Sample records for ncem electron microscopy

  1. Electron Microscopy Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Microscopy Center Argonne Home > EMC > EMC Home Electron Microscopy Center Web Site has moved This page has moved to http:www.anl.govcnmgroupelectron-microscopy-cente...

  2. Electron Microscopy Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date:research communityElectricityLicensing -Electron

  3. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  4. RESEARCH ENGINEER IN ADVANCED ANALYTICAL ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    RESEARCH ENGINEER IN ADVANCED ANALYTICAL ELECTRON MICROSCOPY Department of Materials Science. #12;Job Description (for website) Job Title: Research Engineer in Advanced Analytical Electron or an engineering discipline and four years of demonstrated experience in electron microscopy. Requirements

  5. Electron Microscopy | Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities Atomic-resolution imaging of internal materials structure with scanning transmission and transmission electron microscopy Spectroscopic characterization with...

  6. Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Colliex, C. [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

  7. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy for Nanostructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    152 6 Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy for Nanostructure Characterization S. J. Pennycook. Introduction The scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is an invaluable tool atom. The STEM works on the same principle as the normal scanning electron microscope (SEM), by forming

  8. Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization...

  9. Fast electron microscopy via compressive sensing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Kurt W; Anderson, Hyrum S; Wheeler, Jason W

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Various technologies described herein pertain to compressive sensing electron microscopy. A compressive sensing electron microscope includes a multi-beam generator and a detector. The multi-beam generator emits a sequence of electron patterns over time. Each of the electron patterns can include a plurality of electron beams, where the plurality of electron beams is configured to impart a spatially varying electron density on a sample. Further, the spatially varying electron density varies between each of the electron patterns in the sequence. Moreover, the detector collects signals respectively corresponding to interactions between the sample and each of the electron patterns in the sequence.

  10. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Monday, May 23, 2011 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference room 137-322 Professor Tom Vogt, NanoCenter & Department of...

  11. In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of Interfaces in Li-ion Batteries: Challenges and In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of...

  12. Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  13. Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Catalyst...

  14. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials Investigations of electrode interface and architecture...

  15. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by inmore »this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.« less

  16. Scanning electron microscopy of cold gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santra, Bodhaditya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultracold quantum gases offer unique possibilities to study interacting many-body quantum systems. Probing and manipulating such systems with ever increasing degree of control requires novel experimental techniques. Scanning electron microscopy is a high resolution technique which can be used for in situ imaging, single site addressing in optical lattices and precision density engineering. Here, we review recent advances and achievements obtained with this technique and discuss future perspectives.

  17. Flash Scanning Electron Microscopy Raphael Sznitman, Aurelien Lucchi, Marco Cantoni,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    Flash Scanning Electron Microscopy Raphael Sznitman, Aurelien Lucchi, Marco Cantoni, Graham Knott. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) is an invaluable tool for biologists and neuroscientists to study brain earlier methods, we explicitly balance the conflicting requirements of spending enough time scanning

  18. New Developments in Transmission Electron Microscopy for Nanotechnology**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    New Developments in Transmission Electron Microscopy for Nanotechnology** By Zhong Lin Wang* 1. Electron Microscopy and Nanotechnology Nanotechnology, as an international initiative for science manufacturing are the foundation of nanotechnology. Tracking the historical background of why nanotechnology

  19. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Probing of Native Oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing of Native Oxide and Artificial Layers on Silicon Nanoparticles for Lithium Ion In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Probing of Native Oxide and Artificial...

  20. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-situ characterization and diagnostics of mechanical degradation in electrodes...

  1. advanced electron microscopy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Syllabus MSE 581: Advanced Electron Microscopy Course description: Present the theory of...

  2. Entanglement-assisted electron microscopy based on a flux qubit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamoto, Hiroshi, E-mail: okamoto@akita-pu.ac.jp [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Akita Prefectural University, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan); Nagatani, Yukinori [National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki 444-8787 (Japan)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A notorious problem in high-resolution biological electron microscopy is radiation damage caused by probe electrons. Hence, acquisition of data with minimal number of electrons is of critical importance. Quantum approaches may represent the only way to improve the resolution in this context, but all proposed schemes to date demand delicate control of the electron beam in highly unconventional electron optics. Here we propose a scheme that involves a flux qubit based on a radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device, inserted in a transmission electron microscope. The scheme significantly improves the prospect of realizing a quantum-enhanced electron microscope for radiation-sensitive specimens.

  3. In Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Battery Research. Abstract: The recent development of in situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details...

  4. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  5. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  6. Imaging Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Buck, Edgar C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryo-electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in the collapse of hydrated gel-like EPS into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy imaging of hydraulic cement microstructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    Scanning electron microscopy imaging of hydraulic cement microstructure by Paul Stutzman Building Reprinted from Cement and Concrete Composites, Vol. 26, No. 8, 957-966 pp., November 2004. NOTE: This paper;Available online at www.sciencedirect.com SCIENCE@OIRECT@ Cement & Concrete CompositesELSEVIER Cement

  8. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saibil, Helen R., E-mail: h.saibil@mail.cryst.bbk.ac.uk [Birkbeck College, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Grünewald, Kay [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Stuart, David I. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Birkbeck College, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  9. Microfabricated high-bandpass foucault aperture for electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glaeser, Robert; Cambie, Rossana; Jin, Jian

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A variant of the Foucault (knife-edge) aperture is disclosed that is designed to provide single-sideband (SSB) contrast at low spatial frequencies but retain conventional double-sideband (DSB) contrast at high spatial frequencies in transmission electron microscopy. The aperture includes a plate with an inner open area, a support extending from the plate at an edge of the open area, a half-circle feature mounted on the support and located at the center of the aperture open area. The radius of the half-circle portion of reciprocal space that is blocked by the aperture can be varied to suit the needs of electron microscopy investigation. The aperture is fabricated from conductive material which is preferably non-oxidizing, such as gold, for example.

  10. Aberration-Coreected Electron Microscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu,Y.; Wall, J.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The last decade witnessed the rapid development and implementation of aberration correction in electron optics, realizing a more-than-70-year-old dream of aberration-free electron microscopy with a spatial resolution below one angstrom [1-9]. With sophisticated aberration correctors, modern electron microscopes now can reveal local structural information unavailable with neutrons and x-rays, such as the local arrangement of atoms, order/disorder, electronic inhomogeneity, bonding states, spin configuration, quantum confinement, and symmetry breaking [10-17]. Aberration correction through multipole-based correctors, as well as the associated improved stability in accelerating voltage, lens supplies, and goniometers in electron microscopes now enables medium-voltage (200-300kV) microscopes to achieve image resolution at or below 0.1nm. Aberration correction not only improves the instrument's spatial resolution but, equally importantly, allows larger objective lens pole-piece gaps to be employed thus realizing the potential of the instrument as a nanoscale property-measurement tool. That is, while retaining high spatial resolution, we can use various sample stages to observe the materials response under various temperature, electric- and magnetic- fields, and atmospheric environments. Such capabilities afford tremendous opportunities to tackle challenging science and technology issues in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology. The research goal of the electron microscopy group at the Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science and the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, as well as the Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is to elucidate the microscopic origin of the physical- and chemical-behavior of materials, and the role of individual, or groups of atoms, especially in their native functional environments. We plan to accomplish this by developing and implementing various quantitative electron microscopy techniques in strongly correlated electron systems and nanostructured materials. As a first step, with the support of Materials Science Division, Office of Basic Energy Science, US Department of Energy, and the New York State Office of Science, Technology, and Academic Research, recently we acquired three aberration-corrected electron microscopes from the three major microscope manufacturers, i.e., JEOL, Hitachi, and FEI. The Hitachi HD2700C is equipped with a probe corrector, the FEI Titan 80-300 has an imaging corrector, while the JEOL2200MCO has both. All the correctors are of the dual-hexapole type, designed and manufactured by CEOS GmbH based on the design due to Rose and Haider [3, 18]. All these three are one-of-a-kind in the US, designed for specialized capabilities in characterizing nanoscale structure. In this chapter, we review the performance of these state-of-the art instruments and the new challenges associated with the improved spatial resolution, including the environment requirements of the laboratory that hosts these instruments. Although each instrument we describe here has its own strengths and drawbacks, it is not our intention to rank them in terms of their performance, especially their spatial resolution in imaging.

  11. Confocal Microscopy for Modeling Electron Microbeam Irradiation of Skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John H.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For radiation exposures employing targeted sources such as particle microbeams, the deposition of energy and dose will depend on the spatial heterogeneity of the spample. Although cell structural variations are relatively minor for two-dimensional cell cultures, they can vary significantly for fully differential tissues. Employing high-resolution confocal microscopy, we have determined the spatial distribution, size, and shape of epidermal kerantinocyte nuclei for the full-thickness EpiDerm skin model (MatTek, Ashland, VA). Application of these data to claculate the microdosimetry and microdistribution of energy deposition by an electron microbeam is discussed.

  12. Combined Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Tilt- and Focal Series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahmen, Tim [German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Germany] [German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Germany; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre G [ORNL] [ORNL; Lupini, Andrew R [ORNL] [ORNL; Kubel, Christian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Leopoldshafen, Germany] [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Leopoldshafen, Germany; Slusallek, Phillip [German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Germany] [German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), Germany; De Jonge, Niels [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a combined tilt- and focal series is proposed as a new recording scheme for high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Three-dimensional (3D) data were acquired by mechanically tilting the specimen, and recording a through-focal series at each tilt direction. The sample was a whole-mount macrophage cell with embedded gold nanoparticles. The tilt focal algebraic reconstruction technique (TF-ART) is introduced as a new algorithm to reconstruct tomograms from such combined tilt- and focal series. The feasibility of TF-ART was demonstrated by 3D reconstruction of the experimental 3D data. The results were compared with a conventional STEM tilt series of a similar sample. The combined tilt- and focal series led to smaller missing wedge artifacts, and a higher axial resolution than obtained for the STEM tilt series, thus improving on one of the main issues of tilt series-based electron tomography.

  13. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  14. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Haimei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meng, Shirley Ying [Univ. of California-San Diego, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by in this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.

  15. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Patwardhan, Ardan [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); Scheres, Sjors [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Topf, Maya [University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Roseman, Alan [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Winn, Martyn, E-mail: martyn.winn@stfc.ac.uk [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Science and Technology Facilities Council, Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) is a new initiative for the structural biology community, following the success of CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography. Progress in supporting the users and developers of cryoEM software is reported. The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy of whiskers and hillocks formed on Al films deposited onto a glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saka, H.; Fujino, S.; Kuroda, K. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); Tsujimoto, K.; Tsuji, S. [Display Technology, IBM Japan, Ltd., Shimotsuruma, Yamato, Kanagawa 242 (Japan); Takatsuji, H. [Display Technology, IBM Japan, Ltd., Ichimiyake, Yasu-gun, Shiga 520-23 (Japan)

    1998-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Whiskers and hillocks formed on an Al film deposited onto a glass substrate have been observed by means of a variety of transmission electron microscopy technique.

  17. Imaging doped silicon test structures using low energy electron microscopy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakakura, Craig Yoshimi; Anderson, Meredith Lynn; Kellogg, Gary Lee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final SAND Report for the LDRD Project 105877 - 'Novel Diagnostic for Advanced Measurements of Semiconductor Devices Exposed to Adverse Environments' - funded through the Nanoscience to Microsystems investment area. Along with the continuous decrease in the feature size of semiconductor device structures comes a growing need for inspection tools with high spatial resolution and high sample throughput. Ideally, such tools should be able to characterize both the surface morphology and local conductivity associated with the structures. The imaging capabilities and wide availability of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) make them an obvious choice for imaging device structures. Dopant contrast from pn junctions using secondary electrons in the SEM was first reported in 1967 and more recently starting in the mid-1990s. However, the serial acquisition process associated with scanning techniques places limits on the sample throughput. Significantly improved throughput is possible with the use of a parallel imaging scheme such as that found in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). The application of PEEM and LEEM to device structures relies on contrast mechanisms that distinguish differences in dopant type and concentration. Interestingly, one of the first applications of PEEM was a study of the doping of semiconductors, which showed that the PEEM contrast was very sensitive to the doping level and that dopant concentrations as low as 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} could be detected. More recent PEEM investigations of Schottky contacts were reported in the late 1990s by Giesen et al., followed by a series of papers in the early 2000s addressing doping contrast in PEEM by Ballarotto and co-workers and Frank and co-workers. In contrast to PEEM, comparatively little has been done to identify contrast mechanisms and assess the capabilities of LEEM for imaging semiconductor device strictures. The one exception is the work of Mankos et al., who evaluated the impact of high-throughput requirements on the LEEM designs and demonstrated new applications of imaging modes with a tilted electron beam. To assess its potential as a semiconductor device imaging tool and to identify contrast mechanisms, we used LEEM to investigate doped Si test structures. In section 2, Imaging Oxide-Covered Doped Si Structures Using LEEM, we show that the LEEM technique is able to provide reasonably high contrast images across lateral pn junctions. The observed contrast is attributed to a work function difference ({Delta}{phi}) between the p- and n-type regions. However, because the doped regions were buried under a thermal oxide ({approx}3.5 nm thick), e-beam charging during imaging prevented quantitative measurements of {Delta}{phi}. As part of this project, we also investigated a series of similar test structures in which the thermal oxide was removed by a chemical etch. With the oxide removed, we obtained intensity-versus-voltage (I-V) curves through the transition from mirror to LEEM mode and determined the relative positions of the vacuum cutoffs for the differently doped regions. Although the details are not discussed in this report, the relative position in voltage of the vacuum cutoffs are a direct measure of the work function difference ({Delta}{phi}) between the p- and n-doped regions.

  18. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF HELIUM BEARING FUSION WELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tosten, M; Michael Morgan, M

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was conducted to characterize the helium bubble distributions in tritium-charged-and-aged 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel fusion welds containing approximately 150 appm helium-3. TEM foils were prepared from C-shaped fracture toughness test specimens containing {delta} ferrite levels ranging from 4 to 33 volume percent. The weld microstructures in the low ferrite welds consisted mostly of austenite and discontinuous, skeletal {delta} ferrite. In welds with higher levels of {delta} ferrite, the ferrite was more continuous and, in some areas of the 33 volume percent sample, was the matrix/majority phase. The helium bubble microstructures observed were similar in all samples. Bubbles were found in the austenite but not in the {delta} ferrite. In the austenite, bubbles had nucleated homogeneously in the grain interiors and heterogeneously on dislocations. Bubbles were not found on any austenite/austenite grain boundaries or at the austenite/{delta} ferrite interphase interfaces. Bubbles were not observed in the {delta} ferrite because of the combined effects of the low solubility and rapid diffusion of tritium through the {delta} ferrite which limited the amount of helium present to form visible bubbles.

  19. Analytical Electron Microscopy examination of uranium contamination at the DOE Fernald operation site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) has been used to identify uranium-bearing phases present in contaminated soils from the DOE Fernald operation site. A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and AEM was used in isolating and characterizing uranium-rich regions of the contaminated soils. Soil samples were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) by ultramicrotomy using an embedding resin previously employed for aquatic colloids and biological samples. This preparation method allowed direct comparison between SEM and TEM images. At the macroscopic level much of the uranium appears to be associated with clays in the soils; however, electron beam analysis revealed that the uranium is present as discrete phases, including iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite. Only low levels of uranium were actually within the clay minerals. The distribution of uranium phases was inhomogeneous at the submicron level.

  20. Analytical electron microscopy characterization of uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Site, FY1993 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, E.C.; Cunnane, J.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) is being used to determine the nature of uranium in soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The information gained from these studies is being used to develop and test remediation technologies. Investigations using SEM have shown that uranium is contained within particles that are typically 1 to 100 {mu}m in diameter. Further analysis with AEM has shown that these uranium-rich regions are made up of discrete uranium-bearing phases. The distribution of these uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level.

  1. FLUID DISTRIBUTION IN PROGRESSIVE PULMONARY EDEMA: A LOW TEMPERATURE SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hook, Greogry R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    extchanging function of the lung. Circulation 46: 390-408,electron microscopy of the lungs. Annals. Med. Sect. Pol.Bioengineering Aspects of the Lung, edited by J. B. West,

  2. Engineered ascorbate peroxidase as a genetically encoded reporter for electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deerinck, Thomas J

    Electron microscopy (EM) is the standard method for imaging cellular structures with nanometer resolution, but existing genetic tags are inactive in most cellular compartments[superscript 1] or require light and can be ...

  3. Demonstration of Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy / Spectroscopy on the Au/Si (001) system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drummond, Mary Alyssa

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM) capabilities of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) have been verified. BEEM is used to analyze the characteristics of buried energy barriers and was developed as an extension of scanning tunneling...

  4. Reconstruction of 3D Neuronal Structures from Densely Packed Electron Microscopy Data Stacks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Huei-Fang

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of fully decoding how the brain works requires a detailed wiring diagram of the brain network that reveals the complete connectivity matrix. Recent advances in high-throughput 3D electron microscopy (EM) image ...

  5. Isolation methods and electron microscopy of the Internal Cork Virus of sweet potatoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickens, Edgar Eugene

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISOLATION METHODS AND ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF THE INTERNAL CORK VIRUS OF SWEET POTATOES A Thesis By Edgar Eugene Pickens Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 Major Subject Biochemistry ISOLATION METHODS AND ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF THE INTERNAL CORK VIRUS OF SWEET POTATOES A Thesis Edgar Eugene Pickens Approved as to style and content by: (Cnairman of Committee) (Head wf...

  6. "Electron microscopy in Life Sciences" Carmen Lpez-Iglesias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritort, Felix

    .) * Molecular, Supramolecular and Cellular levels * Molecular localization in subcellular scale * Topography: association of a wave nature to each material particle, also to the electrons. ·1926 Busch proved

  7. A quantum mechanical scheme to reduce radiation damage in electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that radiation damage to unstained biological specimens is not an intractable problem in electron microscopy. When a structural hypothesis of a specimen is available, quantum mechanical principles allow us to verify the hypothesis with a very low electron dose. Realization of such a concept requires precise control of the electron wave front. Based on a diffractive electron optical implementation, we demonstrate the feasibility of this new method by both experimental and numerical investigations.

  8. A quantum mechanical scheme to reduce radiation damage in electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroshi Okamoto; Tatiana Latychevskaia; Hans-Werner Fink

    2015-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that radiation damage to unstained biological specimens is not an intractable problem in electron microscopy. When a structural hypothesis of a specimen is available, quantum mechanical principles allow us to verify the hypothesis with a very low electron dose. Realization of such a concept requires precise control of the electron wave front. Based on a diffractive electron optical implementation, we demonstrate the feasibility of this new method by both experimental and numerical investigations.

  9. Scanning electron microscopy study of carbon nanotubes heated at high temperatures in air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . INTRODUCTION Because of their remarkable physical and electronic properties, carbon nanotubes are promising nanotubes in air,3,4 in an oxygen stream,5 or under a flow of carbon dioxide gas.6 Thinning of nanotubesScanning electron microscopy study of carbon nanotubes heated at high temperatures in air Xuekun Lu

  10. The application of Graphene as a sample support in Transmission Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantelic, R S; Kaiser, U; Stahlberg, H

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transmission electron microscopy has witnessed rampant development and surging point resolution over the past few years. The improved imaging performance of modern electron microscopes shifts the bottleneck for image contrast and resolution to sample preparation. Hence, it is increasingly being realized that the full potential of electron microscopy will only be realized with the optimization of current sample preparation techniques. Perhaps the most recognized issues are background signal and noise contributed by sample supports, sample charging and instability. Graphene provides supports of single atom thickness, extreme physical stability, periodic structure, and ballistic electrical conductivity. As an increasing number of applications adapting graphene to their benefit emerge, we discuss the unique capabilities afforded by the use of graphene as a sample support for electron microscopy.

  11. In-Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for Battery Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehdi, Beata L [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Gu, Meng [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Parent, Lucas [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Xu, WU [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Nasybulin, Eduard [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Chen, Xilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL] [ORNL; Xu, Pinghong [University of California, Davis] [University of California, Davis; Welch, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Abellan, Patricia [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Zhang, Ji-Guang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wang, Chongmin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Arslan, Ilke [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Evans, James E [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Browning, Nigel [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent development of in-situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in-situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in-situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  12. Characterization of multilayer nitride coatings by electron microscopy and modulus mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pemmasani, Sai Pramod [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur P.O., Hyderabad — 500005 India (India); School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad, Gachibowli, Hyderabad — 500046 India (India); Rajulapati, Koteswararao V. [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad, Gachibowli, Hyderabad — 500046 India (India); Ramakrishna, M.; Valleti, Krishna [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur P.O., Hyderabad — 500005 India (India); Gundakaram, Ravi C., E-mail: ravi.gundakaram@arci.res.in [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur P.O., Hyderabad — 500005 India (India); Joshi, Shrikant V. [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur P.O., Hyderabad — 500005 India (India)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses multi-scale characterization of physical vapour deposited multilayer nitride coatings using a combination of electron microscopy and modulus mapping. Multilayer coatings with a triple layer structure based on TiAlN and nanocomposite nitrides with a nano-multilayered architecture were deposited by Cathodic arc deposition and detailed microstructural studies were carried out employing Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, Electron Backscattered Diffraction, Focused Ion Beam and Cross sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy in order to identify the different phases and to study microstructural features of the various layers formed as a result of the deposition process. Modulus mapping was also performed to study the effect of varying composition on the moduli of the nano-multilayers within the triple layer coating by using a Scanning Probe Microscopy based technique. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt on modulus mapping of cathodic arc deposited nitride multilayer coatings. This work demonstrates the application of Scanning Probe Microscopy based modulus mapping and electron microscopy for the study of coating properties and their relation to composition and microstructure. - Highlights: • Microstructure of a triple layer nitride coating studied at multiple length scales. • Phases identified by EDS, EBSD and SAED (TEM). • Nanolayered, nanocomposite structure of the coating studied using FIB and TEM. • Modulus mapping identified moduli variation even in a nani-multilayer architecture.

  13. Electron microscopy of phase and structural transformations in soft magnetic nanocrystalline Fe-Zr-N films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhigalina, O. M., E-mail: zhigal@ns.crys.ras.ru; Khmelenin, D. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Sheftel', E. N.; Usmanova, G. Sh. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science (Russian Federation); Vasil'ev, A. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Carlsson, A. [FEI Company (Netherlands)] [FEI Company (Netherlands)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of deposition conditions (film thickness) on the structure of soft magnetic Fe{sub 80-78}Zr{sub 10}N{sub 10-12} films formed by reactive magnetron deposition on a heat-resistant glass substrate has been investigated by analytical transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution electron microscopy, and diffraction analysis. The processes of evolution of the phase and structural state of films and the film-substrate interface upon annealing in the temperature range of 200-650 Degree-Sign C have been analyzed taking into account the thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural factors and the specific features of the nanocrystalline state.

  14. Transmission electron microscopy of undermined passive films on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Zhu, Y.; Sabatini, R.L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Science; Ryan, M.P. [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study has been made of the passive film remaining over pits on stainless steel using a high resolution transmission electron microscope. Type 305 stainless steel was passivated in a borate buffer solution and pitted in ferric chloride. Passive films formed at 0.2 V relative to a saturated calomel electrode were found to be amorphous. Films formed at higher potentials showed only broad diffraction rings. The passive film was found to cover a remnant lacy structure formed over pits passivated at 0.8 V. The metallic strands of the lace were roughly hemitubular in shape with the curved surface facing the center of the pit.

  15. Los Alamos: MST-MTM: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos8, 2014addsAlamos,3000F

  16. Los Alamos: MST-MTM: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos8,

  17. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos8,XL30 Environmental

  18. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos8,XL30

  19. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos8,XL30Tecnai F30

  20. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos8,XL30Tecnai F30840 EPMA

  1. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos8,XL30Tecnai F30840

  2. Los Alamos: MST: MST-6: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5invests inLos8,XL30Tecnai F30840XL30

  3. Los Alamos: MST-MTM: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is YourAwardspublicexceedsScientistsdiseaseLosElectron

  4. The application of reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and electron microprobe analysis to the study of dusts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagni, A.M.; Hagni, R.D. (Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 500,000 tons of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust is generated each year in the US. The mineralogy and characterization of this dust is being studied to determine the phases and relationships of the valuable zinc, the hazardous lead, cadmium, and chromium, and the deleterious chlorine and fluorine. EAF dust averages 15--20% zinc and is therefore a potential source for 100,000 tons of zinc per year. The major mineralogical phases of EAF dust are franklinite (ZnFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]), magnetite (FeFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]), jacobsite (MnFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]), solid solutions between franklinite-magnetite-jacobsite, and zincite (ZnO). Franklinite, magnetite, and jacobsite solid solutions commonly are cruciform or dendritic crystals in a Ca-Fe-Si matrix and contain up to 5% chromium. Magnetite also occurs as spheres partially oxidized to hematite (Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3]) along its octahedral planes. The dust particles are predominantly in the form of spheres and broken spheres, ranging in size from 200 [mu]m to less than 1 [mu]m. Although many spheres are in the size ranges of 40--50 [mu]m and 10--20 [mu]m, most are less than 1 [mu]m in diameter. Automated scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) probed 118 particles in search of chlorine phases. Chlorine-bearing lime (CaO) was identified by that SEM study. In addition, chlorine is present as hydrophylite (CaCl[sub 2]) and sylvite (KCl). Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) was used to sputter the outer 180[angstrom] layer of the dust particles to search for the possible presence of cotunnite (PbCl[sub 2]) coatings, but none were detected. Minor phases detected include chalcopyrite (CuFeS[sub 2]), sphalerite (ZnS), pyrite (FeS[sub 2]), and coke.

  5. A Facile Method for the Stain-Free Visualization of Hierarchical Structures with Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Paul E.; Appel, Eric A.; Jones, Samuel T.; del Barrio, Jesús; Lan, Yang; Scherman, Oren A.

    2015-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A Facile Method for the Stain-Free Visualization of Hierarchical Structures with Electron Microscopy ?? Paul E. Williams, Eric A. Appel, Samuel T. Jones, Jesús del Barrio, Yang Lan, Oren A. Scherman ? Within the last decade supramolecular self assem... struc- tures. However, most of these materials traditionally consist of carbon and other light elements, which are weak electron scatterers, therefore giving rise to low scattering constants and making them difficult (or impossible) to image.[28...

  6. Nano-mineralogy studies by advanced electron microscopy Chi Ma and George R. Rossman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Chi

    Nano-mineralogy studies by advanced electron microscopy Chi Ma and George R. Rossman Division and planetary materials easier and faster down to nano-scales. Small but new minerals with important geological significance are being discovered. Nano-features are being discovered in many common minerals and gems, which

  7. Dynamic Characterization of Graphene Growth and Etching by Oxygen on Ru(0001) by Photoemission Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Xinhe

    Dynamic Characterization of Graphene Growth and Etching by Oxygen on Ru(0001) by Photoemission of graphene on Ru(0001) was investigated by photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) and scanning tunneling, we show that graphene overlayers with sizes ranging from nanometers to sub-millimeters have been

  8. Rumen microbial degradation of modified lignin plants observed by electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Rumen microbial degradation of modified lignin plants observed by electron microscopy C Mign6, E-Genès-Champanelle, France The microbial degradation of modified lignin tobacco (Samson variety) plants (homozygous line 40 introduced in the rumen for 4 h, 8 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. As from the first hours of degradation (8 h

  9. Low-Energy Electron Microscopy Studies of Interlayer Mass Transport Kinetics on TiN(111)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Israeli, Navot

    Low-Energy Electron Microscopy Studies of Interlayer Mass Transport Kinetics on TiN(111) S annealing of three-dimensional (3D) TiN(111) mounds, consisting of stacked 2D islands, at temperatures-limited decay of 2D TiN islands on atomically-flat TiN(111) terraces [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 (2002) 176102

  10. TheElectronMicroscopyCore(EMC) UniversityofMissouriColumbia,MO65211

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    TheElectronMicroscopyCore(EMC) UniversityofMissouriColumbia,MO65211 The. The EMC houses two field emission SEM's, a Hitachi cold-field SEM (S-4700) and a FEI thermal FE SEM imaging and chemical analysis from their SEM/EDS systems. AdditionalSupportby: FormoreInformationortoregistergoto:http://www.emc

  11. FtsZ Condensates: An In Vitro Electron Microscopy Study David Popp,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Harold P.

    FtsZ Condensates: An In Vitro Electron Microscopy Study David Popp,1 Mitsusada Iwasa,1 Akihiro in vitro system of supramolecular condensates experimentally and theoretically is DNA, which also exists in highly condensed, tightly packed states in viruses and sperm cells in vivo.2 The principle morphologies

  12. New nanocrystalline manganese oxides as cathode materials for lithium batteries : electron microscopy, electrochemical and X-ray absorption studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 New nanocrystalline manganese oxides as cathode materials for lithium batteries : electron: manganese oxide, lithium batteries, nanomaterials Corresponding author: Pierre Strobel, tel. 33 476 887 940 with lithium iodide in aqueous medium at room temperature. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed

  13. The material dependence of temperature measurement resolution in thermal scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xiaowei; Hull, Robert [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal scanning electron microscopy is a recently developed temperature mapping technique based on thermal diffuse scattering in electron backscatter diffraction in a scanning electron microscope. It provides nano-scale and non-contact temperature mapping capabilities. Due to the specific temperature sensitive mechanism inherent to this technique, the temperature resolution is highly material dependent. A thorough investigation of what material properties affect the temperature resolution is important for realizing the inherent temperature resolution limit for each material. In this paper, three material dependent parameters-the Debye-Waller B-factor temperature sensitivity, backscatter yield, and lattice constant-are shown to control the temperature resolution.

  14. Photoemission electron microscopy of localized surface plasmons in silver nanostructures at telecommunication wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mårsell, Erik; Arnold, Cord L; Xu, Hongxing; Mauritsson, Johan; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We image the field enhancement at Ag nanostructures using femtosecond laser pulses with a center wavelength of 1.55 micrometer. Imaging is based on non-linear photoemission observed in a photoemission electron microscope (PEEM). The images are directly compared to ultra violet PEEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging of the same structures. Further, we have carried out atomic scale scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) on the same type of Ag nanostructures and on the Au substrate. Measuring the photoelectron spectrum from individual Ag particles shows a larger contribution from higher order photoemission process above the work function threshold than would be predicted by a fully perturbative model, consistent with recent results using shorter wavelengths. Investigating a wide selection of both Ag nanoparticles and nanowires, field enhancement is observed from 30% of the Ag nanoparticles and from none of the nanowires. No laser-induced damage is observed of the nanostructures neither during the PEEM ...

  15. Reliable strain measurement in transistor arrays by robust scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Suhyun; Kim, Joong Jung; Jung, Younheum; Lee, Kyungwoo; Byun, Gwangsun; Hwang, KyoungHwan; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Kyupil [Memory Analysis Science and Engineering Group, Samsung Electronics, San 16, Hwasung City, Gyeonggi-Do 445-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Memory Analysis Science and Engineering Group, Samsung Electronics, San 16, Hwasung City, Gyeonggi-Do 445-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate measurement of the strain field in the channels of transistor arrays is critical for strain engineering in modern electronic devices. We applied atomic-resolution high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy to quantitative measurement of the strain field in transistor arrays. The quantitative strain profile over 20 transistors was obtained with high reliability and a precision of 0.1%. The strain field was found to form homogeneously in the channels of the transistor arrays. Furthermore, strain relaxation due to the thin foil effect was quantitatively investigated for thicknesses of 35 to 275 nm.

  16. An In Situ Study of the Martensitic Transformation in Shape Memory Alloys Using Photoemission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Mingdong; Langford, Stephen C.; Dickinson, J. T.; Xiong, Gang; Droubay, Timothy C.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermally-induced martensitic phase transformations in polycrystalline CuZnAl and thin-film NiTiCu shape memory alloys were probed using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). Ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy shows a reversible change in the apparent work function during transformation, presumably due to the contrasting surface electronic structures of the martensite and austenite phases. In situ PEEM images provide information on the spatial distribution of these phases and the evolution of the surface microstructure during transformation. PEEM offers considerable potential for improving our understanding of martensitic transformations in shape memory alloys in real time.

  17. Characterization of two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride using scanning electron and scanning helium ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Hongxuan, E-mail: Guo.hongxuan@nims.go.jp, E-mail: msxu@zju.edu.cn [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Gao, Jianhua; Ishida, Nobuyuki [International Center for Young Scientists, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Xu, Mingsheng, E-mail: Guo.hongxuan@nims.go.jp, E-mail: msxu@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Fujita, Daisuke [Advanced Key Technologies Division, Global Research Center for Environment and Energy Based on Nanomaterials Science, and International Center for Young Scientists, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of the structural and physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials, such as layer number and inelastic mean free path measurements, is very important to optimize their synthesis and application. In this study, we characterize the layer number and morphology of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets on a metallic substrate using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and scanning helium ion microscopy (HIM). Using scanning beams of various energies, we could analyze the dependence of the intensities of secondary electrons on the thickness of the h-BN nanosheets. Based on the interaction between the scanning particles (electrons and helium ions) and h-BN nanosheets, we deduced an exponential relationship between the intensities of secondary electrons and number of layers of h-BN. With the attenuation factor of the exponential formula, we calculate the inelastic mean free path of electrons and helium ions in the h-BN nanosheets. Our results show that HIM is more sensitive and consistent than FE-SEM for characterizing the number of layers and morphology of 2D materials.

