Sample records for ne oregon hatchery

  1. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Final Siting Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Montgomery

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  2. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Spring Chinook Master Plan, Technical Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashe, Becky L.; Concannon, Kathleen; Johnson, David B.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spring chinook salmon populations in the Imnaha and Grande Ronde rivers are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and are at high risk of extirpation. The Nez Perce Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, are co-managers of conservation/restoration programs for Imnaha and Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon that use hatchery supplementation and conventional and captive broodstock techniques. The immediate goal of these programs is to prevent extirpation and provide the potential for restoration once factors limiting production are addressed. These programs redirect production occurring under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) from mitigation to conservation and restoration. Both the Imnaha and Grande Ronde conservation/restoration programs are described in ESA Section 10 permit applications and the co-managers refer to the fish production from these programs as the Currently Permitted Program (CPP). Recently, co-managers have determined that it is impossible to produce the CPP at Lookingglass Hatchery, the LSRCP facility intended for production, and that without additional facilities, production must be cut from these conservation programs. Development of new facilities for these programs through the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program is considered a new production initiative by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) and requires a master plan. The master plan provides the NPPC, program proponents and others with the information they need to make sound decisions about whether the proposed facilities to restore salmon populations should move forward to design. This master plan describes alternatives considered to meet the facility needs of the CPP so the conservation program can be fully implemented. Co-managers considered three alternatives: modify Lookingglass Hatchery; use existing facilities elsewhere in the Basin; and use new facilities in conjunct ion with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. Each alternative was evaluated based on criteria developed for rearing fish for a conservation program. After this review, the Nez Perce Tribe determined the only alternative that meets the needs of the program is the alternative to use new facilities in conjunction with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. This is the Proposed Alternative. The Proposed Alternative would require: Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Imnaha River and modifications of the existing Gumboot facility to accommodate the Imnaha component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Lostine River to accommodate the Lostine component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; and Modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery to accommodate the Upper Grande Ronde and Catherine Creek components of the Lookingglass Hatchery production. After an extensive screening process of potential sites, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes the Marks Ranch site on the Imnaha River and the Lundquist site on the Lostine River for new facilities. Conceptual design and cost estimates of the proposed facilities are contained in this master plan. The proposed facilities on the Imnaha and Lostine rivers would be managed in conjunction with the existing adult collection and juvenile acclimation/release facilities. Because this master plan has evolved into an endeavor undertaken primarily by the Nez Perce Tribe, the focus of the document is on actions within the Imnaha and Lostine watersheds where the Nez Perce Tribe have specific co-management responsibilities. Nevertheless, modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery could make it possible to provide a quality rearing environment for the remainder of the CPP. The Nez Perce Tribe will assist co-managers in further evaluating facility needs and providing other components of the NPPC master planning process to develop a solution for the entire CPP. Although the fish production for the conservation programs is already authorized and not at issue in this master pla

  3. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Umatilla County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin.

  4. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin.

  5. Fish Research Project, Oregon : Evaluation of the Success of Supplementing Imnaha River Steelhead with Hatchery Reared Smolts: Phase One : Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, Richard W.; Whitesel, Timothy A.; Jonasson, Brian C.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two streams in the Imnaha River subbasin (Camp Creek and Little Sheep Creek) and eight streams in the Grande Ronde River subbasin (Catherine, Deer, Five Points, Fly, Indian, Lookingglass, Meadow, and Sheep creeks) were selected as study streams to evaluate the success and impacts of steelhead supplementation in northeast Oregon. The habitat of the study streams was inventoried to compare streams and to evaluate whether habitat might influence the performance parameters we will measure in the study. The mean fecundity of hatchery and natural steelhead 1-salts returning to Little Sheep Creek fish facility in 1990 and 1991 ranged from 3,550 to 4,663 eggs/female; the mean fecundity of hatchery and natural steelhead 2-salts ranged from 5,020 to 5,879 eggs/female. Variation in length explained 57% of the variation in fecundity of natural steelhead, but only 41% to 51% of the variation in fecundity of hatchery steelhead. Adult steelhead males had an average spermatocrit of 43.9% at spawning. We were also able to stain sperm cells so that viable cells could be distinguished from dead cells. Large, red disc tags may be the most useful for observing adults on the spawning grounds. The density of wild, juvenile steelhead ranged from 0 fish/l00{sup 2} to 35.1 (age-0) and 14.0 (age-1) fish/l00m{sup 2}. Evidence provided from the National Marine Fisheries Service suggests that hatchery and wild fish within a subbasin are genetically similar. The long-term experimental design is presented as a component of this report.

  6. Lynch Ferry Hatchery - Summer Steelhead, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, M.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Summer Steelhead). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of fall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead, and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  7. HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN Hatchery Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN (HGMP) Hatchery Program: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency-Arriving Summer/Fall Chinook 97 Table B.5 Tribal Incidental Take Thresholds for ESA-Listed 98 Upper Columbia River

  8. Hatchery Evaluation Report / Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Teams (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Montgomery

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Fall Chinook). The audit is being conducted as a requirement of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) ``Strategy for Salmon`` and the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Under the audit, the hatcheries are evaluated against policies and related performance measures developed by the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT). IHOT is a multi-agency group established by the NPPC to direct the development of new basinwide standards for managing and operating fish hatcheries. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  9. Hatchery Evaluation Report/Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Summer Steelhead : an Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Montgomery.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Summer Steelhead). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of tall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead, and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  10. Hatchery Evaluation Report/Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Spring Chinook : an Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Montgomery.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Spring Chinook). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of fall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead. and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  11. HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN Hatchery Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN (HGMP) Hatchery Program: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency Take Thresholds for ESA-Listed 44 Upper Columbia River Steelhead Table 4. Tribal & Recreational Incidental Take Thresholds 45 for Unmarked Spring Chinook Table 5. Estimated Carrying Capacity of Natural

  12. Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  13. Appendix 50 Creston National Fish Hatchery: Hatchery and Genetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to take individuals from wild stocks. 1.9) List of program "Performance Standards." 1. Provide predictable VERSION (HGMP-RF) Hatchery Program: Species or Hatchery Stock: Agency/Operator: Watershed and Region: Date Submitted: Date Last Updated: Hatchery Program: Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Mitigation

  14. ISAB 2001-3 Hatchery Surplus Letter -Page 1 Independent Scientific Advisory Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ISAB 2001-3 Hatchery Surplus Letter - Page 1 Independent Scientific Advisory Board Portland, Oregon 97204 ISAB@nwppc.org April 16, 2001 Dr. Usha Varanasi Science Director Northwest Fisheries Surplus Review Dear Dr. Varanasi: This letter is the ISAB's response to your January 29, 2001 request

  15. August 1993 INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    August 1993 INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM OPERATION PLANS FOR ANADROMOUS FISH PRODUCTION.S. Department of Energy, as part of BPA's program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected as follows: Shelldrake, Tom, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Hatcheries, Integrated Hatchery Operations Team

  16. anadromous salmonid hatcheries: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydraulic Engineer 2 INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM OPERATION PLANS FOR ANADROMOUS FISH Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants Websites Summary: INTEGRATED HATCHERY...

  17. Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  18. Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Policies and Procedures for Columbia Basin Anadromous Salmonid Hatcheries, 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (Northwest Power Planning Council, Portland, OR)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines regional policies and procedures for hatchery operations in the Columbia River Basin. The purpose of these policies is to provide regional guidelines by which all anadromous fish hatcheries will be operated. These policies will be adopted by the fisheries co-managers, and will provide guidance to operate hatcheries in an efficient and biologically sound manner. The hatchery policies presented in this manual are not intended to establish production priorities. Rather, the intent is to guide hatchery operations once production numbers are established. Hatchery operations discussed in this report include broodstock collection, spawning, incubation of eggs, fish rearing and feeding, fish release, equipment maintenance and operations, and personnel training. Decisions regarding production priorities must be provided by fishery managers through a comprehensive plan that addresses both natural and hatchery fish production. The Integrated Hatchery Operations Team is a multi-agency group called for by the Northwest Power Planning Council. This team was directed to develop new basinwide policies for managing and operating all existing and future anadromous fish hatcheries in the Columbia River Basin. The parties pledge to confer with each other and to use their authorities and resources to accomplish these mutually acceptable hatchery practices.

  19. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Redding, Jeremy (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2004, twenty-seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley. Traps on Redfish Lake Creek and the upper Salmon River at the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery intercepted one and four adults, respectively. Additionally, one adult sockeye salmon was collected at the East Fork Salmon River weir, 18 were seined from below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir, one adult sockeye salmon was observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir but not captured, and two adult sockeye salmon were observed in Little Redfish Lake but not captured. Fish were captured/collected between July 24 and September 14, 2004. The captured/collected adult sockeye salmon (12 females and 12 males) originated from a variety of release strategies and were transferred to Eagle Fish Hatchery on September 14, 2004 and later incorporated into hatchery spawn matrices. Nine anadromous females, 102 captive females from brood year 2001, and one captive female from brood year 2000 broodstock groups were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2004. Spawn pairings produced approximately 140,823 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 72.8%. Eyed-eggs (49,134), presmolts (130,716), smolts (96), and adults (241) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 2004. Reintroduction strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and five unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (Oxbow Fish Hatchery) facilities. Two of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2004 spawning design.

  20. Oxbow Fish Hatchery Snake River Sockeye Salmon Smolt Program, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banks, Duane D. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This contract proposal is in response to the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan/Update Proposed Action (UPA) associated with increasing the number of Snake River sockeye smolts by 150,000. To accomplish this proposal the cooperation and efforts of three government entities has been planned (e.g., Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)). Improvements at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery and NMFS Burley Creek Hatchery will focus on increasing sockeye salmon captive broodstock and egg production. Improvements at the ODFW Oxbow Fish Hatchery will be made to accommodate the incubation, hatching and rearing of 150,000 sockeye salmon smolts for release into Idaho's Sawtooth Valley, Upper Salmon River near IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and/or Redfish Lake Creek 1.4 km downstream of Redfish Lake. Modifications to Oxbow Fish Hatchery (ODFW) will include retro-fit existing pond drains so pond cleaning effluent water can be routed to the pollution abatement pond, and modifications to the abatement pond. Also included in this project as an added phase, was the rerouting of the hatchery building effluent water to meet state DEQ guidelines for the use of formalin to treat salmonid eggs. Some additional funding for the described Oxbow Hatchery modifications will come from Mitchell Act Funding. All personnel costs associated with this project will come from Mitchell Act funding. Due to heavy work load issues, being under staffed, and two emergency projects in the spring and summer of 2006, ODFW engineers were not able to complete all plans and get them out for bid in 2006. As a result of these circumstances retro-fitting pond drains and modifications to the abatement pond was carried over into fiscal year 2007-2008. A no cost time extension to the contract was approved by BPA. The format for this report will follow the standard format for Statement of Work Report (SOW), which includes sub-categories Work Element (WE), and within the WE the Milestone Titles.

  1. NE Pacific St. NE Pacific St.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake W ashington Ship Canal NE Pacific St. NE Pacific St. NE Boat St. 15th Ave NE 15thAveNE UniversityWayNE BrooklynAveNE NE Pacific St. MontlakeBlvdNE MontlakeBlvdNE Pacific Place NE University Burke-Gilman Trail METRO NW A CD D EF F GHI H J RR BB CC EE AA Rotunda Cafe Ocean Sciences Hitchcock

  2. PACIFIC SALMON Hatchery Propagation and Its Role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and shop, cold storage and food preparation, and the hatching building. The waste-water channel back AND WILDLIFE SERVICE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR #12;Abstract Population growth and industrial in The hatchery building 42 Troughs 42 Food preparation 44 Food storage 45 Rearing ponds 46 Trapping adult salmon

  3. EIS-0384: Chief Joseph Hatchery Program, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's approach and associated impacts of a comprehensive management program for summer/fall Chinook salmon in the Okanogan subbasin and the Columbia River between the confluence of the Okanogan River and Chief Joseph Dam including construction, operation, and maintenance of a hatchery and acclimation ponds.

  4. HARD CLAM HYBRIDS FOR FLORIDAAQUACULTURE: HATCHERY CULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    . Larvae culture was performed in 400L tanks using standard hard clam hatchery protocols: water changed daily, fed once daily at 50-100K cells T- ISO/mL, salinity 30 ppt, temp 24-28oC (Fig 2a). Setting T-ISO and the diatom Chaetoceros sp. and water changed every other day. Tissue (gill, mantle, and

  5. NE Oregon Wildlife Project "Precious Lands"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Aspen Cliff/Talus Federally Listed Species: Snake River Steelhead, Spalding's Catchfly. Additional Grasslands: Western Meadowlark Canyon Shrublands: Bighorn Sheep Quaking Aspen: None Aquatic (Joseph Cr

  6. Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Dan [Hatchery Scientific Review Group

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

  7. SAFS-UW-1001 Abundance of Adult Hatchery and Wild

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    SAFS-UW-1001 July 2010 Abundance of Adult Hatchery and Wild Salmon by Region of the North Pacific Moore Foundation #12;Hatchery and Wild Salmon Abundance Page ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 1 Approaches to estimating wild salmon spawner abundances......................................... 1

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids : Phase 1, Examination of Fish at Lookingglass Hatchery in 1996 : Addendum to Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groberg, Warren J.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This information is an addendum to the report 'Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids, Phase 1: Examination of Fish at Lower Granite Dam, July 2, 1996' by Ralph Elston because there may be relevant observations included here. The author of this document participated in the examinations at Lower Granite Dam described in that report. Because of Endangered Species Act issues, the Rapid River stock of spring chinook salmon reared at Lookingglass Hatchery on the Grande Ronde River in northeastern Oregon are annually being captured as returning adults at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River and trucked to Lookingglass. During the peak migration period they are held in an adult holding facility at Lower Granite for as long as 72 hours and then transported by truck to Lookingglass for holding in an adult pond for spawning. In 1996 a total of 572 adults were transported from Lower Granite Dam between May 3 and August 6. Two-hundred eighty-one of these were later transported from Lookingglass to Wallowa Hatchery for artificial spawning and the remaining 291 were held for spawning at Lookingglass. On May 21, 24, 30 and June 2, 1996 hatchery personnel identified a total of 32 off-loaded fish with lesions on the dorsal area of the head they described as having the appearance of blisters (Robert Lund personal communication). By date these are shown in Table 1 (fish with similar lesions were also observed on May 27 but the number of these was not recorded). Such lesions were not observed on fish offloaded on any other dates. On May 24, 1996 hatchery personnel took photographs of fish with these lesions but do to light-meter problems the photographs did not turn out. On June 28, 1996 personnel of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Fish Pathology laboratory in La Grande were notified by James Lauman, ODFW Northeast Region supervisor, of discussions and concerns of head burn on returning adult chinook while he was on a visitation to Lower Granite Dam. That led to subsequent investigations at Lower Granite Dam (Ralph Elston 1996) and Lookingglass Hatchery. The results of the Lookingglass investigations are reported here.

  13. ISAB Artificial Production Review Report 3 Recommendations for the Design of Hatchery Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...................................................................................................2 Monitoring for Type 1 Information - Details of Fish Culture Practices Inside the Hatchery......................................................................................................................3 Monitoring Type 2 Information - Survival and Contribution to Harvest of Hatchery Fish after.........................................................................................................6 Monitoring Type 3 Information - The Effects of Released Hatchery Fish on the Ecosystem

  14. Oregon Agriculture and the Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Oregon Agriculture and the Economy: An Update Oregon State University Extension Service Rural Analyst Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics Oregon State University #12;Contents ...........................................................................................................................................12 Agricultural Support Services, Wholesale Trade, Transportation and Warehousing, Retail Trade

  15. Wenatchee Subbasin Plan Hatchery Information for Subbasin Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the final salmon and steelhead 4(d) rule (July 10, 2000; 65 FR 42422) as a mechanism for addressing the take take permits. Completed HGMPs may also be used for regional fish production and management planning that enhance depressed stocks of wild anadromous salmonids through hatchery supplementation, reduction

  16. Port of Morrow, Oregon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wind energy projects in Wyoming, Oregon, and Washington and small amounts of power from solar photovoltaic projects. Bonneville also has contracted to purchase 49.9 megawatts...

  17. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn naturally in existing and future available habitat (i.e. natural supplementation), while meeting other program objectives. In addition to the hatchery specific goals detailed above, hatchery personnel will actively participate in the Northwest Power Planning Council program, participate in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Resident Fish Committee, and other associated committees and Ad Hoc groups that may be formed to address resident fish issues in the blocked area above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams.

  18. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (Idaho).

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Spring, summer and fall chinook salmon would be reared and acclimated to different areas in the Subbasin and released at the hatchery and satellite sites or in other watercourses throughout the Subbasin. The supplementation program differs from other hatchery programs because the fish would be released at different sizes and would return to reproduce naturally in the areas where they are released. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia River juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increase competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management.

  19. Kalispel Resident Fish Project: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluff, Stanley

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No Annual Production Goals were achieved for the year. The Kalispel Hatchery experienced two episodes of brood fish mortality. The first due to a standpipe malfunction and the second attributed to gas bubble disease caused by elevated Total Dissolved Gases (TDG's) in the reservoir. To date, the hatchery has 29 brood fish in the raceway and ready to spawn. If all things go well this spring, hatchery operations should be well underway next year.

  20. Kalispel Resident Fish Project- Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalispel Tribe, Department of Natural Resources

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1996, construction activities commenced on a largemouth bass hatchery located on the Kalispel Indian Reservation. The major construction activities were complete as of October 1997. Of the six objectives identified in the 1997 Annual Operating Plan two objectives were fully achieved: the assembly of the life support system, and the preparation of the hatchery Operations and Maintenance Manual. The remaining four objectives were not fully achieved due to the hatchery not being completed before the spawning season (spring).

  1. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support ''carry-over'' fisheries. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be of sufficient quality and quantity to meet specific monitoring and evaluation goals and objectives outlines in the 2002 statement of work (SOW).

  2. COLUMBIA RIVER INTER-TRIBAL FISH COMMISSION 700 NE Multnomah Street, Suite 1200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLUMBIA RIVER INTER-TRIBAL FISH COMMISSION 700 NE Multnomah Street, Suite 1200 Portland, Oregon 97232 F (503) 235-4228 (503) 238-0667 F (503) 235-4228 www.critfc.org Putting fish back in the rivers and protecting the watersheds where fish live September 17, 2013 Bill Bradbury, Chairman Northwest Power

  3. Some trends in hatchery effects So e t e ds atc e y e ects Northwest Fisheries Science Center,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Societal interactions ­ Take money and effort away from habitat problemsproblems ­ Overharvest of wild stocks ­ May stocks and depend on hatchery productionon hatchery production · Conservation benefits S l i

  4. Oregon: Oregon's Clean Energy Resources and Economy (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of Oregon.

  5. APPARATUS AND METHODS EMPLOYED AT THE MARINE FISH HATCHERY AT FLODEVIG, NORWAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPARATUS AND METHODS EMPLOYED AT THE MARINE FISH HATCHERY AT FLODEVIG, NORWAY By G. M. Dannevig AND METHODS EMPLOYED AT THE MARINE FISH HATCHERY AT FLODEVIG, NORWAY. ~ By G. M. DANNEVIG, Director Fliidevig is situated on the seacoast near Arendal, Norway. The principal parts are a main building, having on the lower

  6. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance Annual Report, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenema, David

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kalispel Tribal hatchery successfully spawned largemouth bass broodfish in spring 2002. Approximately 150,000 eggs were produced and hatched. These fry were started on brine shrimp for a period of ten days. At this time, the fry needed more abundance food supply. Cannibalism started and the hatchery staff transferred the remaining fry to the river in hopes that some fish would survive.

  7. A comparison of prey capture kinematics in hatchery and wild Micropterus salmoides floridanus: effects of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Philip J.

    .e. hatchery Florida largemouth bass feeding on pelleted foods and wild indi- viduals capturing live fish prey largemouth bass compare to those of hatchery fish feeding on novel live prey? (3) How long does it take largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides floridanus captured live prey with very rapid movements and large

  8. Puget Sound Hatcheries Draft EIS S-1 July 2014 Draft Environmental Impact Statement on Two Joint State and Tribal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puget Sound Hatcheries Draft EIS S-1 July 2014 Draft Environmental Impact Statement on Two Joint State and Tribal Resource Management Plans for Puget Sound Salmon and Steelhead Hatchery Programs Introduction Salmon and steelhead have been produced in Puget Sound hatcheries since the late 1800s

  9. Ecological interactions between hatchery summer steelhead and wild Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Willamette River basin, 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Green, Ethan D.; Vernon, Christopher R.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which juvenile hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead overlap in space and time, to evaluate the extent of residualism among hatchery summer steelhead in the South Santiam River, and to evaluate the potential for negative ecological interactions among hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead. Because it is not possible to visually discern juvenile winter steelhead from resident rainbow trout, we treated all adipose-intact juvenile O. mykiss as one group that represented juvenile wild winter steelhead. The 2014 study objectives were to 1) estimate the proportion of hatchery summer steelhead that residualized in the South Santiam River in 2014, 2) determine the extent to which hatchery and naturally produced O. mykiss overlapped in space and time in the South Santiam River, and 3) characterize the behavioral interactions between hatchery-origin juvenile summer steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss. We used a combination of radio telemetry and direct observations (i.e., snorkeling) to determine the potential for negative interactions between hatchery summer and wild winter steelhead juveniles in the South Santiam River. Data collected from these two independent methods indicated that a significant portion of the hatchery summer steelhead released as smolts did not rapidly emigrate from the South Santiam River in 2014. Of the 164 radio-tagged steelhead that volitionally left the hatchery, only 66 (40.2%) were detected outside of the South Santiam River. Forty-four (26.8% of 164) of the radio-tagged hatchery summer steelhead successfully emigrated to Willamette Falls. Thus, the last known location of the majority of the tagged fish (98 of 164 = 59.8%) was in the South Santiam River. Thirty-three of the tagged hatchery steelhead were detected in the South Santiam River during mobile-tracking surveys. Of those, 21 were found to be alive in the South Santiam River over three months after their release, representing a residualization rate of 12.8% (21 of 164). Snorkeling revealed considerable overlap of habitat use (in space and time) by residual hatchery steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss in the South Santiam River. Results from our study (and others) also indicated that hatchery steelhead juveniles typically dominate interactions with naturally produced O. mykiss juveniles. The overlap in space and time, combined with the competitive advantage that residual hatchery steelhead appear to have over naturally produced O. mykiss, increases the potential for negative ecological interactions that could have population-level effects on the wild winter steelhead population of the South Santiam River.

