National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ncem electron microscopy

  1. Electron Microscopy Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Microscopy Center Argonne Home > EMC > EMC Home Electron Microscopy Center Web Site has moved This page has moved to http:www.anl.govcnmgroupelectron-microscopy-cente...

  2. Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-10-12

    Dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) combines the benefits of high spatial resolution electron microscopy with the high temporal resolution of ultrafast lasers. The incorporation of these two components into a single instrument provides a perfect platform for in situ observations of material processes. However, previous DTEM applications have focused on observing structural changes occurring in samples exposed to high vacuum. Therefore, in order to expand the pump-probe experimental regime to more natural environmental conditions, in situ gas and liquid chambers must be coupled with Dynamic TEM. This chapter describes the current and future applications of in situ liquid DTEM to permit time-resolved atomic scale observations in an aqueous environment, Although this chapter focuses mostly on in situ liquid imaging, the same research potential exists for in situ gas experiments and the successful integration of these techniques promises new insights for understanding nanoparticle, catalyst and biological protein dynamics with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution.

  3. Electron Microscopy > Analytical Resources > Research > The Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Differential Electrochemical Mass Spectroscopy (DEMS) Electron Microscopy X-Ray Diffraction Electron Microscopy Aberration-Corrected Electron Microscope Facility Electron...

  4. The Future of Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Haimei

    2015-05-06

    Berkeley Lab scientist Haimei Zheng discusses the future of electron microscopy and her breakthrough research into examining liquids using an electron microscope.

  5. Electron Microscopy Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with electron and ion beam instruments, including crystallographic and chemical techniques. April 12, 2012 Transmission electron microscope Rob Dickerson examines a multiphase...

  6. Electron Microscopy Catalysis Projects: Success Stories from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electron Microscopy Catalysis Projects: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Electron Microscopy Catalysis Projects: Success Stories ...

  7. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  8. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Katherine Jungjohann & Yang Liu Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 cint.lanl.gov * Adjustable HT: 100-300 kV * EDAX EDS Detector * Gatan Tridiem GIF * ADF STEM Detector * HAADF STEM Detector * BF STEM Detector * 2.0 A resolution in TEM * 1.9 A resolution in STEM * High resolution videos using Gatan Ultrascan CCD camera * Simultaneous BF and HAADF STEM imaging * EDS and EELS mapping * Energy-filtered imaging Sample Preparation

  9. Combining Quantitative Electrochemistry and Electron Microscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microscopy to Study Reversible Lithiation of Silicon Nanowires. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combining Quantitative Electrochemistry and Electron Microscopy to ...

  10. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Microscopy Researcher using field-emission scanning electron microscope. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) JEOL 6320F. This FE-SEM equipped with a cold field-emission source and in-lens detectors is designed for ultra-high resolution at low accelerating voltage. Compositional mapping by energy-dispersive microscopy and Electron Backscattered Diffraction are available. In basic scanning electron microscopy (SEM), a beam of highly energetic (0.1-50 keV) electrons is

  11. Scientific Achievement Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) method was developed to determine thickness and wrinkles in electron beam sensitive 2-dimensional (2D) MFI nanosheets....

  12. Electron Microscopy Center | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Microscopy Center Electron Microscopy Center The Electron Microscopy Center Group (EMC) develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those capabilities to solve materials challenges. EMC emphasizes three major areas: materials research, experimental technique and instrumentation development, and operation of unique and state-of-the-art instrumentation. The goals of EMC materials research are closely aligned with those of our user community.

  13. The future of electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifiesmore » to the importance of modern microscopy.« less

  14. The future of electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifies to the importance of modern microscopy.

  15. Fast electron microscopy via compressive sensing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Kurt W; Anderson, Hyrum S; Wheeler, Jason W

    2014-12-09

    Various technologies described herein pertain to compressive sensing electron microscopy. A compressive sensing electron microscope includes a multi-beam generator and a detector. The multi-beam generator emits a sequence of electron patterns over time. Each of the electron patterns can include a plurality of electron beams, where the plurality of electron beams is configured to impart a spatially varying electron density on a sample. Further, the spatially varying electron density varies between each of the electron patterns in the sequence. Moreover, the detector collects signals respectively corresponding to interactions between the sample and each of the electron patterns in the sequence.

  16. Subangstrom Edge Relaxations Probed by Electron Microscopy in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subangstrom Edge Relaxations Probed by Electron Microscopy in Hexagonal Boron Nitride Title: Subangstrom Edge Relaxations Probed by Electron Microscopy in Hexagonal Boron Nitride ...

  17. Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, ...

  18. Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle ...

  19. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials Investigations ...

  20. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-situ ...

  1. Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    pm029allard2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst...

  2. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by inmore » this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.« less

  3. Electron Microscopy Center Capabilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Microscopy Center Capabilities ACAT: Argonne Chromatic Aberration-corrected TEM This FEI Titan 80-300 ST has a CEOS Cc/Cs corrector on the imaging side of the column to correct both spherical and chromatic aberrations. The Cc/Cs corrector also provides greatly-improved resolution and signal for energy filtered imaging and EELS. FEI Tecnai F20ST TEM/STEM This premier analytical transmission electron microscope (AEM) has specialized accessories that include an energy-dispersive x-ray

  4. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NCEM Leadership Change After more than 20 years as Director of the National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), Ulrich Dahmen has stepped into a new role as NCEM Senior Advisor, effective March 15. As Senior Advisor, Dahmen will be focusing on multidisciplinary materials research and helping to set the agenda for electron microscopy research at the Molecular Foundry and NCEM, which are merging into a single User Facility later this year. Under Dahmen's leadership, NCEM has become DOE's

  5. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy. (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy. Abstract not provided. Authors: Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh ; Liu, Yang Publication Date: 2015-02-01 OSTI Identifier: 1238312 Report Number(s): SAND2015-0858C 563495 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Advanced Electron Microscopy (AEM) Workshop held February 11-13, 2015 in San

  6. In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the interfacial reaction between Ni and Al during rapid heating in a nanocalorimeter Grapes, Michael D. Department of...

  7. In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Published Article: In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the interfacial reaction between Ni and Al during rapid heating in a nanocalorimeter Title: In situ...

  8. Combining Quantitative Electrochemistry and Electron Microscopy to Study

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reversible Lithiation of Silicon Nanowires. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Combining Quantitative Electrochemistry and Electron Microscopy to Study Reversible Lithiation of Silicon Nanowires. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combining Quantitative Electrochemistry and Electron Microscopy to Study Reversible Lithiation of Silicon Nanowires. Authors: Zavadil, Kevin R. ; Liu, Yang ; Harris, Charles Thomas ; Sullivan, John P. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (Sandia National

  9. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Monday, May 23, 2011 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference room 137-322 Professor Tom Vogt, NanoCenter & Department of Chemistry, University of South Carolina High-Angle-Annular-Dark-Field/Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF/STEM) is a technique uniquely suited for detailed studies of the structure and composition of complex oxides. The HAADF detector collects electrons

  10. Ion-induced electron emission microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doyle, Barney L.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Weller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    An ion beam analysis system that creates multidimensional maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the secondary electrons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted secondary electrons are collected in a strong electric field perpendicular to the sample surface and (optionally) projected and refocused by the electron lenses found in a photon emission electron microscope, amplified by microchannel plates and then their exact position is sensed by a very sensitive X Y position detector. Position signals from this secondary electron detector are then correlated in time with nuclear, atomic or electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these secondary electrons in the fit place.

  11. Phase contrast in high resolution electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rose, H.H.

    1975-09-23

    This patent relates to a device for developing a phase contrast signal for a scanning transmission electron microscope. The lens system of the microscope is operated in a condition of defocus so that predictable alternate concentric regions of high and low electron density exist in the cone of illumination. Two phase detectors are placed beneath the object inside the cone of illumination, with the first detector having the form of a zone plate, each of its rings covering alternate regions of either higher or lower electron density. The second detector is so configured that it covers the regions of electron density not covered by the first detector. Each detector measures the number of electrons incident thereon and the signal developed by the first detector is subtracted from the signal developed by the record detector to provide a phase contrast signal. (auth)

  12. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  13. Microscopy with slow electrons: from LEEM to XPEEM

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bauer, Ernst [Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona, United States

    2010-01-08

    The short penetration and escape depth of electrons with energies below 1 keV make them ideally suited for the study of surfaces and ultrathin films. The combination of the low energy electrons and the high lateral resolution of a microscope produces a powerful method for the characterization of nanostructures on bulk samples, in particular if the microscope is equipped with an imaging energy filter and connected to a synchrotron radiation source. Comprehensive characterization by imaging, diffraction, and spectroscope of the structural, chemical, and magnetic properties is then possible. The Talk will describe the various imaging techniques in using reflected and emitted electrons in low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM), with an emphasis on magnetic materials with spin-polarized LEEM and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism PEEM. The talk with end with an outlook on future possibilities.

  14. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grnewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  15. Microfabricated high-bandpass foucault aperture for electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glaeser, Robert; Cambie, Rossana; Jin, Jian

    2014-08-26

    A variant of the Foucault (knife-edge) aperture is disclosed that is designed to provide single-sideband (SSB) contrast at low spatial frequencies but retain conventional double-sideband (DSB) contrast at high spatial frequencies in transmission electron microscopy. The aperture includes a plate with an inner open area, a support extending from the plate at an edge of the open area, a half-circle feature mounted on the support and located at the center of the aperture open area. The radius of the half-circle portion of reciprocal space that is blocked by the aperture can be varied to suit the needs of electron microscopy investigation. The aperture is fabricated from conductive material which is preferably non-oxidizing, such as gold, for example.