  18. Dynamic Imaging of Au-nanoparticles via Scanning Electron Microscopy in a Graphene Wet Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wayne Yang; Yuning Zhang; Michael Hilke; Walter Reisner

    2015-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution nanoscale imaging in liquid environments is crucial for studying molecular interactions in biological and chemical systems. In particular, electron microscopy is the gold-standard tool for nanoscale imaging, but its high-vacuum requirements make application to in-liquid samples extremely challenging. Here we present a new graphene based wet cell device where high resolution SEM (scanning electron microscope) and Energy Dispersive X-rays (EDX) analysis can be performed directly inside a liquid environment. Graphene is an ideal membrane material as its high transparancy, conductivity and mechanical strength can support the high vacuum and grounding requirements of a SEM while enabling maximal resolution and signal. In particular, we obtain high resolution (graphene wet cell and EDX analysis of nanoparticle composition in the liquid enviornment. Our obtained resolution surpasses current conventional silicon nitride devices imaged in both SEM and TEM under much higher electron doses.

  19. EMSL - Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microscopy Capability Details * Electron microscopes with tomography, cryo, scanning, photoemission and high-resolution (sub-nanometer) imaging capabilities* Focused ion beam...

  20. Probing Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Atmospheric Particles Using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Iedema, Martin J.; Cowin, James P.; Laskin, Alexander

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of single-particle analysis to investigate the chemistry of isolated, individual particles of atmospheric relevance such as NaCl, sea salt, CaCO3, and SiO2. A variety of state-of-th-art scanning electron microscopy techniques, including environmental scanning electon microscopy and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, were utilized for monitoring and quantifying phase transitions of individual particles, morphology, and compositional changes of individual particles as they react with nitric acid.

  1. Structural defects in GaN revealed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the various types of structural defects observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy in GaN heteroepitaxial layers grown on foreign substrates and homoepitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates. The structural perfection of these layers is compared to the platelet self-standing crystals grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution. Defects in undoped and Mg doped GaN are discussed. Some models explaining the formation of inversion domains in heavily Mg doped layers that are possible defects responsible for the difficulties of p-doping in GaN are also reviewed.

  2. Hetero-epitaxial EuO interfaces studied by analytic electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundy, Julia A. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Hodash, Daniel; Melville, Alexander; Held, Rainer [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Mairoser, Thomas; Schmehl, Andreas [Zentrum für Elektronische Korrelationen und Magnetismus, Universität Augsburg, Universitätsstraße 1, D-86159 Augsburg (Germany); Muller, David A.; Kourkoutis, Lena F. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Schlom, Darrell G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    With nearly complete spin polarization, the ferromagnetic semiconductor europium monoxide could enable next-generation spintronic devices by providing efficient ohmic spin injection into silicon. Spin injection is greatly affected by the quality of the interface between the injector and silicon. Here, we use atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with electron energy loss spectroscopy to directly image and chemically characterize a series of EuO|Si and EuO|YAlO{sub 3} interfaces fabricated using different growth conditions. We identify the presence of europium silicides and regions of disorder at the EuO|Si interfaces, imperfections that could significantly reduce spin injection efficiencies via spin-flip scattering.

  3. Tools for macromolecular model building and refinement into electron cryo-microscopy reconstructions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Alan; Long, Fei; Nicholls, Robert A.; Toots, Jaan; Emsley, Paul; Murshudov, Garib, E-mail: garib@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A description is given of new tools to facilitate model building and refinement into electron cryo-microscopy reconstructions. The recent rapid development of single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) now allows structures to be solved by this method at resolutions close to 3 Å. Here, a number of tools to facilitate the interpretation of EM reconstructions with stereochemically reasonable all-atom models are described. The BALBES database has been repurposed as a tool for identifying protein folds from density maps. Modifications to Coot, including new Jiggle Fit and morphing tools and improved handling of nucleic acids, enhance its functionality for interpreting EM maps. REFMAC has been modified for optimal fitting of atomic models into EM maps. As external structural information can enhance the reliability of the derived atomic models, stabilize refinement and reduce overfitting, ProSMART has been extended to generate interatomic distance restraints from nucleic acid reference structures, and a new tool, LIBG, has been developed to generate nucleic acid base-pair and parallel-plane restraints. Furthermore, restraint generation has been integrated with visualization and editing in Coot, and these restraints have been applied to both real-space refinement in Coot and reciprocal-space refinement in REFMAC.

  4. gEMpicker: A Highly Parallel GPU-Accelerated Particle Picking Tool for Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    gEMpicker: A Highly Parallel GPU-Accelerated Particle Picking Tool for Cryo-Electron Microscopy Abstract Background: Picking images of particles in cryo-electron micrographs is an important step particle images. Thus, a computational bottleneck in reaching high resolution is the accurate and automatic

  5. Femtosecond time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy for spatiotemporal imaging of photogenerated carrier dynamics in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukumoto, Keiki, E-mail: fukumoto.k.ab@m.titech.ac.jp; Yamada, Yuki; Matsuki, Takashi; Koshihara, Shin-ya [Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Oookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency JST-CREST, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Onda, Ken [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency JST-PRESTO, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Mukuta, Tatsuhiko; Tanaka, Sei-ichi [Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Oookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We constructed an instrument for time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy (TR-PEEM) utilizing femtosecond (fs) laser pulses to visualize the dynamics of photogenerated electrons in semiconductors on ultrasmall and ultrafast scales. The spatial distribution of the excited electrons and their relaxation and/or recombination processes were imaged by the proposed TR-PEEM method with a spatial resolution about 100 nm and an ultrafast temporal resolution defined by the cross-correlation of the fs laser pulses (240 fs). A direct observation of the dynamical behavior of electrons on higher resistivity samples, such as semiconductors, by TR-PEEM has still been facing difficulties because of space and/or sample charging effects originating from the high photon flux of the ultrashort pulsed laser utilized for the photoemission process. Here, a regenerative amplified fs laser with a widely tunable repetition rate has been utilized, and with careful optimization of laser parameters, such as fluence and repetition rate, and consideration for carrier lifetimes, the electron dynamics in semiconductors were visualized. For demonstrating our newly developed TR-PEEM method, the photogenerated carrier lifetimes around a nanoscale defect on a GaAs surface were observed. The obtained lifetimes were on a sub-picosecond time scale, which is much shorter than the lifetimes of carriers observed in the non-defective surrounding regions. Our findings are consistent with the fact that structural defects induce mid-gap states in the forbidden band, and that the electrons captured in these states promptly relax into the ground state.

  6. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of acicular ferrite precipitation in {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, X.C., E-mail: xiaochuan.xiong@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS, Nancy-Universite, UPV-Metz, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt CS 14234, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Redjaimia, A. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS, Nancy-Universite, UPV-Metz, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt CS 14234, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Goune, M. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS, Nancy-Universite, UPV-Metz, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt CS 14234, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); ArcelorMittal SA, Voie Romaine, BP 30320, F-57283 Maizieres-les-Metz (France)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Acicular-shaped crystals precipitate from {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N nitride in an iron-nitrogen alloy and were identified by electron microdiffraction as {alpha}-ferrite. Acicular ferrite develops both the Nishiyama-Wassermann and the Kurdjumov-Sachs orientation relationships with {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N nitride. These orientation relationships were discussed in terms of the symmetry theory. The driving force for acicular ferrite formation was related to the increasing nitrogen content of {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N, in equilibrium with {alpha}-ferrite, with decreasing temperature. The passage from lamellar to acicular structure in Fe-N system was proposed. - Research Highlights: {yields} Acicular crystals precipitate from pearlitic{gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N nitride in an iron-nitrogen alloy and were identified by electron microdiffraction as acicular ferrite. {yields} The crystal structure, orientation relationships with the matrix and morphologies of acicular ferrite, were studied by transmission electron microscopy. {yields} The driving force for the formation of acicular ferrite is related to the temperature dependence of nitrogen content of {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N, in equilibrium with ferrite. {yields} The passage from the pearlitic structure to the acicular structure in the present iron-nitrogen alloy was proposed.

  7. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; et al

    2015-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobicmore »environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.« less

  8. Rendering graphene supports hydrophilic with non-covalent aromatic functionalization for transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pantelic, Radosav S., E-mail: pantelic@imbb.forth.gr [National Cancer Institute, 50 South Drive, Building 50, Room 4306, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Fu, Wangyang; Schoenenberger, Christian [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, Basel CH-4056 (Switzerland); Stahlberg, Henning [Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Mattenstrasse 26, WRO-1058, Basel CH-4058 (Switzerland)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous carbon films have been routinely used to enhance the preparation of frozen-hydrated samples for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), either in retaining protein concentration, providing mechanical stability or dissipating sample charge. However, strong background signal from the amorphous carbon support obstructs that of the sample, and the insulating properties of thin amorphous carbon films preclude any efficiency in dispersing charge. Graphene addresses the limitations of amorphous carbon. Graphene is a crystalline material with virtually no phase or amplitude contrast and unparalleled, high electrical carrier mobility. However, the hydrophobic properties of graphene have prevented its routine application in Cryo-TEM. This Letter reports a method for rendering graphene TEM supports hydrophilic—a convenient approach maintaining graphene's structural and electrical properties based on non-covalent, aromatic functionalization.

  9. STRUCTURAL AND CHEMICAL STUDIES ON CdTe/CdS THIN FILM SOLAR CELLS WITH ANALYTICAL TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romeo, Alessandro

    at 430 C for 30 min. The cells exhibit an ef£ciency of 12.4 % with a short circuit current density of 23 mA/cm2 and an open circuit voltage of 800 mV. For transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies

  10. This image presents a scanning electron microscopy image of solid state dye-sensitized solar cell with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, Michael

    This image presents a scanning electron microscopy image of solid state dye-sensitized solar cell­57 Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have received wide-spread research attention due to their high power incorporated into solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ss-DSCs) by nanoimprint lithography. The reflectors

  11. Dynamic Processes in Biology, Chemistry, and Materials Science: Opportunities for UltraFast Transmission Electron Microscopy - Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabius, Bernd C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Diehl, Barbara L.; Stach, Eric A.

    2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes a 2011 workshop that addressed the potential role of rapid, time-resolved electron microscopy measurements in accelerating the solution of important scientific and technical problems. A series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Academy of Science workshops have highlighted the critical role advanced research tools play in addressing scientific challenges relevant to biology, sustainable energy, and technologies that will fuel economic development without degrading our environment. Among the specific capability needs for advancing science and technology are tools that extract more detailed information in realistic environments (in situ or operando) at extreme conditions (pressure and temperature) and as a function of time (dynamic and time-dependent). One of the DOE workshops, Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next Generation Instrumentation and Beyond, specifically addressed the importance of electron-based characterization methods for a wide range of energy-relevant Grand Scientific Challenges. Boosted by the electron optical advancement in the last decade, a diversity of in situ capabilities already is available in many laboratories. The obvious remaining major capability gap in electron microscopy is in the ability to make these direct in situ observations over a broad spectrum of fast (µs) to ultrafast (picosecond [ps] and faster) temporal regimes. In an effort to address current capability gaps, EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, organized an Ultrafast Electron Microscopy Workshop, held June 14-15, 2011, with the primary goal to identify the scientific needs that could be met by creating a facility capable of a strongly improved time resolution with integrated in situ capabilities. The workshop brought together more than 40 leading scientists involved in applying and/or advancing electron microscopy to address important scientific problems of relevance to DOE’s research mission. This workshop built on previous workshops and included three breakout sessions identifying scientific challenges in biology, biogeochemistry, catalysis, and materials science frontier areas of fundamental science that underpin energy and environmental science that would significantly benefit from ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (UTEM). In addition, the current status of time-resolved electron microscopy was examined, and the technologies that will enable future advances in spatio-temporal resolution were identified in a fourth breakout session.

  12. Structure of native oligomeric Sprouty2 by electron microscopy and its property of electroconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Feng-Jung [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China) [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Kuan-Wei; Lai, Chun-Chieh [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Sue-Ping [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shen, Hsiao-Hsuian [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China); Tsai, Shu-Ping [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Bang-Hung [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Ling-Mei [Biomedical Engineering Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan, ROC (China)] [Biomedical Engineering Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liou, Gunn-Guang, E-mail: bogun@nhri.org.tw [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China) [Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Spry2 self-assembles into distinct oligomeric forms. •Self-interaction of Spry2 is detected with a high kinetic affinity in vitro. •The 3D structure of oligomeric Spry2 likes as a donut shape with two lip-cover parts. •Spry2 contains silicon and iron. •Spry2 has a potential to serve as a biological material conductor. -- Abstract: Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate many cellular processes, and Sprouty2 (Spry2) is known as an important regulator of RTK signaling pathways. Therefore, it is worth investigating the properties of Spry2 in more detail. In this study, we found that Spry2 is able to self-assemble into oligomers with a high-affinity KD value of approximately 16 nM, as determined through BIAcore surface plasmon resonance analysis. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of Spry2 was resolved using an electron microscopy (EM) single-particle reconstruction approach, which revealed that Spry2 is donut-shaped with two lip-cover domains. Furthermore, the method of energy dispersive spectrum obtained through EM was analyzed to determine the elements carried by Spry2, and the results demonstrated that Spry2 is a silicon- and iron-containing protein. The silicon may contribute to the electroconductivity of Spry2, and this property exhibits a concentration-dependent feature. This study provides the first report of a silicon- and iron-containing protein, and its 3D structure may allow us (1) to study the potential mechanism through the signal transduction is controlled by switching the electronic transfer on or off and (2) to develop a new type of conductor or even semiconductor using biological or half-biological hybrid materials in the future.

  13. Rapid imaging of mycoplasma in solution using Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy (ASEM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan)] [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Manaka, Sachie [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan)] [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Nakane, Daisuke [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)] [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo [Advanced Technology Division, JEOL Ltd., Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan)] [Advanced Technology Division, JEOL Ltd., Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Nishizaka, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan); Miyata, Makoto [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)] [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Maruyama, Yuusuke [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan)] [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan)

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mycoplasma mobile was observed in buffer with the Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M. mobile attached to sialic acid on the SiN film surface within minutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells were observed at low concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASEM should promote study and early-stage diagnosis of mycoplasma. -- Abstract: Mycoplasma is a genus of bacterial pathogen that causes disease in vertebrates. In humans, the species Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes 15% or more of community-acquired pneumonia. Because this bacterium is tiny, corresponding in size to a large virus, diagnosis using optical microscopy is not easy. In current methods, chest X-rays are usually the first action, followed by serology, PCR amplification, and/or culture, but all of these are particularly difficult at an early stage of the disease. Using Mycoplasma mobile as a model species, we directly observed mycoplasma in buffer with the newly developed Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM). This microscope features an open sample dish with a pressure-resistant thin film window in its base, through which the SEM beam scans samples in solution, from below. Because of its 2-3 {mu}m-deep scanning capability, it can observe the whole internal structure of mycoplasma cells stained with metal solutions. Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Cells were observed at low concentrations, because suspended cells concentrate in the observable zone by attaching to sialic acid on the silicon nitride (SiN) film surface within minutes. These results suggest the applicability of the ASEM for the study of mycoplasmas as well as for early-stage mycoplasma infection diagnosis.

  14. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels and silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruben, G.C. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was to image the structure of two tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels at the single polymer chain level{sup 1,2}. With this level of structural resolution we hoped to interrelate each aerogel's structure with its physical properties and its method of synthesis. Conventional single-step base catalysed TMOS aerogels show strings of spheroidal particles linked together with minimal necking. The spheroidal particles range from 86--132 {Angstrom} and average 113{plus minus}10 {Angstrom} in diameter{sup 2}. In contrast the TMOS aerogels reported on here were made by a two step method. After extended silica chains are grown in solution under acidic conditions with a substoichiometric amount of water, the reaction is stopped and the methanol hydrolysed from TMOS is removed. Then base catalysis and additional water are added to cause gel formation is a nonalcoholic solvent. The MF aerogels were prepared for HRTEM by fracturing them on a stereo microscope stage with razor knife so that fractured pieces with smooth flat surfaces could be selected for platinum-carbon replication. The two silica (TMOS) aerogels were both transparent and difficult to see. These aerogels were fractured on a stereo microscope stage with tweezers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  15. XRD, Electron Microscopy and Vibrational Spectroscopy Characterization of Simulated SB6 HLW Glasses - 13028

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanovsky, S.V. [SIA Radon, 7th Rostovskii lane 2/14, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation) [SIA Radon, 7th Rostovskii lane 2/14, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation); Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry RAS, Leninskii av. 31, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nikonov, B.S.; Omelianenko, B.I. [Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry RAS, Staromonetniy lane 35, Moscow 100117 (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry RAS, Staromonetniy lane 35, Moscow 100117 (Russian Federation); Choi, A.; Marra, J.C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Building 773A, Aiken 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Building 773A, Aiken 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sample glasses have been made using SB6 high level waste (HLW) simulant (high in both Al and Fe) with 12 different frit compositions at a constant waste loading of 36 wt.%. As follows from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) data, all the samples are composed of primarily glass and minor concentration of spinel phases which form both isometric grains and fine cubic (?1 ?m) crystals. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) spectra of all the glasses within the range of 400-1600 cm{sup -1} consist of the bands due to stretching and bending modes in silicon-oxygen, boron-oxygen, aluminum-oxygen and iron-oxygen structural groups. Raman spectra showed that for the spectra of all the glasses within the range of 850-1200 cm{sup -1} the best fit is achieved by suggestion of overlapping of three major components with maxima at 911-936 cm{sup -1}, 988-996 cm{sup -1} and 1020-1045 cm{sup -1}. The structural network is primarily composed of metasilicate chains and rings with embedded AlO{sub 4} and FeO{sub 4} tetrahedra. Major BO{sub 4} tetrahedra and BO{sub 3} triangles form complex borate units and are present as separate constituents. (authors)

  16. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF Al-RICH SILICATE STARDUST FROM ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vollmer, Christian [Institute for Mineralogy, University of Muenster, Correnssstr. 24, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Hoppe, Peter [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Particle Chemistry Department, Hahn-Meitner-Weg 1, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Brenker, Frank E., E-mail: christian.vollmer@wwu.de [Institute of Geoscience/Mineralogy, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Altenhoeferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations of two mineralogically unusual stardust silicates to constrain their circumstellar condensation conditions. Both grains were identified by high spatial resolution nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) in the Acfer 094 meteorite, one of the most pristine carbonaceous chondrites available for study. One grain is a highly crystalline, highly refractory (Fe content < 0.5 at%), structurally undisturbed orthopyroxene (MgSiO{sub 3}) with an unusually high Al content (1.8 {+-} 0.5 at%). This is the first TEM documentation of a single crystal pyroxene within the complete stardust silicate data set. We interpret the microstructure and chemistry of this grain as being a direct condensate from a gas of locally non-solar composition (i.e., with a higher-than-solar Al content and most likely also a lower-than-solar Mg/Si ratio) at (near)-equilibrium conditions. From the overabundance of crystalline olivine (six reported grains to date) compared to crystalline pyroxene (only documented as a single crystal in this work) we infer that formation of olivine over pyroxene is favored in circumstellar environments, in agreement with expectations from condensation theory and experiments. The second stardust silicate consists of an amorphous Ca-Si rich material which lacks any crystallinity based on TEM observations in which tiny (<20 nm) hibonite nanocrystallites are embedded. This complex assemblage therefore attests to the fast cooling and rapidly changing chemical environments under which dust grains in circumstellar shells form.

  17. Scanning X-ray Microscopy Investigations into the Electron Beam Exposure Mechanism of Hydrogen Silsesquioxane Resists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olynick, Deirdre L.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Salmassi, Farhad; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scanning X-ray Microscopy Investigations into the Electronchemistry is investigated by Scanning Transmission X-raythe area exposed. 15 Recently, scanning transmission x-ray

  18. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF TANK 18 SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, M.; O'Rourke, P.; Ajo, H.

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) Performance Assessment (PA) utilizes waste speciation in the waste release model used in the FTF fate and transport modeling. The waste release modeling associated with the residual plutonium in Tank 18 has been identified as a primary contributor to the Tank 18 dose uncertainty. In order to reduce the uncertainty related to plutonium in Tank 18, a better understanding of the plutonium speciation in the Tank 18 waste (including the oxidation state and stoichiometry) is desired. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilized Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to analyze Tank 18 samples to provide information on the speciation of plutonium in the waste material. XRD analysis of the Tank 18 samples did not identify any plutonium mineral phases in the samples. These indicates the crystalline mineral phases of plutonium are below the detection limits of the XRD method or that the plutonium phase(s) lack long range order and are present as amorphous or microcrystalline solids. SEM analysis of the Tank 18 samples did locate particles containing plutonium. The plutonium was found as small particles, usually <1 {micro}m but ranging up to several micrometers in diameter, associated with particles of an iron matrix and at low concentration in other elemental matrices. This suggests the plutonium has an affinity for the iron matrix. Qualitatively, the particles of plutonium found in the SEM analysis do not appear to account for all of the plutonium in the sample based on concentrations determined from the chemical analysis of the Tank 18 samples. This suggests that plutonium is also distributed throughout the solids in low concentrations.

  19. Direct Visualization of Dendrite Nucleation and Growth Kinetics during Lithium Deposition with in situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacci, Robert L [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Browning, Nigel [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation of Li dendrites is a major safety concern existing in Li-ion secondary batteries. A quantitative electrochemistry method to investigate the dendrite nucleation and growth mechanisms at high spatial is presented. Cyclic voltammetry, in combination with in situ electrochemical transmission electron microscopy (in situ ec-TEM), was used to quantitatively characterize dendrite nucleation and growth mechanisms from a Au working electrode and within a 1.2M LiPF6 EC:DMC electrolyte.

  20. Electron microscopy analyses and electrical properties of the layered Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taoufyq, A. [Institut Matériaux Microélectronique et Nanosciences de Provence, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Université du Sud Toulon-Var, BP 20132, 83957, La Garde Cedex (France); Laboratoire Matériaux et Environnement LME, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Zohr, BP 8106, Cité Dakhla, Agadir, Maroc (Morocco); Département d‘Études des Réacteurs, Laboratoire Dosimétrie Capteurs Instrumentation, CEA Cadarache (France); Société CESIGMA—Signals and Systems, 1576 Chemin de La Planquette, F 83 130 LA GARDE (France); Ait Ahsaine, H. [Laboratoire Matériaux et Environnement LME, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Zohr, BP 8106, Cité Dakhla, Agadir, Maroc (Morocco); Patout, L. [Institut Matériaux Microélectronique et Nanosciences de Provence, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Université du Sud Toulon-Var, BP 20132, 83957, La Garde Cedex (France); Benlhachemi, A.; Ezahri, M. [Laboratoire Matériaux et Environnement LME, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Zohr, BP 8106, Cité Dakhla, Agadir, Maroc (Morocco); and others

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The bismuth tungstate Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} was synthesized using a classical coprecipitation method followed by a calcination process at different temperatures. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) analyses. The Rietveld analysis and electron diffraction clearly confirmed the Pca2{sub 1} non centrosymmetric space group previously proposed for this phase. The layers Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} and WO{sub 4}{sup 2?} have been directly evidenced from the HRTEM images. The electrical properties of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} compacted pellets systems were determined from electrical impedance spectrometry (EIS) and direct current (DC) analyses, under air and argon, between 350 and 700 °C. The direct current analyses showed that the conduction observed from EIS analyses was mainly ionic in this temperature range, with a small electronic contribution. Electrical change above the transition temperature of 660 °C is observed under air and argon atmospheres. The strong conductivity increase observed under argon is interpreted in terms of formation of additional oxygen vacancies coupled with electron conduction. - Graphical abstract: High resolution transmission electron microscopy: inverse fast Fourier transform giving the layered structure of the Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} phase, with a representation of the cell dimensions (b and c vectors). The Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} and WO{sub 4}{sup 2?} sandwiches are visible in the IFFT image. - Highlights: • Using transmission electron microscopy, we visualize the layered structure of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}. • Electrical analyses under argon gas show some increase in conductivity. • The phase transition at 660 °C is evidenced from electrical modification.

  1. Microstructure of highly strained BiFeO{sub 3} thin films: Transmission electron microscopy and electron-energy loss spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heon Kim, Young, E-mail: young.h.kim@kriss.re.kr [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Bhatnagar, Akash; Pippel, Eckhard; Hesse, Dietrich [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Alexe, Marin [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany); University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, West Midlands (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructure and electronic structure of highly strained bismuth ferrite (BiFeO{sub 3}) thin films grown on lanthanum aluminate substrates are studied using high-resolution transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopies and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Monoclinic and tetragonal phases were observed in films grown at different temperatures, and a mix of both phases was detected in a film grown at intermediate temperature. In this film, a smooth transition of the microstructure was found between the monoclinic and the tetragonal phases. A considerable increase in the c-axis parameters was observed in both phases compared with the rhombohedral bulk phase. The off-center displacement of iron (Fe) ions was increased in the monoclinic phase as compared with the tetragonal phase. EEL spectra show different electronic structures in the monoclinic and the tetragonal phases. These experimental observations are well consistent with the results of theoretical first-principle calculations performed.

  2. Largely defocused probe scanning transmission electron microscopy for imaging local modulation of strain field in a hetero interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Suhyun, E-mail: u98kim@surface.phys.titech.ac.jp; Jung, Younheum; Kim, Joong Jung; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Haebum [Memory Analysis Science and Engineering Group, Samsung Electronics, San #16 Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 445-701 (Korea, Republic of); Oshima, Yoshifumi [School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an innovative method for characterizing the strain field in three dimensions in a hetero interface. Largely defocused probe scanning transmission electron microscopy (LDP-STEM) was employed for imaging the inhomogeneous strain field in a germanium (Ge) layer deposited on a silicon (Si) substrate. In the LDP-STEM image, Ge-atomic columns that are relaxed or strained to the Si substrate in the Si/Ge hetero interface were observed to be distinguishable, allowing for the qualitative characterization of the coherency of the crystal growth. Our results revealed that the strain field is locally modulated along the in-plane direction in the Si/Ge hetero interface.

  3. Laboratory-Based Cryogenic Soft X-ray Tomography with Correlative Cryo-Light and Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, David B.; Gelb, Jeff; Palshin, Vadim; Evans, James E.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we present a novel laboratory-based cryogenic soft X-ray microscope for whole cell tomography of frozen hydrated samples. We demonstrate the capabilities of this compact cryogenic microscope by visualizing internal sub-cellular structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The microscope is shown to achieve better than 50 nm spatial resolution with a Siemens star test sample. For whole biological cells, the microscope can image specimens up to 5 micrometers thick. Structures as small as 90 nm can be detected in tomographic reconstructions at roughly 70 nm spatial resolution following a low cumulative radiation dose of only 7.2 MGy. Furthermore, the design of the specimen chamber utilizes a standard sample support that permits multimodal correlative imaging of the exact same unstained yeast cell via cryo-fluorescence light microscopy, cryo-soft x-ray microscopy and cryo-transmission electron microscopy. This completely laboratory-based cryogenic soft x-ray microscope will therefore enable greater access to three-dimensional ultrastructure determination of biological whole cells without chemical fixation or physical sectioning.

  4. Image formation modeling in cryo-electron microscopy Milos Vulovic a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieger, Bernd

    dam- age which limits the integrated electron flux that can be used, resulting in a poor signal's scattering properties, microscope optics, and detector response. The specimen interaction potential contrast, changes due to the integrated electron flux, thickness, inelastic scattering, detective quantum

  5. Dislocation mobility in gum metal -titanium alloy studied via in situ transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Dislocation mobility in gum metal -titanium alloy studied via in situ transmission electron in a transmission electron microscope were carried out on a "Gum Metal" titanium alloy. Conventional dislocation and the variation in energy due to the core structure of screw dislocations were measured and compared

  6. Atomic and electronic structure of monolayer graphene on 6H-SiC(0001)(3 3) : a scanning tunneling microscopy study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Atomic and electronic structure of monolayer graphene on 6H-SiC(0001)(3 × 3) : a scanning tunneling of the atomic and electronic structure of graphene monolayer islands on the 6H-SiC(0001)(3×3) (SiC(3×3)) surface reconstruction using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS). The orientation of the graphene

  7. Atomic-scale and three-dimensional transmission electron microscopy of nanoparticle morphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leary, Rowan Kendall

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    nanoparticles with reactive concave surfaces. A compressed sensing-electron tomography (CS-ET) approach. Nano Letters, 11(11): 4666-4673, 2011. Peer reviewed conference proceedings R. Leary, Z. Saghi, P.A. Midgley, and D.J. Holland. Compressed Sensing Electron... algorithms, precision in component fabrication and stability of electrical components that AC optics yielded performance improvements in practice. First generation AC optics have addressed the major limiting aberration, third-order spherical aberration. In a...

  8. Analytical electron microscopy examination of solid reaction products in long-term test of SRL 200 waste glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, E.C.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.; Feng, X.; Dietz, N.L.; Bradley, C.R.; Tani, B.S.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Alteration phases, found on the leached surfaces and present as colloids in the leachates of 200-based frit (fully active and simulated) nuclear waste glass, reacted under static test conditions, at a surface area to leachate volume ratio of 20,000 m{sup {minus}1} for 15 days to 728 days, have been examined by analytical electron microscopy. The compositions of the secondary phases were determined using x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy, and structural analysis was accomplished by electron diffraction. Long-term samples of simulated glass, which had undergone an acceleration of reaction after 182 days, possessed a number of silicate secondary phases, including; smectite (iron silicate and potassium iron alumina-silicate, weeksite (uranium silicate), zeolite (calcium potassium alumino-silicate), tobermorite (calcium silicate), and a pure silica phase. However, uranium silicates and smectite have also been observed in tests, which have not undergone the acceleration of reaction, in both the leachate and leached layer, suggesting that these phases are not responsible for the acceleration of reaction.

  9. Comparison of SOFC Cathode Microstructure Quantified using X-ray Nanotomography and Focused Ioni Beam-scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G Nelson; W Harris; J Lombardo; J Izzo Jr.; W Chiu; P Tanasini; M Cantoni; J Van herle; C Comninellis; et al.

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray nanotomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) have been applied to investigate the complex 3D microstructure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes at spatial resolutions of 45 nm and below. The application of near edge differential absorption for x-ray nanotomography and energy selected backscatter detection for FIB-SEM enable elemental mapping within the microstructure. Using these methods, non-destructive 3D x-ray imaging and FIB-SEM serial sectioning have been applied to compare three-dimensional elemental mapping of the LSM, YSZ, and pore phases in the SOFC cathode microstructure. The microstructural characterization of an SOFC cathode is reported based on these measurements. The results presented demonstrate the viability of x-ray nanotomography as a quantitative characterization technique and provide key insights into the SOFC cathode microstructure.

  10. Comparison of SOFC Cathode Microstructure Quantified using X-ray Nanotomography and Focused Ion Beam - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, George J.; Harris, William H.; Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Izzo, Jr., John R.; Chiu, W. K. S.; Tanasini, Pietro; cantoni, Marco; Van herle, Jan; Comninellis, Christos; Andrews, Joy C.; Liu, Yijin; Pianetta, Piero; Chu, Yong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray nanotomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB?SEM) have been applied to investigate the complex 3D microstructure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes at spatial resolutions of 45 nm and below. The application of near edge differential absorption for x-ray nanotomography and energy selected backscatter detection for FIB–SEM enable elemental mapping within the microstructure. Using these methods, non?destructive 3D x-ray imaging and FIB–SEM serial sectioning have been applied to compare three?dimensional elemental mapping of the LSM, YSZ, and pore phases in the SOFC cathode microstructure. The microstructural characterization of an SOFC cathode is reported based on these measurements. The results presented demonstrate the viability of x-ray nanotomography as a quantitative characterization technique and provide key insights into the SOFC cathode microstructure.

  11. Synchrotron radiation induced x-ray micro analysis: A realistic alternative for electron- and ion beam microscopy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, K.; Adams, F. [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium). Dept. of Chemistry; Rivers, M.L.; Jones, K.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron Radiation induced X-ray micro Fluorescence analysis ({mu}-SRXRF) is compared with more conventional microanalytical techniques such as Secondary Ion Microscopy (SIMS) and Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPXMA) for two typical microanalytical applications. SRXRF and EPXMA are employed for the analysis of individual particles, showing the complementary character of both techniques. By means of element mapping of trace constituents in a heterogeneous feldspar, the strong and weak points of SRXRF in comparison to EPXMA and SIMS are illustrated. The most striking difference between SRXRF and the other two microanalytical methods is the ability of SRXRF to probe deep into the investigated Material, whereas SIMS and EPXMA only investigate the upper surface of the material. The possibilities of SRXRF at third generation synchrotron rings is also briefly discussed.

  12. Synchrotron radiation induced x-ray micro analysis: A realistic alternative for electron- and ion beam microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, K.; Adams, F. (Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium). Dept. of Chemistry); Rivers, M.L.; Jones, K.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron Radiation induced X-ray micro Fluorescence analysis ([mu]-SRXRF) is compared with more conventional microanalytical techniques such as Secondary Ion Microscopy (SIMS) and Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPXMA) for two typical microanalytical applications. SRXRF and EPXMA are employed for the analysis of individual particles, showing the complementary character of both techniques. By means of element mapping of trace constituents in a heterogeneous feldspar, the strong and weak points of SRXRF in comparison to EPXMA and SIMS are illustrated. The most striking difference between SRXRF and the other two microanalytical methods is the ability of SRXRF to probe deep into the investigated Material, whereas SIMS and EPXMA only investigate the upper surface of the material. The possibilities of SRXRF at third generation synchrotron rings is also briefly discussed.