  10. Oregon State University Magruder Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    in the Oregon Department of Energy State Energy Efficient Design (SEED) program. The result of the analysis

  11. Oregon Climate Assessment Report December 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    - Climate change and agriculture in Oregon"" " " " " 151 Chapter 5 - The potential effects of climate changeOregon Climate Assessment Report December 2010 Oregon Climate Change Research Institute #12;Oregon Climate Assessment Report December 2010 Oregon Climate Change Research Institute Recommended citation

  12. Kalispel Resident Fish Project: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluff, Stanley

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October of 1997, The construction of the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was complete. No spawning activity was recorded for the spring of 1998. On June 14, 1999 the first spawn at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was successful. A total of seven nests were fertilized that produced approximately 144,000 fry. The second spawn occurred on July 13, 1999 and a total of six nests were fertilized producing approximately 98,0000 fry. The total amount of largemouth bass fry produced at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was 242,000.

  13. Oregon Health & Science University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    to high-quality health care for all, especially Oregonians. 4. Help meet Oregon's health and science, however, has changed dramatically. National and statewide health care reform alters the ways care, including the changing health care environment, new and disruptive technologies, globalization, changing

  14. & Education CenterOregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caughman, John

    Fourth Ave Building Art Building Science & Education CenterOregon Sustainability Center (planned Hall Lincoln Hall School of Business 5th Ave Cinema East Hall University Technology Services Honors Stratford Building Parkway Science Building 1 Helen Gordon Child Center Science Research & Teaching Center

  15. Nanotechnology Commercialization in Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeck, Peter

    Nanotechnology Commercialization in Oregon February 27, 2012 Portland State University Physics Seminar Robert D. "Skip" Rung President and Executive Director #12;2 Nanotechnology Commercialization on "green" nanotechnology and gap fund portfolio company examples #12;3 Goals of the National Nanotechnology

  16. BooNE: About BooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site MapSolar energy(cousin -in-lawHomeAbout BooNE

  17. Oregon Underground Injection Control Program Authorized Injection...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Underground Injection Control Program Authorized Injection Systems Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Underground...

  18. Oregon Underground Injection Control Registration Application...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Underground Injection Control Registration Application Fees (DEQ Form UIC 1003-GIC) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Oregon...

  19. Oregon Water Quality Permit Program (Stormwater - Industrial...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Water Quality Permit Program (Stormwater - Industrial Activities) Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Water Quality...

  20. Physiological Assessment of Wild and Hatchery Juvenile Salmonids : Final Report, 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Donald A.; Beckman, Brian R.; Dickhoff, Walton W.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally held that hatchery-reared salmonids are of inferior quality and have lower smolt-to-adult survival compared to naturally-reared salmon. The overall objectives of the work performed under this contract were the following: (1) Characterize the physiology and development of naturally rearing juvenile salmonids to: (2) Allow for the design of effective rearing programs for producing wild-like smolts in supplementation and production hatchery programs. (3) Examine the relationship between growth rate and size on the physiology and migratory performance of fish reared in hatchery programs. (4) Examine the interaction of rearing temperature and feed rate on the growth and smoltification of salmon for use in producing a more wild-like smolt in hatchery programs.

  1. New Snake River sockeye hatchery to produce up to 1 million smolts...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    later, the plight of Lonesome Larry is becoming a distant memory as the Springfield Fish Hatchery opened Sept. 6 in Idaho. More than 140 people gathered to watch the dedication...

  2. EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOEs Bonneville Power Administration to support the Kootenai Tribe of Idahos construction of a new hatchery on property owned by the Tribe at the confluence of the Moyie and Kootenai Rivers, approximately eight miles upstream from Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed location of the new hatchery facility is currently the site of the Twin Rivers Canyon Resort.

  3. Mass of Ne-16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodward, C. J.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tanner, D. M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . E. Tribble, J. D. Cossairt, D. P. May, and R. A. Kenefick, Phys. Rev. C 16, 1835 (1977). 4E. Kashy, W. Benenson, D. Mueller, R. G. H. Robert- son, and D. R. Goosman, Phys. Rev. C 11, 1959 (1975). 5For a review of the various calculations, see Ref...PHYSICAL REVIEWER C VOLUME 27, NUMBER 1 Mass of ' Ne JANUARY 1983 C. J. Woodward, * R. E. Tribble, and D. M. Tanner Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 23 August 1982) The mass of ' Ne has been...

  4. MicroBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals fromprocess used in miningMicroBooNE MicroBooNE

  5. Recovery Act State Memos Oregon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    are being used to hire or retrain staff, building in-house expertise in the areas of smart grids, critical energy infrastructure interdependencies and cyber-security. * Oregon...

  6. Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Wind Farm Jump to:Oregon: Energy

  7. Biofuels in Oregon and Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNNL-17351 Biofuels in Oregon and Washington A Business Case Analysis of Opportunities and Challenges Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory #12;#12;Biofuels in Oregon and Washington, particularly in light of the recent growth experienced by the biofuels industry in the Midwest. Policymakers

  8. Anthropology 344 Archaeology of Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the materials presented in each lesson plan. I am looking for engagement with the subject materials, critical. By looking at material remains, various ethnographies, and historical documents, this class will hope Oregon and the surrounding areas. COURSE MATERIALS Oregon Archaeology By Aikens, Connolly and Jenkins

  9. We have only listed Oklahoma Hatcheries as they appear in the National Poultry Improvement Plan. For a listing of hatcheries in your state, contact your state USDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    We have only listed Oklahoma Hatcheries as they appear in the National Poultry Improvement Plan by the Department of Animal Science, Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources or Oklahoma State University. If you are an Oklahoma Resident you can obtain a copy by contacting: Mr. Ralph Duncan Animal

  10. Oregon as unspoiled nature: a rhetorical criticism of Oregon's tourism campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loughran, Tamara Kay

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oregon has suffered dislocating economic and industrial shifts for several years. Because logging and fishing provide less economic support for the state, Oregon is looking to alternative industries including tourism. This thesis examines Oregon...

  11. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairgrieve, William; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Colville Tribal Hatchery produced 62,335 pounds of trout during the contract period, however, only 46,092 pounds were liberated to lakes and streams. The remaining production will be carried over to 2004 to be planted as larger fish into reservation waters for the lakes opener. New raceways were completed in November and brought on line in the spring. These raceways currently hold the redband rainbow brood stock and will be spawned in 2004. Efforts are continuing to capture redbands from other streams in coordination with the monitoring and evaluation program. Creel was expanded by hiring a second creel clerk to give better coverage of reservation waters by reducing travel time. Marking continues on all fish planted from CTH and refinements continue to be made. The first tag retention study has been completed and the second study is now underway to determine long term tag recognition. Lakes continue to be surveyed to complete the baseline analysis of all reservation lakes and will be completed in 2004.

  12. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a foundation for hatchery reform, to help salmon and steelhead hatcheries in the Columbia River meet harvest and hatchery reforms are needed The HSRG report recommends principles for hatchery management

  13. 19Ne.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isN Ground-StateNovember 1997B β--Decay EvaluatedNe β+-Decay

  14. 19Ne_78.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isN Ground-StateNovember 1997B β--Decay EvaluatedNe β+-Decay

  15. EA-1988: NFSC (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) Earthen Drainage Channel, Burley Creek Hatchery, Port Orchard, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with DOEs Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center proposal to construct an earthen drainage channel at its Burley Creek Hatchery in Kitsap County, Washington. The project would facilitate increased discharge of treated effluent from the hatchery facility into the adjacent Burley Creek. BPAs proposal is to fund the project. The project website is http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Burley_Creek/.

  16. Knight Law Center Eugene, Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Knight Law Center Eugene, Oregon ASHRAE Level I Energy Audit June 2011 Prepared for University................................................................................................................................. 6 Energy Audit Procedure and Results.................................................................................................................................................. 22 #12;| ASHRAE Level One Energy Audit3 SUMMARY The William W. Knight Law Center is a four story

  17. Status of Oregon's Bull Trout.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, David V.; Hanson, Mary L.; Hooton, Robert M.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limited historical references indicate that bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Oregon were once widely spread throughout at least 12 basins in the Klamath River and Columbia River systems. No bull trout have been observed in Oregon's coastal systems. A total of 69 bull trout populations in 12 basins are currently identified in Oregon. A comparison of the 1991 bull trout status (Ratliff and Howell 1992) to the revised 1996 status found that 7 populations were newly discovered and 1 population showed a positive or upgraded status while 22 populations showed a negative or downgraded status. The general downgrading of 32% of Oregon's bull trout populations appears largely due to increased survey efforts and increased survey accuracy rather than reduced numbers or distribution. However, three populations in the upper Klamath Basin, two in the Walla Walla Basin, and one in the Willamette Basin showed decreases in estimated population abundance or distribution.

  18. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatchery Operating Under Hatchery Reform Principles From Day 1. Representatives from the Colville was built with hatchery reform as a central tenet, as a way to address conservation and harvest for both the following abstract. Chief Joseph Hatchery: A New Hatchery Operating Under Hatchery Reform Principles From

  19. Protecting Oregon's Bull Kelp April 14, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Protecting Oregon's Bull Kelp April 14, 2006 Megan Mackey Ocean Policy Analyst Pacific Marine........................................................................................... 3 Oregon Kelp Ecology................................................................................3 Effects of Kelp Harvest on Marine Fish and Other Species....................................4

  20. university of oregon DEPARTMENT OF ART

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wanlass 058 #12;#12;The Art MFA program at the University of Oregon fosters creative exploration in areas

  1. Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Renewable Energy Center..........7 Oregon Sea Grant.....................................28 B. Federal and State Agencies Environmental Protection Agency...................................29

  2. Diet-induced phenotypic plasticity in the skull morphology of hatchery-reared Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Philip J.

    for many fish species, Florida largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides flor- idanus (LeSeuer), reared, was retarded at this size. Post-release, the skulls of hatchery fish converged towards those of wild bass bass, Micropterus salmoides floridanus Un resumen en espan~ol se incluye detras del texto principal de

  3. EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOEs Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EIS that will assess potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation of Idaho to construct and operate a hatchery for spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Salmon River subbasin and Yellowstone cutthroat trout in the Upper Snake River subbasin on Fort Hall Reservation.

  4. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  5. Oregon Business Council Presented By: Elizabeth Redman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    to markets Energy Maintain Oregon's competitive advantage in energy costs while creating energy jobsOregon Business Council Presented By: Elizabeth Redman IHS Global Inc. OBC Cluster Strategy How has the Oregon Business Council promoted cluster based economic development? What has our work

  6. Wave Energy Development in Oregon Licensing & Permitting Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    July 09 Wave Energy Development in Oregon Licensing & Permitting Requirements Prepared by Pacific Energy Ventures on behalf of the Oregon Wave Energy Trust w w w . o r e g o n w a v e . o r g #12;This study was commissioned by Oregon Wave Energy Trust. Oregon Wave Energy Trust is funded by the Oregon

  7. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine; Baker, Dan J. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2001 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2001, 26 anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Basin. Twenty-three of these adults were captured at adult weirs located on the upper Salmon River and on Redfish Lake Creek. Three of the anadromous sockeye salmon that returned were observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir and allowed to migrate upstream volitionally (following the dismantling of the weir on October 12, 2001). Nine anadromous adults were incorporated into the captive broodstock program spawning design in 2001. The remaining adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. Based on their marks, returning adult sockeye salmon originated from a variety of release options. Two sockeye salmon females from the anadromous group and 152 females from the brood year 1998 captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2001. Spawn pairings produced approximately 118,121 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 42.0%. Presmolts (106,166), smolts (13,915), and adults (79) were planted or released into Stanley Basin waters in 2001. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game facilities (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery). Two of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2001 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

  8. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willard, Catherine; Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. n 2002, 22 anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley. Fifteen of these adults were captured at adult weirs located on the upper Salmon River and on Redfish Lake Creek. Seven of the anadromous sockeye salmon that returned were observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir and allowed to migrate upstream volitionally (following the dismantling of the weir on September 30, 2002). All adult returns were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. Based on their marks, returning adult sockeye salmon originated from a variety of release options. Sixty-six females from brood year 1999 and 28 females from brood year 2000 captive broodstock groups were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2002. Spawn pairings produced approximately 65,838 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 55.1%. Presmolts (140,410), smolts (38,672), and adults (190) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 2002. Reintroduction strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and three unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game facilities (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery). Three of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2002 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

  9. Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume II of III; Data Summaries, 1978-1983 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slatick, Emil; Ringe, R.R.; Zaugg, Waldo S. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

    1988-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aquaculture task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status or the stocks were quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains the data for the narratives in Volume I.

  10. Contrasting survival strategies of hatchery and wild red drum: implications for stock enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jessica Louise

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . Marshall Kirk O. Winemiller James L. Pinckney Gregory W. Stunz Head of Department, Thomas E. Lacher May 2008 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences iii ABSTRACT Contrasting Survival Strategies of Hatchery and Wild Red Drum... of the Rooker Lab. Many thanks to my committee members, Dr. Christopher Marshall, Dr. Kirk Winemiller, Dr. James Pinckney, and Dr. Gregory Stunz, for their insight and suggestions which greatly improved the content and quality of my dissertation research...

  11. Dialect Contact, Convergence, and Maintenance in Oregon Athabaskan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Justin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contact, Convergence, and Maintenance in Oregon AthabaskanContact, Convergence, and Maintenance in Oregon Athabaskan Jcases of dialect maintenance presented in 5 show that not

  12. Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities,...

  13. Maywood Industries of Oregon Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maywood Industries of Oregon Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Maywood Industries of Oregon Space Heating Low Temperature...

  14. Oregon Construction/Installation Permit for Onsite Wastewater...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon ConstructionInstallation Permit for Onsite Wastewater Treatment System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Construction...

  15. Oregon: Clean Energy Works Coordinates Energy Efficiency Efforts...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Impact EERE-funded program is reducing energy waste, which is slowing the effects of climate change. Locations Oregon Partners Clean Energy Works Oregon EERE Investment 20...

  16. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for Contractors Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for Contractors...

  17. activity hermiston oregon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programs for Oregon Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants Websites Summary: Demand Response Programs for Oregon Utilities Public Utility Commission May 2003 Public...

  18. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Dan J,; Heindel, Jeff A.; Kline, Paul A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 1999 are presented in this report. In 1999, seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley and were captured at the adult weir located on the upper Salmon River. Four anadromous adults were incorporated in the captive broodstock program spawning design for year 1999. The remaining three adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. All seven adults were adipose and left ventral fin-clipped, indicating hatchery origin. One sockeye salmon female from the anadromous group and 81 females from the captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1999. Spawn pairings produced approximately 63,147 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed-stage of development averaging 38.97%. Eyed-eggs (20,311), presmolts (40,271), smolts (9,718), and adults (21) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 1999. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, upper Salmon River (below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir), Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and three production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1999 spawning design and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

  19. Oregon Underground Injection Control Registration Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Underground Injection Control Registration Geothermal Heating Systems (DEQ Form UICGEO-1004(f)) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form:...

  20. Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oregon's geothermal potential, exploration, drilling, utilization, legal and institutional setting are covered. Economic factors of direct use projects are discussed. (MHR)

  1. Bonneville Power Administration, Oregon Energy Northwest, Washington...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bonneville Power Administration, Oregon Energy Northwest, Washington; Wholesale Electric Primary Credit Analyst: David N Bodek, New York (1) 212-438-7969; david.bodek@standardandpo...

  2. Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Energy Center..........6 Oregon Sea Grant of Biomedical Sciences.....................................23 B. Federal and State Agencies Environmental Protection Agency...................................24 PacificCoastalEcologyBranch, Western Ecology Division

  3. Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................... 3 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center..........4 Oregon Sea Grant.....................................21 B. Federal and State Agencies Environmental Protection Agency PacificCoastalEcologyBranch, Western

  4. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatchery Reform Project in 2006. Part of that project is a Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG to offer a foundation for hatchery reform, to help salmon and steelhead hatcheries in the Pacific Northwest determined that both harvest and hatchery reforms are needed #12;The HSRG report recommends principles

  5. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Columbia River Hatchery Reform Project in 2006. Part of that project is a Hatchery Scientific Review Group. The report is intended to offer a foundation for hatchery reform, to help salmon and steelhead hatcheries, the HSRG determined that both harvest and hatchery reforms are needed #12;The HSRG report recommends

  6. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the `Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to Inform Columbia River Basin Hatchery Operations and the Funding of Mitchell Act Hatchery Programs (Columbia Basin Hatchery EIS).' The Hatchery EIS is now nearing completion about the EIS process and drafts. The lead presenter from NOAA will be Rob Jones, Hatcheries and Inland

  7. COLUMBIA RIVER INTER-TRIBAL FISH COMMISSION 729 N.E. Oregon, Suite 200, Portland, Oregon 97232

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................................................................... 12 IV. ANALYSIS OF COLUMBIA BASIN SALMON AND NORTHWEST ENERGY SYSTEM MEASURES.......................................................................................... 25 a) Distributed Generation.................................................................................. 25 b) Conventional Generation Strategically Placed within the Grid.................... 26 5. Trading

  8. Ne pas confondre Absorption Adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lige, Universit de

    Ne pas confondre Absorption Adsorption et Quand des molcules sont amenes en contact avec un'attachent simplement la surface du solide on parle d'adsorption. L'adsorption est donc le collage de molcules la surface d'un solide. Quand le charbon nettoie Principes physiques de l'adsorption Cdric Gommes

  9. MICHAEL G. RAYMER Curriculum Vitae (07/2010) Department of Physics and Oregon Center for Optics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    for Optics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (503) 346-4785 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Knight Professor, 1998 - 1999. Director, Oregon Center for Optics, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon; 1997 ­ 1998 of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon; 1988 - 1990. Associate Professor of Optics, The Institute

  10. Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    in Poplar Steven Strauss, Oregon State University (2009-2011) OVERVIEW The production of bioplastics from

  11. Summer Program for Undergraduate Research Alaska Oregon Research Training Alliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    in SPUR Oregon-Chile International REU Program University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1254 phone (541 Undergraduate Researchers in SPUR (OURS) spur.uoregon.edu Oregon-Chile International REU Program (OC-iREU) spurSummer Program for Undergraduate Research Alaska Oregon Research Training Alliance NSF REU Site

  12. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Paul A.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Willard, Catherine (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 1997 are presented in this report. One hundred twenty-six female sockeye salmon from one captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1997. Successful spawn pairings produced approximately 148,781 eyed-eggs with a cumulative mean survival to eyed-egg rate of 57.3%. Approximately 361,600 sockeye salmon were released to Sawtooth basin waters in 1997. Reintroduction strategies included eyed-eggs (brood year 1997), presmolts (brood year 1996), and prespawn adults for volitional spawning (brood year 1994). Release locations included Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1997 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

  13. Oregon City, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio:OpowerOrchardCity, Oregon: Energy

  14. Ground-water temperature fluctuations at Lyons Ferry Fish Hatchery, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberlander, P.L.; Myers, D.A.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The well field serving the Lyons Ferry Fish Hatchery has experienced reduced water temperatures following continued, periodic withdrawal of large volumes of water. In January 1985, the well field temperature was 49/sup 0/F, which is less than the optimal 52/sup 0/F for raising salmon and steelhead trout. The aquifer supplying the hatchery is in hydraulic and thermal connection with the Snake River and a flooded embayment of the Palouse River. Ground-water temperatures in the well field cycle on an annual basis in response to changes in surface water temperature and pumping rate. Numerical simulation of the well field, using a simplified mixing cell model, demonstrates the coupling of well field hydraulics and aquifer thermal response. Alternative pumping schedules indicate that it is feasible to adjust ground-water pumping to effectively store heat in the aquifer during the summer months when surface water temperatures are elevated. Sensitivity analysis of this model indicated that the primary controls of the system's thermal response are the volume of the aquifer assumed to contribute to the well field and temperature of the overlying surface water body.

  15. USG OREGON | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success|Sustainable EnergyMotor CompanyPlannedUSG OREGON USG

  16. Solaicx (Oregon) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformationSoda Springs,Solaicx (Oregon) Jump to:

  17. Solar Oregon | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteelSolar Energy sro Jump to:Solar GlobalSolar Oregon

  18. NE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate - Events - Fermilab atNovelNC

  19. US NE MA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalThe Outlook269,023Year69,023US Virgin120Mnt(N)NE MA

  20. Overview of NE Research Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of Bad CholesteroliManage Presentation3 DATE: March06-05-09 HSS/UnionNE

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Information

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    production facilities in Oregon, use the TransAtlas interactive mapping tool or use BioFuels Atlas to show the use and potential production of biofuels throughout the U.S. and...

  2. Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................... 4 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center..........5 Oregon Sea Grant.....................................................................18 College of Veterinary Medicine............................................19 B. Federal and State Agencies Environmental Protection Agency...................................... 20 Pacific Coastal Ecology

  3. Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................... 4 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center..........5 Oregon Sea Grant of Biomedical Sciences.....................................22 B. Federal and State Agencies Environmental Protection Agency...................................23 PacificCoastalEcologyBranch, Western Ecology Division

  4. Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oregon Department of Energy provides a tax credit for agricultural producers or collectors of biomass. The credit can be used for eligible biomass used to produce biofuel; biomass used in...

  5. 2011 Oregon Stater EngineeringAwards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Celebrating the impact of OSU Engineering leadership on the global community #12;Meyer Proudly Congratulates Stanley Cheng, Chairman and CEO, as a recipient of the 2011 Oregon Stater Award Engineering Hall of Fame

  6. CHRIS ROBERTSON & ASSOCIATES, LLC Business and Policy Advisors 3707 NE16th Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97212

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Almost all of the relatively few presently installed fleet of DG PV systems have older inverters designed Resilience and Subduction Zone Earthquake Emergency Response: Impacts of Distributed Solar Energy (DG PV. Distributed solar generation (DG PV) sources are sparsely developed. In a subduction zone earthquake the grid

  7. EIS-0296: South Oregon Coast Reinforcement Project, Coos Bay/North Bend, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration proposes to build a 500- kilovolt (kV) transmission line and new substation to reinforce electrical service to the southern coast of the state of Oregon. Nucor Steel, a division of Nucor Corporation, may build a new steel mill in the Coos Bay/North Bend, Oregon, area.

  8. EIS-0296: South Oregon Coast Reinforcement Project, Coos Bay/North Bend, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's proposed action to build a 500- kilovolt (kV) transmission line and new substation to reinforce electrical service to the southern coast of the state of Oregon. Nucor Steel, a division of Nucor Corporation, may build a new steel mill in the Coos Bay/North Bend, Oregon, area.

