosion, on a white dwarf in a binary with a Be star, located near the Small Magellanic Cloud. An early turn-on of the super-soft X-ray source (SSS) phase (<0.44 days), the short SSS phase duration of about one month, and a 0.92 keV neon emission line found in the third MAXI scan, 1296 s after the first detection, suggest that the explosion involves a small amount of ejecta and is produced on an unusually massive O-Ne white dwarf close to, or possibly over, the Chandrasekhar limit. We propose that the huge luminosity detected with MAXI was due to the fireball phase, a direct manifestation of the ignition of the thermonuclear runaway process in a nova explosion.

  11. Production of cold beams of ND{sub 3} with variable rotational state distributions by electrostatic extraction of He and Ne buffer-gas-cooled beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twyman, Kathryn S.; Bell, Martin T.; Heazlewood, Brianna R.; Softley, Timothy P.

    2014-07-14

    The measurement of the rotational state distribution of a velocity-selected, buffer-gas-cooled beam of ND{sub 3} is described. In an apparatus recently constructed to study cold ion-molecule collisions, the ND{sub 3} beam is extracted from a cryogenically cooled buffer-gas cell using a 2.15 m long electrostatic quadrupole guide with three 90 bends. (2+1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of molecules exiting the guide show that beams of ND{sub 3} can be produced with rotational state populations corresponding to approximately T{sub rot} = 918 K, achieved through manipulation of the temperature of the buffer-gas cell (operated at 6 K or 17 K), the identity of the buffer gas (He or Ne), or the relative densities of the buffer gas and ND{sub 3}. The translational temperature of the guided ND{sub 3} is found to be similar in a 6 K helium and 17 K neon buffer-gas cell (peak kinetic energies of 6.92(0.13) K and 5.90(0.01) K, respectively). The characterization of this cold-molecule source provides an opportunity for the first experimental investigations into the rotational dependence of reaction cross sections in low temperature collisions.

  12. SU-E-T-99: Design and Development of Isocenter Parameter System for CT Simulation Laser Based On DICOM RT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In order to receive DICOM files from treatment planning system and generate patient isocenter positioning parameter file for CT laser system automatically, this paper presents a method for communication with treatment planning system and calculation of isocenter parameter for each radiation field. Methods: Coordinate transformation and laser positioning file formats were analyzed, isocenter parameter was calculated via data from DICOM CT Data and DICOM RTPLAN file. An in-house software-DicomGenie was developed based on the object-oriented program platform-Qt with DCMTK SDK (Germany OFFIS company DICOM SDK) . DicomGenie was tested for accuracy using Philips CT simulation plan system (Tumor LOC, Philips) and A2J CT positioning laser system (Thorigny Sur Marne, France). Results: DicomGenie successfully established DICOM communication between treatment planning system, DICOM files were received by DicomGenie and patient laser isocenter information was generated accurately. Patient laser parameter data files can be used for for CT laser system directly. Conclusion: In-house software DicomGenie received and extracted DICOM data, isocenter laser positioning data files were created by DicomGenie and can be use for A2J laser positioning system.

  13. Application of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to silica diagenesis: The opal-A to opal-CT transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, S.B.; Freund, H.; Huang, W.L.; Clouse, J.A.; Isaacs, C.M.

    1995-10-02

    An important goal in silica diagenesis research is to understand the kinetics of opal transformation from noncrystalline opal-A to the disordered silica polymorph opal-CT. Because the conventional technique for monitoring the transformation, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), is applicable only to phases with long-range order, the authors used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to monitor the transformation. They applied this technique, combined with XRD and TEM, to experimental run products and natural opals from the Monterey Formation and from siliceous deposits in the western Pacific Ocean. Using a ratio of two infrared absorption intensities ({omega} = I{sub 472 cm{sup {minus}1}}/I{sub 500 cm{sup {minus}1}}), the relative proportions of opal-A and opal-CT can be determined. The progress of the transformation is marked by changes in slope of {omega} vs. depth or time when a sufficient stratigraphic profile is available. There are three stages in the opal-A to opal-CT reaction: (1) opal-A dissolution; (2) opal-CT precipitation, whose end point is marked by completion of opal-A dissolution; and (3) opal-CT ordering, during which tridymite stacking is eliminated in favor of crystobalite stacking.

  14. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP...