  13. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Martinez, G. T.; Van Aert, S., E-mail: Sandra.VanAert@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Dekker, A. J. den [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Delft Center for Systems and Control, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Rosenauer, A. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee NW1, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Sijbers, J. [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage applications, much effort has been made to optimize the STEM technique in order to detect light elements. Therefore, classical performance criteria, such as contrast or signal-to-noise ratio, are often discussed hereby aiming at improvements of the direct visual interpretability. However, when images are interpreted quantitatively, one needs an alternative criterion, which we derive based on statistical detection theory. Using realistic simulations of technologically important materials, we demonstrate the benefits of the proposed method and compare the results with existing approaches.

  14. Hot-stage transmission electron microscopy study of (Na, K)NbO{sub 3} based lead-free piezoceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shengbo, E-mail: shengbo.lu@yahoo.com [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Department of Applied Physics and Materials Research Centre, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Xu, Zhengkui [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Kwok, K. W.; Chan, Helen L. W. [Department of Applied Physics and Materials Research Centre, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Hierarchical nanodomains assembled into micron-sized stripe domains, which is believed to be associated with outstanding piezoelectric properties, were observed at room temperature in a typical lead free piezoceramics, (Na{sub 0.52}K{sub 0.48?x})(Nb{sub 0.95?x}Ta{sub 0.05})-xLiSbO{sub 3}, with finely tuned polymorphic phase boundaries (x?=?0.0465) by transmission electron microscopy. The evolution of domain morphology and crystal structure under heating and cooling cycles in the ceramic was investigated by in-situ hot stage study. It is found that the nanodomains are irreversibly transformed into micron-sized rectangular domains during heating and cooling cycles, which lead to the thermal instability of piezoelectric properties of the materials.

  15. Electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering study of precipitation in low alloy steel submerged-arc welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.J. [Rolls-Royce and Associates Ltd., Raynesway (United Kingdom); Phythian, W.J. [AEA Reactors Services, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous studies, submerged-arc welds with a range of compositions were irradiated in test reactors over a range of dose and dose-rates. The effect of irradiation was measured by Charpy V-notch and hardness tests, and an irradiation response model was developed. In this paper the authors report the results of a combined electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study on material from some of the Charpy specimens. The results have been interpreted in terms of the Russell and Brown modulus hardening model. In general they have confirmed the predictions of the irradiation response model, and shown that the copper precipitation contribution to the observed macroscopic to the observed macroscopic hardening is strongly dependent on nickel, dose and dose-rate.

  16. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy on dynamic process of a CDW transition in 1T-TaSe2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Shuaishuai; Li, Zhongwen; Cao, Gaolong; Liu, Y; Lu, W J; Sun, Y P; Tian, Huanfang; HuaixinYang,; Li, Jianqi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (4D-UTEM) measurements reveal a rich variety of structural dynamic phenomena at a phase transition in the charge-density-wave (CDW) 1T-TaSe2. Through the photoexcitation, remarkable changes on both the CDW intensity and orientation are clearly observed associated with the transformation from a commensurate (C) into an incommensurate (IC) phase in a time-scale of about 3 ps. Moreover, the transient states show up a notable "structurally isosbestic point" at a wave vector of qiso where the C and IC phases yield their diffracting efficiencies in an equally ratio. This fact demonstrates that the crystal planes parallel to qiso adopts visibly common structural features in these two CDW phases. The second-order characters observed in this nonequilibrium phase transition have been also analyzed based on the time-resolved structural data.

  17. Direct Visualization of Solid Electrolyte Interphase Formation in Lithium-Ion Batteries with In Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL] [ORNL; Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL] [ORNL; Sacci, Robert L [ORNL] [ORNL; Adamczyk, Leslie A [ORNL] [ORNL; Alsem, Daan Hein [Hummingbird Scientific] [Hummingbird Scientific; Dai, Sheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL] [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex, electrochemically driven transport processes form the basis of electrochemical energy storage devices. The direct imaging of electrochemical processes at high spatial resolution and within their native liquid electrolyte would significantly enhance our understanding of device functionality, but has remained elusive. In this work we use a recently developed liquid cell for in situ electrochemical transmission electron microscopy to obtain insight into the electrolyte decomposition mechanisms and kinetics in lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries by characterizing the dynamics of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation and evolution. Here we are able to visualize the detailed structure of the SEI that forms locally at the electrode/electrolyte interface during lithium intercalation into natural graphite from an organic Li-ion battery electrolyte. We quantify the SEI growth kinetics and observe the dynamic self-healing nature of the SEI with changes in cell potential.

  18. Recent Progress in Chromatic Aberration Corrected High-Resolution and Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    80 and 65 pm detail at 80 and 300 kV, respectively. Figure 2 shows CC and CS corrected energy. 58 (2009) 147. [3] R. Leary and R. Brydson. Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics 165 (2011) 73. The smallest detected image spacing at 80 kV (left) is ~80 pm and at 300 kV (right) is ~65 pm. FIG. 2. Atomic

  19. Current Titles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Various

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This booklet is published for those interested in current research being conducted at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. The NCEM is a DOE-designated national user facility and is available at no charge to qualified researchers. Access is controlled by an external steering committee. Interested researchers may contact Jane Cavlina, Administrator, at 510/486-6036.

  20. Gas mixing system for imaging of nanomaterials under dynamic environments by environmental transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akatay, M. Cem [School of Materials Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [School of Materials Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Zvinevich, Yury; Ribeiro, Fabio H., E-mail: fabio@purdue.edu, E-mail: estach@bnl.gov [Forney Hall of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Baumann, Philipp [Computer Sciences, University of Applied Sciences of Northeastern Switzerland, 4132 Muttenz, Switzerland and Department of Physics, Yeshiva University, New York, New York 10016 (United States)] [Computer Sciences, University of Applied Sciences of Northeastern Switzerland, 4132 Muttenz, Switzerland and Department of Physics, Yeshiva University, New York, New York 10016 (United States); Stach, Eric A., E-mail: fabio@purdue.edu, E-mail: estach@bnl.gov [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas mixing manifold system that is capable of delivering a stable pressure stream of a desired composition of gases into an environmental transmission electron microscope has been developed. The system is designed to provide a stable imaging environment upon changes of either the composition of the gas mixture or upon switching from one gas to another. The design of the system is described and the response of the pressure inside the microscope, the sample temperature, and sample drift in response to flow and composition changes of the system are reported.

  1. Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseC Supports - Energy3 PierreElectron

  2. Cs-Exchange in Birnessite: Raction Mechanisms Inferred from Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopano, C.; Heaney, P; Post, J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have explored the exchange of Cs for interlayer Na in birnessite using several techniques, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). Our goal was to test which of two possible exchange mechanisms is operative during the reaction: (1) diffusion of cations in and out of the interlayer or (2) dissolution of Na-birnessite and reprecipitation of Cs-birnessite. The appearance of distinct XRD peaks for Na- and Cs-rich phases in partially exchanged samples offered support for a simple diffusion model, but it was inconsistent with the compositional and crystallographic homogeneity of (Na,Cs)-birnessite platelets from core to rim as ascertained by TEM. Time-resolved XRD revealed systematic changes in the structure of the emergent Cs-rich birnessite phase during exchange, in conflict with a dissolution and reprecipitation model. Instead, we propose that exchange occurred by sequential delamination of Mn oxide octahedral sheets. Exfoliation of a given interlayer region allowed for wholesale replacement of Na by Cs and was rapidly followed by reassembly. This model accounts for the rapidity of metal exchange in birnessite, the co-existence of distinct Na- and Cs-birnessite phases during the process of exchange, and the uniformly mixed Na- and Cs-compositions ascertained from point analyses by selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy of partially exchanged grains.

  3. Characterization of host phases for actinides in simulated metallic waste forms by transmission electron microscopy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janney, D. E.

    2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed an electrometallurgical process for conditioning spent sodium-bonded metallic reactor fuel prior to disposal. A waste stream from this process consists of stainless steel cladding hulls that contain undissolved metal fission products such as Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, and Ag; a small amount of undissolved actinides (U, Np, Pu) also remains with the hulls. These wastes will be immobilized in a waste form whose baseline composition is stainless steel alloyed with 15 wt% Zr (SS-15Zr). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations of simulated metal waste forms (SS-15Zr with added actinides) show eutectic intergrowths of iron solid-solution (''steel'') and Fe-Zr-Cr-Ni (''intermetallic'') materials. The actinide elements are almost entirely in the intermetallic materials, where they occur in concentrations as high as 20 at%. Neutron- and electron-diffraction studies of the simulated waste forms show materials with structures similar to those of Fe{sub 2}Zr and Fe{sub 23}Zr{sub 6}. New TEM observations of simulated waste form samples with compositions SS-15Zr-2Np, SS-15Zr-5U, SS-15Zr-11U-0.6Ru-0.3Tc-0.1Pd, and SS-15Zr-10Pu suggest that the major U- and Pu-bearing phase has a structure similar to that of the C15 (cubic, MgCu{sub 2}-type) polymorph of Fe{sub 2}Zr. Materials with this structure exhibit significant variability in chemical compositions and actinide concentrations up to 20 at% (normalized so that atomic fractions of Cr, Ni, Fe, and Zr add up to 1). A U-bearing material similar to the C36 (dihexagonal, MgNi{sub 2}-type) polymorph of Fe{sub 2}Zr was also observed. Chemical variability in materials with the C36 Fe{sub 2}Zr structure is smaller than in those with the C15 Fe{sub 2}Zr structure, and U concentrations are less than 5 at%. Uranium concentrations up to 5 at.% were observed in materials with the Fe{sub 23}Zr{sub 6} (cubic, Mn{sub 23}Th{sub 6}-type) structure. Microstructures similar to those produced during experimental deformation of Fe-10 at% Zr alloys were observed in intermetallic materials in all of the simulated waste form samples. Stacking faults and associated dislocations are common in samples with U, but rarely observed in those with Np and Pu, while twins occur in all samples. Previously reported differences in dissolution behavior between samples with different actinides may be related to increased defect-assisted dissolution in samples with U.

  4. Strain mapping with nm-scale resolution for the silicon-on-insulator generation of semiconductor devices by advanced electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, David; Denneulin, Thibaud; Barnes, Jean-Paul; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Hutin, Louis; Le Royer, Cyrille [CEA, LETI France MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Beche, Armand [CEA, LETI, and FEI France MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rouviere, Jean-Luc [CEA, INAC, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Strain engineering in the conduction channel is a cost effective method of boosting the performance in state-of-the-art semiconductor devices. However, given the small dimensions of these devices, it is difficult to quantitatively measure the strain with the required spatial resolution. Three different transmission electron microscopy techniques, high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy, dark field electron holography, and nanobeam electron diffraction have been applied to measure the strain in simple bulk and SOI calibration specimens. These techniques are then applied to different gate length SiGe SOI pFET devices in order to measure the strain in the conduction channel. For these devices, improved spatial resolution is required, and strain maps with spatial resolutions as good as 1 nm have been achieved. Finally, we discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of using these three different techniques when used for strain measurement.

  5. Electron Microscopy Study of Novel Ru Doped La0.8Sr0.2CrO3 as Anode Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Laurence D.

    Electron Microscopy Study of Novel Ru Doped La0.8Sr0.2CrO3 as Anode Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Fuel Cells (SOFCs) have been the center of research activities with the goal of improving energy Cells (SOFCs) Y. Wang,* B. D. Madsen,* W. Kobsiriphat,* S.A. Barnett* and L.D. Marks* * Department

  6. Structure of low-density nanoporous dielectrics revealed by low-vacuum electron microscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kucheyev, S O; Toth, M; Baumann, T F; Hamza, A V; Ilavsky, J; Knowles, W R; Thiel, B L; Tileli, V; van Buuren, T; Wang, Y M; Willey, T M

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We use low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy to image directly the ligament and pore size and shape distributions of representative aerogels over a wide range of length scales ({approx} 10{sup 0}-10{sup 5} nm). The images are used for unambiguous, real-space interpretation of small-angle scattering data for these complex nanoporous systems.

  7. Combined electron microscopy and spectroscopy characterization of as-received, acid purified, and oxidized HiPCO single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Contes, Enid J. [University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Department of Chemistry, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico); University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico); Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A. [NASA John H. Glenn Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Road, Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States); Sanchez-Pomales, Germarie [University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Department of Chemistry, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico); University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico); Cabrera, Carlos R., E-mail: carlos.cabrera2@upr.edu [University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Department of Chemistry, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico); University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are very important materials due to their combination of unique structure, dimension, strength, chemical stability, and electronic properties. Nevertheless, SWCNTs from commercial sources usually contain several impurities, which are usually removed by a purification process that includes reflux in acids and strong oxidation. This strong chemical procedure may alter the nanotube properties and it is thus important to control the extent of functionalization and oxidation during the purification procedure. In this report, we provide a comprehensive study of the structure and physical composition of SWCNTs during each step of the purification process. Techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Infrared spectroscopy were used to track the SWCNTs structure, in terms of length and diameter distribution, and surface chemical modifications during each purification stage.

  8. ORNL microscopy directly images problematic lithium dendrites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    865.574.7308 ORNL microscopy directly images problematic lithium dendrites in batteries ORNL electron microscopy captured the first real-time nanoscale images of the nucleation and...

  9. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations of Mn-oxide rich cathodic material from spent disposable alkaline batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krekeler, Mark P.S. [Department of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)], E-mail: mark.krekeler@gmail.com

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to investigate the spent cathodic material of a single common brand of disposable alkaline batteries. Mn-oxide particles are anhedral and irregular in shape and compose an estimated 99-95% of the <10 {mu}m size fraction of sample material. Diameters of particles vary widely and typically are between 50 nm and 3 {mu}m; however, most particles are approximately 200-400 nm in diameter. Chemical composition varies for Mn-oxide particles with concentrations being SiO{sub 2} (0.00-1.52 wt%), TiO{sub 2} (0.49-4.58 wt%), MnO (65.85-92.06 wt%), ZnO (1.00-7.53 wt%), K{sub 2}O (4.97-20.48 wt%) and SO{sub 3} (0.43-2.21 wt%). Discrete prismatic zinc crystals occur and vary from a maximum of approximately 0.8 {mu}m long x 0.15 {mu}m wide, to 100 nm long x 20 nm wide. Titanium metal was also observed in samples and composes approximately 0.25-1.0% of the <10 {mu}m size fraction of sample material. Results of this study suggest that battery components may be recycled in some special applications. Examples are low energy-low material requirement products such as paint pigments and Zn nanoparticles. This investigation provides detailed constraints on the nature of spent cathodic materials to improve existing recycling methods and develop new technologies.

  10. Transmission electron microscopy study on Co/Fe interdiffusion in SmCo5/Fe and Sm2Co7/Fe/Sm2Co7 thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, J. Ping

    Transmission electron microscopy study on Co/Fe interdiffusion in SmCo5/Fe and Sm2Co7/Fe/Sm2Co7 at the interface of an as-deposited SmCo5/Fe bilayer, while annealing results in measurable Co/Fe interdiffusion near the boundary. For the annealed SmCo5/Fe bilayer, phase separation occurs within the bcc

  11. A low energy electron microscopy study of the initial growth, structure, and thermal stability of 4,4{sup '}-biphenyldicarboxylic acid domains on Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khokhar, Fawad S.; Gastel, Raoul van; Schwarz, Daniel; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Poelsema, Bene [Physics of Interfaces and Nanomaterials, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, NL-7500AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of 4,4{sup '}-biphenyldicarboxylic acid (BDA) on Cu(001) has been studied using low energy electron microscopy and selective area low energy electron diffraction. The emergence of large islands and hydrogen bonding to perpendicularly oriented, adjacent molecules is confirmed. The two benzene rings of adsorbed BDA are twisted along the molecular axis. Unconventional growth of the domains, followed by a second nucleation stage, is observed at room temperature. This unanticipated feature is attributed to the accumulation of stress in the islands. Ostwald ripening in the films and the decay of BDA domains at 448 K exhibits features that are consistent with diffusion limited behavior.

  12. Topography, complex refractive index, and conductivity of graphene layers measured by correlation of optical interference contrast, atomic force, and back scattered electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaupel, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias.vaupel@zeiss.com; Dutschke, Anke [Training Application Support Center, Carl Zeiss Microscopy GmbH, Königsallee 9-21, 37081 Göttingen (Germany); Wurstbauer, Ulrich; Pasupathy, Abhay [Department of Physics, Columbia University New York, 538 West 120th Street, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Hitzel, Frank [DME Nanotechnologie GmbH, Geysostr. 13, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical phase shift by reflection on graphene is measured by interference contrast microscopy. The height profile across graphene layers on 300?nm thick SiO{sub 2} on silicon is derived from the phase profile. The complex refractive index and conductivity of graphene layers on silicon with 2?nm thin SiO{sub 2} are evaluated from a phase profile, while the height profile of the layers is measured by atomic force microscopy. It is observed that the conductivity measured on thin SiO{sub 2} is significantly greater than on thick SiO{sub 2}. Back scattered electron contrast of graphene layers is correlated to the height of graphene layers.

  13. Wurtzite GaN surface structures studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and reflection high energy electron diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtzite GaN surface structures studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and reflection high energy-face of wurtzite GaN films grown using molecular beam epitaxy. N-face reconstructions are primarily adatom numerous surface studies of wurtzite GaN have been performed, progress in determining the true surface

  14. Determination of redox reaction rates and –orders by in-situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, Eli A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sutter, Peter W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. By comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  15. Determination of redox reaction rates and –orders by in-situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pdmore »deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. By comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.« less

  16. Determination of redox reaction rates and –orders by in-situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sutter, Eli A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sutter, Peter W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. By comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  17. Morphology of gold nanoparticles determined by full-curve fitting of the light absorption spectrum. Comparison with X-ray scattering and electron microscopy data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostyantyn Slyusarenko; Benjamin Abécassis; Patrick Davidson; Doru Constantin

    2015-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy is frequently used to characterize the size and shape of gold nanoparticles. We present a full-spectrum model that yields reliable results for the commonly encountered case of mixtures of spheres and rods in varying proportions. We determine the volume fractions of the two populations, the aspect ratio distribution of the nanorods (average value and variance) and the interface damping parameter. We validate the model by checking the fit results against small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy data and show that correctly accounting for the polydispersity in aspect ratio is essential for a quantitative description of the longitudinal plasmon peak.

  18. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    .1063/1.3475506 Direct observation of electron emission site on boron-doped polycrystalline diamond thin films using or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force

  19. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF THE FERROELECTRIC DOMAINS AND DOMAIN WALL STRUCTURE IN Pb.52Ti.48O3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goo, E.K.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48. a) Present address:of Energy under Contract W-7405-ENG-48 ELECTRON MICROSCOPYunder Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48. I. INTRODUCTION Lead

  20. High resolution low dose transmission electron microscopy real-time imaging and manipulation of nano-scale objects in the electron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Jr., R. Malcolm (Austin, TX); Barnes, Zack (Austin, TX); Sawatari, Chie (Shizuoka, JP); Kondo, Tetsuo (Kukuoka, JP)

    2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes a method, apparatus and system for nanofabrication in which one or more target molecules are identified for manipulation with an electron beam and the one or more target molecules are manipulated with the electron beam to produce new useful materials.

  1. Temperature-induced martensite in magnetic shape memory Fe{sub 2}MnGa observed by photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, Catherine; Scholl, Andreas; Kainuma, R.; Elmers, Hans-Joachim; Omori, Toshihiro

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic domain structure in single crystals of a Heusler shape memory compound near the composition Fe{sub 2}MnGa was observed during phase transition by photoelectron emission microscopy at Beamline 11.0.1.1 of the Advanced Light Source. The behavior is comparable with recent observations of an adaptive martensite phase in prototype Ni{sub 2}MnGa, although the pinning in the recent work is an epitaxial interface and in this work the e#11;ective pinning plane is a boundary between martensitic variants that transform in a self-accommodating way from the single crystal austenite phase present at high temperatures. Temperature dependent observations of the twinning structure give information as to the coupling behavior between the magnetism and the structural evolution.

  2. Electron microscopy study of NiW/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-F(x) sulfided catalysts prepared using oxisalt and thiosalt precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, J.; Castillo, P.; Benitez, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Mexico City (Mexico)] [and others] [Universidad Autonoma de Mexico City (Mexico); and others

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two different series of sulfided NiW catalysts supported on alumina modified with different amounts of fluoride, in the range 0.0-2.5 wt%, have been prepared by using two different tungsten precursor salts: ammonium metatungstate and ammonium tetrathiotungstate. Samples of both catalyst series have been examined by the use of high-resolution electron microscopy. For the oxisalt-prepared catalysts the results indicate that fluoride incorporation increases the size of WS{sub 2} crystallites but has little effect on the number of layers. On the other hand, the change of precursor salt significantly influences the stacking of WS{sub 2} crystallites without greatly affecting their size. The thiosalt method of preparation also leads to an excess of sulfur in the catalysts, which is distributed in a nonhomogeneous way. 16 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. The structure of SecB/OmpA as visualized by electron microscopy: The mature region of the precursor protein binds asymmetrically to SecB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Ying; Pan, Xijiang [State-Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [State-Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tai, Phang C. [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)] [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Sui, Sen-Fang, E-mail: suisf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [State-Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [State-Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    SecB, a molecular chaperone in Escherichia coli, binds a subset of precursor proteins that are exported across the plasma membrane via the Sec pathway. Previous studies showed that SecB bound directly to the mature region rather than to the signal sequence of the precursor protein. To determine the binding pattern of SecB and the mature region of the preprotein, here, we visualized the structure of the SecB/OmpA complex by electron microscopy. This complex is composed by two parts: the main density represents one SecB tetramer and the unfolded part of OmpA wrapping round it; the elongated smaller density represents the rest of OmpA. Each SecB protomer makes a different contribution to the binding of SecB with OmpA. The binding pattern between SecB tetramer and OmpA is asymmetric.

  4. Transmission electron microscopy assisted in-situ joule heat dissipation study of individual InAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, T. T.; Wei, X. L., E-mail: weixl@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: qingchen@pku.edu.cn; Shu, J. P.; Chen, Q., E-mail: weixl@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: qingchen@pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices and Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing heat transport at nanoscale is an important and challenging task for nanodevice applications and nanostructure engineering. Herein, through in-situ engineering nanowire (NW)-electrode contacts with electron beam induced carbon deposition in a transmission electron microscope, Joule heat dissipation along individual suspended Indium Arsenide NWs is well managed to obtain pre-designed temperature profiles along NWs. The temperature profiles are experimentally determined by the breakdown site of NWs under Joule heating and breakdown temperature measurement. A model with NW-electrode contacts being well considered is proposed to describe heat transport along a NW. By fitting temperature profiles with the model, thermal conductance at NW-electrode contacts is obtained. It is found that, the temperature profile along a specific NW is mainly governed by the relative thermal conductance at the two NW-electrode contacts, which is engineered in experiments.

  5. Combining nanocalorimetry and dynamic transmission electron microscopy for in situ characterization of materials processes under rapid heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grapes, Michael D., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Materials Measurement Science Division, Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H. [Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Friedman, Lawrence H.; LaVan, David A., E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov [Materials Measurement Science Division, Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Weihs, Timothy P., E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanocalorimetry is a chip-based thermal analysis technique capable of analyzing endothermic and exothermic reactions at very high heating and cooling rates. Here, we couple a nanocalorimeter with an extremely fast in situ microstructural characterization tool to identify the physical origin of rapid enthalpic signals. More specifically, we describe the development of a system to enable in situ nanocalorimetry experiments in the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM), a time-resolved TEM capable of generating images and electron diffraction patterns with exposure times of 30 ns–500 ns. The full experimental system consists of a modified nanocalorimeter sensor, a custom-built in situ nanocalorimetry holder, a data acquisition system, and the DTEM itself, and is capable of thermodynamic and microstructural characterization of reactions over a range of heating rates (10{sup 2} K/s–10{sup 5} K/s) accessible by conventional (DC) nanocalorimetry. To establish its ability to capture synchronized calorimetric and microstructural data during rapid transformations, this work describes measurements on the melting of an aluminum thin film. We were able to identify the phase transformation in both the nanocalorimetry traces and in electron diffraction patterns taken by the DTEM. Potential applications for the newly developed system are described and future system improvements are discussed.

  6. In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the interfacial reaction between Ni and Al during rapid heating in a nanocalorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grapes, Michael D., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Material Measurement Laboratory, Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Woll, Karsten [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Institute of Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); LaVan, David A., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Material Measurement Laboratory, Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Weihs, Timothy P., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Al/Ni formation reaction is highly exothermic and of both scientific and technological significance. In this report, we study the evolution of intermetallic phases in this reaction at a heating rate of 830 K/s. 100-nm-thick Al/Ni bilayers were deposited onto nanocalorimeter sensors that enable the measurement of temperature and heat flow during rapid heating. Time-resolved transmission electron diffraction patterns captured simultaneously with thermal measurements allow us to identify the intermetallic phases present and reconstruct the phase transformation sequence as a function of time and temperature. The results show a mostly unaltered phase transformation sequence compared to lower heating rates.

  7. Direct imaging of light elements by annular dark-field aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotnyk, Andriy, E-mail: andriy.lotnyk@iom-leipzig.de; Poppitz, David; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Rauschenbach, Bernd [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we show that an annular dark-field detector in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope allows the direct observation of light element columns in crystalline lattices. At specific imaging conditions, an enhancement of the intensities of light element columns in the presence of heavy element columns is observed. Experimental results are presented for imaging the nitrogen and carbon atomic columns at the GaN-SiC interface and within the GaN and SiC compounds. The crystal polarity of GaN at the interface is identified. The obtained findings are discussed and are well supported by image simulations.

  8. Controlled polarity of sputter-deposited aluminum nitride on metals observed by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harumoto, T. [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-S8-6 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Department of Materials Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Sannomiya, T.; Matsukawa, Y.; Muraishi, S.; Shi, J.; Nakamura, Y. [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-S8-6 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Sawada, H. [Japan Electron Optics Laboratory (JEOL) Ltd., 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Tanaka, T.; Tanishiro, Y.; Takayanagi, K. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-H-51 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The polarity determination process of sputter-deposited aluminum nitride (AlN) on metals has been analyzed using aberration corrected atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscope. Direct growth of c-axis orientated AlN on face centered cubic metals (fcc) (111) with the local epitaxy has been observed, and the polarity was determined at the AlN/metal interface. We found that the AlN polarity can be controlled by the base metal layer: N-polarity AlN grows on Pt(111) while Al-polarity AlN forms on Al(111). Based on these results, the growth mechanism of AlN on metals is discussed.

  9. High resolution electron microscopy of Ag-clusters in crystalline and non-crystalline morphologies grown inside superfluid helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volk, Alexander; Thaler, Philipp; Koch, Markus; Ernst, Wolfgang E. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Fisslthaler, Evelin [Graz Centre for Electron Microscopy, Steyrergasse 17, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Grogger, Werner [Institute for Electron Microscopy and Nanoanalysis, Graz University of Technology, Steyrergasse 17, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a first investigation of structural properties of Ag clusters with a diameter of up to 5.5 nm grown inside superfluid helium nanodroplets (He{sub N}) and deposited on an amorphous C surface. With high resolution transmission electron microscope images we are able to show that in addition to the crystalline face centered cubic (fcc) structure, noncrystalline icosahedral (Ih), and decahedral (Dh) morphologies are grown. Relative abundances (56% fcc, 31% Dh, and 13% Ih) as well as the size distribution of each morphology (mean diameters d{sub fcc}=2.62(5) nm, d{sub Dh}=3.34(7) nm, and d{sub Ih}=3.93(2) nm) do not reflect the situation expected from pure energetic considerations, where small Ihs should be followed by medium sized Dhs and large fccs. Instead, kinetic factors seem to play an important role in the formation of these structures, as it appears to be the case for clusters formed by inert gas aggregation. Considering the low temperatures (0.37 K) and extremely high cooling rates, we discuss basic ideas that might lead to a qualitative picture of the cluster formation process inside He{sub N}.

  10. Rapid Laser Induced Crystallization of Amorphous NiTi Films Observed by Nanosecond Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy (DTEM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaGrange, T; Campbell, G H; Browning, N D; Reed, B W; Grummon, D S

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystallization processes of the as-deposited, amorphous NiTi thin films have been studied in detail using techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry and, in-situ TEM. The kinetic data have been analyzed in terms of Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolomogrov (JMAK) semi-empirical formula. The kinetic parameters determined from this analysis have been useful in defining process control parameters for tailoring microstructural features and shape memory properties. Due to the commercial push to shrink thin film-based devices, unique processing techniques have been developed using laser-based annealing to spatially control the microstructure evolution down to sub-micron levels. Nanosecond, pulse laser annealing is particularly attractive since it limits the amount of peripheral heating and unwanted microstructural changes to underlying or surrounding material. However, crystallization under pulsed laser irradiation can differ significantly from conventional thermal annealing, e.g., slow heating in a furnace. This is especially true for amorphous NiTi materials and relevant for shape memory thin film based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications. There is little to no data on the crystallization kinetics of NiTi under pulsed laser irradiation, primarily due to the high crystallization rates intrinsic to high temperature annealing and the spatial and temporal resolution limits of standard techniques. However, with the high time and spatial resolution capabilities of the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the rapid nucleation events occurring from pulsed laser irradiation can be directly observed and nucleation rates can be quantified. This paper briefly explains the DTEM approach and how it used to investigate the pulsed laser induced crystallization processes in NiTi and to determine kinetic parameters.

  11. Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal Nanoparticles by Correlation with Atomic Resolution Electron Microscopy and Field Evaporation Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Vurpillot, F.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-dielectric composite materials, specifically metal nanoparticles supported on or embedded in metal oxides, are widely used in catalysis. The accurate optimization of such nanostructures warrants the need for detailed three-dimensional characterization. Atom probe tomography is uniquely capable of generating sub-nanometer structural and compositional data with part-per-million mass sensitivity, but there are reconstruction artifacts for composites containing materials with strongly differing fields of evaporation, as for oxide-supported metal nanoparticles. By correlating atom probe tomography with scanning transmission electron microscopy for Au nanoparticles embedded in an MgO support, deviations from an ideal topography during evaporation are demonstrated directly, and correlated with compositional errors in the reconstructed data. Finite element simulations of the field evaporation process confirm that protruding Au nanoparticles will evolve on the tip surface, and that evaporation field variations lead to an inaccurate assessment of the local composition, effectively lowering the spatial resolution of the final reconstructed dataset. Cross-correlating the experimental data with simulations results in a more detailed understanding of local evaporation aberrations during APT analysis of metal-oxide composites, paving the way towards a more accurate three-dimensional characterization of this technologically important class of materials.

  12. Direct comparison between X-ray nanotomography and scanning electron microscopy for the microstructure characterization of a solid oxide fuel cell anode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quey, R., E-mail: quey@emse.fr [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); École des Mines de Saint-Étienne, CNRS UMR 5307, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Étienne, Cedex 2 (France); Suhonen, H., E-mail: heikki.suhonen@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Laurencin, J., E-mail: jerome.laurencin@cea.fr [CEA-Liten, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Cloetens, P., E-mail: peter.cloetens@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Bleuet, P., E-mail: pierre.bleuet@cea.fr [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray computed nanotomography (nano-CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been applied to characterize the microstructure of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) anode. A direct comparison between the results of both methods is conducted on the same region of the microstructure to assess the spatial resolution of the nano-CT microstructure, SEM being taken as a reference. A registration procedure is proposed to find out the position of the SEM image within the nano-CT volume. It involves a second SEM observation, which is taken along an orthogonal direction and gives an estimate reference SEM image position, which is then refined by an automated optimization procedure. This enables an unbiased comparison between the cell porosity morphologies provided by both methods. In the present experiment, nano-CT is shown to underestimate the number of pores smaller than 1 ?m and overestimate the size of the pores larger than 1.5 ?m. - Highlights: ? X-ray computed nanotomography (nano-CT) and SEM are used to characterize an SOFC anode. ? A methodology is proposed to compare the nano-CT and SEM data on the same region. ? The spatial resolution of the nano-CT data is assessed from that comparison.

  13. Demonstration of an Electrochemical Liquid Cell for Operando Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of the Lithiation/Delithiation Behavior of Si Nanowire Battery Anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R.; Mehdi, Beata L.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Mcdowell, Matthew T.; Sacci, Robert L.; Xu, Wu; Connell, Justin G.; Xu, Pinghong; Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Chen, Xilin; Zhang, Yaohui; Perea, Daniel E.; Evans, James E.; Lauhon, Lincoln; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Browning, Nigel D.; Cui, Yi; Arslan, Ilke; Wang, Chong M.

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last few years, in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of lithium ion batteries using an open-cell configuration have helped us to gain fundamental insights into the structural and chemical evolution of the electrode materials in real time. In the standard open-cell configuration, the electrolyte is either solid lithium oxide or an ionic liquid, which is point-contacted with the electrode. This cell design is inherently different from a real battery, where liquid electrolyte forms conformal contact with electrode materials. The knowledge learnt from open cells can deviate significantly from the real battery, calling for operando TEM technique with conformal liquid electrolyte contact. In this paper, we developed an operando TEM electrochemical liquid cell to meet this need, providing the configuration of a real battery and in a relevant liquid electrolyte. To demonstrate this novel technique, we studied the lithiation/delithiation behavior of single Si nanowires. Some of lithiation/delithation behaviors of Si obtained using the liquid-cell are consistent with the results from the open-cell studies. However, we also discovered new insights different from the open cell configuration - the dynamics of the electrolyte and, potentially, a future quantitative characterization of the SEI layer formation and structural and chemical evolution.