  9. UNIVERSITY OF OREGON SOLAR MONITORING LABORATORY The University of Oregon (UO) Solar Moni-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    i UNIVERSITY OF OREGON SOLAR MONITORING LABORATORY The University of Oregon (UO) Solar Moni- toring Laboratory has been measuring incident solar radiation since 1975. Current support for this work comes from the Regional Solar Radiation Monitoring Project (RSRMP), a utility consortium project including the Bon

  10. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project; Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2002 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $3,036,014. Bonneville Power Administration identifies them as follows; (1) Part I--Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and $2,682,635 which includes--Equipment costs of $1,807,105. (2) Part II--Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-35-04, Contract No. 4035, $352,379 for Clearwater Coho Restoration Master Plan development Based on NPPC authorization for construction and operation of NPTH, the annual contracts were negotiated for the amounts shown above under (1) and (2). Construction contracts were handled by BPA until all facilities are completed and accepted.

  11. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program : Hatchery Element : Annual Progress Report, 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000 are presented in this report.

  12. EA-1891: Alvey-Fairview Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild DOEs Bonneville Power Administrations Alvey-Fairview No. 1 230-kV transmission line located between Eugene, Oregon, and Coquille, Oregon.

  13. CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON: COSTS, and J. Kadyszewski (Winrock International). 2007. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use Curves, and Pilot Actions for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock

  14. Natural Reproductive Success and Demographic Effects of Hatchery-Origin Steelhead in Abernathy Creek, Washington : Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Abernathy Fish Technology Center

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many hatchery programs for steelhead pose genetic or ecological risks to natural populations because those programs release or outplant fish from non-native stocks. The goal of many steelhead programs has been to simply provide 'fishing opportunities' with little consideration given to conservation concerns. For example, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has widely propagated and outplanted one stock of winter-run steelhead (Chambers Creek stock) and one stock of summer-run steelhead (Skamania stock) throughout western Washington. Biologists and managers now recognize potential negative effects can occur when non-native hatchery fish interact biologically with native populations. Not only do non-native stocks pose genetic and ecological risks to naturally spawning populations, but non-native fish stray as returning adults at a much higher rate than do native fish (Quinn 1993). Biologists and managers also recognize the need to (a) maintain the genetic resources associated with naturally spawning populations and (b) restore or recover natural populations wherever possible. As a consequence, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the NOAA Fisheries have been recommending a general policy that discourages the use of non-native hatchery stocks and encourages development of native broodstocks. There are two primary motivations for these recommendations: (1) reduce or minimize potential negative biological effects resulting from genetic or ecological interactions between hatchery-origin and native-origin fish and (2) use native broodstocks as genetic repositories to potentially assist with recovery of naturally spawning populations. A major motivation for the captive-rearing work described in this report resulted from NOAA's 1998 Biological Opinion on Artificial Propagation in the Columbia River Basin. In that biological opinion (BO), NOAA concluded that non-native hatchery stocks of steelhead jeopardize the continued existence of U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed, naturally spawning populations in the Columbia River Basin. As a consequence of that BO, NOAA recommended - as a reasonable and prudent alternative (RPA) - that federal and state agencies phase out non-native broodstocks of steelhead and replace them with native broodstocks. However, NOAA provided no guidance on how to achieve that RPA. The development of native broodstocks of hatchery steelhead can potentially pose unacceptable biological risks to naturally spawning populations, particularly those that are already listed as threatened or endangered under the ESA. The traditional method of initiating new hatchery broodstocks of anadromous salmonid fishes is by trapping adults during their upstream, spawning migration. However, removing natural-origin adults from ESA listed populations may not be biologically acceptable because such activities may further depress those populations via 'broodstock mining'. In addition, trapping adult steelhead may be logistically unfeasible in many subbasins due to high water flows in the spring, when steelhead are moving upstream to spawn, that will often 'blow out' temporary weirs. Additional risks associated with trapping adults include genetic founder effects and difficulties meeting minimum, genetic effective number of breeders without 'mining' the wild population to potential extinction. As a result, alternative methods for developing native broodstocks are highly desired. One alternative for developing native broodstocks, particularly when the collection of adults is logistically unfeasible or biologically unacceptable, is captive rearing of natural-origin juveniles to sexual maturity. In this approach, pre-smolt juveniles are collected from the stream or watershed for which a native broodstock is desired, and those juveniles are raised to sexual maturity in a hatchery. Those hatchery-reared adults then become the broodstock source for gametes and initial progeny releases. Such a captive rearing program offers many genetic advantages over traditional adult-trapping programs for developing native

  15. Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    for Use in Pacific Ethanol's Boardman, Oregon Cellulosic Ethanol Plant Russ Karow, Oregon State University OVERVIEW Pacific Ethanol, in Boardman, Oregon, is the recipient of a federal grant to establish a 1/10 th scale cellulosic ethanol pilot plant adjacent to their existing corn-based ethanol facility. This new

  16. Report on the Oregon Ballast Water Management Program in 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballast Water Management Program in 2004 Produced for the Oregon State Legislature By The Oregon Ballast regulations; shipping industry's compliance with Oregon law; and ballast water treatment technology as inefficient and having some safety constraints, ballast water exchange is still the primary treatment method

  17. Design, construction and initiation of operation, of a crawfish hatchery at the Aquacultural Research Center, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Gary

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND INITIATION OF OPERATION, OF A CRAWFISH HATCHERY AT THE A(UACULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER, TEXAS AAM UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS A PROFESSIONAL PAPER BY GARY ARNOLD Submitted to the College of Agriculture 'of Texas A..., and initial operation of such a hatchery facility was determined to be an appropriate project for a Master of Agriculture degree candidate's professional internship. Such an internship project was started on February 15, 1986, by Gary Arnold. Design...

  18. Oregon Department of Agriculture | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEITODO Jump to:Optony IncCove,OregonOregon

  19. Oregon/Geothermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEITODOOregonOregon/Geothermal < Oregon

  20. Durham, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South, New Jersey:JumpOregon:Durham County,NewOregon:

  1. OREGON SEA GRANT | SUMMER 2014 | VOLUME 3 NO. 1 ChangeHow Oregon Sea Grant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9 Adapting to Climate Change: Some Continuing Challenges Communicating about Climate Change: Reflections Bottom line: effective communication is critical 13 Climate Change in the Northwest Confluence's homes and business? In "Communicating about Climate Change: Reflections," Oregon Sea Grant

  2. MicroBooNE Detector Move

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flemming, Bonnie; Rameika, Gina

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    On Monday, June 23, 2014 the MicroBooNE detector -- a 30-ton vessel that will be used to study ghostly particles called neutrinos -- was transported three miles across the Fermilab site and gently lowered into the laboratory's Liquid-Argon Test Facility. This video documents that move, some taken with time-lapse camerad, and shows the process of getting the MicroBooNE detector to its new home.

  3. MicroBooNE Detector Move

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Flemming, Bonnie; Rameika, Gina

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    On Monday, June 23, 2014 the MicroBooNE detector -- a 30-ton vessel that will be used to study ghostly particles called neutrinos -- was transported three miles across the Fermilab site and gently lowered into the laboratory's Liquid-Argon Test Facility. This video documents that move, some taken with time-lapse camerad, and shows the process of getting the MicroBooNE detector to its new home.

  4. University of Oregon Department of Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Oregon Department of Architecture Architecture & Interior Architecture " #12;Historically Innovative "" The School of Architecture and Allied Arts, founded in 1914, is one of the first to combine architecture, and interior architecture with other allied arts fields of study; and

  5. Oregon State University Student Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    and exceptional clinical care. Our commitment to meeting the health needs of our students and the larger Oregon different models of health care delivery. We have focused on using a public health approach to understanding was completed this year as a first step toward that goal. The passage of health reform legislation will impact

  6. EIS-0204: Hermiston Generating Project, Hermiston, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energys Bonneville Power Administration prepared this statement to analyze the alternatives and environmental and socioeconomic impacts thereof of transferring electrical power from a proposed privately-owned, combined cycle combustion turbine cogeneration plant in Oregon.

  7. Continued on back UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Continued on back UNIVERSITY OF OREGON MOBILE TECHNOLOGY ACCESS AND PAYMENT OPTION REQUEST Please complete this form to apply for access to mobile technology (e.g., cell phones, smart phones, etc device use. Information on the UO policies regarding access to mobile technology and payment options can

  8. Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Demand Side Management #12;Current Programs/Tariffs ­ Load Control Programs Cool Keeper, Utah (currentlyDemand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission January 6, 2005 Mike Koszalka Director 33 MW, building to 90 MW) Irrigation load control, Idaho (35 MW summer, 2004) Lighting load control

  9. NE5534, NE5534A, SA5534. SA5534A LOW-NOISE OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    NE5534, NE5534A, SA5534. SA5534A LOW-NOISE OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS SLOS070C - JULY 1979 - REVISED5534. SA5534A LOW-NOISE OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS SLOS070C - JULY 1979 - REVISED SEPTEMBER 2004 3POST dc and ac characteristics. Some of the features include very low noise, high output-drive capability

  10. Commercial Energy Code Enforcement in Oregon and Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, M.; Miller, W.; O'Neill, M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMUERCIAL ENERGY CODE ENFORCEMENT IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON WILL MILLER )(AURA O'NEILL UARK JOHNSON TECHNICAL DIRECTOR PRESIDENT PUBLIC UTILITIES SPECIALIST PORTLAND ENERGY CONSERVATION, IWC . , O'NEILL 6 CO., INC., BONNEVILLE POWER... ADHINISTBATION PORTLAND, OREGON SEATTLE, WASHINGTON PORTLAND. OREGON In recent years. many states and local jurisdictions have passed mandatory building codes to achieve energy efficiency in new construction. All too often the political bodies that pass...

  11. Study of Disease and Physiology in the 1979 Homing Study Hatchery Stocks: A Supplement to "Imprinting Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing", 1979 by Slatick, Gilbreath, and Walch.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novotny, Anthony J.; Zaugg, Waldo S.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), under contract to the Bonneville Power Administration, is conducting research on imprinting salmon and steelhead for homing (Slatick et al. 1979, 1980; Novotny and Zaugg 1979). The studies were begun with little background knowledge of the effects of disease or certain physiological functions on imprinting and homing in salmonids. Consequently, work aimed at filling this void was begun by the authors in 1978 (Novotny and Zaugg 1979) and continued in 1979. In 1979, we examined random samples of normal populations of homing test fish at the hatcheries to determine the physiological readiness to migrate and adapt to seawater and general fish health. At the Manchester Marine Experimental Station, Manchester, Washington, we determined the survival of samples of the test fish maintained in marine net-pens after release from the hatcheries. Hatcheries and stocks sampled are listed in Table 1.

  12. Oregon Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oregon has substantial natural resources, including wind, geothermal, biomass, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down...

  13. Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following subjects are covered: Oregons' geothermal potential, exploration methods and costs, drilling, utilization methods, economic factors of direct use projects, and legal and institutional setting. (MHR)

  14. airport portland oregon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oregon February 25, 2009 MEMORANDUM TO: Power Committee FROM: Maury Galbraith wholesale power market prices. Under "medium" fuel price and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission price...

  15. Oregon Procedure and Criteria for Hazardous Waste Treatment,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Procedure and Criteria for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage or Disposal Permits Fact Sheet Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  16. MHK Technologies/Oregon State University Columbia Power Technologies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Oregon State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct Drive Point Absorber.jpg Technology Profile...

  17. Southern Oregon University Highlighted by U.S. Energy Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    by Southern Oregon University (SOU). The school's investments in renewable energy, sustainability, and purchasing Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) are benefiting residents and...

  18. Oregon Institute of Technology District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Oregon Institute of Technology District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  19. Energy Department Conditionally Authorizes Oregon LNG to Export...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    WASHINGTON - The Energy Department announced today that it has conditionally authorized LNG Development Co., LLC (Oregon LNG) to export domestically produced liquefied natural gas...

  20. Oregon Institute of Technology Recognized for Increasing its...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Institute of Technology Recognized for Increasing its Use of Geothermal and Solar Energy Oregon Institute of Technology Recognized for Increasing its Use of Geothermal and Solar...

  1. Oregon: DOE Advances Game-Changing EGS Geothermal Technology...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Advances Game-Changing EGS Geothermal Technology at the Newberry Volcano Oregon: DOE Advances Game-Changing EGS Geothermal Technology at the Newberry Volcano April 9, 2013 -...

  2. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement Volume I -Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Published by Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Division of Fish and Wildlife #12;North Avenue Pendleton, Oregon 97801 Funded by Larry Everson, Project Manager Bonneville Power Administration

  3. Comparative Survival [Rate] Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Migration Years 1996-1998 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) is a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to measure the smolt-to-adult survival rates of hatchery spring and summer chinook at major production hatcheries in the Snake River basin and at selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates for Snake River basin chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates will be made both from Lower Granite Dam back to Lower Granite Dam (upriver stocks) and from the hatchery back to the hatchery (upriver and downriver stocks). This status report covers the first three migration years, 1996 to 1998, of the study. Study fish were implanted with a PIT (Passive Integrated Transponder) tag which allows unique identification of individual fish. Beginning in 1997, a predetermined proportion of the PIT tagged study fish in the collection/bypass channel at the transportation sites, such as Lower Granite and Little Goose dams, was purposely routed to the raceways for transportation and the rest was routed back to the river. Two categories of in-river migrating fish are used in this study. The in-river group most representative of the non-tagged fish are fish that migrate past Lower Granite, Little Goose, and Lower Monumental dams undetected in the bypass systems. This is because all non-tagged fish collected at these three dams are currently being transported. The other in-river group contains those fish remaining in-river below Lower Monumental Dam that had previously been detected at one or more dams. The number of fish starting at Lower Granite dam that are destined to one of these two in-river groups must be estimated. The Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methodology was used for that purpose. Adult (including jacks) study fish returning to the hatcheries in the Snake River basin were sampled at the Lower Granite Dam adult trap. There the PIT tag was recorded along with a measurement of length, a determination of sex, and a scale sample. The returns to the hatchery rack were adjusted for any sport and tribal harvest to provide an estimate of total return to the hatchery. Adult and jack return data from return years 1997 through 1999 are covered in this status report. Only the returns from the 1996 migration year are complete. A very low overall average of 0.136% survival rate from Lower Granite Dam and back to Lower Granite Dam was estimated for the 1996 migrants. The outcome expected for the 1997 migrants is much better. With one year of returns still to come, the overall average Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite Dam survival rate is 0.666%, with the McCall Hatchery and Imnaha Hatchery fish already producing return rates in excess of 1%. With 635 returning adults (plus jacks) from the 1997 migration year detected at Lower Granite Dam to date, and one additional year of returns to come, there will be a large sample size for statistically testing differences in transportation versus in- river survival rates next year. From the conduct of this study over a series of years, in addition to obtaining estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates, we should be able to investigate what factors may be causing differences in survival rates among the various hatchery stocks used in this study.

  4. Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, William P.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

  5. New MiniBooNE Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zelimir Djurcic

    2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab was designed to be a definitive test of the LSND evidence for neutrino oscillations and has recently reported first results of a search for electron-neutrino appearance in a muon-neutrino Booster beam. No significant excess of events was observed at higher energies, but a sizable excess of events was observed at lower energies. The lack of the excess at higher energies allowed MiniBooNE to rule out simple two-neutrino oscillations as an explanation of the LSND signal. However, the excess at lower energies is presently unexplained. A new data set of neutrinos from the NuMI beam line measured with the MiniBooNE detector at Fermilab has been analyzed. The measurement of NuMI neutrino interactions in MiniBooNE provide a clear proof-of-principle of the off-axis beam concept that is planned to be used by future neutrino experiments such as T2K and NOvA. Moreover, it complements the first oscillation results and will help to determine whether the lower-energy excess is due to background or to new physics. New results from the re-analysis of low energy excess from the Booster beam line and the results from measurements of neutrino interactions from NuMI beam line are discussed. MiniBooNE observes an unexplained excess of $128.8 \\pm 20.4 \\pm 38.3$ electron-like events in the energy region $200 < E_{\

  6. Dear Future FIG Student, Welcome to the University of Oregon!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    of the year is an overnight trip to Ashland, Oregon and the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. As a class, we'll get a chance to enjoy Ashland, which is a great town. We will stay in a hostel, share a few meals

  7. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the monitoring of the well field as required by the ground water permit for hatchery operations. Part of the terms and conditions of the Amended Temporary Permit for the Cle Elum Hatchery Water Permit were

  8. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    discussion of hatchery assessments and reform by Dr. Don Campton, Doug Olson and Mark Bagdovitz, all, motivated hatchery reform efforts in the Pacific Northwest. In 2004, the Service concluded that its 12

  9. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the second in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2002 and March 31, 2003. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2002) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. Each chapter of this report deals with monitoring phenotypic and demographic traits of Yakima River basin spring chinook comparing hatchery and wild returns in 2002; the second year of adult hatchery returns. The first chapter deals specifically with adult traits of American River, Naches basin (excluding the American River), and upper Yakima River spring chinook, excluding gametes. The second chapter examines the gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish. In the third chapter, we describe work begun initially in 2002 to characterize and compare redds of naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River.

  10. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Manager Wildlife & Resident Fish SUBJECT: Summary of Hatchery and Supplementation Issues BACKGROUND Few dispute the importance of the influence of hatchery fish on natural spawning salmon and steelhead of what effects hatchery fish do have on natural fish populations. The issue is important to tribes

  11. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the region to support salmon recovery planning and hatchery reform. The discussion will focus on two tools major regional processes in the Columbia Basin: the congressionally mandated Hatchery Reform Project and developed in the hatchery reform project and NEPA analysis that will result in baseline analysis of all

  12. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the following language: Congress initiated the Columbia River Hatchery Reform Project in 2006. Part://hatcheryreform.us) in March 2009. The report is intended to offer a foundation for hatchery reform, to help salmon to address these twin goals, the HSRG determined that both harvest and hatchery reforms are needed. #12;The

  13. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scientific Review Group (HSRG) completed its Report to Congress on Columbia River Basin Hatchery Reform and System-Wide Report on Columbia River Basin Hatchery Reform in March of this year. The products from. As the hatchery reform process moves forward towards implementation, the objectives of the HSRG must be adapted

  14. *Department of Neurological Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA Department of Molecular Biosciences, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, California, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    blood flow, modulation of neuronal pain processing in the brainstem, control of neurohormone release*Department of Neurological Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA acid that critically influence neuronal and vascu- lar function and disease, primarily via potent

  15. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Oregon | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergy BushCalifornia9Hampshire CategoricalDakotaRenewableOregon

  16. Energy Incentive Programs, Oregon | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal RegisterHydrogenDistributionFactIowaMontanaYorkOregon Energy

  17. Adrian, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta Clara,Addington,Admire, Kansas:Adrian,Oregon: Energy

  18. Brownsville, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable and InnovativeBrookmont,Florida: Energy Resources Jump to:Oregon:

  19. Wasco, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide Permit webpageWalthallFacilityVermont: EnergyWarrickWascoOregon:

  20. Waterloo, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,Area (Wood,Wall TurbineOregon: Energy

  1. Wilsonville, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTEDBird,Wilsonville, Oregon: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,

  2. Carlton, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL GasPermitsGreen BioEnergy LLCCaribouCarlton, Oregon: Energy

  3. Sheridan, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York: EnergySumoncle Solar EnergyNebraska:Sheridan,Oregon:

  4. Eugene, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: Energy Resources(RECP) in DevelopingEtowah,Eugene, Oregon:

  5. Fairview, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolis EnergyRanch,ElectricFairportJersey:Oregon:

  6. Lafayette, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation,working-groups <Lackawanna County,0299573°,Parish,Oregon:

  7. Oregon Coastal Management Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEITODO Jump to:Optony IncCove,Oregon

  8. Oregon Department of Forestry | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEITODO Jump to:OptonyEnvironmentalOregon

  9. Oregon Iron Works Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEITODO JumpInformationOregon

  10. Oregon/Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEITODOOregonOregon/Geothermal <

  11. Oregon/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEITODOOregonOregon/Geothermal

  12. Oregon's Solar Advantage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment ofOil'sEnergy8 *OptionalOrderLEVELProgramOregon's

  13. Harrisburg, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformation HandbookOhio: Energy Resources Jump to:Oregon:

  14. Yamhill, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch, New York:StateXiningYamagawaYamhill, Oregon:

  15. Phoenix, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: Energy Resources JumpPfhotonikaPhoenicia, NewOregon: Energy

  16. Salem, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY) JumpLandSRTHelena:Sakti3 JumpOregon:

  17. Gladstone, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting Jump to: navigation,GilaGirasole SrlOregon: Energy

  18. Newport, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to:Neppelsource History View NewCalifornia:Oregon:

  19. Sumpter, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to: navigation, searchNewOpenSumpter, Oregon: Energy Resources

  20. Sunnyside, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to: navigation,SunElectraSunnyside, Oregon: Energy Resources

  1. Dundee, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South, New Jersey:JumpOregon: Energy Resources Jump to:

  2. Oregon Environmental Quality Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio:OpowerOrchardCity,ProtectioOregon

  3. Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:Energy InformationOregon: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,

  4. BLM Oregon State Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon, France: Energy ResourcesBurley FieldBLMBLM NevadaOregon

  5. Metzger, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee Falls,MccoyMerrimac,MesoFuelMethaneMetzger, Oregon:

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Oregon

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona Arizona az_mapNevada NevadaOhio OhioOregon

  7. Corvallis, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis AtSystems | OpenCorvallis, Oregon: Energy

  8. Damascus, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility Database Data and Resources11-DNADaly City, California:Oregon:

  9. Dayton, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility Database DataDatatechnicNew Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to:Oregon:

  10. Medford, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group JumpNewMassachusettsMayoOregon: Energy Resources Jump

  11. Molalla, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysisMogadore, Ohio:Mokena,Molalla, Oregon:

  12. Richland, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,Maze - MakingMinnesota:Electric Coop JumpOregon: Energy

  13. MicroBooNE MicroBooNE Andrzej Szelc Yale University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverview andSinatra EngineeringMicroBooNE MicroBooNE

  14. The Oregon Health Insurance Experiment: Evidence from the First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taubman, Sarah

    In 2008, a group of uninsured low-income adults in Oregon was selected by lottery to be given the chance to apply for Medicaid. This lottery provides an opportunity to gauge the effects of expanding access to public health ...

  15. Oregon State University School of Civil & Construction Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    1 Oregon State University School of Civil & Construction Engineering Site Safety Plan O.H. Hinsdale Director of Civil & Construction Engineering Laboratories Melora M. Park NEES Site Operations Manager Wave Research Laboratory Structural Engineering Laboratory Geotechnical Research Facility David Trejo

  16. New Biorefinery Will Bring Jobs to Northeastern Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In northeastern Oregon, ZeaChem, a Colorado-based biofuel company, recently broke ground on a 250,000 gallon integrated cellulosic biorefinery. The technology development project is expected to be operating in 2011.

