Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: NCEM Fellowship  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visiting Scientist Program Visiting Scientist Program The National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) offers a program that gives participants the opportunity to conduct...

2

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Becoming an NCEM User  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Research New Research Gallery Microscopy Links Becoming an NCEM User Step 1: Submit a proposal Step 2: Before you begin your research Step 3: Instrument qualification Step 4: Accessing NCEM facilities and performing research Step 1: Submit a proposal Deadlines for new proposals are March 15, June 15, September 15, December 15. Access to NCEM facilities is granted to researchers whose proposals are accepted by the NCEM proposal review committee. NCEM users are expected to have a strong background in transmission electron microscopy, and submitted proposals should include evidence of prior electron microscopy experience by the intended operator. Researchers who do not have sufficient experience in electron microscopy may be able to use NCEM facilities through a collaborative project.

3

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: About NCEM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NCEM NCEM The National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) is one of the world's foremost centers for electron microscopy and microcharacterization. It is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Located adjacent to the University of California, Berkeley, NCEM was established in 1983 to maintain a forefront research center for electron-optical characterization of materials with state-of-the-art instrumentation and expertise. As a national user facility, NCEM is open to scientists from universities, government and industrial laboratories. The center provides cutting-edge instrumentation, techniques and expertise for advanced electron beam microcharacterization of materials at high spatial

4

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NCEM Staff Becoming an NCEM User Assistance and Collaboration Visiting Scientist Program Contact Information Manage Proposals Microscope Scheduling Microscopes and Facilities...

5

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Contact NCEM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Contact Jane Cavlina National Center for Electron Microscopy, MS 72-150 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 Tel.: (510) 486-6036 Fax: (510) 486-5888...

6

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory, Center for Materials Research Brookhaven National Laboratory, Electron Microscopy Program Sites of Interest to the Microscopy Community The Microscopy...

7

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Staff Staff Scientific Technical / Admin. Postdoctoral and Visitors Uli Dahmen, Head Jane Cavlina / Administrator Abhay Gautam Christian Kisielowski John Turner Helmut Poppa Andrew Minor ChengYu Song Frances Allen Andreas Schmid Marissa Libbee Tamara Radetic Peter Ercius Karen Bustillo Haimei Zheng Jim Ciston Alpha N'Diaye Colin Ophus Gong Chen Burak Ozdol Velimir Radmilovic Sara Kiani Hua Guo Christian Liebscher Josh Kacher Chris Nelson Xiuguang Jin Qian Yu Mary Scott Search the LBNL directory services page for other LBNL staff. Scientific Staff Uli Dahmen udahmen@lbl.gov (510) 486-4627 Ulrich Dahmen is Director of the National Center for Electron Microscopy. His current research interests include embedded nanostructures and interfaces in materials. Embedded nanostructures. Size- and shape-dependence of structural phase

8

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: SPLEEM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPLEEM The Spin-Polarized Low-Energy Electron Microscope is a unique low-voltage electron microscope for the study of surfaces and interfaces. The instrument is very sensitive to...

9

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specimen Preparation Specimen Preparation Preparation of samples with large transparent areas and flat surfaces is a key element of electron microscopy. In particular, the interpretation of lattice or holographic images is often limited by the sample's geometry and surface roughness. These parameters are largely determined by a particular sample preparation procedure. The increasing demand for microscopes with a spatial resolution of better than 1Å increases the need for improved sample preparation techniques. A substantial effort at NCEM is devoted to the development of reliable and specialized thinning techniques. Current programs explore the application of chemicals to shape the surfaces of thin films, the use of nanospheres for observation of small particles, and the

10

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Assistance and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assistance and Collaboration Extended help and collaborations at NCEM Most NCEM users are accomplished microscopists and only require some technical assistance to make full use of...

11

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Workshops and Seminars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upcoming Seminars Thursday, October 3, 2013 at 11am Matthew Mecklenburg Center for Electron Microscopy and MicroAnalysis, University of Southern California 2D crystals are...

12

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Heating holder guidelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heating holder guidelines Heating holder guidelines If you plan to use heating holders for in-situ experiments, we require your careful review and compliance with the following guidelines. 1. Include in your proposal target temperature and all phase diagrams of material with those of the tantalum furnaces and tantalum and/or molybdenum washers. Eutectic melting or bonding to the furnace body can occur at much lower temperatures than expected. 2. Holders are individually marked with the maximum temperature displayed on the specimen rod. Do not exceed this marked maximum temperature. It is easy to overshoot target temperature, so approach with caution. 3. Pre-schedule time for technical training and assistance by NCEM staff, especially if you are an infrequent or first-time user.

13

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CM 200 FEG CM 200 FEG AEME The Philips CM200/FEG is a versatile instrument that is designed for analysis of the physical, chemical and magnetic microstructure at high spatial resolution. In addition to high resolution imaging capability, the machine is optimized for analytical electron microscopy and Lorentz imaging, under normal as well as dynamic conditions of variable temperature (77K - 1250K) and applied magnetic fields. Spatially resolved compositional analysis by X-ray emission spectroscopy (Z > 5), local electronic structure measurements by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (Z > 2), convergent beam electron diffraction for three-dimensional structure information, and energy-filtered imaging at the nanometer scale are some of the techniques available on this instrument. In addition, a TEM differential phase

14

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPLEEM SPLEEM Publications Imaging Spin Reorientation Transitions in Consecutive Atomic Co layers, Farid El Gabaly, Silvia Gallego, M. Carmen Munoz, Laszlo Szunyogh, Peter Weinberger, Kevin F. McCarty, Christof Klein, Andreas K. Schmid, Juan de la Figuera, submitted Direct imaging of spin-reorientation transitions in ultra-thin Ni films by spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy, C. Klein, A. K. Schmid, R. Ramchal, and M. Farle, submitted Controlling the kinetic order of spin-reorientation transitions in Ni/Cu(100) films by tuning the substrate step-structure, C. Klein, R. Ramchal, A.K. Schmid, M. Farle, submitted Self-organization and magnetic domain microstructure of Fe nanowire arrays, N. Rougemaille and A.K. Schmid, submitted Self-Assembled Nanofold Network Formation on Layered Crystal Surfaces

15

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I The TEAM I microscope is a double-aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscope (STEMTEM) capable of producing images with 50 pm resolution. The basic...

16

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TEM and STEM. In addition, the incorporation of a monochromator into the gun permits electron energy loss spectroscopy to be performed with an energy resolution of 0.15eV. This...

17

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The system contains both a focused Ga+ ion beam and a field emission scanning electron column. The ion column can be used for selective removal of material by ion beam...

18

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OM The One-Angstrom Microscope (OM) is a mid-voltage transmission electron microscope (TEM) capable of producing images with sub-angstrom resolution. The basic instrument is a...

19

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AEM AEM AEME The Analytical Electron Microscope is optimized for elemental microanalysis. The basic instrument is a JEOL 200CX microscope with a side-entry double-tilt goniometer stage and an assortment of specimen holders. This machine can be operated at between 80 and 200 kV in the TEM or STEM mode. Electron energy loss and x-ray signals for elemental microanalysis or spectral imaging can be collected either separately or simultaneously using probe diameters from 6nm to 100nm. Diffraction modes include convergent beam diffraction for three-dimensional structure information and micro-diffraction with a minimum probe size of 20nm. For updates or details, contact Zonghoon Lee or Velimir Radmilovic. The instrument is equipped with two Kevex EDXS detectors and a Gatan PEELS

20

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.5 0.5 The TEAM 0.5 microscope is a double-aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscope (STEM/TEM) capable of producing images with 50 pm resolution. The basic instrument is a modified FEI Titan 80-300 microscope equipped with a special high-brightness Schottky-field emission electron source, a gun monochromator, a high-resolution GIF Tridiem energy-filter, and two CEOS hexapole-type spherical aberration correctors. The illumination aberration corrector corrects coherent axial aberrations up to 4th order, as well as 5th order spherical aberration and six-fold astigmatism. The imaging aberration corrector fully corrects for coherent axial aberrations up to 3rd order and partially compensates for 4th and 5th order aberrations. The microscope has two 2048x2048 slow-scan CCD

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LIBRA LIBRA The 200kV Zeiss monochromated LIBRA 200MC is designed to produce high contrast imaging for TEM and STEM and either convergent beam or parallel beam diffraction using Koehler illumination.In addition, the incorporation of a monochromator into the field emission gun enables energy resolution of ~0.15eV for electron energy loss spectroscopy. The dedicated in-column Omega Filter implemented in this microscope also can be used for both spectroscopic analysis and energy-filtered imaging with a 2048x2048 CCD camera. The high tilt capability of the stage and pole piece accepts various types of analytical holders.This microscope is optimized for soft materials applications that require either the high contrast imaging performance or analytical methods such as EF-TEM and STEM.( Instrument

22

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3010 In-Situ 3010 In-Situ AEME The 300 kV JEOL 3010 offers greater specimen penetration than 200kV instruments, with significantly improved spatial resolution and probe forming capabilities. The side-entry stage allows ±45° tilt and can be operated with piezo-drift compensation. A flexible condenser system permits CBED, LACBED, and imaging with hollow cone and Koehler illumination. In addition to a standard film camera, a Gatan Orius CCD, and a Gatan 622 intensified TV camera and VCR are available for recording experiments at video rates. Specific capabilities include: high-resolution imaging at 2.1Å and ±40° tilt during simultaneous heating; very-high-resolution imaging at 1.7 Å and ±10° tilt during simultaneous heating; and high magnification Lorentz and Foucault imaging of magnetic samples. Various

23

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscope Driving...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microscope Driving Tests 3010 test.pdf CM 200 test.pdf CM 300 test.pdf Libra test.pdf FIB test.pdf Tecnai test.pdf TEAM 0.5 test.pdf TEAM I test.pdf...

24

NIST: Ultraviolet Photoemission Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultraviolet Photoemission Electron Microscopy. Summary: Ultraviolet photoemission electron microscopy is used to study ...

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

25

Metrology Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metrology Electron Microscopy. Technical Contact: Joseph (Joe) Fu. 301-975-3795. Figure 1. SRM 484f Sample and its Micrograph. ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

26

BNL | CFN: Electron Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and chemistry at the atomic scale is crucial to modern materials science and nanotechnology. Advanced electron microscopy can provide the fundamental knowledge that will...

27

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acknowledgment Acknowledgment EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers Acknowledgment Please acknowledge your use of the EMC in your publications and presentations with the following acknowledgment statement: The electron microscopy was accomplished at the Electron Microscopy Center at Argonne National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Laboratory operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 by UChicago Argonne, LLC.

28

Electron Microscopy Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities » Facilities » Electron Microscopy Lab Electron Microscopy Lab Focusing on the study of microstructures with electron and ion beam instruments, including crystallographic and chemical techniques. April 12, 2012 Transmission electron microscope Rob Dickerson examines a multiphase oxide scale using the FEI Titan 80-300 transmission electron microscope. Contact Rob Dickerson (505) 667-6337 Email Rod McCabe (505) 606-1649 Email Pat Dickerson (505) 665-3036 Email Tom Wynn (505) 665-6861 Email Dedicated to the characterization of materials through imaging, chemical, and crystallographic analyses of material microstructures in support of Basic Energy Science, Laboratory Directed Research and Development, DoD, DOE, Work for Others, nuclear energy, and weapons programs. Go to full website »

29

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAMM SAMM EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers Sub-Ångstrom Microscopy and Microanalysis Facility In order to meet the scientific challenges of the future, the EMC has built a new state-of-the-art laboratory space for advanced electron microscopy. The new building has been designed to provide next- generation science with an operating environment that cannot be attained by renovating existing facilities. The EMC staff learned as much as possible from similar efforts around the world, including the SuperSTEM building at Daresbury, the Triebenberg Special Laboratory, the AML at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the new NIST building, and various facilities for nanoscience.

30

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Laboratory Laboratory Electron Microscopy Center Argonne Home > EMC > EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers An Office of Science User Facility The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those capabilities to solve materials problems. The EMC staff carry out research with collaborators and users from Argonne, universities, and other laboratories. The expertise and facilities of the EMC additionally serve a group of national and international researchers. The EMC emphasizes three major areas: materials research, technique and instrumentation development, and operation as a national research facility. Research by EMC personnel includes microscopy based studies in high Tc superconducting materials, irradiation effects in metals and semiconductors, phase transformations, and processing related structure and chemistry of interfaces in thin films.

31

NCEM sample proposal 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the gold nanoparticle appear fuzzy due to microscope's aberrations and the consequent electron wavefunction delocalization. However, to verify the results from the coherent...

32

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Office of Science User Facility An Office of Science User Facility The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those capabilities to solve materials problems. The EMC staff carry out research with collaborators and users from Argonne, universities, and other laboratories. The expertise and facilities of the EMC additionally serve a group of national and international researchers. The EMC emphasizes three major areas: materials research, technique and instrumentation development, and operation as a national research facility. Research by EMC personnel includes microscopy based studies in high Tc superconducting materials, irradiation effects in metals and semiconductors, phase transformations, and processing related structure and chemistry of interfaces in thin films.

33

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Training EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers User Training Prior Training in Electron Microscopy: People who wish to operate TEMs must have at least one college-level course in TEM with a lab component or previous TEM experience. The college course can't be one in which TEM was just one of many topics. For researchers who lack academic training and/or practical experience in electron microscopy, we suggest the short courses in TEM at the Hooke College of Applied Sciences, and the hands-on TEM courses at Northwestern University or the University of Chicago or Northern Illinois University.

34

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview The mission of the Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) is to: Conduct materials research using advanced microstructural characterization methods; Maintain unique resources and facilities for scientific research for the both the Argonne National Laboratory and national scientific community. Develop and expand the frontiers of microanalysis by fostering the evolution of synergistic state-of-the-art resources in instrumentation, techniques and scientific expertise; The staff members of the EMC carry out their own research as well as participate in collaborative programs with other scientists at Argonne National Laboratory as well as researchers, educators and students worldwide. The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those capabilities to solve materials problems. The EMC staff perform collaborative research with members of other Divisions at Argonne National Laboratory and with collaborators from universities and other laboratories. The expertise and facilities of the EMC additionally serve a group of national and international researchers. The EMC emphasizes three major areas: materials research, technique and instrumentation development, and operation as a national research facility. Research by EMC personnel includes microscopy based studies in high Tc superconducting materials, irradiation effects in metals and semiconductors, phase transformations, and processing related structure and chemistry of interfaces in thin films.

35

Advanced Developments in Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Advanced Developments in Electron Microscopy. Sponsorship, MS&T...

36

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Becoming a User Becoming a User EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers Procedure to Become a User at the EMC 1. Summary All users have to fulfill certain requirements before access to the EMC can be granted. The following list provides short descriptions of the requirements. Details can be found on this page and via the relevant links at the left. Register for access to Argonne's scientific user facilities (or update your user registration information).

37

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submit an EMC Proposal Submit an EMC Proposal EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers Submit an EMC Proposal EMC Proposal Submission Deadline Dates for FY2014: November 1, 2013 March 7, 2014 July 11, 2014 Is your proposal a multi-facility proposal? In other words, do you intend to submit proposals to EMC and APS or CNM for your research project? If your answer is "yes," go now to the Proposal Gateway.

38

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EMC Users Committee EMC Users Committee EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers EMC Users Committee An EMC Users Committee has been organized to enhance communication between the user community and the EMC. While the EMC relies on and encourages strong interaction among its users and between its staff and users, the Users Committee provides an additional formal mechanism for user input into EMC planning and operations to ensure that users' needs and concerns are addressed.

39

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

End-of-Proposal Report End-of-Proposal Report EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers End-of-Proposal Report In accordance with the User Agreement, please provide the EMC with the following information when your proposal expires (one year after its acceptance date or when the experiments end, whichever is sooner). A research summary/progress report using these two templates:

40

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Information for EMC Users General Information for EMC Users The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory. It is one of three scientific user facilities for electron beam microcharacterization and one of several National User Facilities located at Argonne National Laboratory. As a scientific user facility, the EMC supports user-accessible instruments (Resources) for high spatial resolution microanalysis, field imaging, nanoscale structural characterization, nanoscale fabrication and manipulation, and unique in situ studies of materials under the influence of ion-beam irradiation. These capabilities are used in a diverse variety of research areas to address grand challenge scientific questions encompassing, for example, energy-related studies, biology, astrophysics, archaeology, superconductivity, nanotechnology, environmental engineering, tribology, and ferroelectricity. The research is performed both by users and by EMC staff. While many users work independently, the most challenging research activities require extensive contributions from EMC staff.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Scanning Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Bob Gordon of Hitachi explains that the electrons are produced by a tungsten filament, just like in an incandescent light bulb, but since the sample ...

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

42

Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Transmission electron microcopy (TEM) has been used since the 1950s to obtain very high resolution images of microstructures. As TEMs were enhanced to include features such as digitally scanned point beams and energy dispersive x-ray detectors

43

Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The scanning electron microscope provides a valuable combination of high resolution imaging, elemental analysis, and recently, crystallographic analysis: Imaging of features as small as sim 10 nm or less, roughly 100 times smaller than can be seen with...

44

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

iTEAM iTEAM The in situ Transmission Electron Aberration Corrected Microscope (iTEAM) is a proposed project to develop a microscope with powerful capabilities for in situ studies of materials in their native environment. iTEAM will build on the success of the TEAM project by utilizing both spherical and chromatic aberration correction in an electron microscope to provide unprecedented capabilities to study materials in controlled environments of temperature, pressure, or fluidic states with the high-resolution in imaging, diffraction, and spectroscopy typical of electron probes. The capabilities of iTEAM will lead to new ways to understand the behavior of materials in native environments, with particular relevance to major energy initiatives such as catalysis, solar conversion, fuel cells, and batteries. In addition, iTEAM will provide new capabilities to understand organic/inorganic interfaces, functionalized nanoparticles, and biomaterials under natural conditions.

45

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CM30T TEM CM30T TEM Instrument capabilities: Instrument specifications: Accelerating voltages: 100-300 kV LaB6 emitter Resolution (at 300 kV): ~ 0.25 nm point; ~ 0.14 nm line Minimum probe size: ~ 9 nm Operating modes: CTEM, CBED, SAED, light element XEDS CCD camera: 1 Mp, 14 bits, AVI capture possible at 15 fps Specimen holders: Double Tilt (+/- 60 degrees alpha, +/- 30 degrees beta): with Be cup for XEDS liquid nitrogen cooled (96 K) with Be cup heating (1270 K) Tilt/rotate (+/- 60 degrees alpha, rotation 360 degrees) Single Tilt (+/- 60 degrees alpha) Typical experiments (examples): Quantitative XEDS Morphological and diffraction contrast studies of defects In situ heating & cooling studies Electron crystallography Weak beam studies of defects This page can be downloaded here as an Adobe PDF file.

46

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEI Tecnai F20ST TEM/STEM FEI Tecnai F20ST TEM/STEM Instrument capabilities: Instrument specifications: Accelerating voltages: 80-200 kV Schottky FEG emitter Resolution (at 200 kV): ~0.24 nm point; ~0.1 nm line; probe size ~0.2-1 nm Operating modes: CTEM, STEM (BF/ADF, HAADF), CBED, SAED, light element XEDS, EELS, spectrum imaging, energy-filtered imaging (EFI), Lorentz magnetic imaging (LMI), electron holographic imaging (EHI), other computationally-mediated modes. On-axis CCD camera: 16 Mp, 16 bits, 61x61 mm chip size. EMC-owned specimen holders: Double Tilt (+/- 40 degrees alpha, +/- 30 degrees beta): with Be cup for XEDS liquid nitrogen cooled (96 K) with Be cup heating (1270 K) In-plane magnetic field (tilt +/- 40 degrees alpha) Liquid He cooled (tilt +/- 40 degrees alpha, rotate 360 degrees)

47

Electron microscopy of ceramic superconductors  

SciTech Connect

The critical current Jc is at least as important as Tc (transition temperature) for applications in superconducting materials. Jc is strongly dependent on microstructure and, in consequence, electron microscopy will continue to be important in the development of practical ceramic superconductors. We will review the progress that has been made over the past year or so in studying the superconductors by electron microscopy techniques of all kinds--conventional, high resolution, analytical, etc. A thorough review is impossible but a bibliography is available, as well as two special issues of Journals. 25 refs., 9 figs.

Mitchell, T.E.; Roy, T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotube Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotube Composites. Summary: Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs ...

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Colliex, C. [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies on Lithium Battery ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Energy Nanomaterials. Presentation Title, Transmission Electron Microscopy...

51

Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of InN Nanorods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of InN Nanorods Z.epitaxy and studied by transmission electron microscopy,establish their quality. Transmission electron microscopy (

Liliental-Weber, Z.; Li, X.; Kryliouk, Olga; Park, H.J.; Mangum, J.; Anderson, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Electron Microscopy (EM, TEM, SEM, STEM) Information at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electron holography. Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotube Composites. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

53

Electron Microscopy | Center for Functional Nanomaterials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Facility Electron Microscopy Facility Electron Microscopy This facility consists of four top-of-the line transmission electron microscopes, two of which are highly specialized instruments capable of extreme levels of resolution, achieved through spherical aberration correction. The facility is also equipped with extensive sample-preparation capabilities. The scientific interests of the staff focus on understanding the microscopic origin of the physical and chemical behavior of materials, with specific emphasis on in-situ studies of materials in native, functional environments. Capabilities Atomic-resolution imaging of internal materials structure with scanning transmission and transmission electron microscopy Spectroscopic characterization with energy dispersive x-ray

54

Frontiers of In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... significance and versatility of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has ... applied stimulus is observed as it happens inside the microscope. ...

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

55

Grand Opening Slated for Electron Microscopy Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

4 days ago ... The Ohio State University Center for Electron Microscopy and Analysis ... There are also two X-ray diffractometer (XRD) systems, facilities for...

56

Automated Electron Microscopy Film Scanner  

Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies. ... film meets high performance specifications at higher electron energies while digital cameras do not; ...

57

Neural network characterization of scanning electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a sophisticated equipment employed for fine imaging of processed film surfaces. In this study, a prediction model of scanning electron microscopy was constructed by using a generalized regression neural network ... Keywords: generalized regression neural network, genetic algorithm, model, scanning electron microscope, statistical experiment

Sanghee Kwon; Donghwan Kim; Byungwhan Kim

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Monday, May 23, 2011 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference room 137-322 Professor Tom Vogt, NanoCenter & Department of...

59

Electron Microscopy Study of Tin Whisker Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of tin whiskers formed on sputtered tin layers deposited on brass was studied using electron microscopy. The occurrence of whiskers appeared to be largely independent of the macroscopic stress state in the film; rather it was microscopic compressive stresses arising from the formation of an intermetallic phase that appeared to be the necessary precursor. Whisker morphology was a result of whether nucleation had occurred on single grains or on multiple grains. In the latter case, the whiskers had a fluted or striated surface. The formation of whiskers on electron transparent samples was demonstrated. These samples showed the whiskers were monocrystalline and defect free, and that the growth direction could be determined.

Norton, Murray G. (Washington State University); Lebret, Joel (8392)

2003-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

Electron and X-Ray Microscopy: Structural Characterization of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2009 ... Recent Advances in Structural Characterization of Materials: Electron and X-Ray Microscopy: Structural Characterization of Nanoscale...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A flow cell for electron microscopy imaging of specimen in ...  

A flow cell for electron microscopy imaging of specimen in liquid or gas. Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. ...

62

In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of Size  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) nanocompression testing, we ... Ab Initio DFT Modeling of the Dislocation and Its Mobility in TiN Ceramic.

63

Frontiers of In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Direct detection cameras form electron images by directly detecting high energy electrons incident on an active pixel CMOS (complementary metal ...

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

64

Los Alamos: MST-MTM: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Laboratory, MST-6 Electron Microscopy Laboratory, MST-6 MST-6 Home Home In the MSL FEI Tecnai F30 Analytical TEM/STEM JEOL 6300FXV High Resolution SEM JEOL 3000F High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope Philips XL30 F Scanning Electron Microscope & Orientation Imaging System Phillips CM30 Transmission Electron Microscope In the Sigma Building JEOL 840 EPMA with Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy FEI Strata DB235 FIB/SEM FEI XL30 Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope & Orientation Imaging System CONTACTS Bob Field 665.3938 Pat Dickerson 665.3036 Rob Dickerson 667.6337 Rod McCabe 606.1649 The Electron Microscopy Laboratory's Capabilities The Electron Microscopy Laboratory's Capabilities The Electron Microscopy Laboratory (EML) is part of MST-6, the Materials Technology - Metallurgy Group within the Materials Science and Technology Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is a facility dedicated to the characterization of materials primarily through imaging, chemical, and crystallographic analyses of material microstructures with several electron and ion beam instruments. Accessory characterization techniques and equipment include energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDS), wavelength dispersive x-ray analysis (WDS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

65

Molecular image resolution in electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to determine the ultimate molecular resolution attainable with a conventional electron microscope

Natsu Uyeda; Takashi Kobayashi; Eiji Suito; Yoshiyasu Harada

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The NCEM one-Angstrom microscope project reaches 0.89 Angstrom resolution  

SciTech Connect

Sub-Angstrom transmission electron microscopy to a resolution of 0.89 has been achieved at the National Center for Electron Microscopy and is available to electron microscopists who have a requirement for this level of resolution.

O'Keefe, Michael A.; Wang, Y.C.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

67

Ion-induced electron emission microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion beam analysis system that creates multidimensional maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the secondary electrons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted secondary electrons are collected in a strong electric field perpendicular to the sample surface and (optionally) projected and refocused by the electron lenses found in a photon emission electron microscope, amplified by microchannel plates and then their exact position is sensed by a very sensitive X Y position detector. Position signals from this secondary electron detector are then correlated in time with nuclear, atomic or electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these secondary electrons in the fit place.

Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vizkelethy, Gyorgy (Albuquerque, NM); Weller, Robert A. (Brentwood, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Phase contrast in high resolution electron microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a device for developing a phase contrast signal for a scanning transmission electron microscope. The lens system of the microscope is operated in a condition of defocus so that predictable alternate concentric regions of high and low electron density exist in the cone of illumination. Two phase detectors are placed beneath the object inside the cone of illumination, with the first detector having the form of a zone plate, each of its rings covering alternate regions of either higher or lower electron density. The second detector is so configured that it covers the regions of electron density not covered by the first detector. Each detector measures the number of electrons incident thereon and the signal developed by the first detector is subtracted from the signal developed by the record detector to provide a phase contrast signal. (auth)

Rose, H.H.

1975-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

69

Instrument Series: Microscopy Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Transmission Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope EMSL's environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) provides in situ capabilities that enable atomic-resolution imaging and spectroscopic studies of materials under dynamic operating conditions. In contrast to traditional operation of TEM under high vacuum, EMSL's ETEM uniquely allows imaging within high- temperature and gas environments-with a gas pressure up to 20 Torr. With a spherical aberration corrector for the objective lens, the ETEM captures atomic-level processes as they occur, enabling vital research across a range of scientific fields. Research Applications Chemical science and engineering - providing in situ observation of catalytic processes with atomic-level resolution Materials science and engineering - allowing

70

Atmospheric pressure scanning transmission electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images of gold nanoparticles (2.1 nm average diameter) at atmospheric pressure have been recorded through a 0.36 mm thick mixture of CO, O2 and He. This was accomplished using a reaction cell consisting of two electron-transparent silicon nitride membranes mounted on a specially designed specimen rod. Gas flow occurred through plastic tubing from the outside of the microscope to the specimen region and back. Gold nanoparticles of a full width half maximum diameter of 1.0 nm were visible above the background noise and the achieved resolution was 0.5 nm in accordance with calculations of the beam broadening.

De Jonge, Niels [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Bigelow, Wilbur C [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Monday, May 23, 2011 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference room 137-322 Professor Tom Vogt, NanoCenter & Department of Chemistry, University of South Carolina High-Angle-Annular-Dark-Field/Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF/STEM) is a technique uniquely suited for detailed studies of the structure and composition of complex oxides. The HAADF detector collects electrons which have interact inelastically with the potentials of the atoms in the specimen and therefore resembles the better known Z2 (Z is atomic number) Rutherford scattering. One class of important catalysts consists of bronzes based on pentagonal {Mo6O21} building units; these include Mo5O14 and Mo17O47. In the last 20 years, new materials doped with

72

Scanning transmission electron microscopy of gate stacks with HfO2 dielectrics and TiN electrodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scanning transmission electron microscopy of gate stacksEELS) in scanning transmission electron microscopy were usedWe use scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM)

Agustin, Melody P.; Fonseca, Leo R. C.; Hooker, Jacob C.; Stemmer, Susanne

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microscopy Home Staff Only Microscopy Group Staff InstrumentationCapabilities The Advanced Microscopy Laboratory (AML) Microscopy User Centers: MAUC SHaRE Research Highlights...

74

CFN Operations and Safety Awareness (COSA) Checklist Electron Microscopy Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Facility Electron Microscopy Facility Building 735 This COSA form must be completed for all experimenters working in the CFN and must be submitted to the CFN User Office for badge access. CFN Safety Awareness Policy: Each user must be instructed in the safe procedures in CFN related activities. CFN Facility Laboratory personnel shall keep readily available all relevant instructions and safety literature. Employee/Guest Name Life/Guest Number Department/Division ES&H Coordinator/Ext. Facility Manager COSA Trainer Guest User Staff USER ADMINISTRATION Checked in at User Administration and has valid BNL ID badge Safety Approval Form (SAF) approved. Training requirements completed (Indicate additional training specified in SAF or ESR in lines provided below):

75

Electron Microscopy Study of the LiFEPO4 to FePo4 Phase Transition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Study of the LiFEPO4 to FePo4 Phase Transition Title Electron Microscopy Study of the LiFEPO4 to FePo4 Phase Transition Publication Type Journal Article Year of...

76

Aberration-Coreected Electron Microscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last decade witnessed the rapid development and implementation of aberration correction in electron optics, realizing a more-than-70-year-old dream of aberration-free electron microscopy with a spatial resolution below one angstrom [1-9]. With sophisticated aberration correctors, modern electron microscopes now can reveal local structural information unavailable with neutrons and x-rays, such as the local arrangement of atoms, order/disorder, electronic inhomogeneity, bonding states, spin configuration, quantum confinement, and symmetry breaking [10-17]. Aberration correction through multipole-based correctors, as well as the associated improved stability in accelerating voltage, lens supplies, and goniometers in electron microscopes now enables medium-voltage (200-300kV) microscopes to achieve image resolution at or below 0.1nm. Aberration correction not only improves the instrument's spatial resolution but, equally importantly, allows larger objective lens pole-piece gaps to be employed thus realizing the potential of the instrument as a nanoscale property-measurement tool. That is, while retaining high spatial resolution, we can use various sample stages to observe the materials response under various temperature, electric- and magnetic- fields, and atmospheric environments. Such capabilities afford tremendous opportunities to tackle challenging science and technology issues in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology. The research goal of the electron microscopy group at the Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science and the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, as well as the Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is to elucidate the microscopic origin of the physical- and chemical-behavior of materials, and the role of individual, or groups of atoms, especially in their native functional environments. We plan to accomplish this by developing and implementing various quantitative electron microscopy techniques in strongly correlated electron systems and nanostructured materials. As a first step, with the support of Materials Science Division, Office of Basic Energy Science, US Department of Energy, and the New York State Office of Science, Technology, and Academic Research, recently we acquired three aberration-corrected electron microscopes from the three major microscope manufacturers, i.e., JEOL, Hitachi, and FEI. The Hitachi HD2700C is equipped with a probe corrector, the FEI Titan 80-300 has an imaging corrector, while the JEOL2200MCO has both. All the correctors are of the dual-hexapole type, designed and manufactured by CEOS GmbH based on the design due to Rose and Haider [3, 18]. All these three are one-of-a-kind in the US, designed for specialized capabilities in characterizing nanoscale structure. In this chapter, we review the performance of these state-of-the art instruments and the new challenges associated with the improved spatial resolution, including the environment requirements of the laboratory that hosts these instruments. Although each instrument we describe here has its own strengths and drawbacks, it is not our intention to rank them in terms of their performance, especially their spatial resolution in imaging.