  16. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  17. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  18. System and method for compressive scanning electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Bryan W

    2015-01-13

    A scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) system is disclosed. The system may make use of an electron beam scanning system configured to generate a plurality of electron beam scans over substantially an entire sample, with each scan varying in electron-illumination intensity over a course of the scan. A signal acquisition system may be used for obtaining at least one of an image, a diffraction pattern, or a spectrum from the scans, the image, diffraction pattern, or spectrum representing only information from at least one of a select subplurality or linear combination of all pixel locations comprising the image. A dataset may be produced from the information. A subsystem may be used for mathematically analyzing the dataset to predict actual information that would have been produced by each pixel location of the image.

  19. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Foundry and NCEM Merge Complete As of October 1, 2014, the Molecular Foundry includes the National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM). Previously, NCEM was a separate user facility, but at the request of DOE and in response to evolving research needs, NCEM is now one of the seven facilities within the Molecular Foundry. This merger provides outstanding new characterization capabilities to the Foundry, enhancing its position as a leader in nanoscience research, and streamlines the

  20. Time resolved electron microscopy for in situ experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey H. McKeown, Joseph T.; Santala, Melissa K.

    2014-12-15

    Transmission electron microscopy has functioned for decades as a platform for in situ observation of materials and processes with high spatial resolution. Yet, the dynamics often remain elusive, as they unfold too fast to discern at these small spatial scales under traditional imaging conditions. Simply shortening the exposure time in hopes of capturing the action has limitations, as the number of electrons will eventually be reduced to the point where noise overtakes the signal in the image. Pulsed electron sources with high instantaneous current have successfully shortened exposure times (thus increasing the temporal resolution) by about six orders of magnitude over conventional sources while providing the necessary signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic imaging. We describe here the development of this new class of microscope and the principles of its operation, with examples of its application to problems in materials science.

  1. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  2. Electron microscopy study of direct laser deposited IN718

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, R.G.; Huang, Z.W.; Li, H.Y.; Mitchell, I.; Baxter, G.; Bowen, P.

    2015-08-15

    The microstructure of direct laser deposited (DLD) IN718 has been investigated in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results confirm that the dendrite core microstructure can be linked to the cooling rate experienced during the deposition. A ~ 100 μm wide δ partially dissolved region in the IN718 substrate was observed close to the substrate/deposit boundary. In the deposited IN718, γ/Laves eutectic constituent is the predominant minor microconstituent. Irregular and regular (small) (Nb,Ti)C carbides and a mixture of the carbides and Laves were observed. Most M{sub 3}B{sub 2} borides were nucleated around a (Nb,Ti)C carbide. Needles of δ phase precipitated from the Laves phase were also observed. A complex constituent (of Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″, and γ matrix) is reported in IN718 for the first time. The formation of α-Cr particles could be related to Cr rejection during the formation and growth of Cr-depleted δ phase. - Highlights: • Secondary phases in IN718 deposits were identified using electron diffraction and EDS. • MC, M{sub 3}B{sub 2}, γ/Laves eutectic and γ/NbC/Laves eutectic were observed. • Needle-like δ phases were precipitated from the Laves phase. • A complex constituent (Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″ and γ) was reported for the first time.

  3. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and compared to those of other techniques available.

  4. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Patwardhan, Ardan [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); Scheres, Sjors [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Topf, Maya [University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Roseman, Alan [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Winn, Martyn, E-mail: martyn.winn@stfc.ac.uk [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Science and Technology Facilities Council, Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) is a new initiative for the structural biology community, following the success of CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography. Progress in supporting the users and developers of cryoEM software is reported. The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed.

  5. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by in this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.

  6. In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graetz J.; Meng, Y.S.; McGilvray, T.; Yang, M.-C.; Gostovic, D.; Wang, F.; Zeng, D.; Zhu, Y.

    2011-10-31

    Oxides and their tailored structures are at the heart of electrochemical energy storage technologies and advances in understanding and controlling the dynamic behaviors in the complex oxides, particularly at the interfaces, during electrochemical processes will catalyze creative design concepts for new materials with enhanced and better-understood properties. Such knowledge is not accessible without new analytical tools. New innovative experimental techniques are needed for understanding the chemistry and structure of the bulk and interfaces, more importantly how they change with electrochemical processes in situ. Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used extensively to study electrode materials ex situ and is one of the most powerful tools to obtain structural, morphological, and compositional information at nanometer scale by combining imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy, e.g., EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry) and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (EELS). Determining the composition/structure evolution upon electrochemical cycling at the bulk and interfaces can be addressed by new electron microscopy technique with which one can observe, at the nanometer scale and in situ, the dynamic phenomena in the electrode materials. In electrochemical systems, for instance in a lithium ion battery (LIB), materials operate under conditions that are far from equilibrium, so that the materials studied ex situ may not capture the processes that occur in situ in a working battery. In situ electrochemical operation in the ultra-high vacuum column of a TEM has been pursued by two major strategies. In one strategy, a 'nano-battery' can be fabricated from an all-solid-state thin film battery using a focused ion beam (FIB). The electrolyte is either polymer based or ceramic based without any liquid component. As shown in Fig. 1a, the interfaces between the active electrode material/electrolyte can be clearly observed with TEM imaging, in contrast to the composite electrodes/electrolyte interfaces in conventional lithium ion batteries, depicted in Fig.1b, where quantitative interface characterization is extremely difficult if not impossible. A second strategy involves organic electrolyte, though this approach more closely resembles the actual operation conditions of a LIB, the extreme volatility In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry by Ying Shirley Meng, Thomas McGilvray, Ming-Che Yang, Danijel Gostovic, Feng Wang, Dongli Zeng, Yimei Zhu, and Jason Graetz of the organic electrolytes present significant challenges for designing an in situ cell that is suitable for the vacuum environment of the TEM. Significant progress has been made in the past few years on the development of in situ electron microscopy for probing nanoscale electrochemistry. In 2008, Brazier et al. reported the first cross-section observation of an all solid-state lithium ion nano-battery by TEM. In this study the FIB was used to make a 'nano-battery,' from an all solid-state battery prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). In situ TEM observations were not possible at that time due to several key challenges such as the lack of a suitable biasing sample holder and vacuum transfer of sample. In 2010, Yamamoto et al. successfully observed changes of electric potential in an all-solid-state lithium ion battery in situ with electron holography (EH). The 2D potential distribution resulting from movement of lithium ions near the positive-electrode/electrolyte interface was quantified. More recently Huang et al. and Wang et al. reported the in situ observations of the electrochemical lithiation of a single SnO{sub 2} nanowire electrode in two different in situ setups. In their approach, a vacuum compatible ionic liquid is used as the electrolyte, eliminating the need for complicated membrane sealing to prevent the evaporation of carbonate based organic electrolyte into the TEM column. One main limitation of this approach is that EELS spectral imaging is not possible due to the high plasmon signal of the ionic liquid. To this end, we have developed a novel in situ instrumental system combining analytical electron microscopy with advanced spectroscopy to probe the dynamic phenomena in an all solid-state nano-battery. In situ electron microscopy is a versatile technique that yields insights into challenging questions that could not be obtained using other techniques. However, in order to fully exploit the capabilities, a very carefully thought-out plan of action is essential. It is important to recognize that this is not just a simple characterization tool, but a collection of tools that make up a complete experimental set-up: the choice of FIB operation conditions, specimen holder for biasing, grid materials and design as well as microscope environment must be thoroughly considered before performing an experiment.

  7. Advanced analytical electron microscopy for alkali-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Danna; Ma, Cheng; Meng, Ying Shirley; More, Karren; Chi, Miaofang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are a leading candidate for electric vehicle and smart grid applications. However, further optimizations of the energy/power density, coulombic efficiency and cycle life are still needed, and this requires a thorough understanding of the dynamic evolution of each component and their synergistic behaviors during battery operation. With the capability of resolving the structure and chemistry at an atomic resolution, advanced analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) is an ideal technique for this task. The present review paper focuses on recent contributions of this important technique to the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical processes of battery materials. A detailed review of both static (ex situ) and real-time (in situ) studies will be given, and issues that still need to be addressed will be discussed.

  8. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and comparedmore » to those of other techniques available.« less

  9. Advanced analytical electron microscopy for alkali-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qian, Danna; Ma, Cheng; Meng, Ying Shirley; More, Karren; Chi, Miaofang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are a leading candidate for electric vehicle and smart grid applications. However, further optimizations of the energy/power density, coulombic efficiency and cycle life are still needed, and this requires a thorough understanding of the dynamic evolution of each component and their synergistic behaviors during battery operation. With the capability of resolving the structure and chemistry at an atomic resolution, advanced analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) is an ideal technique for this task. The present review paper focuses on recent contributions of this important technique to the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical processes of battery materials. A detailed reviewmore » of both static (ex situ) and real-time (in situ) studies will be given, and issues that still need to be addressed will be discussed.« less

  10. Thin dielectric film thickness determination by advanced transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diebold, A.C.; Foran, B.; Kisielowski, C.; Muller, D.; Pennycook, S.; Principe, E.; Stemmer, S.

    2003-09-01

    High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) has been used as the ultimate method of thickness measurement for thin films. The appearance of phase contrast interference patterns in HR-TEM images has long been confused as the appearance of a crystal lattice by non-specialists. Relatively easy to interpret crystal lattice images are now directly observed with the introduction of annular dark field detectors for scanning TEM (STEM). With the recent development of reliable lattice image processing software that creates crystal structure images from phase contrast data, HR-TEM can also provide crystal lattice images. The resolution of both methods was steadily improved reaching now into the sub Angstrom region. Improvements in electron lens and image analysis software are increasing the spatial resolution of both methods. Optimum resolution for STEM requires that the probe beam be highly localized. In STEM, beam localization is enhanced by selection of the correct aperture. When STEM measurement is done using a highly localized probe beam, HR-TEM and STEM measurement of the thickness of silicon oxynitride films agree within experimental error. In this paper, the optimum conditions for HR-TEM and STEM measurement are discussed along with a method for repeatable film thickness determination. The impact of sample thickness is also discussed. The key result in this paper is the proposal of a reproducible method for film thickness determination.