  17. University of Oregon: GPS-based Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vignola, F.; Andreas, A.

    A partnership with the University of Oregon and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) data to compliment existing resource assessment data collection by the university.

  18. The Holy Dose: Spiritual adventures with Southern Oregon's psychedelic crusaders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Alex L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    crusaders By Alex L. Weber Ashland, Oregon is a smart littleyearly Shakespeare Festival, Ashland is one of those placeswell-known is the fact that Ashland is home to the Church of

  19. fe0013531-Oregon-State | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DE-FE0013531 Goal The goal of this project is to study the biogeochemical response of the gas hydrate system on the Svalbard margin to environmental change. Performer Oregon State...

  20. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF andPoints of Fasterdata IPv6theMicroBooNE

  1. MicroBooNE Proposal Addendum March

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverview andSinatraMicroBooNE Proposal Addendum

  2. Prospects for Antineutrino Running at MiniBooNE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. O. Wascko

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    MiniBooNE began running in antineutrino mode on 19 January, 2006. We describe the sensitivity of MiniBooNE to LSND-like nuebar oscillations and outline a program of antineutrino cross-section measurements necessary for the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. We describe three independent methods of constraining wrong-sign (neutrino) backgrounds in an antineutrino beam, and their application to the MiniBooNE antineutrino analyses.

  3. Geothermal assessment activities in Oregon, 1979-1980, and a case study example at Powell Buttes, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.; Blackwell, D.D.; Brown, D.E.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal assessment activities in Oregon are reviewed briefly. An isogradient map, a lithologic and temperature log, and a finite difference thermal conductivity model of Powell Buttes area are presented. (MHR)

  4. Monitoring the Reproductive Success of Naturally Spawning Hatchery and Natural Spring Chinook Salmon in the Wenatchee River, 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Michael J.; Williamson, Kevin S. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated differences in the statistical power to assign parentage between an artificially propagated and wild salmon population. The propagated fish were derived from the wild population, and are used to supplement its abundance. Levels of genetic variation were similar between the propagated and wild groups at 11 microsatellite loci, and exclusion probabilities were >0.999999 for both groups. The ability to unambiguously identify a pair of parents for each sampled progeny was much lower than expected, however. Simulations demonstrated that the proportion of cases the most likely pair of parents were the true parents was lower for propagated parents than for wild parents. There was a clear relationship between parentage assignment ability and the degree of linkage disequilibrium, the estimated effective number of breeders that produced the parents, and the size of the largest family within the potential parents. If a stringent threshold for parentage assignment was used, estimates of relative fitness were biased downward for the propagated fish. The bias appeared to be largely eliminated by either fractionally assigning progeny among parents in proportion to their likelihood of parentage, or by assigning progeny to the most likely set of parents without using a statistical threshold. We used a DNA-based parentage analysis to measure the relative reproductive success of hatchery- and natural-origin spring Chinook salmon in the natural environment. Both male and female hatchery-origin fish produced far fewer juvenile progeny per parent when spawning naturally than did natural origin fish. Differences in age structure, spawning location, weight and run timing were responsible for some of the difference in fitness. Male size and age had a large influence on fitness, with larger and older males producing more offspring than smaller or younger individuals. Female size had a significant effect on fitness, but the effect was much smaller than the effect of size on male fitness. For both sexes, run time had a smaller but still significant effect on fitness, with earlier returning fish favored. Spawning location within the river had a significant effect on fitness for both males and females, and for females explained most of the reduced fitness observed for hatchery fish in this population. While differences have been reported in the relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced salmonids Oncorhynchus spp., factors explaining the differences are often confounded. We examined the spawning site habitat and redd structure variables of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha of known size that spawned in two tributaries of the Wenatchee River. We controlled for variability in spawning habitat by limiting our analysis to redds found within four selected reaches. No difference in the instantaneous spawner density or location of the redd in the stream channel was detected between reaches. Within each reach, no difference in the fork length or weight of hatchery and naturally produced fish was detected. While most variables differed between reaches, we found no difference in redd characteristics within a reach between hatchery and naturally produced females. Correlation analysis of fish size and redd characteristics found several weak but significant relationships suggesting larger fish contract larger redds in deeper water. Spawner density was inversely related to several redd structure variables suggesting redd size may decrease as spawner density increases. Results should be considered preliminary until samples size and statistical power goals are reached in future years. Trends in relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Wenatchee Basins suggest females that spawn in the upper reaches of the tributaries produced a great number of offspring compared to females that spawn in the lower reaches of the tributaries. To better understand this trend, redd microhabitat data was collected from spring Chinook sa

  5. COLUMBIA RIVER INTER-TRIBAL FISH COMMISSION 729 NE Oregon, Suite 200 Portland, OR 97232 Phone: 503/238-0667

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    containers necessary for a full factorial mating design (discussed below), we propose to decrease the number of stocks from six to four. Originally, our study design would have allowed for a comparison (within both. As modified our design will allow a comparison (within both spring and fall chinook salmon life history types

  6. Clean Energy Works Oregon Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob, Andria [City of Portland] [City of Portland; Cyr, Shirley [Clean Energy Works] [Clean Energy Works

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 2010, the City of Portland received a $20 million award from the U.S. Department of Energy, as part of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant program. This award was appropriated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), passed by President Obama in 2009. DOEs program became known as the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The BBNP grant objectives directed the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability (BPS) as the primary grantee to expand the BPS-led pilot program, Clean Energy Works Portland, into Clean Energy Works Oregon (CEWO), with the mission to deliver thousands of home energy retrofits, create jobs, save energy and reduce carbon dioxide emissions.The Final Technical Report explores the successes and lessons learned from the first 3 years of program implementation.

  7. Upriver and Downriver: A Gradient of Tobacco Intensification Along the Klamath River, California and Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todt, Donn L

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Oregon DONNL.TODT Ashland Parks Department, 340 S.Pioneer, Ashland, OR 97520 This paper identifies the types

  8. 4-H 331 REPRINTED JULY 2005 $8.00 Oregon 4-H Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    4-H 331 REPRINTED JULY 2005 $8.00 #12;Oregon 4-H Forestry Member Manual Contents Lesson 1: Welcome to Oregon 4-H Forestry 1 Lesson 2: Forests in Oregon 4 Lesson 3 Looking Closer 7 Lesson 4 Succession 9 Appendices Appendix A Answers to forestry puzzles 46 Appendix B Extension pubhcations The Wildlife Garden 48

  9. NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean B: NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, High Seas Salmon ocean tagging research on Columbia River salmon and steelhead migrating in the NE Pacific Basin R. Basin in 1995-2004. Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B

  10. DA NE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    K K DA NE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN - LNF, Accelerator Division Frascati, Sept. 2, 1991 Note: G-7 ENERGY LOSS DUE TO THE BROAD-BAND IMPEDANCE IN DA NE L. Palumbo, M. Serio 1. INTRODUCTION The Broad-Band (BB to simplify the evaluation of single-bunch instability thresholds and parasitic losses [1]. Lacking detailed

  11. DA NE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    K K DA NE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN - LNF, Accelerator Division Frascati, April 6, 1992 Note: G-13 RF ENERGY LOSSES AND IMPEDANCE OF THE DA NE ACCUMULATOR RING VACUUM CHAMBER S. Bartalucci, L. Palumbo, M chamber. This field acts back on the beam and it is re- sponsible for energy losses and instabilities. We

  12. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the fourth in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook populations in the Yakima River basin. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2004 and March 31, 2005 and includes analyses of historical baseline data, as well. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2004) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. The first chapter of this report compares first generation hatchery and wild upper Yakima River spring chinook returns over a suite of life-history, phenotypic and demographic traits. The second chapter deals specifically with identification of putative populations of wild spring chinook in the Yakima River basin based on differences in quantitative and genetic traits. The third chapter is a progress report on gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish spawned in 2004 including some comparisons with Little Naches River fish. In the fourth chapter, we present a progress report on comparisons naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River and in an experimental spawning channel at CESRF in 2004. The chapters in this report are in various stages of development. Chapters One and Two will be submitted for peer reviewed publication. Chapters Three and Four should be considered preliminary and additional fieldwork and/or analysis are in progress related to these topics. Readers are cautioned that any preliminary conclusions are subject to future revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  13. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Progam; Thyroid-Induced Chemical Imprinting in Early Life Stages and Assessment of Smoltification in Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1993 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilson, Mary Beth; Galloway, Heather; Scholz, Allan T. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, two hatcheries were built to provide a kokanee salmon and rainbow trout fishery for Lake Roosevelt as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead caused by construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Sherman Creek Hatchery, located on a tributary of Lake Roosevelt to provide an egg collection and imprinting site, is small with limited rearing capability. The second hatchery was located on the Spokane Indian Reservation because of a spring water source that supplied cold, pure water for incubating and rearing eggs.`The Spokane Tribal Hatchery thus serves as the production facility. Fish reared there are released into Sherman Creek and other tributary streams as 7-9 month old fry. However, to date, returns of adult fish to release sites has been poor. If hatchery reared kokanee imprint to the hatchery water at egg or swim up stages before 3 months of age, they may not be imprinting as 7-9 month old fry at the time of stocking. In addition, if these fish undergo a smolt phase in the reservoir when they are 1.5 years old, they could migrate below Grand Coulee Dam and out of the Lake Roosevelt system. In the present investigation, which is part of the Lake Roosevelt monitoring program to assess hatchery effectiveness, kokanee salmon were tested to determine if they experienced thyroxine-induced chemical imprinting and smoltification similar to anadromous salmonids. Determination of the critical period for olfactory imprinting was determined by exposing kokanee to different synthetic chemicals (morpholine or phenethyl alcohol) at different life stages, and then measuring the ability to discriminate the chemicals as sexually mature adults. Whole body thyroxine content and blood plasma thyroxine concentration was measured to determine if peak thyroid activity coincided with imprinting or other morphological, physiological or behavioral transitions associated with smoltification.

  14. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouwes, Nick (EcoLogical Research, Providence, UT); Petrosky, Charlie (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise ID); Schaller, Howard (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office, Vancouver, WA)

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species.Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts. experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. ''D'', or differential delayed mortality, is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. A ''D'' equal to one indicates that there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage, while a ''D'' less than one indicates that transported smolts die at a greater rate after release, than smolts that have migrated through the hydrosystem. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatcheries; (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program; (5) evaluate growth patterns of transported and in-river migrating smolts, and of upriver and downriver stocks. Primary CSS focus in this report for the 1997-1999 migration years included hatchery chinook tasks for objectives 1, 4 and 5.

  15. GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION OF NEWBERRY VOLCANO, OREGON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waibel, Albert F [Columbia Geoscience; Frone, Zachary S [Southern Methodist University; Blackwell, David D [Southern Methodist University

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Davenport Newberry (Davenport) has completed 8 years of exploration for geothermal energy on Newberry Volcano in central Oregon. Two deep exploration test wells were drilled by Davenport on the west flank of the volcano, one intersected a hydrothermal system; the other intersected isolated fractures with no hydrothermal interconnection. Both holes have bottom-hole temperatures near or above 315C (600F). Subsequent to deep test drilling an expanded exploration and evaluation program was initiated. These efforts have included reprocessing existing data, executing multiple geological, geophysical, geochemical programs, deep exploration test well drilling and shallow well drilling. The efforts over the last three years have been made possible through a DOE Innovative Exploration Technology (IET) Grant 109, designed to facilitate innovative geothermal exploration techniques. The combined results of the last 8 years have led to a better understanding of the history and complexity of Newberry Volcano and improved the design and interpretation of geophysical exploration techniques with regard to blind geothermal resources in volcanic terrain.

  16. Oregon Oil, Gas, and Geothermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEITODO JumpInformationOregonOregon

  17. Oregon/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEITODOOregonOregon/GeothermalOregon/Wind

  18. Recent results from SciBooNE and MiniBooNE experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation ProtectionRaisingRecent PublicationsSciTechSciBooNE and

  19. {alpha}-cluster states in N{ne}Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, V. Z.; Rogachev, G. V. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States) and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing (United States)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of studies of {alpha}-Cluster structure in N{ne}Z light nuclei is discussed. Spin-parity assignments for the low-lying levels in {sup 10}C are suggested.

  20. Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mekhiche, Mike [Principal Investigator] [Principal Investigator; Downie, Bruce [Project Manager] [Project Manager

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean wave power can be a significant source of large?scale, renewable energy for the US electrical grid. The Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) conservatively estimated that 20% of all US electricity could be generated by wave energy. Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. (OPT), with funding from private sources and the US Navy, developed the PowerBuoy? to generate renewable energy from the readily available power in ocean waves. OPT's PowerBuoy converts the energy in ocean waves to electricity using the rise and fall of waves to move the buoy up and down (mechanical stroking) which drives an electric generator. This electricity is then conditioned and transmitted ashore as high?voltage power via underwater cable. OPT's wave power generation system includes sophisticated techniques to automatically tune the system for efficient conversion of random wave energy into low cost green electricity, for disconnecting the system in large waves for hardware safety and protection, and for automatically restoring operation when wave conditions normalize. As the first utility scale wave power project in the US, the Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, OR, will consist of 10 PowerBuoys located 2.5 miles off the coast. This U.S. Department of Energy Grant funding along with funding from PNGC Power, an Oregon?based electric power cooperative, was utilized for the design completion, fabrication, assembly and factory testing of the first PowerBuoy for the Reedsport project. At this time, the design and fabrication of this first PowerBuoy and factory testing of the power take?off subsystem are complete; additionally the power take?off subsystem has been successfully integrated into the spar.

  1. Academic Advising at Oregon State University Vision Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Oregon State University academic advising is a teaching and learning process dedicated to student success that is focused on student success. We will... 1. Continually assist students in understanding the nature, purpose education. Advisor and Delivery Outcomes Student Learning Outcomes University, college, department

  2. 3DEP in Oregon by the Numbers Expected annual benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    total cost (quality level 2) $32.41 million Payback 0.7 years Quality level 1 buy-up estimate $203DEP in Oregon by the Numbers Expected annual benefits (quality level 2) $45.73 million Estimated resource management; forest resources management; water supply and quality; infrastructure and construction

  3. Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    biomass into various products. This approach will diversify the value of forest biomass. Progress to DateOregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center A Forest Residue-Based Pyrolysis to produce much-needed biofuels, supply valuable bioproducts, utilize waste streams and create jobs in rural

  4. Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    and Economic Analysis of Cellulosic Ethanol from Grass Straw in the Pacific Northwest Ganti Murthy, Oregon to cellulosic ethanol. This study will provide information on using Pacific Northwest biomass in a sustainable and pretreatment processes on ethanol yields in Pacific Northwest U.S.). Contact: Ganti Murthy, Biological

  5. Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center Hybrid Poplar as a Regional Ethanol is to couple hybrid poplar production with end-use ethanol production. Dr. Swanson, working in collaboration with industrial partners, will analyze feedstock taken from selected hybrid poplar clones to develop ethanol yield

  6. Oregon State University Sun Grant Western Regional Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    and Cellulases in the Bioconversion of Lignocellulosic Feedstocks to Ethanol Christine Kelly, Oregon State to ethanol. The team will examine fungal heme peroxidases to discover new "accessory" enzymes that function of conversion of softwoods to ethanol. Progress to Date · Bioreactor runs and analyses: Dr. Kelly and her

  7. Oregon State University Tuesdays, 4:00 p.m.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    uses 3-D mapping, virtual reality, and terrain fly-through techniques to create vivid interpretations Oregon State University 3-D Scientific Visualization, High Performance Computer Graphics Feb 6 Mark of Earth Structure Mar 13 Bob Crippen NASA Jet Propulsion Lab Pasadena, CA NASA Shuttle Radar Topography

  8. January 21, 2014 Issue No. 56 OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    ($ in millions) Government Relations Update 2 OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY #12;FY 2015 Budget It has been widely reported that release of the Administration's FY 2015 budget will be delayed by about a month. This delay it likely that the budget will be released closer to early to mid-March. The FY2015 discretionary top line

  9. LNG, Public Opinion and Decision-making: Conflict in Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    LNG, Public Opinion and Decision-making: Conflict in Oregon Lisa MB Harrington Kansas State University #12;2 LNG Liquified Natural Gas Natural gas condensed into a liquid by cooling to about -163; LNG is considered cleaner than coal and petroleum- based fuels, but development also poses issues

  10. EIS-0201: Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project Morrow Count, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This environmental impact statement analyzes the protential impacts of the Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, a proposed natural gas-fired cogeneration power plant near Boardman, Oregon. The proposed power plant would be built on a 22-acre site in the Port of Morrow Industrial Park. The plant would have two combustion turbines that would generate 440 average megawatts of energy when completed.

  11. Oregon State University 52 CEM Students Completed the Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    % 27% 12% Number of Industry-Related Internships Completed 0 1 2 3 #12; Alliant Systems, Inc. Andersen Corporation BLM Bonneville Power Administration CECOP Portland Water Bureau CECOP Portland Bureau Company - 2 Nordic PCL ODOT Bend Construction Offices Oregon Electric Group 2 PCL Constructors

  12. Dr. Ed Brook, Oregon State University US Ice Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittner, Andreas

    Dr. Ed Brook, Oregon State University US Ice Drilling Program T I N Y B U B B L E S Greenhouse and Analysis Dry Extraction Crushing under vacuum Analysis by gas chromatography, laser spectroscopy, mass spectrometry Wet Extraction Melting under vacuum Analysis by gas chromatography, laser spectroscopy, mass

  13. II. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND Since 1977 the University of Oregon Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    2 II. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND Since 1977 the University of Oregon Solar Monitoring Laboratory has operated a solar radiation monitoring network in the Pacific Northwest. The number of stations participat of utilities headed by the Eugene Water and Electric Board initiated the Re- gional Solar Radiation Monitoring

  14. Last Edit 2/8/2011 OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Hazardous Materials Public Safety/Crowd Control and Management Rescue Public Works VolunteersLast Edit 2/8/2011 OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY MASTER EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN #12;Last Edit: 2/8/2011 1 OVERVIEW This document provides a management framework for responding to incidents that may

  15. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2000 and returned in 2003. Another goal of CSS was to help resolve uncertainty concerning marking, handling and bypass effects associated with control fish used in National Marine Fisheries Service's (NMFS) transportation research and evaluation. Significant concern had been raised that the designated control groups, which were collected, marked and released at dams, did not experience the same conditions as the in-river migrants which were not collected and bypassed under existing management, and that the estimated ratios of SARs of transported fish to SARs of control fish may be biased (Mundy et al. 1994). Instead of marking at the dams, as traditionally done for NMFS transportation evaluations, CSS began marking sufficient numbers of fish at the hatcheries and defining in-river groups from the detection histories at the dams (e.g., total

  16. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

  17. Avoiding Hard Choices: Oregon's Special Session to Amend the 2009-2011 Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stabrowski, Donald J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guide to the Oregon State Budget. Salem News. January 17.Every Pocket to Fill Budget. The Oregonian. Feb- ruary 20,Deconstructing the State Budget. Portland, Or- egon,

  18. Triple photoionization of Ne and Ar near threshold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluett, J.B.; Wehlitz, R. [Synchrotron Radiation Center, UW-Madison, Stoughton, Wisconsin 53589 (United States); Lukic, D. [Institute of Physics, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The triple-photoionization cross section of neon and argon near threshold has been investigated by ion time-of-flight spectrometry. We applied the Wannier power law to our data and confirmed the theoretical Wannier exponent in the cases of Ne and Ar. Our data also agree with previous findings regarding the Wannier exponent and its range of validity for Ne. However, the Wannier power law exhibits a much smaller range of validity of 2 eV for Ar compared to 5 eV for Ne. Also, in contrast to a previous experiment, we do not find a 'second' power law but a gradual decrease of the exponent above the range of validity of the Wannier power law.

  19. Multiphoton Double Ionization of Ar and Ne Close to Threshold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Yunquan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ye Difa; Liu Jie [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, 100084 Beijing (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, 100088 Beijing (China); Rudenko, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Max-Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Tschuch, S.; Duerr, M.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Siegel, M.; Morgner, U. [Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Welfengarten 1, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Gong Qihuang [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In kinematically complete studies we explore double ionization (DI) of Ne and Ar in the threshold regime (I>3x10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}) for 800 nm, 45 fs pulses. The basic differences are found in the two-electron momentum distributions - 'correlation' (CO) for Ne and 'anticorrelation' (ACO) for Ar - that can be partially explained theoretically within a 3D classical model including tunneling. Transverse electron momentum spectra provide insight into 'Coulomb focusing' and point to correlated nonclassical dynamics. Finally, DI threshold intensities, CO as well as ACO regimes are predicted for both targets.

  20. OREGON LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OFFICE OF THE SENATE PRESIDENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    , Bend, Eugene and Ashland, as well as a hearing at the State Capitol where participants from Hood River," said Buckley (D-Ashland). "We want to hear what services are critical to folks in rural Oregon, as well public hearings from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. in Bend on April 29 and Ashland on April 30 and a 1 to 4 p

  1. EIS-0507: Boardman-Hemingway Transmission Line, Oregon and Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service are preparing, with DOEs Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, an EIS that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct about 305 miles of 500-kV transmission line from northeast Oregon to southwest Idaho. BPAs proposed action is to partially fund part the transmission line.

  2. By Stanley Micklavzina, Asher Tubman, and Frank Vignola for the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

  3. By Stanley Micklavzina, Asher Tubman, and Frank Vignola for the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

  4. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A. [National Marine Fisheries Service

    2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

  5. SSRS Summary for SSRS NE Steering Group 8 September 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SSRS Summary for SSRS NE Steering Group 8 September 2011 1. Project Officer Hollie Walker left us modelling expert) to discuss the project monitoring and data analysis protocols that will be used to demonstrate the benefits of grey squirrel control under the Project. As a result of the discussions we revised

  6. High-frequency surface wave pumped He-Ne laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moutoulas, C.; Moisan, M.; Bertrand, L.; Hubert, J.; Lachambre, J.L.; Ricard, A.

    1985-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new electrodeless He-Ne laser using a plasma produced by an electromagnetic surface wave as the active medium is described. Gain measurements are reported as a function of the pump wave frequency from 200 to 915 MHz. The dependence of laser performance on the gas mixture and pressure is also presented.

