National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ne 301-916 ww

  1. 19Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1939WH02: 19Ne. 1952SC15: 19Ne. 1954JO21: 19Ne. 1954NA29: 19Ne. 1957AL29: 19Ne. 1957PE12: 19Ne. 1958WE25: 19Ne. 1960JA12: 19Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960WA04: 19Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1962EA02: 19Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1964VA23: 19Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1968GO10: 19Ne; measured T1/2. 1972LE33: 19Ne; measured K/β+ ratios.

  2. WW and WZ production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipeles, Elliot; /UC, San Diego

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes recent measurements of the production properties of WW and WZ pairs of bosons at the Tevatron. This includes measurements of the cross-section and triple gauge couplings in the WW process and the first evidence for WZ production.

  3. 18Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1954GO17: 18Ne. 1961BU05: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1961EC02: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963FR10: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1965FR09: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1968GO05: 18Ne; measured Eγ, Iγ; deduced Iβ, log ft. 18F deduced levels, branching ratios. 1970AL11: 18Ne; measured T1/2; deduced log ft, β-branching. 1970AS06,

  4. BooNE: About BooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BooNE Collaboration BooNE Experiment BooNE vs MiniBooNE Interesting Facts Posters Virtual Tour Picture Gallery News Articles BooNE photo montage Technical Information BooNE...

  5. 15Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm for 15Ne Adopted value: 0.59 MeV (2014WA09) Measured Mass Excess for 15Ne Adopted value: 40215 ± 69 keV (2014WA09) Measurements 2014WA09: C(17Ne, 2p)15Ne, E = 500 MeV/nucleon; measured reaction products; deduced fractional energy spectra, J, π, energy levels, atomic mass excess. 15Ne(2p); measured decay products, Ep, Ip; deduced implications for 13O + p + p system. Back to Top Back to Ground-State Decays

  6. 17Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1964MC16: 17Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1966HA22: 17Ne; deduced log ft. 1967ES02: 17Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1967FI10: 17Ne. 1971ESZR, 1971HA05: 17Ne; measured β-delayed proton spectra, Eγ, Iγ, T1/2, pγ-coin; deduced log ft. 17F deduced levels, antianalog state, isospin mixing. 1988BO39: 17Ne(β+p), (β+α); measured T1/2, β-delayed E(p), E(α), I(p), I(α), β(particle)-coin. 17Ne deduced

  7. 16Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm for 16Ne Adopted value: 122 ± 37 keV (1993TI07) Measured Mass Excess for 16Ne Adopted value: 23996 ± 20 keV (2003AU02) Measurements 1971MAXQ: 16O(π+, π-); measured particle spectra, σ. 1977HO13: 16O(π+, π-), E = 145 MeV; measured σ; deduced Q. 16Ne deduced mass excess. 1977KEZX: 20Ne(α, 8He), E = 118 MeV; measured σ. 16Ne deduced levels, mass excess. 1978BU09: 16O(π+, π-), E = 145 MeV; measured σ. 16Ne deduced mass

  8. Studies of [ital WW] and [ital WZ] production and limits on anomalous [ital WW[gamma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstein, S.; Mostafa, M.; Piegaia, R. ); Alves, G.A.; Carvalho, W.; da Motta, H.; Santoro, A. ); Lima, J.G.; Oguri, V. ); Mao, H.S. ); Gomez, B.; Mooney, P.; Negret, J.P. ); Hoeneisen, B. ); Parua, N. ); Ducros, Y. ); Beri, S.B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kohli, J.M.; Singh, J.B. ); Shivpuri, R.K. ); Acharya, B.S.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.R.; Gupta, A.; Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Mondal, N.K.; Narasimham, V.S.; Shankar, H.C. (Tata Inst.

    1999-10-01

    Evidence of anomalous WW and WZ production was sought in p[bar p] collisions at a center-of-mass energy of [radical] (s) =1.8 hthinsp;TeV. The final states WW(WZ)[r arrow][mu][nu] jet jet+X, WZ[r arrow][mu][nu]ee+X and WZ[r arrow]e[nu]ee+X were studied using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 90 hthinsp;pb[sup [minus]1]. No evidence of anomalous diboson production was found. Limits were set on anomalous WW[gamma] and WWZ couplings and were combined with our previous results. The combined 95[percent] confidence level anomalous coupling limits for [Lambda]=2 hthinsp;TeV are [minus]0.25[le][Delta][kappa][le]0.39 ([lambda]=0) and [minus]0.18[le][lambda][le]0.19 ([Delta][kappa]=0), assuming the WW[gamma] couplings are equal to the WWZ couplings. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  9. SciBooNE/MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ž. Pavlović Los Alamos National Laboratory Fermilab Users' Meeting, 2012 SciBooNE/MiniBooNE 2 Outline * Booster Neutrino Beamline * SciBooNE & MiniBooNE experiments * New results - MB Updated neutrino appearance analysis - MB Antineutrino appearance analysis - MB Joint Neutrino & Antineutrino appearance analysis - Joint SciBooNE/MiniBooNE numubar disappearance analysis * Future prospects 3 Booster Neutrino Beam * Horn focused beam/8GeV protons from Booster * Horn polarity → neutrino

  10. NE-23:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 , : -2 rn; NE-23: 4 Whitr%; Ms. Theresa Schaffer 3315 S. Emerald Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60616 Dear Ms. Schaffer: . -. r ;-, .4r.-,. , ' P?;c \ \ ; . EC.. ., . The Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), has reviewed information on the former General Services Administratlon 39th Street Werehouse, Chicago, Illincis, to determine whether it contains residual radioactivity traceable to activities conducted on behalf of the Manhattan

  11. NE-20

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    hi v. !&-2:. /qL lo 1 OCT 2 9 1984 NE-20 -. Authorization for Remedial Action of the Ashland 2 Site, Tonawanda, New York f! Joe LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office Based on the Aerial Radiological Survey (Attachment 1) and a "walk-on" radiologlcal survey (Attachment 2 , excerpted from the ORNL draft report "Ground-Level Investigation of Anomalous Gamma Radiation Levels in the Tonawanda, New York, Area," January 1980), the property identified as Ashland 2 is

  12. MicroBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE MicroBooNE Investigating the field of high energy physics through experiments that ... R. Dharmapalan et al. MiniBooNE Collaboration, arXiv:1211.2258 hep-ex (2012).

  13. BooNE Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research universities, predominantly undergraduate institutions, as well as a high school physics teacher. List of Collaborators The BooNE Collaboration The BooNE Collaboration...

  14. Studies of {ital WW} and {ital WZ} production and limits on anomalous {ital WW{gamma}} and {ital WWZ} couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstein, S.; Mostafa, M.; Piegaia, R.; Alves, G.A.; Carvalho, W.; da Motta, H.; Santoro, A.; Lima, J.G.; Oguri, V.; Mao, H.S.; Gomez, B.; Mooney, P.; Negret, J.P.; Hoeneisen, B.; Parua, N.; Ducros, Y.; Shivpuri, R.K.; Acharya, B.S.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.R.; Gupta, A.; Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Mondal, N.K.; Narasimham, V.S.; Shankar, H.C.; Park, Y.M.; Choi, S.; Kim, S.K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Gonzalez Solis, J.L.; Hernandez-Montoya, R.; Magana-Mendoza, L.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Pawlik, B.; Akimov, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Kuleshov, S.; Belyaev, A.; Dudko, L.V.; Ermolov, P.; Karmanov, D.; Leflat, A.; Manankov, V.; Merkin, M.; Shabalina, E.; Abramov, V.; Babintsev, V.V.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bojko, N.I.; Burtovoi, V.S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Denisov, S.P.; Dyshkant, A.; Eroshin, O.V.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Galyaev, A.N.; Goncharov, P.I.; Gurzhiev, S.N.; Kostritskiy, A.V.; Kozelov, A.V.; Kozlovsky, E.A.; Mayorov, A.A.; Bertram, I.

    1999-10-01

    Evidence of anomalous WW and WZ production was sought in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical} (s) =1.8&hthinsp;TeV. The final states WW(WZ){r_arrow}{mu}{nu} jet jet+X, WZ{r_arrow}{mu}{nu}ee+X and WZ{r_arrow}e{nu}ee+X were studied using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 90&hthinsp;pb{sup {minus}1}. No evidence of anomalous diboson production was found. Limits were set on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings and were combined with our previous results. The combined 95{percent} confidence level anomalous coupling limits for {Lambda}=2&hthinsp;TeV are {minus}0.25{le}{Delta}{kappa}{le}0.39 ({lambda}=0) and {minus}0.18{le}{lambda}{le}0.19 ({Delta}{kappa}=0), assuming the WW{gamma} couplings are equal to the WWZ couplings. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. BooNE Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Goals of BooNE BooNE in a Nutshell Making Neutrinos Detecting Neutrinos schematic of BooNE experiment A sample event (3M animated PDF file) A cosmic ray event as displayed by the MiniBooNE detector.

  16. MicroBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE MicroBooNE Investigating the field of high energy physics through experiments that strengthen our fundamental understanding of matter, energy, space, and time. Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664 Email Bruce Carlsten (505) 667-5657 Email MicroBooNE schematic drawing Figure 1: A schematic drawing of the MicroBooNE liquid argon TPC detector. The main goals of the MicroBooNE experiment are: (1) to demonstrate the capabilities of a liquid argon TPC in the reconstruction of neutrino

  17. Next-to-leading order predictions for WW + jet production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Campbell, John M.; Miller, David J.; Robens, Tania

    2015-07-28

    In this study we report on a next-to-leading order calculation of WW + jet production at hadron colliders, with subsequent leptonic decays of the W bosons included. The calculation of the one-loop contributions is performed using generalized unitarity methods in order to derive analytic expressions for the relevant amplitudes. These amplitudes have been implemented in the parton-level Monte Carlo generator mcfm, which we use to provide a complete next-to-leading order calculation. Predictions for total cross sections, as well as differential distributions for several key observables, are computed both for the LHC operating at 14 TeV as well as for amore » possible future 100 TeV proton-proton collider.« less

  18. Next-to-leading order predictions for WW + jet production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, John M.; Miller, David J.; Robens, Tania

    2015-07-28

    In this study we report on a next-to-leading order calculation of WW + jet production at hadron colliders, with subsequent leptonic decays of the W bosons included. The calculation of the one-loop contributions is performed using generalized unitarity methods in order to derive analytic expressions for the relevant amplitudes. These amplitudes have been implemented in the parton-level Monte Carlo generator mcfm, which we use to provide a complete next-to-leading order calculation. Predictions for total cross sections, as well as differential distributions for several key observables, are computed both for the LHC operating at 14 TeV as well as for a possible future 100 TeV proton-proton collider.

  19. PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, R.B.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat aqueous mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses evaporation to separate organics and water from radionuclides and solids, and catalytic oxidation to convert the hazardous into byproducts. This process hazards analysis evaluated a number of accident scenarios not directly related to the operation of the MTU, such as natural phenomena damage and mishandling of chemical containers. Worst case accident scenarios were further evaluated to determine the risk potential to the MTU and to workers, the public, and the environment. The overall risk to any group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.

  20. BooNE: Posters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Posters What's a Neutrino? How neutrinos fit into our understanding of the universe. Recipe for a Neutrino Beam Start with some protons... concocting the MiniBooNE beam. The MiniBooNE Detector Tracking the traces of neutrino interactions. Of Neutrino Mass, and Oscillation What oscillates in neutrino oscillations, and why it matters

  1. BooNE: Picture Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Picture Gallery BooNE Collaboration Members of the BooNE collaboration Civil Construction Pictorial progress of BooNE civil construction work Detector Installation Pictorial progress of MiniBooNE detector installation BooNE Scrapbook A selection from BooNE Audio Gallery Horn Concerto The Horn Concerto is a recording of the BooNE horn and the NuMI horn sounding at the same time. The rat-a-tat is BooNE; the syncopated boom is NuMI.

  2. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1981DY03 20Ne(p, p'γ): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 1.63-MeV γ-rays X4 03/15/2011 20Ne(p, pαγ): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 6.13-MeV γ-rays 1975RO08 20Ne(p, γ): S-factors 0.37 - 2.10 Direct Capture (DC) → 332-keV state, DC → 2425-keV state, tail of 2425-keV state X4 04/19/2011 20Ne(p, γ): differential σ at θγ = 90° DC → 332-keV state, 332-keV state →

  3. MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahn, Kendall Brianna Mcconnel; /Columbia U.

    2007-03-01

    MiniBooNE is a short baseline neutrino experiment designed to confirm or refute the LSND observed excess of electron anti neutrinos in a muon anti neutrino beam. The experimental setup, data samples, and oscillation fit method are discussed. Although the result was not public at the time of the talk, MiniBooNE has since published results, which are discussed briefly as well.

  4. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20Ne(α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1983SC17 20Ne(α, γ): deduced S-factor of capture σ 0.55 - 3.2 X4 09/15/2011 1997WI12 20Ne(α, γ): deduced primary transitions yield 1.64 - 2.65 X4 09/15/2011 1999KO34 20Ne(α, γ): γ-ray yield for the transition 1.9 - 2.8 g.s. 01/03/2012 1369 keV g.s. 10917 keV g.s., 1369 keV 11016 keV g.s. 1975KU06 20Ne(α, γ): σ 2.5 - 20 X4 09/15/2011 1968HI02 20Ne(α, γ): σ 3 - 6 X4 09/15/2011

  5. BooNE: Interesting Facts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interesting Facts About the BooNE experiment: BooNE is the only experiment to search the entire range covered by the LSND oscillation signal. First proposed in 1997, BooNE will be ready to collect data in summer, 2002. The BooNE collaboration is small by high energy physics standards, having 65 physicists from 13 instiutions. If BooNE detects a supernova, it will send an automatic signal to telescopes around the world describing its position. BooNE collaboration - click to enlarge About the

  6. BooNE versus MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the Los Alamos LSND experiment. MiniBooNE represents the first phase for the BooNE collaboration and consists of a 1 GeV neutrino beam and a single, 800-ton mineral oil...

  7. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Picture Gallery BooNE Collaboration Members of the BooNE collaboration Civil Construction Pictorial progress of BooNE civil construction work Detector Installation Pictorial...

  8. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Booster Neutrino Experiment (BooNE) Goals of BooNE BooNE in a Nutshell Making Neutrinos Detecting Neutrinos

  9. US NE MA Site Consumption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NE MA Site Consumption million Btu 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 US NE MA ... 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours 0 250 500 750 1,000 ...

  10. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Booster Neutrino Experiment (BooNE) BooNE vs MiniBooNE Interesting Facts Posters Virtual Tour Picture Gallery News Articles Technical Information BooNE Proposal Original...

  11. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The DOE Tours MicroBooNE! - Nov. 27, 2012

  12. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Progress in Delivering Beam to MiniBooNE

  13. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE In the News MicroBooNE internal newletters (password protected) National Lab Science Day (public debut of virtual MicroBooNE), Fermilab News, 042916 MicroBooNE Project ...