  11. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing...

  12. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were...

  13. Imaging doped silicon test structures using low energy electron microscopy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakakura, Craig Yoshimi; Anderson, Meredith Lynn; Kellogg, Gary Lee

    2010-01-01

    This document is the final SAND Report for the LDRD Project 105877 - 'Novel Diagnostic for Advanced Measurements of Semiconductor Devices Exposed to Adverse Environments' - funded through the Nanoscience to Microsystems investment area. Along with the continuous decrease in the feature size of semiconductor device structures comes a growing need for inspection tools with high spatial resolution and high sample throughput. Ideally, such tools should be able to characterize both the surface morphology and local conductivity associated with the structures. The imaging capabilities and wide availability of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) make them an obvious choice for imaging device structures. Dopant contrast from pn junctions using secondary electrons in the SEM was first reported in 1967 and more recently starting in the mid-1990s. However, the serial acquisition process associated with scanning techniques places limits on the sample throughput. Significantly improved throughput is possible with the use of a parallel imaging scheme such as that found in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). The application of PEEM and LEEM to device structures relies on contrast mechanisms that distinguish differences in dopant type and concentration. Interestingly, one of the first applications of PEEM was a study of the doping of semiconductors, which showed that the PEEM contrast was very sensitive to the doping level and that dopant concentrations as low as 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} could be detected. More recent PEEM investigations of Schottky contacts were reported in the late 1990s by Giesen et al., followed by a series of papers in the early 2000s addressing doping contrast in PEEM by Ballarotto and co-workers and Frank and co-workers. In contrast to PEEM, comparatively little has been done to identify contrast mechanisms and assess the capabilities of LEEM for imaging semiconductor device strictures. The one exception is the work of Mankos et al., who evaluated the impact of high-throughput requirements on the LEEM designs and demonstrated new applications of imaging modes with a tilted electron beam. To assess its potential as a semiconductor device imaging tool and to identify contrast mechanisms, we used LEEM to investigate doped Si test structures. In section 2, Imaging Oxide-Covered Doped Si Structures Using LEEM, we show that the LEEM technique is able to provide reasonably high contrast images across lateral pn junctions. The observed contrast is attributed to a work function difference ({Delta}{phi}) between the p- and n-type regions. However, because the doped regions were buried under a thermal oxide ({approx}3.5 nm thick), e-beam charging during imaging prevented quantitative measurements of {Delta}{phi}. As part of this project, we also investigated a series of similar test structures in which the thermal oxide was removed by a chemical etch. With the oxide removed, we obtained intensity-versus-voltage (I-V) curves through the transition from mirror to LEEM mode and determined the relative positions of the vacuum cutoffs for the differently doped regions. Although the details are not discussed in this report, the relative position in voltage of the vacuum cutoffs are a direct measure of the work function difference ({Delta}{phi}) between the p- and n-doped regions.

  14. A TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF PRESOLAR HIBONITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Nittler, Larry R.

    2011-04-01

    We report isotopic and microstructural data on five presolar hibonite grains (KH1, KH2, KH6, KH15, and KH21) identified in an acid residue of the Krymka LL3.1 ordinary chondrite. Isotopic measurements by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) verified a presolar circumstellar origin for the grains. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of the crystal structure and chemistry of the grains was enabled by in situ sectioning and lift-out with a focused-ion-beam scanning-electron microscope (FIB-SEM). Comparisons of isotopic compositions with models indicate that four of the five grains formed in low-mass stars that evolved through the red giant/asymptotic giant branches (RGBs/AGBs), whereas one grain formed in the ejecta of a Type II supernova. Selected-area electron-diffraction patterns show that all grains are single crystals of hibonite. Some grains contain minor structural perturbations (stacking faults) and small spreads in orientation that can be attributed to a combination of growth defects and mechanical processing by grain-grain collisions. The similar structure of the supernova grain to those from RGB/AGB stars indicates a similarity in the formation conditions. Radiation damage (e.g., point defects), if present, occurs below our detection limit. Of the five grains we studied, only one has the pure hibonite composition of CaAl{sub 12}O{sub 19}. All others contain minor amounts of Mg, Si, Ti, and Fe. The microstructural data are generally consistent with theoretical predictions, which constrain the circumstellar condensation temperature to a range of 1480-1743 K, assuming a corresponding total gas pressure between 1 x 10{sup -6} and 1 x 10{sup -3} atm. The TEM data were also used to develop a calibration for SIMS determination of Ti contents in oxide grains. Grains with extreme {sup 18}O depletions, indicating deep mixing has occurred in their parent AGB stars, are slightly Ti enriched compared with grains from stars without deep mixing, most likely reflecting differences in grain condensation conditions.

  15. Transmission electron microscopy of whiskers and hillocks formed on Al films deposited onto a glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saka, H.; Fujino, S.; Kuroda, K. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); Tsujimoto, K.; Tsuji, S. [Display Technology, IBM Japan, Ltd., Shimotsuruma, Yamato, Kanagawa 242 (Japan); Takatsuji, H. [Display Technology, IBM Japan, Ltd., Ichimiyake, Yasu-gun, Shiga 520-23 (Japan)

    1998-01-05

    Whiskers and hillocks formed on an Al film deposited onto a glass substrate have been observed by means of a variety of transmission electron microscopy technique.

  16. Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies Materials Sciences and Engineering (MSE) Division MSE Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs BES Funding Opportunities Reports and Activities Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page This research area supports basic research in condensed matter physics and materials physics using

  17. New insights from in-situ electron microscopy into capacity loss mechanisms

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in Li-ion batteries with Al anodes. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect New insights from in-situ electron microscopy into capacity loss mechanisms in Li-ion batteries with Al anodes. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New insights from in-situ electron microscopy into capacity loss mechanisms in Li-ion batteries with Al anodes. Abstract not provided. Authors: Talin, Albert Alec ; Bartelt, Norman Charles ; Leite, Marina ; Ruzmetov, Dmitry ; Zhipeng, Li ; Bendersky, Leonid Publication

  18. In-Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for Battery Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehdi, Beata L; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas; Xu, WU; Nasybulin, Eduard; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chongmin; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James E; Browning, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of in-situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in-situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in-situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  19. New insights from in-situ electron microscopy into capacity loss mechanisms

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in all-solid-state Li-ion batteries with Al anodes. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect New insights from in-situ electron microscopy into capacity loss mechanisms in all-solid-state Li-ion batteries with Al anodes. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New insights from in-situ electron microscopy into capacity loss mechanisms in all-solid-state Li-ion batteries with Al anodes. Abstract not provided. Authors: Talin, Albert Alec ; Leite, Marina ; Ruzmetov, Dmitry ; Li, Zhipeng ;

  20. Characterization of aluminum oxide tunnel barriers by combining transport measurements and transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aref, T.; Averin, A.; Nguyend, H. Q.; Pekola, J. P.; Dijken, S. van; Yao, L. D.; Ferring, A.; Koberidze, M.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2014-08-21

    We present two approaches for studying the uniformity of a tunnel barrier. The first approach is based on measuring single-electron and two-electron tunneling in a hybrid single-electron transistor. Our measurements indicate that the effective area of a conduction channel is about one order of magnitude larger than predicted by theoretical calculations. With the second method, transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrate that variations in the barrier thickness are a plausible explanation for the larger effective area and an enhancement of higher order tunneling processes.

  1. Investigating the mesostructure of ordered porous silica nanocomposites by transmission electron microscopy techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullita, S.; Casula, M. F.; Piludu, M.; Falqui, A.; Carta, D.; Corrias, A.

    2014-10-21

    Nanocomposites made out of FeCo alloy nanocrystals supported onto pre-formed mesoporous ordered silica which features a cubic arrangement of pores (SBA-16) were investigated. Information on the effect of the nanocrystals on the mesostructure (i.e. pore arrangement symmetry, pore size, and shape) were deduced by a multitechnique approach including N2 physisorption, low angle X-ray diffraction, and Transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques are required, however, to gain direct evidence on key compositional and textural features of the nanocomposites. In particular, electron tomography and microtomy techniques make clear that the FeCo nanocrystals are located within the pores of the SBA-16 silica, and that the ordered mesostructure of the nanocomposite is retained throughout the observed specimen.

  2. Imaging and microanalysis of thin ionomer layers by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cullen, David A; Koestner, Roland; Kukreja, Ratan; Minko, Sergiy; Trotsenko, Oleksandr; Tokarev, Alexander V; Guetaz, Laure; Meyer III, Harry M; Parish, Chad M; More, Karren Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Improved conditions for imaging and spectroscopic mapping of thin perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer layers in fuel cell electrodes by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) have been investigated. These conditions are first identified on model systems of Nafion ionomer-coated nanostructured thin films and nanoporous Si. The optimized conditions are then applied in a quantitative study of the ionomer through-layer loading for two typical electrode catalyst coatings using electron energy loss and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope. The e-beam induced damage to the perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer is quantified by following the fluorine mass loss with electron exposure and is then mitigated by a few orders of magnitude using cryogenic specimen cooling and a higher incident electron voltage. Multivariate statistical analysis is also applied to the analysis of spectrum images for data denoising and unbiased separation of independent components related to the catalyst, ionomer, and support.