Zhu,Y.; Wall, J.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Berkeley Lab National User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Energy Sciences Network) Joint Genome Institute The Molecular Foundry National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)...

78

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Foundry (TMF) and the National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), both DOE-funded Nanoscale Research Centers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are pleased to...

79

Berkeley Lab A to Z Index: N  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanotechnology: Technology Transfer National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) National Health Survey Necessary & Sufficient Closure Process Leading to Work Smart Standards...

80

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

26 September 2007 00:00 Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm...

82

In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxides and their tailored structures are at the heart of electrochemical energy storage technologies and advances in understanding and controlling the dynamic behaviors in the complex oxides, particularly at the interfaces, during electrochemical processes will catalyze creative design concepts for new materials with enhanced and better-understood properties. Such knowledge is not accessible without new analytical tools. New innovative experimental techniques are needed for understanding the chemistry and structure of the bulk and interfaces, more importantly how they change with electrochemical processes in situ. Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used extensively to study electrode materials ex situ and is one of the most powerful tools to obtain structural, morphological, and compositional information at nanometer scale by combining imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy, e.g., EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry) and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (EELS). Determining the composition/structure evolution upon electrochemical cycling at the bulk and interfaces can be addressed by new electron microscopy technique with which one can observe, at the nanometer scale and in situ, the dynamic phenomena in the electrode materials. In electrochemical systems, for instance in a lithium ion battery (LIB), materials operate under conditions that are far from equilibrium, so that the materials studied ex situ may not capture the processes that occur in situ in a working battery. In situ electrochemical operation in the ultra-high vacuum column of a TEM has been pursued by two major strategies. In one strategy, a 'nano-battery' can be fabricated from an all-solid-state thin film battery using a focused ion beam (FIB). The electrolyte is either polymer based or ceramic based without any liquid component. As shown in Fig. 1a, the interfaces between the active electrode material/electrolyte can be clearly observed with TEM imaging, in contrast to the composite electrodes/electrolyte interfaces in conventional lithium ion batteries, depicted in Fig.1b, where quantitative interface characterization is extremely difficult if not impossible. A second strategy involves organic electrolyte, though this approach more closely resembles the actual operation conditions of a LIB, the extreme volatility In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry by Ying Shirley Meng, Thomas McGilvray, Ming-Che Yang, Danijel Gostovic, Feng Wang, Dongli Zeng, Yimei Zhu, and Jason Graetz of the organic electrolytes present significant challenges for designing an in situ cell that is suitable for the vacuum environment of the TEM. Significant progress has been made in the past few years on the development of in situ electron microscopy for probing nanoscale electrochemistry. In 2008, Brazier et al. reported the first cross-section observation of an all solid-state lithium ion nano-battery by TEM. In this study the FIB was used to make a 'nano-battery,' from an all solid-state battery prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). In situ TEM observations were not possible at that time due to several key challenges such as the lack of a suitable biasing sample holder and vacuum transfer of sample. In 2010, Yamamoto et al. successfully observed changes of electric potential in an all-solid-state lithium ion battery in situ with electron holography (EH). The 2D potential distribution resulting from movement of lithium ions near the positive-electrode/electrolyte interface was quantified. More recently Huang et al. and Wang et al. reported the in situ observations of the electrochemical lithiation of a single SnO{sub 2} nanowire electrode in two different in situ setups. In their approach, a vacuum compatible ionic liquid is used as the electrolyte, eliminating the need for complicated membrane sealing to prevent the evaporation of carbonate based organic electrolyte into the TEM column. One main limitation of this approach is that EELS spectral imaging is not possible due to the high plasmon signal of the ionic li

Graetz J.; Meng, Y.S.; McGilvray, T.; Yang, M.-C.; Gostovic, D.; Wang, F.; Zeng, D.; Zhu, Y.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies Materials Sciences and Engineering (MSE) Division MSE Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs BES Funding Opportunities The Computational Materials and Chemical Sciences Network (CMCSN) Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Scientific Highlights Reports and Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page This research area supports basic research in condensed matter physics and materials physics using electron scattering and microscopy and scanning probe techniques. The research includes experiments and theory to understand the atomic, electronic, and magnetic structures of materials.

84

Scanning transmission electron microscopy strain measurement from millisecond frames of a direct electron charge coupled device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-speed direct electron detection system is introduced to the field of transmission electron microscopy and applied to strain measurements in semiconductor nanostructures. In particular, a focused electron probe with a diameter of 0.5 nm was scanned over a fourfold quantum layer stack with alternating compressive and tensile strain and diffracted discs have been recorded on a scintillator-free direct electron detector with a frame time of 1 ms. We show that the applied algorithms can accurately detect Bragg beam positions despite a significant point spread each 300 kV electron causes during detection on the scintillator-free camera. For millisecond exposures, we find that strain can be measured with a precision of 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, enabling, e.g., strain mapping in a 100 Multiplication-Sign 100 nm{sup 2} region with 0.5 nm resolution in 40 s.

Mueller, Knut; Rosenauer, Andreas [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Ryll, Henning; Ordavo, Ivan; Ihle, Sebastian; Soltau, Heike [PNSensor GmbH, Roemerstrasse 28, 80803 Muenchen (Germany); Strueder, Lothar [Max-Planck-Institut Halbleiterlabor, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 Muenchen (Germany); Volz, Kerstin [Materials Science Center and Faculty of Physics, Philipps Universitaet Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Strasse, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Zweck, Josef [Institut fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

85

Imaging doped silicon test structures using low energy electron microscopy.  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final SAND Report for the LDRD Project 105877 - 'Novel Diagnostic for Advanced Measurements of Semiconductor Devices Exposed to Adverse Environments' - funded through the Nanoscience to Microsystems investment area. Along with the continuous decrease in the feature size of semiconductor device structures comes a growing need for inspection tools with high spatial resolution and high sample throughput. Ideally, such tools should be able to characterize both the surface morphology and local conductivity associated with the structures. The imaging capabilities and wide availability of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) make them an obvious choice for imaging device structures. Dopant contrast from pn junctions using secondary electrons in the SEM was first reported in 1967 and more recently starting in the mid-1990s. However, the serial acquisition process associated with scanning techniques places limits on the sample throughput. Significantly improved throughput is possible with the use of a parallel imaging scheme such as that found in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). The application of PEEM and LEEM to device structures relies on contrast mechanisms that distinguish differences in dopant type and concentration. Interestingly, one of the first applications of PEEM was a study of the doping of semiconductors, which showed that the PEEM contrast was very sensitive to the doping level and that dopant concentrations as low as 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} could be detected. More recent PEEM investigations of Schottky contacts were reported in the late 1990s by Giesen et al., followed by a series of papers in the early 2000s addressing doping contrast in PEEM by Ballarotto and co-workers and Frank and co-workers. In contrast to PEEM, comparatively little has been done to identify contrast mechanisms and assess the capabilities of LEEM for imaging semiconductor device strictures. The one exception is the work of Mankos et al., who evaluated the impact of high-throughput requirements on the LEEM designs and demonstrated new applications of imaging modes with a tilted electron beam. To assess its potential as a semiconductor device imaging tool and to identify contrast mechanisms, we used LEEM to investigate doped Si test structures. In section 2, Imaging Oxide-Covered Doped Si Structures Using LEEM, we show that the LEEM technique is able to provide reasonably high contrast images across lateral pn junctions. The observed contrast is attributed to a work function difference ({Delta}{phi}) between the p- and n-type regions. However, because the doped regions were buried under a thermal oxide ({approx}3.5 nm thick), e-beam charging during imaging prevented quantitative measurements of {Delta}{phi}. As part of this project, we also investigated a series of similar test structures in which the thermal oxide was removed by a chemical etch. With the oxide removed, we obtained intensity-versus-voltage (I-V) curves through the transition from mirror to LEEM mode and determined the relative positions of the vacuum cutoffs for the differently doped regions. Although the details are not discussed in this report, the relative position in voltage of the vacuum cutoffs are a direct measure of the work function difference ({Delta}{phi}) between the p- and n-doped regions.

Nakakura, Craig Yoshimi; Anderson, Meredith Lynn; Kellogg, Gary Lee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Transmission electron microscopy analysis of corroded metal waste forms.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of analyses with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and selected area electron diffraction (ED) of samples of metallic waste form (MWF) materials that had been subjected to various corrosion tests. The objective of the TEM analyses was to characterize the composition and microstructure of surface alteration products which, when combined with other test results, can be used to determine the matrix corrosion mechanism. The examination of test samples generated over several years has resulted in refinements to the TEM sample preparation methods developed to preserve the orientation of surface alteration layers and the underlying base metal. The preservation of microstructural spatial relationships provides valuable insight for determining the matrix corrosion mechanism and for developing models to calculate radionuclide release in repository performance models. The TEM results presented in this report show that oxide layers are formed over the exposed steel and intermetallic phases of the MWF during corrosion in aqueous solutions and humid air at elevated temperatures. An amorphous non-stoichiometric ZrO{sub 2} layer forms at the exposed surfaces of the intermetallic phases, and several nonstoichiometric Fe-O layers form over the steel phases in the MWF. These oxide layers adhere strongly to the underlying metal, and may be overlain by one or more crystalline Fe-O phases that probably precipitated from solution. The layer compositions are consistent with a corrosion mechanism of oxidative dissolution of the steel and intermetallic phases. The layers formed on the steel and intermetallic phases form a continuous layer over the exposed waste form, although vertical splits in the layer and corrosion in pits and crevices were seen in some samples. Additional tests and analyses are needed to verify that these layers passivate the underlying metals and if passivation can break down as the MWF corrodes. The importance of localized corrosion should also be determined.

Dietz, N. L.

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF HELIUM BEARING FUSION WELDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was conducted to characterize the helium bubble distributions in tritium-charged-and-aged 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel fusion welds containing approximately 150 appm helium-3. TEM foils were prepared from C-shaped fracture toughness test specimens containing {delta} ferrite levels ranging from 4 to 33 volume percent. The weld microstructures in the low ferrite welds consisted mostly of austenite and discontinuous, skeletal {delta} ferrite. In welds with higher levels of {delta} ferrite, the ferrite was more continuous and, in some areas of the 33 volume percent sample, was the matrix/majority phase. The helium bubble microstructures observed were similar in all samples. Bubbles were found in the austenite but not in the {delta} ferrite. In the austenite, bubbles had nucleated homogeneously in the grain interiors and heterogeneously on dislocations. Bubbles were not found on any austenite/austenite grain boundaries or at the austenite/{delta} ferrite interphase interfaces. Bubbles were not observed in the {delta} ferrite because of the combined effects of the low solubility and rapid diffusion of tritium through the {delta} ferrite which limited the amount of helium present to form visible bubbles.

Tosten, M; Michael Morgan, M

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

88

A stochastic kinematic model of class averaging in single-particle electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single-particle electron microscopy is an experimental technique that is used to determine the three-dimensional (3D) structure of biological macromolecules and the complexes that they form. In general, image processing techniques and reconstruction ... Keywords: Class average, convolution, image alignment, single-particle electron microscopy

Wooram Park; Charles R Midgett; Dean R Madden; Gregory S Chirikjian

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Investigating physical and chemical changes in high-k gate stacks using nanoanalytical electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal budget involved in processing high-k gate stacks can cause undesirable physical and chemical changes which limit device performance. The transmission electron microscope and associated analytical techniques provide a way of investigating ... Keywords: Electron energy loss near edge structure, Electron energy loss spectroscopy, High-k dielectrics, Nanoanalytical electron microscopy

A. J. Craven; M. MacKenzie; D. W. McComb; F. T. Docherty

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Recent Advances in Electron Microscopy, Spectral Imaging, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... such as adhesion performance, corrosion resistance, electrical and magnetic ... and surface analysis techniques for probing the composition and structure of ... microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FESEM/STEM/EDS);...

91

In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Nanomaterials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the recent development of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization techniques, the real time study of property-structure correlations in nanomaterials becomes possible. This dissertation reports the direct observations of deformation behavior of Al2O3-ZrO2-MgAl2O4 (AZM) bulk ceramic nanocomposites, strengthening mechanism of twins in YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) thin film, work hardening event in nanocrystalline nickel and deformation of 2wt% Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin film with nanorod structures using the in situ TEM nanoindentation tool. The combined in situ movies with quantitative loading-unloading curves reveal the deformation mechanism of the above nanomaterial systems. At room temperature, in situ dynamic deformation studies show that the AZM nanocomposites undergo the deformation mainly through the grain-boundary sliding and rotation of small grains, i.e., ZrO2 grains, and some of the large grains, i.e., MgAl2O4 grains. We observed both plastic and elastic deformations in different sample regions in these multi-phase ceramic nanocomposites at room temperature. Both ex situ (conventional) and in situ nanoindentation were conducted to reveal the deformation of YBCO films from the directions perpendicular and parallel to the twin interfaces. Hardness measured perpendicular to twin interfaces is ~50% and 40% higher than that measured parallel to twin interfaces, by ex situ and in situ, respectively. By using an in situ nanoindentation tool inside TEM, dynamic work hardening event in nanocrystalline nickel was directly observed. During stain hardening stage, abundant Lomer-Cottrell (L-C) locks formed both within nanograins and against twin boundaries. Two major mechanisms were identified during interactions between L-C locks and twin boundaries. Quantitative nanoindentation experiments recorded during in situ experiments show an increase of yield strength from 1.64 to 2.29 GPa during multiple loading-unloading cycles. In situ TEM nanoindentation has been conducted to explore the size dependent deformation behavior of two different types (type I: ~ 0.51 of width/length ratio and type II: ~ 088 ratio) of AZO nanorods. During the indentation on type I nanord structure, annihilation of defects has been observed which is caused by limitation of the defect activities by relatively small size of the width. On the other hand, type II nanorod shows dislocation activities which enhanced the grain rotation under the external force applied on more isotropic direction through type II nanorod.

Lee, Joon Hwan 1977-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strata DB235 FIB/SEM (Focused Ion Beam/High Reolution Scanning Electron Microscope) Strata DB235 FIB/SEM (Focused Ion Beam/High Reolution Scanning Electron Microscope) FEI Strata DB235 FIB/SEM (Focused Ion Beam/High Reolution Scanning Electron Microscope) This is a versatile field emission scanning electron microscope integrated with a focused ion beam column that is used for sophisticated SEM and TEM sample preparation, micromachining, and ultrahigh resolution SEM imaging. The microscope is also equipped for x-ray microanalysis and crystallographic orientation imaging. Microscope consists of a Hexalens SFEG electron beam column, and a Magnum ion beam column with a gallium liquid metal ion source. Imaging with both secondary electrons and ions. Digital image acquisition. Small, stable, high brightness Schottky based field emission electron source provides 1.5 nm resolution at 30 kV. Three electron beam lens modes - normal imaging, high resolution imaging, and EDS imaging.

93

Analytical Electron Microscopy examination of uranium contamination at the DOE Fernald operation site  

SciTech Connect

Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) has been used to identify uranium-bearing phases present in contaminated soils from the DOE Fernald operation site. A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and AEM was used in isolating and characterizing uranium-rich regions of the contaminated soils. Soil samples were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) by ultramicrotomy using an embedding resin previously employed for aquatic colloids and biological samples. This preparation method allowed direct comparison between SEM and TEM images. At the macroscopic level much of the uranium appears to be associated with clays in the soils; however, electron beam analysis revealed that the uranium is present as discrete phases, including iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite. Only low levels of uranium were actually within the clay minerals. The distribution of uranium phases was inhomogeneous at the submicron level.

Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Analytical electron microscopy characterization of uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Site, FY1993 report  

SciTech Connect

A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) is being used to determine the nature of uranium in soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The information gained from these studies is being used to develop and test remediation technologies. Investigations using SEM have shown that uranium is contained within particles that are typically 1 to 100 {mu}m in diameter. Further analysis with AEM has shown that these uranium-rich regions are made up of discrete uranium-bearing phases. The distribution of these uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level.

Buck, E.C.; Cunnane, J.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Development of multiplexing strategies for electron and super-resolution optical microscopy/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to increase the multiplexing capabilities of electron and super resolution optical microscopy. This will be done through the development of molecular-scale barcodes that can be resolved in one of ...

Tillberg, Paul W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Los Alamos: MST-MTM: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3000F High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope 3000F High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope JEOL 3000F High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope This is a high-resolution TEM equipped with an electron energy-loss spectrometer and a CCD camera for digital image acquisition. This microscope is used primarily for imaging the atomic structure of defects and interfaces in materials. Field emission electron source. Coherent source with an energy spread of 0.8 eV. Operation at accelerating voltages of up to 300 kV. +/- 10° of eucentric specimen tilt. Point to point resolution of 0.17 nm; 0.10 nm resolution can be extracted by computer processing. Gatan Multiscan CCD Camera for digital image acquisition. Automated microscope alignment: defocus calibration/adjustment, astigmatism correction and beam-tilt correction (automatic coma-free alignment).

97

Compact, low power radio frequency cavity for femtosecond electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reported here is the design, construction, and characterization of a small, power efficient, tunable dielectric filled cavity for the creation of femtosecond electron bunches in an existing electron microscope without the mandatory use of femtosecond lasers. A 3 GHz pillbox cavity operating in the TM{sub 110} mode was specially designed for chopping the beam of a 30 keV scanning electron microscope. The dielectric material used is ZrTiO{sub 4}, chosen for the high relative permittivity ({epsilon}{sub r}= 37 at 10 GHz) and low loss tangent (tan {delta}= 2 x 10{sup -4}). This allows the cavity radius to be reduced by a factor of six, while the power consumption is reduced by an order of magnitude compared to a vacuum pillbox cavity. These features make this cavity ideal as a module for existing electron microscopes, and an alternative to femtosecond laser systems integrated with electron microscopes.

Lassise, A.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.; Luiten, O. J. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Investigation of proximity effects in electron microscopy and lithography  

SciTech Connect

A fundamental challenge in lithographic and microscopic techniques employing focused electron beams are so-called proximity effects due to unintended electron emission and scattering in the sample. Herein, we apply a method that allows for visualizing electron induced surface modifications on a SiN substrate covered with a thin native oxide layer by means of iron deposits. Conventional wisdom holds that by using thin membranes proximity effects can be effectively reduced. We demonstrate that, contrary to the expectation, these can be indeed larger on a 200 nm SiN-membrane than on the respective bulk substrate due to charging effects.

Walz, M.-M.; Vollnhals, F.; Rietzler, F.; Schirmer, M.; Steinrueck, H.-P.; Marbach, H.

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

99

The theory and practice of high resolution scanning electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in instrumentation have produced the first commercial examples of what can justifiably be called High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopes. The key components of such instruments are a cold field emission gun, a small-gap immersion probe-forming lens, and a clean dry-pumped vacuum. The performance of these microscopes is characterized by several major features including a spatial resolution, in secondary electron mode on solid specimens, which can exceed 1nm on a routine basis; an incident probe current density of the order of 10{sup 6} amps/cm{sup 2}; and the ability to maintain these levels of performance over an accelerating voltage range of from 1 to 30keV. This combination of high resolution, high probe current, low contamination and flexible electron-optical conditions provides many new opportunitites for the application of the SEM to materials science, physics, and the life sciences. 27 refs., 14 figs.

Joy, D.C. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA) Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Visualizing Macromolecular Complexes with In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

A central focus of biological research is understanding the structure/function relationship of macromolecular protein complexes. Yet conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques are limited to static observations. Here we present the first direct images of purified macromolecular protein complexes using in situ liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy. Our results establish the capability of this technique for visualizing the interface between biology and nanotechnology with high fidelity while also probing the interactions of biomolecules within solution. This method represents an important advancement towards allowing future high-resolution observations of biological processes and conformational dynamics in real-time.

Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Wong, Peony C. K.; Chiu, Po-Lin; Dutrow, Gavin H.; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Nano-mineralogy studies by advanced electron microscopy Chi Ma and George R. Rossman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nano-mineralogy studies by advanced electron microscopy Chi Ma and George R. Rossman Division and planetary materials easier and faster down to nano-scales. Small but new minerals with important geological significance are being discovered. Nano-features are being discovered in many common minerals and gems, which

Ma, Chi

102

proposal writing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

microscopy training from the ground up. Typical users are expected to be proficient in electron microscopy to the point that they can be trained on a NCEM microscope within a...

103

Demonstration of Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy / Spectroscopy on the Au/Si (001) system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM) capabilities of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) have been verified. BEEM is used to analyze the characteristics of buried energy barriers and was developed as an extension of scanning tunneling microscopy; hence, the analytical capabilities of BEEM are on a manometer scale. To use BEEM, low-noise Au/Si (001) Schottky diodes have been fabricated. The diodes were macroscopically tested for their electrical properties using conventional current-voltage (I-V) techniques. The same diodes were then placed in an ultra-high vacuum STM system and analyzed with BEEM. The ballistic electron emission microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy showed some correlation with the topography of the evaporated gold surface. The barrier heights of the diodes were extracted from the ballistic electron emission spectroscopy with the use of a simple one dimensional BEEM current model. Comparison between the barrier heights obtained with BEEM and conventional I-V techniques showed the localized barrier heights to be higher than the macroscopic barrier heights.

Drummond, Mary Alyssa

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Microscopy Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST has worked extensively with microscope manufacturers such as FEI ... Electron microscopy methods have been used to characterize potential ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

105

In situ transmission electron microscopy observation of silver oxidation in ionized/atomic gas.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction between silver and ionized and atomic gas was observed directly by in situ transmission electron microscopy with an environmental cell for the first time. The electron beam provides dual functions as the source of both gas ionization and imaging. The concentration of ionized gas was tuned via adjusting the current density of the electron beam. Oxidation of the silver is observed in situ, indicating the presence of ionized and/or atomic oxygen. The evolution of microstructure and phase constituents was characterized. Then the oxidation rate was measured, and the relationships among grain size, mass transport rate, and electron flux were characterized. The role of the electron beam is discussed, and the results are rationalized with respect to ex situ results from the literature.

Sun, L.; Noh, K. W.; Wen, J-G.; Dillon, S. J. (Materials Science Division); (Massachusetts Inst. Tech.); (Univ. Illinois - Urbana)

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

106

A facile electron microscopy method for measuring precipitate volume fractions in AlCuMg alloys  

SciTech Connect

Precipitate volume fraction is an important parameter to estimate the strength of precipitation-hardened metals. In this study, a facile method was applied to measure the precipitate volume fractions in an age-hardened AlCuMg alloy. In this method, the precipitate volume fraction values can be obtained by multiplying the volume precipitate number densities with the averaged precipitate volumes, which can be easily measured in scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Compared with the conventional method, in which the specimen thickness has to be measured in transmission electron microscopy, the method proposed in this study is more facile to perform. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have proposed a facile method to measure precipitate volume fractions for precipitation-hardened metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This technique works well for the square-shaped {theta} Prime -phase nano-precipitates in 2xxx aluminum alloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interesting is that the proposed method is easy for materials scientists and engineers to perform.

Zhao, X.Q.; Shi, M.J.; Chen, J.H., E-mail: jhchen123@hnu.edu.cn; Wang, S.B.; Liu, C.H.; Wu, C.L.

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Analytical electron microscopy characterization of Fernald soils. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

A combination of backscattered electron imaging and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) with electron diffraction have been used to determine the physical and chemical properties of uranium contamination in soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project in Ohio. The information gained from these studies has been used in the development and testing of remediation technologies. Most chemical washing techniques have been reasonably effective with uranyl [U(VI)] phases, but U(IV) phases have proven difficult to remove from the soils. Carbonate leaching in an oxygen environment (heap leaching) has removed some of the U(IV) phases, and it appears to be the most effective technique developed in the program. The uranium metaphosphate, which was found exclusively at an incinerator site, has not been removed by any of the chemical methods. We suggest that a physical extraction procedure (either a magnetic separation or aqueous biphasic process) be used to remove this phase. Analytical electron microscopy has also been used to determine the effect of the chemical agents on the uranium phases. It has also been used to examine soils from the Portsmouth site in Ohio. The contamination there took the form of uranium oxide and uranium calcium oxide phases. Technology transfer efforts over FY 1994 have led to industry-sponsored projects involving soil characterization.

Buck, E.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

MML Microscopy Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MML Electron Microscopy Facility consists of three transmission electron microscopes (TEM), three scanning electron microscopes (SEM), a ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

109

Transmission electron microscopy characterization of electrically stressed AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor devices has been investigated using step-stress testing, and representative samples of undegraded, source-side-degraded, and drain-side-degraded devices were examined using electron microscopy and microanalysis. An unstressed reference sample was also examined. All tested devices and their corresponding transmission electron microscopy samples originated from the same wafer and thus received nominally identical processing. Step-stressing was performed on each device and the corresponding current voltage characteristics were generated. Degradation in electrical performance, specifically greatly increased gate leakage current, was shown to be correlated with the presence of crystal defects near the gate edges. However, the drain-side-degraded device showed a surface pit on the source side, and another region of the same device showed no evidence of damage. Moreover, significant metal diffusion into the barrier layer from the gate contacts was also observed, as well as thin amorphous oxide layers below the gate metal contacts, even in the unstressed sample. Overall, these observations emphasize that gate-edge defects provide only a partial explanation for device failure.

Johnson, Michael [Arizona State University; Cullen, David A [ORNL; Liu, Lu [University of Florida; Kang, Tsung Sheng [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ren, F. [University of Florida; Chang, C. Y. [University of Florida; Pearton, S. J. [University of Florida; Jang, Soohwan [University of Florida, Gainesville; Johnson, Wayne J. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Smith, David J [Arizona State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

TITLE: Environmental Electron Microscopy Study of the Nucleation and Growth of Si and Ge AUTHORS: Stephan Hofmann  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission electron microscopy study of Si nanowire nucleation from Pd [1] and Ni under disilane exposure advances by lateral propagation of ledges, driven by catalytic dissociation of disilane and coupled Pd

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

111

Robust atomic resolution imaging of light elements using scanning transmission electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

We show that an annular detector placed within the bright field cone in scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of light elements in crystals. In contrast to common high angle annular dark field imaging, both light and heavy atom columns are visible simultaneously. In contrast to common bright field imaging, the images are directly and robustly interpretable over a large range of thicknesses. We demonstrate this through systematic simulations and present a simple physical model to obtain some insight into the scattering dynamics.

Findlay, S. D. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Sawada, H.; Okunishi, E.; Kondo, Y. [JEOL Ltd., Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramic Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramic Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

112

Studying The Kinetics Of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation With In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silicon is an attractive high-capacity anode material for Li-ion batteries, but a comprehensive understanding of the massive ~300% volume change and fracture during lithiation/delithiation is necessary to reliably employ Si anodes. Here, in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the lithiation of crystalline Si nanoparticles reveals that the reaction slows down as it progresses into the particle interior. Analysis suggests that this behavior is due to the influence of mechanical stress at the reaction front on the driving force for the reaction. These experiments give insight into the factors controlling the kinetics of this unique reaction.

Mcdowell, Matthew T.; Ryu, Ill; Lee, Seokwoo; Wang, Chong M.; Nix, William D.; Cui, Yi

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

113

Electron Microscopy Studies of GaP(N,As) Grown on Si  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to perform transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of GaP(N,As) alloys grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on Si substrates. These alloys are of interest for the fabrication of high-efficiency tandem solar cells based on Si. The results indicated that the nucleation and growth conditions used are critical for obtaining planar epitaxial layers with a low defect density. In particular, antiphase domains are eliminated using a low growth temperature. TEM studies of these alloy layers, which contain only a few percent N, revealed no phase separation. However, electron diffraction studies revealed the first evidence of CuPt-type atomic ordering in these P-rich, dilute nitride alloy layers.

Norman, A. G.; Geisz, J. F.; Olson, J. M.; Jones, K. M.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Plasmonic Field Enhancement of Individual Nanoparticles by Correlated Scanning and Photoemission Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

We present results of a combined two-photon photoemission and scanning electron microscopy investigation to determine the electromagnetic enhancement factors of silver-coated spherical nanoparticles deposited on an atomically flat mica substrate. Femtosecond laser excitation, of the nanoparticles, produces intense photoemission, attributed to near-resonant excitation of localized surface plasmons. Enhancement factors are determined by comparing the respective two-photon photoemission yield measured for equal areas between single nanoparticles to that of the surrounding flat surface. For s-polarized, 400 nm (~ 3.1 eV) femtosecond radiation a distribution of enhancement factors are found with a large percentage (77%) of the nanoparticles falling within a median range. A correlated scanning electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that the nanoparticles typifying the median of the distribution were characterized by ideal spherical shapes and defect-free morphologies. The single largest enhancement factors were in contrast produced by a very small percentage (8%) of the total, for which evidence of silver defect anomalies were found that contributed to the overall structure of the nanoparticle. Comparisons are made between the experimentally measured enhancement factors and previously reported theoretical predictions of the localized surface plasmon near-field intensities for isolated nanometer-sized silver spheres.

Peppernick, Samuel J.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

115

Atomic-Scale Imaging and Spectroscopy for In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observation of growth, synthesis, dynamics and electrochemical reactions in the liquid state is an important yet largely unstudied aspect of nanotechnology. The only techniques that can potentially provide the insights necessary to advance our understanding of these mechanisms is simultaneous atomic-scale imaging and quantitative chemical analysis (through spectroscopy) under environmental conditions in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). In this study we describe the experimental and technical conditions necessary to obtain electron energy loss (EEL) spectra from a nanoparticle in colloidal suspension using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with the environmental liquid stage. At a fluid path length below 400 nm, atomic resolution images can be obtained and simultaneous compositional analysis can be achieved. We show that EEL spectroscopy can be used to quantify the total fluid path length around the nanoparticle, and demonstrate characteristic core-loss signals from the suspended nanoparticles can be resolved and analyzed to provide information on the local interfacial chemistry with the surrounding environment. The combined approach using aberration corrected STEM and EEL spectra with the in situ fluid stage demonstrates a plenary platform for detailed investigations of solution based catalysis and biological research.

Jungjohann, K. L.; Evans, James E.; Aguiar, Jeff; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

116

Characterization of polysilicon films by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy: A comparative study  

SciTech Connect

Samples of chemically-vapor-deposited micrometer and sub-micrometer-thick films of polysilicon were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in cross-section and by Raman spectroscopy with illumination at their surface. TEM and Raman spectroscopy both find varying amounts of polycrystalline and amorphous silicon in the wafers. Raman spectra obtained using blue, green and red excitation wavelengths to vary the Raman sampling depth are compared with TEM cross-sections of these films. Films showing crystalline columnar structures in their TEM micrographs have Raman spectra with a band near 497 cm{sup {minus}1} in addition to the dominant polycrystalline silicon band (521 cm{sup {minus}1}). The TEM micrographs of these films have numerous faulted regions and fringes indicative of nanometer-scale silicon structures, which are believed to correspond to the 497cm{sup {minus}1} Raman band.