  7. EMPLOYMENT SUMMARY FOR 2012 GRADUATES Lincoln, NE 68583

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    EMPLOYMENT SUMMARY FOR 2012 GRADUATES Lincoln, NE 68583 Website : http://law.unl.edu/ Phone : 402 Full Time 1 / 1 % Unemployed - Not Seeking 0 / 0 % Employment Status Unknown 1 / 1 % Unemployed - Seeking 10 / 8 % Total graduates 128 Employed - Bar Passage Required 84 1 3 0 88 / 69 % Employed

  8. Motor Vehicle Administration 6601 Ritchie Highway, N.E.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Motor Vehicle Administration 6601 Ritchie Highway, N.E. Glen Burnie, Maryland 21062 For more-Owner's Signature Vehicle Information Year Make Sticker No. Title No. Tag No. Vehicle Identification Number Car Multi-purpose vehicle Truck 1 ton or less Motorcycle Fees: Non Logo Organizational Tags: $15

  9. DA NE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    K K DA NE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN - LNF, Accelerator Division Frascati, Sept. 2, 1991 Note: G-8 RF AND RESISTIVE ENERGY LOSS IN THE INTERACTION REGION VACUUM CHAMBER S. Bartalucci, L. Palumbo, M. Serio, B-section variation leads to sub- stantial energy losses localized in the IR vacuum chamber even if the steps in cross

  10. Ecosystem response to upwelling off the Oregon coast: Behavior of three nitrogen-based models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    Ecosystem response to upwelling off the Oregon coast: Behavior of three nitrogen-based models Y. H; published 6 March 2003. [1] The behavior of three ecosystem models is analyzed for upwelling off the Oregon coast as a function of the number of model components. The first ecosystem model includes dissolved

  11. 74th OREGON LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY--2007 Regular Session Senate Bill 1054

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Department of Geology and Mineral Industries for purpose of paying costs of Oregon territorial sea mapping of the State of Oregon strongly supports the development of this technology for its global benefits, as well has the potential for direct conflict with other important uses of ocean resources; and Whereas energy

  12. Plasma Diagnostics Through Analysis of Ne I Line Shape Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milosavljevic, Vladimir [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O.B. 368, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); School of Physics Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of the experimentally determined 26 prominent neutral neon (Ne I) line shapes (in the 3s-3p, 3s-3p', 3s'-3p', 3s'-3p and 3p-3d transitions) the basic plasma parameters i.e. electron temperature (T) and electron density (N) have been obtained using the line deconvolution procedure, in a plasma created in a linear, low-pressure, pulsed arc operated in pure neon. The mentioned plasma parameters have also been measured using independent experimental diagnostics techniques. Agreement has been found among the two sets of the obtained parameters. This recommends the deconvolution procedure for plasma diagnostical purposes. Self-confidence of the method has checked using Ne I spectral lines which originate from different energy levels. The advance used of the method has been done in the way to find energy level from which it does not existing any more assumption of LTE.This method may be of interest also in astrophysics where direct measurements of the main plasma parameters (T and N) are not possible. With the development of space born spectroscopy the good quality spectra will be enabling to use this method. The separate electron (We) and ion (Wi) contributions to the total Stark width (Wt), which have not been measured so far, have also been obtained for neon spectral lines. The measured and calculated We data are compared to available theoretical We values. It has found stronger influence of the ion contribution to the Ne I lines shape than the predicted ones calculated by the current theory. It has also tested the ion contribution to the Ne II lines shape. Small influence of the ion contribution to the some Ne II line shape has evidenced.

  13. CDC-INV4104 Optimal Control of A ne Connection Control Systems: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Richard M.

    CDC-INV4104 Optimal Control of A ne Connection Control Systems: A Variational Approach J. Alexander we investigate the optimal control of a ne connection control systems. The formalism of the a ne-dimensional second-order system as a 2n-dimensional rst-order system and applying the machinery of optimal control

  14. Production rate of cosmogenic 21 Ne in quartz estimated from 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuster, David L.

    Production rate of cosmogenic 21 Ne in quartz estimated from 10 Be, 26 Al, and 21 Ne concentrations Antarctica production rate calibration We estimated the production rate of 21 Ne in quartz using a set production rate. As the erosion rate can be determined from 10 Be and 26 Al concentrations, this allows

  15. Plate interaction in the NE Caribbean subduction zone from continuous GPS observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    Plate interaction in the NE Caribbean subduction zone from continuous GPS observations Uri S. ten sites on NE Caribbean islands to evaluate strain accumulation along the North American (NA) ­ Caribbean-Venegas (2012), Plate interaction in the NE Caribbean subduction zone from continuous GPS observations, Geophys

  16. CONGESTION IN THE ISO-NE ELECTRICITY MARKETS ANNA BARBARA IHRIG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    CONGESTION IN THE ISO-NE ELECTRICITY MARKETS BY ANNA BARBARA IHRIG THESIS Advisor: Prof. George in charge of operation and control, the ISO-NE. We describe how the ISO-NE administers the energy market in causing congestion is analyzed; no significant correlation was found. In addition, the impacts of the ISO

  17. Predator-prey interactions of salmon in the plume and near-shore ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Comparison of Hatchery and Unmarked Salmon off Washington and Oregon #12;10 20 30 40 5010 20 30 40 50 -3 -2

  18. Overview of DOE-NE Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadasivan, Pratap [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Research objectives are: (1) Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; (2) Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy; (3) Develop Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycles; and (4) Understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The goal is to enable the use of risk information to inform NE R&D program planning. The PTRA program supports DOE-NE's goal of using risk information to inform R&D program planning. The FY12 PTRA program is focused on terrorism risk. The program includes a mix of innovative methods that support the general practice of risk assessments, and selected applications.

  19. MiniBooNE "Windows on the Universe"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanski, Ray; /Fermilab

    2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the last few decades has left neutrino physics with several vexing issues. Among them are the following questions: (1) Why are lepton mixing angles so different from those in the quark sector? (2) What is the most probable range of the reactor mixing angle? (3) Is the atmospheric mixing angle maximal? (4) What is the number of fermion generations? These are some of the issues that neutrino science hopes to study; this article will explore these questions as part of a more general scientific landscape, and will discuss the part MiniBooNE might play in this exploration. We discuss the current state of measurements taken by MiniBooNE, and emphasize the uniqueness of neutrino oscillations as an important probe into the 'Windows on the Universe.'

  20. [NeII] emission line profiles from photoevaporative disc winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. D. Alexander

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I model profiles of the [NeII] forbidden emission line at 12.81um, emitted by photoevaporative winds from discs around young, solar-mass stars. The predicted line luminosities (~ 1E-6 Lsun) are consistent with recent data, and the line profiles vary significantly with disc inclination. Edge-on discs show broad (30-40km/s) double-peaked profiles, due to the rotation of the disc, while in face-on discs the structure of the wind results in a narrower line (~10km/s) and a significant blue-shift (5-10km/s). These results suggest that observations of [NeII] line profiles can provide a direct test of models of protoplanetary disc photoevaporation.

  1. Lake County, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation,working-groupsIllinois: Energy Resources JumpOregon: Energy

  2. Lane County, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind Energy Development Jump to: navigation, searchOregon:

  3. Winchester Bay, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTEDBird,Wilsonville, Oregon: Energy Resources JumpWinWinchester

  4. Cedar Mill, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest, New Jersey: Energy ResourcesMill, Oregon:

  5. Oregon - Compare - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBGOperable Generating Units inOregon

  6. Oregon - Search - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBGOperable Generating UnitsOregon

  7. Biomass Boiler to Heat Oregon School | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJune 17,Agenda AgendaDepartmentOregon Governor Kulongoski

  8. King City, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa:Washington:Kimble County, Texas: EnergyCity, Oregon:

  9. Jackson County, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Wind Farm Jump to:Oregon: Energy Resources

  10. Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEITODO JumpInformation Oregon

  11. Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEITODO JumpInformationOregon Energy

  12. Oregon Wave Energy Partners LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEITODOOregon PublicTrail WindOregon Wave

  13. Oregon's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil andOpenEITODOOregon PublicTrail WindOregon

  14. Linn County, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,LakefrontLighthouse SolarI Jump to:Link to theOregon:

  15. City of Ashland, Oregon (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |City of Ames, IowaAshland, Oregon (Utility

  16. Gold Hill, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting Jump to:Echo,GEF JumpGloverville,Gogebic County,Oregon:

  17. Grass Valley, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: Energy ResourcesSouth,GrapeGrassOregon:

  18. Harney County, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformation Handbook forHansungHarney County, Oregon: Energy

  19. Oregon Trail El Cons Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympia GreenThe communityOrchid BioenergyOregon Trail

  20. North Plains, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: Energy ResourcesGranby,Plains, Oregon: Energy Resources Jump to:

  1. Oak Grove, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence SeedNunn,and Fees for GeothermalOTilt JumpOakOregon:

  2. Oregon Coastal Management Program Website | Open Energy Information

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  3. Oregon Construction/Installation Permit for Onsite Wastewater Treatment

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  4. Oregon County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  5. Oregon DEQ Hazardous Waste Fact Sheet | Open Energy Information

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  6. Oregon Division of State Lands | Open Energy Information

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  7. Oregon Federal and State Compliance for Historic and Archaeological

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  8. Marion County, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,JemezMissouri: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Oregon:

  9. Sweet Home, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:Holdings Co08.0 - Warehouses 73.0 - DaytimeOregon: Energy

  10. Tillamook County, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergyoThornwood,TianfuTidalTikiCounty, Oregon:

  11. Oregon Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhavenMassachusetts Regions NationalScienceofOregon Regions National

  12. RAPID/Geothermal/Environment/Oregon | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod JumpGeorgia:Colorado < RAPID‎ |Hawaii <NevadaOregon

  13. RAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Oregon | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod JumpGeorgia:ColoradoNevada < RAPID‎ |Oregon <

  14. Raleigh Hills, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Raghuraji AgroRajaram MaizeHills, Oregon:

  15. Neutrino and Antineutrino Cross sections at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan; /Alabama U.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment has reported a number of high statistics neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections -among which are the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) and neutral current elastic (NCE) neutrino scattering on mineral oil (CH2). Recently a study of the neutrino contamination of the anti-neutrino beam has concluded and the analysis of the anti-neutrino CCQE and NCE scattering is ongoing.

  16. Time-Resolved Measurement of Interatomic Coulombic Decay in Ne_2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnorr, K; Kurka, M; Rudenko, A; Foucar, L; Schmid, G; Broska, A; Pfeifer, T; Meyer, K; Anielski, D; Boll, R; Rolles, D; Kbel, M; Kling, M F; Jiang, Y H; Mondal, S; Tachibana, T; Ueda, K; Marchenko, T; Simon, M; Brenner, G; Treusch, R; Scheit, S; Averbukh, V; Ullrich, J; Schrter, C D; Moshammer, R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lifetime of interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) [L. S. Cederbaum et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 4778 (1997)] in Ne_2 is determined via an extreme ultraviolet pump-probe experiment at the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg. The pump pulse creates a 2s inner-shell vacancy in one of the two Ne atoms, whereupon the ionized dimer undergoes ICD resulting in a repulsive Ne^{+}(2p^{-1}) - Ne^{+}(2p^{-1}) state, which is probed with a second pulse, removing a further electron. The yield of coincident Ne^{+} - Ne^{2+} pairs is recorded as a function of the pump-probe delay, allowing us to deduce the ICD lifetime of the Ne_{2}^{+}(2s^{-1}) state to be (150 +/- 50) fs in agreement with quantum calculations.

  17. What The Oregon Health Study Can Tell Us About Expanding Medicaid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Heidi

    The recently enacted Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act includes a major expansion of Medicaid to low-income adults in 2014. This paper describes the Oregon Health Study, a randomized controlled trial that will be ...

  18. Oregon State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oregon State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Oregon. The profile is a result of a survey of NRC licensees in Oregon. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Oregon.

  19. GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION ASSESSMENT AND INTERPRETATION, KLAMATH BASIN, OREGON-SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1966, Energy and power of geothermal resources: Dept. o fTelluric exploration for geothermal anomalies i n Oregon:Bowen, R.G. , 1972, Geothermal o v k i e w s of t h e '

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - To NETL Albany Site from Portland, Oregon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portland, Oregon Airport (PDX) 1. Take the AIRPORT EXIT RD. until it intersects I-205. 2. Follow I-205 SOUTH for 25 MILES to the intersection with I-5 SOUTH (Salem exit). 3. Follow...

  1. EA-1952: Lane-Wendson No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project; Lane County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of the 41.3-mile Lane-Wendson No. 1 transmission line between Eugene and Florence, Oregon.

  2. WEATHERIZATION INDUSTRIES SAVE ENERGY ST SE SALEM, OREGON 97301 (503) 5691381 WEATHERIZATIONALLIES@GMAIL.COM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WEATHERIZATION INDUSTRIES SAVE ENERGY 565 21ST ST SE SALEM, OREGON 97301 (503) 5691381 WEATHERIZATIONALLIES@GMAIL.COM COMMENTS ON ACHIEVABLE SAVINGS: A RETROSPECTIVE LOOK AT THE NORTHWEST POWER AND CONSERVATION COUNCIL'S CONSERVATION PLANNING ASSUMPTIONS Weatherization Industries Save Energy (WISE

  3. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lakeview, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lake view, Oregon evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site.

  4. Microsoft Word - CX-OregonCity-ChemawaWoodPolesFY12_WEB .docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    31, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Alvey SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum James Semrau Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Oregon City-Chemawa 2 Wood Pole...

  5. Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 4 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroder, S.L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Watson, B.D. (Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September of 2003, twenty-nine hatchery and twenty-eight wild spring chinook adults were placed into the observation stream located at the Cle Elum Supplementation Research Facility. In, addition 20 precocious males, 7 hatchery and 13 wild, were simultaneously released into the structure. As in previous years, the fish had small amounts of fin material removed prior to being introduced into the stream so that microsatellite DNA based pedigree analyses could be performed on their subsequent progeny. The entire 127 m long by 7.9 m wide stream was made available to this group of fish. Continuous behavioral observations were made while the females prepared nests and spawned. Moreover, standard measurements of adult longevity, spawning participation, water velocity, redd sizes, gravel composition, water temperature and flow were taken. Fry produced from these fish started to emigrate from the stream in early January 2004. They were trapped and sub-sampled for later microsatellite DNA analyses. In mid May of 2004 fry emergence from the channel was complete and residual fish were captured by seine and electro-fishing so that the entire juvenile population could be proportionately sampled. Audiotape records of the behavior of wild and hatchery adults spawning in the observation stream in 2001 were transcribed into continuous ethograms. Courting, agonistic, and location data were extracted from these chronological records and analyzed to characterize the reproductive behavior of both hatchery and wild fish. In addition, a ''gold standard'' pedigree analysis was completed on the fry originating from the adults placed into the observation stream in 2001. Behavioral and morphological data collected on hatchery and wild males were linked to the results of the pedigree analysis to ascertain what factors affected their reproductive success (RS) or capacity to produce fry. Individual RS values were calculated for each male placed into the observation stream and the coefficient of variation calculated from these values was greater than 100%. To determine what might be responsible for this degree of variation we examined the relative importance of a variety of physical and behavioral traits. Relative body size, for example, was found not be an important predictor of reproductive success. Instead, the capacity to court females and dominate sexual rivals was directly associated with male RS. However, males that had low dominance scores were also successful at producing offspring. These individuals utilized alternative behavioral strategies to gain close proximity to females and were successful in their attempts to fertilize eggs. Observations made on the color patterns of males showed dominance was closely linked with the possession of an overall black or dark brown color pattern. In addition, we discovered that males that had multiple mates achieved higher RS values than those who spawned with fewer females. The approach we are taking to compare the reproductive competency of hatchery and wild fish is to first determine the factors that are strongly linked to reproductive behavior and then assess whether significant differences occur in the expression of these traits based on the fish origin. Transcriptions of audiotapes are continuing and a second gold standard pedigree analyses on the fry produced from adults placed into the observation stream in 2002 is nearing completion. Future work will be directed at discovering the factors that affect female RS values. In the fall of 2004 we will again liberate hatchery and wild fish simultaneously into the entire observation stream to continue our efforts to objectively determine if differences in RS are caused by fish origin.

  6. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2002 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2003-2004 Biennial Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer Chinook (hereafter, Chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of Chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams Chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River Chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well as comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer Chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer Chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer Chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer Chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2002 and their respective adult returns through 2004.

  7. EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and Hood River Counties, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild its 24-mile long, 115 kilovolt Bonneville-Hood River transmission line. The existing line runs between the Bonneville Powerhouse at Bonneville Dam in Multnomah County, Oregon, and BPA's existing Hood River Substation in Hood River County, Oregon. The project would include replacing structures and conductor wires, improving access roads, and constructing new access roads or trails where needed.

  8. {sup 18}Ne production for the Beta beams project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodk, Rastislav [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, CTU in Prague, Horsk 3/22a, CZ-12800 Prague (Czech Republic); Mendona, Tania M. [IFIMUP and IN - Institute of Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal and CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Swaziland); Stora, Thierry [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense relativistic (anti)neutrino beams are an unique tool required to study fundamental properties of neutrinos such as neutrino oscillation parameters, as well as their Majorana or Dirac nature, the lepton number conservation hypothesis and the absolute neutrino mass scale. Such beams originate from acceleration of ?-decaying radioactive ions (Beta beams). A molten fluoride salt target has been developed for the production of the required rates of low-Q baseline isotope {sup 18}Ne for the Beta beams project. The prototyped unit has been tested on-line at ISOLDE-CERN. In this contribution an overview of the prototyping and on-line tests is presented.

  9. The MicroBooNE Experiment - At Work

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF andPoints of Fasterdata IPv6theMicroBooNE at

  10. DOE NE Used Fuel Disposition FY2015 Working Group Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOST MANAGEMENT REPORT SRM/ATY 1DepartmentNE

  11. Municipal Energy Agency of NE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoon LakeMountainMunicipal Energy Agency of NE Jump

  12. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are hereNewsOurADMicroBooNE The

  13. MicroBooNE Project Critical Decision Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverview andSinatra EngineeringMicroBooNE

  14. MicroBooNE TPC Wires Image Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverview andSinatraMicroBooNE Proposal AddendumImage

  15. MicroBooNE TPC Wires Image Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverview andSinatraMicroBooNE Proposal

  16. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reform Process BACKGROUND At the December Council meeting the Council members asked staff to provide periodic updates on the status and progress of the Columbia River Hatchery Reform Project and the work

  17. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -up equipment1 . BACKGROUND On June 10, 2013, Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) submitted a hatchery intended to strengthen the proposal's study design. These comments form the qualification that the ISRP

  18. Effects of a livestock exclosure on channel morphology and vegetation along Long Creek in Lake County, Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doehring, Carolyn; Rubin, Zan; Sahai, Rashmi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reaches of Wickiup Creek in Eastern Oregon. Physicalof beaver dams in Bridge Creek, an incised stream channel inavailable data from Long Creek Cross Sections Sites Reach1

  19. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  20. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  1. NE-23 List of California Sites Hattie Carwell. SAN/NSQA Division

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Andrew Wallo III, Designation and Certification Manager Division of Facilitv and Site Decommissioning Projects Dffice of Nuclear Energy bee: W. Murphie, NE-23 J. Wagoners,...

  2. A Case Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated Interpretation Of Seismic Tomography, Litho-Stratigraphy, Salt Tectonics, And Thermal Structure Jump to:...

  3. Quasielastic Scattering at MiniBooNE Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez-Ruso, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Murcia (Spain); Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Fisica Computacional, Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal); Buss, O.; Leitner, T.; Mosel, U. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen (Germany)

    2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present our description of neutrino induced charged current quasielastic scattering (CCQE) in nuclei at energies relevant for the MiniBooNE experiment. In our framework, the nucleons, with initial momentum distributions according to the Local Fermi Gas model, move in a density- and momentum-dependent mean field potential. The broadening of the outgoing nucleons due to nucleon-nucleon interactions is taken into account by spectral functions. Long range (RPA) correlations renormalizing the electroweak strength in the medium are also incorporated. The background from resonance excitation events that do not lead to pions in the final state is also predicted by propagating the outgoing hadrons with the Giessen semiclassical BUU model in coupled channels (GiBUU). We achieve a good description of the shape of the CCQE Q{sup 2} distribution extracted from data by MiniBooNE, thanks to the inclusion of RPA correlations, but underestimate the integrated cross section when the standard value of M{sub A} = 1 GeV is used. Possible reasons for this mismatch are discussed.

  4. By Raghu Parthasarathy for the Meyer for the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory Page 7.1 6

  5. By Stanley Micklavzina and Frank Vignola for the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory Page 2.1 6

  6. EA-1992: Funding for Principle Power, Inc., for the WindFloat Pacific Offshore Wind Demonstration Project, offshore of Coos Bay, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Funding for Principle Power, Inc., for the WindFloat Pacific Offshore Wind Demonstration Project, offshore of Coos Bay, Oregon

  7. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUBJECT: Presentation by Smart Grid Oregon Action items in the Council's Sixth Power Plan require and its operations. These changes often go under the name of "smart grid". One organization working to promote changes to the electricity grid is Smart Grid Oregon. Three members of the Smart Grid Oregon board

  8. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lines indicate LNG imports Gray lines indicate pipeline flows LNG Sunstone Blue Bridge Ruby P ifi C t Pacific Connector Pacific Trail Oregon LNG Bradwood Landing LNG LNG Terminals Kitimat LNG (export) Bradwood Landing Oregon LNG g g Oregon LNG Jordan Cove LNG

  9. Cheer Clinic The Oregon State Cheerleaders will be hosting a cheer clinics this winter, for kids ages 2-13. The clinic is limited to the first 150

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Cheer Clinic The Oregon State Cheerleaders will be hosting a cheer clinics this winter, for kids ages 2-13. The clinic is limited to the first 150 participants that sign up. The clinic includes a t information call the Oregon State Marketing office at (541)737.1085. Jr. Cheer Clinic2008 Cheer Clinic Oregon

  10. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Oregon (ETO), Bonneville and the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) to report improvements in industrial efficiency. The weatherization of low-income housing and improvements in irrigated. Eden Oregon Joan M. Dukes Oregon October 29, 2009 MEMORANDUM TO: Council Members FROM: Tom Eckman

  11. By Stanley Micklavzina, Asher Tubman, and Frank Vignola for the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and the Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and the Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory

  12. Workforce Development Oregon Academic Research Facilities Research Expertise Oregon was the first statein the U.S. to install photovoltaics on its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    in recruiting and supporting solar energy companies that have open access to our university network of cutting students is here to partner with private companies and public agencies to ensure that solar energy succeeds's semiconductor industry makes Oregon an ideal location for solar PV manufacturing companies. Our universities

  13. Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

  14. Neutrino Cross Section Measurements @ SciBooNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariani, C.; /Columbia U.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of cross sections of neutrinos of 0.7 GeV average energy scattering off a carbon target cross sections with by the SciBooNE experiment at Fermilab. These measurements are important inputs for current and future accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments in the interpretation of neutrino oscillation signals. The measurement of neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} is one of the most important goals in current neutrino experiments. For the current and next generation of long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, T2K, NOvA and LBNE, the precise measurement of neutrino-nucleus cross sections in the few GeV energy range is an essential ingredient in the interpretation of neutrino oscillation signals.