  3. Thickness determination of few-layer hexagonal boron nitride films by scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, P. Sutter, E.

    2014-09-01

    We assess scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) for thickness measurements on few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), the layered dielectric of choice for integration with graphene and other two-dimensional materials. Observations on h-BN islands with large, atomically flat terraces show that the secondary electron intensity in SEM reflects monolayer height changes in films up to least 10 atomic layers thickness. From a quantitative analysis of AES data, the energy-dependent electron escape depth in h-BN films is deduced. The results show that AES is suitable for absolute thickness measurements of few-layer h-BN of 1 to 6 layers.

  4. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for the analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.

  5. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for themore » analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.« less

  6. In situ transmission electron microscopy of individual carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structures in Joule heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masuda, Yusuke; Yoshida, Hideto; Takeda, Seiji; Kohno, Hideo

    2014-08-25

    Collapse of a carbon nanotube results in the formation of a nanoribbon, and a switching of the collapse direction yields a nanotetrahedron in the middle of a nanoribbon. Here, we report in-situ transmission electron microscopy observations of the behavior of carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structures during Joule heating to reveal their thermal stability. In addition, we propose that the observed process is related to the formation process of the structure.

  7. Comparison of preparation techniques for nuclear materials for transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel; Madden, James W.; Miller, Brandon D; Cole, James I; Gan, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Preparation of highly radioactive and irradiated nuclear fuels and materials for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is conjoined with a set of unique challenges, including but not limited to personnel radiation exposure and contamination. The paper evaluates three specimen preparation techniques for preparation of irradiated materials and determines which technique yields to the most reliable characterization of radiation damage microstructure. Various specimen preparation artifacts associated with each technique are considered and ways of minimizing these artifacts are addressed.

  8. Defects in paramagnetic Co-doped ZnO films studied by transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovacs, Andras; Ney, A.; Duchamp, Martial; Ney, V.; Boothroyd, Chris; Galindo, Pedro L.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Chambers, Scott A.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal

    2013-12-23

    We have studied planar defects in epitaxial Co:ZnO dilute magnetic semiconductor thin films deposited on c-plane sapphire (Al2O3) and the Co:ZnO/Al2O3 interface structure at atomic resolution using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Comparing Co:ZnO samples deposited by pulsed laser deposition and reactive magnetron sputtering, both exhibit extrinsic stacking faults, incoherent interface structures, and compositional variations within the first 3-4 Co:ZnO layers at the interface.. In addition, we have measured the local strain which reveals the lattice distortion around the stacking faults.

  9. An In Situ Study of the Martensitic Transformation in Shape Memory Alloys Using Photoemission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Mingdong; Langford, Stephen C.; Dickinson, J. T.; Xiong, Gang; Droubay, Timothy C.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2007-04-15

    Thermally-induced martensitic phase transformations in polycrystalline CuZnAl and thin-film NiTiCu shape memory alloys were probed using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). Ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy shows a reversible change in the apparent work function during transformation, presumably due to the contrasting surface electronic structures of the martensite and austenite phases. In situ PEEM images provide information on the spatial distribution of these phases and the evolution of the surface microstructure during transformation. PEEM offers considerable potential for improving our understanding of martensitic transformations in shape memory alloys in real time.

  10. Conductive atomic force microscopy study of local electronic transport in ZnTe thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kshirsagar, Sachin D.; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam; Tewari, Surya P.

    2013-02-05

    ZnTe thin films obtained by the electron beam evaporation technique were subjected to thermal annealing at 500 Degree-Sign C for 2 hours. The as deposited films were amorphous but transformed to the crystalline state under influence of the thermal treatment. There is increase in optical absorption due to the heat treatment caused by increase in free carrier concentration. Conductive atomic force microscopy shows the presence of electronic inhomogeneities in the films. This is attributed to local compositional variations in the films. I-V analysis in these systems indicates formation of Schottky junction at the metal semiconductor (M-S) interface.

  11. Nucleation of diamond by pure carbon ion bombardment--a transmission electron microscopy study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Y.; Liao, M.Y.; Wang, Z.G.; Lifshitz, Y.; Lee, S.

    2005-08-08

    A cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study of a film deposited by a 1 keV mass-selected carbon ion beam onto silicon held at 800 deg. C is presented. Initially, a graphitic film with its basal planes perpendicular to the substrate is evolving. The precipitation of nanodiamond crystallites in upper layers is confirmed by HRTEM, selected area electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The nucleation of diamond on graphitic edges as predicted by Lambrecht et al. [W. R. L. Lambrecht, C. H. Lee, B. Segall, J. C. Angus, Z. Li, and M. Sunkara, Nature, 364 607 (1993)] is experimentally confirmed. The results are discussed in terms of our recent subplantation-based diamond nucleation model.

  12. Studying The Kinetics Of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation With In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcdowell, Matthew T.; Ryu, Ill; Lee, Seokwoo; Wang, Chong M.; Nix, William D.; Cui, Yi

    2012-11-27

    Silicon is an attractive high-capacity anode material for Li-ion batteries, but a comprehensive understanding of the massive ~300% volume change and fracture during lithiation/delithiation is necessary to reliably employ Si anodes. Here, in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the lithiation of crystalline Si nanoparticles reveals that the reaction slows down as it progresses into the particle interior. Analysis suggests that this behavior is due to the influence of mechanical stress at the reaction front on the driving force for the reaction. These experiments give insight into the factors controlling the kinetics of this unique reaction.

  13. Visualizing non-equilibrium lithiation of spinel oxide via in situ transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Kai; Zhang, Sen; Li, Jing; Yu, Xiqian; Meng, Qingping; Zhu, Yizhou; Hu, Enyuan; Sun, Ke; Yun, Hongseok; Yang, Xiao -Qing; et al

    2016-05-09

    In this study, spinel transition metal oxides are an important class of materials that are being considered as electrodes for lithium-ion batteries, due to their low cost and high theoretical capacity. The lithiation of these compounds is known to undergo a two-step reaction, whereby intercalation and conversion occur in a sequential fashion. These two reactions are known to have distinct reaction dynamics, but it is unclear how the kinetics of these processes affect the overall electrochemical response. Here, we explore the lithiation of nanosized magnetite (Fe3O4) by employing a new strain-sensitive, bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy approach.

  14. Structural defects in GaN revealed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

    2014-04-18

    This paper reviews the various types of structural defects observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy in GaN heteroepitaxial layers grown on foreign substrates and homoepitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates. The structural perfection of these layers is compared to the platelet self-standing crystals grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution. Defects in undoped and Mg doped GaN are discussed. Some models explaining the formation of inversion domains in heavily Mg doped layers that are possible defects responsible for the difficulties of p-doping in GaN are also reviewed.

  15. Biological Applications and Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian G. Trewyn

    2006-05-01

    The research presented and discussed within involves the development of novel biological applications of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) and an investigation of mesoporous material by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Mesoporous silica nanoparticles organically functionalized shown to undergo endocytosis in cancer cells and drug release from the pores was controlled intracellularly and intercellularly. Transmission electron microscopy investigations demonstrated the variety of morphologies produced in this field of mesoporous silica nanomaterial synthesis. A series of room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) containing mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) materials with various particle morphologies, including spheres, ellipsoids, rods, and tubes, were synthesized. By changing the RTIL template, the pore morphology was tuned from the MCM-41 type of hexagonal mesopores to rotational moire type of helical channels, and to wormhole-like porous structures. These materials were used as controlled release delivery nanodevices to deliver antibacterial ionic liquids against Escherichia coli K12. The involvement of a specific organosiloxane function group, covalently attached to the exterior of fluorescein doped mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FITC-MSN), on the degree and kinetics of endocytosis in cancer and plant cells was investigated. The kinetics of endocystosis of TEG coated FITC-MSN is significantly quicker than FITC-MSN as determined by flow cytometry experiments. The fluorescence confocal microscopy investigation showed the endocytosis of TEG coated-FITC MSN triethylene glycol grafted fluorescein doped MSN (TEG coated-FITC MSN) into both KeLa cells and Tobacco root protoplasts. Once the synthesis of a controlled-release delivery system based on MCM-41-type mesoporous silica nanorods capped by disulfide bonds with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles was completed. The material was characterized by general methods and the dosage and kinetics of the antioxidant dependent release was measured. Finally, the biological interaction of the material was determined along with TEM measurements. An electron investigation proved that the pore openings of the MSN were indeed blocked by the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. The biological interaction investigation demonstrated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-capped MSN endocytosis into HeLa cells. Not only does the material enter the cells through endocytosis, but it seems that fluorescein was released from the pores most probably caused by disulfide bond reducing molecules, antioxidants. In addition to endocytosis and release, the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-capped MSN propelled the cells across a cuvette upon induction of a magnet force. Finally, an important aspect of materials characterization is transmission electron microscopy. A TEM investigation demonstrated that incorporating different functional groups during the synthesis (co-condensation) changed the particle and pore morphologies.

  16. Structural defects in GaN revealed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

    2014-09-08

    This paper reviews the various types of structural defects observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy in GaN heteroepitaxial layers grown on foreign substrates and homoepitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates. The structural perfection of these layers is compared to the platelet self-standing crystals grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution. Defects in undoped and Mg doped GaN are discussed. Lastly, some models explaining the formation of inversion domains in heavily Mg doped layers that are possible defects responsible for the difficulties of p-doping in GaN are also reviewed.