Tallant, D.R.; Headley, T.J.; Medernach, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Geyling, F. [SEMATECH, Austin, TX (United States)

1993-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

117

Three-dimensional structure of human chromatin accessibility complex hCHRAC by electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes modulate the dynamic assembly and remodeling of chromatin involved in DNA transcription, replication, and repair. There is little structural detail known about these important multiple-subunit enzymes that catalyze chromatin remodeling processes. Here we report a three-dimensional structure of the human chromatin accessibility complex, hCHRAC, using single particle reconstruction by negative stain electron microscopy. This structure shows an asymmetric 15 x 10 x 12 nm disk shape with several lobes protruding out of its surfaces. Based on the factors of larger contact area, smaller steric hindrance, and direct involvement of hCHRAC in interactions with the nucleosome, we propose that four lobes on one side form a multiple-site contact surface 10 nm in diameter for nucleosome binding. This work provides the first determination of the three-dimensional structure of the ISWI-family of chromatin remodeling complexes.

Hu, M.; Hainfeld, J.; Zhang, Y.-B.; Qian, L.; Brinas, R. P.; Kuznetsova, L.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Sub-Angstrom electron microscopy for sub-Angstrom nano-metrology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microscopy for Sub-ngstrom Nano-Metrology Michael A. OMicroscopy for Sub-ngstrom Nano-Metrology Michael A. Owhat we build. Because nano-devices operate on the level of

O'Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Analytical Microscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Automatic Classification of Biological Particles fromElectron-microscopy Images Using Conventional and Genetic-algorithm Optimized Learning Vector Quantization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automatic classification of transmission electron-microscopy images is an important step in the complex task of determining the structure of biologial macromolecules. The process of 3D reconstruction from a set of such images implies their previous ... Keywords: genetic algorithms, image classification, image reconstruction, neural network optimization, neural networks

J. J. Merelo; A. Prieto; F. Morn; R. Marabini; J. M. Carazo

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Book Review published by Analysis, 1997: Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis, By Zhong Lin Wang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book Review published by Analysis, 1997: Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis, By Zhong Lin Wang Professor John F. Watts University of Surrey The book describes, but the author is considerate enough to define them all in the early pages of his book. The dust-cover notes

Wang, Zhong L.

122

Dynamic Processes in Biology, Chemistry, and Materials Science: Opportunities for UltraFast Transmission Electron Microscopy - Workshop Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a 2011 workshop that addressed the potential role of rapid, time-resolved electron microscopy measurements in accelerating the solution of important scientific and technical problems. A series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Academy of Science workshops have highlighted the critical role advanced research tools play in addressing scientific challenges relevant to biology, sustainable energy, and technologies that will fuel economic development without degrading our environment. Among the specific capability needs for advancing science and technology are tools that extract more detailed information in realistic environments (in situ or operando) at extreme conditions (pressure and temperature) and as a function of time (dynamic and time-dependent). One of the DOE workshops, Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next Generation Instrumentation and Beyond, specifically addressed the importance of electron-based characterization methods for a wide range of energy-relevant Grand Scientific Challenges. Boosted by the electron optical advancement in the last decade, a diversity of in situ capabilities already is available in many laboratories. The obvious remaining major capability gap in electron microscopy is in the ability to make these direct in situ observations over a broad spectrum of fast (s) to ultrafast (picosecond [ps] and faster) temporal regimes. In an effort to address current capability gaps, EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, organized an Ultrafast Electron Microscopy Workshop, held June 14-15, 2011, with the primary goal to identify the scientific needs that could be met by creating a facility capable of a strongly improved time resolution with integrated in situ capabilities. The workshop brought together more than 40 leading scientists involved in applying and/or advancing electron microscopy to address important scientific problems of relevance to DOEs research mission. This workshop built on previous workshops and included three breakout sessions identifying scientific challenges in biology, biogeochemistry, catalysis, and materials science frontier areas of fundamental science that underpin energy and environmental science that would significantly benefit from ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (UTEM). In addition, the current status of time-resolved electron microscopy was examined, and the technologies that will enable future advances in spatio-temporal resolution were identified in a fourth breakout session.

Kabius, Bernd C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Diehl, Barbara L.; Stach, Eric A.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

123

Semi-Automated Neuron Boundary Detection and Nonbranching Process Segmentation in Electron Microscopy Images  

SciTech Connect

Neuroscientists are developing new imaging techniques and generating large volumes of data in an effort to understand the complex structure of the nervous system. The complexity and size of this data makes human interpretation a labor-intensive task. To aid in the analysis, new segmentation techniques for identifying neurons in these feature rich datasets are required. This paper presents a method for neuron boundary detection and nonbranching process segmentation in electron microscopy images and visualizing them in three dimensions. It combines both automated segmentation techniques with a graphical user interface for correction of mistakes in the automated process. The automated process first uses machine learning and image processing techniques to identify neuron membranes that deliniate the cells in each two-dimensional section. To segment nonbranching processes, the cell regions in each two-dimensional section are connected in 3D using correlation of regions between sections. The combination of this method with a graphical user interface specially designed for this purpose, enables users to quickly segment cellular processes in large volumes.

Jurrus, Elizabeth R.; Watanabe, Shigeki; Giuly, Richard J.; Paiva, Antonio R.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Tasdizen, Tolga

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Thermodynamic Prediction of Compositional Phases Confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy on Tantalum-Based Alloy Weldments  

SciTech Connect

Tantalum alloys have been used by the U.S. Department of Energy as structural alloys for radioisotope based thermal to electrical power systems since the 1960s. Tantalum alloys are attractive for high temperature structural applications due to their high melting point, excellent formability, good thermal conductivity, good ductility (even at low temperatures), corrosion resistance, and weldability. Tantalum alloys have demonstrated sufficient high-temperature toughness to survive prolonged exposure to the radioisotope power-system working environment. Typically, the fabrication of power systems requires the welding of various components including the structural members made of tantalum alloys. Issues such as thermodynamics, lattice structure, weld pool dynamics, material purity and contamination, and welding atmosphere purity all potentially confound the understanding of the differences between the weldment properties of the different tantalum-based alloys. The objective of this paper is to outline the thermodynamically favorable material phases in tantalum alloys, with and without small amounts of hafnium, during and following solidification, based on the results derived from the FactSage(c) Integrated Thermodynamic Databank. In addition, Transition Electron Microscopy (TEM) data will show for the first time, the changes occurring in the HfC before and after welding, and the data will elucidate the role HfC plays in pinning grain boundaries.

Moddeman, William E.; Birkbeck, Janine C. [BWXT Pantex, Amarillo, Texas 79120-0020 (United States); Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P. [University of Dayton Research Institute, Dayton OH 45469-0102 (United States); Miller, Roger G.; Allard, Lawrence F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064 (United States)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Detecting Cellulase Penetration Into Corn Stover Cell Walls by Immuno-Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In general, pretreatments are designed to enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymes, allowing for more efficient conversion. In this study, we have detected the penetration of major cellulases present in a commercial enzyme preparation (Spezyme CP) into corn stem cell walls following mild-, moderate- and high-severity dilute sulfuric acid pretreatments. The Trichoderma reesei enzymes, Cel7A (CBH I) and Cel7B (EG I), as well as the cell wall matrix components xylan and lignin were visualized within digested corn stover cell walls by immuno transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using enzyme- and polymer-specific antibodies. Low severity dilute-acid pretreatment (20 min at 100 C) enabled <1% of the thickness of secondary cell walls to be penetrated by enzyme, moderate severity pretreatment at (20 min at 120 C) allowed the enzymes to penetrate {approx}20% of the cell wall, and the high severity (20 min pretreatment at 150 C) allowed 100% penetration of even the thickest cell walls. These data allow direct visualization of the dramatic effect dilute-acid pretreatment has on altering the condensed ultrastructure of biomass cell walls. Loosening of plant cell wall structure due to pretreatment and the subsequently improved access by cellulases has been hypothesized by the biomass conversion community for over two decades, and for the first time, this study provides direct visual evidence to verify this hypothesis. Further, the high-resolution enzyme penetration studies presented here provide insight into the mechanisms of cell wall deconstruction by cellulolytic enzymes.

Donohoe, B. S.; Selig, M. J.; Viamajala, S.; Vinzant, T. B.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

High resolution transmission electron microscopy of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels and silica aerogels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was to image the structure of two tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels at the single polymer chain level{sup 1,2}. With this level of structural resolution we hoped to interrelate each aerogel's structure with its physical properties and its method of synthesis. Conventional single-step base catalysed TMOS aerogels show strings of spheroidal particles linked together with minimal necking. The spheroidal particles range from 86--132 {Angstrom} and average 113{plus minus}10 {Angstrom} in diameter{sup 2}. In contrast the TMOS aerogels reported on here were made by a two step method. After extended silica chains are grown in solution under acidic conditions with a substoichiometric amount of water, the reaction is stopped and the methanol hydrolysed from TMOS is removed. Then base catalysis and additional water are added to cause gel formation is a nonalcoholic solvent. The MF aerogels were prepared for HRTEM by fracturing them on a stereo microscope stage with razor knife so that fractured pieces with smooth flat surfaces could be selected for platinum-carbon replication. The two silica (TMOS) aerogels were both transparent and difficult to see. These aerogels were fractured on a stereo microscope stage with tweezers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Ruben, G.C. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Characterization of plutonium-bearing wastes by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of characterization studies of plutonium-bearing wastes produced at the US Department of Energy weapons production facilities. Several different solid wastes were characterized, including incinerator ash and ash heels from Rocky Flats Plant and Los Alamos National Laboratory; sand, stag, and crucible waste from Hanford; and LECO crucibles from the Savannah River Site. These materials were characterized by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy. The results showed the presence of discrete PuO{sub 2}PuO{sub 2{minus}x}, and Pu{sub 4}O{sub 7} phases, of about 1{mu}m or less in size, in all of the samples examined. In addition, a number of amorphous phases were present that contained plutonium. In all the ash and ash heel samples examined, plutonium phases were found that were completely surrounded by silicate matrices. Consequently, to achieve optimum plutonium recovery in any chemical extraction process, extraction would have to be coupled with ultrafine grinding to average particle sizes of less than 1 {mu}m to liberate the plutonium from the surrounding inert matrix.

Behrens, R.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Van Deventer, E.; Chaiko, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF TANK 18 SAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) Performance Assessment (PA) utilizes waste speciation in the waste release model used in the FTF fate and transport modeling. The waste release modeling associated with the residual plutonium in Tank 18 has been identified as a primary contributor to the Tank 18 dose uncertainty. In order to reduce the uncertainty related to plutonium in Tank 18, a better understanding of the plutonium speciation in the Tank 18 waste (including the oxidation state and stoichiometry) is desired. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilized Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to analyze Tank 18 samples to provide information on the speciation of plutonium in the waste material. XRD analysis of the Tank 18 samples did not identify any plutonium mineral phases in the samples. These indicates the crystalline mineral phases of plutonium are below the detection limits of the XRD method or that the plutonium phase(s) lack long range order and are present as amorphous or microcrystalline solids. SEM analysis of the Tank 18 samples did locate particles containing plutonium. The plutonium was found as small particles, usually <1 {micro}m but ranging up to several micrometers in diameter, associated with particles of an iron matrix and at low concentration in other elemental matrices. This suggests the plutonium has an affinity for the iron matrix. Qualitatively, the particles of plutonium found in the SEM analysis do not appear to account for all of the plutonium in the sample based on concentrations determined from the chemical analysis of the Tank 18 samples. This suggests that plutonium is also distributed throughout the solids in low concentrations.

Hay, M.; O'Rourke, P.; Ajo, H.

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

129

In situ transmission electron microscopy study of electric-field-induced microcracking in single crystal Pb,,Mg13Nb23...O3 PbTiO3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In situ transmission electron microscopy study of electric-field-induced microcracking in single March 2000; accepted for publication 2 May 2000 In this letter, we report in situ transmission electron microscopy TEM study of effect of a cyclic electric field on microcracking in a single crystal piezoelectric

Chen, Haydn H.

130

Summary of Analytical Electron Microscopy Observation of Intergranular Attack and Stress Corrosion Cracks in Alloy 600 Steam Generator Tubing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) can identify structures and compositions of corrosion products in attacked boundaries, cracks, and crack tips to help assess impurities that promote intergranular degradation. ATEM analyses has recently been performed on samples from Watts Bar 1 and Diablo Canyon 2 steam generator (SG) tubing and has revealed that lead (Pb) was involved in intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). These new results in combination with previous resu...

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

131

NCEM Scientific Advisory Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisory Committee Dr. Frances Ross, Chair IBM Prof. Alex King Ames Laboratory, Director Amanda Petford-Long Argonne National Laboratory Prof. Michael Isaacson University of...

132

In-situ monitoring of electron beam induced deposition by atomic force microscopy in a scanning electron microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new type of atomic force microscope is proposed for atomic force microscopic analysis inside a scanning electron microscope. We attached a piezoresisitive atomic force microscopic cantilever to a micro manipulator to achieve a compact and guidable ... Keywords: atomic force, electron beam induced deposition, in-situ monitoring, local gas injection, micro manipulator, microscope

S. Bauerdick; C. Burkhardt; R. Rudorf; W. Barth; V. Bucher; W. Nisch

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Studying Fischer-Tropsch catalysts using transmission electron microscopy and model systems of nanoparticles on planar supports.  

SciTech Connect

Nanoparticle model systems on planar supports form a versatile platform for studying morphological and compositional changes of catalysts due to exposure to realistic reaction conditions. We review examples from our work on iron and cobalt catalysts, which can undergo significant rearrangement in the reactive environment of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The use of specially designed, silicon based supports with thin film SiO{sub 2} enables the application of transmission electron microscopy, which has furnished important insight into e.g. the mechanisms of catalyst regeneration.

Thune, P. C.; Weststrate, C. J.; Moodley, P.; Saib, A. M.; van de Loosdrecht, J.; Miller, J. T.; Niemantsverdriet, J. W. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Eindhoven Univ. of Technology); (Sasol Technology)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Nanoscale Energy-Filtered Scanning Confocal Electron Microscopy Using a Double-Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate that a transmission electron microscope fitted with two spherical-aberration correctors can be operated as an energy-filtered scanning confocal electron microscope. A method for establishing this mode is described and initial results showing 3D chemical mapping with nanoscale sensitivity to height and thickness changes in a carbon film are presented. Importantly, uncorrected chromatic aberration does not limit the depth resolution of this technique and moreover performs an energy-filtering role, which is explained in terms of a combined depth and energy-loss response function.

Wang Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I.; Nellist, Peter D. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka [National Institute for Materials Science, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba, 305-0003 (Japan); Shimojo, Masayuki [Advanced Science Research Laboratory, Saitama Institute of Technology, 1690 Fusaiji, Fukaya 369-0293 (Japan)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

135

Electroluminescence and Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Reverse-Biased AlGaN/GaN Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reverse-bias stress testing has been applied to a large set of more than 50 AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors, which were fabricated using the same process but with different values of the AlN mole fraction and the AlGaN barrier-layer thickness, as well as different substrates (SiC and sapphire). Two sets of devices having different defect types and densities, related to the different growth conditions and the choice of nucleation layer, were also compared. When subjected to gate drain (or gate-to-drain and source short-circuited) reverse-bias testing, all devices presented the same time-dependent failure mode, consisting of a significant increase in the gate leakage current. This failure mechanism occurred abruptly during step-stress experiments when a certain negative gate voltage, or critical voltage, was exceeded or, during constant voltage tests, at a certain time, defined as time to breakdown. Electroluminescence (EL) microscopy was systematically used to identify localized damaged areas that induced an increase of gate reverse current. This current increase was correlated with the increase of EL intensity, and significant EL emission during tests occurred only when the critical voltage was exceeded. Focused-ion-beam milling produced cross-sectional samples suitable for electron microscopy observation at the sites of failure points previously identified by EL microscopy. In highdefectivity devices, V-defects were identified that were associated with initially high gate leakage current and corresponding to EL spots already present in untreated devices. Conversely, identification of defects induced by reverse-bias testing proved to be extremely difficult, and only nanometer-size cracks or defect chains, extending vertically from the gate edges through the AlGaN/GaN heterojunction, were found. No signs of metal/semiconductor interdiffusion or extended defective areas were visible.

Cullen, David A [ORNL; Smith, David J [Arizona State University; Passaseo, Adriana [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche; Tasco, Vittorianna [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche; Stocco, Antonio [Universita di Padova; Meneghini, Matteo [Universita di Padova; Meneghesso, Gaudenzio [Universita di Padova; Zanoni, Enrico [Universita di Padova

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of Interfaces in Li-ion Batteries: Challenges and Opportunities  

SciTech Connect

The critical challenge facing the lithium ion battery development is the basic understanding of the structural evolution during the cyclic operation of the battery and the consequence of the structural evolution on the properties of the battery. Although transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and spectroscopy have been evolved to a stage such that it can be routinely used to probe into both the structural and chemical composition of the materials with a spatial resolution of a single atomic column, a direct in-situ TEM observation of structural evolution of the materials in lithium ion battery during the dynamic operation of the battery has never been reported. This is related to three factors: high vacuum operation of a TEM; electron transparency requirement of the region to be observed, and the difficulties dealing with the liquid electrolyte of lithium ion battery. In this paper, we report the results of exploring the in-situ TEM techniques for observation of the interface in lithium ion battery during the operation of the battery. A miniature battery was fabricated using a nanowire and an ionic liquid electrolyte. The structure and chemical composition of the interface across the anode and the electrolyte was studied using TEM imaging, electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. In addition, we also explored the possibilities of carrying out in-situ TEM studies of lithium ion batteries with a solid state electrolyte.

Wang, Chong M.; Xu, Wu; Liu, Jun; Choi, Daiwon; Arey, Bruce W.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Zhang, Jiguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Salmon, Norman

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Analytical electron microscopy examination of solid reaction products in long-term test of SRL 200 waste glasses  

SciTech Connect

Alteration phases, found on the leached surfaces and present as colloids in the leachates of 200-based frit (fully active and simulated) nuclear waste glass, reacted under static test conditions, at a surface area to leachate volume ratio of 20,000 m{sup {minus}1} for 15 days to 728 days, have been examined by analytical electron microscopy. The compositions of the secondary phases were determined using x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy, and structural analysis was accomplished by electron diffraction. Long-term samples of simulated glass, which had undergone an acceleration of reaction after 182 days, possessed a number of silicate secondary phases, including; smectite (iron silicate and potassium iron alumina-silicate, weeksite (uranium silicate), zeolite (calcium potassium alumino-silicate), tobermorite (calcium silicate), and a pure silica phase. However, uranium silicates and smectite have also been observed in tests, which have not undergone the acceleration of reaction, in both the leachate and leached layer, suggesting that these phases are not responsible for the acceleration of reaction.

Buck, E.C.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.; Feng, X.; Dietz, N.L.; Bradley, C.R.; Tani, B.S.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Comparison of SOFC Cathode Microstructure Quantified using X-ray Nanotomography and Focused Ioni Beam-scanning Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray nanotomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) have been applied to investigate the complex 3D microstructure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes at spatial resolutions of 45 nm and below. The application of near edge differential absorption for x-ray nanotomography and energy selected backscatter detection for FIB-SEM enable elemental mapping within the microstructure. Using these methods, non-destructive 3D x-ray imaging and FIB-SEM serial sectioning have been applied to compare three-dimensional elemental mapping of the LSM, YSZ, and pore phases in the SOFC cathode microstructure. The microstructural characterization of an SOFC cathode is reported based on these measurements. The results presented demonstrate the viability of x-ray nanotomography as a quantitative characterization technique and provide key insights into the SOFC cathode microstructure.

G Nelson; W Harris; J Lombardo; J Izzo Jr.; W Chiu; P Tanasini; M Cantoni; J Van herle; C Comninellis; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Sub-0.1 nm-resolution quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy without adjustable parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) constitutes a powerful tool for nanostructure characterization. Here, we demonstrate the quantitative interpretation of atomic-resolution high-angle annular dark-field (ADF) STEM images using an approach that does not rely on adjustable parameters. We measure independently the instrumental parameters that affect sub-0.1 nm-resolution ADF images, quantify their individual and collective contributions to the image intensity, and show that knowledge of these parameters enables a quantitative interpretation of the absolute intensity and contrast across all accessible spatial frequencies. The analysis also provides a method for the in-situ measurement of the STEM's effective source distribution.

Dwyer, C. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Maunders, C. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Zheng, C. L. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Weyland, M.; Etheridge, J. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Tiemeijer, P. C. [FEI Electron Optics, P.O. Box 80066, 5600 KA Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The capture and storage of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in deep geologic formations represents one of the most promising options for mitigating the impacts of greenhouse gases on global warming. In this regard, mineral-fluid interactions are of prime importance since such reactions can result in the long term sequestration of CO2 by trapping in mineral phases. Recently it has been recognized that interactions with neat to water-saturated non-aqueous fluids are of prime importance in understanding mineralization reactions since the introduced CO2 is likely to contain water initially or soon after injection and the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is less dense than the aqueous phase which can result in a buoyant scCO2 plume contacting the isolating caprock. As a result, unraveling the molecular/microscopic mechanisms of mineral transformation in neat to water saturated scCO2 has taken on an added important. In this study, we are examining the interfacial reactions of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) over a range of water contents up to and including complete water saturation in scCO2. The surface precipitates that form on the reacted forsterite grains are extremely fragile and difficult to experimentally characterize. In order to address this issue we have developed experimental protocols for preparing and imaging electron-transparent samples from fragile structures. These electron-transparent samples are then examined using a combination of STEM/EDX, FIB-TEM, and helium ion microscope (HIM) imaging (Figures 1-3). This combination of capabilities has provided unique insight into the geochemical processes that occur on scCO2 reacted mineral surfaces. The experimental procedures and protocols that have been developed also have useful applications for examining fragile structures on a wide variety of materials. This research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Characterization of uranium- and plutonium-contaminated soils by electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Electron beam techniques have been used to characterize uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Site in Ohio, and also plutonium-bearing `hot particles, from Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean. By examining Fernald samples that had undergone chemical leaching it was possible to observe the effect the treatment had on specific uranium-bearing phases. The technique of Heap leaching, using carbonate solution, was found to be the most successful in removing uranium from Fernald soils, the Heap process allows aeration, which facilitates the oxidation of uraninite. However, another refractory uranium(IV) phase, uranium metaphosphate, was not removed or affected by any soil-washing process. Examination of ``hot particles`` from Johnston Island revealed that plutonium and uranium were present in 50--200 nm particles, both amorphous and crystalline, within a partially amorphous aluminum oxide matrix. The aluminum oxide is believed to have undergone a crystalline-to-amorphous transition caused by alpha-particle bombardment during the decay of the plutonium.

Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Brown, N.R. [United States Department of Energy, Richland, WA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

EMSL: Capabilities: Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microscopy Microscopy Additional Information Meet the Microscopy Experts Related EMSL User Projects Microscopy Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Watch the Microscopy capability video on EMSL's YouTube channel and read the transcript. Microscopy brochure Quiet Wing brochure EMSL hosts a variety of sophisticated microscopy instruments, including electron microscopes, optical microscopes, scanning probe microscopes, and computer-controlled microscopes for automated particle analysis. These tools are used to image a range of sample types with nanoscale-and even atomic-resolution with applications to surface, environmental, biogeochemical, atmospheric, and biological science. Each state-of-the-art instrument and customized capability is equipped with features for specific

143

Strain mapping with nm-scale resolution for the silicon-on-insulator generation of semiconductor devices by advanced electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Strain engineering in the conduction channel is a cost effective method of boosting the performance in state-of-the-art semiconductor devices. However, given the small dimensions of these devices, it is difficult to quantitatively measure the strain with the required spatial resolution. Three different transmission electron microscopy techniques, high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy, dark field electron holography, and nanobeam electron diffraction have been applied to measure the strain in simple bulk and SOI calibration specimens. These techniques are then applied to different gate length SiGe SOI pFET devices in order to measure the strain in the conduction channel. For these devices, improved spatial resolution is required, and strain maps with spatial resolutions as good as 1 nm have been achieved. Finally, we discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of using these three different techniques when used for strain measurement.

Cooper, David; Denneulin, Thibaud; Barnes, Jean-Paul; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Hutin, Louis; Le Royer, Cyrille [CEA, LETI France MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Beche, Armand [CEA, LETI, and FEI France MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rouviere, Jean-Luc [CEA, INAC, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Atomic-resolution study of polarity reversal in GaSb grown on Si by scanning transmission electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The atomic-resolved reversal of the polarity across an antiphase boundary (APB) was observed in GaSb films grown on Si by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). The investigation of the interface structure at the origin of the APB reveals that coalescence of two domains with Ga-prelayer and Sb-prelayer causes the sublattice reversal. The local strain and lattice rotation distributions of the APB, attributed to the discordant bonding length at the APB with the surrounding GaSb lattice, were further studied using the geometric phase analysis technique. The crystallographic characteristics of the APBs and their interaction with other planar defects were observed with HAADF-STEM. The quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated images confirms the observed polarities in the acquired HAADF-STEM data. The self-annihilation mechanism of the APBs is addressed based on the rotation induced by anti-site bonds and APBs' faceting.

Hosseini Vajargah, S.; Woo, S. Y.; Botton, G. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Brockhouse Institute for Material Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Ghanad-Tavakoli, S. [Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Kleiman, R. N.; Preston, J. S. [Brockhouse Institute for Material Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Electron Microscopy Study of Hypo-Stoichiometric Fe-Pd Nanocomposites Resulting from Combined Reaction Thermomechanical Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hypo stoichiometric Fe-Pd binary alloys (35-45 at% Pd) were severely deformed (>90%) and subsequently aged to induce concomitant recrystallization, precipitation, and ordering. This thermomechanical processing strategy was articulated by Hornbogen [1] over thirty years ago. The resulting exchange-coupled ferromagnets contain ferrite precipitates and a complex metastable twophase lamellar transformation product comprised of ordered L10 and a metastable FCC phase. The later duplex microconstituent is suggested to form in conjunction with a so-called pseudospinodal reaction [2] involving emerging cubic and tetragonal phases, whereby phase separation and ordering result from continuous changes in composition and a reduction in symmetry, cubic to tetragonal. The deformation texture of the parent austenite is substantially retained in the transformation product, resulting in anisotropy of the magnetic properties as determined by magnetometry (VSM). This paper presents electron microscopy results elucidating the crystallography and morphology of the phase mixtures including HREM. Magnetic field annealing is also included as a branch of our thermomechanical processing strategy, and we discuss the influence of the external fields on recrystallization, precipitation, and ordering. This work was performed in cooperation with ORNL and the NHMFL and is supported by the NSF DMR.

Cantando, Elizabeth Dawn [University of Virginia; Ludtka, Gerard Michael [ORNL; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz- [ORNL; Soffa, William A [University of Virginia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEI Quanta 400F ESEM FEI Quanta 400F ESEM Instrument capabilities: Instrument specifications: Accelerating voltages: 2-30 kV Schottky FEG emitter SEI resolution (actual) at 30 kV: 3 nm at 1330 Pa; 10 nm at 2660 Pa Operating modes: SEI; BEI; specimen chamber pressures from high vacuum to 2660 Pa; various specimen chamber gases (air & water vapor standard; Ar, N2 and He also tested; other gases may be possible); XEDS (Be window – no elements below Na); telepresence. Specimen stage: 5-axis motorized Maximum sample size: 100 x 100 mm (XY) Heating (1770 K) Peltier-cooled (248 K to 328 K) Typical experiments (examples): Imaging of insulating/dielectric materials Imaging biomaterials and polymers at high water vapor pressures In situ materials processing XEDS mapping and spectrum imaging

147

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Resources The EMC currently operates and administers seven full-time user instruments together with support facilities that include specimen preparation, image analysis and computational resources. The instruments are grouped below according to their function and capabilities. Detailed information about the capabilities of each user-accessible resource is available via the underlined links below. The major-capability instruments are generally available by allocated access while the core instruments are generally available by continuous access. Instrument Access Type User Status Separate Proposal? ACAT Allocated Assisted yes IVEM Allocated Assisted yes FEI Tecnai F20ST TEM/STEM Continuous or Allocated User or Assisted Any or all of these instruments may be requested in one proposal.

148

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications The publications listed below are based on work carried out in the EMC. Publication time period: October 1, 2009, through September 30, 2010 Published journal articles (refereed): C. An, S. Peng, Y. Sun, “Facile Synthesis of Sunlight-Driven Plasmonic AgCl:Ag Nanophotocatalysts," Adv. Mater. 22, 2570 (2010). S. Avci, Z. L. Xiao, J. Hua, A. Imre, R. Divan, J. Pearson, U. Welp, W. K. Kwok, and G. W. Crabtree, “Matching effect and dynamic phases of vortex matter in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 nanoribbon with a periodic array of holes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 042511 (2010). A. Belkin, V. Novosad, M. Iavarone, R. Divan, J. Hiller, T. Prolier, J. E. Pearson, and G. Karapetrov “Giant conductance anisotropy in magnetically coupled F/S/F structures,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 092513 (2010)

149

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Access Guidelines Proposal Access Guidelines One part of the EMC mission is to provide unique instrumentation and expertise to the scientific community. Important to achieving this goal is the effective management of EMC instrumentation and staff for maximum scientific impact. Broad and fair access to these resources is achieved through a proposal review process and scheduling and access policies. The type of access granted is based on the nature of the proposed work, the qualifications of the user, and the instrumentation requested. Research projects may be allocated a specific amount of instrument time or may be granted continuous access. Allocated Access: Under allocated access, a user is allocated a specific amount of instrument time to complete the proposed project. Allocated access is utilized primarily to manage instrument time for those instruments that have very high demand and for projects that require exceptional staff assistance.

150

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources for EMC staff members Resources for EMC staff members Gain access to proposals and other records in the EMC proposal database There are two methods, and both require a username and password. You will have access to the following layouts: AEM Proposals for Tech Review, IVEM Proposals for Tech Review, Users' Data, and Technical Reviews. You will not be able to view Personally Identifiable Information (PII). Do not let EMC users access these layouts! Users are limited to submitting proposals via the guest login or editing their proposals via a temporary login given to them by the database administrator. The best method is to use FileMaker Pro. From the File menu, choose Open Remote, then the Host jude.cnm.anl.gov, and then the emc_proposal database. The second method is to use a web browser. The URL for the proposal database is https://pico.cnm.anl.gov/proposals. Login with your web username and password that you have received from the database administrator; these can be different from your FileMaker network login.

151

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

position: 1.5 mm Users' research interests (examples): Radiation effects (fissionfusion reactor materials), radioactive waste storage, ion-beam processing (surface...

152

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ewoldt, Z. Liang, R. Edwin Garcia, E. A. Stach, T. D. Sands (Purdue U. and Birck Nanotechnology Center); N. J. Zaluzec (Argonne-MSD-EMC) Diamond Nanowires and the Mechanism of...