  14. In-situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy observation of silicon nanocrystal nucleation in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, T. C.-J., E-mail: terry.yang@unsw.edu.au; Wu, L.; Lin, Z.; Jia, X.; Puthen-Veettil, B.; Zhang, T.; Conibeer, G.; Perez-Wurfl, I. [School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Kauffmann, Y.; Rothschild, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state nucleation of Si nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix was observed at temperatures as low as 450?°C. This was achieved by aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) with real-time in-situ heating up to 600?°C. This technique is a valuable characterization tool especially with the recent interest in Si nanostructures for light emitting devices, non-volatile memories, and third-generation photovoltaics which all typically require a heating step in their fabrication. The control of size, shape, and distribution of the Si nanocrystals are critical for these applications. This experimental study involves in-situ observation of the nucleation of Si nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix fabricated through radio frequency co-sputtering. The results show that the shapes of Si nanocrystals in amorphous SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrices are irregular and not spherical, in contrast to many claims in the literature. Furthermore, the Si nanocrystals are well confined within their layers by the amorphous SiO{sub 2}. This study demonstrates the potential of in-situ HRTEM as a tool to observe the real time nucleation of Si nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix. Furthermore, ideas for improvements on this in-situ heating HRTEM technique are discussed.

  15. Study of structural order in porphyrin-fullerene dyad ZnDHD6ee monolayers by electron diffraction and atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'yakova, Yu. A.; Suvorova, E. I.; Orekhov, Andrei S.; Orekhov, Anton S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Alekseev, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Gainutdinov, R. V.; Klechkovskaya, V. V., E-mail: klechvv@ns.crys.ras.ru; Tereschenko, E. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Tkachenko, N. V.; Lemmetyinen, H. [Tampere University of Technology (Finland)] [Tampere University of Technology (Finland); Feigin, L. A.; Kovalchuk, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of porphyrin-fullerene dyad ZnDHD6ee monolayers formed on the surface of aqueous subphase in a Langmuir trough and transferred onto solid substrates has been studied. The data obtained are interpreted using simulation of the structure of isolated molecules and their packing in monolayer and modeling of diffraction patterns from molecular aggregates having different sizes and degrees of order. Experiments on the formation of condensed ZnDHD6ee monolayers are described. The structure of these monolayers on a water surface is analyzed using {pi}-A isotherms. The structure of the monolayers transferred onto solid substrates is investigated by electron diffraction and atomic force microscopy. The unit-cell parameters of two-dimensional domains, which are characteristic of molecular packing in monolayers and deposited films, are determined. Domains are found to be organized into a texture (the molecular axes are oriented by the [001] direction perpendicular to the substrate). The monolayers contain a limited number of small 3D domains.

  16. In situ investigation of explosive crystallization in a-Ge: Experimental determination of the interface response function using dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolova, Liliya; MacLeod, Jennifer M.; Ibrahim, Heide [Centre Énergie, Matériaux, Télécommunications, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1650 Lionel Boulet boulevard, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Stern, Mark J.; Siwick, Bradley J., E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca, E-mail: lagrange2@llnl.gov, E-mail: bradley.siwick@mcgill.ca [Center for the Physics of Materials, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, McGill University, 801 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 (Canada); Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; LaGrange, Thomas, E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca, E-mail: lagrange2@llnl.gov, E-mail: bradley.siwick@mcgill.ca [Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Rosei, Federico, E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca, E-mail: lagrange2@llnl.gov, E-mail: bradley.siwick@mcgill.ca [Centre Énergie, Matériaux, Télécommunications, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1650 Lionel Boulet boulevard, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Centre for Self-Assembled Chemical Structures, McGill University, 801 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 (Canada)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystallization of amorphous semiconductors is a strongly exothermic process. Once initiated the release of latent heat can be sufficient to drive a self-sustaining crystallization front through the material in a manner that has been described as explosive. Here, we perform a quantitative in situ study of explosive crystallization in amorphous germanium using dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Direct observations of the speed of the explosive crystallization front as it evolves along a laser-imprinted temperature gradient are used to experimentally determine the complete interface response function (i.e., the temperature-dependent front propagation speed) for this process, which reaches a peak of 16?m/s. Fitting to the Frenkel-Wilson kinetic law demonstrates that the diffusivity of the material locally/immediately in advance of the explosive crystallization front is inconsistent with those of a liquid phase. This result suggests a modification to the liquid-mediated mechanism commonly used to describe this process that replaces the phase change at the leading amorphous-liquid interface with a change in bonding character (from covalent to metallic) occurring in the hot amorphous material.

  17. Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis of Fuel/Matrix Interaction Layers in Highly-Irradiated U–Mo Dispersion Fuel Plates with Al and Al–Si Alloy Matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Brandon D. Miller; Jian Gan; Adam B. Robinson; Pavel Medvedev; James Madden; Dan Wachs; Mitch Meyer

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to investigate how the microstructure of fuel/matrix-interaction (FMI) layers change during irradiation, different U–7Mo dispersion fuel plates have been irradiated to high fission density and then characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Specifially, samples from irradiated U–7Mo dispersion fuel elements with pure Al, Al–2Si and AA4043 (~4.5 wt.%Si) matrices were SEM characterized using polished samples and samples that were prepared with a focused ion beam (FIB). Features not observable for the polished samples could be captured in SEM images taken of the FIB samples. For the Al matrix sample, a relatively large FMI layer develops, with enrichment of Xe at the FMI layer/Al matrix interface and evidence of debonding. Overall, a significant penetration of Si from the FMI layer into the U–7Mo fuel was observed for samples with Si in the Al matrix, which resulted in a change of the size (larger) and shape (round) of the fission-gas bubbles. Additionally, solid-fission-product phases were observed to nucleate and grow within these bubbles. These changes in the localized regions of the microstructure of the U–7Mo may contribute to changes observed in the macroscopic swelling of fuel plates with Al–Si matrices.

  18. Optical Microscopy and 4Optical Microscopy and 4 Pi MicroscopyPi Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Optical Microscopy and 4Optical Microscopy and 4 Pi MicroscopyPi Microscopy Carolyn A. SuttonCarolyn A. Sutton PH 464PH 464 #12;OverviewOverview The OpticalThe Optical MicroscopeMicroscopy 4 Pi Microscopy4 Pi Microscopy Optical Microscope for Metallography #12;Optical Microscope: OriginsOptical

  19. Direct imaging of crystal structure and defects in metastable Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} by quantitative aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Ulrich; Lotnyk, Andriy, E-mail: andriy.lotnyk@iom-leipzig.de; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge about the atomic structure and vacancy distribution in phase change materials is of foremost importance in order to understand the underlying mechanism of fast reversible phase transformation. In this Letter, by combining state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with image simulations, we are able to map the local atomic structure and composition of a textured metastable Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin film deposited by pulsed laser deposition with excellent spatial resolution. The atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy investigations display the heterogeneous defect structure of the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase. The obtained results are discussed. Highly oriented Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin films appear to be a promising approach for further atomic-resolution investigations of the phase change behavior of this material class.

  20. Direct electron detection in transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Liang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Duttweiler, J. Bouwer, S. Peltier, M. Ellisman, P. Denes, F.J. C. Bouwer, S. T. Peltier, M. Ellisman and N. -H. Xuong (J. C. Bouwer, S. T. Peltier, M. H. Ellisman and N. H.

  1. Direct electron detection in transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Liang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    overlay on the photo showed how the sensor chip was aligned40. Photo of the EM5 carrier board with mounted sensor40. Photo of the EM5 carrier board with mounted sensor chip.

  2. The growth of epitaxial iron oxides on platinum (111) as studied by X-ray photoelectron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, and low energy electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Y.J.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three complementary surface structure probes, x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) have been combined in a single instrument. This experimental system has been utilized to study the structure and growth mechanisms of iron oxide films on Pt(111); these films were formed by first depositing a single overlayer of Fe with a certain coverage in monolayers (ML`s), and then thermally oxidizing it in an oxygen atmosphere. For films up to {approximately}1 ML in thickness, a bilayer of Fe and O similar to those in FeO(111) is found to form. In agreement with prior studies, STM and LEED show this to be an incommensurate oxide film forming a lateral superlattice with short- and long-range periodicities of {approximately}3.1 {Angstrom} and {approximately}26.0 {Angstrom}. XPD in addition shows a topmost oxygen layer to be relaxed inward by -0.6 {Angstrom} compared to bulk FeO(111), and these are new structural conclusions. The oxygen stacking in the FeO(111) bilayer is dominated by one of two possible binding sites. For thicker iron oxide films from 1.25 ML to 3.0 ML, the growth mode is essentially Stranski-Krastanov: iron oxide islands form on top of the FeO(111) bilayer mentioned above. For iron oxide films of 3.0 ML thickness, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) yields an Fe 2p{sub 3/2} binding energy and an Fe:O stoichiometry consistent with the presence of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Our XPD data further prove this overlayer to be Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(111)-magnetite in two almost equally populated domains with a 180{degrees} rotation between them. The structural parameters for this Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} overlayer generally agree with those of a previous LEED study, except that we find a significant difference in the first Fe-O interplanar spacing. This work demonstrates the considerable benefits to be derived by using this set of complementary surface structure probes in such epitaxial growth studies.

  3. Electrostatically focused addressable field emission array chips (AFEA's) for high-speed massively parallel maskless digital E-beam direct write lithography and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN); Baylor, Larry R. (Farragut, TN); Voelkl, Edgar (Oak Ridge, TN); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN); Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Whitson, John C. (Clinton, TN); Wilgen, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for addressable field emission array (AFEA) chips. A method of operating an addressable field-emission array, includes: generating a plurality of electron beams from a pluralitly of emitters that compose the addressable field-emission array; and focusing at least one of the plurality of electron beams with an on-chip electrostatic focusing stack. The systems and methods provide advantages including the avoidance of space-charge blow-up.

  4. Transmission electron microscopy of RSP Fe/Cr/Mn/Mo/C alloy. [Fe-3 wt % Cr-2 wt % Mn-0. 5 wt % Mo, -0. 3 wt % C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayment, J.J.; Thomas, G.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid solidification processing (RSP) has been carried out on an Fe/Cr/Mn/Mo/C alloy using both electron-beam melting and piston-and-anvil techniques. Preliminary TEM results show RSP produces a refined duplex microstructure of ferrite and martensite, with a typical ferrite grain size of 0.50 - 3.0 microns. This RSP microstructure is significantly different from that observed in the conventionally austenitized and quenched alloys - a lath martensitic microstructure with thin films of retained interlath austenite. The morphological change produced by RSP is accompanied by an increase in hardness from 48R/sub c/ to 61R/sub c/ (approx. 480 to 720 VHN). It is intended to use electron-beam specimens to examine the potential beneficial effect of RSP upon sliding wear resistance and, by careful TEM studies, it will be possible to characterize the microstructure and its role in the hardness and wear behavior of the RSP alloy.

  5. Chemical Imaging Analysis of Environmental Particles Using the Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy Technique: Microanalysis Insights into Atmospheric Chemistry of Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne fly ash from coal combustion may represent a source of bioavailable iron (Fe) in the open ocean. However, few studies have been made focusing on Fe speciation and distribution in coal fly ash. In this study, chemical imaging of fly ash has been performed using a dual-beam FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope) system for a better understanding of how simulated atmospheric processing modify the morphology, chemical compositions and element distributions of individual particles. A novel approach has been applied for cross-sectioning of fly ash specimen with a FIB in order to explore element distribution within the interior of individual particles. Our results indicate that simulated atmospheric processing causes disintegration of aluminosilicate glass, a dominant material in fly ash particles. Aluminosilicate-phase Fe in the inner core of fly ash particles is more easily mobilized compared with oxide-phase Fe present as surface aggregates on fly ash spheres. Fe release behavior depends strongly on Fe speciation in aerosol particles. The approach for preparation of cross-sectioned specimen described here opens new opportunities for particle microanalysis, particular with respect to inorganic refractive materials like fly ash and mineral dust.

  6. Microscopy image segmentation tool: Robust image data analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valmianski, Ilya, E-mail: ivalmian@ucsd.edu; Monton, Carlos; Schuller, Ivan K. [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a software package called Microscopy Image Segmentation Tool (MIST). MIST is designed for analysis of microscopy images which contain large collections of small regions of interest (ROIs). Originally developed for analysis of porous anodic alumina scanning electron images, MIST capabilities have been expanded to allow use in a large variety of problems including analysis of biological tissue, inorganic and organic film grain structure, as well as nano- and meso-scopic structures. MIST provides a robust segmentation algorithm for the ROIs, includes many useful analysis capabilities, and is highly flexible allowing incorporation of specialized user developed analysis. We describe the unique advantages MIST has over existing analysis software. In addition, we present a number of diverse applications to scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy of intestinal villous structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    briefly in running water for 30 minutes and were dehydrated through graded ethanol series (1 hour each in 50, 70, 80, 95 and 100 %). Dehydrated specimens were dried in a carbon dioxide critical point drier to avoid exposure of the specimens to any surface tension forces when drying. The dried specimens were

  8. Directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    well-separated oxides (NiAl2O4) precipitated along grain boundaries in the metal. Aluminum was depleted from the grain boundary between oxides and also from one side of the...

  9. HIGH STABILITY CURRENT SUPPLY FOR ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motamedi, Maryam Melani

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the current regulator. The power losses through the powerFETs are (31): Power Loss = I drain V ds The drain current (by design to lower the power loss is the drain to source

  10. The Rapidly Changing Face of Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, John Meurig; Leary, Rowan K.; Eggeman, Alexander S.; Midgley, Paul A.

    2015-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    indeed, as Eliot warns, through the ood of data lose the ‘wisdom’ for which we strive. in proof is article was in press, we came across an innovatively by Chen, Alivisatos et al. (ACS Central Science, 2015, 1, hich a generalized strategy is used... to trace the trajec- irs and groups of nanocrystals moving in solution using id phase TEM – see also Yuk, Alivisatos et al., Science, 1–64. gements knowledges a Junior Research Fellowship at Clare .A.M. acknowledges funding from the European uncil under...

  11. Scientific Achievement Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principalfuel cells"03, 2008Physicsintroduced

  12. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chinn, Diane (Pleasanton, CA); Stolz, Christopher J. (Lathrop, CA); Wu, Zhouling (Pleasanton, CA); Huber, Robert (Discovery Bay, CA); Weinzapfel, Carolyn (Tracy, CA)

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

  13. Phase modulated multiphoton microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karki, Khadga Jung; Pullerits, Tonu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the modulation of the phases of the laser beams of ultra-short pulses leads to modulation of the two photon fluorescence intensity. The phase modulation technique when used in multi-photon microscopy can improve the signal to noise ratio. The technique can also be used in multiplexing the signals in the frequency domain in multi-focal raster scanning microscopy. As the technique avoids the use of array detectors as well as elaborate spatiotemporal multiplexing schemes it provides a convenient means to multi-focal scanning in axial direction. We show examples of such uses. Similar methodology can be used in other non-linear scanning microscopies, such as second or third harmonic generation microscopy.

  14. Computational microscopy for sample analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikoma, Hayato

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational microscopy is an emerging technology which extends the capabilities of optical microscopy with the help of computation. One of the notable example is super resolution fluorescence microscopy which achieves ...

  15. advanced microscopy techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Syllabus MSE 581: Advanced Electron Microscopy Course description: Present the theory of...

  16. 1996, Journal of Microscopy 181, 225-237 (and vol 182, p 240.) Multimodal microscopy by digital image processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, J. V.

    , Blakistone and Kyryk 1990 compared applications of polarised light, bright eld, DIC and scanning electron microscopy SEM in the paper industry. Fluorescence microscopy adds further possible imaging modes to light. 1 #12;1 Introduction Di erent imaging modes with the light microscope convey complementary infor

  17. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holtom, Gary R. (Richland, WA); Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney (Richland, WA); Zumbusch, Andreas (Munchen, DE)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  18. Electron microscopy and microanalysis Two transmission electron microscopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    distribution (laser scatter- ing) q Powder surface area by gas adsorption (BET) Commercially Available of a failed austenitic stainless steel tube. The failure type is identified as a fatigue failure, due

  19. Nuclear emission microscopies B.L. Doyle a,*, D.S. Walsh a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear emission microscopies B.L. Doyle a,*, D.S. Walsh a , S.N. Renfrow a,b , G. Vizkelethy a,1 Abstract Alternatives to traditional nuclear microprobe analysis (NMA) emerged two years ago with the invention of ion electron emission microscopy (IEEM). With nuclear emission microscopy (NEM) the ion beam

  20. POLYMER IMAGING WITH FRESNEL PROJECTION MICROSCOPY VU THIEN BINH1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Achim

    1 POLYMER IMAGING WITH FRESNEL PROJECTION MICROSCOPY VU THIEN BINH1 , V. SEMET1 and N. GARCIA2 1 exploited in a compact low-energy electron microscope: the Fresnel Projection Microscope. Images size of the sources. The result is a high-resolution, low-energy electron microscope, the "Fresnel

  1. Characterization of Polymer Blends: Optical Microscopy (*Polarized, Interference and Phase Contrast Microscopy*) and Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan [ORNL; Darling, Seth B. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 15 surveys the characterization of macro, micro and meso morphologies of polymer blends by optical microscopy. Confocal Microscopy offers the ability to view the three dimensional morphology of polymer blends, popular in characterization of biological systems. Confocal microscopy uses point illumination and a spatial pinhole to eliminate out-of focus light in samples that are thicker than the focal plane.

  2. Probing graphene defects and estimating graphene quality with optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Shen [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology (HINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kyu Jang, Sung [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jae Song, Young, E-mail: yjsong@skku.edu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sungjoo, E-mail: leesj@skku.edu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology (HINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a simple and accurate method for detecting graphene defects that utilizes the mild, dry annealing of graphene/Cu films in air. In contrast to previously reported techniques, our simple approach with optical microscopy can determine the density and degree of dislocation of defects in a graphene film without inducing water-related damage or functionalization. Scanning electron microscopy, confocal Raman and atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis were performed to demonstrate that our nondestructive approach to characterizing graphene defects with optimized thermal annealing provides rapid and comprehensive determinations of graphene quality.

  3. Subsurface Examination of a Foliar Biofilm Using Scanning Electron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Examination of a Foliar Biofilm Using Scanning Electron- and Focused-Ion-Beam Microscopy. Subsurface Examination of a Foliar Biofilm Using Scanning Electron- and Focused-Ion-Beam...

  4. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon (El Cerrito, CA); Chemla, Daniel S. (Kensington, CA); Ogletree, D. Frank (El Cerrito, CA); Botkin, David (San Francisco, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  5. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  6. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  7. Nonlinear Photoemission Electron Micrographs of Plasmonic Nanoholes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electron microscopy of isolated nanoholes in gold thin films map propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) launched from the lithographically patterned plasmonic structures....

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: scanning probe microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    focus on stainless steels. Dr. An is an internationally recognized expert on scanning probe microscopy, such as atomic force microscopy and scanning ... Last Updated:...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: scanning tunneling microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    focus on stainless steels. Dr. An is an internationally recognized expert on scanning probe microscopy, such as atomic force microscopy and scanning ... Last Updated:...

  10. 3D rotational diffusion microrheology using 2D video microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rémy Colin; Minhao Yan; Loudjy Chevry; Jean-François Berret; Bérengère Abou

    2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple way to perform three-dimensional (3D) rotational microrheology using two-dimensional (2D) video microscopy. The 3D rotational brownian motion of micrometric wires in a viscous fluid is deduced from their projection on the focal plane of an optical microscope objective. The rotational diffusion coefficient of the wires of length between 1-100 \\mu m is extracted, as well as their diameter distribution in good agreement with electron microscopy measurements. This is a promising way to characterize soft visco-elastic materials, and probe the dimensions of anisotropic objects.

  11. Uranium-contaminated soils: Ultramicrotomy and electron beam analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium contaminated soils from the Fernald Operation Site, Ohio, have been examined by a combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM). A method is described for preparing of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin sections by ultramicrotomy. By using these thin sections, SEM and TEM images can be compared directly. Uranium was found in iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite. Little uranium was associated with clays. The distribution of uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level.

  12. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Callahan, Daniel E; Parvin, Bahram

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  13. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Callahan, Daniel E. (Martinez, CA); Parvin, Bahram (Mill Valley, CA)

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  14. Photoemission Electron Microscopy of a Plasmonic Silver Nanoparticle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    near-fields resulting from femtosecond (fs) laser excitation of localized surface plasmon oscillations in the triangular core-shell structure. We demonstrate that the...

  15. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of Microstructure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a SnO2 Nanowire during Lithium Abstract: This paper reports development of a lithium-ion battery nanostructure device using a single nanowire for in-stu TEM study of the...

  16. THE ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF HYDROCARBON PRODUCTION IN PARTHENIUM ARGENTATUM (GUAYULE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, T.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas left, and oil reserves are variously estimatedlonger estimates for oil reserves depend upon the obtainingoil and gas often mentioned and cur- rently being developed is coal. The United States possesses coal reserves

  17. Corrugation in Exfoliated Graphene: An Electron Microscopy and Diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Philip

    Trieste S.C.p.A., 34149 Basovizza, Trieste, Italy, Department of Physics and § Department of Applied Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027, IOM-CNR Laboratorio TASC, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste, Buyukcekmece, Istanbul, Turkey, and # Department of Physics, Trieste University, Trieste, Italy. o Contributed

  18. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Nanomaterials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joon Hwan 1977-

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    .1. Overview .................................................................................................... 1 1.2. Nanomaterials ............................................................................................. 4 1.2.1. Bulk nanostructured... 1.3. Schematic diagram showing different types of nanostructured ceramic materials: a) two-phased nanocomposite material b) inter/intra-granular nanocomposite material c) micro/nanostructured material d) inter- granular nanocomposite material...

  19. THE ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF HYDROCARBON PRODUCTION IN PARTHENIUM ARGENTATUM (GUAYULE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, T.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in later stages of rubber production will be pre- sentedprimary emphasis on rubber production in Guayule. Thus theare those involved in rubber production in Guayule. Since

  20. THE ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF HYDROCARBON PRODUCTION IN PARTHENIUM ARGENTATUM (GUAYULE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, T.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the time there was no synthetic rubber, the very real natureend of World War II. Synthetic rubber had just been inventedof oil from which synthetic rubber is deriv~d,in conjunction

  1. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joon Hwan 1977-

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    of deformation behavior of Al2O3-ZrO2-MgAl2O4 (AZM) bulk ceramic nanocomposites, strengthening mechanism of twins in YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) thin film, work hardening event in nanocrystalline nickel and deformation of 2wt% Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin film with nanorod...

  2. THE IMPACT OF TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY IN CERAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Gareth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbine Vanes", General Electric Report 74CRD040, Apriland Dr. S. Prochazka of General Electric Corporate Researcha process invented by General Electric Company20,2l in which

  3. Letters to ESEX High resolution transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    ), in south-eastern Libya (Haber- land, 1975), on gibbers (Jessup, 1960) and bedrock faces in Australia (Tratebas et al., 2004), and stone monuments (Paradise, 2005) and can act as an agent of rock art stability

  4. Meeting Review Outcome of the First Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wriggers, Willy

    Richard Henderson,1 Andrej Sali,2 Matthew L. Baker,3 Bridget Carragher,4 Batsal Devkota,5 Kenneth H 22904, USA 8Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics Research Center and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Brandeis University, MS 029, Waltham, MA 02454, USA 11

  5. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  6. Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Dr. Lawrence F. Allard Materials Science & Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN DOE 2010 Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

  7. Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    L. F. Allard Materials Science & Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 2009 DOE Merit Review Crystal City, MD May 22, 2009 Agreement PM-9105 Project ID:...

  8. Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Characterization Dr. Lawrence F. Allard Materials Science & Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN DOE 2010 Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review...

  9. RESEARCH NEWS VOLUME 12 ELECTRON MICROSCOPY SPECIAL ISSUE 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    . The resolution of AFM is limited by the sharpness of the tip and its geometry. Unfortunately, tips degrade during, and a potentially biodegradable semiconductor, 5,5'-bis-(7-dodecyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)- 2,2'-bithiophene (DDFTTF

  10. Amplitude Contrast High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Advanced Materials March 13, 2015 11:00AM to 12:00PM Presenter Jianguo Wen, (EMC) and (CNM) Location Building 203 Type Colloquium Series Physics Division Colloquium...

  11. Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of InN Nanorods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Li, X.; Kryliouk, Olga; Park, H.J.; Mangum, J.; Anderson, T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    crystals grown on Si and GaN substrate is different. Theon c-Al 2 O 3, GaN , and Si substrates by non-catalytic,

  12. Electron Microscopy > Analytical Resources > Research > The Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date:research communityElectricityLicensing -

  13. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principal InvestigatorsSave Energy onofCNMS, SNS launch|

  14. Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and BatteryUS-EU-Japan WorkingUSEA/Johnsonand

  15. Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and BatteryUS-EU-Japan WorkingUSEA/JohnsonandDepartment of

  16. Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and BatteryUS-EU-JapanCatalysts | Department of

  17. Electron Microscopy Catalysis Projects: Success Stories from the High

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory BoardNucleateElectrochemicalProposedElectrolytesTemperature

  18. Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy for Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer Review 2012IowaFebruary 9, 2012 4:00

  19. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovement of the LostDepartmentIn theDepartment

  20. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovement of the LostDepartmentIn theDepartmentDepartment

  1. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print Thursday, 22 January 2015 12:10 X-ray microscopy...

  2. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy currents on locally disordered graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Shan-Wen; Peres, Nuno M. R.; Santos, J. E.; Ribeiro, R. M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy currents on locally disorderedcharacteristic curves of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM)for the calculation of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM)

  3. Coupling EELS/EFTEM Imaging with Environmental Fluid Cell Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL; Baggetto, Loic [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insight into dynamically evolving electrochemical reactions and mechanisms encountered in electrical energy storage (EES) and conversion technologies (batteries, fuel cells, and supercapacitors), materials science (corrosion and oxidation), and materials synthesis (electrodeposition) remains limited due to the present lack of in situ high-resolution characterization methodologies. Electrochemical fluid cell microscopy is an emerging in-situ method that allows for the direct, real-time imaging of electrochemical processes within a fluid environment. This technique is facilitated by the use of MEMS-based biasing microchip platforms that serve the purpose of sealing the highly volatile electrolyte between two electron transparent SiNx membranes and interfacing electrodes to an external potentiostat for controlled nanoscale electrochemislly experiments [!]. In order to elucidate both stmctural and chemical changes during such in situ electrochemical experiments, it is impmtant to first improve upon the spatial resolution by utilizing energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) (to minimize chromatic aben ation), then to detennine the chemical changes via electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). This presents a formidable challenge since the overall thickness through which electrons are scattered through the multiple layers of the cell can be on the order of hundreds of nanometers to microns, scattering through which has the deleterious effect of degrading image resolution and decreasing signal-to noise for spectroscopy [2].

  4. Detection of secondary phases in duplex stainless steel by magnetic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramírez-Salgado, J. [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Dirección de Investigación y Posgrado, Eje Central Norte Lázaro Cárdenas, No. 152, 07730 D.F., México (Mexico); Domínguez-Aguilar, M.A., E-mail: madoming@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Dirección de Investigación y Posgrado, Eje Central Norte Lázaro Cárdenas, No. 152, 07730 D.F., México (Mexico); Castro-Domínguez, B. [University of Tokyo, Department of Chemical System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Bldg. 5, 7F 722, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113–8656 (Japan); Hernández-Hernández, P. [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Dirección de Investigación y Posgrado, Eje Central Norte Lázaro Cárdenas, No. 152, 07730 D.F., México (Mexico); Newman, R.C. [University of Toronto, Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, 200 College Street, Toronto M5S 3E5 (Canada)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The secondary phase transformations in a commercial super duplex stainless steel were investigated by micro-chemical analyses and high resolution scanning probe microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray and electron probe detected ferrite and austenite as well as secondary phases in unetched aged duplex stainless steel type 25Cr-7Ni-3Mo. Volta potential indicated that nitride and sigma appeared more active than ferrite, while secondary austenite and austenite presented a nobler potential. Reversal order in nobility is thought to be attributable to the potential ranking provided by oxide nature diversity as a result of secondary phase surface compositions on steel. After eutectoid transformation, secondary austenite was detected by electron probe microanalysis, whereas atomic force microscopy distinguished this phase from former austenite by image contrast. Magnetic force microscopy revealed a “ghosted” effect on the latter microstructure probably derived from metal memory reminiscence of mechanical polishing at passivity and long range magnetic forces of ferrite phase. - Highlights: • Nobility detection of secondary phases by SKPFM in DSS particles is not a straightforward procedure. • As Volta potential and contrast are not always consistent SKPFM surface oxides is thought played an important role in detection. • AFM distinguished secondary austenite from former austenite by image contrast though SEM required EPMA.

  5. Phase modulation mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Changlin [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn, E-mail: gli@engr.pitt.edu; Wang, Yuechao; Yang, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Guangyong, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn, E-mail: gli@engr.pitt.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter reports a phase modulation (PM) mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy. In this mode, an AC current is directly generated by an AC voltage between the electrodes. The portion of the AC current in phase with the AC voltage, which is the current through the resistance path, is modulated by the tip-sample distance. It can be used as the input of feedback control to drive the scanner in Z direction. The PM mode, taking the advantages of both DC mode and traditional AC mode, is less prone to electronic noise and DC drift but maintains high scanning speed. The effectiveness of the PM mode has been proven by experiments.

  6. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the ?-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane andmore »freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.« less

  7. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, Johanna [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Huang, Xiaojing [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Steinbrener, Jan [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Shapiro, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Kirz, Janos [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Marchesini, Stephano [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Neiman, Aaron M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Turner, Joshua J. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Jacobsen, Chris [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the ?-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.

  8. Proposal for a High-Brightness Pulsed Electron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolotorev, M.; Commins, E.D.; Heifets, S.; Sannibale, F.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /SLAC

    2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel scheme for a high-brightness pulsed electron source, which has the potential for many useful applications in electron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electron scattering experiments, and electron holography. A description of the proposed scheme is presented.

  9. GaN(0001) Surface Structures Studied Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and First-Principles Total Energy Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    occurring on the (0001) surface of wurtzite GaN are studied using scanning tunneling microscopy, electron and electronic properties of wurtzite GaN surfaces. Several prior studies have reported that these surfaces do reconstructions were identified, corresponding to the two inequivalent polar fac- es of wurtzite GaN, the (0001

  10. POLYMER IMAGING WITH FRESNEL PROJECTION MICROSCOPY VU THIEN BINH 1 , V. SEMET 1 and N. GARCIA 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Achim

    1 POLYMER IMAGING WITH FRESNEL PROJECTION MICROSCOPY VU THIEN BINH 1 , V. SEMET 1 and N. GARCIA 2 1 exploited in a compact low­energy electron microscope: the Fresnel Projection Microscope. Images size of the sources. The result is a high­resolution, low­energy electron microscope, the "Fresnel

  11. Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of a Frozen Hydrated Yeast Cell Xiaojing Huang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Hooman

    crystallization, and radiation damage are greatly reduced. In this example, coherent diffraction data using 520 e of biological electron microscopy [1­3]. Radiation damage precludes repeated imaging of live specimens [4 in their natural, hydrated state, without limitations imposed by x-ray optics. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103

  12. Fast scanning two-photon microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Jeremy T

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast scanning two-photon microscopy coupled with the use light activated ion channels provides the basis for fast imaging and stimulation in the characterization of in vivo neural networks. A two-photon microscope capable ...

  13. Introduction to Scanning Microwave Microscopy Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Wenhai Han Introduction to Scanning Microwave Microscopy Mode Application Note Introduction Mapping through" and meanwhile achieve sufficient sensitivity and resolution. With the invention of scanning been developed to probe materials properties. These include scanning near-field to scanning microwave

  14. Scanning probe microscopy studies of semiconductor surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinberg, W.H. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work involving atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy is discussed which involves strain-induced, self-assembling nanostructures in compound semiconductor materials. Specific examples include one-dimensional quantum wires of InAs grown by MBE on GaAs(001) and zero-dimensional quantum dots of InP grown by MOCVD on InGaP which is lattice matched to GaAs(001).

  15. In Situ Photoelectron Emission Microscopy of a Thermally Induced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emission Microscopy of a Thermally Induced Martensitic Transformation in a CuZnAI Shape Memory Alloy. In Situ Photoelectron Emission Microscopy of a Thermally Induced...

  16. ORNL microscopy pencils patterns in polymers at the nanoscale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (865) 574-7308 ORNL microscopy pencils patterns in polymers at the nanoscale Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers used atomic force microscopy to draw nanoscale patterns in a...

  17. DeepView: A collaborative framework for distributed microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parvin, B.; Taylor, J.; Cong, G.