  14. UPdate THE NE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UPdate THE NE January 2014 Edition U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy University Programs It's not every day graduate students get to meet one of nuclear energy's most important decision makers. Integrated University Program (IUP) Fellows had this opportunity at the 2013 Winter American Nuclear Society (ANS) Meeting this past November in Washington, D.C. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Dr. Pete Lyons, greeted IUP Fellows in a special meeting to discuss

  15. NE-23 W

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    >:-1. ,- '"CC3 . ' NE-23 .+ W h itm~ l-l& Mr. Victor 3. Canilov, Director Museum of Science and Industry East 57th Street and Lake Shore Drive Chicago, Illinois 60037 Dear kr. Danilov: The Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSPSIP), has reviewed information on the Museum cf Science and Industry, Chicago, Illinois, to determine whether it contains residual radioactivity traceable to activities conducted on behalf of the

  16. Measurements of WW and WZ Production in W+jets Final States in pp? Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.

    2012-05-02

    We study WW and WZ production with l?qq (l=e,?) final states using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 4.3 fb? of integrated luminosity from pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV. Assuming the ratio between the production cross sections ?(WW) and ?(WZ) as predicted by the standard model, we measure the total WV (V=W,Z) cross section to be ?(WV)=19.6+3.2-3.0 pb and reject the background-only hypothesis at a level of 7.9 standard deviations. We also use b-jet discrimination to separate the WZ component from the dominant WW component. Simultaneously fitting WW and WZ contributions, we measure ?(WW)=15.9+3.7-3.2 pb and ?(WZ)=3.3+4.1-3.3 pb, which is consistent with the standard model predictions.

  17. The No-Higgs Signal: Strong WW Scattering at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael S. Chanowitz

    2004-12-07

    Strong WW scattering at the LHC is discussed as a manifestation of electroweak symmetry breaking in the absence of a light Higgs bosom. The general framework of the Higgs mechanism--with or without a Higgs boson--is reviewed, and unitarity is shown to fix the scale of strong WW scattering. Strong WW scattering is also shown to be a possible outcome of five-dimensional models, which do not employ the usual Higgs mechanism at the TeV scale. Precision electroweak constraints are briefly discussed. Illustrative LHC signals are reviewed for models with QCD-like dynamics, stressing the complementarity of the W{sup {+-}}Z and like-charge W{sup +}W{sup +} + W{sup -}W{sup -} channels.

  18. WW Geminorum: An early B-type eclipsing binary evolving into the contact phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.-G.; Dai, H.-F.; Yin, X.-G.; Yang, Y. E-mail: yangyg@chnu.edu.cn

    2014-11-01

    WW Gem is a B-type eclipsing binary with a period of 1.2378 days. The CCD photometry of this binary was performed in 2013 December using the 85 cm telescope at the Xinglong Stations of the National Astronomical Observatories of China. Using the updated W-D program, the photometric model was deduced from the VRI light curves. The results imply that WW Gem is a near-contact eclipsing binary whose primary component almost fills its Roche lobe. The photometric mass ratio is q {sub ph} = 0.48(± 0.05). All collected times of minimum light, including two new ones, were used for the period studies. The orbital period changes of WW Gem could be described by an upward parabola, possibly overlaid by a light-time orbit with a period of P {sub mod} = 7.41(± 0.04) yr and a semi-amplitude of A = 0.0079 days(± 0.0005 days), respectively. This kind of cyclic oscillation may be attributed to the light-travel time effect via the third body. The long-term period increases at a rate of dP/dt = +3.47(±0.04) × 10{sup –8} day yr{sup –1}, which may be explained by the conserved mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. With mass transfer, the massive binary WW Gem may be evolving into a contact binary.

  19. MiniBooNE E. D. Zimmerman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SciBooNE Detector TargetHorn SciBooNE constraint reduces error at MiniBooNE * Flux errors become 1-2% level: negligible for this analysis * Cross-section errors reduced, but...

  20. MiniBooNE E. D. Zimmerman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from MiniBooNE * MiniBooNE * Neutrino cross-sections * Quasielastic and elastic scattering * Hadron production channels * Neutrino Oscillations * Antineutrino Oscillations...

  1. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE-darkmatter collaboration Original MiniBooNE collaboration From script reading a simple data base, last updated 2008. from inspirehep.net Booster Neutrino...

  2. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updated collaboration list for presentations: powerpoint pdf map collaboration photo MicroBooNE organizational chart MicroBooNE contact list (password required) (IB) ...

  3. Measurement of the $WW+WZ$ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurwitz, Martina; /Chicago U.

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of the WW + WZ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode is presented. The measurement is carried out with 4.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector in {radical}s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron. The main experimental challenge is identifying the signal in the overwhelming background from W+jets production. The modeling of the W+jets background is carefully studied and a matrix element technique is used to build a discriminant to separate signal and background. The cross section of WW + WZ production is measured to be {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WW + WZ) = 16.5{sub -3.0}{sup +3.3} pb, in agreement with the next-to-leading order theoretical prediction of 15.1 {+-} 0.9 pb. The significance of the signal is evaluated to be 5.4{sigma}. This measurement is an important milestone in the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the Tevatron.

  4. Bounding the Higgs width at the LHC: complementary results from H→WW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the potential of the process gg → H→ WW to provide bounds on the Higgs width. Recent studies using off-shell H→ ZZ events have shown that Run 1 LHC data can constrain the Higgs width, $\\Gamma_H < (25-45) \\Gamma_{H}^{\\rm SM}$. Using 20 fb-1 of 8 TeV ATLAS data, we estimate a bound on the Higgs boson width from the WW channel between $\\Gamma_H < (100-500) \\Gamma_H^{SM}$. The large spread in limits is due to the range of cuts applied in the existing experimental analysis. The stricter cuts designed to search for the on-shell Higgs boson limit the potential number of off-shell events, weakening the constraints. As some of the cuts are lifted the bounds improve. We show that there is potential in the high transverse mass region to produce upper bounds of the order of $(25-50) \\Gamma_H^{SM}$, depending strongly on the level of systematic uncertainty that can be obtained. Thus, if these systematics can be controlled, a constraint on the Higgs boson width from the H → WW$ decay mode can complement a corresponding limit from H → ZZ.

  5. A=14Ne (1981AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1AJ01) (Not illustrated) 14Ne has not been observed. See (1976BE1V

  6. WWS-ceremony-WW%2C-LAJ%2C-BH_crop.jpg | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information WWS-ceremony-WW%2C-LAJ%2C-BH_crop

  7. Evidence for small-molecule-mediated loop stabilization in the structure of the isolated Pin1 WW domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortenson, David E.; Kreitler, Dale F.; Yun, Hyun Gi; Gellman, Samuel H., E-mail: gellman@chem.wisc.edu; Forest, Katrina T., E-mail: gellman@chem.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Two structures of a small protein with a defined tertiary fold, the isolated Pin1 WW domain, have been determined via racemic crystallization with small-molecule additives. These additives, which are either racemic or achiral, appear to stabilize a dynamic loop region of the structure. The human Pin1 WW domain is a small autonomously folding protein that has been useful as a model system for biophysical studies of ?-sheet folding. This domain has resisted previous attempts at crystallization for X-ray diffraction studies, perhaps because of intrinsic conformational flexibility that interferes with the formation of a crystal lattice. Here, the crystal structure of the human Pin1 WW domain has been obtained via racemic crystallization in the presence of small-molecule additives. Both enantiomers of a 36-residue variant of the Pin1 WW domain were synthesized chemically, and the l- and d-polypeptides were combined to afford diffracting crystals. The structural data revealed packing interactions of small carboxylic acids, either achiral citrate or a d,l mixture of malic acid, with a mobile loop region of the WW-domain fold. These interactions with solution additives may explain our success in crystallization of this protein racemate. Molecular-dynamics simulations starting from the structure of the Pin1 WW domain suggest that the crystal structure closely resembles the conformation of this domain in solution. The structural data presented here should provide a basis for further studies of this important model system.

  8. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interesting Facts About the Booster Neutrino Experiment (BooNE): BooNE is the only experiment to search the entire range covered by the LSND oscillation signal. First proposed in 1997, BooNE has been collecting data since August 2002. The BooNE collaboration is small by high energy physics standards, comprising 75 physicists from 16 instiutions. If BooNE detects a supernova, it will send an automatic signal to telescopes around the world describing its position. BooNE collaboration - click to

  9. ICARUS/MicroBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ) ICARUS/MicroBooNE ν ( Φ 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 µ ν µ ν e ν e ν

  10. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Releases This page provides MiniBooNE data (histograms, error matrices, ntuples, etc) released in association with particular publications. Only the subset of MiniBooNE papers...

  11. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (505) 695 8364 BooNE Experiment: contact-boone@fnal.gov Current Shifter: (505) 500 5511 Detector Enclosure: (630) 840 6881 or 6081 BooNE Collaborators and Associates:...

  12. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Goals of BooNE BooNE's primary goal is to investigate the neutrino oscillation signal reported by the Los Alamos Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND) experiment. In 1995,...

  13. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sept. 3, 1999 - The MiniBooNE Detector: The Teletubby Design 1998: Oct. 30, 1998 - Good Physics in a Small Package June 5, 1998 - MiniBooNE Faces the PAC May 1, 1998 - The...

  14. About the MicroBooNE Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE The MicroBooNE collaboration is currently operating a large 170-ton liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) that is located on the Booster neutrino beam line at...

  15. MiniBooNE Nuebar Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Event Excess in the MiniBooNE Search for bar numu rightarrow bar nue Oscillations", arXiv:1007.1150 hep-ex,Phys.Rev.Lett.105,181801 (2010) The following MiniBooNE...

  16. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the Los Alamos LSND experiment. MiniBooNE represents the first phase for the BooNE collaboration and consists of a 1 GeV neutrino beam and a single, 800-ton mineral oil...

  17. A=14Ne (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ01) (Not illustrated) 14Ne, 14Na and 14Mg have not been observed. See (1983ANZQ

  18. A=14Ne (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91AJ01) (Not illustrated) 14Ne, 14Na and 14Mg have not been observed. See (1986AN07

  19. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE Collaboration Photos Click on image to view larger version April 2016 October 2014

  20. Measurements of WW and WZ Production in W+jets Final States in pp̄ Collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2012-05-02

    We study WW and WZ production with lνqq (l=e,μ) final states using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 4.3 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity from pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV. Assuming the ratio between the production cross sections σ(WW) and σ(WZ) as predicted by the standard model, we measure the total WV (V=W,Z) cross section to be σ(WV)=19.6+3.2-3.0 pb and reject the background-only hypothesis at a level of 7.9 standard deviations. We also use b-jet discrimination to separate the WZ component from the dominant WW component. Simultaneously fitting WW and WZ contributions, we measuremore » σ(WW)=15.9+3.7-3.2 pb and σ(WZ)=3.3+4.1-3.3 pb, which is consistent with the standard model predictions.« less

  1. Measurements of WW and WZ Production in W plus jets Final States in p(p)over-bar Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De la Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin et al.

    2012-05-02

    We study WW and WZ production with {ell}{nu}qq ({ell} = e,{mu}) final states using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Assuming the ratio between the production cross sections {sigma}(WW) and {sigma}(WZ) as predicted by the standard model, we measure the total WV (V = W,Z) cross section to be {sigma}(WV) = 19.6{sub -3.0}{sup +3.2} pb and reject the background-only hypothesis at a level of 7.9 standard deviations. We also use b-jet discrimination to separate the WZ component from the dominant WW component. Simultaneously fitting WW and WZ contributions, we measure {sigma}(WW) = 15.9{sub -3.2}{sup +3.7} pb and {sigma}(WZ) = 3.3{sub -3.3}{sup +4.1} pb, which is consistent with the standard model predictions.

  2. Measurements of WW and WZ Production in W+jets Final States in pp̄ Collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2012-05-02

    We study WW and WZ production with lνqq (l=e,μ) final states using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 4.3 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity from pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV. Assuming the ratio between the production cross sections σ(WW) and σ(WZ) as predicted by the standard model, we measure the total WV (V=W,Z) cross section to be σ(WV)=19.6+3.2-3.0 pb and reject the background-only hypothesis at a level of 7.9 standard deviations. We also use b-jet discrimination to separate the WZ component from the dominant WW component. Simultaneously fitting WW and WZ contributions, we measuremore »σ(WW)=15.9+3.7-3.2 pb and σ(WZ)=3.3+4.1-3.3 pb, which is consistent with the standard model predictions.« less

  3. Measurement of the WW+WZ Production Cross Section Using the Lepton+Jets Final State at CDF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-11-01

    We report two complementary measurements of the diboson (WW + WZ) cross section in the final state consisting of an electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and jets, performed using p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The first method uses the dijet invariant mass distribution while the second method uses more of the kinematic information in the event through matrix-element calculations of the signal and background processes and has a higher sensitivity. The result from the second method has a signal significance of 5.4{sigma} and is the first observation of WW + WZ production using this signature. Combining the results from both methods gives {sigma}{sub WW+WZ} = 16.0 {+-} 3.3 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction.

  4. A=18Ne (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (Not illustrated) Theory: See (RA57). 1. 18Ne(β+)18F Qm = 4.227 The maximum energy of the positrons is 3.2 ± 0.2 MeV, the half-life is 1.6 ± 0.2 sec: log ft = 2.9 ± 0.2 (GO54D). See also (DZ56). 2. 16O(3He, n)18Ne Qm = -2.966 See (KU53A). 3. 19F(p, 2n)18Ne Qm = -15.424 See (GO54D). 4. 20Ne(p, t)18Ne Qm = -19.812 Not reported

  5. A=17Ne (1977AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (See the Isobar Diagram for 17Ne) GENERAL: See also (1971AJ02) and Table 17.20 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory and reviews: (1971HA1Y, 1973HA77, 1973RE17, 1975BE31). Mass of 17Ne: The mass excess of 17Ne, determined from a measurement of the Q-value of 20Ne(3He, 6He)17Ne is 16.48 ± 0.05 MeV (1970ME11, 1972CE1A). Then 17Ne - 17F = 14.53 MeV and Eb for p, 3He and α are, respectively, 1.50, 6.46 and 9.05 MeV. See also (1971AJ02). 1. (a) 17Ne(β+)17F* → 16O + p Qm = 13.93

  6. Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    m er of 2002, the cross sections for an 8 GeV proton beam on Be were m easured by the HARP ex perim ent at CERN. Harp Setup Intro ductio n Im po rtant s te ps s ince las t re v...