153

Aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy studies of epitaxial Fe/MgO/(001)Ge heterostructures  

SciTech Connect

Aberration correction in the scanning transmission electron microscope combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy allows simultaneous mapping of the structure, the chemistry and even the electronic properties of materials in one single experiment with spatial resolutions of the order of one Angstrom. Here the authors will apply these techniques to the characterization of epitaxial Fe/MgO/(001)Ge and interfaces with possible applications for tunneling junctions, and the authors will show that epitaxial MgO films can be grown on a (001)Ge substrates by molecular beam epitaxy and how it is possible to map the chemistry of interfaces with atomic resolution. Epitaxial growth of insulator oxides on semiconductors constitutes a key issue within the field of electronics, and a considerably large effort has been devoted to harness the growth of high-k oxides on Si. Ge, due to its high electronic and hole mobility, is a very interesting alternative as a potential substrate for future high performance complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. However, a major issue is to avoid the high resistivity at the source and drain contacts ensuing from the pinning of the Fermi level at the valence-band maximum. It has been suggested that this problem could be fixed by depositing a thin insulating tunneling barrier between the Ge substrate and the metal contacts. In this case, single crystal epitaxy would represent an additional benefit, since it would lead to a reduction of interfacial defects and improved performance of the tunneling barrier. MgO has been suggested to fulfill such requisites. Furthermore, MgO has been demonstrated to be a good substrate for epitaxial growth of transition metals thin films, such as Fe and Co, thus avoiding the potential problem of chemical reactivity with Ge. In such a scenario, epitaxial deposition of high quality MgO films on Ge substrates is highly desirable. But in addition, successful epitaxial growth of MgO on a semiconductor would also constitute a plus for applications in spintronics, since the injection of a spin polarized current from a ferromagnetic electrode to a non-magnetic semiconductor requires the presence of a potential barrier. MgO represents a convenient choice because the symmetry filtering properties at the interface with transition metals would allow an efficient spin filtering effect. For this approach to succeed, a suitable semiconducting substrate where MgO can be grown epitaxially must be found. And again, while GaAs and Si have been investigated for such role, Ge has not received much attention so far. In this study the authors report on the atomic resolution characterization of high quality interfaces in Fe/MgO/(001)Ge heterostructures. The study of the defects, the inhomogeneities and the interface structure of such junctions is a must to pave the way toward future applications. For this aim, the combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is a most useful tool, since it allows these features to be probed with atomic resolution. Spherical aberration correction in the STEM allows for increased contrast, allowing even single atoms to be detected both in imaging and spectroscopy.

Gazquez Alabart, Jaume [ORNL; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Petti, D. [Politecnico di Milano; Cantoni, M. [Politecnico di Milano; Rinaldi, C. [Politecnico di Milano; Brivio, S. [Politecnico di Milano; Bertacco, R. [Politecnico di Milano

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Current Titles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This booklet is published for those interested in current research being conducted at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. The NCEM is a DOE-designated national user facility and is available at no charge to qualified researchers. Access is controlled by an external steering committee. Interested researchers may contact Jane Cavlina, Administrator, at 510/486-6036.

Various

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

High resolution low dose transmission electron microscopy real-time imaging and manipulation of nano-scale objects in the electron beam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a method, apparatus and system for nanofabrication in which one or more target molecules are identified for manipulation with an electron beam and the one or more target molecules are manipulated with the electron beam to produce new useful materials.

Brown, Jr., R. Malcolm (Austin, TX); Barnes, Zack (Austin, TX); Sawatari, Chie (Shizuoka, JP); Kondo, Tetsuo (Kukuoka, JP)

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

156

Deflection gating for time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism-photoemission electron microscopy using synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we present a newly developed gating technique for a time-resolving photoemission microscope. The technique makes use of an electrostatic deflector within the microscope's electron optical system for fast switching between two electron-optical paths, one of which is used for imaging, while the other is blocked by an aperture stop. The system can be operated with a switching time of 20 ns and shows superior dark current rejection. We report on the application of this new gating technique to exploit the time structure in the injection bunch pattern of the synchrotron radiation source BESSY II at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for time-resolved measurements in the picosecond regime.

Wiemann, C.; Kaiser, A. M.; Cramm, S. [Peter Gruenberg Institut PGI-6 'Electronic Properties', Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Schneider, C. M. [Peter Gruenberg Institut PGI-6 'Electronic Properties', Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Fakultaet fuer Physik and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE), Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

A Physically-Intuitive Method for Calculation of the Local Lattice Constant from a High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Image by Fourier Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a physically-intuitive method to calculate the local lattice constant as a function of position in a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image by performing a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform. We apply a Gaussian filter with appropriate spatial full-width-half-max (FWHM) bandwidth to the image centered at the desired location to calculate the local lattice constant (as opposed to the average lattice constant). Fourier analysis of the filtered image yields the vertical and horizontal lattice constants at this location. The process is repeated by stepping the Gaussian filter across the image to produce a set of local lattice constants in the vertical and horizontal direction as a function of position in the image. The method has been implemented in a freely available tool on nanoHUB.

Teherani, James T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Aberration Corrected Analytical Electron Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), where ... the beam electrons as they ... filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

An Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action InstitutionDegradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings with Syngas Combustion: Testing by Hyperbaric Advanced Development Environmental Simulator and Characterization by Advanced Electron Microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Please accept my apology in delayed delivery. Enclosed is the final technical report entitled Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings with Syngas Combustion: Testing by Hyperbaric Advanced Development Environmental Simulator and Characterization by Advanced Electron Microscopy, by Sohn. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me at 407-882-1181 or ysohn@mail.ucf.edu.

Dr. Richard Wenglarz; Yongho Sohn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Three distinct stages of apoptotic nuclear condensation revealed by time-lapse imaging, biochemical and electron microscopy analysis of cell-free apoptosis  

SciTech Connect

During apoptotic execution, chromatin undergoes a phase change from a heterogeneous, genetically active network to an inert highly condensed form that is fragmented and packaged into apoptotic bodies. We have previously used a cell-free system to examine the roles of caspases or other proteases in apoptotic chromatin condensation and nuclear disassembly. But so far, the role of DNase activity or ATP hydrolysis in this system has not yet been elucidated. Here, in order to better define the stages of nuclear disassembly in apoptosis, we have characterized the apoptotic condensation using a cell-free system and time-lapse imaging. We demonstrated that the population of nuclei undergoing apoptosis in vitro appears to follow a reproducible program of nuclear condensation, suggesting the existence of an ordered biochemical pathway. This enabled us to define three stages of apoptotic chromatin condensation: stage 1 ring condensation; stage 2 necklace condensation; and stage 3 nuclear collapse/disassembly. Electron microscopy revealed that neither chromatin nor detectable subnuclear structures were present inside the stage 1 ring-condensed structures. DNase activity was not essential for stage 1 ring condensation, which could occur in apoptotic extracts depleted of all detectable DNase activity. However, DNase(s) were required for stage 2 necklace condensation. Finally, we demonstrated that hydrolyzable ATP is required for stage 3 nuclear collapse/disassembly. This requirement for ATP hydrolysis further distinguished stage 2 from stage 3. Together, these experiments provide the first steps towards a systematic biochemical characterization of chromatin condensation during apoptosis.

Tone, Shigenobu [Department of Biochemistry, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0192 (Japan)], E-mail: tone@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp; Sugimoto, Kenji [Laboratory of Applied Molecular Biology, Division of Bioscience and Informatics, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Tanda, Kazue [Department of Biochemistry, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0192 (Japan); Suda, Taiji; Uehira, Kenzo [Electron Microscope Center, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0192 (Japan); Kanouchi, Hiroaki [Department of Biochemistry, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0192 (Japan); Samejima, Kumiko [Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, ICMB, King's Buildings, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH93JR, Scotland (United Kingdom); Minatogawa, Yohsuke [Department of Biochemistry, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0192 (Japan); Earnshaw, William C. [Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, ICMB, King's Buildings, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH93JR, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Bill.Earnshaw@ed.ac.uk

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Electron microscopy studies of lutetium doped erbium silicide (Er{sub 0.9}Lu{sub 0.1}){sub 5}Si{sub 4}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Examination of bulk microstructures of lutetium doped erbium silicide (Er{sub 0.9}Lu{sub 0.1}){sub 5}Si{sub 4} (space group: Pnma) using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) reveals the existence of thin plates of a hexagonal phase (space group: P6{sub 3}/mcm) where the stoichiometric ratio in moles between the rare earths and Si is 5 to 3, i. e the 5:3 phase. The orientation relationship between the matrix and the plates was determined as [010]{sub m} {approx} -parallel [-1010]{sub p.} This observation adds credence to the assumption that all linear features noted in alloys of the rare-earth intermetallic family R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} are of the stoichiometric ratio 5:3 and possess a common orientation relationship with the parent 5:4 alloys. - Highlights: {yields} The linear features observed in the (Er{sub 0.9}Lu{sub 0.1}){sub 5}Si{sub 4} sample are hexagonal 5:3 plates. {yields} Thickness of 5:3 plates in 5:4 alloys made by tri-arc pulling is greater than made by arc-melting. {yields} The orientation relationship between 5:3 plates and the matrix is [010]{sub m} {approx} ||[-1010]{sub p}.

Cao, Q., E-mail: qcao@iastate.edu; Chumbley, L.S.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Office of the Chief Financial Officer Annual Report 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microscopy (NCEM) User Facility ($1.2M), the Molecu- larScience Research Center User Facility, ($3.4), Advance Light

Fernandez, Jeffrey

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Forward modeling of electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Data Analytics for Materials Science and Manufacturing. Presentation Title...

164

Positron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The negative work function property that some materials have for positrons make possible the development of positron reemission microscopy (PRM). Because of the low energies with which the positrons are emitted, some unique applications, such as the imaging of defects, can be made. The history of the concept of PRM, and its present state of development will be reviewed. The potential of positron microprobe techniques will be discussed also.

Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Xu, J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Rate Testing and Analytical Electron Microscopy of Alloy 600 as a Function of Pourbaix Space and Microstructure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth rate tests and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) studies were performed over a broad range of environments and heat treatments of Alloy 600. This effort was conducted to correlate bulk environmental conditions such as pH and electrochemical potential (EcP) with the morphology of the SCC crack. Development of a library of AEM morphologies formed by SCC in different environments is an important step in identifying the conditions that lead to SCC in components. Additionally, AEM examination of stress corrosion cracks formed in different environments and microstructures lends insight into the mechanism(s) of stress corrosion cracking. Testing was conducted on compact tension specimens in three environments: a mildly acidic oxidizing environment containing sulfate ions, a caustic environment containing 10% NaOH, and hydrogenated near-neutral buffered water. Additionally, stress corrosion cracking testing of a smooth specimen was conducted in hydrogenated steam. The following heat treatments of Alloy 600 were examined: mill annealed at 980 C (near-neutral water), mill annealed at 1010 C (steam), sensitized (acid and caustic), and mill annealed + healed to homogenize the grain boundary Cr concentration (caustic). Crack growth rate (CGR) testing showed that sensitized Alloy 600 tested in the mildly acidic, oxidizing environment containing sulfate ions produced the fastest cracking ({approx} 8.8 {micro}m/hr at 260 C), and AEM examination revealed evidence of sulfur segregation to the crack tip. The caustic environment produced slower cracking ({approx} 0.4 {micro}m/hr at 307 C) in the mill annealed + healed heat treatment but no observed cracking in the sensitized condition. In the caustic environment, fully oxidized carbides were present in the crack wake but not ahead of the crack tip. In near-neutral buffered water at 338 C, the CGR was a function of dissolved hydrogen in the water and exhibited a maximum (0.17 {micro}m/hr) near the transition between Ni and NiO stability. The cracks in near-neutral hydrogenated water exhibited Cr-rich spinels and NiO-type oxides but no significant oxidation of grain boundary carbides. No clear effect of dissolved hydrogen on the crack wake morphology was apparent. In hydrogenated steam testing of a smooth specimen (CGR estimated as {approx} 0.7 {micro}m/hr at 399 C), metallic nickel nodules were evident in both the crack wake and on the specimen surface. Oxide particles having a similar size and shape to the microstructural carbides were found in the crack wake, suggesting that these particles are carbides that were oxidized by contact with the steam. The present results show that different environments often produce unique crack tip morphologies that can be identified via AEM.

N. Lewis; S.A. Attanasio; D.S. Morton; G.A. Young

2000-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

166

Short Course Agricultural Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short Course in Agricultural Microscopy. Fargo North Dakota held June 13-16 2011. Sponsored by the Agricultural Microscopy Division of AOCS and the Great Plains Institute of Food Safety. Short Course Agricultural Microscopy Short Courses ...

167

Agricultural Microscopy Division Of Interest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural Microscopy, Reports, Journals, Websites Agricultural Microscopy Division Of Interest Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions f

168

In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of Microstructure and Phase Evolution in a SnO2 Nanowire during Lithium Intercalation  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports development of a lithium-ion battery nanostructure device using a single nanowire for in-stu TEM study of the battery. This prototype lithium ion battery was built using a single SnO? nanowire as the anode, an air stable salt: lithium bis(trifluoromethansulfonyl) imide (LiTFSI) in a hydrophobic ionic liquid: 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidium TFSI (P14TFSI) as the electrolyte, and LiCoO? as the cathode. The microstructure evolution of the single nanowire anode was studied using TEM imaging, electron diffraction, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy during the operation of the battery. It has been observed that during initial charging, the electrolyte was found to decompose and subsequently be electrodeposited on the anode, leading to the formation of a coating layer on the anode. This coating layer was enriched with Li. Formation of this layer will retard the Li intercalation of SnO?. This in situ TEM observation provides direct evidence that accounts for the observed low capacity and fast fading of the Li battery when LiTFSI-P14TFSI is used as the electrolyte.

Wang, Chong M.; Xu, Wu; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Arey, Bruce W.; Choi, Daiwon; Yang, Zhenguo; Xiao, Jie; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

169

Defect microstructural evolution in ion irradiated metallic nanofoils: Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation versus cluster dynamics modeling and in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments  

SciTech Connect

Understanding materials degradation under intense irradiation is important for the development of next generation nuclear power plants. Here we demonstrate that defect microstructural evolution in molybdenum nanofoils in situ irradiated and observed on a transmission electron microscope can be reproduced with high fidelity using an object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulation technique. Main characteristics of defect evolution predicted by OKMC, namely, defect density and size distribution as functions of foil thickness, ion fluence and flux, are in excellent agreement with those obtained from the in situ experiments and from previous continuum-based cluster dynamics modeling. The combination of advanced in situ experiments and high performance computer simulation/modeling is a unique tool to validate physical assumptions/mechanisms regarding materials response to irradiation, and to achieve the predictive power for materials stability and safety in nuclear facilities.

Xu Donghua; Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Li Meimei [Division of Nuclear Engineering, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kirk, Marquis A. [Division of Materials Science, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

170

In situ investigation of ion-induced dewetting of a thin iron-oxide film on silicon by high resolution scanning electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Using our new in situ high resolution scanning electron microscope, which is integrated into the UNILAC ion beamline at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany, we investigated the swift heavy ion induced dewetting of a thin iron oxide layer on Si. Besides heterogeneous hole nucleation at defects and spontaneous (homogeneous) hole nucleation, we could clearly identify a dewetting mechanism, which is similar to the spinodal dewetting observed for liquid films. Instead of being due to capillary waves, it is based on a stress induced surface instability. The latter results in the formation of a wavy surface with constant dominant wave-length and increasing amplitude during ion irradiation. Dewetting sets in as soon as the wave-troughs reach the film-substrate interface. Inspection of the hole radii and rim shapes indicates that removal of the material from the hole area occurs mainly by plastic deformation at the inner boundary and ion induced viscous flow in the peripheral zone due to surface tension.

Amirthapandian, S. [Institut fuer Halbleiteroptik und Funktionelle Grenzflaechen, Universitaet Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Material Physics Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Schuchart, F.; Garmatter, D.; Bolse, W. [Institut fuer Halbleiteroptik und Funktionelle Grenzflaechen, Universitaet Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Agricultural Microscopy Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Agricultural Microscopy Division advances visual imaging in discerning the quality and content of ingredients and finished products of the feed, fertilizer, seed, and agri-food sectors. Agricultural Microscopy Division Divisions achievement ag

172

Electronic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contribution contribution to friction on GaAs: An atomic force microscope study Yabing Qi, 1,2 J. Y. Park, 2 B. L. M. Hendriksen, 2 D. F. Ogletree, 2 and M. Salmeron 2,3 1 Applied Science and Technology Graduate Group, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA 2 Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA 3 Department of Materials Sciences and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA ͑Received 23 January 2008; revised manuscript received 11 April 2008; published 7 May 2008͒ The electronic contribution to friction at semiconductor surfaces was investigated by using a Pt-coated tip with 50 nm radius in an atomic force microscope sliding against an n-type GaAs͑100͒ substrate. The GaAs surface was covered by an approximately 1 nm thick oxide layer. Charge accumulation

173

Epitaxial BaTiO{sub 3}(100) films on Pt(100): A low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of epitaxial ultrathin BaTiO{sub 3} films on a Pt(100) substrate has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The films have been prepared by radio-frequency-assisted magnetron sputter deposition at room temperature and develop a long-range order upon annealing at 900 K in O{sub 2}. By adjusting the Ar and O{sub 2} partial pressures of the sputter gas, the stoichiometry was tuned to match that of a BaTiO{sub 3}(100) single crystal as determined by XPS. STM reveals the growth of continuous BaTiO{sub 3} films with unit cell high islands on top. With LEED already for monolayer thicknesses, the formation of a BaTiO{sub 3}(100)-(1 x 1) structure has been observed. Films of 2-3 unit cell thickness show a brilliant (1 x 1) LEED pattern for which an extended set of LEED I-V data has been acquired. At temperatures above 1050 K the BaTiO{sub 3} thin film starts to decay by formation of vacancy islands. In addition (4 x 4) and (3 x 3) surface reconstructions develop upon prolonged heating.

Foerster, Stefan; Huth, Michael; Schindler, Karl-Michael; Widdra, Wolf [Institute of Physics, Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany)

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

174

Atom Probe Tomography and Transmission Electron Microscopy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Atom probe tomography (APT) and analytical transmission .... of a Leaking Type 316 Socket Weld in a Boron Injection Tank Sampling Line.

175

Scanning electron microscopy imaging of hydraulic cement ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cement clinker is manufactured from a finely-ground, homogenized blend of limestone, shale and iron ore sintered in a rotary kiln to temperatures ...

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

176

Compressed sensing for fast electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Data Analytics for Materials Science and Manufacturing. Presentation Title...

177

Scanning Electron Microscopy Education Outreach Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... TMS Member price: 10.00. Non-member price: 25.00. TMS Student Member price : 10.00. Product In Stock. Description This paper describes an...

178

Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies on Lithium Battery ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microstructural Evolution of SnS Thin Films Grown by Electrodeposition Morphology Engineering of 1D, 2D and 3D TiO2 Nanostructures and Their Application...

179

Grand Opening Slated for Electron Microscopy Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 12, 2013 ... You are not signed in | Login here | New User? .... This truly unique facility exemplifies The Ohio State University's excellence-to-eminence...

180

Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... hydrogen production by steam reforming of methanol and oxidation of CO for low ... Recent Developments in In Situ Studies of Catalytic Materials at Atomic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Historical Publications of the Electron Physics Group, 1990 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... DT Pierce, in Handbook of Microscopy ... Modification of Materials: Fundamentals and Applications ... Polarized Electrons in Fundamental Electron-Atom ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

182

Photonics poster small  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities in Solid State Lighting Research and Development of Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) and Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) Research & Development Applications Optical Measurements National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) Advanced Light Source (ALS) Research in LEDs Spin casting of OLED Growing Low Defect GaN Crystals to reduce the density of structural defects Minigoniometer viewing LED Optical design of device and packaging Local Lattice Constants and Electric Fields LEDs Research & Development of OLEDs Measurement of spectral power distribution and efficacy of OLED Design and fabrication of luminaires: LED porchlight Electric fields and lattice parameters are simultaneously recorded by the side band and autocorrelation of an electron

183

Basic Design of the Scanning Electron Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...H.E. Exner and S. Weinbruch, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Metallography and Microstructures, Vol 9, ASM Handbook,

184

Nonlinear vibrational microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

Holtom, Gary R. (Richland, WA); Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney (Richland, WA); Zumbusch, Andreas (Munchen, DE)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

ABSTRACT: Electron Irradiation Induced Transformation of ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 27, 2007 ... Crystallochemical changes of (Pb5Ca5)(VO4)6F2 apatite under electron irradiation were examined by transmission electron microscopy.

186

NIST Electron and Optical Physics Division - 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of long standing within the Division is scanning electron microscopy with ... of magnetic structures via analysis of the spins of ejected electrons. ...

187

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ Life Sciences Microscopy Center Facilities Manager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis; instrument maintenance and technical support; usage management; maintaining the facility web site or training in a higher-education environment; expertise in both light microscopy and electron microscopy

California at Santa Cruz, University of

188

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in...

189

Agricultural Microscopy Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryAgricultural Microscopy Division2013 Members72 Members as of October 1, 2013Ajbani, RutviInstitute of Chemical TechnologyMumbai, MH, IndiaAlonso, CarmenPuerto Rico Dept ofAgricultureDorado, Puerto RicoArmbrust, KevinLoui

190

Novel Microscopy Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... Atomic Imaging of Surface and Bulk with an Aberration Corrected Scanning Electron Microscope: Yimei Zhu1; 1Brookhaven National...

191

A Networked Scanning Electron Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Featured Overview. A New ParadigmMulti-User Scanning Electron Microscopy. L.S. Chumbley, M. Meyer, K. Fredrickson, and F.C. Laabs. Introduction; System...

192

Agricultural Microscopy Newsletter March 11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter March 2011 Greetings from the Chairperson The Agricultural Microscopy Division would like to take this opportunity to express our sincere sympathy to the family and friends of George Liepa who rece

193

Current titles  

SciTech Connect

116 abstracts are presented of work done with the electron microscope. NCEM is a DOE-designated national user facility and is available at no charge to qualified researchers (assess is controlled by a steering committee).

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Ren Group - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ren Group Home Research Members Publications ContactsLinks NEWS Dec 15, 2012 Host an Electron Tomography Workshop with Peter Ercius at NCEM from Jan. 16-18th, 2013. Nov 20, 2012...

195

Instrument Series: Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quanta 3D FEG Quanta 3D FEG This instrument is now available in EMSL's Radiochemistry Annex. The Quanta 3D FEG is the most versatile high-resolution, low vacuum SEM/FIB for 2D and 3D material characterization and analysis. Featuring three imaging modes - high vacuum, low vacuum and ESEM - it accommodates the widest range of samples of any SEM system. The Quanta 3D FEG's novel, field-emission electron source delivers clear and sharp electron imaging and increased electron beam current enhances EDS and EBSP analysis. This system also offers the capability for in situ study of the dynamic behavior of materials at different humidity levels (up to 100% RH) and temperatures (up to 1500 °C). Quanta 3D FEG's unprecedented high- current FIB enables fast material removal.

196

Materials Applications of Photoelectron Emission Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) is a versatile technique that can image a variety of materials including metals, semiconductors and even insulators. Under favorable conditions the most advanced aberration corrected instruments have a spatial resolution approaching 2 nm. Although PEEM cannot compete with transmission or scanning electron microscopies for ultimate resolution, the technique is much more gentle and has the unique advantage of imaging structure as well as electronic and magnetic states on the nanoscale. Since the image contrast is derived from spatial variations in electron photoemission intensity, PEEM is ideal for interrogating both static and dynamic electronic properties of complex nanostructured materials. PEEM can be performed using a variety of photoexcitation sources including synchrotron emission, femtosecond laser pulses and conventional UV lamp emission. Each source has advantages, for example, fs laser excitation enables time-resolved imaging for study of ultrafast dynamics of surface intermediate states while tunable synchrotron sources allow chemically specific excitation. Even more detail can be extracted from energy resolved PEEM. Here, we review the key principles and contrast mechanisms of PEEM and briefly summarize materials applications of PEEM with examples of a thermally-induced structural phase transformation in barium titanate, inter-diffusion between thin metal copper and ruthenium layers, and multiphoton imaging of polystyrene nanoparticles on a silver coated substrate.

Xiong, Gang; Shao, Rui; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.; Cai, Mingdong; Duchene, J.; Wang, J. Y.; Wei, Wei

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the latest news from the Agricultural Microscopy division. Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013 Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013 ...

198

A Study of Conversion Reactions Using Electron Energy Loss  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, conversion mechanism in NiO was studied using high resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

199

Historical Publications of the Electron Physics Group, 1980 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Spin Polarized Secondary Electrons in Transition ... Analysis in a Scanning Electron Microscope, J. Unguris ... and DT Pierce, J. Microscopy 139, RP1 ...

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

Weiss, Shimon (El Cerrito, CA); Chemla, Daniel S. (Kensington, CA); Ogletree, D. Frank (El Cerrito, CA); Botkin, David (San Francisco, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

1995-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

202

Vector potential photoelectron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

A new class of electron microscope has been developed for the chemical microanalysis of a wide range of real world samples using photoelectron spectroscopy. Highly structured, three-dimensional samples, such as fiber mats and fracture surfaces can be imaged, as well as insulators and magnetic materials. The new microscope uses the vector potential field from a solenoid magnet as a spatial reference for imaging. A prototype instrument has demonstrated imaging of uncoated silk, magnetic steel wool, and micron-sized single strand tungsten wires.

Browning, R. [R. Browning Consultants, 14 John Street, Shoreham, New York 11786 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Environmental Transmission Electron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 26, 2012 11:00 am Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy for Catalysis Research: The Example of Carbon Nanotubes Eric A. Stach Center for...

204

TUTORIALS: Introduction to Conventional Transmission Electron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... The link provided accesses the web site for the text, Introduction to Conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy by Marc DeGraef. The site...

205

Feed Microscopy Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Feed Microscopy using microscopic examination of animal feed samples and AAFCO terminology. Feed Microscopy Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Micr

206

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

207

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

208

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

209

Microscopy for STEM Educators - SPIE Conference 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SPIE Conference 2012. SPIE Conference 2012. ... Microscopy for STEM Educators - SPIE Conference 2012. Sound interesting? ...

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

210

In-situ Studies with Electron Microscopy Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Observation and Control of Catalyst Phase during the Growth of Semiconductor Nanowires: Frances Ross1; 1IBM T. J. Watson Research...

211

Laboratory design for high-performance electron microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environment. Electromagnetic interference and stray magneticTo minimize electromagnetic interference, all power conduits

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Failure Analysis of a Rupture Disk Assembly by Electron Microscopy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Charles R. Morin Memorial Symposium on Failure Analysis and ... Tools for Failure Event Database Management and Probability Risk Analysis for...

213

THE ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF HYDROCARBON PRODUCTION IN PARTHENIUM ARGENTATUM (GUAYULE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigation of solar-related alternative energy sources.B. Non~Solar Energy Alternatives . u C. Solar~RelatedThese alternatives are hydropower, and energy derived from

Bauer, T.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Advanced Electron Microscopy Techniques for the Study of Tribology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Martin Company, for the United Stated Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) under contract DE-AC0494AL85000.

215

Electron Microscopy: Its Role in Materials Science, The Mike Meshii ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2003 ... Out of Print. Description This collection of papers from the upcoming 2003 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition captures current research activities...

216

THE ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF HYDROCARBON PRODUCTION IN PARTHENIUM ARGENTATUM (GUAYULE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other drawbacks. First, the fusion reactors currently underproblem of its own. the fusion reactor makes the structuralFusion research (II): Detailed Science, 19l, 38. and small terns reactor

Bauer, T.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Conventional And Analytical Electron Microscopy Study Of Phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What Can we Learn from Atomic Scale Calculations of Grain Boundary Properties? What Can We Learn from Measurements of Li-ion Battery Single Particles?

218

Letters to ESEX High resolution transmission electron microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Montakhab and A. Asadian, Phys. Rev. A 77, 062322 (2008). [13] B. Fortescue and H. K. Lo, Phys. Rev. Lett

Dorn, Ron

219

Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy in the Third Dimension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Optical and X-ray Imaging Techniques for Material Characterization.

220

THE ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF HYDROCARBON PRODUCTION IN PARTHENIUM ARGENTATUM (GUAYULE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas left, and oil reserves are variously estimatedlonger estimates for oil reserves depend upon the obtainingoil and gas often mentioned and cur- rently being developed is coal. The United States possesses coal reserves

Bauer, T.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The EMC Specimen Preparation Laboratory The Electron Microscopy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RCRA waste: F003, U159, ignitable. Methyl ethyl ketone RCRA waste: F005, U159, D035 (TCLP > 200 mgl), ignitable. MICRO cleaning solution Mineral oil 5 mgm 3 (mist) 5 mgm 3...

222

High Resolution Transmission Microscopy Characterization of an ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Resolution Transmission Microscopy Characterization of an Oxide ... Line Dislocation Dynamics Simulation of fundamental dislocation properties in...

223

Microscopy Technique Could Help Computer Industry ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopy Technique Could Help Computer Industry Develop 3-D Components. From NIST Tech Beat: June 25, 2013. ...

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

224

Visual-servoing optical microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

Callahan, Daniel E. (Martinez, CA); Parvin, Bahram (Mill Valley, CA)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

225

Visual-servoing optical microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time: quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

Callahan, Daniel E. (Martinez, CA); Parvin, Bahram (Hercules, CA)

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

226

TMS e-News: The monthly electronic newsletter for TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

They keep silent watch over the long, dim corridor to the Carnegie-Mellon .... Transmission electron microscopy revealed a C amorphizing dose of ?5.0 10

227

Uranium-contaminated soils: Ultramicrotomy and electron beam analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium contaminated soils from the Fernald Operation Site, Ohio, have been examined by a combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM). A method is described for preparing of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin sections by ultramicrotomy. By using these thin sections, SEM and TEM images can be compared directly. Uranium was found in iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite. Little uranium was associated with clays. The distribution of uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level.

Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

In Situ Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using real-time transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at atomic resolutions should shed light into some of the fundamental questions in this field.

229

High Contrast Hollow-Cone Dark Field Transmission Electron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For nanocrystalline materials, the scale of grain size necessitates the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for quantification. Given the complex...

230

Evolution of structural defects associated with electrical degradation in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated the surface morphology of electrically stressed AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy after removing the gate metallization by ...

Makaram, Prashanth

231

3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone at the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone 3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone at the Nanoscale Scientists studying osteoporosis and other skeletal diseases are interested in the 3D structure of bone and its responses to conditions such as weightlessness, radiation (of particular interest to astronauts) and vitamin D deficiency. The current gold standard, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), provides 3D images of trabeculae, the small interior struts of bone tissue, and electron microscopy can provide nanometer resolution of thin tissue slices. Hard X-ray transmission microscopy has provided the first 3D view of bone structure within individual trabeculae on the nanoscale. figure 1 Figure 1 Micro-CT (left) shows trabecular structure inside of bone. Transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM; center and right) can reveal localized details of osteocyte lacunae and their processes.