    1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines the motivation, requirements, and architecture of a collaborative framework for distributed virtual microscopy. In this context, the requirements are specified in terms of (1) functionality, (2) scalability, (3) interactivity, and (4) safety and security. Functionality refers to what and how an instrument does something. Scalability refers to the number of instruments, vendor-specific desktop workstations, analysis programs, and collaborators that can be accessed. Interactivity refers to how well the system can be steered either for static or dynamic experiments. Safety and security refers to safe operation of an instrument coupled with user authentication, privacy, and integrity of data communication. To meet these requirements, we introduce three types of services in the architecture: Instrument Services (IS), Exchange Services (ES), and Computational Services (CS). These services may reside on any host in the distributed system. The IS provide an abstraction for manipulating different types of microscopes; the ES provide common services that are required between different resources; and the CS provide analytical capabilities for data analysis and simulation. These services are brought together through CORBA and its enabling services, e.g., Event Services, Time Services, Naming Services, and Security Services. Two unique applications have been introduced into the CS for analyzing scientific images either for instrument control or recovery of a model for objects of interest. These include: in-situ electron microscopy and recovery of 3D shape from holographic microscopy. The first application provides a near real-time processing of the video-stream for on-line quantitative analysis and the use of that information for closed-loop servo control. The second application reconstructs a 3D representation of an inclusion (a crystal structure in a matrix) from multiple views through holographic electron microscopy. These application require steering external stimuli or computational parameters for a particular result. In a sense, ''computational instruments'' (symmetric multiprocessors) interact closely with data generated from ''experimental instruments'' (unique microscopes) to conduct new experiments and bring new functionalities to these instruments. Both of these features exploit high-performance computing and low-latency networks to bring novel functionalities to unique scientific imaging instruments.

  18. Image Scanning Microscopy Claus B. Muller and Jorg Enderlein*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enderlein, Jörg

    Image Scanning Microscopy Claus B. Mu¨ller and Jo¨rg Enderlein* III. Institute of Physics, Georg microscopy technique is introduced, image scanning microscopy (ISM), which combines conventional confocal-laser scanning microscopy with fast wide-field CCD detection. The technique allows for doubling the lateral

  19. Application of fluorescence microscopy to coal-derived resid characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbone, R.F.; Hower, J.C.; Derbyshire, F.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the usefulness of a fluorescence microscopy methodology to analyze coal-derived resids and interpret the data in the light of liquefaction processing conditions, process response, the inferred resid reactivity, and in relation to results of other analytical data. The fluorescence technique utilized has been widely applied to coal and kerogen characterization, albeit with some modifications, but is novel in its application to the characterization of coal liquids. Fluorescence is the emission of light energy which occurs when electrons, having been excited to a higher energy orbital, return to their lower energy ground state. The majority of organic molecules that fluoresce are those with conjugated double bonds (chromophores), such as aromatics, characterized by pi-electrons less strongly bound within the molecule than sigma electrons, that can be excited to anti-bonding pi-orbitals. Increasing the extent of pi-bond conjugation (i.e. larger molecular size) generally imparts a shift in absorption and emission spectra to longer wavelengths. Resid fluorescence largely depends on the concentration and degree of conjugation of aromatic chromophores in the high molecular weight liquids, possibly with ancillary effects from oxygen functionalities. In this context, fluorescence analysis of liquefaction resids can potentially evaluate process performance, since direct liquefaction processes endeavor to break down the macromolecular structure of coal, and reduce the molecular weight of polycondensed aromatics through hydrogenation, the opening of ring structures, and heteroatom removal.

  20. Application of fluorescence microscopy to coal-derived resid characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbone, R.F.; Hower, J.C.; Derbyshire, F.J.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the usefulness of a fluorescence microscopy methodology to analyze coal-derived resids and interpret the data in the light of liquefaction processing conditions, process response, the inferred resid reactivity, and in relation to results of other analytical data. The fluorescence technique utilized has been widely applied to coal and kerogen characterization, albeit with some modifications, but is novel in its application to the characterization of coal liquids. Fluorescence is the emission of light energy which occurs when electrons, having been excited to a higher energy orbital, return to their lower energy ground state. The majority of organic molecules that fluoresce are those with conjugated double bonds (chromophores), such as aromatics, characterized by pi-electrons less strongly bound within the molecule than sigma electrons, that can be excited to anti-bonding pi-orbitals. Increasing the extent of pi-bond conjugation (i.e. larger molecular size) generally imparts a shift in absorption and emission spectra to longer wavelengths. Resid fluorescence largely depends on the concentration and degree of conjugation of aromatic chromophores in the high molecular weight liquids, possibly with ancillary effects from oxygen functionalities. In this context, fluorescence analysis of liquefaction resids can potentially evaluate process performance, since direct liquefaction processes endeavor to break down the macromolecular structure of coal, and reduce the molecular weight of polycondensed aromatics through hydrogenation, the opening of ring structures, and heteroatom removal.

  1. Potential applications of microscopy for steam coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVanney, K.F.; Clarkson, R.J.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical microscopy has been an extremely useful tool for many industrial sectors in the past. This paper introduces some of the potential applications of using coal and fly ash carbon microscopy for the combustion process and steam coal industry. Coal and fly ash carbon microscopic classification criteria are described. Plant sample data are presented which demonstrate that these techniques can be useful for coal selection and for problem solving in the coal-fired power plant environment. Practical recommendations for further study are proposed.

  2. Spatial resolution in vector potential photoelectron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browning, R. [R. Browning Consultants, 1 Barnhart Place, Shoreham, New York 11786 (United States)] [R. Browning Consultants, 1 Barnhart Place, Shoreham, New York 11786 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental spatial resolution of vector potential photoelectron microscopy is found to be much higher than expected because of the cancellation of one of the expected contributions to the point spread function. We present a new calculation of the spatial resolution with support from finite element ray tracing, and experimental results.

  3. Electron radiography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher

    2005-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A system capable of performing radiography using a beam of electrons. Diffuser means receive a beam of electrons and diffuse the electrons before they enter first matching quadrupoles where the diffused electrons are focused prior to the diffused electrons entering an object. First imaging quadrupoles receive the focused diffused electrons after the focused diffused electrons have been scattered by the object for focusing the scattered electrons. Collimator means receive the scattered electrons and remove scattered electrons that have scattered to large angles. Second imaging quadrupoles receive the collimated scattered electrons and refocus the collimated scattered electrons and map the focused collimated scattered electrons to transverse locations on an image plane representative of the electrons' positions in the object.

  4. Dispersion compensation for attosecond electron pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Peter; Baumgarten, Cory; Batelaan, Herman; Centurion, Martin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a device to compensate for the dispersion of attosecond electron pulses. The device uses only static electric and magnetic fields and therefore does not require synchronization to the pulsed electron source. Analogous to the well-known optical dispersion compensator, an electron dispersion compensator separates paths by energy in space. Magnetic fields are used as the dispersing element, while a Wien filter is used for compensation of the electron arrival times. We analyze a device with a size of centimeters, which can be applied to ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy, and fundamental studies.

  5. Proposal for a High-Brightness Pulsed Electron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolotorev, Max; Commins, Eugene D.; Heifets, Sam; Sannibale,Fernando

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel scheme for a high-brightness pulsedelectron source, which has the potential for many useful applications inelectron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electronscattering experiments, and electron holography. A description of theproposed scheme is presented.

  6. STM studies of the nanoscale electronic landscape of the cuprates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, William Douglas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies of the high-T superconductors have led to a number of important discoveries. In particular, STM has revealed spatial patterns in electronic density due to phenomena such as ...

  7. Defect and damage evolution quantification in dynamically-deformed metals using orientation-imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, George T., III [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Livescu, Veronica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Orientation-imaging microscopy offers unique capabilities to quantify the defects and damage evolution occurring in metals following dynamic and shock loading. Examples of the quantification of the types of deformation twins activated, volume fraction of twinning, and damage evolution as a function of shock loading in Ta are presented. Electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) examination of the damage evolution in sweeping-detonation-wave shock loading to study spallation in Cu is also presented.

  8. Single particle microscopy with nanometer resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georg Jacob; Karin Groot-Berning; Sebastian Wolf; Stefan Ulm; Luc Couturier; Ulrich G. Poschinger; Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler; Kilian Singer

    2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate nanoscopic transmission microscopy relying on a deterministic single particle source. This increases the signal-to-noise ratio with respect to conventional microscopy methods, which employ Poissonian particle sources. We use laser-cooled ions extracted from a Paul trap, and demonstrate remote imaging of transmissive objects with a resolution of 8.6 $\\pm$ 2.0nm and a minimum two-sample deviation of the beam position of 1.5nm. Detector dark counts can be suppressed by 6 orders of magnitudes through gating by the extraction event. The deterministic nature of our source enables an information-gain driven approach to imaging. We demonstrate this by performing efficient beam characterization based on a Bayes experiment design method.

  9. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Fang, Ning

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also observe and measure individual crystal growth during a replacement reaction between copper and silver nitrate. The experiment allows for quantitative, qualitative, and image data analyses for undergraduate students.

  10. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with...

  11. Video-rate Scanning Confocal Microscopy and Microendoscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nichols, Alexander J.

    Confocal microscopy has become an invaluable tool in biology and the biomedical sciences, enabling rapid, high-sensitivity, and high-resolution optical sectioning of complex systems. Confocal microscopy is routinely used, ...

  12. Quantitative imaging of living cells by deep ultraviolet microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeskind, Benjamin J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developments in light microscopy over the past three centuries have opened new windows into cell structure and function, yet many questions remain unanswered by current imaging approaches. Deep ultraviolet microscopy ...

  13. Graphene on Ru(0001) Moire Corrugation Studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy on Au/Graphene/Ru(0001) Heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciobanu, Cristian

    Graphene on Ru(0001) Moire Corrugation Studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy on Au/Graphene on graphene/Ru(0001) were used to study the corrugation of the moire structure of graphene/Ru(0001 for the graphene/Ru(0001) moire is of structural nature rather than electronic. STM showed a large value

  14. Chemically-selective imaging of brain structures with CARS microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    Chemically-selective imaging of brain structures with CARS microscopy Conor L. Evans1§ , Xiaoyin Xu anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy to image brain structure and pathology ex vivo. Although. Definitive diagnosis still requires brain biopsy in a significant number of cases. CARS microscopy

  15. Targeted Inactivation of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Fresh Cantaloupe Flesh (Cucumis melo L.) Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chimbombi, Ezekiel M.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    law function was used for predicting the bacterial mobility. The microbiological structure of cantaloupe flesh was assessed using Transmission Electron, Scanning Electron, and Light Microscopy as a basis for understanding the mobility of the bacteria...

  16. New Microscopy Patent Awarded | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilverNephelineNeuralNewIdeasofNew Microscopy Patent

  17. Direct observation of temperature dependent magnetic domain structure of the multiferroic La{sub 0.66}Sr{sub 0.34}MnO{sub 3}/BiFeO{sub 3} bilayer system by x-ray linear dichroism- and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism-photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mix, C.; Finizio, S.; Jakob, G.; Kläui, M. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Buzzi, M.; Nolting, F. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kronast, F. [Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein Straße 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-thickness La{sub 0.66}Sr{sub 0.34}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO)/BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) thin film samples deposited on SrTiO{sub 3} were imaged by high resolution x-ray microscopy at different temperatures. The ultra-thin thickness of the top layer allows to image both the ferromagnetic domain structure of LSMO and the multiferroic domain structure of the buried BFO layer, opening a path to a direct observation of coupling at the interface on a microscopic level. By comparing the domain size and structure of the BFO and LSMO, we observed that, in contrast to LSMO single layers, LSMO/BFO multilayers show a strong temperature dependence of the ferromagnetic domain structure of the LSMO. Particularly, at 40?K, a similar domain size for BFO and LSMO is observed. This indicates a persistence of exchange coupling on the microscopic scale at a temperature, where the exchange bias as determined by magnetometer measurements is vanishing.

  18. The Use Of Scanning Probe Microscopy To Investigate Crystal-Fluid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orme, C A; Giocondi, J L

    2007-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past decade there has been a natural drive to extend the investigation of dynamic surfaces in fluid environments to higher resolution characterization tools. Various aspects of solution crystal growth have been directly visualized for the first time. These include island nucleation and growth using transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy; elemental step motion using scanning probe microscopy; and the time evolution of interfacial atomic structure using various diffraction techniques. In this lecture we will discuss the use of one such in situ method, scanning probe microscopy, as a means of measuring surface dynamics during crystal growth and dissolution. We will cover both practical aspects of imaging such as environmental control, fluid flow, and electrochemical manipulation, as well as the types of physical measurements that can be made. Measurements such as step motion, critical lengths, nucleation density, and step fluctuations, will be put in context of the information they provide about mechanistic processes at surfaces using examples from metal and mineral crystal growth.

  19. Domain switching by electron beam irradiation of Z{sup +}-polar surface in Mg-doped lithium niobate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shur, V. Ya., E-mail: vladimir.shur@urfu.ru; Chezganov, D. S.; Smirnov, M. M.; Alikin, D. O.; Neradovskiy, M. M.; Kuznetsov, D. K. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The appearance of the static domains with depth above 200??m in the bulk of MgO-doped lithium niobate single crystals as a result of focused electron beam irradiation of Z{sup +}-polar surface was demonstrated. The created domain patterns were visualized by high-resolution methods including piezoresponse force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal Raman microscopy. The main stages of the domain structure formation were revealed and explained in terms of the original model.

  20. In Situ Photoelectron Emission Microscopy of a Thermally Induced Martensitic Transformation in a CuZnAI Shape Memory Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Gang; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.; Cai, Mingdong; Langford, Stephen C.; Dickinson, J T.

    2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoemission electron microscopy, in conjunction with photoemission spectroscopy, reflectivity, and surface roughness measurements, is used to study the thermally-induced martensitic transformation in a CuZnAI shape memory alloy. Real-time phase transformation is observed as a nearly instantaneous change of photoelectron intensity, accompanied by microstructural deformation and displacement due to the shape memory effect. The difference in the photoelectron intensity before and after the phase transformation is attributed to the concomitant change of work function as measured by photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoemission electron microscopy is shown to be a valuable new technique facilitating the study of phase transformations in shape memory alloys, and provides real-time information on microstructural changes and phase-dependent electronic properties.

  1. advanced electronic materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electronic materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ADVANCED ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND...

  2. Uranium-contaminated soils: Ultramicrotomy and electron beam analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium-contaminated soils from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Site, Ohio, have been examined by a combination of scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron imaging (SEM/BSE) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The inhomogeneous distribution of particulate uranium phases in the soil required the development of a method for using ultramicrotomy to prepare transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin sections of the SEM mounts. A water-miscible resin was selected that allowed comparison between SEM and TEM images, permitting representative sampling of the soil. Uranium was found in iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite (UO{sub 2}). No uranium was detected in association with phyllosilicates in the soil.

  3. NATIONAL CENTRE FOR SENSOR RESEARCH (NCSR) Research Engineer Fluorescence Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    manuals, prepare standard operating procedures and ensure documentation is maintained. · Manage online projects. · Undertake the commissioning and maintenance of microscopy equipment. · Collate operations

  4. Note: Switching crosstalk on and off in Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polak, Leo, E-mail: l.polak@vu.nl; Wijngaarden, Rinke J. [Division of Physics and Astronomy, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Division of Physics and Astronomy, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Man, Sven de [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium, Leiden University, Leiden (Netherlands)] [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium, Leiden University, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM) electronic crosstalk can occur between the excitation signal and probe deflection signal. Here, we demonstrate how a small modification to our commercial instrument enables us to literally switch the crosstalk on and off. We study in detail the effect of crosstalk on open-loop KPFM and compare with closed-loop KPFM. We measure the pure crosstalk signal and verify that we can correct for it in the data-processing required for open-loop KPFM. We also demonstrate that open-loop KPFM results are independent of the frequency and amplitude of the excitation signal, provided that the influence of crosstalk has been eliminated.

  5. Optimized cobalt nanowires for domain wall manipulation imaged by in situ Lorentz microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, L. A. [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain) [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); CEMES-CNRS 29, rue Jeanne Marvig, B.P. 94347 F-31055, Toulouse Cedex (France); Magen, C. [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain) [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); Fundacion ARAID, 50004 Zaragoza (Spain)] [Spain; Snoeck, E.; Gatel, C. [Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France) [Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); CEMES-CNRS 29, rue Jeanne Marvig, B.P. 94347 F-31055, Toulouse Cedex (France); Serrano-Ramon, L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain) [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (ICMA), Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); and others

    2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct observation of domain wall (DW) nucleation and propagation in focused electron beam induced deposited Co nanowires as a function of their dimensions was carried out by Lorentz microscopy (LTEM) upon in situ application of magnetic field. Optimal dimensions favoring the unambiguous DW nucleation/propagation required for applications were found in 500-nm-wide and 13-nm-thick Co nanowires, with a maximum nucleation field and the largest gap between nucleation and propagation fields. The internal DW structures were resolved using the transport-of-intensity equation formalism in LTEM images and showed that the optimal nanowire dimensions correspond to the crossover between the nucleation of transverse and vortex walls.

  6. Complete information acquisition in scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belianinov, Alex [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last three decades, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has emerged as a primary tool for exploring and controlling the nanoworld. A critical part of the SPM measurements is the information transfer from the tip-surface junction to a macroscopic measurement system. This process reduces the many degrees of freedom of a vibrating cantilever to relatively few parameters recorded as images. Similarly, the details of dynamic cantilever response at sub-microsecond time scales of transients, higher-order eigenmodes and harmonics are averaged out by transitioning to millisecond time scale of pixel acquisition. Hence, the amount of information available to the external observer is severely limited, and its selection is biased by the chosen data processing method. Here, we report a fundamentally new approach for SPM imaging based on information theory-type analysis of the data stream from the detector. This approach allows full exploration of complex tip-surface interactions, spatial mapping of multidimensional variability of material s properties and their mutual interactions, and SPM imaging at the information channel capacity limit.

  7. Comparison of Segmentation Algorithms For Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernal, Javier

    - mentation techniques are less accurate than k-means clustering with multiple clusters. Segmentation accuracy fluorescence microscopy; k-means cluster; image segmentation; cell edge; bivariate simi- larity index NUMEROUSComparison of Segmentation Algorithms For Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Cells Alden A. Dima,1

  8. High-temperature piezoresponse force microscopy B. Bhatia,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, William P.

    High-temperature piezoresponse force microscopy B. Bhatia,1 J. Karthik,2 D. G. Cahill,1,2 L. W September 2011; published online 24 October 2011) We report high temperature piezoresponse force microscopy resistive heater allows local temperature control up to 1000 C with minimal electrostatic interactions

  9. Photoacoustic microscopy of tyrosinase reporter gene in vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    Photoacoustic microscopy of tyrosinase reporter gene in vivo Arie Krumholz Sarah J. Van microscopy of tyrosinase reporter gene in vivo Arie Krumholz,a Sarah J. VanVickle-Chavez,b Junjie Yao for tyrosinase, the primary enzyme responsible for expression of melanin in melanogenic cells. Optical res

  10. Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lai, Keji; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave microscope including a probe tip electrode vertically positionable over a sample and projecting downwardly from the end of a cantilever. A transmission line connecting the tip electrode to the electronic control system extends along the cantilever and is separated from a ground plane at the bottom of the cantilever by a dielectric layer. The probe tip may be vertically tapped near or at the sample surface at a low frequency and the microwave signal reflected from the tip/sample interaction is demodulated at the low frequency. Alternatively, a low-frequency electrical signal is also a non-linear electrical element associated with the probe tip to non-linearly interact with the applied microwave signal and the reflected non-linear microwave signal is detected at the low frequency. The non-linear element may be semiconductor junction formed near the apex of the probe tip or be an FET formed at the base of a semiconducting tip.

  11. Carmichael's Concise Review Microscopy is Only Skin Deep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Eric

    Carmichael's Concise Review Microscopy is Only Skin Deep Stephen W. Carmichael Mayo Clinic. Coming Events 2011 EMAS 2011 May 15­19, 2011 Angers, France www.emas-web.net IUMAS-V May 22­27, 2011

  12. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Theoretical Study of Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Theoretical Study of Water Adsorption on Fe3O4: Implications for Catalysis. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Theoretical Study of Water Adsorption on Fe3O4: Implications...

  13. Optical fiber based ultrashort pulse multispectral nonlinear optical microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Adam Michael

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) utilizing femtosecond laser pulses is well suited for imaging living tissues. This work reports on the design and development of an optical fiber based multispectral NLOM developed around a laser generating...

  14. Target-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hepler Blackwell, Megan Leticia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution ex vivo magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) can be used to delineate prominent architectonic features in the human brain, but increased contrast is required to visualize more subtle distinctions. The goal ...

  15. Doppler optical coherence microscopy for studies of cochlear mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Stanley S.

    The possibility of measuring subnanometer motions with micron scale spatial resolution in the intact mammalian cochlea using Doppler optical coherence microscopy (DOCM) is demonstrated. A novel DOCM system is described ...

  16. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12.0.2.2 Citation: J.J. Turner et al., "X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures," Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 033904 (2011). Web: http:prl.aps.orgpdfPRLv107i3e033904...

  17. Combined confocal Raman and quantitative phase microscopy system for biomedical diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jeon Woong

    We have developed a novel multimodal microscopy system that incorporates confocal Raman, confocal reflectance, and quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) into a single imaging entity. Confocal Raman microscopy provides detailed ...

  18. Ultra-bright pulsed electron beam with low longitudinal emittance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zolotorev, Max (Oakland, CA)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-brightness pulsed electron source, which has the potential for many useful applications in electron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electron scattering experiments, and electron holography has been described. The source makes use of Cs atoms in an atomic beam. The source is cycled beginning with a laser pulse that excites a single Cs atom on average to a band of high-lying Rydberg nP states. The resulting valence electron Rydberg wave packet evolves in a nearly classical Kepler orbit. When the electron reaches apogee, an electric field pulse is applied that ionizes the atom and accelerates the electron away from its parent ion. The collection of electron wave packets thus generated in a series of cycles can occupy a phase volume near the quantum limit and it can possess very high brightness. Each wave packet can exhibit a considerable degree of coherence.

  19. Toward single cell traction microscopy within 3D collagen matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Matthew S. [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Long, Rong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2G8 (Canada); Feng, Xinzeng [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Huang, YuLing [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hui, Chung-Yuen [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wu, Mingming, E-mail: mw272@cornell.edu [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three-dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell–ECM and cell–cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cell migration within collagen gels. - Highlights: • Review of the current state of the art in 3D cell traction force microscopy. • Bulk and micro-characterization of remodelable fibrous collagen gels. • Strategies for performing 3D cell traction microscopy within collagen gels.

  20. Semianalytic model of electron pulse propagation: Magnetic lenses and rf pulse compression cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Joel A.; Schroeder, W. Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 W. Taylor (M/C 273), Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical Gaussian electron pulse propagation model of Michalik and Sipe [J. Appl. Phys. 99, 054908 (2006)] is extended to include the action of external forces on the pulse. The resultant ability to simulate efficiently the effect of electron optical elements (e.g., magnetic lenses and radio-frequency cavities) allows for the rapid assessment of electron pulse delivery systems in time-resolved ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy experiments.

  1. Josephson scanning tunneling microscopy -- a local and direct probe of the superconducting order parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimura, Hikari

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title Josephson scanning tunneling microscopy – a local andthe sample using a novel scanning tunneling microscope (STM)discussed. I. INTRODUCTION Scanning tunneling microscopy (

  2. Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular Environmental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular Environmental Science Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular...

  3. Swept source optical coherence microscopy for pathological assessment of cancerous tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahsen, Osman Oguz

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) with confocal microscopy and enables depth resolved visualization of biological specimens with cellular resolution. OCM offers a suitable ...

  4. Electron tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suyama, Motohiro (Hamamatsu, JP); Fukasawa, Atsuhito (Hamamatsu, JP); Arisaka, Katsushi (Los Angeles, CA); Wang, Hanguo (North Hills, CA)

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  5. Magnetic spectroscopy and microscopy of functional materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, C.A.

    2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Heusler intermetallics Mn{sub 2}Y Ga and X{sub 2}MnGa (X; Y =Fe, Co, Ni) undergo tetragonal magnetostructural transitions that can result in half metallicity, magnetic shape memory, or the magnetocaloric effect. Understanding the magnetism and magnetic behavior in functional materials is often the most direct route to being able to optimize current materials for todays applications and to design novel ones for tomorrow. Synchrotron soft x-ray magnetic spectromicroscopy techniques are well suited to explore the the competing effects from the magnetization and the lattice parameters in these materials as they provide detailed element-, valence-, and site-specifc information on the coupling of crystallographic ordering and electronic structure as well as external parameters like temperature and pressure on the bonding and exchange. Fundamental work preparing the model systems of spintronic, multiferroic, and energy-related compositions is presented for context. The methodology of synchrotron spectroscopy is presented and applied to not only magnetic characterization but also of developing a systematic screening method for future examples of materials exhibiting any of the above effects. The chapter progression is as follows: an introduction to the concepts and materials under consideration (Chapter 1); an overview of sample preparation techniques and results, and the kinds of characterization methods employed (Chapter 2); spectro- and microscopic explorations of X{sub 2}MnGa/Ge (Chapter 3); spectroscopic investigations of the composition series Mn{sub 2}Y Ga to the logical Mn{sub 3}Ga endpoint (Chapter 4); and a summary and overview of upcoming work (Chapter 5). Appendices include the results of a Think Tank for the Graduate School of Excellence MAINZ (Appendix A) and details of an imaging project now in progress on magnetic reversal and domain wall observation in the classical Heusler material Co{sub 2}FeSi (Appendix B).

  6. Final Report: Algorithms for Diffractive Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elser, Veit

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomenal coherence and brightness of x-ray free-electron laser light sources, such as the LCLS at SLAC, have the potential of revolutionizing the investigation of structure and dynamics in the nano-domain. However, this potential will go unrealized without a similar revolution in the way the data are analyzed. While it is true that the ambitious design parameters of the LCLS have been achieved, the prospects of realizing the most publicized goal of this instrument — the imaging of individual bio-particles — remains daunting. Even with 10{sup 12} photons per x-ray pulse, the feebleness of the scattering process represents a fundamental limit that no amount of engineering ingenuity can overcome. Large bio-molecules will scatter on the order of only 10{sup 3} photons per pulse into a detector with 106 pixels; the diffraction “images” will be virtually indistinguishable from noise. Averaging such noisy signals over many pulses is not possible because the particle orientation cannot be controlled. Each noisy laser snapshot is thus confounded by the unknown viewpoint of the particle. Given the heavy DOE investment in LCLS and the profound technical challenges facing single-particle imaging, the final two years of this project have concentrated on this effort. We are happy to report that we succeeded in developing an extremely efficient algorithm that can reconstruct the shapes of particles at even the extremes of noise expected in future LCLS experiments with single bio-particles. Since this is the most important outcome of this project, the major part of this report documents this accomplishment. The theoretical techniques that were developed for the single-particle imaging project have proved useful in other imaging problems that are described at the end of the report.

  7. Determination of the positions and orientations of concentrated rod-like colloids from 3D microscopy data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. H. Besseling; M. Hermes; A. Kuijk; B. de Nijs; T. -S. Deng; M. Dijkstra; A. Imhof; A. van Blaaderen

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Confocal microscopy in combination with real-space particle tracking has proven to be a powerful tool in scientific fields such as soft matter physics, materials science and cell biology. However, 3D tracking of anisotropic particles in concentrated phases remains not as optimized compared to algorithms for spherical particles. To address this problem, we developed a new particle-fitting algorithm that can extract the positions and orientations of fluorescent rod-like particles from three dimensional confocal microscopy data stacks, even when the fluorescent signals of the particles overlap considerably. We demonstrate that our algorithm correctly identifies all five coordinates of uniaxial particles in both a concentrated disordered phase and a liquid-crystalline smectic-B phase. Apart from confocal microscopy images, we also demonstrate that the algorithm can be used to identify nanorods in 3D electron tomography reconstructions. Lastly, we determined the accuracy of the algorithm using both simulated and experimental confocal microscopy data-stacks of diffusing silica rods in a dilute suspension. This novel particle-fitting algorithm allows for the study of structure and dynamics in both dilute and dense liquid-crystalline phases (such as nematic, smectic and crystalline phases) as well as the study of the glass transition of rod-like particles in three dimensions on the single particle level.

  8. Field mapping by off-axis electron holography: from devices to the detection of single dopant atoms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Field mapping by off-axis electron holography: from devices to the detection of single dopant atoms. 3. Ernst-Ruska Center for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Research Centre Julich, D-52425 Julich, Germany. david.cooper@cea.fr Keywords: electron holography, dopant potentials, strain

  9. Development of a large format direct detection device for three dimensional transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milazzo, Anna-Clare

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F. Duttweiler, J.C. Bouwer, S.T. Peltier, M.H. Ellisman, andDuttweiler, J.C. Bouwer, S.T. Peltier, M. Ellisman, and N.H.Duttweiler, J.C. Bouwer, S.T. Peltier, A.C. Milazzo, and M.

  10. Morphological properties of pillared layered materials investigated by electron microscopy technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navas de Mascianglioli, Margarit

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . REFERENCES. 92 93 VITA 98 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 A model for the pillaring of smectite clays by hydrolyzed cations 2 Idealized structure of o-Zrp showing arrangement of the layers. 15 3 X-ray diffraction powder pattern of the nickel... intercalate a-ZrP product. . . . . . . . 16 4 SEM picture at 20, 000 of the nickel intecalate a-ZrP product 17 5 X-ray diffraction powder pattern of the nickel pillared a-ZrP product. 19 6 SEM picture at 20, 000x of the nickel pillared a-ZrP product. 20...

  11. Supporting Online Materials Electron Microscopy Observation of TiO2 Nanocrystal Evolution in High-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xudong

    ) A horizontal tube furnace system was used to perform the vapor deposition of ZnO NW. A small quartz tube 25 cm of the ALD chamber (stainless steel tube with a diameter of 2 inch) and 10 cm downstream away from the precursor injection nozzle. During the growth, a constant flow of 40 sccm N2 was applied into the chamber

  12. Reactive ion etching: Optimized diamond membrane fabrication for transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Luozhou

    Commonly used preparation method for thin diamond membranes by focused ion beam (FIB) techniques results in surface damage. Here, the authors introduce an alternative method based on reactive ion etching (RIE). To compare ...

  13. Validation of Pisum sativum agglutinin fluorescent marker for stallion spermatozoal acrosomes with transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrell, Betty Pauline

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to validate the use of a pea lectin to assess changes in acrosomal integrity of equine spermatozoa. The optimal conditions for the induction of the acrosome reaction were determined using ejaculates from three stallions...

  14. An electron microscopy study of wear in polysilicon microelectromechanical systems in ambient air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    in bulk silicon, can severely impact the durability and reliability of microelectromechanical system in the multiuser microelectromechanical system process MUMPs foundry and Sandia Ultra-planar, Multi-level MEMS

  15. Direct Observation of Colloidal Nanocrystals by Using Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jungwon

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 1.2 Preparation of Graphene Liquidcorrected TEM. 1.2 Preparation of Graphene Liquid Cells The3 Figure 1.2. Preparation of a graphene liquid

  16. Investigation of bone response to implant materials by electron microscopy and computer simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hao, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) implementation of this scintigraphic method for quantitative studies of osteoblast-mediated mineralization in vitro. A 2-D truss finite element model is used to study the remodeling of trabecular bone. Using strain ...

  17. Hall effect and transmission electron microscopy of epitaxial MnSi thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meynell, S. A.; Wilson, M. N.; Loudon, J. C.; Spitzig, A.; Rybakov, F. N.; Johnson, M. B.; Monchesky, T. L.

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    (2011). 20 S. X. Huang and C. L. Chien, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 267201 (2012). 21 M. N. Wilson, E. A. Karhu, A. S. Quigley, U. K. Ro¨ßler, A. B. Butenko, A. N. Bogdanov, M. D. Robertson, and T. L. Monchesky, Phys. Rev. B 86, 144420 (2012). 22 H. Du, J. P... . Karhu, D. P. Lake, A. S. Quigley, S. Meynell, A. N. Bogdanov, H. Fritzsche, U. K. Ro¨ßler, and T. L. Monchesky, Phys. Rev. B 88, 214420 (2013). 32 E. A. Karhu, U. K. Ro¨ßler, A. N. Bogdanov, S. Kahwaji, B. J. Kirby, H. Fritzsche, M. D. Robertson, C. F...

  18. Transmission electron microscopy of oxide development on 9Cr ODS steel in supercritical water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    is on the ferritic­martensitic 9Cr ODS steel, which was originally developed by JAEA for use in sodium-cooled fast. Ó 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the Generation- IV nuclear reactor concepts, currently being studied to help meet future

  19. AUTOMATED CELL NUCLEUS DETECTION FOR LARGE-VOLUME ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF NEURAL TISSUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamprecht, Fred A.

    indicator of cell type; and nuclear locations make it possible to gather cellular spatial statistics of neurites for morphological and circuit reconstructions. Furthermore, nuclear structure is a useful and perform quantitative cytoarchitectonics for objective regional parcellations. while visiting

  20. SINTERING OF A12O3 POWDER COMPACT BY HOT STAGE SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, D.N.-K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 G3 WITH 0..1 WT. % MgG GENERAL ELECTRIC Co. GREEN DENSITY·compacts. WITH 0.1 WT. GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. EEN DENSITY: 40R. Grace, General Electric and Lniun Carbide Co:apa! lic,,~

  1. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND PORE CASTING: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Louis H. Taylor

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  2. Situs: A Package for Docking Crystal Structures into Low-Resolution Maps from Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wriggers, Willy

    of the underlying structural data. 1999 Academic Press Key Words: topology representing neural net- works of visualization in structural biology is currently expanding, as novel modeling and graphics tools begin

  3. Identification of concrete deteriorating minerals by polarizing and scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregerova, Miroslava, E-mail: mirka@sci.muni.cz [Masaryk University in Brno, Faculty of Science, Institute of Geological Sciences, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Vsiansky, Dalibor, E-mail: daliborv@centrum.cz [Research Institute of Building Materials, JSC., Hnevkovskeho 65, 617 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The deterioration of concrete represents one of the most serious problems of civil engineering worldwide. Besides other processes, deterioration of concrete consists of sulfate attack and carbonation. Sulfate attack results in the formation of gypsum, ettringite and thaumasite in hardened concrete. Products of sulfate attack may cause a loss of material strength and a risk of collapse of the concrete constructions. The authors focused especially on the microscopical research of sulfate attack. Concrete samples were taken from the Charles Bridge in Prague, Czech Republic. A succession of degrading mineral formation was suggested. Microscope methods represent a new approach to solving the deterioration problems. They enable evaluation of the state of concrete constructions and in cooperation with hydro-geochemistry, mathematics and statistics permit prediction of the durability of a structure. Considering the number of concrete constructions and their age, research of concrete deterioration has an increasing importance. The results obtained can also be useful for future construction, because they identify the risk factors associated with formation of minerals known to degrade structures.