  7. MicroBooNE MicroBooNE Andrzej Szelc Yale University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE MicroBooNE Andrzej Szelc Yale University 2 Outline ● The LArTPC. ● Physics with MicroBooNE. ● The MicroBooNE detector. 3 LArTPC Operation ● Charged particles in argon create electron-ion pairs and scintillation light. ● Electrons are drifted towards the anode wires. ● Multiple anode planes together with drift time allow 3D reconstruction. ● Collected charge allows calorimetric reconstruction. time 4 US LAr R&D Program 5 MicroBooNE Physics Goals 6 MiniBooNE

  8. Measurement of Higgs boson production and properties in the WW decay channel with leptonic final states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-01-17

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to a W-boson pair at the LHC is reported. The event sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 and 19.4 inverse femtobarns collected with the CMS detector in pp collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV, respectively. The Higgs boson candidates are selected in events with two or three charged leptons. An excess of events above background is observed, consistent with the expectation from the standard model Higgs boson with a mass of around 125 GeV. The probability to observe an excess equal or larger than the one seen,more » under the background-only hypothesis, corresponds to a significance of 4.3 standard deviations for mH = 125.6 GeV. The observed signal cross section times the branching fraction to WW for mH = 125.6 GeV is 0.72+0.20-0.18 times the standard model expectation. The spin-parity JP=0+ hypothesis is favored against a narrow resonance with JP=2+ or JP=0– that decays to a W-boson pair. Lastly, this result provides strong evidence for a Higgs-like boson decaying to a W-boson pair.« less

  9. MiniBooNE Pion Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contents: Pion Group Home Pion Group Members Pion References Colin's Cross Section Page MiniBooNE Internal Email M. Tzanov....

  10. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Releases This page provides MiniBooNE data (histograms, error matrices, ntuples, etc) released in association with particular publications. Only the subset of MiniBooNE papers with released data are listed here. Refer to the Publications page for a complete list of MiniBooNE publications. Other MiniBooNE Data Releases: Data Released with A.A. Aguilar-Arevalo et al., "First Measurement of the Muon Antineutrino Double-Differential Charged-Current Quasielastic Cross section",

  11. A=19Ne (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ03) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19Ne) GENERAL: See (1972AJ02) and Table 19.24 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1972EN03, 1972NE1B, 1972WE01, 1973DE13, 1977BU05). Electromagnetic transitions: (1972EN03, 1972LE06, 1973HA53, 1973PE09, 1977BU05). Special states: (1972EN03, 1972GA14, 1972HI17, 1972NE1B, 1972WE01, 1977BU05, 1977SC08). Complex reactions involving 19Ne: (1976HI05, 1977BU05). Astrophsyical questions: (1973CL1E). Muon capture: (1972MI11). Pion capture and

  12. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scrapbook Page 2 The BooNE collaboration in winter. A tour of the construction site. Working with the BooNE Horn. BooNE in the winter A tour of the construction site. A day with the Horn Janet, Bonnie, and Jen in the Tank. Janet and Bill: the early years. Bill, Richard, Jeff, and Shawn in the midst of discussion. Preparing the tubes Janet and Bill: the early days Discussion in progress The oil tanker arrives. The final stages of oil filling. The BooNE Collaboration in the summer. The oil tanker

  13. Outcome of the First wwPDB/CCDC/D3R Ligand Validation Workshop

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adams, Paul  D.; Aertgeerts, Kathleen; Bauer, Cary; Bell, Jeffrey A.; Berman, Helen  M.; Bhat, Talapady  N.; Blaney, Jeff  M.; Bolton, Evan; Bricogne, Gerard; Brown, David; et al

    2016-04-05

    Crystallographic studies of ligands bound to biological macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids) represent an important source of information concerning drug-target interactions, providing atomic level insights into the physical chemistry of complex formation between macromolecules and ligands. Of the more than 115,000 entries extant in the Protein Data Bank archive, ~75% include at least one non-polymeric ligand. Ligand geometrical and stereochemical quality, the suitability of ligand models for in silico drug discovery/design, and the goodness-of-fit of ligand models to electron density maps vary widely across the archive. We describe the proceedings and conclusions from the first Worldwide Protein Data Bank/Cambridge Crystallographicmore » Data Centre/Drug Design Data Resource (wwPDB/CCDC/D3R) Ligand Validation Workshop held at the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics at Rutgers University on July 30-31, 2015. Experts in protein crystallography from academe and industry came together with non-profit and for-profit software providers for crystallography and with experts in computational chemistry and data archiving to discuss and make recommendations on best practices, as framed by a series of questions central to structural studies of macromolecule-ligand complexes. What data concerning bound ligands should be archived in the Protein Data Bank? How should the ligands be best represented? How should structural models of macromolecule-ligand complexes be validated? What supplementary information should accompany publications of structural studies of biological macromolecules? Consensus recommendations on best practices developed in response to each of these questions are provided, together with some details regarding implementation. Important issues addressed but not resolved at the workshop are also enumerated.« less

  14. Measurement of the $W^+W^-$ Production Cross Section and Search for Anomalous $WW\\gamma$ and $WWZ$ Couplings in $p \\bar p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-12-01

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the W boson pair production cross section and most sensitive test of anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The WW candidates are reconstructed from decays containing two charged leptons and two neutrinos, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector from 3.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, a total of 654 candidate events are observed with an expected background contribution of 320 {+-} 47 events. The measured total cross section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} + X) = 12.1 {+-} 0.9 (stat){sub -1.4}{sup +1.6} (syst) pb, which is in good agreement with the standard model prediction. The same data sample is used to place constraints on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings.

  15. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Details This page provides information on the MiniBooNE experiment. Images are linked in their own page with captions. Additional resources are the Talks, Slides and Posters page, Publications page, and Data Release page Beamline Flux Detector Cross sections Light Propagation (Optical Model) Calibration Particle Identification BooNE photo montage

  16. A=16Ne (1982AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    82AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 16Ne) GENERAL: See also (1977AJ02) and Table 16.27 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theoretical work: (1978GU10, 1978SP1C, 1981LI1M). Reviews: (1977CE05, 1979AL1J, 1980TR1E). Mass of 16Ne: The Q-values of the 20Ne(α, 8He) and 16O(π+, π-) reactions lead to an atomic mass excess of 24.02 ± 0.04 MeV for 16Ne. 16Ne is then unbound with respect to decay into 14O + 2p by 1.43 MeV and is bound with respect to decay into 15F + p by 0.04 MeV. 1. 16O(π+,

  17. A=17Ne (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 17Ne) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 17.26 preview 17.26 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). 1. (a) 17Ne(β+)17F* → 16O + p Qm = 13.928 (b) 17Ne(β+)17F → 13N + α Qm = 8.711 (c) 17Ne(β+)17F Qm = 14.529 The half-life of 17Ne has been reported as 109.0 ± 1.0 msec (1971HA05) and 109.3 ± 0.6 msec (1988BO39): the weighted mean is 109.2 ± 0.6 and we adopt it. The decay is primarily to the proton unstable states of 17F at 4.65, 5.49, 6.04 and 8.08 MeV

  18. FY16 NE Budget Request Presentation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 NE Budget Request Presentation FY16 NE Budget Request Presentation PDF icon Office of Nuclear Energy FY16 Budget Request Presentation More Documents & Publications FY17 NE Budget ...

  19. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Nuclear Energy (NE) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Energy (NE) 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Nuclear Energy (NE) The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 ...

  20. MiniBooNE Flux Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Neutrino Flux Prediction at MiniBooNE", arXiv:0806.1449 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. D. 79, 072002 (2009) The following MiniBooNE information from the large flux paper in 2009 is made available to the public: Text files containing flux information for each neutrino species Positive horn polarity (neutrino-enhanced mode) Negative horn polarity (anti neutrino-enhanced mode) Contact Information For clarifications on how to use MiniBooNE public data or for enquiries about additional data not linked

  1. NE - Nuclear Energy - Energy Conservation Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NUCLEAR ENERGY (NE) ENERGY CONSERVATION PLAN NE has heavily emphasized the use of flexiplace, both regular and situational. Since approximately 56 percent of NE staff use flexiplace, our plan is based on the Forrestal/Germantown (FORS/GTN) office spaces, and flexiplace office space. There are other common sense actions and policies that will be used to improve energy efficiency in the offices at both FORS and GTN. In the FORS/GTN office space: 1. Use flexiplace to the maximum extent possible.

  2. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proceedings This page contains links to conference proceedings submitted by members of the MiniBooNE collaboration New Guidelines for Submitting Proceedings at MiniBooNE: As of June 2007, we have changed the rules on conference proceedings. Proceedings must be read by one other MiniBooNE person (besides the author) of postdoc level or above before being submitted. Proceedings should also be sent to boone-talks@fnal.gov for archiving on this website. back to Talks page Speaker Proceedings Info

  3. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Documents and Publications Public Notes See the Public Notes Page for a list of notes with results made public by the MicroBooNE collaboration. Presentations See the Talks Page for copies of slides and posters presented at conferences and workshops. MicroBooNE DocDB Like most experiments at Fermilab, MicroBooNE uses DocDB - a documents database. Much of the contents of the DocDB are restricted to members of the collaboration, but some items are public. Use the link below to enter the public

  4. The NeXus data format

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Könnecke, Mark; Akeroyd, Frederick A.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Clausen, Björn; Cottrell, Stephen; Hoffmann, Jens Uwe; Jemian, Pete R.; Männicke, David; Osborn, Raymond; Peterson, Peter F.; Richter, Tobias; Suzuki, Jiro; Watts, Benjamin; Wintersberger, Eugen; Wuttke, Joachim

    2015-01-30

    NeXus is an effort by an international group of scientists to define a common data exchange and archival format for neutron, X-ray and muon experiments. NeXus is built on top of the scientific data format HDF5 and adds domain-specific rules for organizing data within HDF5 files, in addition to a dictionary of well defined domain-specific field names. The NeXus data format has two purposes. First, it defines a format that can serve as a container for all relevant data associated with a beamline. This is a very important use case. Second, it defines standards in the form of application definitions for the exchange of data between applications. NeXus provides structures for raw experimental data as well as for processed data.

  5. A=16Ne (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ04) (See the Isobar Diagram for 16Ne) GENERAL: See also (1982AJ01) and Table 16.26 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. See (1981SE1B, 1983ANZQ, 1985AN28, 1985MA1X). Mass of 16Ne: The Q-values of the 20Ne(α, 8He) and 16O(π+, π-) reactions lead to atomic mass excesses of 23.93 ± 0.08 MeV (1978KE06), 23.978 ± 0.024 MeV (1983WO01) and 24.048 ± 0.045 MeV (1980BU15) [recalculated using the (1985WA02) masses for 8He, 16O and 20Ne]. The weighted mean is 23.989 ± 0.020 MeV which is

  6. A=16Ne (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 16Ne) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 16.29 preview 16.29 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 16.32 preview 16.32 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 16Ne: The Q-values of the 20Ne(α, 8He) and 16O(π+, π-) reactions lead to atomic mass excesses of 23.93 ± 0.08 MeV (1978KE06), 23.978 ± 0.024 MeV (1983WO01) and 24.048 ± 0.045 MeV (1980BU15) [recalculated using the (1985WA02) masses for 8He, 16O and 20Ne]. The weighted mean is

  7. A=17Ne (1982AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    82AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 17Ne) GENERAL: See (1977AJ02) and Table 17.22 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory and reviews:(1975BE56, 1977CE05, 1978GU10, 1978WO1E, 1979BE1H). Other topics:(1981GR08). Mass of 17Ne: The mass excess adopted by (1977WA08) is 16.478 ± 0.026 MeV, based on unpublished data. We retain the mass excess 16.48 ± 0.05 MeV based on the evidence reviewed in (1977AJ02). 1. (a) 17Ne(β+)17F* → 16O + p Qm = 13.93 (b) 17Ne(β+)17F Qm = 14.53 The half-life of

  8. A=17Ne (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ04) (See the Isobar Diagram for 17Ne) GENERAL: See (1982AJ01) and Table 17.20 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory and reviews: (1983ANZQ, 1983AU1B, 1985AN28). 1. (a) 17Ne(β+)17F* → 16O + p Qm = 13.93 (b) 17Ne(β+)17F Qm = 14.53 The half-life of 17Ne is 109.0 ± 1.0 msec (1971HA05). Earlier values (see (1971AJ02)) gave a mean value of 108.0 ± 2.7 msec. The decay is primarily to the proton unstable states of 17F at 4.70, 5.52 and 6.04 MeV with Jπ = 3/2-, 3/2- and 1/2-: see

  9. UCB-NE-107 user's manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, W.W.L.

    1989-03-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide users of UCB-NE-107 with the information necessary to use UCB-NE-107 effectively. UCB-NE-107 is a computer code for calculating the fractional rate of readily soluble radionuclides that are released from nuclear waste emplaced in water-saturated porous media. Waste placed in such environments will gradually dissolve. For many species such as actinides and rare earths, the process of dissolution is governed by the exterior flow field, and the chemical reaction rate or leaching rate. However, for readily soluble species such as /sup 135/Cs, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 129/I, it has been observed that their dissolution rates are rapid. UCB-NE-107 is a code for calculating the release rate at the waste/rock interface, to check compliance with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (USNRC) subsystem performance objective. It is an implementation of the analytic solution given below. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  10. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (numbers, plots, details) of the MiniBooNE experiment and analysis pieces. Images are linked in their own page with captions. Additional resources are the Talks, Slides and...

  11. MiniBooNE Flux Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on how to use MiniBooNE public data or for enquiries about additional data not linked from this page, please contact: Steve Brice or Richard Van de Water Acknowledgments If...

  12. The NeXus data format

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Könnecke, Mark; Akeroyd, Frederick A.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Clausen, Björn; Cottrell, Stephen; Hoffmann, Jens Uwe; Jemian, Pete R.; Männicke, David; et al

    2015-01-30

    NeXus is an effort by an international group of scientists to define a common data exchange and archival format for neutron, X-ray and muon experiments. NeXus is built on top of the scientific data format HDF5 and adds domain-specific rules for organizing data within HDF5 files, in addition to a dictionary of well defined domain-specific field names. The NeXus data format has two purposes. First, it defines a format that can serve as a container for all relevant data associated with a beamline. This is a very important use case. Second, it defines standards in the form of application definitionsmore » for the exchange of data between applications. NeXus provides structures for raw experimental data as well as for processed data.« less

  13. MiniBooNE Cross Sections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SSECTIONS(AT)fnal.gov convenors: Alessandro Curioni (alessandro.curioni(AT)yale.edu) and Sam Zeller (gzeller(AT)fnal.gov) Cross Sections at MiniBooNE, Meetings, Reference Articles,...

  14. A=20Ne (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ) elastic scattering. It is interpreted in terms of a quasi-molecular -particle cluster model (CO69S). See also (WA65M). 18. 17O(, n)20Ne Qm 0.588 Angular...

  15. A=18Ne (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18Ne) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 18.35 preview 18.35 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 18.36 preview 18.36 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). For B(E2) of 18Ne*(1.89) and other parameters see (1987RA01) and Table Prev. Table 2 preview 2 in the Introduction. 1. 18Ne(β+)18F Qm = 4.446 The half-life of 18Ne is 1672 ± 8 ms: see (1978AJ03) and (1983AD03). The decay is primarily to 18F*(0, 1.04, 1.70 MeV). In addition there is an

  16. A=20Ne (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See Energy Level Diagram for 20Ne) GENERAL: See also Table 20.6 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (GA55B, HE55F, MO56, BA57, RA57). 1. 9Be(14N, t)20Ne Qm = 6.323 See (GO58E). 2. 16O(α, γ)20Ne Qm = 4.753 An unsuccessful attempt has been made to observe the isobaric spin-forbidden transition between the T = 0 states at 7.19 MeV (J = 3-) and 1.63 MeV (J = 2+). The radiative width is < 6 x 10-3 eV, indicating an admixture of T = 1 of < 1.3 x 10-3 in 20Ne*(7.19)

  17. MiniBooNE Nue Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrino Appearance at the m2 1 eV2 Scale", arXiv:0704.1500 hep-ex, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 231801 (2007) The following MiniBooNE information from the first oscillation paper in...