  15. Effective versus ion thermal temperatures in the Weizmann Ne Z-pinch: Modeling and stagnation physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroupp, Eyal

    Effective versus ion thermal temperatures in the Weizmann Ne Z-pinch: Modeling and stagnation of Technology, Haifa, Israel 5 National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89144, USA (Received 23 thermal and effective temperatures is investigated through simulations of the Ne gas puff z-pinch reported

  16. N.E. Leonard U. Pisa 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    1 N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control and Mobile Sensor Networks Application to Mobile Sensor Networks, Part II Naomi Ehrich Leonard Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.princeton.edu/~naomi N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 2 Key References [1] Leonard, Paley, Lekien

  17. N.E. Leonard U. Pisa 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    1 N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control and Mobile Sensor Networks Introduction Naomi Ehrich Leonard Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Princeton University and Electrical Systems and Automation University of Pisa naomi@princeton.edu, www.princeton.edu/~naomi N.E. Leonard ­ U

  18. N.E. Leonard U. Pisa 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    1 N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control and Mobile Sensor Networks Cooperative Control, Part I, A-C Naomi Ehrich Leonard Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Princeton.princeton.edu/~naomi N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 2 Natural Groups Photo by Norbert Wu Exhibit

  19. N.E. Leonard U. Pisa 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    1 N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control and Mobile Sensor Networks Cooperative Control, Part I, D-F Naomi Ehrich Leonard Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Princeton.princeton.edu/~naomi N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 2 Outline and Key References A. Artificial Potentials

  20. N.E. Leonard U. Pisa 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    1 N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control and Mobile Sensor Networks Application to Mobile Sensor Networks, Part I Naomi Ehrich Leonard Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.princeton.edu/~naomi N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 2 Outline 1. Introduction to cooperative control

  1. THE GENESIS SOLAR WIND CONCENTRATOR TARGET: MASS FRACTIONATION CHARACTERISED BY NE ISOTOPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WIENS, ROGER C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; OLINGER, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HEBER, V.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; REISENFELD, D.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BURNETT, D.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; ALLTON, J.H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BAUR, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; WIECHERT, U. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; WIELER, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The concentrator on Genesis provides samples of increased fluences of solar wind ions for precise determination of the oxygen isotopic composition of the solar wind. The concentration process caused mass fractionation as function of the radial target position. They measured the fractionation using Ne released by UV laser ablation along two arms of the gold cross from the concentrator target to compare measured Ne with modeled Ne. The latter is based on simulations using actual conditions of the solar wind during Genesis operation. Measured Ne abundances and isotopic composition of both arms agree within uncertainties indicating a radial symmetric concentration process. Ne data reveal a maximum concentration factor of {approx} 30% at the target center and a target-wide fractionation of Ne isotopes of 3.8%/amu with monotonously decreasing {sup 20}Ne/{sup 22}Ne ratios towards the center. The experimentally determined data, in particular the isotopic fractionation, differ from the modeled data. They discuss potential reasons and propose future attempts to overcome these disagreements.

  2. Optogalvanic isotope enrichment of Cu ions in Cu-Ne positive column discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Optogalvanic isotope enrichment of Cu ions in Cu-Ne positive column discharges M. J. Kushner The isotopic enrichment of copper ions in a positive column Cu-Ne discharge using optogalvanic excitation the 63-amu isotope of copper is enriched relative to the neutral abundance. Enrichment as large as 10

  3. ccsd00000561 Proton Zemach radius from measurements of the hyper ne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd00000561 (version 1) : 25 Aug 2003 Proton Zemach radius from measurements of the hyper#12;ne and discuss the information about the electromagnetic structure of protons that could be extracted from theoretical results on the proton polarizability e#11;ects and the experimental hydrogen hyper#12;ne splitting

  4. Extractors for LowWeight A#ne Sources Institute for Advanced Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    to solve this problem. These are functions that are easy to invert given the en tire output, but very hardExtractors for LowWeight A#ne Sources Anup Rao # Institute for Advanced Study arao . An extractor for entropy k a#ne sources is a function A#Ext : F n # {0, 1} m such that for any such source X

  5. The Cretaceous/ Tertiary boundary: sedimentology and micropalaeontology at El Mulato section, NE Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    The Cretaceous/ Tertiary boundary: sedimentology and micropalaeontology at El Mulato section, NE and sedimentological analysis of this transition at the El Mulato section (NE Mexico), in order to infer the little Palaeogene Velasco Formation, there is a 2-m-thick Clastic Unit. Strati- graphical and sedimentological ana

  6. Motor Vehicle Crash Fatalities and Injuries: An Analysis of the Relationship of Roadway, Driver, Vehicle Characteristics in Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Motor Vehicle Crash Fatalities and Injuries: An Analysis of the Relationship of Roadway, Driver, Vehicle Characteristics in Oregon Motor Vehicle Crash Fatalities and Injuries: An Analysis,000 population among Oregon counties from 2000-2005 ranged from 6.64-211.17. In the event of a severe motor

  7. Liquid Argon scintillation light quenching due to Nitrogen impurities : measurements performed for the MicroBooNE vertical slice test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Christie Shinglei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino experiment MicroBooNE is currently under construction. To expedite the physics output of MicroBooNE, a smaller version of its optical detection system has been implemented. To demonstrate full operability of ...

  8. Coupling between JET Pedestal ne-Te and Outer Target Plate Recycling: Consequences for JET ITER-Like-Wall Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupling between JET Pedestal ne-Te and Outer Target Plate Recycling: Consequences for JET ITER-Like-Wall Operation

  9. Mossbauer spectra of single-domain ne particle systems described using a multiple-level relaxation model for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Dominic

    Mossbauer spectra of single-domain #12;ne particle systems described using a multiple describes the Mossbauer spectra of real #12;ne particle systems at all temperatures of interest, and yields temperatures, when all moments are blocked, Mossbauer spectra can be described with static hyper#12;ne #12

  10. Reference Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title NE/J005398/2 Professor Christopher Perry University of Exeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant Reference Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title NE/J005398/2 Professor Christopher and resultant sediment records of the event. NE/J006122/1 Dr David Tappin NERC British Geological Survey Japan of severe wildfires on moorland carbon dynamics NE/J01141X/1 Dr Stephen G. Willis Durham University

  11. Hood River Passive House, Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50%" (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  12. Geomorphic surfaces in the northwestern Klamath Mountains, California and Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, K.S. (Forest Service, Happy Camp, CA (United States)); Ricks, C.L. (Forest Service, Gold Beach, OR (United States))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thick, residual, colluvial and alluvial soils derived from ophiolitic rocks mantle at least four geomorphic surfaces in the Siskiyou and marble mountains, in northwestern California and Illinois Valley, in southwestern Oregon. Analysis of digital elevation data provides constraints on the distribution and origin of these surfaces. Because of the geomorphic expression and soil mechanical properties of the surfaces, a map of slope gradients less than 22 degrees closely approximates the distribution of geomorphic surfaces as they are known from field observations. Preliminary definition of individual surfaces is based upon classification of the slop-map by elevation ranges. The Klamath Peneplain'' of Diller (1902) and associated soils, recently referred to as Klamath Saprolite'', are recognized near summit elevation (1,500 meters) across the area. Regional uplift and erosion has resulted in extensive, large earthflow landslides derived from these soils. Alluvial and residual deposits on the floor of the Illinois Valley occur at the same elevation (300 meters) as incised alluvial and colluvial terrace deposits along the Klamath River and tributary streams. At least two additional surfaces have been identified in the Siskiyou and Marble Mountains at approximately elevation 750 and 1,000 meters. Analysis of digital elevation data, combined with the map of earthflow landslides, allows rapid preliminary mapping of geomorphic surfaces in this terrain.

  13. The MiniBooNE detector technical design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. Stancu et al.

    2003-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment [1] is motivated by the LSND observation, [2] which has been interpreted as {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, and by the atmospheric neutrino deficit, [3,4,5] which may be ascribed to {nu}{sub {mu}} oscillations into another type of neutrino. MiniBooNE is a single-detector experiment designed to: obtain {approx} 1000 {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} events if the LSND signal is due to {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, establishing the oscillation signal at the > 5{sigma} level as shown in Fig. 1.1; extend the search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations significantly beyond what has been studied previously if no signal is observed; search for {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance to address the atmospheric neutrino deficit with a signal that is a suppression of the rate of {nu}{sub {mu}}C {yields} {mu}N events from the expected 600,000 per year; measure the oscillation parameters as shown in Fig. 1.2 if oscillations are observed; and test CP conservation in the lepton sector if oscillations are observed by running with separate {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beams. The detector will consist of a spherical tank 6.1 m (20 feet) in radius, as shown in Fig. 1.3, that stands in a 45-foot diameter cylindrical vault. An inner tank structure at 5.75 m radius will support 1280 8-inch phototubes (10% coverage) pointed inward and optically isolated from the outer region of the tank. The tank will be filled with 807 t of mineral oil, resulting in a 445 t fiducial volume. The outer tank volume will serve as a veto shield for identifying particles both entering and leaving the detector with 240 phototubes mounted on the tank wall. Above the detector tank will be an electronics enclosure that houses the fast electronics and data acquisition system and a utilities enclosure that houses the plumbing, overflow tank, and calibration laser. The detector will be located {approx} 550 m from the Booster neutrino source. The neutrino beam, produced using 8 GeV protons from the Booster at FNAL, will consist of a target within a focusing system, followed by a {approx}50 m long pion decay volume. The low energy, high intensity and 1 {micro}s time-structure of a neutrino beam produced from the Booster beam are ideal for this experiment. We assume that the Booster can reliably deliver protons for a typical run which is two-thirds of a calendar year. The sensitivities discussed above assume the experiment receives 5 x 10{sup 20} protons per year. This Booster experiment is compatible with the Fermilab collider and MI programs. The Booster must run at 7.5 Hz to accommodate the MiniBooNE and collider programs simultaneously. The current schedule calls for data-taking to begin by the end of calendar year 2001.

  14. Data Center Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Anderson Readiness Center; Salem, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, I.; Van Geet, O.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results from the data center energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment conducted for the Oregon Army National Guard in Salem, Oregon. A team led by NREL conducted the assessment of the Anderson Readiness Center data centers March 18-20, 2014 as part of ongoing efforts to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies where feasible. Although the data centers in this facility account for less than 5% of the total square footage, they are estimated to be responsible for 70% of the annual electricity consumption.

  15. Few-Photon Multiple Ionization of Ne and Ar by Strong Free-Electron-Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moshammer, R.; Jiang, Y. H.; Rudenko, A.; Ergler, Th.; Schroeter, C. D.; Luedemann, S.; Zrost, K.; Dorn, A.; Ferger, T.; Kuehnel, K. U.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Foucar, L.; Titze, J.; Jahnke, T.; Schoeffler, M.; Doerner, R. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Frankfurt, D 60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Fischer, D. [Atomic Physics, Stockholm University, Alba Nova University Centrum, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Weber, T. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Frankfurt, D 60486 Frankfurt (Germany); DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Zouros, T. J. M. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, P.O. Box 1527, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Duesterer, S. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)] (and others)

    2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Few-photon multiple ionization of Ne and Ar atoms by strong vacuum ultraviolet laser pulses from the free-electron laser at Hamburg was investigated differentially with the Heidelberg reaction microscope. The light-intensity dependence of Ne{sup 2+} production reveals the dominance of nonsequential two-photon double ionization at intensities of I<6x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} and significant contributions of three-photon ionization as I increases. Ne{sup 2+} recoil-ion-momentum distributions suggest that two electrons absorbing ''instantaneously'' two photons are ejected most likely into opposite hemispheres with similar energies.

  16. Thomas-Ehrman effect in a three-body model: $^{16}$Ne case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. V. Grigorenko; T. A. Golubkova; M. V. Zhukov

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamic mechanism of the Thomas-Ehrman shift is studied in three-cluster systems by example of $^{16}$Ne and $^{16}$C isobaric mirror partners. We predict configuration mixings for $0^+$ and $2^+$ states in $^{16}$Ne and $^{16}$C. Large isospin symmetry breaking on the level of wave function component weights is demonstrated for these states and discussed as three-body mechanism of Thomas-Ehrman shift. It is shown that the description of the Coulomb displacement energies requires a consistency among three parameters: the $^{16}$Ne decay energy $E_T$, the $^{15}$F ground state energy $E_r$, and the configuration mixing parameters for the $^{16}$Ne/$^{16}$C $0^+$ and $2^+$ states. Basing on this analysis we infer the $^{15}$F $1/2^+$ ground state energy to be $E_r=1.39-1.42$ MeV.

  17. Tests of Lorentz and CPT violation with MiniBooNE neutrino oscillation excesses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teppei Katori

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Violation of Lorentz invariance and CPT symmetry is a predicted phenomenon of Planck-scale physics. Various types of data are analyzed to search for Lorentz violation under the Standard-Model Extension (SME) framework, including neutrino oscillation data. MiniBooNE is a short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at Fermilab. The measured excesses from MiniBooNE cannot be reconciled within the neutrino Standard Model; thus it might be a signal of new physics, such as Lorentz violation. We have analyzed the sidereal time dependence of MiniBooNE data for signals of the possible breakdown of Lorentz invariance in neutrinos. In this brief review, we introduce Lorentz violation, the neutrino sector of the SME, and the analysis of short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. We then present the results of the search for Lorentz violation in MiniBooNE data. This review is based on the published result (ArXiv:1109.3480).

  18. Application for Presidential Permit PP-400 TDI-NE - New England...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Comments of the Vermont Department of Public Service - August 6, 2014 Application for Presidential Permit PP-400 TDI-NE - New England Clean Power Link Project - Motion to...

  19. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVI : Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.

    2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the University of Washington developed a new statistical model to analyze the combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged salmon migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine), has been used to estimate survival and transportation effects on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin from 1996 to 2003. Those results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on both a systemwide basis, incorporating all transport dams analyzed, and a dam-specific basis. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 5,000 tagged smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few tagged hatchery steelhead were transported in these years, no transportation effects are estimated for steelhead. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.71% with a standard error (SE) of 0.18% for spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2003, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. For summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin, the estimates of annual SAR averaged 1.15% (SE=0.31%). Only for the release years 1999 and 2000 did the Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for hatchery steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.45% (SE=0.11%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2003. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2003), it was estimated that on average approximately 86% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook, and 74% for steelhead, occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the systemwide T/I are weighted averages of the dam-specific T/I ratios for each transport dam (with {ge} 5,000 tagged fish transported), weighted by the probabilities of being transported at each dam. The systemwide T/I compares the observed SAR under the existing transportation system with the expected SAR if the transportation system had not been operated. Estimates of 1.0 indicate that the systemwide transportation program has no effect on SAR, while estimates > 1.0 indicate that the transportation program increases SAR. Excluding the 2001 release group, the geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.15 (SE=0.03) for release years 1997 through 2003. The geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.28 (SE=0.13) for release years 1997 through 2000 and 2003. Estimates were much higher for the 2001 release groups. These estimates reflect transportation from Lower Granite and/or Little Goose for most release years, depending on the number of tagged smolts actually transported at each dam during each release year. Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of post-Bonneville survival to Lower Granite Dam of transported fish to that of nontransported ('inriver') fish. Excluding the 2001 release year, the geometric mean of the D estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin

  20. Neutrino induced pion production at MiniBooNE and K2K energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, T.; Buss, O.; Mosel, U. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Alvarez-Ruso, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Fisica Computacional, Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal)

    2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate charged and neutral current neutrino-induced incoherent pion production off nuclei within the GiBUU model at energies relevant for the MiniBooNE and K2K experiments. Special attention is paid to the entanglement between measured CCQE and CC1{pi}{sup +} cross sections. We further give predictions and compare to recent data measured at MiniBooNE.

  1. Oregon State University Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiation Health Physics NeutronSpring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    THE Oregon State University Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiation Health Physics NeutronSpring 2011 4 Continued on page 3 2 2 Nuclear Career Horizons Expand in France NERHP Senior Alison Arnold's Study Abroad Program. Arnold will earn a B.S. in Nuclear Engineering with a minor in French when she

  2. NEAR-SURFACE HYDROLOGIC RESPONSE FOR A STEEP, UNCHANNELED CATCHMENT NEAR COOS BAY, OREGON: 2.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    con- trolled sprinkling experiments at the Coos Bay 1 (CB1) experimental catchment in the Oregon Coast indicate that the 3D geometry and hydraulic characteris- tics of the layered geologic interfaces at CB1 can-rock hydraulic properties that preclude accurate fracture flow representation. Sensitivity analyses for the CB1

  3. The Economic Impact of Oregon's Urban Research University $1.4 billion and growing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    The Economic Impact of Oregon's Urban Research University $1.4 billion and growing #12;From this in the face of tough economic times. This report offers a snapshot of the economic benefits Portland State are an economic catalyst through our partnerships, our research and our programs. Continue to expect great things

  4. Using Layered Manufacturing for Scientific Visualization Mike Bailey, Oregon State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Mike

    Manufacturing, on the other hand, is characterized by additive manufacturing processes. They start with nothing, but there are significant advantages to additive manufacturing for scientific visualization: Extremely complex parts can1 Using Layered Manufacturing for Scientific Visualization Mike Bailey, Oregon State University

  5. Modeling of ecosystem processes on the Oregon shelf during the 2001 summer upwelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gan, Jian-Ping

    Modeling of ecosystem processes on the Oregon shelf during the 2001 summer upwelling Y. H. Spitz 2005; accepted 19 August 2005; published 22 October 2005. [1] Three-dimensional ecosystem response-based ecosystem model coupled to a high-resolution circulation model. We investigate, in particular, the influence

  6. Protecting Oregon Old-Growth Forests from Fires: How Much Is It Worth?1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    ), but not for protecting these old-growth ecosystems from fire. The USDI Fish and Wildlife Service has designated about 2 (Gregory and von Winterfeldt 1992). This paper describes the performance of contingent valuation method) for protecting old-growth forests in Oregon from catastrophic fires. Methods Contingent valuation is a widely

  7. 4 -Coastal Ocean Processes The Oregon Coastal Ocean: A Sink for Atmospheric CO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    4 - Coastal Ocean Processes The Oregon Coastal Ocean: A Sink for Atmospheric CO 2 ? As part of the Coastal Ocean Processes (CoOP)-sponsored Coastal Ocean Advances in Shelf Transport project (COAST) we laboratory, we developed analytical sys- tems that were capable of measuring nutrient con- centrations and CO

  8. Partnership ofPartnership of Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partnership ofPartnership of Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Washington Dept. of Fish for compensatory predation by smallmouth bass and walleye. 4 Evaluate effect of program on salmonid4. Evaluate 4 Decreased amount of older/larger fish4. Decreased amount of older/larger fish. 5. Reduced

  9. EA-1974: Wallooskee-Youngs Confluence Restoration Project, Clatsop County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed restoration of a tidal marsh in the Columbia River Estuary, near Astoria in Clatsop County, Oregon. The project website is https://www.bpa.gov/goto/WallooskeeYoungs.

  10. EIS-0436: I-5 Corridor Reinforcement Project; Multnomah County, Oregon, and Cowlitz and Clark Counties, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOEs Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS that will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a BPA proposal to build a 500-kilovolt (kV) lattice-steel-tower transmission line that would run from a new 500-kV substation near Castle Rock, Washington, to a new 500-kV substation near Troutdale, Oregon.

  11. EA-1967: Hills Creek-Lookout Point Transmission Line Rebuild, Lane County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of its 26-mile 115 kilovolt (kV) wood-pole Hills Creek-Lookout Point transmission line, which is generally located between Lowell and Oakridge, in Lane County, Oregon.

  12. RELATIONSHIPS OF THE FISH FAUNA OF THE LAKES OF SOUTHEASTERN OREGON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the lakes and streams in southern Oregon, leaving Ashland, Oreg., July 15 with camping outfit and remaining Ashland on the west and the Warner Lakes on the east. The entire distance traveled by this party exceeded, of Ashland, Oreg. bComposed of the writer, 1'1'01. E. C. starke, and Messrs. E. L. Morris and J. D. Snyder

  13. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, Karen L.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

  14. Citizens' Utility Board of Oregon 610 S.W. Broadway, Suite 308

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Future Role of the Bonneville Power Administration in Power Supply Dear Mr. Walker, The Citizens' Utility-227-1984 Fax 503-274-2956 April 22, 2004 Mark Walker Director of Public Affairs Northwest Power & Conservation Board of Oregon thanks the members and staff of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council

  15. EA-1946: Salem-Albany Transmission Line Rebuild Project; Polk, Benton, Marion, and Linn Counties, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of the 24-mile Salem-Albany No. 1 and 28-mile Salem-Albany No. 2 transmission lines between Salem and Albany, Oregon.

  16. First results from a marine controlled-source electromagnetic survey to detect gas hydrates offshore Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Key, Kerry

    First results from a marine controlled-source electromagnetic survey to detect gas hydrates 13 December 2005; accepted 19 December 2005; published 3 February 2006. [1] Submarine gas hydrate from a marine controlled-source electromagnetic survey to detect gas hydrates offshore Oregon, Geophys

  17. Changing Obsidian Sources at the Lost Dune and McCoy Creek Sites, Blitzen Valley, Southeast Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, William H; Thomas, Scott P; Skinner, Craig E

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dune (35HA792); MC = McCoy Creek (35HA1263) Component ffl;sample. Provenience of McCoy Creek artifacts from Musil (AT THE LOST DUNE AND MCCOY CREEK SITES OREGON NEVADA Burns

  18. M.S. Economic Geology, Oregon State University College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR Expected Spring, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    EDUCATION M.S. Economic Geology, Oregon State University College of Earth, Ocean. Dilles Relevant Courses Interpretation of Geologic Maps Igneous Petrology Tectonic Geomorphology B.S. Geology, University of Idaho College of Science, Moscow, ID; GPA: 3

  19. The Cost of Caution: Tobacco Industry Political Influence and Tobacco Policy Making in Oregon 1997-2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristen Lum; Stanton A. Glantz, PhD

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Is Oregon going up in smoke? Ashland Daily Tidings, May 17,Rep. Peter Buckley (D-Ashland) Rep. Tom Butler (R-Ontario)Rep. Judy Uherbelau (D-Ashland) Rep. Cherryl Walker (R-

  20. The Impact of Medicaid on Labor Market Activity and Program Participation: Evidence from the Oregon Health Insurance Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baicker, Katherine

    In 2008, a group of uninsured low-income adults in Oregon was selected by lottery for the chance to apply for Medicaid. Using this randomized design and 2009 administrative data, we find no significant effect of Medicaid ...

  1. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook and Juvenile-to-Adult PIT-tag Retention; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the first in an anticipated series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2001 and March 31, 2002. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons.