  4. Comparison of synchrotron x-ray microanalysis with electron and proton microscopy for individual particle analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, K.H.; van Langevelde, F.; Adams, F.C. (Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium)); Vis, R.D. (Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States)); Jones, K.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Bowen, D.K. (Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is concerned with the evaluation of the use of synchrotron/radiation induced x-ray fluorescences ({mu}-SRXRF) as implemented at two existing X-ray microprobes for the analysis of individual particles. As representative environmental particulates, National Institutes of Science and Technology (NIST) K227, K309, K441 and K961 glass microspheres were analyzed using two types of X-ray micro probes: the white light microprobe at beamline X26A of the monochromatic (15 keV) X-ray microprobe at station 7.6 of the SRS. For reference, the particles were also analyzed with microanalytical techniques more commonly employed for individual particles analysis such as EPMA and micro-PIXE.

  5. Comparison of synchrotron x-ray microanalysis with electron and proton microscopy for individual particle analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, K.H.; van Langevelde, F.; Adams, F.C. [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium); Vis, R.D. [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States); Jones, K.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bowen, D.K. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is concerned with the evaluation of the use of synchrotron/radiation induced x-ray fluorescences ({mu}-SRXRF) as implemented at two existing X-ray microprobes for the analysis of individual particles. As representative environmental particulates, National Institutes of Science and Technology (NIST) K227, K309, K441 and K961 glass microspheres were analyzed using two types of X-ray micro probes: the white light microprobe at beamline X26A of the monochromatic (15 keV) X-ray microprobe at station 7.6 of the SRS. For reference, the particles were also analyzed with microanalytical techniques more commonly employed for individual particles analysis such as EPMA and micro-PIXE.

  6. Photoemission Electron Microscopy of TiO2 Anatase Films Embedded...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    densities between the two phases near the Fermi level. This assertion is confirmed by UPS data that shows the rutile work function to be 0.2 eV lower and a greater occupied...

  7. Electron Microscopy Characterization of Tc-Bearing Metallic Waste Forms- Final Report FY10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, Edgar C.; Neiner, Doinita

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D) Program is developing aqueous and electrochemical approaches to the processing of used nuclear fuel that will generate technetium-bearing waste streams. This final report presents Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research in FY10 to evaluate an iron-based alloy waste form for Tc that provides high waste loading within waste form processing limitations, meets waste form performance requirements for durability and the long-term retention of radionuclides and can be produced with consistent physical, chemical, and radiological properties that meet regulatory acceptance requirements for disposal.

  8. A revision of generic concepts in the subfamily Acetabularieae (Acetabulariaceae, dasycladales) based on scanning electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Glenn Paul

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Eiseman (1970) in Lake Surprise, Florida. He reported a variety of phenotypes which formed a continuum between Chalmasia antillana Solms-Laubach, 1895 (calcified cysts} and Acetabularia farlowii Solms-Laubach, 1895 (uncalcified cysts). He concluded... lime matrix between adjacent cysts similar to the type of calcification in the genus Acicularia. He also reported a difference in crystal habits produced by species of Acetabularia anti liana. found in two different habitats, again indicating...

  9. SINTERING OF A12O3 POWDER COMPACT BY HOT STAGE SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, D.N.-K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from W. R. Grace, General Electric and Lniun Carbide Co:apa!2 G3 WITH 0..1 WT. % MgG GENERAL ELECTRIC Co. GREEN DENSITY·compacts. WITH 0.1 WT. GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. EEN DENSITY: 40

  10. 3D Motion of DNA-Au Nanoconjugates in Graphene Liquid Cell Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex

    structural details from the laborious sample preparations of a system frozen in vitrified ice,2 which of an ensemble of artificially fixated samples in their native liquid environment, each sample exhibiting one

  11. SINTERING OF A12O3 POWDER COMPACT BY HOT STAGE SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, D.N.-K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    previous investigators for Linde-A A1 20 3 with MgO dopant (by previous investigators for Linde-A A1 0 with MgO dopant (by Jorgensen for undoped Linde-A A1 0 (Ref. 18), Jorgensen's

  12. Proceedings of the seventh international conference on high voltage electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, R.M.; Gronsky, R.; Westmacott, K.H. (eds.)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eight-four papers are arranged under the following headings: high resolution, techniques and instrumentation, radiation effects, in-situ and phase transformations, minerals and ceramics, and semiconductors and thin films. Twenty-three papers were abstracted separately for the data base; three of the remainder had previously been abstracted. (DLC)

  13. An electron microscopy study of ground-nut poisoning in turkey poults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Alcides Amilcar

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    etiology. In the eat'Ly papers the condition was known by the name of Turkey ' X" disease. However, this name was quickly changed when in L961 Blount (7) concluded that toxic Brasilian ground-nut meal was responsible for the outbreaks of this new... condition. Similar toxic effects in ducklings, chickens, rats, guinea pigs, cows and pigs have also been reported. In general, there is little available information about how and where tbe toxic principles of any kind act in the cells structures. Also...

  14. Atom-by-atom structural and chemical analysis by annular dark-field electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . Corbin1 , Niklas Dellby1 , Matthew F. Murfitt1 , Christopher S. Own1 , Zoltan S. Szilagyi1 , Mark P

  15. An electron microscopy study of ground-nut poisoning in turkey poults 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Alcides Amilcar

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    etiology. In the eat'Ly papers the condition was known by the name of Turkey ' X" disease. However, this name was quickly changed when in L961 Blount (7) concluded that toxic Brasilian ground-nut meal was responsible for the outbreaks of this new... condition. Similar toxic effects in ducklings, chickens, rats, guinea pigs, cows and pigs have also been reported. In general, there is little available information about how and where tbe toxic principles of any kind act in the cells structures. Also...

  16. Cathodoluminescent properties at nanometer resolution through Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    another factor to be crucial to external radiative efficiency, the porosity of the films. Poros- ity information about the deposition can be found elsewhere.10 Cross-sectional slices were obtained by cutting a , the sample prepared at 735 °C, 10 Hz shows a high density of pores at the edge of the sample, with an average

  17. A technique for quantitative and qualitative viewing of aquatic bacteria using scanning electron microscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreier, Thomas Michael

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    microscopic enumeration techniques. Water samples are concentrated on pre-wetted (Triton X-100) Nuclepore filters (0. 2 um pore size) to prov1de a uniform distri- bution of bacteria on the filter surface and vacuum filtered (660 Torr). The filter... is transferred to a petri dish containing filter paper soaked 1n 2% glutaraldehyde and the bacter1a are fixed for one hour. Dehydration 1s performed by transferr1ng the filters through a series of petri dishes conta1ning filter paper saturated with 25, 50, 75...

  18. Transmission Electron Microscopy and Theoretical Analysis of AuCu Nanoparticles: Atomic Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    de Investigacio´n y Desarrollo de Ductos, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central La´zaro Ca´rdenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, C.P.07730, Mexico D.F., Mexico 2 Instituto de Fi´sica, Universidad Auto´noma de Puebla, Apdo. Postal J-48, Puebla, Pue. 72570, Mexico 3 Instituto de Investigaciones

  19. Characterization of Catalysts for the Synthesis of Higher Alcohols using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    the use of biogas to create alcohol for fuel. Higher alcohols are favorable due to their high energy. In combination with a use of a heating holder, this microscope allows catalysts to be studied using a variety

  20. Characterization of Catalysts for Synthesis of Higher Alcohols using Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    and better production paths. One of these is using biogas to create alcohol as a fuel. Higher. Together with a heating holder, it enables us to study catalysts with TEM methods while

  1. A technique for quantitative and qualitative viewing of aquatic bacteria using scanning electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreier, Thomas Michael

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    microscopic enumeration techniques. Water samples are concentrated on pre-wetted (Triton X-100) Nuclepore filters (0. 2 um pore size) to prov1de a uniform distri- bution of bacteria on the filter surface and vacuum filtered (660 Torr). The filter... is transferred to a petri dish containing filter paper soaked 1n 2% glutaraldehyde and the bacter1a are fixed for one hour. Dehydration 1s performed by transferr1ng the filters through a series of petri dishes conta1ning filter paper saturated with 25, 50, 75...

  2. In situ transmission electron microscopy of electrochemical lithiation, delithiation and deformation of individual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sow-Hsin

    - stantial promise of graphene for building durable batteries. Ó 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1 larger than that of graphite ($10 m2 /g) or single-walled carbon 0008-6223/$ - see front matter Ó 2012-dimensional nature and the strong in-plane bonding [6]. As an anode material for lithium ion batteries (LIBs

  3. Study of perineal patterns of four species of Meloidogyne (Nematoda:Heteroderoidea) using scanning electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Zainab Najafali

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , except that in M. ~ha la a raised and clearly differentiated tail area was always observed. M. ~fco it hibited tiy a high d I a h. The inner st 1- tions around the vulva and up the tail area formed a distinctive pear shape. The lateral field... was sometimes differentiated. The vulval lip striations were present and a whorl in the tail area was p o inent. M. java ica had both Iow and high d a1 a h . The typical lateral lines and pattern rays were seen in most specimens. A whorl in the tail area...

  4. Magnetofossil spike during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum: Ferromagnetic resonance, rock magnetic, and electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . A novel paleogeographic analysis applying a recent paleomagnetic pole from the Faeroe Islands indicates atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The climatic event led to changes in the hydrologic cycle, which bacteria and production as a fallout condensate following a cometary impact. Magnetotactic bacteria

  5. On the use of peak-force tapping atomic force microscopy for quantification of the local elastic modulus in hardened cement paste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trtik, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.trtik@empa.ch [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Josef [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Volz, Udo [Bruker Nano GmbH, Mannheim (Germany)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface of epoxy-impregnated hardened cement paste was investigated using a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging mode that allows for the quantitative mapping of the local elastic modulus. The analyzed surface was previously prepared using focussed ion beam milling. The same surface was also characterized by electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We demonstrate the capability of this quantitative nanomechanical mapping to provide information on the local distribution of the elastic modulus (from about 1 to about 100 GPa) with a spatial resolution in the range of decananometers, that corresponds to that of low-keV back-scattered electron imaging. Despite some surface roughness which affects the measured nanomechanical properties it is shown that topography, adhesion and Young's modulus can be clearly distinguished. The quantitative mapping of the local elastic modulus is able to discriminate between phases in the cement paste microstructure that cannot be distinguished from the corresponding back-scattered electron images.

  6. SHORT REPORT Open Access Nuclear lipid droplets identified by electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    SHORT REPORT Open Access Nuclear lipid droplets identified by electron microscopy of serial that nuclear lipid droplets (LDs) are organized into domains similar to those of cytoplasmic LDs with the nuclear envelope, it could be suggested however that nuclear LDs are cytoplamic LDs trapped within

  7. Reasons for superior mechanical and corrosion properties of 2219 aluminum alloy electron beam welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koteswara Rao, S.R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai-600 036 (India)]. E-mail: sajjarkr@yahoo.com; Madhusudhan Reddy, G. [Defense Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad-500 058 (India); Srinivasa Rao, K. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai-600 036 (India); Kamaraj, M. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai-600 036 (India); Prasad Rao, K. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai-600 036 (India)

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam welds of aluminum alloy 2219 offer much higher strength compared to gas tungsten arc welds of the same alloy and the reasons for this have not been fully explored. In this study both types of welds were made and mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile testing and pitting corrosion resistance by potentio dynamic polarization tests. It is shown that electron beam welds exhibit superior mechanical and corrosion properties. The weld metals have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy; transmission electron microscopy and electron probe micro analysis. Presence of partially disintegrated precipitates in the weld metal, finer micro porosity and uniform distribution of copper in the matrix were found to be the reasons for superior properties of electron beam welds apart from the fine equiaxed grain structure. Transmission electron micrographs of the heat affected zones revealed the precipitate disintegration and over aging in gas tungsten arc welds.

  8. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, K.F.; Godfrey, R.D.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains citations of books, conference proceedings, journals, and patents published in 1992 on the following types of microscopy: atom probe field ion microscopy (108 items); field emission microscopy (101 items); and field ion microscopy (48 items). An addendum of 34 items missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  9. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy of picene thin films formed on Ag(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Yasuo, E-mail: yyoshida@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Yokosuka, Takuya; Hasegawa, Yukio, E-mail: hasegawa@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The Institute of Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8581 (Japan); Yang, Hung-Hsiang [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsu-Sheng; Guan, Shu-You; Su, Wei-Bin; Chang, Chia-Seng [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Yanagisawa, Susumu [Department of Physics and Earth Science Department, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Lin, Minn-Tsong [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hoffmann, Germar [The Institute of Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8581 (Japan); Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Using ultrahigh-vacuum low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy combined with first principles density functional theory calculations, we have investigated structural and electronic properties of pristine and potassium (K)-deposited picene thin films formed in situ on a Ag(111) substrate. At low coverages, the molecules are uniformly distributed with the long axis aligned along the [112{sup ¯}] direction of the substrate. At higher coverages, ordered structures composed of monolayer molecules are observed, one of which is a monolayer with tilted and flat-lying molecules resembling a (11{sup ¯}0) plane of the bulk crystalline picene. Between the molecules and the substrate, the van der Waals interaction is dominant with negligible hybridization between their electronic states; a conclusion that contrasts with the chemisorption exhibited by pentacene molecules on the same substrate. We also observed a monolayer picene thin film in which all molecules were standing to form an intermolecular ? stacking. Two-dimensional delocalized electronic states are found on the K-deposited ? stacking structure.

  10. Variable temperature electrochemical strain microscopy of Sm-doped ceria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Eliseev, E. A. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Yang, Nan [ORNL; Doria, Sandra [ORNL; Tebano, Antonello [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variable temperature electrochemical strain microscopy has been used to study the electrochemical activity of Sm-doped ceria as a function of temperature and bias. The electrochemical strain microscopy hysteresis loops have been collected across the surface at different temperatures and the relative activity at different temperatures has been compared. The relaxation behavior of the signal at different temperatures has been also evaluated to relate kinetic process during bias induced electrochemical reactions with temperature and two different kinetic regimes have been identified. The strongly non-monotonic dependence of relaxation behavior on temperature is interpreted as evidence for water-mediated mechanisms.

  11. Mechanics of hydrogenated amorphous carbon deposits from electron-beam-induced deposition of a paraffin precursor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , electron-energy-loss spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, secondary-ion-mass spectrometry, and nanoindentation approach employs the high surface energy of nanostructures. Cuenot et al.1 and Salvetat et al.2 used of hydrocarbon near the area where the EBID deposits were made. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy

  12. 60th Anniversary Issue: Physical Picoscale science and nanoscale engineering by electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    th Anniversary Issue: Physical Picoscale science and nanoscale engineering by electron microscopy Zhong Lin Wang* School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta.wang@mse.gatech.edu Abstract A future scanning/transmission electron microscope is proposed to be a comprehensive machine

  13. Characterization of microstructure and crack propagation in alumina using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM). December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, S.J.; Michael, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Readey, M.J. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States); Wright, S.I.; Field, D.P. [TSL, Inc., Provo, UT (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A more complete description requires the lattice orientations of a statistically significant number of grains, coupled with morphology such as grain size and shape; this can be obtained using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), which uses crystallographic orientation data from Backscattered Electron Kikuchi patterns (BEKP) collected using a SEM. This report describes the OIM results for alumina; these include image quality maps, grain boundary maps, pole figures, and lattice misorientations depicted on MacKenzie plot and in Rodrigues space. High quality BEKP were obtained and the images and data readily reveal the grain morphology, texture, and grain boundary misorientations, including those for cracked boundaries. A larger number of grains should be measured to make statistical comparisons between materials with different processing histories.

  14. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C.; et al

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatialmore »resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.« less

  15. High-resolution ab initio Three-dimensional X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; Cui, C; Howells, M R; Rosen, R; He, H; Spence, J H; Weierstall, U; Beetz, T; Jacobsen, C; Shapiro, D

    2005-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging non-periodic isolated objects at resolutions only limited, in principle, by the largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate X-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the 3D diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a non-periodic object. We also construct 2D images of thick objects with infinite depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution using X-ray undulator radiation, and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at X-ray free-electron laser sources.

  16. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C.; Weierstall, Uwe; Beetz, Tobias; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.

  17. Detection of Percolating Paths in PMMA/CB Segregated Network Composites Using Electrostatic Force Microscopy and Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waddell, J. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ou, R. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Gupta, S. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Parker, A. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Gerhardt, Dr. Rosario [Georgia Institute of Technology; Seal, Katyayani [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Baddorf, Arthur P [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite specimens possessing polyhedral segregated network microstructures require a very small amount of nanosize filler, <1 vol %, to reach percolation because percolation occurs by accumulation of the fillers along the edges of the deformed polymer matrix particles. In this paper, electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) were used to confirm the location of the nanosize fillers and the corresponding percolating paths in polymethyl methacrylate/carbon black composites. The EFM and C-AFM images revealed that the polyhedral polymer particles were coated with filler, primarily on the edges as predicted by the geometric models provided.

  18. ELECTRONIC WARFARE NOVEMBER 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FM 3-36 ELECTRONIC WARFARE NOVEMBER 2012 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release Electronic Warfare Contents Page PREFACE..............................................................................................................iv Chapter 1 ELECTRONIC WARFARE OVERVIEW ............................................................ 1

  19. DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800742 Scanning Photoemission Microscopy of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800742 Scanning Photoemission Microscopy of Graphene Sheets on SiO2** By Ki in extracting individual sheets of carbon atoms (graphene) from graphite crystals, graphene has been attracted metals or molecules.[4­6] In addition, the modification of graphene surfaces using a direct chemical

  20. Surface Science Letters Scanning tunneling microscopy study of the anatase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diebold, Ulrike

    ; Surface structure, morphology, roughness, and topography; Low index single crystal surfaces The structureSurface Science Letters Scanning tunneling microscopy study of the anatase (1 0 0) surface NancyO2 anatase (1 0 0) surface. Natural single crystals of anatase were employed; and after several

  1. Nanoscale Thermotropic Phase Transitions Enhance Photothermal Microscopy Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the material undergoes a phase transition. Herein, we show that thermotropic phase transitions in 4-Cyano-41 Nanoscale Thermotropic Phase Transitions Enhance Photothermal Microscopy Signals A. Nicholas G-objects in various environments. It uses a photo-induced change in the refractive index of the environment. Taking

  2. Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy U. Kemiktarak1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LETTERS Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy U. Kemiktarak1 , T. Ndukum3 , K. C. Schwab3 measurementsinmesoscopicelectronicsandmechanics. Broadband noise measurements across the tunnel junction using this radio-frequency STM available from nanoscale optical and electrical displacement detection tech- niques, and the radio

  3. Instrument Series: Microscopy Ultra-High Vacuum, Low-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instrument Series: Microscopy Ultra-High Vacuum, Low- Temperature Scanning Probe Microscope EMSL's ultra-high vacuum, low-temperature scanning probe microscope instrument, or UHV LT SPM range of surface analytical techniques at low temperature ­ enables ultra-violet/X-ray photoelectron

  4. Preparation of Samples for Light Microscopy Simple Wax Seal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    Preparation of Samples for Light Microscopy Simple Wax Seal Materials - Slide - Cover Slip - Paraffin Wax Candle - Pasteur Pipette (suggested size 5 3/4 inch) - Matches Preparation of the Slide - You may want to protect the work surface from melted wax. We use a sheet of aluminum foil taped

  5. Optimal resolution in Fresnel incoherent correlation holographic fluorescence microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Joseph

    Optimal resolution in Fresnel incoherent correlation holographic fluorescence microscopy Gary, Israel 4 rosen@ee.bgu.ac.il *gbrooker@jhu.edu Abstract: Fresnel Incoherent Correlation Holography (FINCH. Rosen and G. Brooker, "Digital spatially incoherent Fresnel holography," Opt. Lett. 32(8), 912­914 (2007

  6. absorption spectroscopic microscopy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption spectroscopic microscopy First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Confocal light...

  7. Electronic transport in graphene-based heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, J. Y.; Avsar, A.; Balakrishnan, J.; Taychatanapat, T.; O'Farrell, E. C. T.; Eda, G.; Castro Neto, A. H. [Graphene Research Center, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Koon, G. K. W.; Özyilmaz, B., E-mail: barbaros@nus.edu.sg [Graphene Research Center, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); NanoCore, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    While boron nitride (BN) substrates have been utilized to achieve high electronic mobilities in graphene field effect transistors, it is unclear how other layered two dimensional (2D) crystals influence the electronic performance of graphene. In this Letter, we study the surface morphology of 2D BN, gallium selenide (GaSe), and transition metal dichalcogenides (tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2})) crystals and their influence on graphene's electronic quality. Atomic force microscopy analysis shows that these crystals have improved surface roughness (root mean square value of only ?0.1?nm) compared to conventional SiO{sub 2} substrate. While our results confirm that graphene devices exhibit very high electronic mobility (?) on BN substrates, graphene devices on WS{sub 2} substrates (G/WS{sub 2}) are equally promising for high quality electronic transport (????38?000 cm{sup 2}/V s at room temperature), followed by G/MoS{sub 2} (????10?000 cm{sup 2}/V s) and G/GaSe (????2200 cm{sup 2}/V s). However, we observe a significant asymmetry in electron and hole conduction in G/WS{sub 2} and G/MoS{sub 2} heterostructures, most likely due to the presence of sulphur vacancies in the substrate crystals. GaSe crystals are observed to degrade over time even under ambient conditions, leading to a large hysteresis in graphene transport making it a less suitable substrate.

  8. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shapiro, D. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Thibault, P. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Beetz, T. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials; Elser, V. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Howells, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Jacobsen, C. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials; Kirz, J. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Lima, E. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Miao, H. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Neiman, A. M. [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, NY (United States); Sayre, D. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffraction microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.

  9. Scanning probe microscopy: Sulfate minerals in scales and cements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, C. [Schlumberger Cambridge Research (United Kingdom)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principles of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) are illustrated with examples from oilfield mineralogy, particularly emphasizing sulfate minerals involved in scale formation and cement hydration chemistry. The topography of the (010) cleavage surface of gypsum observed by atomic force microscopy shows atomically flat terraces separated by shallow steps often only one unit cell high. SPM allows direct observation of processes on mineral surfaces while they are in contact with solutions. The dissolution etching and crystal growth of gypsum and barite are discussed and rates of step migration estimated. The orientation of steps is related to the crystallographic axes. The action of phosphonate crystal growth inhibitor on gypsum and of a chelating scale solvent on barite are also shown. The multiphase microstructure of an oilwell cement clinker is described in relation to its hydration chemistry in contact with water and its reaction with sulfate ions.

  10. Biological Imaging by Soft X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro,D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Miao, H.; et al.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffraction microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.

  11. Scanning acoustic microscopy for mapping the microstructure of soft materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. G. Parker; M. J. W. Povey

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustics provides a powerful modality with which to 'see' the mechanical properties of a wide range of elastic materials. It is particularly adept at probing soft materials where excellent contrast and propagation distance can be achieved. We have constructed a scanning acoustic microscope capable of mapping the microstructure of such materials. We review the general principles of scanning acoustic microscopy and present new examples of its application in imaging biological matter, industrial materials and particulate systems.

  12. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection RadiationRecord-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage

  13. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection RadiationRecord-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy

  14. Single beam Fourier transform digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, A., E-mail: arun-nair-in@yahoo.com; Chhaniwal, V. K.; Mahajan, S.; Trivedi, V. [Optics Laboratory, Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390001 (India)] [Optics Laboratory, Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390001 (India); Faridian, A.; Pedrini, G.; Osten, W. [Institut für Technische Optik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 9, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Institut für Technische Optik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 9, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Dubey, S. K. [Siemens Technology and Services Pvt. Ltd, Corporate Technology—Research and Technology Centre, Bangalore 560100 (India)] [Siemens Technology and Services Pvt. Ltd, Corporate Technology—Research and Technology Centre, Bangalore 560100 (India); Javidi, B. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, U-4157, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-2157 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, U-4157, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-2157 (United States)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative phase contrast microscopy reveals thickness or height information of a biological or technical micro-object under investigation. The information obtained from this process provides a means to study their dynamics. Digital holographic (DH) microscopy is one of the most used, state of the art single-shot quantitative techniques for three dimensional imaging of living cells. Conventional off axis DH microscopy directly provides phase contrast images of the objects. However, this process requires two separate beams and their ratio adjustment for high contrast interference fringes. Also the use of two separate beams may make the system more vulnerable to vibrations. Single beam techniques can overcome these hurdles while remaining compact as well. Here, we describe the development of a single beam DH microscope providing whole field imaging of micro-objects. A hologram of the magnified object projected on to a diffuser co-located with a pinhole is recorded with the use of a commercially available diode laser and an arrayed sensor. A Fourier transform of the recorded hologram directly yields the complex amplitude at the image plane. The method proposed was investigated using various phase objects. It was also used to image the dynamics of human red blood cells in which sub-micrometer level thickness variation were measurable.

  15. Heavy d-electron Quasiparticle Interference and Real-space Electronic Structure of Sr3Ru2O7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.; Allan, M.P.; Wang, M.A.; Farrell, J.; Grigera, S.A.; Baumberger, F.; Davis, J.C.; Mackenzie, A.P.

    2009-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The intriguing idea that strongly interacting electrons can generate spatially inhomogeneous electronic liquid-crystalline phases is over a decade old, but these systems still represent an unexplored frontier of condensed-matter physics. One reason is that visualization of the many-body quantum states generated by the strong interactions, and of the resulting electronic phases, has not been achieved. Soft condensed-matter physics was transformed by microscopies that enabled imaging of real-space structures and patterns. A candidate technique for obtaining equivalent data in the purely electronic systems is spectroscopic imaging scanning tunnelling microscopy (SI-STM). The core challenge is to detect the tenuous but 'heavy' momentum (k)-space components of the many-body electronic state simultaneously with its real-space constituents. Sr{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7} provides a particularly exciting opportunity to address these issues. It possesses a very strongly renormalized 'heavy' d-electron Fermi liquid and exhibits a field-induced transition to an electronic liquid-crystalline phase. Finally, as a layered compound, it can be cleaved to present an excellent surface for SI-STM.

  16. In-situ and ex-situ observations of lithium de-intercalation from LiCoO? : atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clémençon, Anne

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium cobalt dioxide is the most commonly used material for positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries. During lithium de-intercalation from this material, ... undergoes a number of phase transitions, which ...

  17. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  18. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, John S. (Los Alamos, NM); Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  19. Integrating Experiment and Theory in Electrochemical Surface Science: Studies on the Molecular Adsorption on Noble-Metal Electrode Surfaces by Density Functional Theory, Electron Spectroscopy, and Electrochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javier, Alnald Caintic

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational techniques based on density functional theory (DFT) and experimental methods based on electrochemistry (EC), electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM), and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) were...

  20. Wavelength swept spectrally encoded confocal microscopy for biological and clinical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boudoux, Caroline

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a technique that facilitates the incorporation of confocal microscopy into small, portable clinical instruments. This would allow in vivo evaluation of cellular and sub-cellular ...

  1. High throughput 3D optical microscopy : from image cytometry to endomicroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Heejin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical microscopy is an imaging technique that allows morphological mapping of intracellular structures with submicron resolution. More importantly, optical microscopy is a technique that can readily provide images with ...

  2. Cellular resolution ex vivo imaging of gastrointestinal tissues with coherence microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, James G.

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to improve imaging depth and contrast, enabling cellular imaging in human tissues. We aim to investigate OCM for ex ...

  3. Cathodoluminescence microscopy and petrographic image analysis of aggregates in concrete pavements affected by alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stastna, A., E-mail: astastna@gmail.com [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Sachlova, S.; Pertold, Z.; Prikryl, R. [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Leichmann, J. [Department of Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Various microscopic techniques (cathodoluminescence, polarizing and electron microscopy) were combined with image analysis with the aim to determine a) the modal composition and degradation features within concrete, and b) the petrographic characteristics and the geological types (rocks, and their provenance) of the aggregates. Concrete samples were taken from five different portions of Highway Nos. D1, D11, and D5 (the Czech Republic). Coarse and fine aggregates were found to be primarily composed of volcanic, plutonic, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, as well as of quartz and feldspar aggregates of variable origins. The alkali-silica reaction was observed to be the main degradation mechanism, based upon the presence of microcracks and alkali-silica gels in the concrete. Use of cathodoluminescence enabled the identification of the source materials of the quartz aggregates, based upon their CL characteristics (i.e., color, intensity, microfractures, deformation, and zoning), which is difficult to distinguish only employing polarizing and electron microscopy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR in concrete pavements on the Highways Nos. D1, D5 and D11 (Czech Republic). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cathodoluminescence was combined with various microscopic techniques and image analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR was attributed to aggregates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Source materials of aggregates were identified based on cathodoluminescence characteristics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quartz comes from different volcanic, plutonic and metamorphic parent rocks.

  4. Total-scattering pair-distribution function of organic material from powder electron diffraction data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gorelik, Tatiana E.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Schmidt, Martin U.; Kolb, Ute

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper shows for the first time that pair-distribution function analyses can be carried out on organic and organo-metallic compounds from powder electron diffraction data. Different experimental setups are demonstrated, including selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nanodiffraction in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or nanodiffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) modes. The methods were demonstrated on organo-metallic complexes (chlorinated and unchlorinated copper-phthalocyanine) and on purely organic compounds (quinacridone). The PDF curves from powder electron diffraction data, called ePDF, are in good agreement with PDF curves determined from X-ray powder data demonstrating that the problems of obtaining kinematical scattering datamore »and avoiding beam-damage of the sample are possible to resolve.« less

  5. Scanning Force Microscopy Studies on Molecular Packing and Friction Anisotropy in Thin Films of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Scanning Force Microscopy Studies on Molecular Packing and Friction Anisotropy in Thin Films in bulk, was studied using differential scanning calorimetry, optical microscopy, magic angle solid were investigated at the molecular level by a combination of multimode scanning force microscopy (SFM

  6. Scanning microscopy using a short-focal-length Fresnel zone plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanning microscopy using a short-focal-length Fresnel zone plate Ethan Schonbrun,* Winnie N. Ye demonstrate a form of scanning microscopy using a short-focal-length Fresnel zone plate and a low-NA relay. In this scheme, parallel scanning microscopy using a Fresnel zone-plate array would require only a single spatial

  7. Journal of Electron Spectroscopy and Related Phenomena 144147 (2005) 259269 Soft X-ray spectromicroscopy of biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    in the case of electron beam based techniques; radiation damage in the case of electron microscopy; lack. This requires a source of bright, continu- ouslytunablesoftX-rays(50­2000 eV),andthussynchrotron radiation spatial reso- lution in the case of IR, NMR and optical techniques; inabil- ity to couple to wet specimens

  8. Electronic Durability of Flexible Transparent Films from Type-Specific Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J; Iyer, S; Bernhardt, A; Huh, JY; Hudson, S; Fagan, J; Hobbie, E.

    2011-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupling between mechanical flexibility and electronic performance is evaluated for thin films of metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deposited on compliant supports. Percolated networks of type-purified SWCNTs are assembled as thin conducting coatings on elastic polymer substrates, and the sheet resistance is measured as a function of compression and cyclic strain through impedance spectroscopy. The wrinkling topography, microstructure and transparency of the films are independently characterized using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and optical absorption spectroscopy. Thin films made from metallic SWCNTs show better durability as flexible transparent conductive coatings, which we attribute to a combination of superior mechanical performance and higher interfacial conductivity.

  9. Origin and control of magnetic exchange coupling in between focused electron beam deposited cobalt nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikulina, E.; Idigoras, O.; Porro, J. M.; Berger, A. [CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain)] [CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Vavassori, P.; Chuvilin, A. [CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain) [CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Ikerbasque, Basque Foundation for Science, Alameda Urquijo 36-5, 48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the existence and control of inter-particle magnetic exchange coupling in densely packed nanostructures fabricated by focused electron beam induced deposition. With Xe beam post-processing, we have achieved the controlled reduction and eventual elimination of the parasitic halo-like cobalt deposits formed in the proximity of intended nanostructures, which are the identified source of the magnetic exchange coupling. The elimination of the halo-mediated exchange coupling is demonstrated by magnetic measurements using Kerr microscopy on Co pillar arrays. Electron microscopy studies allowed us to identify the mechanisms underlying this process and to verify the efficiency and opportunities of the described nano-scale fabrication approach.