  17. In situ transmission electron microscopy analysis of conductive filament during solid electrolyte resistance switching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, Takashi; Arita, Masashi; Takahashi, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Ichiro

    2011-05-23

    An in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of a solid electrolyte, Cu-GeS, during resistance switching is reported. Real-time observations of the filament formation and disappearance process were performed in the TEM instrument and the conductive-filament-formation model was confirmed experimentally. Narrow conductive filaments were formed corresponding to resistance switching from high- to low-resistance states. When the resistance changed to high-resistance state, the filament disappeared. It was also confirmed by use of selected area diffractometry and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy that the conductive filament was made of nanocrystals composed mainly of Cu.

  18. Imaging electronic trap states in perovskite thin films with combined fluorescence and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; Doughty, Benjamin; Yang, Bin

    2016-04-22

    Charge carrier trapping degrades the performance of organometallic halide perovskite solar cells. To characterize the locations of electronic trap states in a heterogeneous photoactive layer, a spatially resolved approach is essential. Here, we report a comparative study on methylammonium lead tri-iodide perovskite thin films subject to different thermal annealing times using a combined photoluminescence (PL) and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy (TAM) approach to spatially map trap states. This approach coregisters the initially populated electronic excited states with the regions that recombine radiatively. Although the TAM images are relatively homogeneous for both samples, the corresponding PL images are highly structured. Themore » remarkable variation in the PL intensities as compared to transient absorption signal amplitude suggests spatially dependent PL quantum efficiency, indicative of trapping events. Furthermore, detailed analysis enables identification of two trapping regimes: a densely packed trapping region and a sparse trapping area that appear as unique spatial features in scaled PL maps.« less

  19. Hetero-epitaxial EuO interfaces studied by analytic electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundy, Julia A.; Hodash, Daniel; Melville, Alexander; Held, Rainer; Mairoser, Thomas; Schmehl, Andreas; Muller, David A.; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Schlom, Darrell G.

    2014-03-03

    With nearly complete spin polarization, the ferromagnetic semiconductor europium monoxide could enable next-generation spintronic devices by providing efficient ohmic spin injection into silicon. Spin injection is greatly affected by the quality of the interface between the injector and silicon. Here, we use atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with electron energy loss spectroscopy to directly image and chemically characterize a series of EuO|Si and EuO|YAlO{sub 3} interfaces fabricated using different growth conditions. We identify the presence of europium silicides and regions of disorder at the EuO|Si interfaces, imperfections that could significantly reduce spin injection efficiencies via spin-flip scattering.

  20. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip windowmore » surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.« less

  1. Tools for macromolecular model building and refinement into electron cryo-microscopy reconstructions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Alan; Long, Fei; Nicholls, Robert A.; Toots, Jaan; Emsley, Paul; Murshudov, Garib, E-mail: garib@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    A description is given of new tools to facilitate model building and refinement into electron cryo-microscopy reconstructions. The recent rapid development of single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) now allows structures to be solved by this method at resolutions close to 3 . Here, a number of tools to facilitate the interpretation of EM reconstructions with stereochemically reasonable all-atom models are described. The BALBES database has been repurposed as a tool for identifying protein folds from density maps. Modifications to Coot, including new Jiggle Fit and morphing tools and improved handling of nucleic acids, enhance its functionality for interpreting EM maps. REFMAC has been modified for optimal fitting of atomic models into EM maps. As external structural information can enhance the reliability of the derived atomic models, stabilize refinement and reduce overfitting, ProSMART has been extended to generate interatomic distance restraints from nucleic acid reference structures, and a new tool, LIBG, has been developed to generate nucleic acid base-pair and parallel-plane restraints. Furthermore, restraint generation has been integrated with visualization and editing in Coot, and these restraints have been applied to both real-space refinement in Coot and reciprocal-space refinement in REFMAC.

  2. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.

  3. Rendering graphene supports hydrophilic with non-covalent aromatic functionalization for transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pantelic, Radosav S., E-mail: pantelic@imbb.forth.gr [National Cancer Institute, 50 South Drive, Building 50, Room 4306, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Fu, Wangyang; Schoenenberger, Christian [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, Basel CH-4056 (Switzerland); Stahlberg, Henning [Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Mattenstrasse 26, WRO-1058, Basel CH-4058 (Switzerland)

    2014-03-31

    Amorphous carbon films have been routinely used to enhance the preparation of frozen-hydrated samples for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), either in retaining protein concentration, providing mechanical stability or dissipating sample charge. However, strong background signal from the amorphous carbon support obstructs that of the sample, and the insulating properties of thin amorphous carbon films preclude any efficiency in dispersing charge. Graphene addresses the limitations of amorphous carbon. Graphene is a crystalline material with virtually no phase or amplitude contrast and unparalleled, high electrical carrier mobility. However, the hydrophobic properties of graphene have prevented its routine application in Cryo-TEM. This Letter reports a method for rendering graphene TEM supports hydrophilica convenient approach maintaining graphene's structural and electrical properties based on non-covalent, aromatic functionalization.

  4. Transmission electron microscopy of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum: effects of irradiation on material microstructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranwal, R. and Burke, M.G.

    2003-03-03

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the effects of irradiation on material microstructure. This work describes the results-to-date from TEM characterization of unirradiated and irradiated ODS molybdenum. The general microstructure of the unirradiated material consists of fine molybdenum grains (< 5 {micro}m average grain size) with numerous low angle boundaries and isolated dislocation networks. 'Ribbon'-like lanthanum oxides are aligned along the working direction of the product form and are frequently associated with grain boundaries, serving to inhibit grain boundary and dislocation movement. In addition to the 'ribbons', discrete lanthanum oxide particles have also been detected. After irradiation, the material is characterized by the presence of nonuniformly distributed large ({approx} 20 to 100 nm in diameter), multi-faceted voids, while the molybdenum grain size and oxide morphology appear to be unaffected by irradiation.

  5. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.

  6. Big Data and Deep data in scanning and electron microscopies: functionality from multidimensional data sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belianinov, Alex; Vasudevan, Rama K; Strelcov, Evgheni; Steed, Chad A; Yang, Sang Mo; Tselev, Alexander; Jesse, Stephen; Biegalski, Michael D; Shipman, Galen M; Symons, Christopher T; Borisevich, Albina Y; Archibald, Richard K; Kalinin, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    The development of electron, and scanning probe microscopies in the second half of the twentieth century have produced spectacular images of internal structure and composition of matter with, at nanometer, molecular, and atomic resolution. Largely, this progress was enabled by computer-assisted methods of microscope operation, data acquisition and analysis. The progress in imaging technologies in the beginning of the twenty first century has opened the proverbial floodgates of high-veracity information on structure and functionality. High resolution imaging now allows information on atomic positions with picometer precision, allowing for quantitative measurements of individual bond length and angles. Functional imaging often leads to multidimensional data sets containing partial or full information on properties of interest, acquired as a function of multiple parameters (time, temperature, or other external stimuli). Here, we review several recent applications of the big and deep data analysis methods to visualize, compress, and translate this data into physically and chemically relevant information from imaging data.

  7. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; et al

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobicmore » environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.« less

  8. An in situ electron microscopy technique for the study of thermally activated reactions in multilayered materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, M.A.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Weihs, T.P.

    1995-04-14

    A novel in situ transmission electron microscopy technique for the observation of reaction processes in multilayered materials is reported. The technique involves constant heating rate experiments of multilayered materials in image and diffraction modes. Because the fine scale microstructure of multilayered materials is typically a small fraction of the TEM specimen thickness, realistic comparison of the microstructural evolution with that of similarly processed thick foil samples is possible. Such experiments, when well designed, can provide rapid characterization of phase transformations and stability of nano-structured materials. The results of these experiments can be recorded in both video and micrograph format. The results and limitations of this technique will be shown for the Al/Zr and Al/Monel multilayered systems.

  9. High resolution electron microscopy study of as-prepared and annealed tungsten-carbon multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Gronsky, R.; Kortright, J.B.

    1988-12-01

    A series of sputtered tungsten-carbon multilayer structures with periods ranging from 2 to 12 nm in the as-prepared state and after annealing at 500/degree/C for 4 hours has been studied with high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The evolution with annealing of the microstructure of these multilayers depends on their period. As-prepared structures appear predominantly amorphous from TEM imaging and diffraction. Annealing results in crystallization of the W-rich layers into WC in the larger period samples, and less complete or no crystallization in the smaller period samples. X-ray scattering reveals that annealing expands the period in a systematic way. The layers remain remarkably well-defined after annealing under these conditions. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Dynamics of soft Nanomaterials captured by transmission electron microscopy in liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Proetto, Maria T.; Rush, Anthony M.; Chien, Miao-Ping; Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Patterson, Joseph P.; Thompson, Matthew P.; Olson, Norman H.; Moore, Curtis E.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Andolina, Christopher; Millstone, Jill; Howell, Stephen B.; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.

    2014-01-14

    In this paper we present in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of soft, synthetic nanoparticles with a comparative analysis using conventional TEM methods. This comparison is made with the simple aim of describing what is an unprecedented example of in situ imaging by TEM. However, we contend the technique will quickly become essential in the characterization of analogous systems, especially where dynamics are of interest in the solvated state. In this case, particles were studied which were obtained from the direct polymerization of an oxaliplatin analog, designed for an ongoing program in novel chemotherapeutic delivery systems. The resulting nanoparticles provided sufficient contrast for facile imaging in situ, and point toward key design parameters that enable this new characterization approach for organic nanomaterials. We describe the preparation of the synthetic micellar nanoparticles to- gether with their characterization in liquid water.

  11. Defects in paramagnetic Co-doped ZnO films studied by transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovcs, A.; Duchamp, M.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Ney, A.; Ney, V.; Galindo, P. L.; Kaspar, T. C.; Chambers, S. A.