232

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

233

Exploring nanomagnetism with soft x-ray microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy images magnetism in nanoscale systems with a spatial resolution down to 15nm provided by state-of-the-art Fresnel zone plate optics. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD) is used as element-specific magnetic contrast mechanism similar to photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), however, with volume sensitivity and the ability to record the images in varying applied magnetic fields which allows to study magnetization reversal processes at fundamental length scales. Utilizing a stroboscopic pump-probe scheme one can investigate fast spin dynamics with a time resolution down to 70 ps which gives access to precessional and relaxation phenomena as well as spin torque driven domain wall dynamics in nanoscale systems. Current developments in zone plate optics aim for a spatial resolution towards 10nm and at next generation X-ray sources a time resolution in the fsec regime can be envisioned.

Fischer, P.; Kim, D.-H.; Mesler, B.L.; Chao, W.; Sakdinawat,A.E.; Anderson, E.H.

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

235

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

236

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

237

Dynamic Electron Control using Light and Nanostructure.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The advent of nano-technology has made possible the manipulation of electron or light through nanostructures. For example, a nano-tip in near-field optical microscopy allows imaging (more)

Huang, Cheng-Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Maximizing fluorescence collection efficiency in multiphoton microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-depth limit in two-photon microscopy," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 23(12), 3139­3149 (2006). 9. D. Kobat, M. E. Durst

Levene, Michael J.

239

In-situ spectro-microscopy on organic films: Mn-Phthalocyanine on Ag(100)  

SciTech Connect

Metal phthalocyanines are attracting significant attention, owing to their potential for applications in chemical sensors, solar cells and organic magnets. As the electronic properties of molecular films are determined by their crystallinity and molecular packing, the optimization of film quality is important for improving the performance of organic devices. Here, we present the results of in situ low-energy electron microscopy / photoemission electron microscopy (LEEM/PEEM) studies of incorporation-limited growth [1] of manganese-phthalocyanine (MnPc) on Ag(100) surfaces. MnPc thin films were grown on both, bulk Ag(100) surface and thin Ag(100)/Fe(100) films, where substrate spin-polarized electronic states can be modified through tuning the thickness of the Ag film [2]. We also discuss the electronic structure and magnetic ordering in MnPc thin films, investigated by angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

Al-Mahboob A.; Vescovo, E.; Sadowski, J.T.

2013-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

240

Molecular structures on crystalline metallic surfaces - From STM images to molecular electronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present results from scanning tunneling microscopy obtained for organic molecules - coronene and different phthalocyanine derivatives - adsorbed on crystalline metallic substrates under UHV conditions. Molecular structures resolved till to submolecular ... Keywords: Molecular electronics, Nanoscale structures, Organic molecules, Scanning tunneling microscopy

M. Hietschold; M. Lackinger; S. Griessl; W. M. Heckl; T. G. Gopakumar; G. W. Flynn

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Electron holography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... An electron hologram is a fringe modulated image containing the amplitude and phase information of an electron transparent object. ...

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

242

Quantum Phenomena Observed Using Electrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron phase microscopy based on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect principle has been used to illuminate fundamental phenomena concerning magnetism and superconductivity by visualizing quantitative magnetic lines of force. This paper deals with confirmation experiments on the AB effect, the magnetization process of tiny magnetic heads for perpendicular recording, and vortex behaviors in high-Tc superconductors.

Tonomura, Akira [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Onna-son, Okinawa 904-0412 (Japan); Advanced Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama, 350-0395 (Japan); Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

243

Schmahl, Kirz Receive Compton Award for Contributions to X-ray Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schmahl, Kirz Received Compton Award for Contributions to X-ray Microscopy Schmahl, Kirz Received Compton Award for Contributions to X-ray Microscopy Image of Compton Award The Advanced Photon Source (APS) and APS Users Organization (APSUO) are very pleased to announce that the 2005 Arthur H. Compton Award was given to Günter Schmahl and Janos Kirz for pioneering and developing the field of x-ray microscopy using Fresnel zone plates. Because of their leadership over the last 30 years, x-ray microscopy has evolved into a powerful method for the study of nanoscale structures and phenomena in many areas of science. Their achievements have opened up productive research avenues in biology, polymers, electronic nanostructures, magnetic materials, meteoritics, and environmental sciences. " Günter Schmahl and Janos Kirz have created a

244

Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass L. Tetard a,b , A. Passian a,b,n , R.H. Farahi a , U.C. Kalluri c , B.H. Davison c , T. Thundat a,b a Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA b Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA c Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Atomic force microscopy Spectroscopy Plant cells Biomass Nanomechanics a b s t r a c t Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach to a broader understanding of the molecular architecture of cell walls, which may shed light on the challenge of efficient cellulosic ethanol production. We have obtained preliminary images of both Populus and switchgrass samples using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show distinctive features that are shared by switchgrass

245

Advanced Photon Source | Combining Scanning Probe Microscopy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications | SXSPM Related Book Chapters V. Rose, J.W. Freeland, S.K. Streiffer, "New Capabilities at the Interface of X-rays and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy", in Scanning...

246

Silicon Fresnel zone plates for high heat load X-ray microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique to produce diffractive X-ray lenses optimized for high heat load applications is demonstrated. The lenses are made from single crystal silicon membranes, which have uniform thermal conductivity and homogeneous thermal expansion. Silicon Fresnel ... Keywords: Electron beam lithography, Fresnel zone plate, Reactive ion etching, X-ray microscopy

J. Vila-Comamala; K. Jefimovs; J. Raabe; B. Kaulich; C. David

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Electron Microprobe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron Microprobe. ... The JEOL JXA-8600 is a conventional hairpin filament thermal emission electron microprobe that is more than 20 years old. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Scanning probe microscopy in the superconductor industry  

SciTech Connect

High-temperature superconductivity and scanning probe microscopy (SPM) have much in common. Both revolutionized their scientific fields and earned Nobel prizes for the original researchers. Both represent small-scale table-top research. Finally, both have emerged from research laboratories into growing industries. Applications of scanning probe microscopy to the superconductor industry range from the straightforward to the exotic. The superior three-dimensional resolution of scanning probe microscopes makes them ideal for routine topographic imaging and profilometry of substrates and thin films. On the other hand, the more esoteric applications of SPM include spectroscopic investigations of various electromagnetic properties of superconductors above and below the critical temperature.

Howland, R.S.; Kirk, M.D. (Park Scientific Instruments (US))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Dispersion compensation for attosecond electron pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a device to compensate for the dispersion of attosecond electron pulses. The device uses only static electric and magnetic fields and therefore does not require synchronization to the pulsed electron source. Analogous to the well-known optical dispersion compensator, an electron dispersion compensator separates paths by energy in space. Magnetic fields are used as the dispersing element, while a Wien filter is used for compensation of the electron arrival times. We analyze a device with a size of centimeters, which can be applied to ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy, and fundamental studies.

Hansen, Peter; Baumgarten, Cory; Batelaan, Herman; Centurion, Martin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

250

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Wednesday, 30 November 2005 00:00 Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

251

Advanced Photon Source | Combining Scanning Probe Microscopy and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

27.2013 27.2013 Researchers from NSLS-II visit SXSPM team at Argonne Synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy will soon also be developed at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In order to establish collaboration between the two National Laboratories, Drs. Evgeny Nazaretski and Hui Yan fom BNL visited Argonne to learn more about recent progress made in the SXSPM project. During the 2-day visit the teams discussed mutual scientific goals and strategies to achieve them. NSLS-II will be a new state-of-the-art, medium-energy electron storage ring at BNL designed to deliver high intensity and brightness. Construction of the NSLS-II's ring building began in March 2009. The new facility will begin operating in 2014

252

STM studies of the nanoscale electronic landscape of the cuprates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies of the high-T superconductors have led to a number of important discoveries. In particular, STM has revealed spatial patterns in electronic density due to phenomena such as ...

Wise, William Douglas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Scanning He Ion Beam Microscopy and Metrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Damage to polymers is less severe ... 29 Charging is controlled by an electron flood gun aimed at the specimen ... polymer film even at low doses ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

254

Monitoring charge storage processes in nanoscale oxides using electrochemical scanning probe microscopy.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in electrochemical energy storage science require the development of new or the refinement of existing in situ probes that can be used to establish structure - activity relationships for technologically relevant materials. The drive to develop reversible, high capacity electrodes from nanoscale building blocks creates an additional requirement for high spatial resolution probes to yield information of local structural, compositional, and electronic property changes as a function of the storage state of a material. In this paper, we describe a method for deconstructing a lithium ion battery positive electrode into its basic constituents of ion insertion host particles and a carbon current collector. This model system is then probed in an electrochemical environment using a combination of atomic force microscopy and tunneling spectroscopy to correlate local activity with morphological and electronic configurational changes. Cubic spinel Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are grown on graphite surfaces using vacuum deposition methods. The structure and composition of these particles are determined using transmission electron microscopy and Auger microprobe analysis. The response of these particles to initial de-lithiation, along with subsequent electrochemical cycling, is tracked using scanning probe microscopy techniques in polar aprotic electrolytes (lithium hexafluorophosphate in ethylene carbonate:diethylcarbonate). The relationship between nanoparticle size and reversible ion insertion activity will be a specific focus of this paper.

Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Lu, Ping; Huang, Jian Yu

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

A population global optimization algorithm to solve the image alignment problem in electron crystallography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of the structure of biological specimens is critical to understanding their function. Electron crystallography is an electron microscopy (EM) approach that derives the 3D structure of specimens at high-resolution, even at atomic detail. Prior ... Keywords: Electron crystallography, Electron microscope tomography, Evolutionary algorithms, Global optimization, Image alignment, Stochastic optimization

P. M. Ortigosa; J. L. Redondo; I. Garca; J. J. Fernndez

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Quantitative imaging of living cells by deep ultraviolet microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developments in light microscopy over the past three centuries have opened new windows into cell structure and function, yet many questions remain unanswered by current imaging approaches. Deep ultraviolet microscopy ...

Zeskind, Benjamin J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Public Safety and Security in Analytical Microscopy Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Public Safety and Security in Analytical Microscopy Group. Summary: Reliable standards are needed to test, maintain, and ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

258

Depth Charge: Using Atomic Force Microscopy to Study ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... right circumstances, surface science instruments such ... Electric force microscopy can be used to ... superior strength and electrical conductance, added ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

259

Opportunities for Multimodal CARS Microscopy in Materials Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Optical and X-ray Imaging Techniques for Material Characterization. Presentation Title, Opportunities for Multimodal CARS Microscopy in Materials...

260

Comparison of Segmentation Algorithms For Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of Segmentation Algorithms For Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Cells Alden A. Dima,1 Mary C. Brady,1 Hai C. Tang,1 Anne L. Plant2 * Abstract The analysis of fluorescence microscopy fluorescence microscopy; k-means cluster; image segmentation; cell edge; bivariate simi- larity index NUMEROUS

Bernal, Javier

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Electron Transfer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Pierre Kennepohl1,2 and Edward Solomon1* 1Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Electron transfer, or the act of moving an electron from one place to another, is amongst the simplest of chemical processes, yet certainly one of the most critical. The process of efficiently and controllably moving electrons around is one of the primary regulation mechanisms in biology. Without stringent control of electrons in living organisms, life could simply not exist. For example, photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation (to name but two of the most well-known biochemical activities) are driven by electron transfer processes. It is unsurprising, therefore, that much effort has been placed on understanding the fundamental principles that control and define the simple act of adding and/or removing electrons from chemical species.

262

Direct measurement of interfacial structure in epitaxial Gd2O3 on GaAs (001) using scanning tunneling microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The epitaxial growth of Gd"2O"3 on GaAs (001) has given a low interfacial density of states, resulting in the demonstration of the first inversion-channel GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor. Motivated by the significance of this discovery, ... Keywords: Electronic information, GaAs, Gd2O3, Interfacial stacking, Scanning tunneling microscopy

Y. P. Chiu; M. C. Shih; B. C. Huang; J. Y. Shen; M. L. Huang; W. C. Lee; P. Chang; T. H. Chiang; M. Hong; J. Kwo

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Application: Electronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application: Electronics. ... Suppression of Electrical Cable Fires: Development of a Standard PVC Cable Fire Test for ISO 14520-1.. Robin, ML ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

264

Vanishing electronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineers are reinventing electronics by building safe devices that dissolve in the body or within the environment. The technology could redefine everything from medicine to computing.

Samuel Greengard

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Argonne CNM: X-Ray Microscopy Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Microscopy Facilities X-Ray Microscopy Facilities The Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN) facility provides scanning fluorescence, scanning diffraction, and full-field transmission and tomographic imaging capabilities with a spatial resolution of 30 nm over a spectral range of 6-12 keV. Modes of Operation Full-Field Transmission Imaging and Nanotomography X-ray transmission imaging uses both the absorption and phase shift of the X-ray beam by the sample as contrast mechanisms. Absorption contrast is used to map the sample density. Elemental constituents can be located by using differential edge contrast in this mode. Phase contrast can be highly sensitive to edges and interfaces even when the X-ray absorption is weak. These contrast mechanisms are exploited to image samples rapidly in full-field transmission mode under various environmental conditions, or combined with nanotomography methods to study the three-dimensional structure of complex and amorphous nanomaterials with the HXN.

266

A Remote Operation System for the 3MV Electron Microscope with a Both-Direction Conversation Capability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 3MV ultrahigh voltage electron microscope (UHVEM) at the Research Center for UHVEM, Osaka University, has been widely used for microscopy of thick specimens, taking advantage of high penetration power of incident electrons. Recent developments in ...

Hirotaro Mori; Kiyokazu Yoshida; Shinji Shimojo; Hiroki Nogawa; Toyokazu Akiyama; Heishichiro Takahashi; Tamaki Shibayama

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Uranium-contaminated soils: Ultramicrotomy and electron beam analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium-contaminated soils from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Site, Ohio, have been examined by a combination of scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron imaging (SEM/BSE) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The inhomogeneous distribution of particulate uranium phases in the soil required the development of a method for using ultramicrotomy to prepare transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin sections of the SEM mounts. A water-miscible resin was selected that allowed comparison between SEM and TEM images, permitting representative sampling of the soil. Uranium was found in iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite (UO{sub 2}). No uranium was detected in association with phyllosilicates in the soil.

Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Power Electronics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Power electronics (PE) play a critical role in transforming the current electric grid into the next-generation grid. PE enable utilities to deliver power to their customers effectively while...

269

Atomic-scale properties of semiconductor heterostructures probed by scanning tunneling microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The engineering of advanced semiconductor heterostructure materials and devices requires a detailed understanding of, and control over, the structure and properties of semiconductor materials and devices at the atomic to nanometer scale. Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy has emerged as a unique and powerful method to characterize structural morphology and electronic properties in semiconductor epitaxial layers and device structures at these length scales. The basic experimental techniques in cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy are described, and some representative applications to semiconductor heterostructure characterization drawn from recent investigations in the authors laboratory are discussed. Specifically, they describe some recent studies of InP/InAsP and InAsP/InAsSb heterostructures in which nanoscale compositional clustering has been observed and analyzed.

Yu, E.T.; Zuo, S.L.; Bi, W.G.; Tu, C.W. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Biefeld, R.M.; Allerman, A.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Ultrasonic-Based Mode-Synthesizing Atomic Force Microscopy  

In a single run and without damaging the sample, ORNLs mode-synthesizingatomic force microscopy (MSAFM), along with mode-synthesizing sensing, ...

271

Optical Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Material Characterization II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 30, 2013 ... By measuring the phase of the SHG, it provides information about the relative ... We combined interferometry to SHG microscopy to retrieve the...

272

Characterization of Battery Cycling by In-Situ Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Characterization of Battery Cycling by In-Situ Microscopy ... of lithium ion batteries provides an important route to reducing the lifetime costs of...

273

High Energy Diffraction Microscopy at the Advanced Photon Source ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The APS 1-ID beamline is dedicated to high-energy diffraction and the status of the ... High Energy Diffraction Microscopy at the Advanced Photon Source 1-ID...

274

Scanning magnetoresistance microscopy of atom chips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface based geometries of microfabricated wires or patterned magnetic films can be used to magnetically trap and manipulate ultracold neutral atoms or Bose-Einstein condensates. We investigate the magnetic properties of such atom chips using a scanning magnetoresistive (MR) microscope with high spatial resolution and high field sensitivity. By comparing MR scans of a permanent magnetic atom chip to field profiles obtained using ultracold atoms, we show that MR sensors are ideally suited to observe small variations of the magnetic field caused by imperfections in the wires or magnetic materials which ultimately lead to fragmentation of ultracold atom clouds. Measurements are also provided for the magnetic field produced by a thin current-carrying wire with small geometric modulations along the edge. Comparisons of our measurements with a full numeric calculation of the current flow in the wire and the subsequent magnetic field show excellent agreement. Our results highlight the use of scanning MR microscopy as a convenient and powerful technique for precisely characterizing the magnetic fields produced near the surface of atom chips.

Volk, M.; Whitlock, S.; Wolff, C. H.; Hall, B. V.; Sidorov, A. I. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics and Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Glossary Item - Electron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron An Electron Electrons are negatively charged particles that surround the atom's nucleus. Electrons were discovered by J. J. Thomson in 1897. Particle Data Symbol Mass...

276

Electron tube  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

Suyama, Motohiro (Hamamatsu, JP); Fukasawa, Atsuhito (Hamamatsu, JP); Arisaka, Katsushi (Los Angeles, CA); Wang, Hanguo (North Hills, CA)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

Extracting physically interpretable data from electron energy-loss spectra.  

SciTech Connect

Principal component analysis is routinely applied to analyze data sets in electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). We show how physically meaningful spectra can be obtained from the principal components using a knowledge of the scattering of the probe electron and the geometry of the experiment. This approach is illustrated by application to EELS data for the carbon K edge in graphite obtained using a conventional transmission electron microscope. The effect of scattering of the probe electron is accounted for, yielding spectra which are equivalent to experiments using linearly polarized X-rays. The approach is general and can also be applied to EELS in the context of scanning transmission electron microscopy.

Witte, C.; Zaluzec, N. J.; Allen, L. J.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Melbourn

2010-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

278

Determining Mechanical Properties of Carbon Microcoils Using Lateral Force Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanical properties of amorphous carbon microcoil (CMC) synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition method were examined in compression and tension tests, using the lateral force mode of atomic force microscope (AFM). The AFM cantilever tip was ... Keywords: Atomic force microscopy (AFM), atomic force microscopy, carbon microcoil, shear modulus, spring constant

Neng-Kai Chang; Shuo-Hung Chang

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Feasibility and limitation of track studies using atomic force microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feasibility and limitation of track studies using atomic force microscopy D. Nikezic, J.P.Y. Ho, C.W.Y. Yip, V.S.Y. Koo, K.N. Yu * Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong July 2002 Abstract Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been employed to investigate characteristics

Yu, K.N.

280

Imaging Small Molecules by Scanning Probe Microscopy Shirley Chiang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Imaging Small Molecules by Scanning Probe Microscopy Shirley Chiang Department of Physics. Ohtani, R.J. Wilson, S. Chiang, and C.M. Mate, "Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Observations of Benzene. V.M. Hallmark, S. Chiang, J.F. Rabolt, J.D. Swalen, and R.J. Wilson, "Observation of Atomic

Chiang, Shirley

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A microwave microscope including a probe tip electrode vertically positionable over a sample and projecting downwardly from the end of a cantilever. A transmission line connecting the tip electrode to the electronic control system extends along the cantilever and is separated from a ground plane at the bottom of the cantilever by a dielectric layer. The probe tip may be vertically tapped near or at the sample surface at a low frequency and the microwave signal reflected from the tip/sample interaction is demodulated at the low frequency. Alternatively, a low-frequency electrical signal is also a non-linear electrical element associated with the probe tip to non-linearly interact with the applied microwave signal and the reflected non-linear microwave signal is detected at the low frequency. The non-linear element may be semiconductor junction formed near the apex of the probe tip or be an FET formed at the base of a semiconducting tip.

Lai, Keji; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

282

ELECTRONIC MULTIPLIER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An electronic multiplier is described for use in analog computers. Two electrical input signals are received; one controls the slope of a saw-tooth voltage wave while the other controls the time duration of the wave. A condenser and diode clamps are provided to sustain the crest voltage reached by the wave, and for storing that voltage to provide an output signal which is a steady d-c voltage.

Collier, D.M.; Meeks, L.A.; Palmer, J.P.

1961-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

ELECTRON GUN  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulsed electron gun capable of delivering pulses at voltages of the order of 1 mv and currents of the order of 100 amperes is described. The principal novelty resides in a transformer construction which is disposed in the same vacuum housing as the electron source and accelerating electrode structure of the gun to supply the accelerating potential thereto. The transformer is provided by a plurality of magnetic cores disposed in circumferentially spaced relation and having a plurality of primary windings each inductively coupled to a different one of the cores, and a helical secondary winding which is disposed coaxially of the cores and passes therethrough in circumferential succession. Additional novelty resides in the disposition of the electron source cathode filament input leads interiorly of the transformer secondary winding which is hollow, as well as in the employment of a half-wave filament supply which is synchronously operated with the transformer supply such that the transformer is pulsed during the zero current portions of the half-wave cycle.

Christofilos, N.C.; Ehlers, K.W.

1960-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Materials Science and Engineering A314 (2001) 157161 In situ transmission electron microscopy observations of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the piezos increase as the walls become thinner, so depoling will then be- come the limiting factor. Typical PZT piezos have dc depoling fields of at least 200 V/mm, so allowable tube thicknesses may be 1.2 mm

Chen, Haydn H.

285

Transmission electron microscopy of oxide development on 9Cr ODS steel in supercritical water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. These axial segments were inserted and contained in a thin- walled, 3-mm diameter brass tube with the same

Motta, Arthur T.

286

Transmission electron microscopy examination of oxide layers formed on Zr alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which slid into a 3 mm round brass tube, as done previously [12]. The sample configurations were held

Motta, Arthur T.

287

Li-Ion Nanobattery: Lessons from In-Situ Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3D Nanostructured Bicontinuous Electrodes: Path to Ultra-High Power and Energy ... High Energy Density Lithium Capacitors Using Carbon-Carbon Electrodes.

288

Investigation of bone response to implant materials by electron microscopy and computer simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) implementation of this scintigraphic method for quantitative studies of osteoblast-mediated mineralization in vitro. A 2-D truss finite element model is used to study the remodeling of trabecular bone. Using strain ...

Wang, Hao, 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Electron Thermal Microscopy Todd Brintlinger,, Yi Qi, Kamal H. Baloch, David Goldhaber-Gordon,| and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrical and thermal modeling. This provides a generic and adaptable platform for nanoscale thermal, probe shape, water meniscus, etc.). Near-field optical techniques4 similarly must rely on a given, as is illustrated in Figure 2. To create local temperature gradients, metal heater wires were fabricated

Goldhaber-Gordon, David

290

Direct Observation of Colloidal Nanocrystals by Using Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

superlattices. Angewandte Chemie (International ed. incrystals. Angewandte Chemie (International ed. in English)nanocrystals. Angewandte Chemie (International ed. in

Park, Jungwon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hollow-cone Dark-field Transmission Electron Microscopy for Grain ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional bright-field and dark-field TEM images often cannot provide such ... Stages of Precipitation of Alpha Platelets in the Beta Matrix of Titanium Alloys.

292

Actuatable capacitive transducer for quantitative nanoindentation combined with transmission electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An actuatable capacitive transducer including a transducer body, a first capacitor including a displaceable electrode and electrically configured as an electrostatic actuator, and a second capacitor including a displaceable electrode and electrically configured as a capacitive displacement sensor, wherein the second capacitor comprises a multi-plate capacitor. The actuatable capacitive transducer further includes a coupling shaft configured to mechanically couple the displaceable electrode of the first capacitor to the displaceable electrode of the second capacitor to form a displaceable electrode unit which is displaceable relative to the transducer body, and an electrically-conductive indenter mechanically coupled to the coupling shaft so as to be displaceable in unison with the displaceable electrode unit.

Warren, Oden L; Asif, Syed Amanula Syed; Cyrankowski, Edward; Kounev, Kalin

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

293

Electron Microscopy Characterization of Tc-Bearing Metallic Waste Forms- Final Report FY10  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D) Program is developing aqueous and electrochemical approaches to the processing of used nuclear fuel that will generate technetium-bearing waste streams. This final report presents Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research in FY10 to evaluate an iron-based alloy waste form for Tc that provides high waste loading within waste form processing limitations, meets waste form performance requirements for durability and the long-term retention of radionuclides and can be produced with consistent physical, chemical, and radiological properties that meet regulatory acceptance requirements for disposal.

Buck, Edgar C.; Neiner, Doinita

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of Colloidal Nanocrystal Growth Mechanisms using Graphene Liquid Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growth Mechanisms using Graphene Liquid Cells Jong Min Yuk,Legends Fig. S1. Preparation of a graphene liquid cell. (fabrication processes of the graphene liquid cell. (B) SEM

Yuk, Jong Min

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Modular architecture of eukaryotic RNase P and RNase MRP revealed by electron microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ribonuclease P (RNase P) and RNase MRP are closely related ribonucleoprotein enzymes, which process RNA substrates including tRNA precursors for RNase P and 5.8?S rRNA precursors, as well as some mRNAs, for RNase MRP. The ...

Hipp, Katharina

296

TheElectronMicroscopyCore(EMC) UniversityofMissouriColumbia,MO65211  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

service engineer in the UK, and afterwards moved into sales and marketing where he worked with a number modifications to the set-up in order to optimize the instrument's performance. In this way, gun and specimen

Noble, James S.

297

Mapping Ionic Currents and Reactivity on the Nanoscale: Electrochemical Strain Microscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid-state electrochemical processes in oxides underpin a broad spectrum of energy and information storage devices, ranging from Li-ion and Li-air batteries, to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) to electroresistive and memristive systems. These functionalities are controlled by the bias-driven diffusive and electromigration transport of mobile ionic species, as well as intricate a set of electrochemical and defect-controlled reactions at interfaces and in bulk. Despite the wealth of device-level and atomistic studies, little is known on the mesoscopic mechanisms of ion diffusion and electronic transport on the level of grain clusters, individual grains, and extended defects. The development of the capability for probing ion transport on the nanometer scale is a key to deciphering complex interplay between structure, functionality, and performance in these systems. Here we introduce Electrochemical Strain Microscopy, a scanning probe microscopy technique based on strong strain-bias coupling in the systems in which local ion concentrations are changed by electrical fields. The imaging capability, as well as time- and voltage spectroscopies analogous to traditional current based electrochemical characterization methods are developed. The reversible intercalation of Li and mapping electrochemical activity in LiCoO2 is demonstrated, illustrating higher Li diffusivity at non-basal planes and grain boundaries. In Si-anode device structure, the direct mapping of Li diffusion at extended defects and evolution of Li-activity with charge state is explored. The electrical field-dependence of Li mobility is studied to determine the critical bias required for the onset of electrochemical transformation, allowing reaction and diffusion processes in the battery system to be separated at each location. Finally, the applicability of ESM for probing oxygen vacancy diffusion and oxygen reduction/evolution reactions is illustrated, and the high resolution ESM maps are correlated with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging. The future potential for deciphering mechanisms of electrochemical transformations on an atomically-defined single-defect level is discussed.

Kalinin, S.V. (Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, ORNL)

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

298

Magnetic spectroscopy and microscopy of functional materials  

SciTech Connect

Heusler intermetallics Mn{sub 2}Y Ga and X{sub 2}MnGa (X; Y =Fe, Co, Ni) undergo tetragonal magnetostructural transitions that can result in half metallicity, magnetic shape memory, or the magnetocaloric effect. Understanding the magnetism and magnetic behavior in functional materials is often the most direct route to being able to optimize current materials for todays applications and to design novel ones for tomorrow. Synchrotron soft x-ray magnetic spectromicroscopy techniques are well suited to explore the the competing effects from the magnetization and the lattice parameters in these materials as they provide detailed element-, valence-, and site-specifc information on the coupling of crystallographic ordering and electronic structure as well as external parameters like temperature and pressure on the bonding and exchange. Fundamental work preparing the model systems of spintronic, multiferroic, and energy-related compositions is presented for context. The methodology of synchrotron spectroscopy is presented and applied to not only magnetic characterization but also of developing a systematic screening method for future examples of materials exhibiting any of the above effects. The chapter progression is as follows: an introduction to the concepts and materials under consideration (Chapter 1); an overview of sample preparation techniques and results, and the kinds of characterization methods employed (Chapter 2); spectro- and microscopic explorations of X{sub 2}MnGa/Ge (Chapter 3); spectroscopic investigations of the composition series Mn{sub 2}Y Ga to the logical Mn{sub 3}Ga endpoint (Chapter 4); and a summary and overview of upcoming work (Chapter 5). Appendices include the results of a Think Tank for the Graduate School of Excellence MAINZ (Appendix A) and details of an imaging project now in progress on magnetic reversal and domain wall observation in the classical Heusler material Co{sub 2}FeSi (Appendix B).

Jenkins, C.A.

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

299

Target-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution ex vivo magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) can be used to delineate prominent architectonic features in the human brain, but increased contrast is required to visualize more subtle distinctions. The goal ...

Hepler Blackwell, Megan Leticia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Estimating Geometric Dislocation Densities in Polycrystalline Materialsfrom Orientation Imaging Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Herein we consider polycrystalline materials which can be taken as statistically homogeneous and whose grains can be adequately modeled as rigid-plastic. Our objective is to obtain, from orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), estimates of geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities.

Man, Chi-Sing [University of Kentucky; Gao, Xiang [University of Kentucky; Godefroy, Scott [University of Kentucky; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Physics Out Loud - Electrons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Scattering Previous Video (Electron Scattering) Physics Out Loud Main Index Next Video (Elementary Particles) Elementary Particles Electrons David Lawrence, a physicist,...

302

Transmission Electron Microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopes -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities > Transmission Electron Facilities > Transmission Electron Microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopes FACILITIES Transmission Electron Microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopes Overview Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Transmission Electron Microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopes The research activities of the Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Section are supported by complete metallography/sample preparation rooms equipped with several optical and electron microscopes: a Transmission Electron Microscope and two Scanning Electron Microscopes. Bookmark and Share Transmission electron microscope (TEM) Detail of JEOL 100CXII TEM Figure 1: Detail of JEOL 100CXII TEM. Click on image to view larger image.

303

ELECTRON PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ELECTRON PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROELECTROCHEMISTRY OF TRANSITION METAL SOLAR FUELS CATALYSTS. ...

304

High Speed Electronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Speed Electronics. ... optic sampling system provides traceability for our electrical waveform measurements ... Metrology for Electronic Packaging. ...

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

305

Future Electronics in CNST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electronic Transport in Nanoscale Organic/Inorganic Devices. ... for graphene, nanophotonic, nanoplasmonic, spintronic, and other future electronics. ...

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

306

Magnetodynamics and Spin Electronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Spintronics exploits the interaction between electrons' spin angular momentum ... stochastic processes in the form of electron microscope images of ...

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

307

Swept source optical coherence microscopy for pathological assessment of cancerous tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) with confocal microscopy and enables depth resolved visualization of biological specimens with cellular resolution. OCM offers a suitable ...