  10. Electrical/Electronic Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology The Division of Engineering of Science in Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology Get ready for a dynamic career in Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology. Possible applications

  11. FREE-ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variable-Wiggler Free-Electron-Laser Oscillat.ion. Phys. :_.The Los Alamos Free Electron Laser: Accelerator Perfoemance.First Operation of a Free-Electron Laser. Phys . __ Rev~.

  12. FREE ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colson, W.B.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1984). Colson, W. B. , "Free electron laser theory," Ph.D.aspects of the free electron laser," Laser Handbook i,Quant. Elect. Bendor Free Electron Laser Conference, Journal

  13. Chapter 9: Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spieler, Helmuth G

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. Armstrong Contents Electronics 9.1 Introduction 9.2measurements 9.11 Digital electronics 9.11.1 Logic elementsProblems page 1 vii Electronics This chapter was contributed

  14. Polymer Filler Aging and Failure Studied by Lateral Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratto, T; Saab, A P

    2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work, we study, via force microscopy, the basic physical interactions of a single bead of silica filler with a PDMS matrix both before and after exposure to gamma radiation. Our goal was to confirm our results from last year, and to explore force microscopy as a means of obtaining particle-scale polymer/filler interactions suitable for use as empirical inputs to a computational model consisting of an ensemble of silica beads embedded in a PDMS matrix. Through careful calibration of a conventional atomic force microscope, we obtained both normal and lateral force data that was fitted to yield adhesion, surface shear modulus, and friction of a 1 {micro}m silica bead in contact with PDMS layers of various thickness. Comparison of these terms before and after gamma exposure indicated that initially, radiation exposure lead to softening of the PDMS, but eventually resulted in stiffening. Simultaneously, adhesion between the polymer and silica decreased. This could indicate a serious failure path for filled PDMS exposed to radiation, whereby stiffening of the bulk polymer leads to loss of compressive elastic behavior, while a decrease in polymer filler adhesion results in an increased likelihood of stress failure under load. In addition to further testing of radiation damaged polymers, we also performed FEA modeling of silica beads in a silicone matrix using the shear modulus and adhesion values isolated from the force microscopy experiments as model inputs. The resulting simulation indicated that as a polymer stiffens due to impinging radiation, it also undergoes weakening of adhesion to the filler. The implication is that radiation induces a compound failure mode in filled polymer systems.

  15. Invited Review Article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Vos, Winnok H., E-mail: winnok.devos@uantwerpen.be [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Histology, Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Cell Systems and Imaging Research Group, Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Beghuin, Didier [Lambda-X, Nivelles (Belgium); Schwarz, Christian J. [European Space Agency (ESA), ESTEC, TEC-MMG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Jones, David B. [Institute for Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Philipps University, Marburg (Germany); Loon, Jack J. W. A. van [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Oral Pathology, VU University Medical Center and Department of Oral Cell Biology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bereiter-Hahn, Juergen; Stelzer, Ernst H. K. [Physical Biology, BMLS (FB15, IZN), Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as ionizing radiation and microgravity at the cellular and tissue level demands adequate visualization technology. Advanced light microscopy (ALM) is the leading tool for non-destructive structural and functional investigation of static as well as dynamic biological systems. In recent years, technological developments and advances in photochemistry and genetic engineering have boosted all aspects of resolution, readout and throughput, rendering ALM ideally suited for biological space research. While various microscopy-based studies have addressed cellular response to space-related environmental stressors, biological endpoints have typically been determined only after the mission, leaving an experimental gap that is prone to bias results. An on-board, real-time microscopical monitoring device can bridge this gap. Breadboards and even fully operational microscope setups have been conceived, but they need to be rendered more compact and versatile. Most importantly, they must allow addressing the impact of gravity, or the lack thereof, on physiologically relevant biological systems in space and in ground-based simulations. In order to delineate the essential functionalities for such a system, we have reviewed the pending questions in space science, the relevant biological model systems, and the state-of-the art in ALM. Based on a rigorous trade-off, in which we recognize the relevance of multi-cellular systems and the cellular microenvironment, we propose a compact, but flexible concept for space-related cell biological research that is based on light sheet microscopy.

  16. In-situ scanning probe microscopy of electrodeposited nickel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, James J.; Dibble, Dean C.

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance characteristics and material properties such as stress, microstructure, and composition of nickel coatings and electroformed components can be controlled over a wide range by the addition of small amounts of surface-active compounds to the electroplating bath. Saccharin is one compound that is widely utilized for its ability to reduce tensile stress and refine grain size in electrodeposited nickel. While the effects of saccharin on nickel electrodeposition have been studied by many authors in the past, there is still uncertainty over saccharin's mechanisms of incorporation, stress reduction, and grain refinement. In-situ scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a tool that can be used to directly image the nucleation and growth of thin nickel films at nanometer length scales to help elucidate saccharin's role in the development and evolution of grain structure. In this study, in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques are used to investigate the effects of saccharin on the morphological evolution of thin nickel films. By observing mono-atomic height nickel island growth with and without saccharin present we conclude that saccharin has little effect on the nickel surface mobility during deposition at low overpotentials where the growth occurs in a layer-by-layer mode. Saccharin was imaged on Au(l11) terraces as condensed patches without resolved packing structure. AFM measurements of the roughness evolution of nickel films up to 1200 nm thick on polycrystalline gold indicate that saccharin initially increases the roughness and surface skewness of the deposit that at greater thickness becomes smoother than films deposited without saccharin. Faceting of the deposit morphology decreases as saccharin concentration increases even for the thinnest films that have 3-D growth.

  17. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently Approved Justification Memoranda byRecord-Setting Microscopy

  18. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has...

  19. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in...

  20. Antibody recognition force microscopy shows that outer membrane...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells during anaerobic growth, when Fe(III) served as the terminal electron acceptor. OmcA was localized to the interface with hematite, while MtrC was...

  1. Advanced Confocal Microscopy An Essential Technique for Microfluidics Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terence Lundy

    Many believe that microfluidics has the potential to do for chemistry and biology what the integrated circuit has done for electronics — integrating tremendously complex chemical and biological processes into simple easy-to-use devices that will eventually pervade

  2. Non-contact atomic-level interfacial force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houston, J.E.; Fleming, J.G.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scanning force microscopies (notably the Atomic Force Microscope--AFM), because of their applicability to nearly all materials, are presently the most widely used of the scanning-probe techniques. However, the AFM uses a deflection sensor to measure sample/probe forces which suffers from an inherent mechanical instability that occurs when the rate of change of the force with respect to the interfacial separation becomes equal to the spring constant of the deflecting member. This instability dramatically limits the breadth of applicability of AFM-type techniques to materials problems. In the course of implementing a DOE sponsored basic research program in interfacial adhesion, a self-balancing force sensor concept has been developed and incorporated into an Interfacial Force Microscopy (IFM) system by Sandia scientists. This sensor eliminates the instability problem and greatly enhances the applicability of the scanning force-probe technique to a broader range of materials and materials parameters. The impact of this Sandia development was recognized in 1993 by a Department of Energy award for potential impact on DOE programs and by an R and D 100 award for one of the most important new products of 1994. However, in its present stage of development, the IFM is strictly a research-level tool and a CRADA was initiated in order to bring this sensor technology into wide-spread availability by making it accessible in the form of a commercial instrument. The present report described the goals, approach and results of this CRADA effort.

  3. Electronics, Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SCHOOL OF Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science IS IN YOUR HANDS THE FUTURE #12;SCHOOL OF Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science2 CAREERS IN ELECTRONICS, ELECTRICAL Belfast. Ranked among the top 100 in the world for Electrical and Electronic Engineering (QS World

  4. Direct determination of the local Hamaker constant of inorganic surfaces based on scanning force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krajina, Brad A.; Kocherlakota, Lakshmi S.; Overney, René M., E-mail: roverney@u.washington.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1750 (United States)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The energetics involved in the bonding fluctuations between nanometer-sized silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) probes and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) could be quantified directly and locally on the submicron scale via a time-temperature superposition analysis of the lateral forces between scanning force microscopy silicon dioxide probes and inorganic sample surfaces. The so-called “intrinsic friction analysis” (IFA) provided direct access to the Hamaker constants for HOPG and MoS{sub 2}, as well as the control sample, calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}). The use of scanning probe enables nanoscopic analysis of bonding fluctuations, thereby overcoming challenges associated with larger scale inhomogeneity and surface roughness common to conventional techniques used to determine surface free energies and dielectric properties. A complementary numerical analysis based on optical and electron energy loss spectroscopy and the Lifshitz quantum electrodynamic theory of van der Waals interactions is provided and confirms quantitatively the IFA results.

  5. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles on graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnette, Drew [Microelectronics and Photonics Graduate Program, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Roper, D. Keith, E-mail: dkroper@uark.edu [Microelectronics and Photonics Graduate Program, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States)

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasmon excitation decay by absorption, scattering, and hot electron transfer has been distinguished from effects induced by incident photons for gold nanoparticles on graphene monolayer using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Gold nano-ellipses were evaporated onto lithographed graphene, which was transferred onto a silicon nitride transmission electron microscopy grid. Plasmon decay from lithographed nanoparticles measured with EELS was compared in the absence and presence of the graphene monolayer. Measured decay values compared favorably with estimated radiative and non-radiative contributions to decay in the absence of graphene. Graphene significantly enhanced low-energy plasmon decay, increasing mode width 38%, but did not affect higher energy plasmon or dark mode decay. This decay beyond expected radiative and non-radiative mechanisms was attributed to hot electron transfer, and had quantum efficiency of 20%, consistent with previous reports.

  6. In Situ Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy in Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz, Megan E; Gao, Jie; Abruña, Héctor D; Muller, David A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) through liquids is a promising approach for exploring biological and materials processes. However, options for in situ chemical identification are limited: X-ray analysis is precluded because the holder shadows the detector, and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is degraded by multiple scattering events in thick layers. Here, we explore the limits of EELS for studying chemical reactions in their native environments in real time and on the nanometer scale. The determination of the local electron density, optical gap and thickness of the liquid layer by valence EELS is demonstrated for liquids. By comparing theoretical and experimental plasmon energies, we find that liquids appear to follow the free-electron model that has been previously established for solids. Signals at energies below the optical gap and plasmon energy of the liquid provide a high signal-to-background ratio as demonstrated for LiFePO4 in aqueous solution. The potential for using...

  7. Imaging of ferromagnetic domains using photoelectrons: Photoelectron emission microscopy of neodymium-iron-boron (Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundschau, M.; Romanowicz, J. [Center for Materials Science, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403-0213 (United States)] [Center for Materials Science, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403-0213 (United States); Wang, J.Y.; Sun, D.L.; Chen, H.C. [Institute of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, People`s Republic of (China)] [Institute of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, People`s Republic of (China)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ferromagnetic domains of a single crystal of neodymium-iron-boron, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (one of the strongest permanent magnetic materials known) are imaged by focusing a beam of photoelectrons with electrostatic optics in a photoelectron emission microscope. Photoelectrons emitted from the surface are deflected laterally into two opposite directions by stray magnetic fields that exist above the domains. The photoelectron beam is partially split into two. Magnetic contrast is produced by blocking part of the beam and imaging with an edge of the beam. The magnetic contrast mechanism appears to be similar to the type I magnetic contrast mechanism known from scanning electron microscopy, in which stray magnetic fields above the ferromagnetic domains deflect secondary electrons either towards or away from the electron detector. Upon heating the sample above the Curie temperature, the ferromagnetic domains gradually disappear, as expected for a second order phase transition. They reappear upon cooling. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  8. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youvan, Douglas C. (San Jose, CA); Silva, Christopher M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Bylina, Edward J. (San Jose, CA); Coleman, William J. (Moutain View, CA); Dilworth, Michael R. (Santa Cruz, CA); Yang, Mary M. (San Jose, CA)

    2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  9. Cryo diffraction microscopy: Ice conditions and finite supports

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miao, H; Downing, K; Huang, X; Kirz, J; Marchesini, S; Nelson, J; Shapiro, D; Steinbrener, J; Stewart, A; Jacobsen, C

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution imagesmore »using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.« less

  10. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.; Lima, E.; Huang, X.; Krupin, O.; Seu, K.; Parks, D.; Kevan, S.; Kisslinger, K.; McNulty, I.; Gambino, R.; Mangin, S.; Roy, S. and Fischer, P.

    2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first proof-of-principle experiment of iterative phase retrieval from magnetic x-ray diffraction. By using the resonant x-ray excitation process and coherent x-ray scattering, we show that linearly polarized soft x rays can be used to image both the amplitude and the phase of magnetic domain structures. We recovered the magnetic structure of an amorphous terbium-cobalt thin film with a spatial resolution of about 75 nm at the Co L{sub 3} edge at 778 eV. In comparison with soft x-ray microscopy images recorded with Fresnel zone plate optics at better than 25 nm spatial resolution, we find qualitative agreement in the observed magnetic structure.

  11. Cryo diffraction microscopy: Ice conditions and finite supports

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miao, H; Downing, K; Huang, X; Kirz, J; Marchesini, S; Nelson, J; Shapiro, D; Steinbrener, J; Stewart, A; Jacobsen, C

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.

  12. Photoionization microscopy in terms of local frame transformation theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Giannakeas; F. Robicheaux; Chris H. Greene

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-photon ionization of an alkali-metal atom in the presence of a uniform electric field is investigated using a standardized form of local frame transformation and generalized quantum defect theory. The relevant long-range quantum defect parameters in the combined Coulombic plus Stark potential is calculated with eigenchannel R-matrix theory applied in the downstream parabolic coordinate $\\eta$. The present formulation permits us to express the corresponding microscopy observables in terms of the local frame transformation, and it gives a critical test of the accuracy of the Harmin-Fano theory permitting a scholastic investigation of the claims presented in Zhao {\\it et al.} [Phys. Rev. A 86, 053413 (2012)].

  13. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youvan, Dougalas C.; Silva, Christopher M.; Bylina, Edward J.; Coleman, William J.; Dilworth, Michael R.; Yang, Mary M.

    2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  14. Integrated fiducial sample mount and software for correlated microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy R McJunkin; Jill R. Scott; Tammy L. Trowbridge; Karen E. Wright

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel design sample mount with integrated fiducials and software for assisting operators in easily and efficiently locating points of interest established in previous analytical sessions is described. The sample holder and software were evaluated with experiments to demonstrate the utility and ease of finding the same points of interest in two different microscopy instruments. Also, numerical analysis of expected errors in determining the same position with errors unbiased by a human operator was performed. Based on the results, issues related to acquiring reproducibility and best practices for using the sample mount and software were identified. Overall, the sample mount methodology allows data to be efficiently and easily collected on different instruments for the same sample location.

  15. Handheld and low-cost digital holographic microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiraki, Atsushi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study developed handheld and low-cost digital holographic microscopy (DHM) by adopting an in-line type hologram, a webcam, a high power RGB light emitting diode (LED), and a pinhole. It cost less than 20,000 yen (approximately 250 US dollars at 80 yen/dollar), and was approximately 120 mm x 80 mm x 55 mm in size. In addition, by adjusting the recording-distance of a hologram, the lateral resolution power at the most suitable distance was 17.5 um. Furthermore, this DHM was developed for use in open source libraries, and is therefore low-cost and can be easily developed by anyone. In this research, it is the feature to cut down cost and size and to improve the lateral resolution power further rather than existing reports. This DHM will be a useful application in fieldwork, education, and so forth.

  16. Scanning Josephson Tunneling Microscopy of Single Crystal Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta with a Conventional Superconducting Tip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimura, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title) Scanning Josephson Tunneling Microscopy of Singlea conventional superconducting scanning tunneling microscopeabstract} (Body) Remarkable scanning tunneling microscopy (

  17. Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tittmann, B. R. [Penn State; Xi, X. [Penn State

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property study of complex biological cell walls. A unique feature of this approach is that both microscopes allow the biological samples to be examined in their natural fluid (water) environment.

  18. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.K.; Hawkins, A.R.; Russell, K.F.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion spectroscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), liquid metal ion sources (LMIS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and theory. Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. This bibliography covers the period 1989. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications.

  19. Sulfur doping of diamond films: Spectroscopic, electronic, and gas-phase studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    with various levels of H2S addition 100­5000 ppm , using both microwave MW plasma enhanced CVD and hot filament is virtually unaffected by gas phase H2S concentration, and the films remain highly resistive. In contrast of S incorporation is directly proportional to the H2S concentration in the gas phase. Secondary electron microscopy

  20. Diffraction de Fresnel des electrons diffuss lastiquement et inlastiquement par des crans semi-transparents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1353 Diffraction de Fresnel des electrons diffusés élastiquement et inélastiquement par des écrans 1980) Résumé. 2014 L'application du principe de Huygens-Fresnel à l'étude de la diffraction par le bord légèrement divergent rend compte de l'allure générale des franges de Fresnel observées en microscopie

  1. Model-Based Automated Extraction of Microtubules from Electron Tomography Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the microtubules attach to chromosomes via kinetochore to drive the movement of chromosomes during mitosis. Re by NIH grants GM066270 and RR01219 and the Wadsworth Core Facility for Electron Microscopy M. Jiang segmentation. In the first phase, the volume is first processed with an anisotropic invariant wavelet transform

  2. Investigation of Band-Offsets at Monolayer-Multilayer MoS2 Junctions by Scanning Photocurrent Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, Sarah L; Wu, Chung-Chiang; Chen, Kan-Sheng; Sangwan, Vinod K; Kang, Junmo; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C; Lauhon, Lincoln J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thickness-dependent band structure of MoS2 implies that discontinuities in energy bands exist at the interface of monolayer (1L) and multilayer (ML) thin films. The characteristics of such heterojunctions are analyzed here using current versus voltage measurements, scanning photocurrent microscopy, and finite element simulations of charge carrier transport. Rectifying I-V curves are consistently observed between contacts on opposite sides of 1L-ML junctions, and a strong bias-dependent photocurrent is observed at the junction. Finite element device simulations with varying carrier concentrations and electron affinities show that a type II band alignment at single layer/multi-layer junctions reproduces both the rectifying electrical characteristics and the photocurrent response under bias. However, the zero-bias junction photocurrent and its energy dependence are not explained by conventional photovoltaic and photothermoelectric mechanisms, indicating the contributions of hot carriers.

  3. Catalac free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  4. Matter & Energy Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    See also: Matter & Energy Electronics· Detectors· Technology· Construction· Sports Science Electronic Tongue Tastes Wine Variety, Vintage (Aug. 12, 2008) -- You don't need a wine expert to Advance

  5. J. Phys III FFance 7 (1997) 1451-1467 JULY 1997, PAGE 1451 High Resolution Electron Microscopic Studies of the Atomistic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo l13, Japan (~) Institute for Solid State Physics Mechanical properties of solids PACS.61.18.-j Other methods of structure determination Abstract. Direct attempted by using high resolution electron microscopy with the electron beam incident normal

  6. Polarization-Modulated Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy in Collagen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoller, P C

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Collagen is a key structural protein in the body; several pathological conditions lead to changes in collagen. Among imaging modalities that can be used in vivo, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has a key advantage: it provides {approx}1 {micro}m resolution information about collagen structure as a function of depth. A new technique--polarization-modulated SHG--is presented: it permits simultaneous measurement of collagen orientation, of a lower bound on the magnitude of the second order nonlinear susceptibility tensor, and of the ratio of the two independent elements in this tensor. It is applied to characterizing SHG in collagen and to determining effects of biologically relevant changes in collagen structure. The magnitude of the second harmonic signal in two dimensional images varies with position even in structurally homogeneous tissue; this phenomenon is due to interference between second harmonic light generated by neighboring fibrils, which are randomly oriented parallel or anti-parallel to each other. Studies in which focal spot size was varied indicated that regions where fibrils are co-oriented are less than {approx}1.5 {micro}m in diameter. A quartz reference was used to determine the spot size as well as a lower limit (d{sub xxx} > 0.3 pm/V) for the magnitude of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The ratio of the two independent tensor elements ranged between d{sub XYY}/d{sub XXX} = 0.60 and 0.75. SHG magnitude alone was not useful for identifying structural anomalies in collagenous tissue. Instead, changes in the polarization dependence of SHG were used to analyze biologically relevant perturbations in collagen structure. Changes in polarization dependence were observed in dehydrated samples, but not in highly crosslinked samples, despite significant alterations in packing structure. Complete thermal denaturation and collagenase digestion produced samples with no detectable SHG signal. Collagen orientation was measured in thin samples of several different tissues in transmission mode as well as at different depths (up to 200 {micro}m) in thick samples in reflection mode; birefringence had no effect on the measurement. These studies showed that SHG microscopy was capable of detecting pathophysiological changes in collagen structure, suggesting that this technique has potential clinical applications.

  7. Achromatic and Isochronous Electron Beam Transport for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bengtsson, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beamlines for Free Electron Lasers," LBL-28880 Preprint (Thirteenth mtemational Free Electron Laser Conference, SantaTransport for Tunable Free Electron Lasers 1. Bengtsson and

  8. Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations The 2008 Peer Review Meeting for the...

  9. Neutrinos in the Electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Koschmieder

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We will show that one half of the rest mass of the electron is equal to the sum of the rest masses of electron neutrinos and that the other half of the rest mass of the electron is given by the energy in the sum of electric oscillations. With this composition we can explain the rest mass, the electric charge, the spin and the magnetic moment of the electron.

  10. Combined Application of QEM-SEM and Hard X-ray Microscopy to Determine Mineralogical Associations and Chemcial Speciation of Trace Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Grafe; M Landers; R Tappero; P Austin; B Gan; A Grabsch; C Klauber

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the application of quantitative evaluation of mineralogy by scanning electron microscopy in combination with techniques commonly available at hard X-ray microprobes to define the mineralogical environment of a bauxite residue core segment with the more specific aim of determining the speciation of trace metals (e.g., Ti, V, Cr, and Mn) within the mineral matrix. Successful trace metal speciation in heterogeneous matrices, such as those encountered in soils or mineral residues, relies on a combination of techniques including spectroscopy, microscopy, diffraction, and wet chemical and physical experiments. Of substantial interest is the ability to define the mineralogy of a sample to infer redox behavior, pH buffering, and mineral-water interfaces that are likely to interact with trace metals through adsorption, coprecipitation, dissolution, or electron transfer reactions. Quantitative evaluation of mineralogy by scanning electron microscopy coupled with micro-focused X-ray diffraction, micro-X-ray fluorescence, and micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (mXANES) spectroscopy provided detailed insights into the composition of mineral assemblages and their effect on trace metal speciation during this investigation. In the sample investigated, titanium occurs as poorly ordered ilmenite, as rutile, and is substituted in iron oxides. Manganese's spatial correlation to Ti is closely linked to ilmenite, where it appears to substitute for Fe and Ti in the ilmenite structure based on its mXANES signature. Vanadium is associated with ilmenite and goethite but always assumes the +4 oxidation state, whereas chromium is predominantly in the +3 oxidation state and solely associated with iron oxides (goethite and hematite) and appears to substitute for Fe in the goethite structure.

  11. Dark Energy and Electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In the light of recent developments in Dark Energy, we consider the electron in a such a background field and show that at the Compton wavelength the electron is stable, in that the Cassini inward pressure exactly counterbalances the outward Coulomb repulsive pressure thus answering a problem of the earlier electron theory.

  12. Magnetic domain structure in nanocrystalline Ni-Zn-Co spinel ferrite thin films using off-axis electron holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, D., E-mail: dzhang28@asu.edu [School of Engineering for Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-6106 (United States); Ray, N. M.; Petuskey, W. T. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604 (United States); Smith, D. J.; McCartney, M. R. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a study of the magnetic domain structure of nanocrystalline thin films of nickel-zinc ferrite. The ferrite films were synthesized using aqueous spin-spray coating at low temperature (?90?°C) and showed high complex permeability in the GHz range. Electron microscopy and microanalysis revealed that the films consisted of columnar grains with uniform chemical composition. Off-axis electron holography combined with magnetic force microscopy indicated a multi-grain domain structure with in-plane magnetization. The correlation between the magnetic domain morphology and crystal structure is briefly discussed.

  13. Distance dependence of the phase signal in eddy current microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roll, Tino; Fischer, Ulrich; Schleberger, Marika

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic force microscopy using a magnetic tip is a promising tool for investigating conductivity on the nano-scale. By the oscillating magnetic tip eddy currents are induced in the conducting parts of the sample which can be detected in the phase signal of the cantilever. However, the origin of the phase signal is still controversial because theoretical calculations using a monopole appoximation for taking the electromagnetic forces acting on the tip into account yield an effect which is too small by more than two orders of magnitude. In order to determine the origin of the signal we used especially prepared gold nano patterns embedded in a non-conducting polycarbonate matrix and measured the distance dependence of the phase signal. Our data clearly shows that the interacting forces are long ranged and therefore, are likely due to the electromagnetic interaction between the magnetic tip and the conducting parts of the surface. Due to the long range character of the interaction a change in conductivity of $\\Del...

  14. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  15. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Kalinin, Sergei V. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  16. Microrheological Studies of Regenerated Silk Fibroin Solution by Video Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghu A; Somashekar R; Sharath Ananthamurthy

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out studies on the rheological properties of regenerated silk fibroin (RSF) solution using video microscopy. The degummed silk from the Bombyx mori silkworm was used to prepare RSF solution by dissolving it in calcium nitrate tetrahydrate-methanol solvent. Measurements were carried out by tracking the position of an embedded micron-sized polystyrene bead within the RSF solution through video imaging. The time dependent mean squared displacement (MSD) of the bead in solution and hence, the complex shear modulus of this solution was calculated from the bead's position information. An optical tweezer was used to transport and locate the bead at any desired site within the micro-volume of the sample, to facilitate the subsequent free-bead video analysis. We present here the results of rheological measurements of the silk polymer network in solution over a frequency range, whose upper limit is the frame capture rate of our camera, at full resolution. By examining the distribution of MSD of beads at different locations within the sample volume, we demonstrate that this probe technique enables us to detect local inhomogeneties at micrometer length scales, not detectable either by a rheometer or from diffusing wave spectroscopy.

  17. Quantitative high dynamic range beam profiling for fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, T. J., E-mail: t.j.mitchell@dur.ac.uk; Saunter, C. D.; O’Nions, W.; Girkin, J. M.; Love, G. D. [Centre for Advanced Instrumentation and Biophysical Sciences Institute, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern developmental biology relies on optically sectioning fluorescence microscope techniques to produce non-destructive in vivo images of developing specimens at high resolution in three dimensions. As optimal performance of these techniques is reliant on the three-dimensional (3D) intensity profile of the illumination employed, the ability to directly record and analyze these profiles is of great use to the fluorescence microscopist or instrument builder. Though excitation beam profiles can be measured indirectly using a sample of fluorescent beads and recording the emission along the microscope detection path, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a miniature camera sensor is used directly within the illumination beam. Measurements taken using our approach are solely concerned with the illumination optics as the detection optics are not involved. We present a miniature beam profiling device and high dynamic range flux reconstruction algorithm that together are capable of accurately reproducing quantitative 3D flux maps over a large focal volume. Performance of this beam profiling system is verified within an optical test bench and demonstrated for fluorescence microscopy by profiling the low NA illumination beam of a single plane illumination microscope. The generality and success of this approach showcases a widely flexible beam amplitude diagnostic tool for use within the life sciences.

  18. Two-Color Ultrafast Photoexcited Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camillone, N.; Dolocan, A.; Acharya, D.P.; Zahl, P.; Sutter, P.

    2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on two-color two-photon photoexcitation of a metal surface driven by ultrafast laser pulses and detected with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip as a proximate anode. Results are presented for two cases: (i) where the tip is retracted from the surface far enough to prohibit tunneling, and (ii) where the tip is within tunneling range of the surface. A delay-modulation technique is implemented to isolate the two-color photoemission from concurrent one-color two-photon photoemission and provide subpicosecond time-resolved detection. When applied with the tip in tunneling range, this approach effectively isolates the two-photon photoexcited current signal from the conventional tunneling current and enables subpicosecond time-resolved detection of the photoexcited surface electrons. The advantage of the two-color approach is highlighted by comparison with the one-color case where optical interference causes thermal modulation of the STM tip length, resulting in tunneling current modulations that are orders of magnitude larger than the current due to photoexcitation of surface electrons. By completely eliminating this interference, and thereby avoiding thermal modulation of the STM tip length, the two-color approach represents an important step toward the ultimate goal of simultaneous subnanometer and subpicosecond measurements of surface electron dynamics by ultrafast-laser-excited STM.

  19. SOLUTION-PROCESSED INORGANIC ELECTRONICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhishev, Teymur

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solution-Processed Graphene Electronics,” Nano Letters, vol.applications,” Organic Electronics, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 249-design in organic electronics by dual-gate technology,” in

  20. JLAB Electron Driver Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazimi, Reza [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Several schemes have been proposed for adding a positron beam option at the Continuous Electron Beam Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Laboratory (JLAB). They involve using a primary beam of electrons or gamma rays striking a target to produce a positron beam. At JLAB electron beams are produced and used in two different accelerators, CEBAF and the JLAB FEL (Free Electron Laser). Both have low emittance and energy spread. The CEBAF beam is polarized. The FEL beam is unpolarized but the injector can produce a higher current electron beam. In this paper we describe the characteristics of these beams and the parameters relevant for positron production.

  1. Laser-Scanning Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy and Applications to Cell Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    Laser-Scanning Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy and Applications to Cell Biology Ji 11747-3157 USA ABSTRACT Laser-scanning coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy with fast., 1990). Duncan et al. constructed the first CARS microscope by use of two dye laser beams

  2. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy of isolated multiwall carbon A. Felten,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy of isolated multiwall carbon nanotubes A. Felten,a H. Hody September 2006 Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy STXM has been used to study isolated carbon nanotubes- cations including biological and chemical sensors, nanoelec- tronic devices, tips for scanning probe

  3. Scanning photovoltage microscopy of potential modulations in carbon Marcus Freitag,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jie

    Scanning photovoltage microscopy of potential modulations in carbon nanotubes Marcus Freitag to understand their role in ac- tive devices. Here we use scanning photovoltage microscopy to probe the built. Scanning the laser laterally produces a moving potential step that is capable of inducing a photovoltage

  4. Scanning near-field optical microscopy based on the heterodyne phase-controlled oscillator method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    Scanning near-field optical microscopy based on the heterodyne phase-controlled oscillator method G and quality factor of the tip oscillations was used to control the scanning near-field optical microscope SNOM0021-8979 00 04017-2 I. INTRODUCTION Scanning near-field optical microscopy SNOM is in- creasingly

  5. NEAR-FIELD SCANNING MICROWAVE MICROSCOPY: MEASURING LOCAL MICROWAVE PROPERTIES AND ELECTRIC FIELD DISTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    WEIF-49 NEAR-FIELD SCANNING MICROWAVE MICROSCOPY: MEASURING LOCAL MICROWAVE PROPERTIES AND ELECTRIC>;ics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 2OY@-4lll, USA Abstract We describe the near-field scanning methods of scanning probe microscopy have been developed. Generally spea- king one can divide

  6. Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy of Temperature-and Thickness-Dependent Morphology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buratto, Steve

    Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy of Temperature- and Thickness-Dependent Morphology 21, 2000 We use near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to probe the local optical spectroscopy with bulk techniques such as differ- ential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffractom- etry

  7. ACQUISITION AND RECONSTRUCTION OF BRAIN TISSUE USING KNIFE-EDGE SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keyser, John

    ACQUISITION AND RECONSTRUCTION OF BRAIN TISSUE USING KNIFE- EDGE SCANNING MICROSCOPY A Thesis Science #12;ACQUISITION AND RECONSTRUCTION OF BRAIN TISSUE USING KNIFE- EDGE SCANNING MICROSCOPY A Thesis) ______________________________ ______________________________ Ergun Akleman Valerie Taylor (Member) (Head of Department) December 2003 Major Subject: Computer Science

  8. High spatial resolution subsurface thermal emission microscopy S. B. Ippolito,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a total optical power proportional to its absolute temperature to the fourth power. An object that hasHigh spatial resolution subsurface thermal emission microscopy S. B. Ippolito,a) S. A. Thorne, M. G increasing lens technique to subsurface thermal emission microscopy of Si integrated circuits. We achieve

  9. Asbestos, polarized light microscopy, PLM, The Clean Air Act mandates a specific analytical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    75 KEY WORDS Asbestos, polarized light microscopy, PLM, NESHAP ABSTRACT The Clean Air Act of the polarized light microscopy (PLM) test method that re moved the compositing of layers and effectively sought within the sample. In 1994 and again in 1995, the EPA recommended that the 1993 PLM method be used

  10. A Method for Measuring Cerebral Blood Volume of Mouse using Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vial, Jean-Claude

    A Method for Measuring Cerebral Blood Volume of Mouse using Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy P Joseph Fourier,Grenoble, France ABSTRACT Knowledge of the volume of blood per unit volume of brain tissue-photon laser scanning microscopy to obtain the local blood volume in the cortex of the anesthetized mouse. We

  11. Technical note: Characterizing individual milk fat globules with holographic video microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    Technical note: Characterizing individual milk fat globules with holographic video microscopy Fook representation of holographic video microscopy. The sample scatters light from a collimated laser beam. Both to a video camera, which records their interference as a hologram. A typical example of one fat droplet

  12. Size effects in bimetallic nickelgold nanowires: Insight from atomic force microscopy nanoindentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sansoz, Frederic

    Size effects in bimetallic nickel­gold nanowires: Insight from atomic force microscopy the local plastic behavior and hardness properties of electrodeposited bimetallic Ni­Au NWs ranging from 60 rights reserved. Keywords: Atomic force microscopy (AFM); Nanowire; Nickel; Gold; Nanoindentation 1

  13. Electron thermal conductivity owing to collisions between degenerate electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Shternin; D. G. Yakovlev

    2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the thermal conductivity of electrons produced by electron-electron Coulomb scattering in a strongly degenerate electron gas taking into account the Landau damping of transverse plasmons. The Landau damping strongly reduces this conductivity in the domain of ultrarelativistic electrons at temperatures below the electron plasma temperature. In the inner crust of a neutron star at temperatures T scattering and becomes competitive with the the electron conductivity due to scattering of electrons by impurity ions.