  18. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    elastic cross-section paper is on the archive (arXiv:1309.7257) and has been published in Phys. Rev. D91, 012004 (2015). MiniBooNE's antineutrino charged current quasi-elastic...

  19. MiniBooNE Nuebar Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Anti-Neutrino Appearance at the m2 1 eV2 Scale", arXiv:0904.1958 hep-ex, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 111801 (2009) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2009...

  20. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Posters What's a Neutrino? How neutrinos fit into our understanding of the universe. Recipe for a Neutrino Beam Start with some protons... concocting the MiniBooNE beam. The...

  1. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BooNE will investigate the question of neutrino mass by searching for oscillations of muon neutrinos into electron neutrinos. This will be done by directing a muon neutrino beam...

  2. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact MicroBooNE Spokespeople: Bonnie Fleming, Yale email: bonnie.fleming(AT)yale.edu phone: (203) 432-3235 Sam Zeller, FNAL email: gzeller(AT)fnal.gov phone: (630) 840-6879 Collaboration Members

  3. {beta} decay of {sup 26}Ne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissman, L.; Lisetskiy, A.F.; Arndt, O.; Dillmann, I.; Hallmann, O.; Kratz, K.L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Bergmann, U.; Cederkall, J.; Fraile, L.; Koester, U.; Franchoo, S.; Gaudefroy, L.; Sorlin, O.; Tabor, S.

    2004-11-01

    A pure neutron-rich {sup 26}Ne beam was obtained at the ISOLDE facility using isobaric selectivity. This was achieved by a combination of a plasma ion source with a cooled transfer line and subsequent mass separation. The high quality of the beam and good statistics allowed us to obtain new experimental information on the {sup 26}Ne {beta}-decay properties and resolve a contradiction between earlier experimental data and prediction of shell-model calculations.

  4. NE Press Releases | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Press Releases NE Press Releases RSS July 6, 2016 Energy Department To Fund Radiochemistry Traineeship Program The Energy Department's offices of Nuclear Energy (NE) and Environmental Management (EM) are co-funding a new traineeship program in radiochemistry at Washington State University (WSU) in Pullman. June 14, 2016 Energy Department Invests $82 Million to Advanced Nuclear Technology In total, 93 projects were selected to receive funding that will help push innovative nuclear technologies

  5. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Articles FermiNews Fermilab's biweekly magazine (several stories) Beam Line: Special Neutrino Issue A special issue of SLAC's quarterly magazine. Earth & Sky "Catching Ghost Particles": Interview with Janet Conrad Columbia Magazine "The Nature of the Neutrino": MiniBooNE and neutrinos The Los Angeles Times "It's No Small Matter": K. C. Cole's article detailing her summer 2003 stint at Fermilab working on MiniBooNE [text only]

  6. MicroBooNE Detector Move

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Flemming, Bonnie; Rameika, Gina

    2014-07-15

    On Monday, June 23, 2014 the MicroBooNE detector -- a 30-ton vessel that will be used to study ghostly particles called neutrinos -- was transported three miles across the Fermilab site and gently lowered into the laboratory's Liquid-Argon Test Facility. This video documents that move, some taken with time-lapse camerad, and shows the process of getting the MicroBooNE detector to its new home.

  7. MicroBooNE Detector Stability MICROBOONE-NOTE-1013-PUB The MicroBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE Detector Stability MICROBOONE-NOTE-1013-PUB The MicroBooNE Collaboration June 30, 2016 Abstract The Micro Booster Neutrino Experiment (MicroBooNE) is designed to explore the low- energy excess in the ν e event spectrum reported by the MiniBooNE experiment [1] and to measure ν-Ar cross sections in the 1 GeV energy range. The detector is a liquid argon time projection chamber with wire readout, supplemented with a light detection system based on photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs). The

  8. Double Higgs boson production via WW fusion in TeV e sup + e sup minus collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barger, V.; Han, T. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-04-10

    The production of two standard model Higgs bosons via the WW fusion process e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {r arrow} {bar v}{sub e}v{sub e}HH would test the predicted HHH, HWW and HHWW couplings. At TeV energies this fusion cross section dominates over that from e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {r arrow} ZHH and would give significant event rates for M{sub H}{approx lt} 1/2 M{sub z} at high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders. The authors evaluate the rates and present the dynamical distributions.

  9. Search for Resonant WW and WZ Production in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Ancu, L. S.; Aoki, M.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christoudias, T.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; ?wiok, M.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hossain, S.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jain, S.; Jamin, D.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Owen, M.; Padilla, M.; Pangilinan, M.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Piper, J.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pol, M.-E.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rich, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.

    2011-06-29

    We search for resonant WW or WZ production by using up to 5.4 fb? of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data are consistent with the standard model background expectation, and we set limits on a resonance mass by using the sequential standard model W' boson and the Randall-Sundrum model graviton G as benchmarks. We exclude a sequential standard model W' boson in the mass range 180690 GeV and a Randall-Sundrum graviton in the range 300754 GeV at 95% C.L.

  10. FY17 NE Budget Request Presentation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY17 NE Budget Request Presentation FY17 NE Budget Request Presentation FY17 NE Budget Request Presentation (2.07 MB) More Documents & Publications FY16 NE Budget Request Presentation Office of Nuclear Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Request Assessment of Small Modular Reactor Suitability for Use On or Near Air Force Space Command Installations SAND 2016-2600

  11. MiniBooNE at All Experimenter's Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    100807 MiniBooNE Status Report R.G. Van de Water 100107 MiniBooNE Status Report R.G. Van de Water 080607 MiniBooNE Status Report Steve Brice 073007 MiniBooNE Status...

  12. Cross section analyses in MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katori, Teppei

    2015-05-15

    The MiniBooNE experiment (2002-2012) and the SciBooNE experiment (2007-2008) are modern high statistics neutrino experiments, and they developed many new ideas in neutrino cross section analyses. In this note, I discuss selected topics of these analyses.

  13. A=19Ne (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19Ne) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 19.26 preview 19.26 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 19.27 preview 19.27 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. μg.s. = -1.88542 (8) nm (1982MA39) μ0.239 = -0.740 (8) nm (1978LEZA) 1. 19Ne(β+)19F Qm = 3.238 We adopt the half-life of 19Ne suggested by (1983AD03): 17.34 ± 0.09 s. See also (1978AJ03). The decay is principally to 19Fg.s.: see Table Prev. Table 19.29 preview 19.29 (in PDF or

  14. MiniBooNE Nue Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrino Appearance at the Δm2 ~1 eV2 Scale", arXiv:0704.1500 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 231801 (2007) The following MiniBooNE information from the first oscillation paper in 2007 is made available to the public: Energy Range for Default Oscillation Fit (475 MeV - 3000 MeV reconstructed neutrino energy) ntuple file of official MiniBooNE sin2(2theta) sensitivity and upper limit curves as a function of Dm2, for a 2-neutrino muon-to-electron oscillation fit, and 90% and 3sigma confidence

  15. MiniBooNE Nuebar Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search for Electron Anti-Neutrino Appearance at the Δm2 ~1 eV2 Scale", arXiv:0904.1958 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 111801 (2009) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2009 nuebar appearance paper is made available to the public: Energy Range: 475 MeV - 3000 MeV reconstructed neutrino energy ntuple file of MiniBooNE sin2(2theta) sensitivity and upper limit curves as a function of Dm2, for a 2-neutrino muon-to-electron antineutrino oscillation fit, and 90% and 3sigma confidence

  16. MiniBooNE Oscillation Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oscillation Results and Implications Michael H. Shaevitz for the MiniBooNE Collaboration Abstract. The MiniBooNE Collaboration has reported ...rst results of a search for e appearance in a beam. With two largely independent analyses, no signi...cant excess was observed of events above background for reconstructed neutrino energies above 475 MeV and the data are consistent with no oscillations within a two neutrino appearance-only oscillation model. An excess of events (186 27 33 events) is

  17. MiniBooNE Steve Brice Fermilab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    17 May 2006 1 MiniBooNE Steve Brice Fermilab * Oscillation Analysis * Issues of the Past Year - Normalization - Optical Model -  0 MisIDs * Summary * Future DOE Review 17 May 2006 2 MiniBooNE Goal * Search for  e appearance in a   beam at the ~0.3% level - L=540 m ~10x LSND - E~500 MeV ~10x LSND DOE Review 17 May 2006 3 Particle ID * Identify electrons (and thus candidate  e events) from characteristic hit topology * Non-neutrino background easily removed     n p W

  18. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Milestones 2008: January 1 1E21 protons on target recorded by MiniBooNE 2007: April 10 25m absorber repaired 2006: August 23 9e16 protons delivered in a single hour (Booster champagne goal) January 18 first antineutrino beam 2004: April 26 Record week (04/19-04/26) 6.83E18 protons delivered. 2003: March 28 Record day: 9.6E17 protons delivered March 18 Record day: 8.18E17 protons delivered March 06 5.5E17 protons delivered to MiniBooNE in 1 hour. (passed the official BD 5E16 milestone) March 01

  19. MicroBooNE First Cosmic Tracks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Tracks in MicroBooNE (August 6, 2015) On August 6, 2015, we started to turn on the drift high voltage in the MicroBooNE detector for the very first time. We paused at 58 kV (this is about 1/2 of our design voltage) and immediately started to see tracks across the entire TPC. Below are some of our first images of cosmic rays and UV laser tracks (last picture) recorded by the TPC! Collection plane images: And here is one of the first images of a UV laser track in the TPC. You can tell which

  20. A=18Ne (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18Ne) GENERAL: See also (1978AJ03) and Table 18.21 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1979DA15, 1979SA31, 1980ZH01). Electromagnetic transitions: (1977HA1Z, 1979SA31, 1982LA26). Special states: (1977HE18, 1978KR1G, 1979DA15, 1979SA31, 1980OK01, 1982ZH1D). Astrophysical questions: (1978WO1E). Complex reactions involving 18Ne: (1979HE1D). Pion-induced capture and reactions (See also reaction 6.): (1977PE12, 1977SP1B, 1978BU09,

  1. A=18Ne (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18Ne) GENERAL: See (1983AJ01) and Table 18.22 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(1982ZH01, 1983BR29, 1984SA37, 1985RO1G). Special states:(1982ZH01, 1983BI1C, 1983BR29, 1984SA37, 1985RO1G, 1986AN10, 1986AN07). Electromagnetic transitions:(1982BR24, 1982RI04, 1983BR29, 1985AL21, 1986AN10). Astrophysical questions:(1982WI1B, 1987WI11). Complex reactions involving 18Ne:(1986HA1B). Pion capture and reactions (See also reaction

  2. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cross Sections MiniBooNE's neutrino flux (with a mean energy of ~700 MeV) dictates the type of neutrino interactions the experiment sees. At these energies, quasi-elastic (QE) and single pion production processes dominate. For MiniBooNE, the contributions from multi-pion production and deep inelastic scattering (DIS) are small. image: neutrino cross sections vs energy There are several cross sections which contribute at these energies. Here is a plot of the charged current (CC) cross section

  3. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detector The MiniBooNE tank is 12 m diameter sphere, filled with approximately 800 tons of mineral oil, CH2, which has a density of 0.845 ± 0.001 g/cm3. 1280 PMTs provide about 10% coverage of the inner tank region, and 240 PMTs cover the outer, optically isolated "veto" region in the last 1.3 m in the tank. Most of the tubes were recovered from LSND, and are 'old' tubes, some additional ones were bought for MiniBooNE, and are 'new'; differences in the new vs the old tube function are

  4. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flux The MiniBooNE neutrino flux calculations are described in detail in PRD 79, 072002 (2009) and arXiv:0806.1449 General neutrino fluxes vs true neutrino energy, for MiniBooNE: image:muon neutrino flux image:electron neutrino flux image:final muon and electron neutrino fluxes π+ production Data sets: M.G. Catanesi et al. [HARP Collaboration], ``Measurement of the production cross-section of positive pions in the collision of 8.9-GeV/c protons on beryllium,'', arXiv:hep-ex/0702024 E910

  5. UCB-NE-108 user's manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, C.H.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide users of UCB-NE-108 with the information necessary to use UCB-NE-108 effectively. UCB-NE-108 is a computer code for calculating the fractional release rate of readily soluble radionuclides that are released from nuclear waste emplaced in water-saturated porous media, and transported through layers of porous media. Waste placed in such environments will gradually dissolve. For many species such as actinides and rare earths, the process of dissolution is governed by the exterior flow field, and the chemical reaction rate or leaching rate. In a spent-fuel waste package the soluble cesium and iodine accumulated in fuel-cladding gaps, voids, and grain boundaries of spent fuel rods are expected to dissolve rapidly when groundwater penetrates the fuel cladding. UCB-NE-108 is a code for calculating the release rate at the interface of two layers of porous material, such as the backfill around a high-level waste package and natural rock, to check compliance with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (USNRC) subsystem performance objective. It is an implementation of the analytic solution given below. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  6. MiniBooNE darkmatter collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE-DM Collaboration A.A. Aguilar-Arevalo,1 B. Batell,2 B.C. Brown,3 R. Carr,4 R. Cooper,5 P. deNiverville,6 R. Dharmapalan,7 R. Ford,3 F.G. Garcia,3 G. T. Garvey,8 J....

  7. A=16Ne (71AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    predicts M - A 25.15 0.6 MeV (CE68A: 16Ne is then unbound with respect to breakup into 14O + 2p by 2.6 MeV. See also (GO60K, GO60P, BA61F, GO61N, GO62N, GO62O, GA64A,...

  8. A=16Ne (1977AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    predicts M - A 25.15 0.6 MeV (1968CE1A); 16Ne is then unbound with respect to breakup into 14O + 2p by 2.6 MeV: see (1971AJ02) for the earlier work. See also (1972WA07)...

  9. A=17Ne (71AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diagram for 17Ne) GENERAL: See also Table 17.22 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Theory: (WI64E, MA65J, MA66BB). Reviews: (BA60Q, GO60P, BA61F, GO62N, GO64J, GO66J, GO66L,...

  10. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Civil Construction Pictures The civil construction required for the MiniBooNE experiment consists of two independent construction projects. The Detector Construction: This project was started on October 15, 1999. The 8-GeV Beamline and Target Hall: This project started on June 7, 2000.

  11. MiniBooNE Results / MicroBooNE Status! Eric Church, Yale University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    trigger ReconstructionpID: LArSoft LAr fill w.o. evacuation Surface Running UV Laser Calibration System Spring-Summer, 2014 16 February 22, 2014 MicroBooNE ...