Ahsen, Osman Oguz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Open Source Scanning Probe Microscopy Control Software package GXSM  

SciTech Connect

GXSM is a full featured and modern scanning probe microscopy (SPM) software. It can be used for powerful multidimensional image/data processing, analysis, and visualization. Connected to an instrument, it is operating many different flavors of SPM, e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy or, in general, two-dimensional multichannel data acquisition instruments. The GXSM core can handle different data types, e.g., integer and floating point numbers. An easily extendable plug-in architecture provides many image analysis and manipulation functions. A digital signal processor subsystem runs the feedback loop, generates the scanning signals, and acquires the data during SPM measurements. The programmable GXSM vector probe engine performs virtually any thinkable spectroscopy and manipulation task, such as scanning tunneling spectroscopy or tip formation. The GXSM software is released under the GNU general public license and can be obtained via the internet.

Zahl, P.; Wagner, T.; Moller, R.; Klust, A.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Open-loop Band excitation Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multidimensional scanning probe microscopy approach for quantitative, cross-talk free mapping of surface electrostatic properties is demonstrated. Open-loop band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy (OL BE KPFM) probes the full response-frequency-potential surface at each pixel at standard imaging rates. The subsequent analysis reconstructs work function, tip surface capacitance gradient and resonant frequency maps, obviating feedback-related artifacts. OL BE KPFM imaging is demonstrated for several materials systems with topographic, potential and combined contrast. This approach combines the features of both frequency and amplitude KPFM and allows complete decoupling of topographic and voltage contributions to the KPFM signal.

Guo, Senli [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Variable temperature electrochemical strain microscopy of Sm-doped ceria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variable temperature electrochemical strain microscopy has been used to study the electrochemical activity of Sm-doped ceria as a function of temperature and bias. The electrochemical strain microscopy hysteresis loops have been collected across the surface at different temperatures and the relative activity at different temperatures has been compared. The relaxation behavior of the signal at different temperatures has been also evaluated to relate kinetic process during bias induced electrochemical reactions with temperature and two different kinetic regimes have been identified. The strongly non-monotonic dependence of relaxation behavior on temperature is interpreted as evidence for water-mediated mechanisms.

Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Eliseev, E. A. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Yang, Nan [ORNL; Doria, Sandra [ORNL; Tebano, Antonello [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Optically pulsed electron accelerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

312

Optically pulsed electron accelerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

Fraser, John S. (Los Alamos, NM); Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Focused ion beam patterned Fe thin films A study by selective area Stokes polarimetry and soft x-Ray microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate the potential to modify the magnetic behavior and structural properties of ferromagnetic thin films using focused ion beam 'direct-write' lithography. Patterns inspired by the split-ring resonators often used as components in meta-materials were defined upon 15 nm Fe films using a 30 keV Ga{sup +} focused ion beam at a dose of 2 x 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2}. Structural, chemical and magnetic changes to the Fe were studied using transmission soft X-ray microscopy at the ALS, Berkeley CA. X-ray absorption spectra showed a 23% reduction in the thickness of the film in the Ga irradiated areas, but no chemical change to the Fe was evident. X-ray images of the magnetic reversal process show domain wall pinning around the implanted areas, resulting in an overall increase in the coercivity of the film. Transmission electron microscopy showed significant grain growth in the implanted regions.

Cook, P. J.; Shen, T. H.; Grundy, P. J.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.; Morton, S. A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.

2010-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

314

The Measurement of MTFs in X-ray Microscopy Using Diffractograms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel method to characterize the optical performance of a high-resolution transmission x-ray microscope is presented. It makes use of test patterns that consist of random arrays of sub-resolution holes in a thin metal film, and so approximate to white-noise input signals for the microscope. The test patterns have been fabricated by electron-beam lithography at length scales appropriate for the resolution available in x-ray microscopy, so that diffractograms produced from the image data can be directly interpreted in terms of the contrast transfer function of the optical system. Results of this method are shown for both brightfield and differential phase contrast imaging.

Morrison, G. R. [King's College London, Dept. of Physics, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Charalambous, P. S. [ZonePlates Ltd, 8 South Way, Claverings Industrial Estate, London N9 0AB (United Kingdom); Gianoncelli, A.; Kaulich, B. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14, km 163.5 in Area Science Park, 34149 Trieste (Italy)

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

315

Phase Contrast Microscopy with Soft and Hard X-rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibration ­ Uses up part of dynamic range · Solution: ­ Soft x-rays: Back side Illumination ­ Hard xPhase Contrast Microscopy with Soft and Hard X-rays Using a Segmented Detector Benjamin Hornberger ­ Phase Contrast 101 · A Segmented Detector for Hard X-ray Microprobes ­ Segmented Silicon Chip ­ Charge

Homes, Christopher C.

316

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for bioremediation. It is known that some organics promote aggregation. Amine-bearing molecules, for example, can organize sulfide nanoparticles into semiconductor nanowires. The research team used a series of imaging techniques and detectors to analyze aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals in the biofilms. Their examination yielded excellent results and some surprises. They were able to prove that natural organic matter promotes dense aggregation of the zinc sulfide nanocrystals into much larger spheroids and that the organic matter is preserved in nanometer-scale pores in the spheroids. What was not expected was the presence of proteins in the spheroids, making them a key component in aggregation and an example of extracellular biomineralization.

317

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for bioremediation. It is known that some organics promote aggregation. Amine-bearing molecules, for example, can organize sulfide nanoparticles into semiconductor nanowires. The research team used a series of imaging techniques and detectors to analyze aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals in the biofilms. Their examination yielded excellent results and some surprises. They were able to prove that natural organic matter promotes dense aggregation of the zinc sulfide nanocrystals into much larger spheroids and that the organic matter is preserved in nanometer-scale pores in the spheroids. What was not expected was the presence of proteins in the spheroids, making them a key component in aggregation and an example of extracellular biomineralization.

318

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extracellular Proteins Promote Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Wednesday, 26 September 2007 00:00 Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for bioremediation. It is known that some organics promote aggregation. Amine-bearing molecules, for example, can organize sulfide nanoparticles into semiconductor nanowires. The research team used a series of imaging techniques and detectors to analyze aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals in the biofilms. Their examination yielded excellent results and some surprises. They were able to prove that natural organic matter promotes dense aggregation of the zinc sulfide nanocrystals into much larger spheroids and that the organic matter is preserved in nanometer-scale pores in the spheroids. What was not expected was the presence of proteins in the spheroids, making them a key component in aggregation and an example of extracellular biomineralization.

319

Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

Taniguchi, Yoshifumi [Science and Medical Systems Business Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Matsumoto, Hiroaki [Corporate Manufacturing Strategy Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ishikawa-cho, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-1991 (Japan); Harada, Ken [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan)

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

320

In-situ and ex-situ observations of lithium de-intercalation from LiCoO? : atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium cobalt dioxide is the most commonly used material for positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries. During lithium de-intercalation from this material, ... undergoes a number of phase transitions, which ...

Clmenon, Anne

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Glossary Term - Electron Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Electron Previous Term (Electron) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Electron Volt (eV)) Electron Volt (eV) Electron Capture After electron capture, an atom contains one less proton and one more neutron. Electron capture is one process that unstable atoms can use to become more stable. During electron capture, an electron in an atom's inner shell is drawn into the nucleus where it combines with a proton, forming a neutron and a neutrino. The neutrino is ejected from the atom's nucleus. Since an atom loses a proton during electron capture, it changes from one element to another. For example, after undergoing electron capture, an atom of carbon (with 6 protons) becomes an atom of boron (with 5 protons). Although the numbers of protons and neutrons in an atom's nucleus change

322

FREE ELECTRON LASERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1984). Colson, W. B. , "Free electron laser theory," Ph.D.M. 0. , Spitzer, R. , editors, Free Electron Generators ofM.D. , Spitzer, R. , editors, Free Electron Generators of

Colson, W.B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

ELECTRON WELDING OF METALS  

SciTech Connect

The advantages and disadvantages of the electron welding of metals are briefly reviewed. Typical apparatuses used for electron welding are described. (J.S.R)

Stohr, J.-A.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Electron-Ion Collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Since the ions are created and excited with the same beam of electrons, by changing the electron beam energy one can selectively exclude certain ...

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

Free Electron Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free Electron Laser Building Exterior Top Floor Control Room RF Gallery User Lab Beam Enclosure Injector Linear Accelerator Wiggler Magnet Return Line Free Electron Laser Most...

326

Electron Affinity Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electron Affinity Search Help. Search options (step 1) (Back to search). You may search for species based on electron affinity values in two ways: ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Analytical Electron Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a conventional parallel electron energy-loss spectrometer (EELS) to record spectra of the energy losses experienced by the beam electrons as they ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Diamondoids Improve Electron Emitters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diamondoids Improve Electron Emitters Diamondoids Improve Electron Emitters Print Monday, 17 September 2012 12:02 Diamondoids are nanoparticles made of only a handful of carbon...

329

Single Electron Coherence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Single electron tunneling (SET) devices have the amazing property that we can measure and control the motion of electrons one-by-one. ...

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

330

Foil Electron Multiplier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multiplier Foil Electron Multiplier An apparatus for electron multiplication by transmission that is designed with at least one foil having a front side for receiving incident...

331

Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in...

332

Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has...

333

Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics (PE) Systems...

334

Instrument Series: Microscopy Aberration-Corrected Scanning/Transmission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aberration-Corrected Aberration-Corrected Scanning/Transmission Electron Microscope EMSL's aberration-corrected Titan 80-300(tm) scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) provides high-resolution imaging with sub-angstrom resolution and spectroscopic capabilities. This state-of-the-art instrument is equipped with a Schottky field-emission electron source, an electron gun monochromator, CEOS hexapole spherical aberration corrector for the probe-forming lens, high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector, an X-ray spectrometer (EDS), and a high-resolution Gatan Imaging Filter (GIF). The selection of electron energy between 80 kV and 300 kV enables optimized imaging for a variety of samples, including electron beam sensitive materials. Research Applications

335

4D Functional Materials Science with X-ray Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultrafast Electron Diffraction Studies of Lattice Dynamics in Thin Bismuth Films Understanding Fatigue and Corrosion-Fatigue Behavior by In Situ 3D X-ray...

336

Electronics Stewardship and Data Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of electronic stewardship: Procurement of environmentally preferable electronics Enable electronics power management capabilities Establish and implement policies to extend the...

337

X-ray Microscopy and Imaging (XSD-XMI)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Imaging (XMI) Imaging (XMI) About XMI Science and Research Beamlines Highlights Software and Tools Intranet Search APS... Argonne Home > Advanced Photon Source > Contacts FAQs Beamlines News Publications APS Email Portal APS Intranet APS Phonebook APS Quick Links for Users APS Safety and Training Welcome to the X-ray Microscopy and Imaging group (XMI)! X-ray Microscopy and Imaging is part of the X-ray Science Division at the Advanced Photon Source. We develop and support a diverse and multidisciplinary user research program at Sectors 2 and 32 of the APS, with the overall goal to image and study materials structures at spatial and temporal resolutions that are most scientifically relevant to the cutting-edge advances in materials, biological, environmental, and biomedical sciences. To achieve this goal, we actively engage in various research activities including

338

Near-Field Microscopy Through a SiC Superlens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-Field Microscopy Through a SiC Superlens Thomas Taubner,1 * Dmitriy Korobkin,2 Yaroslav of the slab (4­6). In our experiment, we placed a SiC superlens (7) between the scan- ning probe tip-crystalline SiC membrane coated on both sides with 220-nm-thick SiO2 layers (7). The two surfaces of the sandwich

Shvets, Gennady

339

Note: A scanning electron microscope sample holder for bidirectional characterization of atomic force microscope probe tips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel sample holder that enables atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips to be mounted inside a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the purpose of characterizing the AFM tips is described. The holder provides quick and easy handling of tips by using a spring clip to hold them in place. The holder can accommodate two tips simultaneously in two perpendicular orientations, allowing both top and side view imaging of the tips by the SEM.

Eisenstein, Alon; Goh, M. Cynthia [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Optical Sciences, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto M5S 3H6 (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Electronics and Telecommunications Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Quantum Electrical Measurements; Quantum Information and ... The working of countless electronic devices involves electric and magnetic ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamental length and times scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The magnetic properties of low dimensional solid state matter is of the utmost interest both scientifically as well as technologically. In addition to the charge of the electron which is the base for current electronics, by taking into account the spin degree of freedom in future spintronics applications open a new avenue. Progress towards a better physical understanding of the mechanism and principles involved as well as potential applications of nanomagnetic devices can only be achieved with advanced analytical tools. Soft X-ray microscopy providing a spatial resolution towards 10nm, a time resolution currently in the sub-ns regime and inherent elemental sensitivity is a very promising technique for that. This article reviews the recent achievements of magnetic soft X-ray microscopy by selected examples of spin torque phenomena, stochastical behavior on the nanoscale and spin dynamics in magnetic nanopatterns. The future potential with regard to addressing fundamental magnetic length and time scales, e.g. imaging fsec spin dynamics at upcoming X-ray sources is pointed out.

Fischer, Peter

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Cathodoluminescence microscopy and petrographic image analysis of aggregates in concrete pavements affected by alkali-silica reaction  

SciTech Connect

Various microscopic techniques (cathodoluminescence, polarizing and electron microscopy) were combined with image analysis with the aim to determine a) the modal composition and degradation features within concrete, and b) the petrographic characteristics and the geological types (rocks, and their provenance) of the aggregates. Concrete samples were taken from five different portions of Highway Nos. D1, D11, and D5 (the Czech Republic). Coarse and fine aggregates were found to be primarily composed of volcanic, plutonic, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, as well as of quartz and feldspar aggregates of variable origins. The alkali-silica reaction was observed to be the main degradation mechanism, based upon the presence of microcracks and alkali-silica gels in the concrete. Use of cathodoluminescence enabled the identification of the source materials of the quartz aggregates, based upon their CL characteristics (i.e., color, intensity, microfractures, deformation, and zoning), which is difficult to distinguish only employing polarizing and electron microscopy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR in concrete pavements on the Highways Nos. D1, D5 and D11 (Czech Republic). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cathodoluminescence was combined with various microscopic techniques and image analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR was attributed to aggregates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Source materials of aggregates were identified based on cathodoluminescence characteristics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quartz comes from different volcanic, plutonic and metamorphic parent rocks.

Stastna, A., E-mail: astastna@gmail.com [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Sachlova, S.; Pertold, Z.; Prikryl, R. [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Leichmann, J. [Department of Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. R. et al. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy: A newwith the scanning transmission X-ray microscope at BESSY II.T. et al. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy imaging of

Moffet, Ryan C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Wavelength swept spectrally encoded confocal microscopy for biological and clinical applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a technique that facilitates the incorporation of confocal microscopy into small, portable clinical instruments. This would allow in vivo evaluation of cellular and sub-cellular ...

Boudoux, Caroline

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Correction of distance-dependent blurring in projection data for fully three-dimensional electron microscopic reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a method of correction for distance-dependent blurring, which is one of the limiting factors to achieving higher resolution in 3D reconstructions of biological specimens from 2D projections obtained by an electron microscope. Our proposed ... Keywords: contrast transfer function, distance-dependent blurring, electron microscopy, stationary phase

Joanna Klukowska; Gabor T. Herman; Ivan G. Kazantsev

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Study of Lignocellulosic Material Degradation with CARS Microscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program of research undertaken by our Harvard group, in collaboration with Dr. Ding at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, CO, seeks to introduce, validate and apply a new analytical technique to study the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into ethanol. This conversion process has been the subject of intense interest over the past few years because of its potential to provide a clean, renewable source of energy to meet increasing global demand. During the funding period, we have clearly demonstrated visualization of lignin and cellulose using intrinsic vibrational contrast with simulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, developed at Harvard. Our approach offers high spatial resolution and time resolution that is sufficient to capture the kinetics of a pre?treatment process. This is reflected by the publications listed below, as well as the use of SRS microscopy at NREL as a routine analysis tool for research on lignocellulosic biomass. In our original proposal, we envisioned moving to near?field CARS imaging in order to perform chemical mapping at the nanoscale. However, given the dramatic progress made by our group in SRS imaging, we concentrated our efforts on using multi?component SRS (lignin, cellulose, lipid, water, protein, deuterated metabolites, etc.) to quantitatively understand the spatially dispersed kinetics in a variety of plant samples under a variety of conditions. In addition, we built a next generation laser system based on fiber laser technology that allowed rugged and portable instrumentation for SRS microscopy. We also pursued new imaging approaches to improve the acquisition speed of SRS imaging of lignocellulose without sacrificing signal?to?noise ratio. This allowed us to image larger volumes of tissue with higher time resolution to get a more comprehensive picture of the heterogeneity of this chemical process from the submicron up to the centimeter scale.

Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Ding, Shi-You

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

Sixth International Conference on X-ray Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

More than 180 participants from around the world crowded the Clark Kerr Campus of the University of California, Berkeley, from August 1-6, 1999 for the Sixth International Conference on X-Ray Microscopy (XRM99). Held every three years since 1983, the XRM conferences have become the primary international forum for the presentation and discussion of advances in high-spatial-resolution x-ray imaging and applications (including the use of x-ray spectroscopic and analytical techniques) in biological and medical sciences, environmental and soil sciences, and materials and surface sciences.

Robinson, Arthur L.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

348

Electronic Durability of Flexible Transparent Films from Type-Specific Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coupling between mechanical flexibility and electronic performance is evaluated for thin films of metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deposited on compliant supports. Percolated networks of type-purified SWCNTs are assembled as thin conducting coatings on elastic polymer substrates, and the sheet resistance is measured as a function of compression and cyclic strain through impedance spectroscopy. The wrinkling topography, microstructure and transparency of the films are independently characterized using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and optical absorption spectroscopy. Thin films made from metallic SWCNTs show better durability as flexible transparent conductive coatings, which we attribute to a combination of superior mechanical performance and higher interfacial conductivity.

Harris, J; Iyer, S; Bernhardt, A; Huh, JY; Hudson, S; Fagan, J; Hobbie, E.

2011-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

349

Foil Electron Multiplier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foil Electron Multiplier Foil Electron Multiplier Foil Electron Multiplier An apparatus for electron multiplication by transmission that is designed with at least one foil having a front side for receiving incident particles and a back side for transmitting secondary electrons that are produced from the incident particles transiting through the foil. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Foil Electron Multiplier An apparatus for electron multiplication by transmission that is designed with at least one foil having a front side for receiving incident particles and a back side for transmitting secondary electrons that are produced from the incident particles transiting through the foil. The foil thickness enables the incident particles to travel through the foil and continue on

350

Chapter 9: Electronics  

SciTech Connect

Sophisticated front-end electronics are a key part of practically all modern radiation detector systems. This chapter introduces the basic principles and their implementation. Topics include signal acquisition, electronic noise, pulse shaping (analog and digital), and data readout techniques.

Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris A.

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

351

Electron Photon Absorbed Dose  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is in progress, with preliminary results obtained for both high-energy electrons (at the ... of Clinac 12 MeV, 16 MeV and 20 MeV electron beams at ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

352

Catalac free electron laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac is described. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator, or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

1979-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

353

Relativistic electron beam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

1975-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

354

Catalac free electron laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

FREE-ELECTRON LASERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1977. First Operation of a Free-Electron Laser. Phys . __Radiation from a High-Gain Free-Electeon Lasee Amplifier. ~1984. Variable-Wiggler Free-Electron-Laser Oscillat.ion.

Sessler, A.M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

BNL | CFN: Electronic Nanomaterials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

goals of our CFN research program in Electronic Nanomaterials involve implementing nanostructures for photovoltaic, photochemical, and electrochemical energy conversion. Our...

357

Auger electron spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

A review of Auger electron spectroscopy is presented. Methods, resolution, sensitivity, and uses are discussed. 30 references, 10 figures. (GHT)

Somorjai, G.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Electronic Materials: Web resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 11, 2008 ... WEB: NETWORKS MATEC, Maricopa Community Colleges. NSF resource center focused on semiconductor and electronics education, 0, 811...

359

Electron Based Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Characterization of Materials through High Resolution Coherent Imaging: Electron Based Techniques Sponsored by: TMS Structural Materials...

360

Electron Backscatter Diffraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... Recent Advances in Structural Characterization of Materials: Electron Backscatter Diffraction Sponsored by: MS&T Organization Program...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Genomics of Electronic Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Metamaterials; Highly correlated electron materials, eg superconductors, such as ... A near-field scanning microwave microscope for characterization ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

362

ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... DSP-based signal generator and analyzer to ... background and provide direct measurement of ... temperature electronics to drive our superconducting ...

2012-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

363

Usage of Electronic Monograph  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usage of Electronic Monograph. The following table shows the approximate usage of the monograph since April 1998. ...

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

364

Scanning Surface Potential Microscopy of Spore Adhesion on Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

The adhesion of spores of Bacillus anthracis - the cause of anthrax and a likely biological threat - to solid surfaces is an important consideration in cleanup after an accidental or deliberate release. However, because of safety concerns, directly studying B. anthracis spores with advanced instrumentation is problematic. As a first step, we are examining the electrostatic potential of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which is a closely related species that is often used as a simulant to study B. anthracis. Scanning surface potential microscopy (SSPM), also known as Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), was used to investigate the influence of relative humidity (RH) on the surface electrostatic potential of Bt that had adhered to silica, mica, or gold substrates. AFM/SSPM side-by-side images were obtained separately in air, at various values of RH, after an aqueous droplet with spores was applied on each surface and allowed to dry before measurements. In the SSPM images, a negative potential on the surface of the spores was observed compared with that of the substrates. The surface potential decreased as the humidity increased. Spores were unable to adhere to a surface with an extremely negative potential, such as mica.

Lee, Ida [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chung, Eunhyea [Georgia Institute of Technology; Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Observation of Localized Corrosion of Ni-Based Alloys Using Coupled Orientation Imaging Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present a method for assessing the relative vulnerabilities of distinct classes of grain boundaries to localized corrosion. Orientation imaging microscopy provides a spatial map which identifies and classifies grain boundaries at a metal surface. Once the microstructure of a region of a sample surface has been characterized, a sample can be exposed to repeated cycles of exposure to a corrosive environment alternating with topographic measurement by an atomic force microscope in the same region in which the microstructure had been mapped. When this procedure is applied to Ni and Ni-based alloys, we observe enhanced attack at random grain boundaries relative to special boundaries and twins in a variety of environments.

Bedrossian, P.J.

1999-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

366

ELECTRONS IN NONPOLAR LIQUIDS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Excess electrons can be introduced into liquids by absorption of high energy radiation, by photoionization, or by photoinjection from metal surfaces. The electron's chemical and physical properties can then be measured, but this requires that the electrons remain free. That is, the liquid must be sufficiently free of electron attaching impurities for these studies. The drift mobility as well as other transport properties of the electron are discussed here as well as electron reactions, free-ion yields and energy levels, Ionization processes typically produce electrons with excess kinetic energy. In liquids during thermalization, where this excess energy is lost to bath molecules, the electrons travel some distance from their geminate positive ions. In general the electrons at this point are still within the coulombic field of their geminate ions and a large fraction of the electrons recombine. However, some electrons escape recombination and the yield that escapes to become free electrons and ions is termed G{sub fi}. Reported values of G{sub fi} for molecular liquids range from 0.05 to 1.1 per 100 eV of energy absorbed. The reasons for this 20-fold range of yields are discussed here.

HOLROYD,R.A.

2002-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

367

Electron beam device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent pertains to an electron beam device in which a hollow target is symmetrically irradiated by a high energy, pulsed electron beam about its periphery and wherein the outer portion of the target has a thickness slightly greater than required to absorb the electron beam pulse energy. (auth)

Beckner, E.H.; Clauser, M.J.

1975-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

368

Electronic collection management and electronic information services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the life cycle of information products has become increasingly digital from cradle to grave, the nature of electronic information management has dramatically changed. These changes have brought new strategies and methods as well as new ...

Gladys Cotter; Bonnie Carroll; Gail Hodge; Andrea Japzon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation Express Licensing Acoustic Concentration Of Particles In Fluid Flow Express Licensing Apparatus And Method For Hydrogen And Oxygen Mass Spectrometry Of The Terrestrial Magnetosphere Express Licensing Apparatus And Method For Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of Inorganic Scintillation Detectors Express Licensing Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components Express Licensing Corrosion Test Cell For Bipolar Plates Express Licensing Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator Negotiable Licensing Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Express Licensing Foil electron multiplier Express Licensing Hydrogen Sensor

370

JLAB Electron Driver Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several schemes have been proposed for adding a positron beam option at the Continuous Electron Beam Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Laboratory (JLAB). They involve using a primary beam of electrons or gamma rays striking a target to produce a positron beam. At JLAB electron beams are produced and used in two different accelerators, CEBAF and the JLAB FEL (Free Electron Laser). Both have low emittance and energy spread. The CEBAF beam is polarized. The FEL beam is unpolarized but the injector can produce a higher current electron beam. In this paper we describe the characteristics of these beams and the parameters relevant for positron production.

Kazimi, Reza [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

371

High brightness electron accelerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electrons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electrons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

Sheffield, R.L.; Carlsten, B.E.; Young, L.M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Electronics to Power Electronics to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Power Electronics Electrical Machines Thermal Control & System Integration Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Power Electronics The power electronics activity focuses on research and development (R&D)

373

Physics Out Loud - Electron Scattering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Electromagnetic Force) Physics Out Loud Main Index Next Video (Electrons) Electrons Electron Scattering Jefferson Lab's Hall A Leader, Cynthia Keppel, explains how nuclear...

374

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1993-98  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NCEM). This national user facility has kept DOE programs atdeveloping advanced user facilities to support scientists inALS. NCEM, a national user facility, is supported by the DOE

Chartock, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Advanced Photon Source | Combining Scanning Probe Microscopy and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS APS SXSPM News Researchers from NSLS-II visit SXSPM team at Argonne (November 27, 2013) Cummings presents invited talk at magnetism meeting (November 11, 2013) Invited talk at ACSIN-12 & ICSPM21 in Japan (November 11, 2013) Nanoscience Seminar presented at Tokyo University (November 01, 2013) Scientists study old photos for new solutions to corrosion (October 21, 2013) More News Featured Image Recent Publications Kangkang Wang, Daniel Rosenmann, Martin Holt, Robert Winarski, Saw-Wai Hla, and Volker Rose, "An easy-to-implement filter for separating photo-excited signals from topography in scanning tunneling microscopy", Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 063704 (2013). More SXSPM Publications Upcoming Presentations V. Rose, 41st Conference on the Physics and Chemistry of Surfaces and Interfaces (PCSI-41) (Invited Speaker)

376

Advanced Photon Source | Combining Scanning Probe Microscopy and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

01.2013 01.2013 Nanoscience Seminar presented at Tokyo University On November 1, 2013, Volker Rose was invited to present the Nanoscience Seminar at the Institute of Solid State Physics (ISSP) of the University of Tokyo. In his seminar he discussed the physical principles of Synchrotron X-ray Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (SXSTM) as well as the recent progress made by his team at the Advanced Photon Source. He was invited by Prof. Yukio Hasegawa, who himself conducts SXSTM experiment at the Photon Factory in Tsukuba, Japan. The ISSP serves as the central laboratory of materials science in Japan equipped with state-of-art facilities. It was relocated to the new campus in Kashiwa of the University of Tokyo in 2000 after the 43 years of activities at the Roppongi campus in downtown Tokyo. Here ISSP is focusing

377

Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

Youvan, Douglas C. (San Jose, CA); Silva, Christopher M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Bylina, Edward J. (San Jose, CA); Coleman, William J. (Moutain View, CA); Dilworth, Michael R. (Santa Cruz, CA); Yang, Mary M. (San Jose, CA)

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

378

Handheld and low-cost digital holographic microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study developed handheld and low-cost digital holographic microscopy (DHM) by adopting an in-line type hologram, a webcam, a high power RGB light emitting diode (LED), and a pinhole. It cost less than 20,000 yen (approximately 250 US dollars at 80 yen/dollar), and was approximately 120 mm x 80 mm x 55 mm in size. In addition, by adjusting the recording-distance of a hologram, the lateral resolution power at the most suitable distance was 17.5 um. Furthermore, this DHM was developed for use in open source libraries, and is therefore low-cost and can be easily developed by anyone. In this research, it is the feature to cut down cost and size and to improve the lateral resolution power further rather than existing reports. This DHM will be a useful application in fieldwork, education, and so forth.

Shiraki, Atsushi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Scanning tunneling microscopy observation of Pb-induced superstructures on Si(557)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pb-induced superstructures on Si(557) are investigated by low-energy-electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Using an indirect heating method, we have succeeded in obtaining almost perfect single-domain LEED patterns of one-dimensional wire (chain) structures, so called {alpha}x2 and {beta}x2 phases. Careful LEED analysis and STM investigation reveal that these phases are formed on the (223) and (112) facets, respectively. The {alpha}x2 phase has regular bundles of triple wires at low annealing temperature but wider bundles through step bunching after a higher temperature annealing. Along the wires of the {alpha}x2 phase, which was recently reported to exhibit a transition between one-dimensional (1D) metallic and 2D semiconducting conductance, a clear commensurate x2 modulation is observed at 78-120 K in contrast to the incommensurate and disordered structure reported previously. A tentative atomic structure model of the {alpha}x2 phase is proposed based on the dense Pb overlayers on (111) and (223) facets. The details of the STM images of the {beta}x2 phase are discussed.

Morikawa, Harumo; Kim, Keun Su; Jung, Duk Yong; Yeom, Han Woong [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics and Center for Atomic Wires and Layers, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Application of hydrogenation to low-temperature cleaning of the Si(001) surface in the processes of molecular-beam epitaxy: Investigation by scanning tunneling microscopy, reflected high-energy electron diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural properties of the clean Si(001) surface obtained as a result of low-temperature (470-650 Degree-Sign C) pre-growth annealings of silicon wafers in a molecular-beam epitaxy chamber have been investigated. To decrease the cleaning temperature, a silicon surface was hydrogenated in the process of a preliminary chemical treatment in HF and NH{sub 4}F aqueous solutions. It has been shown that smooth surfaces composed of wide terraces separated by monoatomic steps can be obtained by dehydrogenation at the temperatures Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 600 Degree-Sign C, whereas clean surfaces obtained at the temperatures clean surfaces on the temperature of hydrogen thermal desorption and the process of the preliminary chemical treatment. The frequency of detachment/attachment of Si dimers from/to the steps and effect of the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier on ad-dimer migration across steps have been found to be the most probable factors determining a degree of the resultant surface roughness.

Arapkina, L. V.; Krylova, L. A.; Chizh, K. V.; Chapnin, V. A.; Uvarov, O. V.; Yuryev, V. A. [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NIST Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... leading a national and international effort in electron paramagnetic resonance ... centers (molecules or atoms with unpaired electrons) are produced ...

382

Field emission electron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Microscopy and spectroscopy of lithium nickel oxide based particles used in high-power lithium-ion cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Structural and electronic investigations were conducted on lithium nickel oxide-based particles used in positive electrodes of 18650-type high-power Li-ion cells. K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed trivalent Ni and Co ions in the bulk LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} powder used to prepare the high power electrode laminates. Using oxygen K-edge XAS, high resolution electron microscopy, nanoprobe diffraction, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we identified a <5 nm thick modified layer on the surface of the oxide particles, which results from the loss of Ni and Li ordering in the layered R{bar 3}m structure. This structural change was accompanied by oxygen loss and a lowering of the Ni- and Co-oxidation states in the surface layer. Growth of this surface layer may contribute to the impedance rise observed during accelerated aging of these Li-ion cells.