  2. California | Connecticut | Illinois | Maine | Maryland | Massachusetts | Michigan | New Hampshire | New Jersey | New York | Oregon | Vermont | Washington STATES' PRINCIPLES ON REFORM OF THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    | New Jersey | New York | Oregon | Vermont | Washington STATES' PRINCIPLES ON REFORM OF THE TOXIC chemical alternatives assessments. #12;States' Principles on Reform of the Toxic Substances Control Act

  3. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon Bruce A. Measure Montana Rhonda Whiting Montana May 3, 2007 MEMORANDUM TO: Power Committee FROM begins developing guidelines for interpreting regional energy and capacity adequacy standards

  4. STUDEN T FIN ANCIAL AID AND SCHO LARSHIP S SE RVICE SUPPO RT SUCC ESS 1278 University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1278 http://financialaid.uoregon.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    STUDEN T FIN ANCIAL AID AND SCHO LARSHIP S SE RVICE SUPPO RT SUCC ESS 1278 University of Oregon #12;STUDEN T FIN ANCIAL AID AND SCHO LARSHIP S SE RVICE SUPPO RT SUCC ESS 1278 University of Oregon

  5. Analysis of ISO NE Balancing Requirements: Uncertainty-based Secure Ranges for ISO New England Dynamic Inerchange Adjustments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Wu, Di; Hou, Zhangshuan; Sun, Yannan; Maslennikov, S.; Luo, X.; Zheng, T.; George, S.; Knowland, T.; Litvinov, E.; Weaver, S.; Sanchez, E.

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The document describes detailed uncertainty quantification (UQ) methodology developed by PNNL to estimate secure ranges of potential dynamic intra-hour interchange adjustments in the ISO-NE system and provides description of the dynamic interchange adjustment (DINA) tool developed under the same contract. The overall system ramping up and down capability, spinning reserve requirements, interchange schedules, load variations and uncertainties from various sources that are relevant to the ISO-NE system are incorporated into the methodology and the tool. The DINA tool has been tested by PNNL and ISO-NE staff engineers using ISO-NE data.

  6. Postcollisional decay in Ne multiple ionization by H{sub 2}{sup +} ions in breakup collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sant'Anna, M.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Luna, H.; Cavalcanti, E.G.; Sigaud, G. M.; Montenegro, E. C. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro 22452-970 (Brazil); Santos, A.C.F. [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, Missouri 65401 (United States); McGrath, C.; Shah, M.B. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, The Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the Ne{sup q+} charge-state yield distribution for Ne atoms multiply ionized by 1-MeV/amu H{sub 2}{sup +}, in coincidence with the final state of the projectile, for both breakup and nonbreakup channels. Measurements with 1-MeV H{sup +} projectiles were also performed. While the H{sub 2}{sup +} nonbreakup channel produces results similar to equal-velocity proton or electron projectiles, the breakup channels lead to a charge-state yield distribution very close to the known Ne 2s{sup -1} postcollisional decay distribution, measured through photoionization [T. A. Carlson, W. E. Hunt, and M. O. Krause, Phys. Rev. 151, 41 (1966)]. This behavior suggests that, in the breakup channels, contributions to multiple ionization from mechanisms that are usually considered to be dominant in ion-atom collisions are less important than the postcollisional decay.

  7. MCViNE -- An object oriented Monte Carlo neutron ray tracing simulation package

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiao Y Y; Granroth, Garrett E; Abernathy, Douglas L; Lumsden, Mark D; Winn, Barry; Aczel, Adam A; Aivazis, Michael; Fultz, Brent

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MCViNE (Monte-Carlo VIrtual Neutron Experiment) is a versatile Monte Carlo (MC) neutron ray-tracing program that provides researchers with tools for performing computer modeling and simulations that mirror real neutron scattering experiments. By adopting modern software engineering practices such as using composite and visitor design patterns for representing and accessing neutron scatterers, and using recursive algorithms for multiple scattering, MCViNE is flexible enough to handle sophisticated neutron scattering problems including, for example, neutron detection by complex detector systems, and single and multiple scattering events in a variety of samples and sample environments. In addition, MCViNE can take advantage of simulation components in linear-chain-based MC ray tracing packages widely used in instrument design and optimization, as well as NumPy-based components that make prototypes useful and easy to develop. These developments have enabled us to carry out detailed simulations of neutron scatteri...

  8. Ambulatory Research and Education Center Oregon Health Science University. Environmental Assesment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0921) evaluating the proposed construction and operation of the Ambulatory Research and Education Center (AREC), which would be located on the top seven floors of the existing NeuroSensory Research Center (NRC) on the campus of the Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) at Portland, Oregon. The proposed action would combine activities scattered across the campus into a central facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  9. EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates Ormat Nevada, Inc.s (Ormats) proposed geothermal project consists of drilling up to 16 wells for geothermal exploration approximately 70 miles southeast of Bend, Oregon and 50 miles northwest of Burns, Oregon just south of U.S. Highway 20. The proposed project includes three distinct drilling areas. Up to three wells would be drilled on lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Prineville District (Mahogany), up to ten wells would be drilled on lands managed by the BLM Burns District (Midnight Point), and up to three wells would be drilled on private land located adjacent to the federal geothermal leases west of Glass Butte (Private Lands). DOE funding would be associated with three of the sixteen proposed wells. BLM is the lead agency and DOE is participating as a cooperating agency.

  10. Testing of Oregon dolomite from central Kentucky in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the first in a series of six limestone reports, and describes the results of testing of an Oregon dolomite from central Kentucky (1/8 in. x 0, 63% CaCO/sub 3/, 31% MgCO/sub 3/) in a 2 ft/ 8 in. x 2 ft. 5 in., 0.75-MW AFBC. All six limestones (or dolomites) were tested using the same coal, a washed Western Kentucky No. 9 coal (1/4 in. x 0, 3.1% sulfur, 9% ash, 13230 Btu/lb.). Operating problems encountered are described. On the basis of numbers, it was concluded that an economic re-evaluation of low-superficial-velocity fluidized beds is warranted, and that it is feasible to burn high-sulfur coals efficiently in an AFBC when Oregon dolomite from central Kentucky is used as the sulfur sorbent.

  11. Characterization of fragment emission in ^{20}Ne (7 - 10 MeV/nucleon) + ^{12}C reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aparajita Dey; C. Bhattacharya; S. Bhattacharya; S. Kundu; K. Banerjee; S. Mukhopadhyay; D. Gupta; T. Bhattacharjee; S. R. Banerjee; S. Bhattacharyya; T. K. Rana; S. K. Basu; R. Saha; K. Krishan; A. Mukherjee; D. Bandopadhyay; C. Beck

    2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The inclusive energy distributions of the complex fragments (3 $\\leq$ Z $\\leq$ 7) emitted from the bombardment of ^{12}C by ^{20}Ne beams with incident energies between 145 and 200 MeV have been measured in the angular range 10$^{o} \\leq \\theta_{lab} \\leq$ 50^{o}. Damped fragment yields in all the cases have been found to be the characteristic of emission from fully energy equilibrated composites. The binary fragment yields are compared with the standard statistical model predictions. Enhanced yields of entrance channel fragments (5 $\\leq$ Z $\\leq$ 7) indicate the survival of orbiting-like process in ^{20}Ne + ^{12}C system at these energies.

  12. Spectroscopy and intruder configurations of $^{33}$Mg and $^{31}$Ne studied with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kimura

    2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Excitation spectra and neutron single particle configurations of $^{33}$Mg and $^{31}$Ne are investigated by using antisymmetrized molecular dynamics combined with generator coordinate method. It is shown that both nuclei have strongly deformed $3/2^-$ ground state with a $3p2h$ configuration. The excitation spectra are qualitatively understood in terms of the Nilsson model and the calculation has shown the coexistence of different intruder configurations within small excitation energy. The calculated one neutron separation energy of $^{31}$Ne is rather small ($S_n=250$ keV) and implies a p-wave one neutron halo with a strongly deformed core.

  13. Proton-proton correlations observed in two-proton decay of $^{19}$Mg and $^{16}$Ne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Mukha; L. Grigorenko; K. Summerer; L. Acosta; M. A. G. Alvarez; E. Casarejos; A. Chatillon; D. Cortina-Gil; J. Espino; A. Fomichev; J. E. Garcia-Ramos; H. Geissel; J. Gomez-Camacho; J. Hofmann; O. Kiselev; A. Korsheninnikov; N. Kurz; Yu. Litvinov; I. Martel; C. Nociforo; W. Ott; M. Pfutzner; C. Rodriguez-Tajes; E. Roeckl; M. Stanoiu; H. Weick; P. J. Woods

    2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton-proton correlations were observed for the two-proton decays of the ground states of $^{19}$Mg and $^{16}$Ne. The trajectories of the respective decay products, $^{17}$Ne+p+p and $^{14}$O+p+p, were measured by using a tracking technique with microstrip detectors. These data were used to reconstruct the angular correlations of fragments projected on planes transverse to the precursor momenta. The measured three-particle correlations reflect a genuine three-body decay mechanism and allowed us to obtain spectroscopic information on the precursors with valence protons in the $sd$ shell.

  14. MiniBooNE as related to Windows on the Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanski, Ray; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of absolute neutrino and anti-neutrino cross-sections, the observation of a 'low energy anomaly' in the neutrino sector, the constraints placed on the LSND effect by a non-observation of neutrino oscillations, the search for neutrino and anti-neutrino appearance, and for the possible existence of new heavy particles makes MiniBooNE a major contributor to the current view of the Universe. This paper addresses specific model constraints set by the MiniBooNE data, and explores expectations for further remaining analysis of the data.

  15. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , fish passage, hatcheries, wildlife and recreation. #12;TACOMA POWER'S CUSHMAN HYDROELECTRIC PROJECT SUBJECT: Briefing on Relicensing of Tacoma's Cushman Hydro Project Tacoma Power owns and operates the Cushman Hydroelectric project, located on the Skokomish River near Hood Canal on the Olympic Peninsula

  16. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from PIT tag studies. Long term Council convenes first meeting in FY 2015. Work through forum created in 3, above. Triennial report from the forum created in 3, above. January 2015 Research Plan Add and hatchery operations and evaluations. TBD by Council Members BPA BPA to report to the Council on budget

  17. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisheries Project, Design & Construction. In the Master Plan, the YN proposes to implement hatchery are a planning baseline from which to refine cost estimates, evaluate alternatives and protect against budget) phases and implementation. Project costs provided in the Step 1 Master Plan are based on the proposed

  18. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Tony Grover SUBJECT: Overview of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to Inform Columbia River EIS on funding and operation of hatchery programs in the Columbia River basin. NMFS will use the EIS Purcell, NMFS, will update the Committee on the EIS process. NMFS's presentation to the Council on March 7

  19. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -033-00 Yakima Phase II Fish Screens Operations and Maintenance (O&M) with Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) BOR $107 Withdrawn 2003-114-00 Pacific Ocean Survey Tracking Kintama Research $2,091,528 $94,663 BOG Management ODFW $2,000,0005 $5,000,0006 August Decision 5 1983-350-00 Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Operations

  20. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND DISCOUNT RATE FOR THE SIXTH POWER PLAN When Albert Einstein died, he met three people in the queue outside. Eden Oregon Joan M. Dukes Oregon April 3, 2008 MEMORANDUM TO: Power Committee FROM: Wally Gibson SUBJECT: Paper on Financial Assumptions for the Sixth Power Plan There will be a presentation

  1. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a modified forecast of CO2 allowance price, updated information regarding power plant outage rates, a revised Geothermal Wind Nuclear Hydropower #12;Northwest Power and Conservation Council Northwest Power. Eden Oregon Joan M. Dukes Oregon January 6, 2010 MEMORANDUM TO: Power Committee FROM: Jeff King, Senior

  2. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Eden Oregon Joan M. Dukes Oregon September 30, 2010 MEMORANDUM TO: Fish and Wildlife Committee members on Project #2008-800-00, Montana Resident Fish Habitat Acquisition1 , Columbia Basin Fish Accord project. No action is requested of the Fish and Wildlife Committee regarding this Accord project. Currently

  3. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Eden Oregon Joan M. Dukes Oregon September 24, 2009 MEMORANDUM TO: Fish and Wildlife Committee FROM: Nancy Leonard, Fish, Wildlife and Ecosystem Monitoring and Evaluation Manager SUBJECT: Discussion on proposed Fish and Wildlife Program Indicators Briefly describe the process used to derive the recommended

  4. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Chair Montana Bruce A. Measure Montana James A. Yost Idaho W. Bill Booth Idaho Bill Bradbury Oregon Tom Karier Oregon Rhonda Whiting Vice-Chair Montana Bruce A. Measure Montana James A. Yost Idaho W. Bill Booth Idaho and associated programmatic issues Introduction Pursuant to Section 4(h)(10)(D) of the Northwest Power Act

  5. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Chair Montana Bruce A. Measure Montana James A. Yost Idaho W. Bill Booth Idaho Bill Bradbury Oregon Tom Karier-Chair Montana Bruce A. Measure Montana James A. Yost Idaho W. Bill Booth Idaho Bill Bradbury Oregon Tom Karier Introduction Pursuant to Section 4(h)(10)(D) of the Northwest Power Act, the Northwest Power and Conservation

  6. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schilmoeller, Power Systems Analyst SUBJECT: Chapter 8 of the Sixth Power Plan: Developing a Resource Strategy that electric vehicles may afford and the consequences of changes to hydrogeneration capability. These studies. Eden Oregon Joan M. Dukes Oregon April 2, 2009 MEMORANDUM TO: Council Power Committee FROM: Michael

  7. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    requirements, including Renewable Portfolio Standards. These assumptions were discussed at the last Power for the Fifth Power Plan. The model produced a plan that is largely consistent with that which the Council. Eden Oregon Joan M. Dukes Oregon April 2, 2008 MEMORANDUM TO: Power Committee FROM: Michael

  8. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and demonstration of demand response as a potential source of load- and wind-balancing. The Council has been asked for balancing wind/load Guides for evaluation of technology and cost effectiveness 3 Schedule. Eden Oregon Joan M. Dukes Oregon August 3, 2010 MEMORANDUM TO: Power Committee FROM: Ken Corum SUBJECT

  9. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for within hour balancing reserves will be needed for wind integration Many short- and long. Eden Oregon Joan M. Dukes Oregon April 29, 2009 MEMORANDUM TO: Power Committee FROM: Terry Morlan SUBJECT: Plan Focus and Topics for Executive Summary Staff has discussed with the Power Committee

  10. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Eden Oregon Joan M. Dukes Oregon September 4, 2008 MEMORANDUM TO: Power Committee FROM: Wally Gibson as increasing amounts of wind generation enter the system. It will describe the control problem facing a Balancing Authority (formerly called a "control area") in balancing load and resources while maintaining

  11. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Chair Oregon Bruce A. Measure Montana James A. Yost Idaho W. Bill Booth Idaho Henry Lorenzen Oregon Tom Karier Report Over the past several months the RTF has been busy reviewing measure updates, preparing a business case for end use load data research, consolidating and updating its guidelines for estimating savings

  12. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    structured the proposal to limit the cost and risk to its other customers. If Bonneville can purchase power. This Framework contemplates a number of different power purchase and delivery period scenarios under which BPA. Eden Oregon Joan M. Dukes Oregon November 6, 2008 MEMORANDUM TO: Power Committee FROM: Terry Morlan

  13. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUBJECT: Presentation from the Oregon Wave Energy Trust The Oregon Wave Energy Trust (OWET) is a nonprofit public-private partnership that supports the research, development, and deployment of ocean wave energy the regional electric utilities with the resource potential of the wave energy industry and establish useful

  14. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    available during development of the Sixth Power Plan. The Council's interim forecast of Mid-Columbia trading Melinda S. Eden Oregon Joan M. Dukes Oregon DRAFT Interim Wholesale Power Price Forecast March 6, 2008 Council Document 2008-XX #12;2 This report describes an interim revision to the Northwest Power

  15. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Plan. The Council's interim forecast of Mid-Columbia trading hub electricity prices, levelized. Eden Oregon Joan M. Dukes Oregon INTERIM WHOLESALE POWER PRICE FORECAST MARCH 6, 2008 Council Document 2008-05 #12;Interim Wholesale Power Price Forecast This report describes an interim revision

  16. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Eden Oregon Joan M. Dukes Oregon August 27, 2009 MEMORANDUM TO: Fish and Wildlife Committee FROM: Nancy Leonard, Fish, Wildlife and Ecosystem Monitoring and Evaluation Manager SUBJECT: Final Draft of Council Fish and Wildlife Program's Management Questions for Indicators In response to public comments received

  17. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Division Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208 Dear Mr. Maslen: The purpose Reservation of Oregon, Project #2008-311-00 In 2008-2009, the Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army document outlining the review process for the Accords, the Council recognizes Bonneville's commitment

  18. MicroBooNE, A Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katori, Teppei

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) is a promising detector technology for future neutrino experiments. MicroBooNE is a upcoming LArTPC neutrino experiment which will be located on-axis of Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab, USA. The R&D efforts on this detection method and related neutrino interaction measurements are discussed.

  19. N.E. Leonard U. Pisa 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    1 N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control and Mobile Sensor Networks Cooperative Control, Part II Naomi Ehrich Leonard Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Princeton University.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 2 Collective Motion Stabilization Problem · Achieve synchrony

  20. Magnetostratigraphy and small mammals of the Late Oligocene Banovii basin in NE Bosnia and Herzegovina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Magnetostratigraphy and small mammals of the Late Oligocene Banovii basin in NE Bosnia Rudnici mrkog uglja Banovii d.d., Branilaca Banovia 36, 71290 Banovii, Bosnia and Herzegovina a b s t r in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Although the Dinarides occupy a crucial paleogeographic position bridging Central

  1. Living Longer on Less THe neW economic (in)securiTy of seniors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    Living Longer on Less THe neW economic (in)securiTy of seniors INSTITUTE ON ASSETS & SOCIAL POLICY to measuring economic security applied in this report builds on previous work on middle class economic security for Social Policy and Manage- ment at Brandeis University, is dedicated to the economic well-being and social

  2. Astronomical forcing of sedimentary cycles in the middle to late Miocene continental Calatayud Basin (NE Spain)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Basin (NE Spain) H. Abdul Aziz aY *, F. Hilgen a , W. Krijgsman b , E. Sanz c , J.P. Calvo d, Spain d Departemento de Petrologia y Geoqu|¨mica, Fac. CC. Geolo¨gicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid, Spain Received 16 August 1999; received in revised form 28 January 2000; accepted 29 January 2000

  3. Come to Norway Experience the World JuNE 20-July 31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    Come to Norway ­ Experience the World 2015 JuNE 20-July 31 #12;An Academic Experience The ISS of Bergen and the fjords of Western Norway. Studying and living with fellow students from all over the world School PO Box 1082 Blindern NO 0317 Oslo Norway uio.no/summerschool Tel: +47 22 85 63 85 iss

  4. Oil and Gas CDT Cenomanian-Turonian Palaeoenvironments of NE Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Cenomanian-Turonian Palaeoenvironments of NE Brazil Margin University of Birmingham, biostratigraphy, Brazil, Cretaceous Overview The Late Cretaceous stratigraphy of the Equatorial margin of North East Brazil holds a unique record of the final stages of the opening of the South Atlantic. During

  5. U ne rapide recension bibliographique sur la Tunisie et le Maroc laisse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    U ne rapide recension bibliographique sur la Tunisie et le Maroc laisse apparaître que tradition et. La France moderne serait là au secours d'une Tunisie et d'un Maroc traditionnels incapables de s) affirme par exemple qu'au Maroc, 1. Nombreux sont les auteurs qui convoquent l'une ou l'autre dans le

  6. The LSND puzzle in the light of MiniBooNE results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I give a brief overview over various attempts to reconcile the LSND evidence for oscillations with all other global neutrino data, including the results from MiniBooNE. I discuss the status of oscillation schemes with one or more sterile neutrinos and comment on various exotic proposals.

  7. Searches for new physics at MiniBooNE : sterile neutrinos and mixing freedom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karagiorgi, Georgia S. (Georgia Stelios)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment was designed to perform a search for Vu --> Ve oscillations in a region of A[delta]sin 2 20very different from that allowed by standard, three neutrino oscillations, as determined by solar and ...

  8. Thermodynamics and equilibrium structure of Ne38 cluster: Quantum mechanics versus classical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelshtam, Vladimir A.

    . For example, although the heat capacity Cv T around the "solid-liquid" transition temperature T 10 K MC simulations are implemented in the parallel tempering framework. The classical heat capacity Cv do not play an essential role in the thermodynamics of Ne38, the quantum heat capacity

  9. Search for core-collapse supernovae using the MiniBooNE neutrino detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karagiorgi, Georgia Stelios

    We present a search for core-collapse supernovae in the Milky Way galaxy, using the MiniBooNE neutrino detector. No evidence is found for core-collapse supernovae occurring in our Galaxy in the period from December 14, ...

  10. 36 SEPTEMBER | 2012 WiNd TURbiNE CAPACiTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    36 SEPTEMBER | 2012 WiNd TURbiNE CAPACiTY FRONTiER FROM SCAdA ThE WORld hAS SEEN A significant contributor to this growth. The wind turbine generated energy depends on the wind potential and the turbine of wind turbines. Supervi- sory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems record wind turbine

  11. PI Research Organisation Project Title NE/J024678/1 Dr Christopher Davis University of Reading Driving space weather forecasts with real data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Southampton NE/J021075/1 Where did all the CO2 go? Insights from boron isotopes in deep University of Leeds NE/J02371X/1 Did the Southern Ocean drive deglacial atmospheric CO2 rise?Dr Raja of Leeds NE/J023310/1 Spectrally High resolution Infrared measurements for the characterisation of Volcanic

  12. EIS-0492: Oregon LNG Export Project (Warrenton, OR) and Washington Expansion Project (between Sumas and Woodland, WA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of proposals (1) to add liquefaction and export capability to a proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in Warrenton, Oregon, and add 39 miles of new pipeline in Columbia County, Oregon, and Cowlitz County, Washington, to interconnect with the Northwest Pipeline, and (2) to expand the capacity of the Northwest Pipeline by adding 140 miles of 36-inch diameter pipeline in 10 segments and increasing compression at five existing compressor stations. These proposals are connected actions and will be evaluated in the same EIS.