  12. MiniBooNE Numu/Numubar Disappearance Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for muon neutrino and antineutrino disappearance in MiniBooNE", arXiv:0903.2465 hep-ex, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 061802 (2009) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2009 numu...

  13. Joint MiniBooNE, SciBooNE Disappearance Analysis Gary Cheng Warren Huelsnitz

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE, SciBooNE Disappearance Analysis Gary Cheng Warren Huelsnitz Columbia University Los Alamos National Lab Fermilab 31 Aug 2012 Friday, August 31, 2012 Acknowledgements * Teppei Katori * Joe Grange * Zarko Pavlovic * Kendall Mahn and Yasuhiro Nakajima 2 * Muon Neutrino CCQE Cross Section Analysis (Phys. Rev. D81, 092005 (2010)) * Neutrino Contamination in Antineutrino Mode (Phys. Rev. D84, 072005 (2011) and arXiv: 1107.5327) * Electron Neutrino (Antineutrino) Appearance (Phys. Rev. Lett.

  14. A=18Ne (1972AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18Ne) GENERAL: See Table 18.23 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell and cluster model calculations: (1957WI1E, 1969BE1T, 1970BA2E, 1970EL08, 1970HA49, 1972KA01). Electromagnetic transitions: (1970EL08, 1970HA49). Special levels: (1966MI1G, 1969KA29, 1972KA01). Pion reactions: (1965PA1F). Other theoretical calculations: (1965GO1F, 1966KE16, 1968BA2H, 1968BE1V, 1968MU1B, 1968NE1C, 1968VA1J, 1968VA24, 1969BA1Z, 1969GA1G, 1969KA29, 1969MU09, 1969RA28,

  15. A=19Ne (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19Ne) GENERAL: See (1978AJ03) and Table 19.23 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1978MA2H, 1978PE09, 1978PI06, 1979DA15, 1979MA27, 1979PE16, 1982KI02). Electromagnetic transitions: (1978PE09, 1978SC19, 1979MA27, 1979PE16). Special states: (1978MA2H, 1978PE09, 1978PI06, 1978SC19, 1979DA15, 1980OK01, 1982KI02). Astrophysical questions: (1977SI1D, 1978WO1E, 1979RA1C). Applied topics: (1979AL1Q). Complex reactions involving 19Ne:

  16. A=19Ne (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19Ne) GENERAL: See (1983AJ01) and Table 19.21 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models:(1983BR29, 1983PO02). Special states: (1983BI1C, 1983BR29, 1983PO02, 1986AN07). Electromagnetic transitions: (1982BR24, 1983BR29, 1985AL21). Astrophysical questions: (1981WA1Q, 1982WI1B, 1986LA07). Applications:(1982BO1N). Complex reactions involving 19Ne:(1981DE1P, 1983JA05, 1984GR08, 1985BE40, 1986GR1A, 1986HA1B, 1987RI03). Pion capture and reactions (See

  17. Djurcic_MiniBooNE_NuFact2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE Results Zelimir Djurcic Zelimir Djurcic Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory NuFact2010: 12th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories, NuFact2010: 12th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories, Superbeams Superbeams and and Beta Beams Beta Beams October 20-25, 2010. Mumbai, India October 20-25, 2010. Mumbai, India Outline Outline * * MiniBooNE MiniBooNE Experiment Description Experiment Description * * MiniBooNE MiniBooNE ' ' s s Neutrino Results Neutrino

  18. WW production cross section measurement and limits on anomalous trilinear gauge couplings at sqrt(s) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Michael P.; /Rice U.

    2008-04-01

    The cross section for WW production is measured and limits on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ trilinear gauge couplings are set using WW {yields} ee/e{mu}/{mu}{mu} events collected by the Run II D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Across the three final states, 108 candidate events are observed with 40.8 {+-} 3.8 total background expected, consistent with {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WW) = 11.6 {+-} 1.8(stat) {+-} 0.7(syst) {+-} 0.7(lumi) pb. Using a set of SU(2){sub L} {direct_product} U(1){sub Y} conserving constraints, the one-dimensional 95% C.L. limits on trilinear gauge couplings are -0.63 < {Delta}{kappa}{sub {gamma}} < 0.99, -0.15 < {lambda}{sub {gamma}} < 0.19, and -0.14 < {Delta}g{sub 1}{sup Z} < 0.34.

  19. M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    300.955 L*Enfom Plaza, S. Iv.. Washrhington. D.C. 200242174, Tekphonc (202) 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Deconnnissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordi with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The reconu includes 26 colleges and universities

  20. MicroBooNE Proposal Addendum March

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE Proposal Addendum March 3, 2008 H. Chen, G. de Geronimo, J. Farrell, A. Kandasamy, F. Lanni, D. Lissauer, D. Makowiecki, J. Mead, V. Radeka, S. Rescia, J. Sondericker, B. Yu Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY L. Bugel, J. M. Conrad, Z. Djurcic, V. Nguyen, M. Shaevitz, W. Willis ‡ Columbia University, New York, NY C. James, S. Pordes, G. Rameika Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL C. Bromberg, D. Edmunds Michigan State University, Lansing, MI P. Nienaber St.

  1. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Light propagation in mineral oil Though the dominant light observed in MiniBooNE is Cherenkov light, scintillation and fluorescence (here, reabsorbed Cherenkov light re-emitted) account for about 25% of the light. We model: scintillation light (yield, decay times, spectrum), fluorescence, scattering (Rayleigh, Raman), absorption, reflection (off tank walls, PMT faces) and PMT effects (single pe charge response). External measurements Scintillation from p beam (IUCF) Scintillation from cosmic mu

  2. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Particle Identification (PID) We use hit topology and timing to identify events. Particles produce Cherenkov light in our tank, as well as some scintillation light, dependent on particle type. Two independent methods to identify electron neutrinos in MiniBooNE: Boosted Decision Trees, and Track Based. The two methods use different event reconstruction fitters. Boosted Decision Trees (BDT) Decision trees are similar to neural nets, but don't suffer from the same pathologies. To form a decision

  3. Search for resonant WW and WZ production in ppbar collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    The standard model of particle physics is expected to be a low energy effective theory valid for particle interactions below the TeV scale. Above this scale, extensions to the standard model (SM) augment the existing particle content, leading to enhanced production of many final states at colliders. Specifically, the production and decay of massive charged or neutral particles can produce an excess of W boson pairs for neutral particles or W and Z boson pairs for charged particles. We search for resonant WW or WZ production using up to 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data are consistent with the standard model background expectation, and we set limits on a resonance mass using the sequential standard model (SSM) W{prime} boson and the Randall-Sundrum model graviton G as benchmarks. We exclude an SSM W{prime} boson in the mass range 180-690 GeV and a Randall-Sundrum graviton in the range 300-754 GeV at 95% CL.

  4. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the H -> WW -> lepton+neutrino+q'qbar Decay Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2011-04-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV in events containing a charged lepton (ell), missing transverse energy, and at least two jets, using 5.4 fb^-1 of integrated luminosity recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. This analysis is sensitive primarily to Higgs bosons produced through the fusion of two gluons or two electroweak bosons, with subsequent decay H->WW->ell+nu+q'qbar, where ell is an electron or muon. The search is also sensitive to contributions from other production channels, such as WH->ell+nu+bbbar In the absence of signal, we set limits at the 95% C.L. on the cross section for H production sigma(ppbar->H+X) in these final states. For a mass of MH=160 GeV, the limit is a factor of 3.9 larger than the cross section in the standard model, and consistent with expectation.

  5. W-W

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... On the basis of the ranking procedure of the FUSRAP protocol (USDOE, 1986), the site is classified as a medium priority site. This ranking is based upon potential health risk ...

  6. GM WW HP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Killer Micros ii: The sofTware sTriKes BacK Burton Smith Technical Fellow Developer Productivity Luncheon, November 15, 2007 BurTon sMiTh Technical fellow eXTreMe coMPuTinG GrouP...

  7. Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    300, 955 L'E~~MI Phm.SW.:. Washin@on. LX. 200242174, T~kphonc(202)48ll. 5 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 cA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES M/).0-05 pl 0.0% The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flD.o-02

  8. Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    9% L'Enfam Plaza, S, W.. Warhin@on, D.C. 2002ijl74j Tekphow (202) 488ddO 7117-03.87.cdy.'i3 23 September 1967 ~ s ~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Oivision of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND IJNIVFRSITIES , The attached elimination reconnnendation was prepar!ad in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September! The recommendation includes 26 colleges and

  9. Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    suite 7900,955 L%l/onr Plaza, S. W., Washingion, D.C. 20024.?174,, Telephone: (202) 488.~ Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 7117~03.87.dy.43 23 September 1987 I j / Dear Mr. Wallo: I ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UN&ITIES I . The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September!. The recommend includes 26

  10. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Author Resources The following is a randomly ordered set of useful resources for people writing MiniBooNE publications:- Have a journal in mind when first putting together the paper. Each journal has LaTeX style files that can be downloaded from their web pages. There is a nice little LaTeX macro that will put line numbers by each line of your document. This makes it much easier for people to feedback comments on the paper. To use it just put \RequirePackage{lineno} just before the

  11. A=18Ne (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ03) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18Ne) GENERAL: See also (1972AJ02) and Table 18.22 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1972EN03, 1974LO04). Electromagnetic transitions: (1970SI1J, 1972EN03, 1974LO04, 1976SH04, 1977BR03, 1977SA13). Special states: (1972EN03, 1972RA08). Muon- and pion-induced capture and reactions (See also reaction 5.): (1972MI11, 1974LI1N, 1975LI04, 1976HE1G, 1977MA2Q, 1977RO1U). Other theoretical calculations: (1970SI1J, 1972CA37, 1972RA08,

  12. CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ?9OQ, 95.5 L'E&nt Plaza, SW.. W.ashin@.m, D.C. 20024.2174, Tekphone: (202) 488AQOO 7117-03.B7.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Oepartment of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES zh/ ! o-01 lM!tl5 ML)!o-05 PI 77!0> The attached elimination recoannendation was prepared in accordance . -1 rlL.0~ with your suggestion during our meeting on

  13. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline Proton beam 8.89 GeV/c protons from the Fermilab Booster are incident on a beryllium target. The beam is modeled with measured mean position and angle with Gaussian smearing. MiniBooNE simulates the effects of varying the spread in the beam and different focus points of the beam. The typical proton beam contains 4 x 10¹² protons delivered in a spill approximately 1.6 µs in duration. The absolute number of protons on target (p.o.t) is measured by two toroids upstream of the target.

  14. Prospects for antineutrino running at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wascko, M.O.; /Louisiana State U.

    2006-02-01

    MiniBooNE began running in antineutrino mode on 19 January, 2006. We describe the sensitivity of MiniBooNE to LSND-like {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations and outline a program of antineutrino cross-section measurements necessary for the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. We describe three independent methods of constraining wrong-sign (neutrino) backgrounds in an antineutrino beam, and their application to the MiniBooNE antineutrino analyses.

  15. The MicroBooNE Experiment - About the Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Physics Goals MicroBooNE will collect neutrino interactions using the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab and produce the first neutrino cross section measurements on argon in the 1 GeV energy range. MicroBooNE will also explore the currently unexplained excess of low energy electromagnetic events observed in the MiniBooNE experiment. Click here for public plots and physics distributions.

  16. A=19Ne (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See Energy Level Diagram for 19Ne) GENERAL: See also Table 19.9 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (EL55A, RE55, RE55B, RA57, RE58). 1. 19Ne(β+)19F Qm = 3.256 The positron end point is 2.18 ± 0.03 (SC52A), 2.23 ± 0.05 (AL57), 2.24 ± 0.01 MeV (WE58B). The half-life is 17.4 ± 0.2 sec (HE59), 17.7 ± 0.1 (PE57), 18.3 ± 0.5 (AL57), 18.5 ± 0.5 (SC52A), 19 ± 1 (NA54B), 19.5 ± 1.0 (WE58B), 20.3 ± 0.5 sec (WH39). The absence of low-energy γ-rays (see 19F) indicates

  17. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Getting Started

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Getting Started on MicroBooNE Welcome to MicroBooNE! This page is designed to help new MicroBooNE collaborators find their way around the experiment and Fermilab. Table of Contents Fermilab ID, Computing Accounts, and Required Training Visas for non-US Citizens Traveling to Fermilab Housing/Hotels Getting Around Communication within the Collaboration Software Getting Help Step One First, make sure the PI of your institution has sent an email to the MicroBooNE spokespeople letting them know that

  18. Constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson signal strength in the high-mass ZZ and WW final states with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The measurements of the ZZ and WW final states in the mass range above the \\(2m_Z\\) and \\(2m_W\\) thresholds provide a unique opportunity to measure the off-shell coupling strength of the Higgs boson. This paper presents constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson event yields normalised to the Standard Model prediction (signal strength) in the \\(ZZ \\rightarrow 4\\ell \\), \\(ZZ\\rightarrow 2\\ell 2\

  19. A conserved serine residue regulates the stability of Drosophila Salvador and human WW domain-containing adaptor 45 through proteasomal degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Di Wu, Shian

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: Ser-17 is key for the stability of Drosophila Sav. Ala mutation of Ser-17 promotes the proteasomal degradation of Sav. Ser-17 residue is not the main target of Hpo-induced Sav stabilization. Hpo-dependent and -independent mechanisms regulate Sav stability. This mechanism is conserved in the homologue of Sav, human WW45. -- Abstract: The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved tumor suppressor pathway that controls organ size through the coordinated regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Drosophila Salvador (Sav), which limits organ size, is a core component of the Hpo pathway. In this study, Ser-17 was shown to be important for the stability of Sav. Alanine mutation of Ser-17 promoted the proteasomal degradation of Sav. Destabilization and stabilization of the Sav protein mediated by alanine mutation of Ser-17 and by Hpo, respectively, were independent of each other. This implies that the stability of Sav is controlled by two mechanisms, one that is Ser-17-dependent and Hpo-independent, and another that is Ser-17-independent and Hpo-dependent. These dual mechanisms also regulated the human counterpart of Drosophila Sav, WW domain-containing adaptor 45 (WW45). The conservation of this regulation adds to its significance in normal physiology and tumorigenesis.

  20. A=20Ne (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ03) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20Ne) GENERAL: See also (1972AJ02) and Table 20.18 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1970CR1A, 1971DE56, 1971RA1B, 1971ZO1A, 1972AB12, 1972AR1F, 1972AS13, 1972BO38, 1972BR1G, 1972JA24, 1972KA39, 1972KA67, 1972KH08, 1972KR1D, 1972KU1F, 1972LE13, 1972LE38, 1972MA07, 1972NI14, 1972RE03, 1972SA1B, 1972VO09, 1972WH04, 1973CO03, 1973DH1A, 1973EL04, 1973EN1C, 1973GI09, 1973HA05, 1973HE1F, 1973IC01, 1973IR01, 1973MA1K, 1973MC06, 1973MC1E,

  1. NE-23 List of California Sites NE-23 Hattie Car-well, SAN/NSQA Division

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NE-23 Hattie Car-well, SAN/NSQA Division Attached for your information is the list of California sites we identified in our search of Manhattdn Engineer District records for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). None of the facilities listed qualified"fbr'FUSRAP:'~- The only site in California,that was included in FUSRAP was Gilman Hall on the University of California-Berkeley Campus. All California sites that are in our Surplus Facilities Management Prcgram are

  2. Neutrino Scattering Results from MiniBooNE R. Tayloe, Indiana...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrino Scattering Results from MiniBooNE R. Tayloe, Indiana U. ECT workshop Trento, Italy, 1211 Outline: introduction, motivation MiniBooNE experiment MiniBooNE ...