Abraham, D. P.; Twesten, R. D.; Balasubramanian, M.; Kropf, A. J.; Fischer, D.; McBreen, J.; Petrov, I.; Amine, K.; Chemical Engineering; Univ. of Illinois; BNL; NIST

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Electronic Nanodevices Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... such as charge and energy transfer occur at ... screened for their potential integration into electronic ... of electrical transport processes in such systems. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

385

Electron Beam Melting (EBM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2011 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting (EBM) I Sponsored by: MS&T Organization Program Organizers: Ian D. Harris, EWI;...

386

Electron caustic lithography  

SciTech Connect

A maskless method of electron beam lithography is described which uses the reflection of an electron beam from an electrostatic mirror to produce caustics in the demagnified image projected onto a resist-coated wafer. By varying the electron optics, e.g. via objective lens defocus, both the morphology and dimensions of the caustic features may be controlled, producing a range of bright and tightly focused projected features. The method is illustrated for line and fold caustics and is complementary to other methods of reflective electron beam lithography.

Kennedy, S. M.; Zheng, C. X.; Tang, W. X.; Paganin, D. M.; Jesson, D. E. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Fu, J. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Victoria, 3800 (Australia)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Electron Beam Melting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting Program Organizers: Ian Harris, EWI; Ola Harrysson, North Carolina State University;...

388

Free electron lasers  

SciTech Connect

A review of experimental and theoretical concepts of a free electron laser is given. The possibilities of scaling these lasers to high powers are discussed. (MOW)

Brau, C.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Carbon Fiber Electronic Interconnects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon fiber is an emerging material in electrical and electronics industry. It has been used as contact in many applications, such as switch, potentiometer, and (more)

Deng, Yuliang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Recycling Electronic Waste - Website  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 18, 2010 ... Joined: 2/13/2007. Below is a link to a website that has articles on recycling electronic waste. http://www.scientificamerican....ectronic-waste-...

391

Comparison of airborne asbestos levels determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using direct- and indirect-transfer techniques. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A subset of air samples from a 1988 EPA study was reanalyzed for asbestos by TEM using an indirect transfer technique. The samples were originally analyzed using a direct transfer technique. The document presents the results of the reanalysis and extends the discussion to include data from six other studies. The development of the two techniques and their respective advantages and disadvantages are described. The data support the general opinion that TEM analysis of air samples using indirect transfer methods tends to provide estimates of total airborne asbestos structure concentration that are higher than those obtained using direct transfer methods. There is no single factor that can be used to convert measurements made by one method to a value that is comparable with measurements made by the other because the quantitative relationship is expected to depend on details of the sampling and analytical protocols and the nature of the asbestos in the air. The ratio of indirect measurements to direct measurements ranges from 3.8 to 1,700 for the studies considered. Additional research is needed to determine which transfer technique more accurately reflects biologically meaningful airborne asbestos concentrations. Breakdown of larger structures into smaller ones during indirect preparation does not appear to be sufficient to explain the difference in measured concentrations.

Chesson, J.; Hatfield, J.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrophobic organic compound sorption in natural sorbents and quantification of black carbon by electron microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sorption behaviors of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediments were investigated using pyrene. Native pyrene desorbed slowly, taking from weeks to months to equilibrate. The end-point data suggested that, at ...

Kuo, Dave Ta Fu, 1978-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Computer-Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) Investigation of Respirable Quartz in Air Samples Collected During Power Plant Maintenance Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable methods of determining the amount of respirable, crystalline silica (quartz) in coal fly ash (CFA) are clearly of interest in order to satisfy Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations and to accurately assess the potential risks of workers with prolonged CFA exposure to certain respiratory diseases. Earlier EPRI-sponsored research focused on development of a new method for determining the amount of respirable quartz in bulk CFA samples using computer-controlled scanning e...

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

394

Investigation of magnetic structure and magnetization process of yttrium iron garnet film by Lorentz microscopy and electron holography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. On the left-hand sides of b and c , schematic diagrams are added to show domain walls with white and black by photons or scanning probes.9 In this paper, the domain structure of YIG films, including its variation as shown by the white rectangle in Fig. 1. The corresponding TEM results are shown in Fig. 2, where

Krishnan, Kannan M.

395

Elucidating the medium-resolution structure of ribosomal particles: an interplay between electron cryo-microscopy and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Not only are the ribosomes of a huge size with no internal symmetry, they also exhibit internal flexibility of the ribosomal crystals show extreme radiation sensitivity, poor isomorphism and non-isotropic mosaicity. They yield deformed spot shapes and suffer from an increase in the unit-cell dimensions during X-ray exposure

Yonath, Ada E.

396

Thin-section microscopy of decayed crystalline marble from the garden sculptures of Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna  

SciTech Connect

Sterzing marble, a crystalline white marble used in the late-Baroque garden sculptures of Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna, was studied by means of thin-section and scanning electron microscopy in order to obtain a better understanding of its surface decay caused by atmospheric weathering. Following the classification of distinct phenomena of deterioration by visual on-site inspection, the microstructural features including surface erosion, micro-cracking, soiling, black crust formation, and microbiological infestation are exemplified by microscopical images and are briefly discussed. The results proved useful for evaluating and understanding the various types of marble decay for creating a safer basis for establishing the procedural principles aimed at conservation and maintenance of the sculptures.

Weber, J. [Institute of Art and Technology, Conservation Sciences, University of Applied Arts Vienna. A-1013 Vienna, Salzgries 14/1 (Austria)], E-mail: johannes.weber@uni-ak.ac.at; Beseler, S. [Institute of Conservation and Restoration, University of Applied Arts Vienna A-1013 Vienna, Salzgries 14/4 (Austria); Sterflinger, K. [Institute for Applied Microbiology, Department of Biotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna A-1190 Vienna, Muthgasse 18 (Austria)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with effectively zero mass and constant velocity, like photons. Graphene's intrinsically low scattering rate from defects implies the possibility of a new kind of electronics based on the manipulation of electrons as waves rather than particles. The primary technical difficulty has been controlling the transport of electrical charge carriers through the sheet. This area of research is known as bandgap engineering. While bandgap engineering is the basis of semiconductor technology, it is only now being applied to graphene. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) at ALS Beamline 7.0.1, a team of scientists from the ALS and Germany characterized the electronic band structure and successfully controlled the gap between valence and conduction bands in a bilayer of graphene thin films deposited on a substrate of silicon carbide. This was done by doping one sheet with adsorbed potassium atoms, creating an asymmetry between the two layers.

398

Scanning tunneling optical resonance microscopy applied to indium arsenide quantum dot structures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The technique of Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy (STORM) has been investigated for use on nanostructures. It has been demonstrated as a viable technique to (more)

Byrnes, Daniel P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Refractive Optics for Hard X-ray Transmission Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For hard x-ray transmission microscopy at photon energies higher than 15 keV we design refractive condenser and imaging elements to be used with synchrotron light sources as well as with x-ray tube sources. The condenser lenses are optimized for low x-ray attenuation--resulting in apertures greater than 1 mm--and homogeneous intensity distribution on the detector plane, whereas the imaging enables high-resolution (condenser and imaging lenses are being developed. The imaging lenses (compound refractive lenses, CRLs) are made of SU-8 negative resist by deep x-ray lithography. SU-8 shows high radiation stability. The fabrication technique enables high-quality lens structures regarding surface roughness and arrangement precision with arbitrary 2D geometry. To provide point foci, crossed pairs of lenses are used. Condenser lenses have been made utilizing deep x-ray lithographic patterning of thick SU-8 layers, too, whereas in this case, the aperture is limited due to process restrictions. Thus, in terms of large apertures, condenser lenses made of structured and rolled polyimide film are more attractive. Both condenser types, x-ray mosaic lenses and rolled x-ray prism lenses (RXPLs), are considered to be implemented into a microscope setup. The x-ray optical elements mentioned above are characterized with synchrotron radiation and x-ray laboratory sources, respectively.

Simon, M.; Last, A.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Reznikova, E. [Institute for Microstructure Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Kaiserstrasse 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ahrens, G.; Voigt, A. [Microresist Technology, Koepenikerstrasse 325, 12555 Berlin (Germany)

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

400

Electronic Reading Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electronic Reading Room - making information about the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Privacy Act process accessible to the public electronically. Electronic Reading Room - making information about the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Privacy Act process accessible to the public electronically. Major Information Systems - Final Opinions - [5 USC 552 (a)(2)](A) final opinions, including concurring and dissenting opinions, as well as orders, made in the adjudication of cases within the Office of Hearings and Appeals Statements of Policy and Interpretation and Administrative Staff Manuals and Instructions - [5 USC 552 (a)(2)](B) those statements of policy and interpretation which have been adopted by the agency and are not published in the Federal Register - Directives, DOE Orders, Headquarters Orders, Secretarial Notices, Technical Standards, Forms, Delegations, Electronic Library Public Reading Facilities - making information available for public inspection and copying

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Electron: Cluster interactions  

SciTech Connect

Beam depletion spectroscopy has been used to measure absolute total inelastic electron-sodium cluster collision cross sections in the energy range from E {approximately} 0.1 to E {approximately} 6 eV. The investigation focused on the closed shell clusters Na{sub 8}, Na{sub 20}, Na{sub 40}. The measured cross sections show an increase for the lowest collision energies where electron attachment is the primary scattering channel. The electron attachment cross section can be understood in terms of Langevin scattering, connecting this measurement with the polarizability of the cluster. For energies above the dissociation energy the measured electron-cluster cross section is energy independent, thus defining an electron-cluster interaction range. This interaction range increases with the cluster size.

Scheidemann, A.A. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Kresin, V.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Knight, W.D. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Electrons and Mirror Symmetry  

SciTech Connect

The neutral weak force between an electron and a target particle, mediated by the Z boson, can be isolated by measuring the fractional change under a mirror reflection of the scattering probability of relativistic longitudinally polarized electrons off unpolarized targets. This technique yields neutral weak force measurements at a length scale of 1 femtometer, in contrast to high energy collider measurements that probe much smaller length scales. Study of the variation of the weak force over a range of length scales provides a stringent test of theory, complementing collider measurements. We describe a recent measurement of the neutral weak force between two electrons by the E158 experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. While the weak force between an electron and positron has been extensively studied, that between two electrons had never directly been measured. We conclude by discussing prospects for even more precise measurements at future facilities.

Kumar, Krishna (University of Massachusetts, Amherst)

2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

403

Developing electronic textbooks  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses a new approach to the development of engineering education materials. The ``Electronic Textbook`` represents the logical progression of the printed textbook in the Electronic Age. The concept behind this approach is simple; to place all of the information contained in a textbook in electronic form. Currently, paper texts exist on the market with electronic supplements, however, this Electronic Textbook would include supplements fully integrated in the whole text. The computer hardware and software needed to make this advance possible have existed for nearly ten years, and they have been readily available to engineering educators and students for over three years. Computer based ``tools`` in engineering textbooks as are prevalent today range from computer styled algorithms and code snippets, to fully developed software applications with graphical user interfaces on floppy disks attached to the back covers of books. The next logical step in publishing is to dispense with the paper book entirely, by distributing textbooks via electronic media such as CD-ROM. Electronic Textbooks use the full range of multi-media technologies in the learning and teaching process including video clips, computer animations and fully functional numerical engines as integral parts of the textbook material. This is very appealing since interactive media provide teaching tools that appeal to divergent learning styles. The advantages of Electronic Textbooks lead to several challenges. Special attention must be paid to the development of user interfaces; navigation is of particular importance when non- linear exploration is encouraged. These issues are being addressed at the Sandia National Laboratories by an electronic documentation development team. This team includes experts in engineering, in human factors, and in computer hardware and software development. Guidelines for the development of electronic textbooks based on the experiences of this team are provided.

Zadoks, R.I. [Texas Univ., El Paso, TX (United States). Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Dept.; Ratner, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Geometric and Electronic Structure of Closed Graphene Edges  

SciTech Connect

We report theoretical and experimental results on single and multiple looped graphene sheets. Experimental images of stable closed-edge structures in few-layer graphene samples obtained by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) are compared with first- principles density functional theory calculations. We demonstrate that the electronic structure of a graphene nanoribbon is not significantly perturbed upon closing. By contrast, a significant modulation of the electronic structure is observed for closed-edge graphene structures deposited on a planar graphene substrate. This effect is due to an enhanced reactivity of the looped (coalesced) edges observed experimentally. The coexistence of different degrees of curvature in the graphene sheet induced by folding indicates that these materials could be used for surface chemistry engineering.

Lopez-Benzanilla, Alejandro [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Campos-Delgado, Jessica [IPICyT; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Baptista, Daniel [National Institute of Metrology, Duque de Caxias, Brazil; Hayashi, Takuya [Institute of Carbon Science and Technology, Shinshu Unversity; Kim, Y A [Shinshu University; Muramatsu, H [Shinshu University; Endo, M [Shinshu University; Achete, Carlos [National Institute of Metrology, Duque de Caxias, Brazil; Terrones, M. [Universidad Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Aerogels for electronics  

SciTech Connect

In addition to their other exceptional properties, aerogels also exhibit unusual dielectric and electronic properties due to their nano-sized structures and high porosities. For example, aerogels have the lowest dielectric constants measured for a solid material (having values approaching 1.0); they have exceptionally high dielectric resistivities and strengths (i.e., ability to insulate very high voltages); they exhibit low dielectric loss at microwave frequencies; and some aerogels are electrically conductive and photoconductive. These properties are being exploited to provide the next generation of materials for energy storage, low power consumption, and ultra-fast electronics. We are working toward adapting these unusual materials for microelectronic applications, particularly, making thin aerogel films for dielectric substrates and for energy storage devices such as supercapacitors. Measurements are presented in this paper for the dielectric and electronic properties of aerogels, including the dielectric constant, loss factor, dielectric and electrical conductivity, volume resistivity, and dielectric strength. We also describe methods to form and characterize thin aerogel films which are being developed for numerous electronic applications. Finally, some of the electronic applications proposed for aerogels are presented. Commercialization of aerogels for electronics must await further feasibility, prototype development, and cost studies, but they are one of the key materials and are sure to have a major impact on future electronics.

Hrubesh, L.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

High resolution scanning tunnelling microscopy and extended x-ray-absorption fine structure study of the (533) silicide structure on Cu(001)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using low energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques, we have studied the first steps of silicon adsorption onto Cu (001) single crystal substrate. For low coverage (~ 0.5 ML) and after annealing at 100{\\deg}C, STM images and LEED patterns reveal the formation of an ordered quasi commensurate superstructure. From a quantitative analysis of XAS data, we extract the Si-Cu distance and detail the local atomic arrangement of the structure.

B. Lalmi; M. Chorro; R. Belkhou

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

407

Serial Section Registration of Axonal Confocal Microscopy Datasets for Long-Range Neural Circuit Reconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fluorescence con- focal microscopy. We are targeting neurons in a 12 mm-deep re- gion of interest and work, immunohistochemically stained, and placed on its own microscope slide for fluorescence confocal imaging. view). The histological techniques used to image neurons of interest in fluorescence confocal microscopy impose digital

Paiva, António R. C.

408

Batch fabrication of cantilever array aperture probes for scanning near-field optical microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a novel batch fabrication process for cantilever array aperture probes used in scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). The array probes, consisting of 16 parallel cantilevers with each tip having an identical aperture, are proposed ... Keywords: Cantilever probes, Nanofabrication, Scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM)

Y. Zhang; K. E. Docherty; J. M. R. Weaver

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Phase Contrast Microscopy with Soft and Hard X-rays Using a Segmented  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phase Contrast Microscopy with Soft and Hard X-rays Using a Segmented Detector A Dissertation Contrast Microscopy with Soft and Hard X-rays Using a Segmented Detector by Benjamin Hornberger Doctor. In the hard x-ray range (multi-keV), the main focus lies on trace ele- ment mapping by x-ray fluorescence

410

Effect of Roughness as Determined by Atomic Force Microscopy on the Wetting Properties of PTFE Thin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of Roughness as Determined by Atomic Force Microscopy on the Wetting Properties of PTFE Thin Engineering College of Mines and Earth Sciences University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 and G. YAMAUCHI films has been investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle goniometry. Surface

Drelich, Jaroslaw W.

411

What is flexible electronics?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flexible electronics has recently attracted much attention because of their potential in providing cost-efficient solutions to large-area applications such as rollable displays and TVs, e-paper, smart sensors and transparent RFIDs. The key advantages ...

Kwang-Ting (Tim) Cheng; Tsung-Ching Huang

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Free electron laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high gain, single-pass free electron laser formed of a high brilliance electron injector source, a linear accelerator which imparts high energy to the electron beam, and an undulator capable of extremely high magnetic fields, yet with a very short period. The electron injector source is the first stage (gap) of the linear accelerator or a radial line transformer driven by fast circular switch. The linear accelerator is formed of a plurality of accelerating gaps arranged in series. These gaps are energized in sequence by releasing a single pulse of energy which propagates simultaneously along a plurality of transmission lines, each of which feeds the gaps. The transmission lines are graduated in length so that pulse power is present at each gap as the accelerated electrons pass therethrough. The transmission lines for each gap are open circuited at their ends. The undualtor has a structure similar to the accelerator, except that the transmission lines for each gap are substantially short circuited at their ends, thus converting the electric field into magnetic field. A small amount of resistance is retained in order to generate a small electric field for replenishing the electron bunch with the energy lost as it traverses through the undulator structure.

Villa, Francesco (Alameda, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Effect of Electronic Excitation on Thin Film Growth  

SciTech Connect

The effect of nanosecond pulsed laser excitation on surface diffusion during growth of Ge on Si(100) at 250 degrees C was studied. In Situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) was used to measure the surface diffusion coefficient while ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to probe the structure and morphology of the grown quantum dots. The results show that laser excitation of the substrate increases the surface diffusion during growth of Ge on Si(100), changes the growth morphology, improves crystalline structure of the grown quantum dots, and decreases their size distribution. A purely electronic mechanism of enhanced surface diffusion of the deposited Ge is proposed. Ge quantum dots were grown on Si(100)-(2x1) by pulsed laser deposition at various substrate temperatures using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser. In-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction and ex-situ atomic force microscopy were used to analyze the fim structure and morphology. The morphology of germanium islands on silicon was studied at differect coverages. The results show that femtosecond pulsed laser depositon reduces the minimum temperature for epitaxial growth of Ge quantum dots to ~280 degrees C, which is 120 degrees C lower then previously observed in nanosecond pulsed laser deposition and more than 200 degrees C lower than that reported for molecular beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition.

Elsayed-Ali, Hani E. [Old Dominion University

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Electron and laser beam welding  

SciTech Connect

This book contains 22 selections. Some of the titles are: Laser welding of chandelles to the plates of the sommier employed in the nuclear power plant core; Electron beam welding of hobbing cutters; Sealing welds in electron beam welding of thick metals; Development and application of high power electron beam welding; Electron beam welding of dissimilar metals (niobium, molybdenum, porous tungsten-molybdenum); Status of electron beam welding in the United States of America; and Electron and laser beam welding in Japan.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Electronics Stewardship | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electronics Electronics Stewardship Electronics Stewardship Mission The team promotes sustainable management of LM's electronic equipment by integrating the relevant requirements of Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability, with LM activities, as approved by LM. The team advocates environmentally sound electronic stewardship practices. Scope The team uses a life-cycle approach to reduce the negative environmental impacts posed by electronic equipment. Established processes evaluate beneficial acquisition, use, and disposition of electronic equipment. Key Expectations Propose electronic stewardship goals/targets.

416

Circular free-electron laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high efficiency, free electron laser is described utilizing a circular relativistic electron beam accelerator and a circular whispering mode optical waveguide for guiding optical energy in a circular path in the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator such that the circular relativistic electron beam and the optical energy are spatially contiguous in a resonant condition for free electron laser operation. Both a betatron and synchrotron are disclosed for use in the present invention. A free electron laser wiggler is disposed around the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator for generating a periodic magnetic field to transform energy from the circular relativistic electron beam to optical energy.

Brau, C.A.; Kurnit, N.A.; Cooper, R.K.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

417

Electron Physics Group Staff Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electron Physics Group Staff. ... Jabez McClelland, Group Leader Jabez McClelland is the Group Leader of the CNST Electron Physics Group. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

418

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally...

419

Circular free-electron laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high efficiency, free electron laser utilizing a circular relativistic electron beam accelerator and a circular whispering mode optical waveguide for guiding optical energy in a circular path in the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator such that the circular relativistic electron beam and the optical energy are spatially contiguous in a resonant condition for free electron laser operation. Both a betatron and synchrotron are disclosed for use in the present invention. A free electron laser wiggler is disposed around the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator for generating a periodic magnetic field to transform energy from the circular relativistic electron beam to optical energy.

Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM); Cooper, Richard K. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Advance Electronics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advance Electronics Jump to: navigation, search Name Advance Electronics Place United Kingdom Zip LL14 3YR Product Develop and deliver power conditioners, transient suppressors,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

28 00 00 ELECTRONIC SAFETY AND SECURITY ELECTRONIC SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

28 00 00 ELECTRONIC SAFETY AND SECURITY ELECTRONIC SECURITY SYSTEM DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION Services #12;28 00 00 ELECTRONIC SAFETY AND SECURITY August 8, 2011 2 THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN ELECTRONIC SECURITY SYSTEM DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND COMMISSIONING GUIDE PART 1 - GENERAL 1.1 NOTICE

Texas at Austin, University of

422

28 00 00 ELECTRONIC SAFETY AND SECURITY ELECTRONIC SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

28 00 00 ELECTRONIC SAFETY AND SECURITY ELECTRONIC SECURITY SYSTEM DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION Services #12;28 00 00 ELECTRONIC SAFETY AND SECURITY May 1, 2013 2 THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN ELECTRONIC SECURITY SYSTEM DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND COMMISSIONING GUIDE PART 1 - GENERAL 1.1 NOTICE

Texas at Austin, University of

423

Electron-electron interactions in fast neutral-neutral collisions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Differential electron emission is studied for 50--500 keV H{sup +} and H atom impact on helium. Using the first Born formulation, it is shown that projectile electron-target electron interactions are expected to dominate the differential cross sections for low energy target electron emission induced by fast neutral projectile impact on any target. Measurements of the 15{degrees} electron emission were made in order to investigate this prediction. For low impact energies, a constant ratio between the hydrogen atom and proton impact cross sections was found for emitted electron velocities less than half the projectile velocity, V{sub p} But as the collision energy increased, for electron velocities less than 0.25 V{sub p}, the cross section ratio increased as the emitted electron velocity decreased. This is interpreted as a signature of projectile electron-target electron interactions becoming dominant for distant collisions between neutral particles.

DuBois, R.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Manson, S.T. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Electron-electron interactions in fast neutral-neutral collisions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Differential electron emission is studied for 50--500 keV H[sup +] and H atom impact on helium. Using the first Born formulation, it is shown that projectile electron-target electron interactions are expected to dominate the differential cross sections for low energy target electron emission induced by fast neutral projectile impact on any target. Measurements of the 15[degrees] electron emission were made in order to investigate this prediction. For low impact energies, a constant ratio between the hydrogen atom and proton impact cross sections was found for emitted electron velocities less than half the projectile velocity, V[sub p] But as the collision energy increased, for electron velocities less than 0.25 V[sub p], the cross section ratio increased as the emitted electron velocity decreased. This is interpreted as a signature of projectile electron-target electron interactions becoming dominant for distant collisions between neutral particles.

DuBois, R.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Manson, S.T. (Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Viewing spin structures with soft x-ray microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment marks the basic unit for magnetic properties of matter. Magnetism, in particular ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism is described by a collective order of these spins, where the interaction between individual spins reflects a competition between exchange, anisotropy and dipolar energy terms. As a result the energetically favored ground state of a ferromagnetic system is a rather complex spin configuration, the magnetic domain structure. Magnetism is one of the eldest scientific phenomena, yet it is one of the most powerful and versatile utilized physical effects in modern technologies, such as in magnetic storage and sensor devices. To achieve highest storage density, the relevant length scales, such as the bit size in disk drives is now approaching the nanoscale and as such further developments have to deal with nanoscience phenomena. Advanced characterization tools are required to fully understand the underlying physical principles. Magnetic microscopes using polarized soft X-rays offer a close-up view into magnetism with unique features, these include elemental sensitivity due to X-ray magnetic dichroism effects as contrast mechanism, high spatial resolution provided by state-of-the-art X-ray optics and fast time resolution limited by the inherent time structure of current X-ray sources, which will be overcome with the introduction of ultrafast and high brilliant X-ray sources.

Fischer, Peter

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

Brenholdt, I.R.

1957-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

427

Electron launching voltage monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron launching voltage monitor measures MITL voltage using a relationship between anode electric field and electron current launched from a cathode-mounted perturbation. An electron launching probe extends through and is spaced from the edge of an opening in a first MITL conductor, one end of the launching probe being in the gap between the MITL conductor, the other end being adjacent a first side of the first conductor away from the second conductor. A housing surrounds the launching probe and electrically connects the first side of the first conductor to the other end of the launching probe. A detector detects the current passing through the housing to the launching probe, the detected current being representative of the voltage between the conductors.

Mendel, Clifford W. (Albuquerque, NM); Savage, Mark E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Electronic ballast improves efficiency  

SciTech Connect

As part of a DOE program, the performance of various electronic ballasts for fluorescent lamps have been evaluated relative to high quality core-coil ballasts under similar ambient conditions. The results of this investigation are reported. Real energy savings can exceed 40% while comfort and quality of illumination are improved. A detailed comparison of two types of ballast is presented. Voltage effects and temperature effects as well as dimming features are discussed. Light levels, power energy consumption, and daylighting are also treated. It is concluded that, with the electronic ballast, an annual payback of $8.20/yr is possible as compared to the core-coil ballasted fluorescent lamp. Further, much greater flexibility in use is possible with the electronic ballast equipped lamp. (MJJ)

Verderber, R.R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Precision electron polarimetry  

SciTech Connect

A new generation of precise Parity-Violating experiments will require a sub-percent accuracy of electron beam polarimetry. Compton polarimetry can provide such accuracy at high energies, but at a few hundred MeV the small analyzing power limits the sensitivity. M{\\o}ller polarimetry provides a high analyzing power independent on the beam energy, but is limited by the properties of the polarized targets commonly used. Options for precision polarimetry at ~300 MeV will be discussed, in particular a proposal to use ultra-cold atomic hydrogen traps to provide a 100\\%-polarized electron target for M{\\o}ller polarimetry.

Chudakov, Eugene A. [JLAB

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

ElectronicFabrication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fabrication Fabrication Manufacturing Technologies Electronic Fabrication provides our cus- tomers solutions for the packaging design, production acceptable prototype fabrica- tion, or deliverable production fabrication. Capabilities * Final electronic product packaging from sketches and verbal instructions * Provide CAD drawing package after project completion if no formal prints are available * Complete system development and fab- rication through concurrent engineering * Concurrent engineering in prototype and production fabrication * Integrate commercial equipment into prototype system design * Implementation and modification of commercial equipment * Packaging of prototype into finalized product assembly Resources * Customer assistance from fabrication, to testing, to complete system installation

431

ElectronicPackaging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Packaging Packaging Manufacturing Technologies The Electronic Packaging technologies in the Thin Film, Vacuum, and Packaging Department are a resource for all aspects of microelectronic packag- ing. From design and layout to fabrication of proto- type samples, the staff offers partners the opportu- nity for concurrent engineering and development of a variety of electronic packaging concepts. This includes assistance in selecting the most appropri- ate technology for manufacturing, analysis of per- formance characteristics and development of new and unique processes. Capabilities 1. Network Fabrication * Low Temperature Co-Fired Ceramic (LTCC) * Thick Film * Thin Film 2. Packaging and Assembly * Chip Level Packaging * MEMs Packaging * Hermetic Sealing * Surface Mount Technology

432

Electronically configured battery pack  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Battery packs for portable equipment must sometimes accommodate conflicting requirements to meet application needs. An electronically configurable battery pack was developed to support two highly different operating modes, one requiring very low power consumption at a low voltage and the other requiring high power consumption at a higher voltage. The configurable battery pack optimizes the lifetime and performance of the system by making the best use of all available energy thus enabling the system to meet its goals of operation, volume, and lifetime. This paper describes the cell chemistry chosen, the battery pack electronics, and tradeoffs made during the evolution of its design.

Kemper, D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

A graphene electron lens  

SciTech Connect

An epitaxial layer of graphene was grown on a pre patterned 6H-SiC(0001) crystal. The graphene smoothly covers the hexagonal nano-holes in the substrate without the introduction of small angle grain boundaries or dislocations. This is achieved by an elastic deformation of the graphene by {approx_equal}0.3% in accordance to its large elastic strain limit. This elastic stretching of the graphene leads to a modification of the band structure and to a local lowering of the electron group velocity of the graphene. We propose to use this effect to focus two-dimensional electrons in analogy to simple optical lenses.

Gerhard, L.; Balashov, T.; Wulfhekel, W. [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Moyen, E.; Ozerov, I.; Sahaf, H.; Masson, L.; Hanbuecken, M. [CINaM-CNRS, Aix-Marseille University, Campus Luminy - Case 913, 18288 Marseille (France); Portail, M. [CRHEA-CNRS, Parc de Sophia - Antipolis, rue B. Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France)

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

434

Electron Beam Powder Bed Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Materials, Processes and Applications for Additive Manufacturing : Electron Beam Powder Bed Processes Program Organizers: Andrzej...

435

Simultaneous forward and epi-CARS microscopy with a single detector by time-correlated single photon counting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy," Proc Natl Acadenables separation of CARS microscopy data from multiphoton-overlap of the F and E-CARS signals. Due to traveling an

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

437

Development of high-speed two-photon microscopy for biological and medical applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two-photon microscopy (TPM) is one of the most powerful microscopic technologies for in-vivo 3D tissue imaging up to a few hundred micrometers. It has been finding important applications in neuronal imaging, tumor physiology ...

Kim, Ki Hean

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

High speed optical coherence microscopy with autofocus adjustment and a miniaturized endoscopic imaging probe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a promising technique for high resolution cellular imaging in human tissues. An OCM system for high-speed en face cellular resolution imaging was developed at 1060 nm wavelength at ...

Aguirre, Aaron Dominic

439

Biological image restoration in optical-sectioning microscopy using prototype image constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deconvolution of images obtained by means of optical-sectioning widefield fluorescence microscopy, is a relevant problem in biological applications. Several methods have been proposed in the last few years, with different degrees of success, to improve ...

M. R. P. Homem; N. D. A. Mascarenhas; L. F. Costa; C. Preza

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Method for detecting cancer in a single cell using mitochondrial correlation microscopy  

SciTech Connect

A method for distinguishing a normal cell from an abnormal cell, such as, for example a cancer cell or diseased cell, of the same tissue type using mitochondrial correlation microscopy.

Gourley, Paul L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Super-resolution wide-field optical microscopy by use of Evanescent standing waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of high resolution, high speed imaging techniques allows the study of dynamical processes in biological systems. Optical fluorescence microscopy is an essential tool for investigations in many disciplines ...