    2013-12-28

    We study planar defects in epitaxial Co:ZnO dilute magnetic semiconductor thin films deposited on c-plane sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), as well as the Co:ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface, using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Co:ZnO samples that were deposited using pulsed laser deposition and reactive magnetron sputtering are both found to contain extrinsic stacking faults, incoherent interface structures, and compositional variations within the first 34 Co:ZnO layers next to the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate. The stacking fault density is in the range of 10{sup 17} cm{sup ?3}. We also measure the local lattice distortions around the stacking faults. It is shown that despite the relatively high density of planar defects, lattice distortions, and small compositional variation, the Co:ZnO films retain paramagnetic properties.

  12. Lithium electrodeposition dynamics in aprotic electrolyte observed in situ via transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leenheer, Andrew Jay; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh; Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Sullivan, John P.; Harris, Charles Thomas

    2015-03-18

    Electrodeposited metallic lithium is an ideal negative battery electrode, but nonuniform microstructure evolution during cycling leads to degradation and safety issues. A better understanding of the Li plating and stripping processes is needed to enable practical Li-metal batteries. Here we use a custom microfabricated, sealed liquid cell for in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to image the first few cycles of lithium electrodeposition/dissolution in liquid aprotic electrolyte at submicron resolution. Cycling at current densities from 1 to 25 mA/cm2 leads to variations in grain structure, with higher current densities giving a more needle-like, higher surface area deposit. The effectmore » of the electron beam was explored, and it was found that, even with minimal beam exposure, beam-induced surface film formation could alter the Li microstructure. The electrochemical dissolution was seen to initiate from isolated points on grains rather than uniformly across the Li surface, due to the stabilizing solid electrolyte interphase surface film. As a result, we discuss the implications for operando STEM liquid-cell imaging and Li-battery applications.« less

  13. Rapid imaging of mycoplasma in solution using Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy (ASEM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Chikara; Manaka, Sachie; Nakane, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Miyata, Makoto; Maruyama, Yuusuke

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mycoplasma mobile was observed in buffer with the Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M. mobile attached to sialic acid on the SiN film surface within minutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells were observed at low concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASEM should promote study and early-stage diagnosis of mycoplasma. -- Abstract: Mycoplasma is a genus of bacterial pathogen that causes disease in vertebrates. In humans, the species Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes 15% or more of community-acquired pneumonia. Because this bacterium is tiny, corresponding in size to a large virus, diagnosis using optical microscopy is not easy. In current methods, chest X-rays are usually the first action, followed by serology, PCR amplification, and/or culture, but all of these are particularly difficult at an early stage of the disease. Using Mycoplasma mobile as a model species, we directly observed mycoplasma in buffer with the newly developed Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM). This microscope features an open sample dish with a pressure-resistant thin film window in its base, through which the SEM beam scans samples in solution, from below. Because of its 2-3 {mu}m-deep scanning capability, it can observe the whole internal structure of mycoplasma cells stained with metal solutions. Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Cells were observed at low concentrations, because suspended cells concentrate in the observable zone by attaching to sialic acid on the silicon nitride (SiN) film surface within minutes. These results suggest the applicability of the ASEM for the study of mycoplasmas as well as for early-stage mycoplasma infection diagnosis.

  14. X-ray photoemission electron microscopy for the study of semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, S.; Stammler, T.; Padmore, H.; Terminello, L.J.; Jankowski, A.F.; Stohr, J.; Diaz, J.; Cossy-Gantner, A.

    1998-03-01

    Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) using X-rays is a novel combination of two established materials analysis techniques--PEEM using UV light, and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. This combination allows the study of elemental composition and bonding structure of the sample by NEXAFS spectroscopy with a high spatial resolution given by the microscope. A simple, two lens, 10 kV operation voltage PEEM has been used at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley to study various problems including materials of interest for the semiconductor industry. In the present paper the authors give a short overview over the method and the instrument which was used, and describe in detail a number of applications. These applications include the study of the different phases of titanium disilicide, various phases of boron nitride, and the analysis of small particles. A brief outlook is given on possible new fields of application of the PEEM technique, and the development of new PEEM instruments.

  15. Big Data and Deep data in scanning and electron microscopies: functionality from multidimensional data sets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Belianinov, Alex; Vasudevan, Rama K; Strelcov, Evgheni; Steed, Chad A; Yang, Sang Mo; Tselev, Alexander; Jesse, Stephen; Biegalski, Michael D; Shipman, Galen M; Symons, Christopher T; et al

    2015-01-01

    The development of electron, and scanning probe microscopies in the second half of the twentieth century have produced spectacular images of internal structure and composition of matter with, at nanometer, molecular, and atomic resolution. Largely, this progress was enabled by computer-assisted methods of microscope operation, data acquisition and analysis. The progress in imaging technologies in the beginning of the twenty first century has opened the proverbial floodgates of high-veracity information on structure and functionality. High resolution imaging now allows information on atomic positions with picometer precision, allowing for quantitative measurements of individual bond length and angles. Functional imaging often leadsmore » to multidimensional data sets containing partial or full information on properties of interest, acquired as a function of multiple parameters (time, temperature, or other external stimuli). Here, we review several recent applications of the big and deep data analysis methods to visualize, compress, and translate this data into physically and chemically relevant information from imaging data.« less

  16. Characterization of plutonium-bearing wastes by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrens, R.G.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Van Deventer, E.; Chaiko, D.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of characterization studies of plutonium-bearing wastes produced at the US Department of Energy weapons production facilities. Several different solid wastes were characterized, including incinerator ash and ash heels from Rocky Flats Plant and Los Alamos National Laboratory; sand, stag, and crucible waste from Hanford; and LECO crucibles from the Savannah River Site. These materials were characterized by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy. The results showed the presence of discrete PuO{sub 2}PuO{sub 2{minus}x}, and Pu{sub 4}O{sub 7} phases, of about 1{mu}m or less in size, in all of the samples examined. In addition, a number of amorphous phases were present that contained plutonium. In all the ash and ash heel samples examined, plutonium phases were found that were completely surrounded by silicate matrices. Consequently, to achieve optimum plutonium recovery in any chemical extraction process, extraction would have to be coupled with ultrafine grinding to average particle sizes of less than 1 {mu}m to liberate the plutonium from the surrounding inert matrix.

  17. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels and silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruben, G.C. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1991-09-01

    The goal of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was to image the structure of two tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels at the single polymer chain level{sup 1,2}. With this level of structural resolution we hoped to interrelate each aerogel's structure with its physical properties and its method of synthesis. Conventional single-step base catalysed TMOS aerogels show strings of spheroidal particles linked together with minimal necking. The spheroidal particles range from 86--132 {Angstrom} and average 113{plus minus}10 {Angstrom} in diameter{sup 2}. In contrast the TMOS aerogels reported on here were made by a two step method. After extended silica chains are grown in solution under acidic conditions with a substoichiometric amount of water, the reaction is stopped and the methanol hydrolysed from TMOS is removed. Then base catalysis and additional water are added to cause gel formation is a nonalcoholic solvent. The MF aerogels were prepared for HRTEM by fracturing them on a stereo microscope stage with razor knife so that fractured pieces with smooth flat surfaces could be selected for platinum-carbon replication. The two silica (TMOS) aerogels were both transparent and difficult to see. These aerogels were fractured on a stereo microscope stage with tweezers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Applications of scanning electron microscopy to the study of mineral matter in peat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Andrejko, M.J.; Bardin, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) have been used for in situ analysis of minerals in peats by combining methods for producing oriented microtome sections of peat with methods for critical point drying. The combined technique allows SEM analysis of the inorganic components and their associated botanical constituents, along with petrographic identification of the botanical constituents. In peat deposits with abundant fluvial- or marine-derived minerals, one may use the above technique and/or medium- or low-temperature ashing followed by x-ray diffraction to readily identify the various mineral components. However, in some freshwater environments the scarcity of non-silica minerals makes the above techniques impractical. By separating the inorganic residues from the peat, one can isolate the non-silica mineral matter in the SEM for analysis by EDS. Furthermore, such separation allows SEM analysis of features and textures of both silica and non-silica mineral particles that might otherwise be unidentifiable. Results indicate the occurrence of detritial minerals in both Okefenokee and Snuggedy Swamp peats, the presence of authigenic or diagenetic minerals growing within peats, and dissolution features on freshwater sponge spicules that may account for the absence of spicules in Tertiary lignites.

  19. Detecting Cellulase Penetration Into Corn Stover Cell Walls by Immuno-Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donohoe, B. S.; Selig, M. J.; Viamajala, S.; Vinzant, T. B.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.

    2009-06-15

    In general, pretreatments are designed to enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymes, allowing for more efficient conversion. In this study, we have detected the penetration of major cellulases present in a commercial enzyme preparation (Spezyme CP) into corn stem cell walls following mild-, moderate- and high-severity dilute sulfuric acid pretreatments. The Trichoderma reesei enzymes, Cel7A (CBH I) and Cel7B (EG I), as well as the cell wall matrix components xylan and lignin were visualized within digested corn stover cell walls by immuno transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using enzyme- and polymer-specific antibodies. Low severity dilute-acid pretreatment (20 min at 100 C) enabled <1% of the thickness of secondary cell walls to be penetrated by enzyme, moderate severity pretreatment at (20 min at 120 C) allowed the enzymes to penetrate {approx}20% of the cell wall, and the high severity (20 min pretreatment at 150 C) allowed 100% penetration of even the thickest cell walls. These data allow direct visualization of the dramatic effect dilute-acid pretreatment has on altering the condensed ultrastructure of biomass cell walls. Loosening of plant cell wall structure due to pretreatment and the subsequently improved access by cellulases has been hypothesized by the biomass conversion community for over two decades, and for the first time, this study provides direct visual evidence to verify this hypothesis. Further, the high-resolution enzyme penetration studies presented here provide insight into the mechanisms of cell wall deconstruction by cellulolytic enzymes.