  14. Surface Science Analysis of GaAs Photocathodes Following Sustained Electron Beam Delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shutthanandan, V.; Zhu, Zihua; Stutzman, Marcy L.; Hannon, Fay; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Hess, Wayne P.

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power Free Electron Lasers (FEL). Several photocathode degradation processes are suspected, including defect formation by ion back bombardment, photochemistry of surface adsorbed species and irradiation-induced surface defect formation. To better understand the mechanisms of photocathode degradation, we have conducted surface and bulk analysis studies of two GaAs photocathodes removed from the FEL photoinjector after delivering electron beam for a few years. The analysis techniques include Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). In addition, strained super-lattice GaAs photocathode samples, removed from the CEBAF photoinjector were analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and SIMS. This analysis of photocathode degradation during nominal photoinjector operating conditions represents first steps towards developing robust new photocathode designs necessary for generating sub-micron emittance electron beams required for both fourth generation light sources and intense polarized CW electron beams for nuclear and high energy physics facilities.

  15. Enhancement of the Microscopy Facilities at the NSLS X1A Beamline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Chris

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As originally proposed, the authors constructed a new Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope, STXM IV. The design and construction was led by Chris Jacobsen, and involved graduate students Michael Feser, Mary Carlucci-Dayton and Tobias Beetz. This microscope has the following new features: It has a new and improved high resolution scanning stage that should make it possible to perform higher resolution imaging without distortions. Preliminary results indicate that the stage performs as designed. It has an enclosure that can be evacuated and backfilled with helium. This makes it possible to perform imaging in the neighborhood of the nitrogen and oxygen edges without interference from residual air. It has a motorized detector stage for easy interchange of detectors and alignment microscope. We expect to use this to align the new segmented detector which makes it possible to perform brightfield and dark field microscopy simultaneously, and to record images in differential phase contrast as well. The microscope is located upstream of cryoSTXM, the instrument we use to examine specimens in a frozen hydrated state. The design of STXM IV is such that it makes it quick and easy to switch between STXM IV and cryo-STXM operations and vice versa. IEEE488 based control electronics provides multiple channels of data collection. The microscope is run from a LINUX PC with all new software, developed in-house. The stages for the zone plate and the order sorting aperture (OSA) have kinematic mounts. This way different sets of zone plates (optimized for different wavelengths and working distances) can be exchanged without the need for complete realignment of the instrument. The enclosure can be used as a glove-box, making it possible to examine specimens which require anaerobic handling.

  16. Advanced electron microscopic techniques applied to the characterization of irradiation effects and fission product identification of irradiated TRISO coated particles from the AGR-1 experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rooyen, I.J. van; Lillo, T.M.; Trowbridge, T.L.; Madden, J.M. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Wu, Y.Q. [Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725-2090 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Goran, D. [Brucker Nano Gmbh, Berlin, 12489 (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary electron microscopy of coated fuel particles from the AGR-1 experiment was conducted using characterization techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). Microscopic quantification of fission-product precipitates was performed. Although numerous micro- and nano-sized precipitates observed in the coating layers during initial SEM characterization of the cross-sections, and in subsequent TEM diffraction patterns, were indexed as UPd{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, no Ag was conclusively found. Additionally, characterization of these precipitates highlighted the difficulty of measuring low concentrations of Ag in precipitates in the presence of significantly higher concentrations of Pd and U. The electron microscopy team followed a multi-directional and phased approach in the identification of fission products in irradiated TRISO fuel. The advanced electron microscopy techniques discussed in this paper, not only demonstrate the usefulness of the equipment (methods) as relevant research tools, but also provide relevant scientific results which increase the knowledge about TRISO fuel particles microstructure and fission products transport.

  17. Thin Film Morphology Control by Mechanical, Electronic and Chemical Interactions: a Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Dezheng

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the formation of Anthraquinone self-assembled honeycombsizes are the same. Anthraquinone (AQ) molecules adsorb on

  18. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Probing of Native Oxide and Artificial Layers on Silicon Nanoparticles for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Yang; Piper, Daniela M.; Gu, Meng; Travis, Jonathan J.; George, Steven M.; Lee, Se-Hee; Genc, Arda; Pullan, Lee; Liu, Jun; Mao, Scott X.; Zhang, Jiguang; Ban, Chunmei; Wang, Chong M.

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface modification of silicon nanoparticle via molecular layer deposition (MLD) has been recently proved to be an effective way for dramatically enhancing the cyclic performance in lithium ion batteries. However, the fundamental mechanism as how this thin layer of coating function is not known, which is even complicated by the inevitable presence of native oxide of several nanometers on the silicon nanoparticle. Using in-situ TEM, we probed in detail the structural and chemical evolution of both uncoated and coated silicon particles upon cyclic lithiation/delithation. We discovered that upon initial lithiation, the native oxide layer converts to crystalline Li2O islands, which essentially increases the impedance on the particle, resulting in ineffective lithiation/delithiation, and therefore low coulombic efficiency. In contrast, the alucone MLD coated particles show extremely fast, thorough and highly reversible lithiation behaviors, which are clarified to be associated with the mechanical flexibility and fast Li+/e- conductivity of the alucone coating. Surprisingly, the alucone MLD coating process chemically changes the silicon surface, essentially removing the native oxide layer and therefore mitigates side reaction and detrimental effects of the native oxide. This study provides a vivid picture of how the MLD coating works to enhance the coulombic efficiency and preserve capacity and clarifies the role of the native oxide on silicon nanoparticles during cyclic lithiation and delithiation. More broadly, this work also demonstrated that the effect of the subtle chemical modification of the surface during the coating process may be of equal importance as the coating layer itself.

  19. DOE BES/DMS Materials Science and Engineering/Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory A Tutorial on Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Jian-Min "Jim"

    DOE BES/DMS Materials Science and Engineering/Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory #12;DOE BES/DMS Materials Science and Engineering/Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory and spectroscopy #12;DOE BES/DMS Materials Science and Engineering/Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory I

  20. Direct Visualization of Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics During Lithium Deposition by in situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren L.; Parent, Lucas R.; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.; Unocic, Raymond R.

    2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Deposition of Li is a major safety concern existing in Li-ion secondary batteries. Here we perform the first in situ high spatial resolution measurement coupled with real-time quantitative electrochemistry to characterize SEI formation on gold using a standard battery electrolyte. We demonstrate that a dendritic SEI forms prior to Li deposition and that it remains on the surface after Li electrodissolution.

  1. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy study of femtosecond laser-irradiated selenium-doped 'black' silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, Arthur H. (Arthur Henry)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'Black silicon' refers to silicon that has been treated in a laser-ablation process to incorporate large amounts of chalcogen dopants. The material has been found to have greatly increased absorbance of visible and infared ...

  2. Thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrophobic organic compound sorption in natural sorbents and quantification of black carbon by electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuo, Dave Ta Fu, 1978-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sorption behaviors of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediments were investigated using pyrene. Native pyrene desorbed slowly, taking from weeks to months to equilibrate. The end-point data suggested that, at ...

  3. Rumen microbial degradation of the top internode of maize Co125 and maize W401 observed by scanning electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Rumen microbial degradation of the top internode of maize Co125 and maize W401 observed by scanning, respectively. Observations before and after degradation in the rumen of the top and the bottom of the upper on the tissues were observed. Cell- wall degradation began in the parenchyma and the phloem from the bottom of Co

  4. Measurement of the Penetration Depth and Coherence Length of MgB2 in All Directions Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, J.C.; Yazdi, S.; Kasama, T.; Zhigadlo, N.D.; Karpinski, J.

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    the value 6.523× 106 m?1V?1 at 300 kV. V0, the mean inner po- tential, was calculated as V0 = 17.71 V from theoretical scattering factors given in ref. 20, giving ?i = 244±5 nm and the thickness, l, varied from 200–290 nm across the field of view of Fig. 5... . These show that the con- ditions used (4.8 mT and 10.8 K) were in the low field limit (neutron diffraction) but not quite in the low temperature limit (< 5 K from radio-frequency measurements). In 2005, Fletcher et al.23 performed...

  5. Electron Microscopy and Analytical X-ray Characterization of Compositional and Nanoscale Structural Changes in Fossil Bone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boatman, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of questions surrounding the diagenesis and fossilization ofthe consequences of diagenesis for that particular feature (on the concept of bone diagenesis and how it relates to

  6. Thin Film Morphology Control by Mechanical, Electronic and Chemical Interactions: a Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Dezheng

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Y. , Luo M. , Wyrick J. , Cheng Z. , Einstein T.L. , Rahman63 (2001) (11), p. 115415. 2. Z. Cheng, E.S. Chu, D. Sun, D.Lu, Y. Zhu, M. Luo, J. Wyrick, Z. Cheng, T.L. Einstein, T.S.

  7. diameter and length of the nanotubes were obtained from about a hundred nanotubes in twenty transmission electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    , Nat. Rev. Drug Discovery 2003, 2, 29. b) A. P. Alivisatos, Nat. Biotechnol. 2004, 22, 47. c) C. M. Alivisatos, Science 1998, 281, 2013. b) W. C. Chan, S. Nie, Science 1998, 281, 2016. c) C.-C. Lin, Y.-C. Yeh

  8. PHILOSOPHICAL MAGAZINE LETTERS, 2000, VOL. 80, NO. 6, 381 386 High-resolution electron microscopy of a microporous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Peter J F

    , 41-819, Zabrze, Poland kInstitute of Coal Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Sowinskiego 5 variety of materials, ranging from synthetic polymers to sugar. When `activated' by mild oxi- dation

  9. JOURNAL OF ELECTRON MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUE 16:160-166 11990) A Stopped-Flow/Rapid-Freezing Machine With Millisecond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in chemical kinetics (Johnson, 1986)with a propane jet freezing unit previously used to prepare static samples a Berger-type mixer and into a thin-walled copper flow cell (Fig. 1). After a predetermined delay, Rockford, IL) con- nected to a 1.5-mm Mark I Berger-type mixer (Re- search Instruments and Manufacturi

  10. Electron crystallography as an informative method for studying the structure of nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avilov, A. S., E-mail: avilovanatoly@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Gubin, S. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Zaporozhets, M. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overwhelming majority of modern nanotechnologies deal with nanoparticles owing to the great variety of their unusual properties, which make them irreplaceable in various fields of science and technology. Since the physical properties of nanoparticles depend on their composition, structure, and shape, the problem of monitoring these parameters both after and during formation of nanoparticles is very important. Methods of electron crystallography are most informative and appropriate for studying and monitoring nanoparticle parameters. In this review, we briefly report the main modern methods based on the use of electron diffraction and electron microscopy, along with examples of their applications for nanoparticles, to solve a number of urgent structural problems of nanomaterials science.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation study of scanning Auger electron images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y. G.; Ding, Z. J. [Department of Physics and Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Z. M. [Department of Astronomy and Applied Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of contrast formation in Auger electron imaging of surfaces is helpful for analyzing scanning Auger microscopy/microanalysis (SAM) images. In this work, we have extended our previous Monte Carlo model and the simulation method for calculation of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images to SAM images of complex structures. The essentials of the simulation method are as follows. (1) We use a constructive solid geometry modeling for a sample geometry, which is complex in elemental distribution, as well as in topographical configuration and a ray-tracing technique in the calculation procedure of electron flight steps that across the different element zones. The combination of the basic objects filled with elements, alloys, or compounds enables the simulation to a variety of sample geometries. (2) Sampled Auger signal electrons with a characteristic energy are generated in the simulation following an inner-shell ionization event, whose description is based on the Castani's inner-shell ionization cross section. This paper discusses in detail the features of simulated SAM images and of line scans for structured samples, i.e., the objects embedded in a matrix, under various experimental conditions (object size, location depth, beam energy, and the incident angle). Several effects are predicted and explained, such as the contrast reversion for nanoparticles in sizes of 10-60 nm, the contrast enhancement for particles made of different elements and wholly embedded in a matrix, and the artifact contrast due to nearby objects containing different elements. The simulated SAM images are also compared with the simulated SEM images of secondary electrons and of backscattered electrons. The results indicate that the Monte Carlo simulation can play an important role in quantitative SAM mapping.

  12. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  13. Ceramic Electron Multiplier

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Comby, G.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ceramic Electron Multipliers (CEM) is a compact, robust, linear and fast multi-channel electron multiplier. The Multi Layer Ceramic Technique (MLCT) allows to build metallic dynodes inside a compact ceramic block. The activation of the metallic dynodes enhances their secondary electron emission (SEE). The CEM can be used in multi-channel photomultipliers, multi-channel light intensifiers, ion detection, spectroscopy, analysis of time of flight events, particle detection or Cherenkov imaging detectors. (auth)

  14. Photoemission Electron Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanoscale surface structures ( 8 nm) via electron emission induced by ultraviolet and laser light sources. The PEEM is applied to surface science studies of individual...

  15. Electron caustic lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, S. M.; Zheng, C. X.; Tang, W. X.; Paganin, D. M.; Jesson, D. E. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Fu, J. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Victoria, 3800 (Australia)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A maskless method of electron beam lithography is described which uses the reflection of an electron beam from an electrostatic mirror to produce caustics in the demagnified image projected onto a resist-coated wafer. By varying the electron optics, e.g. via objective lens defocus, both the morphology and dimensions of the caustic features may be controlled, producing a range of bright and tightly focused projected features. The method is illustrated for line and fold caustics and is complementary to other methods of reflective electron beam lithography.

  16. Breaking the Diffraction Barrier in Fluorescence Microscopy by Optical Shelving Stefan Bretschneider, Christian Eggeling, and Stefan W. Hell*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    Breaking the Diffraction Barrier in Fluorescence Microscopy by Optical Shelving Stefan the breaking of the diffraction resolution barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy by transiently shelving barrier by shelving the fluorophore in a metastable dark state, thereby effectively depleting

  17. Alpha-recoil tracks in natural dark mica: Dating geological samples by optical and scanning force microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -differential-interference-contrast microscopy; Scanning force microscopy; Natural radiation damage 1. Introduction Alpha-recoil tracks (ARTsAlpha-recoil tracks in natural dark mica: Dating geological samples by optical and scanning force

  18. Anti-contamination device for cryogenic soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Nelson, Johanna; Turner, Joshua; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Jacobsen, Chris

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cryogenic microscopy allows one to view frozen hydrated biological and soft matter specimens with good structural preservation and a high degree of stability against radiation damage. We describe a liquid nitrogen-cooled anti-contamination device for cryogenic X-ray diffraction microscopy. The anti-contaminator greatly reduces the buildup of ice layers on the specimen due to condensation of residual water vapor in the experimental vacuum chamber. We show by coherent X-ray diffraction measurements that this leads to fivefold reduction of background scattering, which is important for far-field X-ray diffraction microscopy of biological specimens.

  19. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion microscopy (FIM), field emission (FE), ion sources, and field desorption mass microscopy (FDMM). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The bibliography covers the period 1990. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references, listed alphabetically by authors, are subdivided into the categories listed in paragraph one above. An Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  20. Electrostrictive and electrostatic responses in contact mode voltage modulated Scanning Probe Microscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliseev, E. A. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine] [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine] [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Ievlev, Anton [ORNL] [ORNL; Balke, Nina [ORNL] [ORNL; Maksymovych, Petro [ORNL] [ORNL; Tselev, Alexander [ORNL] [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromechanical response of solids underpins image formation mechanism of several scanning probe microscopy techniques including the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). While the theory of linear piezoelectric and ionic responses are well developed, the contributions of quadratic effects including electrostriction and capacitive tip-surface forces to measured signal remain poorly understood. Here we analyze the electrostrictive and capacitive contributions to the PFM and ESM signals and discuss the implications of the dielectric tip-surface gap on these interactions.

  1. Effect of Electronic Excitation on Thin Film Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elsayed-Ali, Hani E. [Old Dominion University

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of nanosecond pulsed laser excitation on surface diffusion during growth of Ge on Si(100) at 250 degrees C was studied. In Situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) was used to measure the surface diffusion coefficient while ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to probe the structure and morphology of the grown quantum dots. The results show that laser excitation of the substrate increases the surface diffusion during growth of Ge on Si(100), changes the growth morphology, improves crystalline structure of the grown quantum dots, and decreases their size distribution. A purely electronic mechanism of enhanced surface diffusion of the deposited Ge is proposed. Ge quantum dots were grown on Si(100)-(2x1) by pulsed laser deposition at various substrate temperatures using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser. In-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction and ex-situ atomic force microscopy were used to analyze the fim structure and morphology. The morphology of germanium islands on silicon was studied at differect coverages. The results show that femtosecond pulsed laser depositon reduces the minimum temperature for epitaxial growth of Ge quantum dots to ~280 degrees C, which is 120 degrees C lower then previously observed in nanosecond pulsed laser deposition and more than 200 degrees C lower than that reported for molecular beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition.

  2. Potential variations around grain boundaries in impurity-doped BaSi? epitaxial films evaluated by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsukahara, D.; Baba, M.; Honda, S.; Toko, K. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Imai, Y. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); AIST, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Hara, K. O.; Usami, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Werner, J. H. [Institute for Photovoltaics, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart 70569 (Germany); Suemasu, T. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Institute for Photovoltaics, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart 70569 (Germany)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential variations around the grain boundaries (GBs) in antimony (Sb)-doped n-type and boron (B)-doped p-type BaSi? epitaxial films on Si(111) were evaluated by Kelvin probe force microscopy. Sb-doped n-BaSi? films exhibited positively charged GBs with a downward band bending at the GBs. The average barrier height for holes was approximately 10 meV for an electron concentration n ? 10¹? cm?³. This downward band bending changed to upward band bending when n was increased to n = 1.8 × 10¹?cm?³. In the B-doped p-BaSi? films, the upward band bending was observed for a hole concentration p ? 10¹?cm?³. The average barrier height for electrons decreased from approximately 25 to 15 meV when p was increased from p = 2.7 × 10¹? to p = 4.0 × 10¹? cm?³. These results are explained under the assumption that the position of the Fermi level E{sub f} at GBs depends on the degree of occupancy of defect states at the GBs, while E{sub f} approached the bottom of the conduction band or the top of the valence band in the BaSi? grain interiors with increasing impurity concentrations. In both cases, such small barrier heights may not deteriorate the carrier transport properties. The electronic structures of impurity-doped BaSi? are also discussed using first-principles pseudopotential method to discuss the insertion sites of impurity atoms and clarify the reason for the observed n-type conduction in the Sb-doped BaSi? and p-type conduction in the B-doped BaSi?.

  3. Electronic Mail Analysis Capability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes the pilot program to test the Department of Energy (DOE) Electronic Mail Analysis Capability (EMAC), which will be used to monitor and analyze outgoing and incoming electronic mail (e-mail) from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and DOE laboratories that are engaged in nuclear weapons design or work involving special nuclear material. No cancellation.

  4. Electrons and Mirror Symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Krishna (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) [University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutral weak force between an electron and a target particle, mediated by the Z boson, can be isolated by measuring the fractional change under a mirror reflection of the scattering probability of relativistic longitudinally polarized electrons off unpolarized targets. This technique yields neutral weak force measurements at a length scale of 1 femtometer, in contrast to high energy collider measurements that probe much smaller length scales. Study of the variation of the weak force over a range of length scales provides a stringent test of theory, complementing collider measurements. We describe a recent measurement of the neutral weak force between two electrons by the E158 experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. While the weak force between an electron and positron has been extensively studied, that between two electrons had never directly been measured. We conclude by discussing prospects for even more precise measurements at future facilities.

  5. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM); Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM); Young, Lloyd M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  6. Investigations into Protein-Surface Interactions via Atomic Force Microscopy and Surface Plasmon Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settle, Jenifer Kaye

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    microscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Chapter one provides background information on protein surfaces interactions. Chapter 2 summarizes the techniques and surfaces utilized in the investigations in the following chapters. Chapter 3 provides background...

  7. Improving the delivery and efficacy of molecular medicine via extracellular matrix modulation : insights from intravital microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKee, Trevor David

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extracellular matrix of tumors is a major barrier to the delivery of molecular medicine. We used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching combined with intravital microscopy to quantitate the transport properties of ...

  8. CellVisualizer : exploring hierarchical, multi-dimensional data with applications to high-throughput microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, InHan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we present a system for visualizing hierarchical, multi-dimensional, memory-intensive datasets. Specifically, we designed an interactive system to visualize data collected by high-throughput microscopy and ...

  9. Supervised Machine Learning Algorithms for Early Detection of Oral Epithelial Cancer Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joohyung

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the clinical potential of the endogenous multispectral Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) was investigated to objectively detect oral cancer. To this end, in vivo FLIM imaging was performed on a hamster cheek pouch model...

  10. Experimenting Liver Fibrosis Diagnostic by Two Photon Excitation Microscopy and Bag-of-Features Image Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanciu, Stefan G.

    The accurate staging of liver fibrosis is of paramount importance to determine the state of disease progression, therapy responses, and to optimize disease treatment strategies. Non-linear optical microscopy techniques ...

  11. The Application of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy to Quantitatively Map Mixing and Temperature in Microfluidic Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Emmelyn M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been employed to quantitatively and spatially map the fluid composition and temperature within microfluidic systems. A molecular probe with a ...

  12. Thermal and Optical Characterization of Photonic Integrated Circuits by Thermoreflectance Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudgings, Janice A.

    We report high resolution, non-invasive, thermal and optical characterization of semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) and SOA-based photonic integrated circuits (PICs) using thermoreflectance microscopy. Chip-scale ...

  13. Industrial Affiliates Day 2006, April 21, 2006 ULTRAFAST NONLINEAR OPTICAL MICROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    of studies, including photochemical reactions, molecular dynamics, micropharmacology and optical memory. History of Two-Photon Molecular Excitation 1905 First Conception: A. Einstein: Creation and Conversion for data storage. Combined with fluorescence microscopy, multiphoton excitation (MPE) provides 3D

  14. Super-resolution wide-field optical microscopy by use of Evanescent standing waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Euiheon

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of high resolution, high speed imaging techniques allows the study of dynamical processes in biological systems. Optical fluorescence microscopy is an essential tool for investigations in many disciplines ...

  15. Development of high-speed two-photon microscopy for biological and medical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ki Hean

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-photon microscopy (TPM) is one of the most powerful microscopic technologies for in-vivo 3D tissue imaging up to a few hundred micrometers. It has been finding important applications in neuronal imaging, tumor physiology ...

  16. Design and implementation of a fiber optic doppler optical coherence microscopy system for cochlear imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Logan P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the design and implementation of a fiber optic Doppler optical coherence microscopy (FO-DOCM) system for cochlear imaging applications is presented. The use of a fiber optic design significantly reduces ...

  17. MARKOV CHAIN MONTE CARLO FOR AUTOMATED TRACKING OF GENEALOGY IN MICROSCOPY VIDEOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARKOV CHAIN MONTE CARLO FOR AUTOMATED TRACKING OF GENEALOGY IN MICROSCOPY VIDEOS KATHLEEN CHAMPION of the nuclei in the images and their genealogies. Evan Tice '09 has already developed some code that aims

  18. Method of detecting cancer in a single cell using mitochondrial correlation microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gourley, Paul L

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for distinguishing a normal cell from an abnormal cell, such as, for example a cancer cell or diseased cell, of the same tissue type using mitochondrial correlation microscopy.

  19. Method for detecting cancer in a single cell using mitochondrial correlation microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gourley, Paul L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for distinguishing a normal cell from an abnormal cell, such as, for example a cancer cell or diseased cell, of the same tissue type using mitochondrial correlation microscopy.

  20. Shack-Hartmann wavefront-sensor-based adaptive optics system for microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Peter T. C.

    The imaging depth of two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy is partly limited by the inhomogeneity of the refractive index in biological specimens. This inhomogeneity results in a distortion of the wavefront of the ...

  1. Spectral multiplexing using quantum dot tagged microspheres with diffusing colloidal probe microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muthukumar, Shankarapandian

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    (TIRM) and Video Microscopy to simultaneously measure multiple particle-surface interactions with nanometer resolution in particle-surface separation. By acquiring the scattered intensity emitted by the particles, the separation distance can...

  2. Optimizing and extending light-sculpting microscopy for fast functional imaging in neuroscience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupprecht, Peter; Groessl, Florian; Haubensak, Wulf E; Vaziri, Alipasha

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of questions in systems biology such as understanding how dynamics of neuronal networks are related to brain function require the ability to capture the functional dynamics of large cellular populations at high speed. Recently, this has driven the development of a number of parallel and high speed imaging techniques such as light-sculpting microscopy, which has been used to capture neuronal dynamics at the whole brain and single cell level in small model organism. However, the broader applicability of light-sculpting microscopy is limited by the size of volumes for which high speed imaging can be obtained and scattering in brain tissue. Here, we present strategies for optimizing the present tradeoffs in light-sculpting microscopy. Various scanning modalities in light-sculpting microscopy are theoretically and experimentally evaluated, and strategies to maximize the obtainable volume speeds, and depth penetration in brain tissue using different laser systems are provided. Design-choices, important par...

  3. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for in situ Electrical Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for in situ Electrical Characterization of Organic Solar Cells., University of Pittsburgh The most efficient organic solar cell today is made from blending conjugated donors and acceptors in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. Most microscopic characterization

  4. Development of the Ultrashort Pulse Nonlinear Optical Microscopy Spectral Imaging System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Anthony Chien-der

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    DEVELOPMENT OF THE ULTRASHORT PULSE NONLINEAR OPTICAL MICROSCOPY SPECTRAL IMAGING SYSTEM A Dissertation by ANTHONY CHIEN-DER LEE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Anthony Chien-der Lee DEVELOPMENT OF THE ULTRASHORT PULSE NONLINEAR OPTICAL MICROSCOPY SPECTRAL IMAGING SYSTEM A Dissertation by ANTHONY CHIEN-DER LEE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  5. Acquisition and reconstruction of brain tissue using knife-edge scanning microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayerich, David Matthew

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ACQUISITION AND RECONSTRUCTION OF BRAIN TISSUE USING KNIFE- EDGE SCANNING MICROSCOPY A Thesis by DAVID MATTHEW MAYERICH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2003 Major Subject: Computer Science ACQUISITION AND RECONSTRUCTION OF BRAIN TISSUE USING KNIFE- EDGE SCANNING MICROSCOPY A Thesis by DAVID MATTHEW MAYERICH Submitted to Texas...

  6. Half-harmonic Kelvin probe force microscopy with transfer function correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Senli [ORNL] [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL] [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach for surface potential imaging based on half-harmonic band excitation (BE) in Kelvin probe force microscopy is demonstrated. Using linear and half-harmonic BE enables quantitative correction of the cantilever transfer function. Half-harmonic band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy (HBE KPFM) thus allows quantitative separation of surface potential and topographic contributions to the signal, obviating the primary sources of topographic cross-talk. HBE KPFM imaging and voltage spectroscopy methods are illustrated for several model systems.

  7. Viewing spin structures with soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Peter

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment marks the basic unit for magnetic properties of matter. Magnetism, in particular ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism is described by a collective order of these spins, where the interaction between individual spins reflects a competition between exchange, anisotropy and dipolar energy terms. As a result the energetically favored ground state of a ferromagnetic system is a rather complex spin configuration, the magnetic domain structure. Magnetism is one of the eldest scientific phenomena, yet it is one of the most powerful and versatile utilized physical effects in modern technologies, such as in magnetic storage and sensor devices. To achieve highest storage density, the relevant length scales, such as the bit size in disk drives is now approaching the nanoscale and as such further developments have to deal with nanoscience phenomena. Advanced characterization tools are required to fully understand the underlying physical principles. Magnetic microscopes using polarized soft X-rays offer a close-up view into magnetism with unique features, these include elemental sensitivity due to X-ray magnetic dichroism effects as contrast mechanism, high spatial resolution provided by state-of-the-art X-ray optics and fast time resolution limited by the inherent time structure of current X-ray sources, which will be overcome with the introduction of ultrafast and high brilliant X-ray sources.

  8. Aerogels for electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.W.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to their other exceptional properties, aerogels also exhibit unusual dielectric and electronic properties due to their nano-sized structures and high porosities. For example, aerogels have the lowest dielectric constants measured for a solid material (having values approaching 1.0); they have exceptionally high dielectric resistivities and strengths (i.e., ability to insulate very high voltages); they exhibit low dielectric loss at microwave frequencies; and some aerogels are electrically conductive and photoconductive. These properties are being exploited to provide the next generation of materials for energy storage, low power consumption, and ultra-fast electronics. We are working toward adapting these unusual materials for microelectronic applications, particularly, making thin aerogel films for dielectric substrates and for energy storage devices such as supercapacitors. Measurements are presented in this paper for the dielectric and electronic properties of aerogels, including the dielectric constant, loss factor, dielectric and electrical conductivity, volume resistivity, and dielectric strength. We also describe methods to form and characterize thin aerogel films which are being developed for numerous electronic applications. Finally, some of the electronic applications proposed for aerogels are presented. Commercialization of aerogels for electronics must await further feasibility, prototype development, and cost studies, but they are one of the key materials and are sure to have a major impact on future electronics.

  9. Fabrication and electronic transport studies of single nanocrystal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, D L [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor and metallic nanocrystals exhibit interesting electronic transport behavior as a result of electrostatic and quantum mechanical confinement effects. These effects can be studied to learn about the nature of electronic states in these systems. This thesis describes several techniques for the electronic study of nanocrystals. The primary focus is the development of novel methods to attach leads to prefabricated nanocrystals. This is because, while nanocrystals can be readily synthesized from a variety of materials with excellent size control, means to make electrical contact to these nanocrystals are limited. The first approach that will be described uses scanning probe microscopy to first image and then electrically probe surfaces. It is found that electronic investigations of nanocrystals by this technique are complicated by tip-sample interactions and environmental factors such as salvation and capillary forces. Next, an atomic force microscope technique for the catalytic patterning of the surface of a self assembled monolayer is described. In principle, this nano-fabrication technique can be used to create electronic devices which are based upon complex arrangements of nanocrystals. Finally, the fabrication and electrical characterization of a nanocrystal-based single electron transistor is presented. This device is fabricated using a hybrid scheme which combines electron beam lithography and wet chemistry to bind single nanocrystals in tunneling contact between closely spaced metallic leads. In these devices, both Au and CdSe nanocrystals show Coulomb blockade effects with characteristic energies of several tens of meV. Additional structure is seen the transport behavior of CdSe nanocrystals as a result of its electronic structure.

  10. Linkping University Electronic Press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    do so. Beyond Ph.D. theses, 41 Licentiate theses (of 61 in total) were published electronically-Press to 640, 208 and 4794 Ph.D., Licentiate and Undergraduate theses, respectively. Conference Proceedings

  11. VIA ELECTRONIC MAIL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1, 2013 VIA ELECTRONIC MAIL U.S. Department of Energy (FE-34) Office of Fossil Energy Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Attn: Natural Gas Reports P.O. Box 44375...

  12. Electron Microscope Facility

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven Lab is home to one of only a few Scanning Transmision Electron Microscope (STEM) machines in the world and one of the few that can image single heavy atoms.

  13. VIA ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    39 MacDougal Street, Third Floor * New York, New York 10012 * (212) 992-8932 * www.policyintegrity.org March 21, 2011 VIA ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION Office of the General Counsel US...

  14. VIA ELECTRONIC MAIL

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    VIA ELECTRONIC MAIL U.S. Department of Energy (FE-34) Office of Fossil Energy Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Attn: Natural Gas Reports P.O. Box 44375...

  15. 3D Printing Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stryk, Oskar von

    Login Register Home Videos Jobs Games 3D Printing Electronics Design Software Designer Edge for 3D Printing · -- B6 Sigma Labs (ticker SGLB) is not the same company as Sigma Technologies

  16. Toward pure electronic spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrovi?, Vladimir, 1978-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis is summarized the progress toward completing our understanding of the Rydberg system of CaF and developing Pure Electronic Spectroscopy. The Rydberg system of CaF possesses a paradigmatic character due to ...

  17. Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

    2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

  18. SUPERTHERMAL ELECTRON DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauffman, R

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This memo discusses the analysis of the high-energy x-ray distribution from a laser-induced plasma to determine the superthermal electron distribution. The methods of deconvolution outlined in I are similar to formulae derived in the literature not including and including effects due to electron stopping. In II the methods are applied to an x-ray spectrum from an Au disc irradiated by ARGUS.

  19. Electron tomography of defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Joanne

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 2.6 Limitations of electron tomography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 2.6.1 The missing wedge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 2.6.2 Minimum reliable spacing of features . . . . . . . . . . 39 3 Tomography of dislocations using weak... ELECTRON TOMOGRAPHY OF DEFECTS This dissertation is submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy by Joanne Sharp Of Wolfson College Submitted 26th April 2010 Acknowledgements This dissertation is the result of my own work and includes nothing...

  20. Polymers For Advanced Lithium Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Barriers: -(1) Energy density -(2) Safety -(3) Low cycle fife. * Partners: ANL, ALS (at LBNL) and NCEM (at LBNL) Objectives * A) Develop cost-effective method for creating...