  15. SU-E-J-214: Comparative Assessment On IGRT On Partial Bladder Cancer Treatment Between CT-On-Rails (CTOR) and KV Cone Beam CT (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, T; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-Guided radiation therapy(IGRT) depends on reliable online patient-specific anatomy information to address random and progressive anatomy changes. Large margins have been suggested to bladder cancer treatment due to large daily bladder anatomy variation. KV Cone beam CT(CBCT) has been used in IGRT localization prevalently; however, its lack of soft tissue contrast makes clinicians hesitate to perform daily soft tissue alignment with CBCT for partial bladder cancer treatment. This study compares the localization uncertainties of bladder cancer IGRT using CTon- Rails(CTOR) and CBCT. Methods: Three T2N0M0 bladder cancer patients (total of 66 Gy to partial bladder alone) were localized daily with either CTOR or CBCT for their entire treatment course. A total of 71 sets of CTOR and 22 sets of CBCT images were acquired and registered with original planning CT scans by radiation therapists and approved by radiation oncologists for the daily treatment. CTOR scanning entailed 2mm slice thickness, 0.98mm axial voxel size, 120kVp and 240mAs. CBCT used a half fan pelvis protocol from Varian OBI system with 2mm slice thickness, 0.98axial voxel size, 125kVp, and 680mAs. Daily localization distribution was compared. Accuracy of CTOR and CBCT on partial bladder alignment was also evaluated by comparing bladder PTV coverage. Results: 1cm all around PTV margins were used in every patient except target superior limit margin to 0mm due to bowel constraint. Daily shifts on CTOR averaged to 0.48, 0.24, 0.19 mms(SI,Lat,AP directions); CBCT averaged to 0.43, 0.09, 0.19 mms(SI,Lat,AP directions). The CTOR daily localization showed superior results of V100% of PTV(102% CTOR vs. 89% CBCT) and bowel(Dmax 69.5Gy vs. 78Gy CBCT). CTOR images showed much higher contrast on bladder PTV alignment. Conclusion: CTOR daily localization for IGRT is more dosimetrically beneficial for partial bladder cancer treatment than kV CBCT localization and provided better soft tissue PTV identification.

  16. Active investigation of material damage under load using micro-CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navalgund, Megha Mishra, Debasish; Manoharan, V.; Zunjarrao, Suraj

    2015-03-31

    Due the growth of composite materials across multiple industries such as Aviation, Wind there is an increasing need to not just standardize and improve manufacturing processes but also to design these materials for the specific applications. One of the things that this translates to is understanding how failure initiates and grows in these materials and at what loads, especially around internal flaws such as voids or features such as ply drops. Traditional methods of investigating internal damage such as CT lack the resolution to resolve ply level damage in composites. Interrupted testing with layer removal can be used to investigate internal damage using microscopy; however this is a destructive method. Advanced techniques such as such as DIC are useful for in-situ damage detection, however are limited to surface information and would not enable interrogating the volume. Computed tomography has become a state of the art technique for metrology and complete volumetric investigation especially for metallic components. However, its application to the composite world is still nascent. This paper demonstrates micro-CTs capability as a gauge to quantitatively estimate the extent of damage and understand the propagation of damage in PMC composites while the component is under stress.

  17. Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoretti, Nicolas Huwart, Laurent

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

  18. SU-C-18A-05: Registration Accuracy of MR-Based Images to On-Board Megavoltage Cone-Beam CT for Brain Patient Setup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinnaduwage, D S; Chen, J; Descovich, M; Pouliot, J; Hwang, Ken-Ping

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the difference in isocenter shifts when co-registering MR and MR-based pseudo CTs (pCT) with on-board megavoltage conebeam CT (CBCT) images. Methods: Fast Spoiled Gradient Echo MRs were used to generate pCTs (research version of Advantage Sim MD, GE Healthcare) for ten patients who had prior brain radiotherapy. The planning CT (rCT) for each was co-registered with the MR, and the plan isocenter and two other reference points were transferred to the MR and pCT. CBCT images (with the machine isocenter) from a single treatment day were coregistered with the 3 test images (MR, pCT and rCT), by two observers and by an automated registration algorithm. The reference points were used to calculate patient shifts and rotations from the registrations. The shifts calculated from the test image registrations were compared to each other and to the shifts performed by the therapists who treated the patients on that day. Results: The average difference in absolute value between the isocenter shifts from the MR-, pCT- and rCT-CBCT registrations, and the therapist shifts, were 2.02, 3.01 and 0.89 mm (craniocaudal), 1.14, 1.34 and 0.46 mm (lateral), and 1.37, 3.43 and 1.43 mm (vertical), respectively. The MR- and pCT-CBCT registrations differed by 1.99, and 2.53 mm (craniocaudal), 1.36, and 1.37 mm (lateral), and 0.74 and 2.34 mm (vertical), respectively, from the average rCT-CBCT shifts. On average, differences of 2.39 (craniocaudal), 1.28 (lateral) and 2.84 mm (vertical) were seen between the MR and pCT shifts. Rotations relative to the CBCT coordinate system were on average <2 for the MR and rCT, and <6 for the pCT. Conclusion: In this study, FSPGR MR-CBCT registrations were more precise compared to the pCT-CBCT registrations. For improved accuracy, MR sequences that are optimal for bony anatomy visualization are necessary. GE healthcare has provided a research version of Advantage Sim MD to UCSF. No financial support was provided.