  3. An accumulator/compressor ring for Ne+ ions (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An accumulatorcompressor ring for Ne+ ions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An accumulatorcompressor ring for Ne+ ions The primary goal of the High Energy Density ...

  4. Search for Resonant WW and WZ Production in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-06-29

    We search for resonant WW or WZ production by using up to 5.4 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data are consistent with the standard model background expectation, and we set limits on a resonance mass by using the sequential standard model W' boson and the Randall-Sundrum model graviton G as benchmarks. We exclude a sequential standard model W' boson in the mass range 180–690 GeV and a Randall-Sundrum graviton in the range 300–754 GeV at 95% C.L.

  5. Djurcic_MiniBooNE_NuFact2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report Zelimir Djurcic Argonne National Laboratory NuFact2011: 13th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories, Super Beams and Beta Beams August 1-6, 2011. Geneva, Switzerland 1 Outline * MiniBooNE Experiment Description * MiniBooNE s Neutrino Results * (New) MiniBooNE s Anti-neutrino Results * Summary 2 This signal looks very different from the others... * Much higher !m 2 = 0.1 - 10 eV 2 * Much smaller mixing angle * Only one experiment! In SM there are only 3 neutrinos !m 13 !m 12 !m 23 2

  6. MiniBooNE Numu/Numubar Disappearance Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Search for muon neutrino and antineutrino disappearance in MiniBooNE", arXiv:0903.2465 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 061802 (2009) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2009 numu and numubar disappearance paper is made available to the public: Numu Disappearance ntuple file of MiniBooNE numu 90% confidence level sensitivity as a function of Dm2, for a 2-neutrino numu -> nux ocillation fit. The file contains 141 rows, with two columns: Dm2 value in the range 0.4 < Dm2 (eV2)

  7. DOE-NE-STD-1004-92 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NE-STD-1004-92 DOE-NE-STD-1004-92 July 27, 2005 Root Cause Analysis Guidance Document Standard became Inactive This document is a guide for root cause analysis specified by DOE Order 5000.3A, "Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information." Causal factors identify program control deficiencies and guide early corrective actions. As such, root cause analysis is central to DOE Order 5000.3A. DOE-NE-STD-1004-92, Root Cause Analysis Guidance Document (689.62 KB) More

  8. New Oscillation Results From MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intrinsic e 20 Background prediction Intrinsic nue External measurements - HARP p+Be for - Sanford-Wang fits to world K + K 0 data MiniBooNE data...

  9. {alpha}-cluster states in N{ne}Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, V. Z.; Rogachev, G. V.

    2012-10-20

    The importance of studies of {alpha}-Cluster structure in N{ne}Z light nuclei is discussed. Spin-parity assignments for the low-lying levels in {sup 10}C are suggested.

  10. MiniBooNE/LSND Neutrino Oscillation Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M. Sorel (IFIC - CSIC & U. Valencia) Workshop on Beyond Three Family Neutrino Oscillations May 3-4, 2011, LNGS (Italy) 1. LSND e (1993-2001) 2. MiniBooNE ...

  11. MicroBooNE Project Critical Decision Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Decisions for MicroBooNE Documents CD-0 Mission Need CD-1 Selection of Alternatives CD-2/3a Performance Baseline and Long Lead Procurements CD-3b Start of Construction

  12. The MicroBooNE Project - Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    posted in the MicroBooNE DocDB, private access user-name is reviewer, password on request. ... Password access to these pages is necessary, user-name is reviewer, password on request. ...

  13. MiniBooNE LowE Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Excess of Electron-Like Events From a 1 GeV Neutrino Beam", arXiv:0812.2243 hep-ex, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 101802 (2009) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2009...

  14. MiniBooNE QE Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Quasielastic Double Differential Cross section", arXiv:1002:2680 hep-ex, Phys. Rev. D81, 092005 (2010) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2010 CCQE cross...

  15. Search for anomalous quartic WW?? couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Holzbauer, J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.

    2013-07-29

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WW?? in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb? of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp? collisions at s?=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with ?cutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed upper limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/?|<0.0025 GeV? and |aWC/?|<0.0092 GeV?.

  16. NE NEET-Reactor Materials Award Summaries May 2016.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Idaho National Laboratory | Department of Energy NE & EERE Working Together: 5 Facts About the New Energy Innovation Lab at Idaho National Laboratory NE & EERE Working Together: 5 Facts About the New Energy Innovation Lab at Idaho National Laboratory April 24, 2014 - 5:57pm Addthis The Energy Innovation Laboratory at the Energy Department’s Idaho National Laboratory was dedicated earlier this week. The new facility enables researchers to tackle some of the most pressing

  17. MiniBooNE_LoNu_Shaevitz.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE MiniBooNE Oscillation Results Oscillation Results and Future and Future Prospects Prospects Mike Mike Shaevitz Shaevitz - Columbia University - Columbia University 6th International Workshop on Low Energy Neutrino Physics 6th International Workshop on Low Energy Neutrino Physics Seoul National University Seoul National University ( ( Nov. 9 - 12, 2011) Nov. 9 - 12, 2011) 2 Neutrino Oscillation Summary Confirmed by K2K and Minos accelerator neutrino exps Confirmed by Kamland reactor

  18. Neutral Current Elastic Interactions in MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan; /Alabama U.

    2011-10-01

    Neutral Current Elastic (NCE) interactions in MiniBooNE are discussed. In the neutrino mode MiniBooNE reported: the flux averaged NCE differential cross section as a function of four-momentum transferred squared, an axial mass (M{sub A}) measurement, and a measurement of the strange quark spin content of the nucleon, {Delta}s. In the antineutrino mode we present the background-subtracted data which is compared with the Monte Carlo predictions.

  19. High Precision Measurement of the 19Ne Lifetime

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Precision Measurement of the 19 Ne Lifetime by Leah Jacklyn Broussard Department of Physics Duke University Date: Approved: Albert Young Calvin Howell Kate Scholberg Berndt Mueller John Thomas Dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Physics in the Graduate School of Duke University 2012 Abstract (Nuclear physics) High Precision Measurement of the 19 Ne Lifetime by Leah Jacklyn Broussard Department of Physics

  20. W? Production and Limits on Anomalous WW? Couplings in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; deJong, S. J.; DeLaCruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.

    2011-12-09

    We measure the cross section and the difference in rapidities between photons and charged leptons for inclusive W(?l?)+? production in e? and ?? final states. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 fb? collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, the measured cross section times branching fraction for the process pp??W?+X?l??+X and the distribution of the charge-signed photon-lepton rapidity difference are found to be in agreement with the standard model. These results provide the most stringent limits on anomalous WW? couplings for data from hadron colliders: -0.4?<0.4 and -0.08?<0.07 at the 95% C.L.

  1. Determination of spin and parity of the Higgs boson in the WW* → e ν μ ν decay channel with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-05-27

    Research of the spin and parity quantum numbers of the Higgs boson in the WW* → eνμν final state are presented, based on proton–proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 at a centre-of-mass energy of √s=8 TeV. The Standard Model spin-parity JCP=0++ hypothesis is compared with alternative hypotheses for both spin and CP. The case where the observed resonance is a mixture of the Standard-Model-like Higgs boson and CP-even (JCP=0++) or CP-odd (JCP=0+–) Higgs boson in scenarios beyond the Standard Model is also studied. The datamore » are found to be consistent with the Standard Model prediction and limits are placed on alternative spin and CP hypotheses, including CP mixing in different scenarios.« less

  2. Constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson signal strength in the high-mass ZZ and WW final states with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Piqueras, D. Álvarez; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. 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N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Denis, R. D. St.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Torres, R. E. Ticse; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of the ZZ and WW final states in the mass range above the 2mZ and 2mW thresholds provide a unique opportunity to measure the off-shell coupling strength of the Higgs boson. This paper presents constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson event yields normalised to the Standard Model prediction (signal strength) in the ZZ→4ℓ, ZZ→2ℓ2ν and WW→eνμν final states. The result is based on pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 at a collision energy of √s=8 TeV. Using the CLs method, the observed 95 %% confidence level (CL) upper limit on the off-shell signal strength is in the range 5.1–8.6, with an expected range of 6.7–11.0. In each case the range is determined by varying the unknown gg→ZZ and gg→WW background K-factor from higher-order quantum chromodynamics corrections between half and twice the value of the known signal K-factor. Assuming the relevant Higgs boson couplings are independent of the energy scale of the Higgs boson production, a combination with the on-shell measurements yields an observed (expected) 95 % CL upper limit on ΓH/ΓSMH in the range 4.5–7.5 (6.5–11.2) using the same variations of the background K-factor. Assuming that the unknown gg→VV background K-factor is equal to the signal K-factor, this translates into an observed (expected) 95 % CL upper limit on the Higgs boson total width of 22.7 (33.0) MeV.

  3. MiniBooNE Antineutrino Data Van Nguyen Columbia University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moriond EW 2008 Coherent NC π 0 Production in the MiniBooNE Antineutrino Data Van Nguyen Columbia University for the MiniBooNE collaboration Moriond EW 2008 2 Moriond EW 2008 At low energy, NC π 0 's can be created through resonant and coherent production:  Resonant NC π 0 production:  Coherent NC π 0 production: (Signature: π 0 which is highly forward-going) NC π 0 Production 3 Moriond EW 2008 Why study coherent NC π 0 production? ➔ NC π 0 events are the dominant bgd to osc

  4. Exclusive Neutrino Cross Sections From MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exclusive Neutrino Cross Sections From MiniBooNE Martin Tzanov University of Colorado PANIC 2008, 9-14 November, Eilat, ISRAEL Martin Tzanov, PANIC 2008 Neutrino Cross Sections Today * Precise knowledge needed for precise oscillation measurements. * Cross section well measured above 20 GeV. * Few measurements below 20 GeV. * 20-30 years old bubble chamber experiments (mostly H 2 , D 2 ). * Neutral current cross sections are even less understood. ν CC world data CC world data ν T2K, BooNE K2K,

  5. The MicroBooNE Experiment - About the Detector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Detector Cryostat delivered Assembly Photos The MicroBooNE time projection chamber (TPC) was assembled at Fermilab in 2012-2013, sealed in the cryostat at the end of 2013, and installed in the Liquid Argon Test Facilty (LArTF) in the Booster neutrino beamline in June 2014. Watch a video of the MicroBooNE detector move! Please check Assembly Photos for a slide-show of the effort These same photos are posted here in a simpler format Photos of Wires Taken from inside the cryostat in April 2015

  6. The MicroBooNE Experiment - At Work

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE at Work At Work Now The Getting Started Page holds links to help find your way around Fermilab services and prepare for working on the experiment. The MicroBooNE Contact List contains contact information for collaboration members. The Working Groups Page is a portal to these sub-sites. The Operations Page is a portal to the running detector. The Meetings Page lists the current regular meeting time slots, and also lists the collaboration meeting dates with links to the DocDB for past

  7. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Conference Talks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Talks and Posters Once you have given a MicroBooNE presentation, please send your talk to Sam Zeller so it can be archived. If you have written proceedings to accompany your talk, please upload them to the MicroBooNE DocDB and send the document number to Sam. Also, remember that conference proceedings are required by Fermilab policy to be submitted to the Fermilab Technical Publications archive. Instructions for doing that are here. Click here for Future talks. Conference Presentations Speaker

  8. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Public Notes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Public Notes Page Back to the Publications Page 7/4/16 MICROBOONE-NOTE-1019-PUB Convolutional Neural Networks Applied to Neutrino Events in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber 7/4/16 MICROBOONE-NOTE-1017-PUB A Method to Extract the Charge Distribution Arriving at the TPC Wire Planes in MicroBooNE 7/4/16 MICROBOONE-NOTE-1016-PUB Noise Characterization and Filtering in the MicroBooNE TPC 7/4/16 MICROBOONE-NOTE-1015-PUB The Pandora multi-algorithm approach to automated pattern recognition in LAr

  9. Appearance Results from MiniBooNE Georgia Karagiorgi Columbia University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Appearance Results from MiniBooNE Georgia Karagiorgi Columbia University WIN'11 - Cape Town, South Africa 2 Outline of this talk: -- The LSND excess signal: Evidence for high-Δm 2 oscillations -- The MiniBooNE experiment -- MiniBooNE neutrino mode oscillation results: LSND signature refuted -- MiniBooNE antineutrino mode oscillation results: LSND signature confrmed ? -- Light sterile neutrino oscillations: Where we stand today -- Future searches: MiniBooNE, MicroBooNE 1993 -1998 1998 2001

  10. DOE-NE Small Business Voucher Program Launched

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN) initiative, the NE Voucher program will provide up to $2 million in this pilot year for access to expertise, knowledge, and facilities of the National Laboratories and our partner facilities to help advance nuclear energy technologies.

  11. Nu2010_MiniBooNE_Osc.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Most importantly, not a region of LE where LSND observed a significant signal Energy in MiniBooNE MeV 1250 475 333 MB Neutrino mode LE (mMeV) "LSND sweet spot" LSND * 6.5E20 ...

  12. ReNeW: Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Needs for the ITER Era...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ReNeW: Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Needs for the ITER Era Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ReNeW: Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Needs for the ITER Era Authors: ...

  13. DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and ...

  14. Morgan Wascko Imperial College London MiniBooNE's First Neutrino Oscillation Result

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wascko Imperial College London MiniBooNE's First Neutrino Oscillation Result Morgan Wascko CalTech Physics Research Conference 26 April, 2007 Outline * A short course in the physics of ν oscillations * What are neutrinos? Oscillations? * ν oscillation landscape * MiniBooNE * Experiment description * MiniBooNE's First Results * Neutrino Physics Big Picture * Next Steps for the Field * What has MiniBooNE told us? 2 Morgan Wascko CalTech Physics Research Conference 26 April, 2007 * Particle

  15. RESULTS OF THE MiniBooNE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION SEARCH E. D. Zimmerman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RESULTS OF THE MiniBooNE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION SEARCH E. D. Zimmerman University of Colorado American Physical Society Meeting Jacksonville, April 16, 2007 Results of the MiniBooNE Neutrino Oscillation Search * Introduction to MiniBooNE * The oscillation analysis * The initial results and their implications * The next steps MiniBooNE: E898 at Fermilab * Purpose is to test LSND with: * Higher energy * Different beam * Different oscillation signature * Different systematics * L=500 meters, E=0.5-1

  16. Measurement of the tt, WW and Z -> tautau Production Cross Sections in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carron Montero, Sebastian Fernando; /Duke U.