  13. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Energy Computational Fluid Dynamics Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-CAMS) system is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Utah State University (USU), and other interested parties with the objective of developing and implementing a comprehensive and readily accessible data and information management system for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) verification and validation (V&V) in support of nuclear energy systems design and safety analysis. The two key objectives of the NE-CAMS effort are to identify, collect, assess, store and maintain high resolution and high quality experimental data and related expert knowledge (metadata) for use in CFD V&V assessments specific to the nuclear energy field and to establish a working relationship with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop a CFD V&V database, including benchmark cases, that addresses and supports the associated NRC regulations and policies on the use of CFD analysis. In particular, the NE-CAMS system will support the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program, which aims to develop and deploy advanced modeling and simulation methods and computational tools for reliable numerical simulation of nuclear reactor systems for design and safety analysis. Primary NE-CAMS Elements There are four primary elements of the NE-CAMS knowledge base designed to support computer modeling and simulation in the nuclear energy arena as listed below. Element 1. The database will contain experimental data that can be used for CFD validation that is relevant to nuclear reactor and plant processes, particularly those important to the nuclear industry and the NRC. Element 2. Qualification standards for data evaluation and classification will be incorporated and applied such that validation data sets will result in well-defined, well-characterized data. Element 3. Standards will be established for the design and operation of experiments for the generation of new validation data sets that are to be submitted to NE-CAMS that addresses the completeness and characterization of the dataset. Element 4. Standards will be developed for performing verification and validation (V&V) to establish confidence levels in CFD analyses of nuclear reactor processes; such processes will be acceptable and recognized by both CFD experts and the NRC.

  14. Searches for New Physics at MiniBooNE: Sterile Neutrinos and Mixing Freedom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karagiorgi, Georgia S.; /MIT

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment was designed to perform a search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations in a region of {Delta}m{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta} very different from that allowed by standard, three-neutrino oscillations, as determined by solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments. This search was motivated by the LSND experimental observation of an excess of {bar {nu}}{sub e} events in a {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam which was found compatible with two-neutrino oscillations at {Delta}m{sup 2} {approx} 1 eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta} < 1%. If confirmed, such oscillation signature could be attributed to the existence of a light, mostly-sterile neutrino, containing small admixtures of weak neutrino eigenstates. In addition to a search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, MiniBooNE has also performed a search for {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations, which provides a test of the LSND two-neutrino oscillation interpretation that is independent of CP or CPT violation assumptions. This dissertation presents the MiniBooNE {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} analyses and results, with emphasis on the latter. While the neutrino search excludes the two-neutrino oscillation interpretation of LSND at 98% C.L., the antineutrino search shows an excess of events which is in agreement with the two-neutrino {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillation interpretation of LSND, and excludes the no oscillations hypothesis at 96% C.L. Even though the neutrino and antineutrino oscillation results from MiniBooNE disagree under the single sterile neutrino oscillation hypothesis, a simple extension to the model to include additional sterile neutrino states and the possibility of CP violation allows for differences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillation signatures. In view of that, the viability of oscillation models with one or two sterile neutrinos is investigated in global fits to MiniBooNE and LSND data, with and without constraints from other oscillation experiments with similar sensitivities to those models. A general search for new physics scenarios which would lead to effective non-unitarity of the standard 3 x 3 neutrino mixing matrix, or mixing freedom, is also performed using neutrino and antineutrino data available from MiniBooNE.

  15. CX-004296: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Determination CX-004296: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oaks Springs Hatchery Hydro CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 10202010 Location(s): Oregon Office(s): Energy Efficiency...

  16. Aquatic Supplement Hood River Subbasin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Oregon and Washington stream temperature data Figure 4 and 5. Herman Creek (Oxbow Hatchery): 7-Day Moving.7 (10 cfs) 50 powerhouse discharge river mile 4.51 (20 cfs) Upper Lenz or Odell cr no info Davis water

  17. EA-1931: Keeler to Tillamook Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Washington and Tillamook Counties, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration prepared this EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of the Keeler-Forest Grove and Forest Grove-Tillamook 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines between the cities of Hillsboro and Tillamook, in Washington and Tillamook Counties, Oregon. The 58-mile-long rebuild would include replacement of all wood-pole structures over 10 years in age. Some existing access roads would be improved to accommodate construction equipment and some new road access would be acquired or constructed in areas where access is not available.

  18. Genetic variation and seed transfer guidelines for ponderosa pine in central Oregon. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorensen, F.C.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report includes an adaptive genetic variation in seed and seedling traits for ponderosa pine from the east slopes of the Cascade Range in Oregon which was analyzed by using 307 families from 227 locations. Factor scores from three principal components based on seed and seedling traits were related by multiple regression to latitude, distance from the Cascade crest, elevation, slope, and aspect of the seed sources and by classification analysis to seed zone and 300-meter elevation band within zone. A provisional transfer risk equation and tentative new seed zones were delineated to guide seed transfer in artificial regeneration.

  19. Genetic variation and seed transfer guidelines for lodgepole pine in Central Oregon. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorensen, F.C.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pine cones were collected from 272 trees at 189 locations uniformly distributed over the east slopes of the Oregon Cascade Range and Warner Mountains. Variation in seed and seedling traits was related to (1) seed source latitude, distance from the Cascade crest, elevation, slope, and aspect in multiple regression analyses; and (2) seed zone and elevation band in classification analyses. Provisional seed transfer guidelines are presented. These include a regression equation for guiding seed transfer and estimating transfer risk, and a new outline of fixed seed zones.

  20. Union County - La Grande, Oregon geothermal district heating: feasibility assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, H. II; Giddings, M.; Hanson, P.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an assessment of geothermal district heating in the City of La Grande, Oregon. Eight study area districts were analyzed to determine their economic feasibility. Results from the analyses conclude that certain districts within the City of La Grande are economically feasible if certain assumptions are correct. Development of geothermal district heating for these areas would provide direct energy and dollar savings to the building owners and would also provide direct and indirect benefits to low and moderate income households within the City.

  1. KOFF-A 623 \\-5 (\\969) U.S. Fish Wild\\. Servo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    \\ ........ . ............. ... ... . . ....... . . .. ............. .. ..... 4 Future hatchery production ...................................... 4 Literature cited of these hatcheries appeared to be well in excess of their costs. The Oregon moist pellet diet was the greatest single and that the co t per unit of production ca n be decreased . INTRODUCTION The Columbia River Fishery Development

  2. Survival of orbiting in $^{20}$Ne (7 - 10 MeV/nucleon) + $^{12}$C reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Bhattacharya; A. Dey; S. Kundu; K. Banerjee; S. Bhattacharya; S. Mukhopadhyay; D. Gupta; T. Bhattacharjee; S. R. Banerjee; S. Bhattacharyya; T. Rana; S. K. Basu; R. Saha; S. Bhattacharjee; K. Krishan; A. Mukherjee; D. Bandopadhyay; C. Beck

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The inclusive energy distributions of fragments with Z $\\geq$ 3 emitted from the bombardment of $^{12}$C by $^{20}$Ne beams with incident energies between 145 and 200 MeV have been measured in the angular range $\\theta_{lab} \\sim$ 10$^\\circ$ - 50$^\\circ$. Damped fragment yields in all cases have been found to be characteristic of emission from fully energy equilibrated composites; for B, C fragments, average Q-values, $$, were independent of the centre of mass emission angle ($\\theta_{c.m}$), and the angular distributions followed $\\sim$1/sin$\\theta_{c.m}$ like variation, signifying long life times of the emitting di-nuclear systems. Total yields of these fragments have been found to be much larger compared to the standard statistical model predictions of the same. This may be indicative of the survival of orbiting like process in $^{12}$C + $^{20}$Ne system at these energies.

  3. Conical Emission from Shock Waves in Ne(1-20 AGeV)+U Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Rau; Jan Steinheimer; Barbara Betz; Hannah Petersen; Marcus Bleicher; Horst Stcker

    2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation and propagation of high-density compression waves, e.g. Mach shock waves, in cold nuclear matter is studied by simulating high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions of Ne with U in the energy range from E_lab = 0.5 AGeV to 20 AGeV. In an ideal hydrodynamic approach, the high-density shock wave created by the small Ne nucleus passing through the heavy U nucleus is followed by a slower and more dilute Mach shock wave which causes conical emission of particles at the Mach cone angle. The conical emission originates from low-density regions with a small flow velocity comparable to the speed of sound. Moreover, it is shown that the angular distributions of emitted baryons clearly distinguish between a hydrodynamic approach and binary cascade processes used in the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) transport model.

  4. The thermonuclear rate for the 19F(a,p)22Ne reaction at stellar temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Ugalde; Richard Azuma; Aaron Couture; Joachim Grres; Hye-Young Lee; Edward Stech; Elizabeth Strandberg; Wanpeng Tan; Michael Wiescher

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The $^{19}$F($\\alpha$,p)$^{22}$Ne reaction is considered to be one of the main sources of fluorine depletion in AGB and Wolf-Rayet stars. The reaction rate still retains large uncertainties due to the lack of experimental studies available. In this work the yields for both exit channels to the ground state and first excited state of $^{22}$Ne have been measured and several previously unobserved resonances have been found in the energy range E$_{lab}$=792-1993 keV. The level parameters have been determined through a detailed R-matrix analysis of the reaction data and a new reaction rate is provided on the basis of the available experimental information.

  5. Neutrino and Anti-neutrino Cross Sections at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan [University of Alabama Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tuscaloosa, AL-35487 (United States)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment has reported a number of high statistics neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections -among which are the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) and neutral current elastic (NCE) neutrino scattering on mineral oil (CH{sub 2}). Recently a study of the neutrino contamination of the anti-neutrino beam has concluded and the analysis of the anti-neutrino CCQE and NCE scattering is ongoing.

  6. A sterile neutrino at MiniBooNE and IceCube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masip, Manuel [CAFPE and Depto. Fsica Terica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the possibility that a sterile neutrino of mass around 50 MeV slightly mixed with the muon flavor may be the origin of the MiniBooNE anomaly. We show that its production in the atmosphere in a fraction of kaon decays would imply an excess of contained showers at IceCube from down-going and near-horizontal directions.

  7. The Photomultiplier Tube Calibration System of the MicroBooNE Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, J; Moss, Z; Strauss, T; Toups, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the design and construction of an LED-based fiber calibration system for large liquid argon time projection detectors. This system was developed to calibrate the optical systems of the MicroBooNE experiment. As well as detailing the materials and installation procedure, we provide technical drawings and specifications so that the system may be easily replicated in future LArTPC detectors.

  8. Quasiparticle and Optical Excitations in Solid Ne and Ar: GW and BSE Approximations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, Charles H.; Galamic-Mulaomerovic, S. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2007-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) have been used to calculate quasiparticle and optical excitations in solid Ne and Ar. Absolute positions of quasiparticle and quasihole energies are found to be in very good agreement with experimental values. Binding energies of Frenkel excitons for these systems calculated using the BSE are also in good agreement with experiment. Splitting of excitons into longitudinal and transverse modes is calculated and found to be approximately twice the experimentally measured value.

  9. White River Falls Fish Passage Project, Tygh Valley, Oregon : Final Technical Report, Volume I..

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oregon. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Mount Hood National Forest (Or.)

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were conducted to describe current habitat conditions in the White River basin above White River Falls and to evaluate the potential to produce anadromous fish. An inventory of spawning and rearing habitats, irrigation diversions, and enhancement opportunities for anadromous fish in the White River drainage was conducted. Survival of juvenile fish at White River Falls was estimated by releasing juvenile chinook and steelhead above the falls during high and low flow periods and recapturing them below the falls in 1983 and 1984. Four alternatives to provide upstream passage for adult salmon and steelhead were developed to a predesign level. The cost of adult passage and the estimated run size of anadromous fish were used to determine the benefit/cost ratio of the preferred alternative. Possible effects of the introduction of anadromous fish on resident fish and on nearby Oak Springs Hatchery were evaluated. This included an inventory of resident species, a genetic study of native rainbow, and the identification of fish diseases in the basin. 28 figs., 23 tabs.

  10. Benthic biological and biogeochemical patterns and processes across an oxygen minimum zone (Pakistan margin, NE Arabian Sea)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    (Pakistan margin, NE Arabian Sea) Gregory L. Cowie a,, Lisa A. Levin b a The Sir John Murray Laboratories), and organic matter (OM) availability on benthic communities and processes across the Pakistan Margin

  11. Developing an Online Tool for Delivering Research Results: An Update to the Oregon Department of Transportation's Crash Reduction Factor Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Developing an Online Tool for Delivering Research Results: An Update to the Oregon Department interactive online report (tool) can produce results that are easier for the user to access of Transportation's crash reduction factor (CRF) database were incorporated into an online tool. The paper describes

  12. Student Health Advisory Board Meeting, April 15, 2013. Passed June 3, 2013. Oregon State University Student Health Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    information about intent and options to raise level of care. Jaya will ask Jeff Luck in Public HealthMinutes Student Health Advisory Board Meeting, April 15, 2013. Passed June 3, 2013. Oregon State University Student Health Services I. Call to Order. A meeting of the OSU Student Health Services Student

  13. Internal Chronology: Activities of CIOSS Fellows at the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    fieldwork and monitoring events such as wildfires, oil spills, and harmful algal blooms. Background: Oregon to the evaluation and testing of direct broadcast downlinks from this new sensor. Collaboration on cal/val efforts, processing, and distribution of data in near real time from the sensors onboard is essential for guiding

  14. Policy on Accepting Equity when Licensing University Technology Oregon State University recognizes the importance of encouraging the practical application of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    the market demand for the technology. The University generally will seek from the licensee the costs technology transfer program. The combination of developmental costs and risk, and uncertaintyPolicy on Accepting Equity when Licensing University Technology Oregon State University recognizes

  15. EIS-0005-S2: Bonneville Power Administration Proposed FY 1979 Program Facility Planning Supplement Southwest Oregon Area Service, Supplemental

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statement, one of a series prepared by the U.S. Department of Energys Bonneville Power Administration on various facets of its construction and maintenance activities, addresses the potential impact of a major new facility proposed for fiscal year 1979. To allow power generated in Wyoming to be delivered to Southwest Oregon and to facilitate the exchange of electric power between the Pacific Northwest and the Middle Snake region, two basic plans of service, each with two corridor routing options, have been identified to meet system requirements. BPA proposes construction of the following two transmission facilities: (1) a 500-kV line from Idaho Power Company's Brownlee Substation in Idaho to BPA's Slatt Substation near Arlington, Oregon, and (2) a 500-kV line from Buckley (near Maupin, Oregon) to Malin, Oregon. This statement must be reviewed and used in conjunction with the overall programmatic environmental statement entitled ""The Role of the Bonneville Power Administration in the Pacific Northwest Power Supply System, Including Its Participation in the Hydro-Thermal Power Program: A Program Environmental Statement and Planning Report (The ""Role EIS""), particularly Appendix B - BPA Power Transmission.

  16. Close-in blasting at the TRI-MET light rail tunnels in Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revey, G.F.; Painter, D.Z.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Frontier/Traylor Joint Venture is presently constructing a section of the Tri-County Metropolitan Transit District of Oregon`s (TRI-MET) Westside Light Rail System. This new section will extend Portland`s existing transit system to the western suburbs of Beaverton and Hillsboro. The drill-blast excavations at this project include 10,000 feet of 20 foot tunnel, 18 cross passages, three shafts, an underground railway station, and a U-wall open cut. From a blast designer`s perspective, this job has been extremely challenging. Blast vibration is limited to 0.5 ips at 200 feet or at the nearest structure, and airblast is limited to 129 dB--linear peak and 96 dB--C scale. The tunnels pass under heavily built up areas and have top of tunnel to surface cover distances as low as 70 feet. Surface blasting in the 26,000 cubic yard U-wall excavation was limited to five short nighttime periods due to its proximity to the very busy highway 26. This paper describes the techniques that were used to develop safe blasting designs for the TRI-MET Surface blasts and tunnel rounds. It also discusses the measures that were necessary to mitigate noise, vibration, and flyrock.

  17. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Medford Quadrangle Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Medford, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of three miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twelve miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 2925 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  18. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Roseburg Quadrangle, Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Roseburg, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1596 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  19. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Johnson; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NE-KAMS knowledge base will assist computational analysts, physics model developers, experimentalists, nuclear reactor designers, and federal regulators by: (1) Establishing accepted standards, requirements and best practices for V&V and UQ of computational models and simulations, (2) Establishing accepted standards and procedures for qualifying and classifying experimental and numerical benchmark data, (3) Providing readily accessible databases for nuclear energy related experimental and numerical benchmark data that can be used in V&V assessments and computational methods development, (4) Providing a searchable knowledge base of information, documents and data on V&V and UQ, and (5) Providing web-enabled applications, tools and utilities for V&V and UQ activities, data assessment and processing, and information and data searches. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), the Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve computational modeling and simulation (M&S) of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs. In addition, from the outset, NE-KAMS will support the use of computational M&S in the nuclear industry by developing guidelines and recommended practices aimed at quantifying the uncertainty and assessing the applicability of existing analysis models and methods. The NE-KAMS effort will initially focus on supporting the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and thermal hydraulics (T/H) analysis for M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and will later expand to include materials, fuel system performance and other areas of M&S as time and funding allow.

  20. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a consensus on clear guidelines for determining cost effectiveness of demand response measures and some Oregon Bruce A. Measure Montana Rhonda Whiting Montana April 30, 2008 MEMORANDUM TO: Power Committee FROM

  1. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Director 800-452-5161 www.nwcouncil.org Fax: 503-820-2370 Bill Bradbury Chair Oregon Bruce A. Measure Vice and the guidelines they must adhere to, membership selection, purpose and role, and current status. Attachments

  2. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . At the January Council meeting Gary James (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation) and Kevin Blakely (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife) will discuss how the managers plan to address the fall

  3. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , PacifiCorp Chris Hill, Cowlitz County PUD Chris Robinson, Tacoma Power Doug Findley, Portland General Electric Erin Erben, Eugene Water and Electric Board Fred Gordon, Energy Trust of Oregon Gail Gutsche

  4. Depths and temperatures of <10.5?Ma mantle melting and the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary below southern Oregon and northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Till, Christy B.

    Plagioclase and spinel lherzolite thermometry and barometry are applied to an extensive geochemical dataset of young (<10.5?Ma) primitive basaltic lavas from across Oregon's High Lava Plains, California's Modoc Plateau, ...

  5. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

  6. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

  7. 20Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, 2014Energy,F β--Decay EvaluatedMgNNa

  8. NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 August 2008 Office7-TACi+J-UN 2DCTt-tJOF

  9. NE-23,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 August 2008 Office7-TACi+J-UN>:-1.

  10. NE-23:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 August 2008 Office7-TACi+J-UN>:-1.1 , : -2

  11. NE-24

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 August 2008 Office7-TACi+J-UN>:-1.1 , :

  12. 18Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isN Ground-State Decay Evaluated Dataargeα, X)p, X)83BCFMgNNe

  13. 18Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isN Ground-State Decay Evaluated Dataargeα, X)p, X)83BCFMgNNe

  14. NE-20

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8 7 + PROJECT

  15. NE-24

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8 7 + PROJECTpi/L +3 *3L 52.the

  16. 17Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isN Ground-State Decay Evaluated Dataargeα, X) (CurrentBCFNNe

  17. EIS-0005-FS: Bonneville Power Administration Proposed FY 1979 Program, Facility Location on Supplement, Southwest Oregon Area Service, Buckley-Summer Lake 500 kV Line, Supplemental

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Bonneville Power Administration document assesses the environmental impacts of constructing transmission facilities, which will coordinate with the Midpoint-Malin 500-kV line to be constructed by the Pacific Power and Light (PP&L) Company. The proposed action includes the construction of the 1.56-mile Buckley-Summer Lake 500-kV transmission line; the proposed Buckley Substation near Maupin, Oregon; and the proposed Summer Lake Substation near Silver Lake, Oregon.

  18. Impact of the uncertainty in ?-captures on {sup 22}Ne on the weak s-process in massive stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, N. [Astrophysics group, EPSAM, Keele University, Keele, ST5 1BH, UK and NuGrid Project (United Kingdom); Hirschi, R. [Astrophysics group, EPSAM, Keele University, Keele, ST5 1BH, UK and Kavli IPMU (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, 277-8583 (Japan); Pignatari, M. [NuGrid Project and Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, CH-4056 (Switzerland); Herwig, F. [NuGrid Project and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P5C2 (Canada); Beard, M. [NuGrid Project and Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Imbriani, G. [Dipartiment di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Grres, J.; Boer, R. J. de; Wiescher, M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive stars at solar metallicity contribute to the production of heavy elements with atomic masses between A = 60 and A = 90 via the so-called weak s-process (which takes place during core He and shell C burning phases). Furthermore, recent studies have shown that rotation boosts the s-process production in massive stars at low metallicities, with a production that may reach the barium neutron-magic peak. These results are very sensitive to neutron source and neutron poison reaction rates. For the weak s-process, the main neutron source is the reaction {sup 22}Ne(?,n){sup 25}Mg, which is in competition with {sup 22}Ne(?,?){sup 26}Mg. The uncertainty of both rates strongly affects the nucleosynthesis predictions from stellar model calculations. In this study, we investigate the impact of the uncertainty in ?-captures on {sup 22}Ne on the s-process nucleosynthesis in massive stars both at solar and at very low metallicity. For this purpose, we post-process, with the Nugrid mppnp code, non-rotating and rotating evolutionary models 25M{sub ?} stars at two different metallicities: Z = Z{sub ?} and Z = 10{sup ?5}Z{sub ?}, respectively. Our results show that uncertainty of {sup 22}Ne(?,n){sup 25}Mg and {sup 22}Ne(?,?){sup 26}Mg rates have a significant impact on the final elemental production especially for metal poor rotating models. Beside uncertainties in the neutron source reactions, for fast rotating massive stars at low metallicity we revisit the impact of the neutron poisoning effect by the reaction chain {sup 16}O(n,?){sup 17}O(?,?){sup 21}Ne, in competition with the {sup 17}O(?,n){sup 20}Ne, recycling the neutrons captured by {sup 16}O.

  19. The response of NE 102 to 2.6-28.0 MeV neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Stephen Dobie

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    y(c), (b) the location of T, and (c) the location of a time channel T in the 0 n neutron continuum. 16 6. H vs. E spectrum for the first data run, Ed ? 12. 5 NeV. . . 20 n Proton recoil spectrum for tine channel 35 (E = 23. 5 MeV) from... Page calculated data points of Gocding and Pugh and with the measured data points of Evans and Eellamy, Nadey et al. , and Nadey and Waterman . 42 17. Zero extrapolated ~ given in table 7 fitted to the present data and to the data of refs. 5 and 6...

  20. DOE-NE Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment: FY12 Plans Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadasivan, Pratap [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides background information on FY12 plans for the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment program. Program plans, organization, and individual project elements are described. Research objectives are: (1) Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; (2) Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy; (3) Develop Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycles; and (4) Understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism - Goal is to enable the use of risk information to inform NE R&D program planning.