  19. SU-E-I-25: Determining Tube Current, Tube Voltage and Pitch Suitable for Low- Dose Lung Screening CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K; Matthews, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The quality of a computed tomography (CT) image and the dose delivered during its acquisition depend upon the acquisition parameters used. Tube current, tube voltage, and pitch are acquisition parameters that potentially affect image quality and dose. This study investigated physicians' abilities to characterize small, solid nodules in low-dose CT images for combinations of current, voltage and pitch, for three CT scanner models. Methods: Lung CT images was acquired of a Data Spectrum anthropomorphic torso phantom with various combinations of pitch, tube current, and tube voltage; this phantom was used because acrylic beads of various sizes could be placed within the lung compartments to simulate nodules. The phantom was imaged on two 16-slice scanners and a 64-slice scanner. The acquisition parameters spanned a range of estimated CTDI levels; the CTDI estimates from the acquisition software were verified by measurement. Several experienced radiologists viewed the phantom lung CT images and noted nodule location, size and shape, as well as the acceptability of overall image quality. Results: Image quality for assessment of nodules was deemed unsatisfactory for all scanners at 80 kV (any tube current) and at 35 mA (any tube voltage). Tube current of 50 mA or more at 120 kV resulted in similar assessments from all three scanners. Physician-measured sphere diameters were closer to actual diameters for larger spheres, higher tube current, and higher kV. Pitch influenced size measurements less for larger spheres than for smaller spheres. CTDI was typically overestimated by the scanner software compared to measurement. Conclusion: Based on this survey of acquisition parameters, a low-dose CT protocol of 120 kV, 50 mA, and pitch of 1.4 is recommended to balance patient dose and acceptable image quality. For three models of scanners, this protocol resulted in estimated CTDIs from 2.93.6 mGy.

  20. Quantum noise properties of CT images with anatomical textured backgrounds across reconstruction algorithms: FBP and SAFIRE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, Justin; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Quantum noise properties of CT images are generally assessed using simple geometric phantoms with uniform backgrounds. Such phantoms may be inadequate when assessing nonlinear reconstruction or postprocessing algorithms. The purpose of this study was to design anatomically informed textured phantoms and use the phantoms to assess quantum noise properties across two clinically available reconstruction algorithms, filtered back projection (FBP) and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE). Methods: Two phantoms were designed to represent lung and soft-tissue textures. The lung phantom included intricate vessel-like structures along with embedded nodules (spherical, lobulated, and spiculated). The soft tissue phantom was designed based on a three-dimensional clustered lumpy background with included low-contrast lesions (spherical and anthropomorphic). The phantoms were built using rapid prototyping (3D printing) technology and, along with a uniform phantom of similar size, were imaged on a Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash CT scanner and reconstructed with FBP and SAFIRE. Fifty repeated acquisitions were acquired for each background type and noise was assessed by estimating pixel-value statistics, such as standard deviation (i.e., noise magnitude), autocorrelation, and noise power spectrum. Noise stationarity was also assessed by examining the spatial distribution of noise magnitude. The noise properties were compared across background types and between the two reconstruction algorithms. Results: In FBP and SAFIRE images, noise was globally nonstationary for all phantoms. In FBP images of all phantoms, and in SAFIRE images of the uniform phantom, noise appeared to be locally stationary (within a reasonably small region of interest). Noise was locally nonstationary in SAFIRE images of the textured phantoms with edge pixels showing higher noise magnitude compared to pixels in more homogenous regions. For pixels in uniform regions, noise magnitude was reduced by an average of 60% in SAFIRE images compared to FBP. However, for edge pixels, noise magnitude ranged from 20% higher to 40% lower in SAFIRE images compared to FBP. SAFIRE images of the lung phantom exhibited distinct regions with varying noise texture (i.e., noise autocorrelation/power spectra). Conclusions: Quantum noise properties observed in uniform phantoms may not be representative of those in actual patients for nonlinear reconstruction algorithms. Anatomical texture should be considered when evaluating the performance of CT systems that use such nonlinear algorithms.