    2006-11-01

    In this thesis we present a new technique to analyze events containing two highly energetic leptons, as a probe of the Standard Model. The philosophy is to consider the data in a more global way, as opposed to the more traditional process dependent approach of extracting a given signal over the expected backgrounds by using various kinematical requirements. We use our global technique to simultaneously measure the cross sections of the main Standard Model processes; the t{bar t}, WW and Z {yields} {tau}{tau} production from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the CDF detector at Fermilab. We select events by requiring they contain two highly energetic leptons (e{mu}, ee, or {mu}{mu}), and make no other kinematic requirements, except for the ee and {mu}{mu} channels. We then use a likelihood fit of the data in the two-dimensional phase space defined by the missing transverse energy (E{sub T}) and the number of jets in the event (N{sub jet}), to the expected Standard Model distributions, to simultaneously extract the production cross-sections of the main process contributing to our dilepton sample.

  17. Determination of spin and parity of the Higgs boson in the WW* → e ν μ ν decay channel with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-05-27

    Research of the spin and parity quantum numbers of the Higgs boson in the WW* → eνμν final state are presented, based on proton–proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 at a centre-of-mass energy of √s=8 TeV. The Standard Model spin-parity JCP=0++ hypothesis is compared with alternative hypotheses for both spin and CP. The case where the observed resonance is a mixture of the Standard-Model-like Higgs boson and CP-even (JCP=0++) or CP-odd (JCP=0+–) Higgs boson in scenarios beyond the Standard Model is also studied. The data are found to be consistent with the Standard Model prediction and limits are placed on alternative spin and CP hypotheses, including CP mixing in different scenarios.

  18. Overview of DOE-NE Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadasivan, Pratap

    2012-08-24

    Research objectives are: (1) Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; (2) Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy; (3) Develop Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycles; and (4) Understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The goal is to enable the use of risk information to inform NE R&D program planning. The PTRA program supports DOE-NE's goal of using risk information to inform R&D program planning. The FY12 PTRA program is focused on terrorism risk. The program includes a mix of innovative methods that support the general practice of risk assessments, and selected applications.

  19. MICROBOONE PHYSICS Ben Carls Fermilab MicroBooNE Physics Outline

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PHYSICS Ben Carls Fermilab MicroBooNE Physics Outline * The detector and beam - MicroBooNE TPC - Booster and NuMI beams at Fermilab * Oscillation physics - Shed light on the MiniBooNE low energy excess * Low energy neutrino cross sections * Non-accelerator topics - Supernova neutrino detection - Proton decay backgrounds 2 B. Carls, Fermilab MicroBooNE Physics MicroBooNE Detector * 60 ton fiducial volume (of 170 tons total) liquid Argon TPC * TPC consists of 3 planes of wires; vertical Y, ±60°

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - TAUP_07_MiniBooNE.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MinibooNE Oscillation Results and Implications Mike Shaevitz Columbia University for the MiniBooNE Collaboration 2 Outline * MiniBooNE Experiment and Analysis Techniques * MiniBooNE First Oscillation Result * Going Beyond the First Result * Future Plans and Prospects 3 LSND observed a (~3.8σ) excess of⎯ν e events in a pure⎯ν μ beam: 87.9 ± 22.4 ± 6.0 events MiniBooNE was Prompted by the Positive LSND Result Oscillation Probability: ( ) (0.264 0.067 0.045)% e P μ ν ν → = ± ± The

  1. PNM Resources 2401 Aztec NE, MS-Z100

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PNM Resources 2401 Aztec NE, MS-Z100 Albuquerque, NM 87107 505-241-2025 Fax 505 241-2384 PNMResources.com October 29, 2013 Mr. Christopher Lawrence Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE-20) U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Submitted electronically via email to: Christopher.Lawrence@hq.doe.gov Dear Mr. Lawrence: Subject: Department of Energy (DOE)- Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects,

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - MiniBooNE Neutrino 2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oscillation Searches Steve Brice (Fermilab) for the MiniBooNE Collaboration Neutrino 2008 Neutrino 2008 Steve Brice (FNAL) 2 Outline * Electron Neutrino Appearance - Oscillation Result - π 0 Rate Measurement - Combining Analyses - Compatibility of High ∆m 2 Measurements - Low Energy Electron Candidate Excess - Data from NuMI Beam * Muon Neutrino Disappearance * Anti-Electron Neutrino Appearance * Summary Neutrino 2008 Steve Brice (FNAL) 3 2 National Laboratories, 14 Universities, 80

  3. Migration of Nuclear Shell Gaps Studied in the d({sup 24}Ne,p{gamma}){sup 25}Ne Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catford, W. N.; Timis, C. N.; Baldwin, T. D.; Gelletly, W.; Pain, S. D.; Lemmon, R. C.; Pucknell, V. P. E.; Warner, D. D.; Labiche, M.; Orr, N. A.; Achouri, N. L.; Chapman, R.; Amzal, N.; Burns, M.; Liang, X.; Spohr, K.; Freer, M.; Ashwood, N. I.

    2010-05-14

    The transfer of neutrons onto {sup 24}Ne has been measured using a reaccelerated radioactive beam of {sup 24}Ne to study the (d,p) reaction in inverse kinematics. The unusual raising of the first 3/2{sup +} level in {sup 25}Ne and its significance in terms of the migration of the neutron magic number from N=20 to N=16 is put on a firm footing by confirmation of this state's identity. The raised 3/2{sup +} level is observed simultaneously with the intruder negative parity 7/2{sup -} and 3/2{sup -} levels, providing evidence for the reduction in the N=20 gap. The coincident gamma-ray decays allowed the assignment of spins as well as the transferred orbital angular momentum. The excitation energy of the 3/2{sup +} state shows that the established USD shell model breaks down well within the sd model space and requires a revised treatment of the proton-neutron monopole interaction.

  4. Measured water heating performance of a vertical-bore water-to-water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) for domestic water heating over twelve months under simulated occupancy loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D; Baxter, Van D; Gehl, Anthony C

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents monthly performance metrics of a 5.275 kW (1.5 ton) WW-GSHP providing 227 L day-1 domestic hot water at 49 C. Daily water use is simulated as stipulated in the Building America Research Benchmark Definition capturing the living habits of the average U.S household. The 94.5m vertical-bore ground loop is shared with a separate GSHP for space conditioning the 251m2 residential home. Data on entering water temperatures, energy extracted from the ground, delivered energy, compressor electricity use, COP, WW-GSHP run times, and the impact of fan and pump energy consumption on efficiency are presented for each month. Factors influencing performance metrics are highlighted.

  5. NE-24 Unlverslty of Chicayo Remedial Action Plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    (YJ 4 tlsj .?I2 416 17 1983 NE-24 Unlverslty of Chicayo Remedial Action Plan 22&d 7 IA +-- E. I.. Keller, Director Technical Services Division Oak Ridge Operations Ufflce In response to your memorandum dated July 29, 1983, the Field Task Proposal/Agreement (FTP/A) received frw Aryonne National Laboratory (ANL) appears to be satisfactory, and this office concurs in the use of ANL to provide the decontamination effort as noted in the FTP/A. The final decontaminatton report should Include the

  6. MiniBooNE LowE Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unexplained Excess of Electron-Like Events From a 1 GeV Neutrino Beam", arXiv:0812.2243 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 101802 (2009) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2009 updated nue oscillation paper is made available to the public: Energy Range for Default Oscillation Fit (475 MeV - 3000 MeV reconstructed neutrino energy) 1D array of bin boundaries in electron neutrino reconstructed neutrino energy 1D array of observed electron neutrino candidate events per reconstructed

  7. Idaho National Laboratory DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability-

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -2023 Idaho National Laboratory DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure TEN-YEAR SITE PLAN DOE/ID-11474 Final June 2012 Sustainable INL continues to exceed DOE goals for reduction in the use of petroleum fuels - running its entire bus fleet on biodiesel while converting 75% of its light-duty fleet to E85 fuel. The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL), slated for completion this year, will be a state-of-the-art laboratory with high-bay lab space where

  8. CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    kire 7900. 955 L*E,,fa,u PLUG S. W.. Washin@ on. D.C. 20024-2174, Tekphme: (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 CT.05 FL .0-o/ lti.Ob id.Or Dear Mr. Wallo: In/. O-01 flA.05 ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Mbj.o-03 I4 v.o+ The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.o= with your

  9. CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    i900,9SS L%nfam Phm, S. W.. Washington. D.C. 20024.2174, Tlkphme: (20.7) 4S.S-M)o 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES I - The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance M1.oS with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation nO.O-02

  10. CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    i5W 95.5 L' E&nt plom. S. W.:. Washingr on. D.C. ZOOX2i74, Tekphm: (202) 488-6OGb 7II7-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987. Ii CA M r. Andrew Wallo, III. NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES pqq.0' 05 PI ;p.03- The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ,I ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The

  11. Exclusive Neutrino Cross Sections From MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5[BOPW -PVJTJBOB 4UBUF 6OJWFSTJUZ /V'BDU 8PSLTIPQ 8JMMJBNTCVSH +VMZ -BUFTU $SPTT 4FDUJPO 3FTVMUT GSPN .JOJ#PP/& Test of LSND within the context of e appearance only is an essential first step: Keep the same L/E w )JHIFS FOFSHZ BOE MPOHFS CBTFMJOF r & r (F7 L=500m w %JGGFSFOU CFBN w %JGGFSFOU PTDJMMBUJPO TJHOBUVSF F w %JGGFSFOU TZTUFNBUJDT w "OUJOFVUSJOP DBQBCMF CFBN MiniBooNE Experiment ± E898 at Fermilab Booster K + target and horn detector dirt decay region absorber primary beam

  12. Office of Nuclear Energy Doe/ne-0143

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy Office of Nuclear Energy Doe/ne-0143 Table of Contents Lesson 1 - Energy Basics Lesson 2 - Electricity Basics Lesson 3 - Atoms and Isotopes Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson 5 - Fission, Chain Reactions Lesson 6 - Atom to Electricity Lesson 7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants Lesson 8 - Concerns Lesson 9 - Energy and You 1 Lesson 1 Energy Basics ENERGY BASICS What is energy? Energy is the ability to do work. But what does that really mean? You might think of work as cleaning your room,

  13. Princeton graduate student Imène Goumiri creates computer program that

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    helps stabilize fusion plasmas | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton graduate student Imène Goumiri creates computer program that helps stabilize fusion plasmas By John Greenwald and Raphael Rosen April 14, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Imène Goumiri led the design of a controller. (Photo by Elle Starkman/Office of Communications) Imène Goumiri led the design of a controller. Imène Goumiri, a Princeton University graduate student, has worked with physicists at

  14. Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: NE Cully Blvd., Portland, OR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, M. P.; Poplawski, M. E.; Tuenge, J. R.

    2012-08-01

    GATEWAY program report on a demonstration of LED roadway lighting on NE Cully Boulevard in Portland, OR, a residential collector road.

  15. MiniBooNE's First Oscillation Result Morgan Wascko Imperial College...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 July, 2007 Meson Production 9 MiniBooNE Overview * External meson production data * HARP data (CERN) * Parametrisation of cross- sections * Sanford-Wang for pions * Feynman...

  16. High-energy physics detector MicroBooNE sees first accelerator-born

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    neutrinos MicroBooNE sees first accelerator-born neutrinos High-energy physics detector MicroBooNE sees first accelerator-born neutrinos The principal purpose of the detector is to confirm or deny the existence of a hypothetical particle known as the sterile neutrino. November 2, 2015 An accelerator-born neutrino candidate, spotted with the MicroBooNE detector. Image courtesy Fermilab. An accelerator-born neutrino candidate, spotted with the MicroBooNE detector. Image courtesy Fermilab.

  17. Kaon Monitoring in MiniBooNE: The LMC Detector E. D. Zimmerman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kaon Monitoring in MiniBooNE: The LMC Detector E. D. Zimmerman University of Colorado NBI 2003 KEK, Tsukuba November 10, 2003 Kaon Monitoring at MiniBooNE 1) K-decay ν e background at BooNE K production estimates 2) Decay kinematics 3) The "Little Muon Counter" (LMC) Concept/Placement Civil construction/infrastructure Collimator Fiber Tracker Temporary detector Status K-decay ν e background MiniBooNE will see ~200-400 ν e from K + and K 0 L decays each year -- comparable to the

  18. Analysis of Neutral Current 0 Events at MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutral Current π 0 Events at MiniBooNE Colin Anderson April 14, 2008 The Experiment Analysis Outline Experiment MiniBooNE Description NC π 0 Overview Analysis Selection and Reconstruction of Events Rate Measurement Correcting Monte Carlo w/ Data Coherent Fraction Measurement C.E. Anderson MiniBooNE NC π 0 Analysis 2/22 The Experiment Analysis MiniBooNE ν e appearance search designed to confirm or refute the LSND result The Beam 8 GeV p's from Booster beam directed at a Be target Produced π

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - TAUP_09_MiniBooNE.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Results from the MiniBooNE Booster Neutrino Experiment Mike Shaevitz Columbia University for the MiniBooNE Collaboration 2 Outline * Overview of MiniBooNE Beam and Detector * Brief Presentation of New Cross Section Results * Recent Oscillation Results - ν e and⎯ν e appearance - ν µ and⎯ν µ disappearance - Offaxis results from NuMI beam * Future Plans and Prospects 3 LSND observed a (~3.8σ) excess of⎯ν e events in a pure⎯ν µ beam: 87.9 ± 22.4 ± 6.0 events MiniBooNE was

  20. MiniBooNE: Up and Running Morgan Wascko Morgan Wascko Louisiana...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wascko Louisiana State University Louisiana State University Morgan O. Wascko, LSU Yang Institute Conference 11 October, 2002 MiniBooNE detector at Fermi National Accelerator...

  1. 2014 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting 2014 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting 2014 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting The 2014 Annual Face-to-Face Meeting of the Environmental Management (EM), Nuclear Energy (NE), and Science (SC) Software Quality Assurance (SQA) Support Group (SG) was held May 6-8, 2014. This meeting was hosted by the Office of Safeguards, Security and Emergency Services (OSSES) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) sponsors

  2. 2015 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting 2015 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting 2015 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting The Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) formed the Environmental Management (EM), Nuclear Energy (NE), and Science (SC) Software Quality Assurance (SQA) Support Group (SG) in March 2007. The first Annual Meeting was held August 2008. The 8th Annual Meeting will be held May 11-14, 2015. This year the Annual Meeting will be hosted by EM's Office of River Protection in

  3. Oscillations results from the MiniBooNE experiment Alexis Aguilar-Arévalo (ICN-UNAM),

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oscillations results from the MiniBooNE experiment Alexis Aguilar-Arévalo (ICN-UNAM), for the MiniBooNE collaboration SILAFAE 2010 10 December 2010, Valparaíso, Chile 2 Outlook MiniBooNE Motivation MiniBooNE Description Summary of past Results New Antineutrino Result Future outlook Conclusions A. Aguilar-Arévalo (ICN-UNAM) SILAFAE 2010, Valparaíso, Chile December 6-12, 2010 MiniBooNE Collaboration 3 MiniBooNE motivation ● LSND experiment (Los Alamos) ● Excess of  e in a  

  4. THE GENESIS SOLAR WIND CONCENTRATOR TARGET: MASS FRACTIONATION CHARACTERISED BY NE ISOTOPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WIENS, ROGER C.; OLINGER, C.; HEBER, V.S.; REISENFELD, D.B.; BURNETT, D.S.; ALLTON, J.H.; BAUR, H.; WIECHERT, U.; WIELER, R.