  20. Dynamic Processes in Biology, Chemistry, and Materials Science: Opportunities for UltraFast Transmission Electron Microscopy - Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabius, Bernd C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Diehl, Barbara L.; Stach, Eric A.

    2012-07-25

    This report summarizes a 2011 workshop that addressed the potential role of rapid, time-resolved electron microscopy measurements in accelerating the solution of important scientific and technical problems. A series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Academy of Science workshops have highlighted the critical role advanced research tools play in addressing scientific challenges relevant to biology, sustainable energy, and technologies that will fuel economic development without degrading our environment. Among the specific capability needs for advancing science and technology are tools that extract more detailed information in realistic environments (in situ or operando) at extreme conditions (pressure and temperature) and as a function of time (dynamic and time-dependent). One of the DOE workshops, Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next Generation Instrumentation and Beyond, specifically addressed the importance of electron-based characterization methods for a wide range of energy-relevant Grand Scientific Challenges. Boosted by the electron optical advancement in the last decade, a diversity of in situ capabilities already is available in many laboratories. The obvious remaining major capability gap in electron microscopy is in the ability to make these direct in situ observations over a broad spectrum of fast (µs) to ultrafast (picosecond [ps] and faster) temporal regimes. In an effort to address current capability gaps, EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, organized an Ultrafast Electron Microscopy Workshop, held June 14-15, 2011, with the primary goal to identify the scientific needs that could be met by creating a facility capable of a strongly improved time resolution with integrated in situ capabilities. The workshop brought together more than 40 leading scientists involved in applying and/or advancing electron microscopy to address important scientific problems of relevance to DOE’s research mission. This workshop built on previous workshops and included three breakout sessions identifying scientific challenges in biology, biogeochemistry, catalysis, and materials science frontier areas of fundamental science that underpin energy and environmental science that would significantly benefit from ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (UTEM). In addition, the current status of time-resolved electron microscopy was examined, and the technologies that will enable future advances in spatio-temporal resolution were identified in a fourth breakout session.

  1. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF TANK 18 SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, M.; O'Rourke, P.; Ajo, H.

    2012-03-08

    The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) Performance Assessment (PA) utilizes waste speciation in the waste release model used in the FTF fate and transport modeling. The waste release modeling associated with the residual plutonium in Tank 18 has been identified as a primary contributor to the Tank 18 dose uncertainty. In order to reduce the uncertainty related to plutonium in Tank 18, a better understanding of the plutonium speciation in the Tank 18 waste (including the oxidation state and stoichiometry) is desired. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilized Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to analyze Tank 18 samples to provide information on the speciation of plutonium in the waste material. XRD analysis of the Tank 18 samples did not identify any plutonium mineral phases in the samples. These indicates the crystalline mineral phases of plutonium are below the detection limits of the XRD method or that the plutonium phase(s) lack long range order and are present as amorphous or microcrystalline solids. SEM analysis of the Tank 18 samples did locate particles containing plutonium. The plutonium was found as small particles, usually <1 {micro}m but ranging up to several micrometers in diameter, associated with particles of an iron matrix and at low concentration in other elemental matrices. This suggests the plutonium has an affinity for the iron matrix. Qualitatively, the particles of plutonium found in the SEM analysis do not appear to account for all of the plutonium in the sample based on concentrations determined from the chemical analysis of the Tank 18 samples. This suggests that plutonium is also distributed throughout the solids in low concentrations.

  2. Structural evolution and strain induced mixing in Cu–Co composites studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachmaier, A.; Aboulfadl, H.; Pfaff, M.; Mücklich, F.; Motz, C.

    2015-02-15

    A Cu–Co composite material is chosen as a model system to study structural evolution and phase formations during severe plastic deformation. The evolving microstructures as a function of the applied strain were characterized at the micro-, nano-, and atomic scale-levels by combining scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy including energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The amount of intermixing between the two phases at different strains was examined at the atomic scale using atom probe tomography as complimentary method. It is shown that Co particles are dissolved in the Cu matrix during severe plastic deformation to a remarkable extent and their size, number, and volume fraction were quantitatively determined during the deformation process. From the results, it can be concluded that supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in a fcc Cu–26 at.% Co alloy are obtained during deformation. However, the distribution of Co was found to be inhomogeneous even at the highest degree of investigated strain. - Highlights: • Structural evolution in a deformed Cu–Co composite is studied on all length scales. • Amount of intermixing is examined by atom-probe tomography. • Supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in Cu are observed.

  3. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See the Foundry's full equipment list NCEM Capabilities & Tools NCEM operates an array of state-of-the art electron microscopes, offering a wide range of capabilities for materials characterization at high resolution. Several of these instruments, most notably the TEAM suite of microscopes, are unique and of world class. Others are at the state of the art, or offer forefront capabilities and techniques such as in-situ nanoindentation, spin-polarized low-energy microscopy, or tomography.

  4. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marissa Libbee Scientific Engineering Associate, NCEM mlibbee@lbl.gov 510.495.2308 Biography Marissa Libbee transitioned from the liberal arts world in 2005 and spent the next two years at the Center for Mathematics and Applied Sciences at San Joaquin Delta College where she completed her studies on electron microscopy with an emphasis on crystalline materials and biological ultra-structure. Before joining NCEM, Marissa worked for IBM Almaden on multi-layer magnetic thin films, for SanDisk with

  5. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foundry/NCEM Combined Call for Proposals - Deadline March 31st In preparation for their merge that will be finalized by October 1, 2014, the Molecular Foundry and the National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) have combined their user proposal submission and review processes for their next Call for Proposals. Proposals can be submitted here and will be accepted through March 31, 2014. The new coordinated proposal submission and review process is designed to combine the best aspects of the

  6. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-04-28

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350?C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface.

  7. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e⁻aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e⁻aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pdmore » deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e⁻aq]. In addition, by comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e⁻aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.« less

  8. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. In addition, by comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  9. Largely defocused probe scanning transmission electron microscopy for imaging local modulation of strain field in a hetero interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Suhyun Jung, Younheum; Kim, Joong Jung; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Haebum; Oshima, Yoshifumi

    2014-10-13

    We present an innovative method for characterizing the strain field in three dimensions in a hetero interface. Largely defocused probe scanning transmission electron microscopy (LDP-STEM) was employed for imaging the inhomogeneous strain field in a germanium (Ge) layer deposited on a silicon (Si) substrate. In the LDP-STEM image, Ge-atomic columns that are relaxed or strained to the Si substrate in the Si/Ge hetero interface were observed to be distinguishable, allowing for the qualitative characterization of the coherency of the crystal growth. Our results revealed that the strain field is locally modulated along the in-plane direction in the Si/Ge hetero interface.

  10. Determination of pigments in colour layers on walls of some selected historical buildings using optical and scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skapin, A. Sever Ropret, P. Bukovec, P.

    2007-11-15

    For successful restoration of painted walls and painted coloured finishing coats it is necessary to determine the composition of the original colour layers. Identification of the pigments used in The Cistercian Abbey of Sticna and The Manor of Novo Celje was carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Selected samples of wall paintings were inspected by the combined application of an optical microscope and a low-vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope to determine their colour and structural features and to identify the position of individual pigment grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to determine the elemental distribution on selected surfaces and elemental composition of individual pigments. It was found that the most abundantly used pigments were iron oxide red, cinnabar, green earth, umber, calcium carbonate white, ultramarine, yellow ochre and carbon black. These identifications have allowed us to compare the use of various pigments in buildings from different historical periods.

  11. Magnetic properties and transmission electron microscopy studies of Ni nanoparticles encapsulated in carbon nanocages and carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He Chunnian; Zhao Naiqin Shi Chunsheng; Li Jiajun; Li Haipeng

    2008-08-04

    Three types of carbon nanomaterials, including bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes with Ni encapsulated and hollow and Ni catalytic particles filled carbon nanocages, have been prepared by methane catalytic decomposition at a relatively low temperature. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed that fascinating fullerene-like Ni-C (graphitic) core-shell nanostructures predominated. Detailed examination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that the walls of bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes with quasi-cone catalytic particles encapsulated consisted of oblique graphene planes with respect to the tube axis. The Ni particles encapsulated in the carbon nanocages were larger than that encapsulated in carbon nanotubes, but the diameters of the cores of hollow carbon nanocages were less than that of Ni particles encapsulated in carbon nanotubes, suggesting that the sizes of catalyst particles played an important role during carbon nanomaterial growth. The magnetic properties of the carbon nanomaterials were measured, which showed relatively large coercive force (H{sub c} = 138.4 O{sub e}) and good ferromagnetism (M{sub r}/M{sub s} = 0.325)

  12. Kinetics of liquid-mediated crystallization of amorphous Ge from multi-frame dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santala, M. K.; Raoux, S.; Campbell, G. H.

    2015-12-24

    The kinetics of laser-induced, liquid-mediated crystallization of amorphous Ge thin films were studied using multi-frame dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM), a nanosecond-scale photo-emission transmission electron microscopy technique. In these experiments, high temperature gradients are established in thin amorphous Ge films with a 12-ns laser pulse with a Gaussian spatial profile. The hottest region at the center of the laser spot crystallizes in ~100 ns and becomes nano-crystalline. Over the next several hundred nanoseconds crystallization continues radially outward from the nano-crystalline region forming elongated grains, some many microns long. The growth rate during the formation of these radial grains is measured with time-resolved imaging experiments. Crystal growth rates exceed 10 m/s, which are consistent with crystallization mediated by a very thin, undercooled transient liquid layer, rather than a purely solid-state transformation mechanism. The kinetics of this growth mode have been studied in detail under steady-state conditions, but here we provide a detailed study of liquid-mediated growth in high temperature gradients. Unexpectedly, the propagation rate of the crystallization front was observed to remain constant during this growth mode even when passing through large local temperature gradients, in stark contrast to other similar studies that suggested the growth rate changed dramatically. As a result, the high throughput of multi-frame DTEM provides gives a more complete picture of the role of temperature and temperature gradient on laser crystallization than previous DTEM experiments.