Chung, Euiheon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

electronic reprint Crystallography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electronic reprint Journal of Applied Crystallography ISSN 0021-8898 Molsee: a Tcl/Tk-based program of Crystallography Printed in Great Britain ± all rights reserved Molsee: a Tcl/Tk-based program to control Rasmol molecules. In order to make it more user-friendly, Molsee, a Tcl/Tk-based graphical user interface front end

Luhua, Lai

443

Electron beam cutting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the cutting of holes 20 Angstroms in diameter, or lines 20 Angstroms wide in a material having positive ionic conduction by the use of a focused electron probe is described. The holes and lines are stable under ambient conditions. 2 figs.

Mochel, M.E.; Humphreys, C.J.

1985-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

444

Electron beam cutting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the cutting of holes 20 Angstroms in diameter, or lines 20 Angstroms wide in a material having positive ionic conduction by the use of a focused electron probe is described. The holes and lines are stable under ambient conditions.

Mochel, Margaret E. (Champaign, IL); Humphreys, Colin J. (Abingdon, GB2)

1985-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

445

ELECTRONIC DIGITAL COMPUTER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The electronic digital computer is designed to solve systems involving a plurality of simultaneous linear equations. The computer can solve a system which converges rather rapidly when using Von Seidel's method of approximation and performs the summations required for solving for the unknown terms by a method of successive approximations.

Stone, J.J. Jr.; Bettis, E.S.; Mann, E.R.

1957-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Superconductivity and electron tunneling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments on the tunneling of electrons through a thin dielectric layer separating two superconducting metals are reported. Data are presented for the pairs AI-Pb, Sn-Pb, and In-Sn. Particular attention is paid to the form of the tunneling current ...

S. Shapiro; P. H. Smith; J. Nicol; J. L. Miles; P. F. Strong

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Calorimeter Electronics Jim Pilcher  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photons to electrical signal Photons from Cerenkov radiation or scintillation Amplify the number diverse device Many sizes and shapes Much experience from years of usage and development Wide range. Pilcher9 The Physics of PMTs Design principle Amplification by electron acceleration in electric field

448

Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations The 2008 Peer Review Meeting for the DOE Energy Storage and Power Electronics Program (ESPE) was held in Washington DC on Sept. 29-30, 2008. Current and completed program projects were presented and reviewed by a group of industry professionals. The 2008 agenda was composed of 28 projects that covered a broad range of new and ongoing, state-of-the-art, energy storage and power electronics technologies, including updates on the collaborations among DOE/ESPE, CEC in California, and NYSERDA in New York. Power Electronics (PE) Systems presentations are available below. ESPE 2008 Peer Review - High Power Density Silicon Carbide Power Electronic

449

Stereo soft x-ray microscopy and elemental mapping of hematite and clay suspensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial arrangements of hematite particles within aqueous soil and clay samples are investigated with soft X-ray microscopy, taking advantage of the elemental contrast at the Fe-L edge around E = 707 eV. In combination with stereo microscopy, information about spatial arrangements are revealed and correlated to electrostatic interactions of the different mixtures. Manipulation of a sample mounted to the microscope is possible and particles added while imaging can be detected.

Gleber, S.-C.; Thieme, J.; Chao, W.; Fischer, P.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Supporting soil remediation at Fernald by electron beam methods  

SciTech Connect

Electron beam techniques have been used to characterize uranium-contaminated soils at the Fernald Site, Ohio. The major uranium phases have been identified by analytical electron microscopy (AEM) as uranyl phosphate (autunite), uranium oxide (uraninite), and uranium phosphite [U(PO{sub 3}){sub 4}]. Luminescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy incorrectly identified uranium oxide hydrate (schoepite) as the major phase in Fernald soils. The solubilities of schoepite and autunite are very different, so a solubility-dependent remediation method selected for schoepite will not be effective for removing autunite. AEM is the only technique capable of precisely identifying unknown submicron phases. The uranium phosphite has been found predominantly at the incinerator site at Fernald. This phase has not been removed successfully by any of the chemical remediation technologies. We suggest that an alternative physical extraction procedure be applied to remove this phase.

Buck, E.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.; Cunnane, J.C.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Electronic Thermometry in Tunable Tunnel Junction  

adjustable. The method does not require calibration against known temperature standards. When combined with scanning probe microscopy, ...

452

Electron and Optical Physics Division 1999 - Technical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA) were successfully used to resolve a controversy involving the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in Co ...

453

Electronics & Telecommunications Programs/Projects in PML  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electronics & Telecommunications Programs/Projects in PML. ... Electric Power Metrology and the Smart Grid. Electronic Kilogram. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

454

NIST Reference Materials Are 'Gold Standard' for Bio ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential mobility analysis (DMA ...

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

Towards demonstration of electron cooling with bunched electron beam  

SciTech Connect

All electron cooling systems which were in operation so far employed electron beam generated with an electrostatic electron gun in DC operating mode, immersed in a longitudinal magnetic field. At low energies magnetic field is also being used to transport electron beam through the cooling section from the gun to the collector. At higher energies (few MeV), it was shown that one can have simpler electron beam transport without continuous magnetic field. Because of a rather weak magnetic field on the cathode and in the cooling section the latter approach was referred to as 'non-magnetized cooling', since there was no suppression of the transverse angular spread of the electron beam with the magnetic field in the cooling section. Such a cooler successfully operated at FNAL (2005-11) at electron beam energy of 4.3 MeV. Providing cooling at even higher energies would be easier with RF acceleration of electron beam, and thus using bunched electron beam for cooling. Significant efforts were devoted to explore various aspects of such bunched electron beam cooling as part of R and D of high-energy electron cooling for RHIC. However, experimental studies of such cooling are still lacking. Establishing this technique experimentally would be extremely useful for future high-energy applications. Presently there is an ongoing effort to build Proof-of-Principle (PoP) experiment of Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) at RHIC, which promises to be superior to conventional electron cooling for high energies. Since the CEC experiment is based on bunched electron beam and it has sections where electron beam co-propagates with the ion beam at the same velocity, it also provides a unique opportunity to explore experimentally conventional electron cooling but for the first time with a bunched electron beam. As a result, it allows us to explore techniques needed for the high-energy electron cooling such as 'painting' with a short electron beam and control of ion beam distribution under cooling which is essential if cooling is provided in a collider. The software needed for comparison with the experiments is already developed as part of the previous high-energy electron cooling studies for RHIC. Since electron beam will be non-magnetized and there will be no magnetic field in the cooling section it will be also a first demonstration of fully non-magnetized cooling. The purpose of these studies was to explore whether we would be able to observe conventional electron cooling with parameters expected in the CEC PoP experiment. Below we summarize requirements on electron beam and cooling section needed for such demonstration.

Fedotov, A.

2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

456

Organizational Assimilation of Electronic Procurement Innovations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the assimilation of electronic procurement innovations (EPIs) and its impact on procurement productivity in buyer organizations. We identify online reverse auctions, electronic catalog management, electronic order fulfillment, and electronic ... Keywords: Electronic Procurement Innovations, It Assimilation, Productivity, Structuration Theory

Arun Rai; Paul Brown; Xinlin Tang

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Electron-doping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron-doping Electron-doping evolution of the low-energy spin excitations in the iron arsenide superconductor BaFe 2-x Ni x As 2 Miaoyin Wang, 1 Huiqian Luo, 2 Jun Zhao, 1 Chenglin Zhang, 1 Meng Wang, 2,1 Karol Marty, 3 Songxue Chi, 4 Jeffrey W. Lynn, 4 Astrid Schneidewind, 5,6 Shiliang Li, 2, * and Pengcheng Dai 1,2,3,† 1 Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1200, USA 2 Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190, China 3 Neutron Scattering Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6393, USA 4 NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899, USA 5 Gemeinsame Forschergruppe HZB, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, D-14109

458

ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF SOLIDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for altering physical properties of certain solids, such as enhancing the usefulness of solids, in which atomic interchange occurs through a vacancy mechanism, electron irradiation, and temperature control. In a centain class of metals, alloys, and semiconductors, diffusion or displacement of atoms occurs through a vacancy mechanism, i.e., an atom can only move when there exists a vacant atomic or lattice site in an adjacent position. In the process of the invention highenergy electron irradiation produces additional vacancies in a solid over those normally occurring at a given temperature and allows diffusion of the component atoms of the solid to proceed at temperatures at which it would not occur under thermal means alone in any reasonable length of time. The invention offers a precise way to increase the number of vacancies and thereby, to a controlled degree, change the physical properties of some materials, such as resistivity or hardness.

Damask, A.C.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Power electronics reliability.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project's goals are: (1) use experiments and modeling to investigate and characterize stress-related failure modes of post-silicon power electronic (PE) devices such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) switches; and (2) seek opportunities for condition monitoring (CM) and prognostics and health management (PHM) to further enhance the reliability of power electronics devices and equipment. CM - detect anomalies and diagnose problems that require maintenance. PHM - track damage growth, predict time to failure, and manage subsequent maintenance and operations in such a way to optimize overall system utility against cost. The benefits of CM/PHM are: (1) operate power conversion systems in ways that will preclude predicted failures; (2) reduce unscheduled downtime and thereby reduce costs; and (3) pioneering reliability in SiC and GaN.

Kaplar, Robert James; Brock, Reinhard C.; Marinella, Matthew; King, Michael Patrick; Stanley, James K.; Smith, Mark A.; Atcitty, Stanley

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Electronics for Satellite Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The tracking detector for the LAT science instrument on the GLAST mission is an example of a large-scale particle detection system built primarily by particle physicists for space flight within the context of a NASA program. The design and fabrication model in most ways reflected practice and experience from particle physics, but the quality assurance aspects were guided by NASA. Similarly, most of the electronics in the LAT as a whole were designed and built by staff at a particle physics lab. This paper reports on many of the challenges and lessons learned in the experience of designing and building the tracking detector and general LAT electronics for use in the NASA GLAST mission.

Johnson, Robert P.; /UC, Santa Cruz

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Electronic Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the fastest growing energy efficient light source the electronic compact fluorescent lamp (CFL). Business and technical market factors (Chapter 2) explain the past and future growth of the CFL market while emphasizing future technical improvements along with discussion of the importance of utility involvement in helping their customers make the switch from incandescent lamps to CFLs. The basic CFL technology is covered in Chapter 3 including test results for selected ...

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

462

Relativistic electron beam device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A design is given for an electron beam device for irradiating spherical hydrogen isotope bearing targets. The accelerator, which includes hollow cathodes facing each other, injects an anode plasma between the cathodes and produces an approximately 10 nanosecond, megajoule pulse between the anode plasma and the cathodes. Targets may be repetitively positioned within the plasma between the cathodes, and accelerator diode arrangement permits materials to survive operation in a fusion power source. (auth)

Freeman, J.R.; Poukey, J.W.; Shope, S.L.; Yonas, G.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Xyce parallel electronic simulator.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users' Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users' Guide.

Keiter, Eric Richard; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Santarelli, Keith R.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

465

Simulation study of electron response amplification in coherent electron cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC), it is essential to study the amplification of electron response to a single ion in the FEL process, in order to proper align the electron beam and the ion beam in the kicker to maximize the cooling effect. In this paper, we use Genesis to simulate the amplified electron beam response of single ion in FEL amplification process, which acts as Green's function of the FEL amplifier.

Hao Y.; Litvinenko, V.N.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

466

RHIC | Electron-Ion Collider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron-Ion Collider A breakthrough particle accelerator could collide electrons with heavy ions or protons at nearly the speed of light to create rapid-fire, high-resolution...

467

Infrastructure for Integrated Electronics Design & ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrastructure for Integrated Electronics Design & Manufacturing (IIEDM) Project. ... designed to support distributed supply chain integration and e ...

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

468

Scanning Confocal Electron Microscope (SCEM)  

Transmission/Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope. The SCEM enables imaging of sub-surface structures of thick, optically opaque materials, ...

469

Rf Feedback free electron laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Rf feedback free electron laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

1979-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

471

Electronics & Telecommunications Programs and Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... nanostructured materials. In the phenomenon more. Electronic Kilogram Last Updated Date: 06/25/2013 This project ...

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

472

Opening Remarks: Electronic Book Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... no consensus standards for electronic publishing formats, security, and retrieval. ... The Information Technology Laboratory is willing to work with the ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

473

Electronic Materials: Books/Articles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FORUMS > ELECTRONIC MATERIALS: BOOKS/ARTICLES, Replies, Views, Originator, Last Post. Search Category: [ advanced search ]. rss feed. Spacer

474

Transmission electron microscope CCD camera  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

Downing, Kenneth H. (Lafayette, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Security Aspects of Electronic Voting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Security Aspects of Electronic Voting. Summary: The Help America Vote Act (HAVA) of 2002 was passed by Congress to ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Hot electron transmission in metals using epitaxial NiSi{sub 2}/n-Si(111) interfaces  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated hot electron transmission across epitaxial metal-disilicide/n-Si(111) interfaces using ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM). Different crystal orientations of epitaxial NiSi{sub 2} were grown on a Si(111) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy. The presence of different interfaces of NiSi{sub 2} on Si(111) were confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Electrical transport measurements reveal a clear rectifying Schottky interface with a barrier height of 0.69 eV. However, using BEEM, three different regions with different transmissions and Schottky barrier heights of 0.65 eV, 0.78 eV, and 0.71 eV are found. The addition of a thin Ni film on the NiSi{sub 2} layer strongly reduces the transmission in all the three regions and interestingly, almost equalizes the transmission across them.

Parui, S.; Wit, B.; Wees, B. J. van; Banerjee, T. [Physics of Nanodevices, Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Bignardi, L.; Rudolf, P. [Surfaces and Thin Films, Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Kooi, B. [Nanostructured Materials and Interfaces, Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

477

Computing and Electronics Computer Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computing and Electronics Technology Computer Technology NetworkManagementoption InformationSystemsManagementoption Computer System Technician Electronics Technology Energy Technology ace.cte.umt.edu www.cte.umt.edu Department of Applied Computing and Electronics Chair: Tom Gallagher Phone: 406.243.7814 Email: Thomas

Crone, Elizabeth

478

Optical manipulation of ultrafast electron and nuclear motion on metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect

We study the unoccupied electronic structure and dynamics of chemisorbed atoms and molecules on metal surfaces by time resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PP). spectroscopy, low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM), and theory. Our research concerns simple atomic adsorbates such as alkali and alkaline earth atoms, which provide fundamentally important models for adsorbate-surface interactions, and more complex adsorbates such as fullerenes on noble metals, which illustrate emergent interfacial properties that derive from intrinsic molecular attributes, and moleculemolecule and molecule-surface interactions. Our goal is to understand how these interactions contribute to formation of the interfacial electronic structure, and how thus formed electronic properties affect interfacial phenomena of importance to energy transduction and storage. Moreover, we explore how the interfacial electronic excitation drives dynamical phenomena such as charge transfer and surface femtochemistry.

Petek, Hrvoje

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

479

High Availability Electronics Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Availability modeling of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) predicts unacceptably low uptime with current electronics systems designs. High Availability (HA) analysis is being used as a guideline for all major machine systems including sources, utilities, cryogenics, magnets, power supplies, instrumentation and controls. R&D teams are seeking to achieve total machine high availability with nominal impact on system cost. The focus of this paper is the investigation of commercial standard HA architectures and packaging for Accelerator Controls and Instrumentation. Application of HA design principles to power systems and detector instrumentation are also discussed.

Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

2006-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

480

Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Electronics Power Electronics The power electronics activity focuses on research and development (R&D) for flexible, integrated, modular power electronics for power conditioning and control, including a power switch stage capable of running a variety of motors and loads. Efforts are underway to reduce overall system costs for these vehicles through the elimination of additional cooling loops to keep the power electronics within their safe operation ranges. These challenges are being met within the program through research in: Silicon carbide and Gallium Nitride semiconductors, which can be operated at much higher temperatures than current silicon semiconductors; Packaging innovations for higher temperature operation; Improved thermal control technologies; and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ncem electron microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Split-illumination electron holography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed a split-illumination electron holography that uses an electron biprism in the illuminating system and two biprisms (applicable to one biprism) in the imaging system, enabling holographic interference micrographs of regions far from the sample edge to be obtained. Using a condenser biprism, we split an electron wave into two coherent electron waves: one wave is to illuminate an observation area far from the sample edge in the sample plane and the other wave to pass through a vacuum space outside the sample. The split-illumination holography has the potential to greatly expand the breadth of applications of electron holography.

Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Aizawa, Shinji; Suzuki, Takahiro; Park, Hyun Soon [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Inada, Yoshikatsu [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Matsuda, Tsuyoshi [Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Taniyama, Akira [Corporate Research and Development Laboratories, Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Amagasaki, Hyogo 660-0891 (Japan); Shindo, Daisuke [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Tonomura, Akira [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Graduate University, Onna-son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

482

Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BL6-2c / Transmission X-ray Microscopy BL6-2c / Transmission X-ray Microscopy Home Researchers Publications Science Highlights Department of Energy Office of Science Search form Search Search TXM Search Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy Capabilities Full-field TXM is an excellent method to examine nanoscale heterogeneties in many materials, including complex hierarchical systems such as catalysts, fuel cells and battery electrodes, and biological and environmental samples, at 30 nm resolution.The transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) on beam line 6-2c at SSRL is capable of 2D imaging and tomography, as well as spectroscopic imaging for 2D and 3D elemental mapping and chemical mapping over tens of microns (up to mm in 2D). The field of view (FOV) is 30 microns, but mosaic images can be collected to

483

Influence of Polarization Setting on Gold Nanorod Signal at Nonplasmonic Wavelengths Under Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Researchers rely on a variety of microscopic techniques for observing and tracking anisotropic nanoparticles in real time experiments. This technical note focuses on the optical behavior exhibited by gold nanorods at nonplasmonic wavelengths under differential interference contrast microscopy (DIC). Intense diffraction patterns appear at nonplasmonic wavelengths, and the behavior of these patterns can be altered by adjusting the surrounding medium or the polarizer setting. Such patterns are absent when linear and crossed polarizations are utilized. Making polarization adjustments is important in DIC microscopy, because it affects bias retardation and image contrast. The nonplasmonic diffraction bands that were observed could potentially be exploited for rotational tracking, but more importantly, researchers should exhibit care in selecting a nanorod sample and the polarization setting when working with DIC microscopy.

Stender, Anthony S.; Augspurgert, Ashley E.; Wang, Gufeng: Fang, Ning

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

484

Electronic security device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a security device having a control box containing an electronic system and a communications loop over which the system transmits a signal. The device is constructed so that the communications loop can extend from the control box across the boundary of a portal such as a door into a sealed enclosure into which access is restricted whereby the loop must be damaged or moved in order for an entry to be made into the enclosure. The device is adapted for detecting unauthorized entries into such enclosures such as rooms or containers and for recording the time at which such entries occur for later reference. Additionally, the device detects attempts to tamper or interfere with the operation of the device itself and records the time at which such events take place. In the preferred embodiment, the security device includes a microprocessor-based electronic system and a detection module capable of registering changes in the voltage and phase of the signal transmitted over the loop. 11 figs.

Eschbach, E.A.; LeBlanc, E.J.; Griffin, J.W.

1992-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

485

Electronic security device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a security device having a control box (12) containing an electronic system (50) and a communications loop (14) over which the system transmits a signal. The device is constructed so that the communications loop can extend from the control box across the boundary of a portal such as a door into a sealed enclosure into which access is restricted whereby the loop must be damaged or moved in order for an entry to be made into the enclosure. The device is adapted for detecting unauthorized entries into such enclosures such as rooms or containers and for recording the time at which such entries occur for later reference. Additionally, the device detects attempts to tamper or interfere with the operation of the device itself and records the time at which such events take place. In the preferred embodiment, the security device includes a microprocessor-based electronic system (50) and a detection module (72) capable of registering changes in the voltage and phase of the signal transmitted over the loop.

Eschbach, Eugene A. (Richland, WA); LeBlanc, Edward J. (Kennewick, WA); Griffin, Jeffrey W. (Kennewick, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

NIST Electron and Optical Physics Division - 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electron Standing Waves: The electron standing waves produced by scattering of the surface state electrons from step edges and defects on Cu ...

487

Kk electronic A S | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kk electronic A S Jump to: navigation, search Name kk-electronic AS Place Herning, Denmark Zip DK-7400 Sector Wind energy Product Provides electronic wind turbine controllers....

488

Single-spin measurements for quantum computation using magnetic resonance force microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The quantum theory of a singlespin measurements using a magnetic resonance force microscopy is presented. We use an oscillating cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals technique. The frequency shift of the cantilever vibrations is estimated. We show that the frequency shift causes the formation of the Schroedinger cat state for the cantilever. The interaction between the cantilever and the environment quickly destroys the coherence between the two cantilever trajectories. It is shown that using partial adiabatic reversals one can obtain a significant increase in the frequency shift. We discuss the possibility of sub-magneton spin density detection in molecules using magnetic resonance force microscopy.

Berman, G. P. (Gennady P.); Borgonovi, F.; Rinkevicius, Z.; Tsifrinovich, V. I. (Vladimir I.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Studying Nanoscale Magnetism and its Dynamics with Soft X-ray Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy allows for imaging magnetic structures at a spatial resolution down to 15nm and a time resolution in the sub-100ps regime. Inherent elemental specificity can be used to image the magnetic response of individual components such as layers in multilayered systems. This review highlights current achievements and discusses the future potential of magnetic soft X-ray microscopy at fsec X-ray sources where snapshot images of ultrafast spin dynamics with a spatial resolution below 10nm will become feasible.

Mccall, Monnikue M; Fischer, Peter

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Surface science analysis of GaAs photocathodes following sustained electron beam delivery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power Free Electron Lasers (FEL). Photocathode quantum efficiency (QE) degradation is due to residual gasses in the electron source vacuum system being ionized and accelerated back to the photocathode. These investigations are a first attempt to characterize the nature of the photocathode degradation, and employ multiple surface and bulk analysis techniques to investigate damage mechanisms including sputtering of the Cs-oxidant surface monolayer, other surface chemistry effects, and ion implantation. Surface and bulk analysis studies were conducted on two GaAs photocathodes, which were removed from the JLab FEL DC photoemission gun after delivering electron beam, and two control samples. The analysis techniques include Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). In addition, two high-polarization strained superlattice GaAs photocathode samples, one removed from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) photoinjector and one unused, were also analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and SIMS. It was found that heat cleaning the FEL GaAs wafer introduces surface roughness, which seems to be reduced by prolonged use. The bulk GaAs samples retained a fairly well organized crystalline structure after delivering beam but shows evidence of Cs depletion on the surface. Within the precision of the SIMS and RBS measurements the data showed no indication of hydrogen implantation or lattice damage from ion back bombardment in the bulk GaAs wafers. In contrast, SIMS and TEM measurements of the strained superlattice photocathode show clear crystal damage in the wafer from ion back bombardment.

Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, Fay Hannon, Marcy Stutzman, V. Shutthanandan, Z. Zhu, M. Nandasri, S. V. Kuchibhatla, S. Thevuthasan, W. P. Hess

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

FREE-ELECTRON LASERS  

SciTech Connect

We can now produce intense, coherent light at wavelengths where no conventional lasers exist. The recent successes of devices known as free-electron lasers mark a striking confluence of two conceptual developments that themselves are only a few decades old. The first of these, the laser, is a product of the fifties and sixties whose essential characteristics have made it a staple resource in almost every field of science and technology. In a practical sense, what defines a laser is its emission of monochromatic, coherent light (that is, light of a single wavelength, with its waves locked in step) at a wavelength in the infrared, visible, or ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum. A second kind of light, called synchrotron radiation, is a by-product of the age of particle accelerators and was first observed in the laboratory in 1947. As the energies of accelerators grew in the 1960s and 70s, intense, incoherent beams of ultraviolet radiation and x--rays became available at machines built for high-energy physics research. Today, several facilities operate solely as sources of synchrotron light. Unlike the well-collimated monochromatic light emitted by lasers, however, this incoherent radiation is like a sweeping searchlight--more accurately, like the headlight of a train on a circular track--whose wavelengths encompass a wide spectral band. Now, in several laboratories around the world, researchers have exploited the physics of these two light sources and have combined the virtues of both in a single contrivance, the free-electron laser, or FEL (1). The emitted light is laserlike in its narrow, sharply peaked spectral distribution and in its phase coherence, yet it can be of a wavelength unavailable with ordinary lasers. Furthermore, like synchrotron radiation, but unlike the output of most conventional lasers, the radiation emitted by free-electron lasers can be tuned, that is, its wavelength can be easily varied across a wide range. The promise of this new technology extends from the fields of solid-state physics, gas- and liquid-phase photochemistry, and surface catalysis to futuristic schemes for ultrahigh-energy linear accelerators.

Sessler, A.M.; Vaughan, D.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Generation of attosecond electron bunches  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ultra-fast science is an important new research frontier that is driving the development of novel sources for generation of extremely short x-ray and electron pulses. Recent advances in femtosecond lasers have stimulated development of femtosecond x-ray sources that allow the study of matter at the time scale shorter than period of oscillations of atoms in molecules, {approx} 100 fs. The next breakthrough would be a source of electron pulses comparable with atomic periods {omega}{sup -1} {approx} 100 attosecond (10{sup -16} s), where {omega} is a transition frequency between atomic levels. This will open qualitatively new class of phenomena based on the interaction of atomic electrons in the medium with a collective electric field of electron pulses and not with their individual electrons. For example, one can expect coherent ionization losses that are proportional to a square number of electrons in the microbunch, phase synchronized excitation of medium followed by its relaxation with a radiation of a single-cycled optical pulse, excitation of entanglement states in the medium of atoms with few valence electrons, and possibly other new phenomena, yet to be identified. Simple estimation of coherent ionization losses shows that a 100 MeV, 100 attosecond electron pulse containing 10{sup 5} electrons will lose its total energy after propagating only {approx} 200{micro}m through liquid hydrogen. This is approximately 104 times shorter stopping range than it is for a long (on atomic scale) electron bunch.

Zholents, Alexander A.; Zolotorev, Max S.; Wan, Weishi

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

493

ELECTRONIC INTEGRATING CIRCUIT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electronic integrating circuit using a transistor with a capacitor connected between the emitter and collector through which the capacitor discharges at a rate proportional to the input current at the base is described. Means are provided for biasing the base with an operating bias and for applying a voltage pulse to the capacitor for charging to an initial voltage. A current dividing diode is connected between the base and emitter of the transistor, and signal input terminal means are coupled to the juncture of the capacitor and emitter and to the base of the transistor. At the end of the integration period, the residual voltage on said capacitor is less by an amount proportional to the integral of the input signal. Either continuous or intermittent periods of integration are provided. (AEC)

Englemann, R.H.

1963-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

494

Power electronics reliability analysis.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the DOE and industry with a general process for analyzing power electronics reliability. The analysis can help with understanding the main causes of failures, downtime, and cost and how to reduce them. One approach is to collect field maintenance data and use it directly to calculate reliability metrics related to each cause. Another approach is to model the functional structure of the equipment using a fault tree to derive system reliability from component reliability. Analysis of a fictitious device demonstrates the latter process. Optimization can use the resulting baseline model to decide how to improve reliability and/or lower costs. It is recommended that both electric utilities and equipment manufacturers make provisions to collect and share data in order to lay the groundwork for improving reliability into the future. Reliability analysis helps guide reliability improvements in hardware and software technology including condition monitoring and prognostics and health management.

Smith, Mark A.; Atcitty, Stanley

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

VIA ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

39 MacDougal Street, Third Floor * New York, New York 10012 * (212) 992-8932 * www.policyintegrity.org 39 MacDougal Street, Third Floor * New York, New York 10012 * (212) 992-8932 * www.policyintegrity.org March 21, 2011 VIA ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION Office of the General Counsel US Department of Energy Washington, DC Attention: Regulatory Burden RFI - Docket No. DOE-HQ-2011-0014-0001 Subject: Response to Request for Information on "Reducing Regulatory Burden," 76 Fed. Reg. 6123 (Feb. 3, 2011) The Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University School of Law submits the following comments to the Department of Energy ("DOE") in response to its request for comments on the formulation of a preliminary plan for retrospective analysis as required by Executive Order 13,563.

496

Electronic distribution backup apparatus  

SciTech Connect

An electric distribution backup apparatus is described comprising an electronic distributor for sequentially distributing an ignition signal to each of igniter disposed so as to correspond to respective cylinders of an engine on the basis of a reference position signal for each of the cylinders generated by a revolution sensor in accordance with the revolution of the engine and on the basis of a rotating angle signal generated by the revolution sensor. The improvement comprising: an auxiliary revolution sensor for detecting another reference position signal of each of the cylinders when the revolution sensor for generating the two signals is out of order; control means for outputting a failure judging signal in response to detection of the failure of the revolution sensor on the basis of the two signals from revolution sensor; and a pseudo reference position signal generator for generating a pseudo reference position signal in place of the reference position signal on the basis of the auxiliary reference cylinder signal.

Sasaki, S.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

497

Protocols for electron dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

Brief comments are made on the standardezation of electron dose calibration procedures in relation to the recommeudations made by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine 1966, The Mordic Association of Clinical Physics 1971, The Hospital Physicists Association 1971, and the ICRU 1972. Errors arising from depth-dose curves are discussed, together with those arising from the specification of beam energy using the half-value depth in water. It is recommended that the depth-dose curves (especially in the region of dose maximum) be measured for each machine, the depth of calibration be chosen as close to the maximum as possible, and the energy be determined from the established rangeenergy relationships. (UK)

De Almeida, C.E.; Almond, P.R.

1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

ELECTRONIC TRIGGER CIRCUIT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electronic trigger circuit is described of the type where an output pulse is obtained only after an input voltage has cqualed or exceeded a selected reference voltage. In general, the invention comprises a source of direct current reference voltage in series with an impedance and a diode rectifying element. An input pulse of preselected amplitude causes the diode to conduct and develop a signal across the impedance. The signal is delivered to an amplifier where an output pulse is produced and part of the output is fed back in a positive manner to the diode so that the amplifier produces a steep wave front trigger pulsc at the output. The trigger point of the described circuit is not subject to variation due to the aging, etc., of multi-electrode tabes, since the diode circuit essentially determines the trigger point.

Russell, J.A.G.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Personnel electronic neutron dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personnel electronic dosimeter includes a neutron-proton and neutron-alpha converter for providing an electrical signal having a magnitude proportional to the energy of a detected proton or alpha particle produced from the converter, a pulse generator circuit for generating a pulse having a duration controlled by the weighed effect of the amplitude of the electrical signal, an oscillator enabled by the pulse for generating a train of clock pulses for a time dependent upon the pulse length, a counter for counting the clock pulses, and an indicator for providing a direct reading and aural alarm when the count indicates that the wearer has been exposed to a selected level of neutron dose equivalent.

Falk, R.B.; Tyree, W.H.

1982-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

500

Pulsed electron beam precharger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Florida State University is investigating the concept of pulsed electron beams for fly ash precipitation. This report describes the results and data on three of the subtasks of this project and preliminary work only on the remaining five subtasks. Described are the modification of precharger for pulsed and DC energization of anode; installation of the Q/A measurement system; and modification and installation of pulsed power supply to provide both pulsed and DC energization of the anode. The other tasks include: measurement of the removal efficiency for monodisperse simulated fly ash particles; measurement of particle charge; optimization of pulse energization schedule for maximum removal efficiency; practical assessment of results; and measurement of the removal efficiency for polydisperse test particles. 15 figs., 1 tab. (CK)

Finney, W.C. (ed.); Shelton, W.N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z