    2007-01-02

    The concentrator on Genesis provides samples of increased fluences of solar wind ions for precise determination of the oxygen isotopic composition of the solar wind. The concentration process caused mass fractionation as function of the radial target position. They measured the fractionation using Ne released by UV laser ablation along two arms of the gold cross from the concentrator target to compare measured Ne with modeled Ne. The latter is based on simulations using actual conditions of the solar wind during Genesis operation. Measured Ne abundances and isotopic composition of both arms agree within uncertainties indicating a radial symmetric concentration process. Ne data reveal a maximum concentration factor of {approx} 30% at the target center and a target-wide fractionation of Ne isotopes of 3.8%/amu with monotonously decreasing {sup 20}Ne/{sup 22}Ne ratios towards the center. The experimentally determined data, in particular the isotopic fractionation, differ from the modeled data. They discuss potential reasons and propose future attempts to overcome these disagreements.

  5. Search for the Higgs Boson in the H→WW*→l⁺νl⁻ν¯ Decay Channel in pp Collisions at √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2012-03-13

    A search for the Higgs boson has been performed in the H→WW*→l⁺νl⁻ν¯ channel (l=e/μ) with an integrated luminosity of 2.05 fb⁻¹ of pp collisions at √s=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events over the expected background is observed and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 110 GeV

  6. The MiniBooNE detector technical design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. Stancu et al.

    2003-04-18

    The MiniBooNE experiment [1] is motivated by the LSND observation, [2] which has been interpreted as {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, and by the atmospheric neutrino deficit, [3,4,5] which may be ascribed to {nu}{sub {mu}} oscillations into another type of neutrino. MiniBooNE is a single-detector experiment designed to: obtain {approx} 1000 {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} events if the LSND signal is due to {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, establishing the oscillation signal at the > 5{sigma} level as shown in Fig. 1.1; extend the search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations significantly beyond what has been studied previously if no signal is observed; search for {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance to address the atmospheric neutrino deficit with a signal that is a suppression of the rate of {nu}{sub {mu}}C {yields} {mu}N events from the expected 600,000 per year; measure the oscillation parameters as shown in Fig. 1.2 if oscillations are observed; and test CP conservation in the lepton sector if oscillations are observed by running with separate {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beams. The detector will consist of a spherical tank 6.1 m (20 feet) in radius, as shown in Fig. 1.3, that stands in a 45-foot diameter cylindrical vault. An inner tank structure at 5.75 m radius will support 1280 8-inch phototubes (10% coverage) pointed inward and optically isolated from the outer region of the tank. The tank will be filled with 807 t of mineral oil, resulting in a 445 t fiducial volume. The outer tank volume will serve as a veto shield for identifying particles both entering and leaving the detector with 240 phototubes mounted on the tank wall. Above the detector tank will be an electronics enclosure that houses the fast electronics and data acquisition system and a utilities enclosure that houses the plumbing, overflow tank, and calibration laser. The detector will be located {approx} 550 m from the Booster neutrino

  7. The Ne-to-O abundance ratio of the interstellar medium from IBEX-Lo observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.; Kucharek, H.; Möbius, E.; Leonard, T.; Bzowski, M.; Sokół, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we report on a two-year study to estimate the Ne/O abundance ratio in the gas phase of the local interstellar cloud (LIC). Based on the first two years of observations with the Interstellar Boundary Explorer, we determined the fluxes of interstellar neutral (ISN) O and Ne atoms at the Earth's orbit in spring 2009 and 2010. A temporal variation of the Ne/O abundance ratio at the Earth's orbit could be expected due to solar cycle-related effects such as changes of ionization. However, this study shows that there is no significant change in the Ne/O ratio at the Earths orbit from 2009 to 2010. We used time-dependent survival probabilities of the ISNs to calculate the Ne/O abundance ratio at the termination shock. Then we estimated the Ne/O abundance ratio in the gas phase of the LIC with the use of filtration factors and the ionization fractions. From our analysis, the Ne/O abundance ratio in the LIC is 0.33 ± 0.07, which is in agreement with the abundance ratio inferred from pickup-ion measurements.

  8. Level-resolved R-matrix calculations for the electron-impact excitation of Ne{sup 3+} and Ne{sup 6+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludlow, J. A.; Lee, T. G.; Ballance, C. P.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2011-08-15

    Large-scale R-matrix calculations are carried out for the electron-impact excitation of Ne{sup 3+} and Ne{sup 6+}. For Ne{sup 3+}, a 581-LSJ-level R-matrix intermediate coupling frame transformation calculation is made for excitations up to the n=4 shell. For some transitions, large effective collision strength differences are found with current 23-jKJ-level Breit-Pauli R-matrix and earlier 22-LSJ-level R-matrix jj omega (JAJOM) calculations. For Ne{sup 6+}, a 171-jKJ-level Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculation is made for excitations up to the n=5 shell. For some transitions, large effective collision strength differences are found with current 46-jKJ-level Breit-Pauli R-matrix and earlier 46-LSJ-level R-matrix JAJOM calculations. Together with existing R-matrix calculations for other ion stages, high-quality excitation data are now available for astrophysical and laboratory plasma modeling along the entire Ne isonuclear sequence.

  9. MiniBooNE Anti-Neutrino CCQE Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anti-Neutrino Double-Differential Charged Current Quasi-Elastic Cross Section", arXiv:1301.7067 [hep-ex] The following MiniBooNE information from the anti-neutrino CCQE cross section paper is made available to the public: νμ CCQE data: MiniBooNE flux table of MiniBooNE anti-neutrino mode flux by neutrino species (Figure 1 and Tables XI-XII). Note that, based on the constraints of the in situ measurements, the muon neutrino flux spectrum given here should be scaled by 0.77. flux-integrated

  10. Presentation V: Joe Grange, University of Florida Experiments I: MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Presentation V: Joe Grange, University of Florida Experiments I: MiniBooNE West Wing (WH10W) 5:30 PM Thursday July 15 Refreshments at 5 PM Neutrino University (NeutU) is a series of informal, informative, and interactive presentations for summer students in the Fermilab Neutrino Program (Minerva, MiniBooNE, Minos, MicroBooNE, and Nova). These presentations are intended to introduce students to some of the important ideas and experiments of neutrino physics, particularly those that are running or

  11. Geoffrey Mills Los Alamos National Laboratory For the MiniBooNE Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ICHEP Paris, France XXV Juillet, MMX New Observations from the MiniBooNE Experiment 1. Motivation 2. MiniBooNE Appearance Results 3. Comparison of LSND and MiniBooNE 4. Future Possibilities 5. Conclusions Neutrino Oscillations The oscillation patterns between the 3 known active neutrino species have been demonstrated by a number of experiments over the last two decades: SNO, Kamland Super-K, K2K, MINOS Armed with that knowledge, measurements of neutrino behavior outside the standard 3

  12. Geoffrey Mills Los Alamos National Laboratory For the MiniBooNE Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SLAC XXIV August MMX New Observations from the MiniBooNE Experiment 1. Motivation 2. MiniBooNE Appearance Results 3. Comparison of LSND and MiniBooNE 4. Future Possibilities 5. Conclusions Neutrino Oscillations " The oscillation patterns between the 3 known active neutrino species have been demonstrated by a number of experiments over the last two decades: " SNO, Kamland " Super-K, K2K, MINOS " Armed with that knowledge, measurements of neutrino behavior outside the standard

  13. Geoffrey Mills Los Alamos National Laboratory For the MiniBooNE Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NeuTel2011 Venezia, Italia Results from the MiniBooNE Experiment 1. Motivation 2. MiniBooNE Appearance Results 3. Comparison of LSND and MiniBooNE 4. Future Possibilities 5. Conclusions Mesdames et Mes Neutrino Oscillations " The oscillation patterns between the 3 known active neutrino species have been demonstrated by a number of experiments over the last two decades: " SNO, Kamland " Super-K, K2K, MINOS " Armed with that knowledge, measurements of neutrino behavior outside

  14. /Users/jzennamo/Desktop/ObsLimit_MiniSciBooNE_SBN_numuDis.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    µ θ 2 2 sin 3 - 10 2 - 10 1 - 10 1 ] 2 [eV 2 m ∆ 1 - 10 1 10 2 10 POT) 20 10 × POT) and T600 (6.6 21 10 × MicroBooNE (1.3 POT) 20 10 × LAr1-ND (6.6 mode, CC Events ν Stat, Flux, Cross Section Uncerts. Reconstructed Energy Efficiency µ ν 80% Shape and Rate 90% CL CL σ 3 CL σ 5 MiniBooNE + SciBooNE 90% CL

  15. 2015 ANNUAL DOE-NE MATERIALS RESEARCH MEETING

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Reactor Materials element of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program conducted its FY 2015 coordination meeting as a series of two web-conferences to act as a forum for the nuclear materials research community. The purpose of this meeting was to report on current and planned nuclear materials research, identify new areas of collaboration and promote greater coordination among the various Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) programs. Although each program has unique materials issues, there are opportunities to enhance coordination and collaboration. Other departmental programs such as the Offices of Science (Basic Energy Sciences and Fusion Energy), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Fossil Energy, and other agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) also sponsor research in nuclear materials. Engagement with these organizations fosters new research partnerships, enhanced collaboration, and shared investment in research facilities. The presentations from this two part webinar series are available here. Data, images, and conclusions should be considered preliminary and should not be reproduced or reused without written permission of the authors.

  16. Application for Presidential Permit PP-400 TDI-NE - New England...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PP-400 TDI-NE - New England Clean Power Link Project - Motion to Intervene and Comments of the Vermont Department of Public Service - August 6, 2014 Application for Presidential ...

  17. REPLY TO ATTN OF: NE-24 L SUBJECT: Authorization to Conduct Remedial...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Government '--Department of Energy | memorandum 4 ' It) |1 e0i78 DATE: OCT 9 1984 REPLY TO ATTN OF: NE-24 L SUBJECT: Authorization to Conduct Remedial Action at Vicinity...

  18. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-NE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NE.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Nebraska Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275 pixels,...

  19. MiniBooNE H. A. Tanaka Princeton University Neutrino Factory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H. A. Tanaka Princeton University Neutrino Factory 2004 Osaka, Japan The MiniBooNE ... J.L.Raaf University of Colorado: T.Hart, R.H.Nelson, M.Wilking, E.D.Zimmerman Columbia ...

  20. Microsoft Word - MicroBooNE CD-2-3a appr.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Integration and commissioning of the detector components with liquid argon will be handled as operating R&D outside of the MicroBooNE Project; the R&D program will study the ...

  1. Microsoft Word - MicroBooNE CD-3b appr.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Integration and commissioning of the detector components with liquid argon will be handled as operating R&D outside of the MicroBooNE Project; the R&D program will study the ...

  2. MiniBooNE NC 1?0 Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 production cross sections on mineral oil at EO(1 GeV)", arXiv:0911.2063 hep-ex, Phys. Rev. D81, 013005 (2010) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2009 NC 10...

  3. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | June 24, 2014: MicroBooNE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jpeg images. When using these images, please credit each photo as indicated. Med Res | Hi Res The 30-ton MicroBooNE neutrino detector was transported across the Fermilab site on...

  4. WC_2000_001_CLASS_WAIVER_BETWEEN_DOE_and_EMPLOYEES_OF_THE_NE.pdf |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 2000_001_CLASS_WAIVER_BETWEEN_DOE_and_EMPLOYEES_OF_THE_NE.pdf WC_2000_001_CLASS_WAIVER_BETWEEN_DOE_and_EMPLOYEES_OF_THE_NE.pdf (486.67 KB) More Documents & Publications Class_Waiver_W_C-2000-001.pdf WC_1994_010__CLASS_WAIVER_of_the_Governments_Patent_Rights_.pdf WC_1994_001_CLASS_WAIVER_OF_THE_Governments_Patent_Rights_i

  5. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI-NE - New

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    England Clean Power Link Project: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 131 - July 9, 2014 | Department of Energy - New England Clean Power Link Project: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 131 - July 9, 2014 Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-400 TDI-NE - New England Clean Power Link Project: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 131 - July 9, 2014 Application from TDI-NE to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada

  6. Princeton graduate student Imène Goumiri creates computer program that

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    helps stabilize fusion plasmas | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton graduate student Imène Goumiri creates computer program that helps stabilize fusion plasmas By John Greenwald and Raphael Rosen April 14, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Imène Goumiri, a Princeton University graduate student, has worked with physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) to simulate a method for limiting instabilities that reduce the

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hallam Nuclear Power Facility - NE 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hallam Nuclear Power Facility - NE 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hallam Nuclear Power Facility (NE.01 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site Documents Related to Hallam Nuclear Power Facility U.S. Department of Energy 2009 Annual Inspection - Hallam, Nebraska June 2009 Page 1

  8. Introduction to MiniBooNE and Charged Current Quasi-Elastic (CCQE) Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MiniBooNE and ν μ Charged Current Quasi-Elastic (CCQE) Results Byron P. Roe University of Michigan For the MiniBooNE collaboration 2 University of Alabama Los Alamos National Laboratory Bucknell University Louisiana State University University of Cincinnati University of Michigan University of Colorado Princeton University Columbia University Saint Mary's University of Minnesota Embry Riddle University Virginia Polytechnic Institute Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Western Illinois

  9. Search for production of WW / WZ resonances decaying to a lepton, neutrino and jets in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-05-12

    In this study, a search is presented for narrow diboson resonances decaying to WW or WZ in the final state where one W boson decays leptonically (to an electron or a muon plus a neutrino) and the other W/Z boson decays hadronically. The analysis is performed using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 of pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. No evidence for resonant diboson production is observed, and resonance masses below 700 and 1490 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level for the spin-2 Randall–Sundrum bulk graviton G* with coupling constant of 1.0 and the extended gauge model W' boson respectively.

  10. Search for $WW$ and $WZ$ resonances decaying to electron, missing $E_T$, and two jets in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-04-01

    Using data from 2.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, we search for resonances decaying into a pair of on-shell gauge bosons, WW or WZ, where one W decays into an electron and a neutrino, and the other boson decays into two jets. We observed no statistically significant excess above the expected standard model background, and we set cross section limits at 95% confidence level on G* (Randall-Sundrum graviton), Z{prime}, and W{prime} bosons. By comparing these limits to theoretical cross sections, mass exclusion regions for the three particles are derived. The mass exclusion regions for Z{prime} and W{prime} are further evaluated as a function of their gauge coupling strength.