  13. Electron-Impact Water-Jet Microfocus Source for Water-Window Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skoglund, P.; Lundstroem, U.; Vogt, U.; Takman, P.; Hertz, H. M.

    2011-09-09

    We demonstrate high-brightness operation of an electron-impact water-jet-anode soft x-ray source with an increased power loading of 15 times compared to our previously published results, with a corresponding increase in {approx}525-eV x-ray intensity of 6.4 times. This has been accomplished by improving the vacuum pumping system and the electron focusing optics, and increasing the liquid-jet velocity. The source now operates up to 120-W e-beam power and at a 525-eV brightness of 3.5x10{sup 9} ph/(sx{mu}m{sup 2}xsrxline). The source concept has potential to increase the x-ray brightness by another order of magnitude by optimizing the e-beam focusing and upgrading the power supply. Currently, spot enlargement with increased power is determined to be the most important limiting factor.

  14. Gas mixing system for imaging of nanomaterials under dynamic environments by environmental transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akatay, M. Cem; Zvinevich, Yury; Ribeiro, Fabio H. E-mail: estach@bnl.gov; Baumann, Philipp; Stach, Eric A. E-mail: estach@bnl.gov

    2014-03-15

    A gas mixing manifold system that is capable of delivering a stable pressure stream of a desired composition of gases into an environmental transmission electron microscope has been developed. The system is designed to provide a stable imaging environment upon changes of either the composition of the gas mixture or upon switching from one gas to another. The design of the system is described and the response of the pressure inside the microscope, the sample temperature, and sample drift in response to flow and composition changes of the system are reported.

  15. Ultrahigh-spatial-resolution chemical and magnetic imaging by laser-based photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taniuchi, Toshiyuki Kotani, Yoshinori; Shin, Shik

    2015-02-15

    We report the first experiments carried out on a new chemical and magnetic imaging system, which combines the high spatial resolution of a photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) with a continuous-wave deep-ultraviolet laser. Threshold photoemission is sensitive to the chemical and magnetic structures of the surface of materials. The spatial resolution of PEEM is limited by space charging when using pulsed photon sources as well as aberrations in the electron optics. We show that the use of a continuous-wave laser enabled us to overcome such a limit by suppressing the space-charge effect, allowing us to obtain a resolution of approximately 2.6 nm. With this system, we demonstrated the imaging of surface reconstruction domains on Si(001) by linear dichroism with normal incidence of the laser beam. We also succeeded in magnetic imaging of thin films with the use of magnetic circular dichroism near the Fermi level. The unique features of the ultraviolet laser will give us fast switching of the incident angles and polarizations of the photon source, which will be useful for the characterization of antiferromagnetic materials as well as ferromagnetic materials.

  16. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy study of carbon deposited on the NiO/MgO solid solution catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Y.H.; Ruckenstein, E.

    1999-05-15

    The carbon deposition due to the CH{sub 4} decomposition at 790 C over NiO/MgO catalysts was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. While no deposits could be detected over the catalysts with a NiO content smaller than 9.1 wt%, they were detected over the catalysts with NiO contents of 23 and 50 wt%. The carbon deposits are composed of platelets located at distances of about 0.34 nm, corresponding to the graphitic carbon. Various structures of the deposited carbon were observed: (a) carbon consisting of platelets parallel to the surface of the particle, which covers a catalyst particle, (b) nanotubes composed of platelets parallel to their axis, and (c) carbon vortexes consisting of platelets parallel to their axis.

  17. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Martinez, G. T.; Van Aert, S.; Dekker, A. J. den; Rosenauer, A.; Sijbers, J.

    2014-08-11

    We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage applications, much effort has been made to optimize the STEM technique in order to detect light elements. Therefore, classical performance criteria, such as contrast or signal-to-noise ratio, are often discussed hereby aiming at improvements of the direct visual interpretability. However, when images are interpreted quantitatively, one needs an alternative criterion, which we derive based on statistical detection theory. Using realistic simulations of technologically important materials, we demonstrate the benefits of the proposed method and compare the results with existing approaches.

  18. Hot-stage transmission electron microscopy study of (Na, K)NbO{sub 3} based lead-free piezoceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shengbo; Xu, Zhengkui; Kwok, K. W.; Chan, Helen L. W.

    2014-07-28

    Hierarchical nanodomains assembled into micron-sized stripe domains, which is believed to be associated with outstanding piezoelectric properties, were observed at room temperature in a typical lead free piezoceramics, (Na{sub 0.52}K{sub 0.48−x})(Nb{sub 0.95−x}Ta{sub 0.05})-xLiSbO{sub 3}, with finely tuned polymorphic phase boundaries (x = 0.0465) by transmission electron microscopy. The evolution of domain morphology and crystal structure under heating and cooling cycles in the ceramic was investigated by in-situ hot stage study. It is found that the nanodomains are irreversibly transformed into micron-sized rectangular domains during heating and cooling cycles, which lead to the thermal instability of piezoelectric properties of the materials.

  19. Real-time observation of morphological transformations in II-VI semiconducting nanobelts via environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agarwal, Rahul; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Krook, Nadia M.; Liu, Wenjing; Berger, Jacob; Stach, Eric A.; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2015-05-01

    It has been observed that wurtzite II–VI semiconducting nanobelts transform into single-crystal, periodically branched nanostructures upon heating. The mechanism of this novel transformation has been elucidated by heating II–VI nanobelts in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) in oxidizing, reducing and inert atmospheres while observing their structural changes with high spatial resolution. The interplay of surface reconstruction of high-energy surfaces of the wurtzite phase and environment-dependent anisotropic chemical etching of certain crystal surfaces in the branching mechanism of nanobelts has been observed. Understanding of structural and chemical transformations of materials via in situ microscopy techniques and their role in designingmore » new nanostructured materials is discussed.« less

  20. Direct Visualization of Solid Electrolyte Interphase Formation in Lithium-Ion Batteries with In Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unocic, Raymond R; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Sacci, Robert L; Adamczyk, Leslie A; Alsem, Daan Hein; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Complex, electrochemically driven transport processes form the basis of electrochemical energy storage devices. The direct imaging of electrochemical processes at high spatial resolution and within their native liquid electrolyte would significantly enhance our understanding of device functionality, but has remained elusive. In this work we use a recently developed liquid cell for in situ electrochemical transmission electron microscopy to obtain insight into the electrolyte decomposition mechanisms and kinetics in lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries by characterizing the dynamics of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation and evolution. Here we are able to visualize the detailed structure of the SEI that forms locally at the electrode/electrolyte interface during lithium intercalation into natural graphite from an organic Li-ion battery electrolyte. We quantify the SEI growth kinetics and observe the dynamic self-healing nature of the SEI with changes in cell potential.

  1. Real-time observation of morphological transformations in II-VI semiconducting nanobelts via environmental transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Rahul; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Krook, Nadia M.; Liu, Wenjing; Berger, Jacob; Stach, Eric A.; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2015-05-01

    It has been observed that wurtzite II–VI semiconducting nanobelts transform into single-crystal, periodically branched nanostructures upon heating. The mechanism of this novel transformation has been elucidated by heating II–VI nanobelts in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) in oxidizing, reducing and inert atmospheres while observing their structural changes with high spatial resolution. The interplay of surface reconstruction of high-energy surfaces of the wurtzite phase and environment-dependent anisotropic chemical etching of certain crystal surfaces in the branching mechanism of nanobelts has been observed. Understanding of structural and chemical transformations of materials via in situ microscopy techniques and their role in designing new nanostructured materials is discussed.

  2. Comparison of SOFC Cathode Microstructure Quantified using X-ray Nanotomography and Focused Ioni Beam-scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G Nelson; W Harris; J Lombardo; J Izzo Jr.; W Chiu; P Tanasini; M Cantoni; J Van herle; C Comninellis; et al.

    2011-12-31

    X-ray nanotomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) have been applied to investigate the complex 3D microstructure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes at spatial resolutions of 45 nm and below. The application of near edge differential absorption for x-ray nanotomography and energy selected backscatter detection for FIB-SEM enable elemental mapping within the microstructure. Using these methods, non-destructive 3D x-ray imaging and FIB-SEM serial sectioning have been applied to compare three-dimensional elemental mapping of the LSM, YSZ, and pore phases in the SOFC cathode microstructure. The microstructural characterization of an SOFC cathode is reported based on these measurements. The results presented demonstrate the viability of x-ray nanotomography as a quantitative characterization technique and provide key insights into the SOFC cathode microstructure.

  3. Comparison of SOFC Cathode Microstructure Quantified using X-ray Nanotomography and Focused Ion Beam - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, George J.; Harris, William H.; Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Izzo, Jr., John R.; Chiu, W. K. S.; Tanasini, Pietro; Cantoni, Marco; Van herle, Jan; Comninellis, Christos; Andrews, Joy C.; Liu, Yijin; Pianetta, Piero; Chu, Yong

    2011-03-24

    X-ray nanotomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) have been applied to investigate the complex 3D microstructure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes at spatial resolutions of 45 nm and below. The application of near edge differential absorption for x-ray nanotomography and energy selected backscatter detection for FIBSEM enable elemental mapping within the microstructure. Using these methods, non-destructive 3D x-ray imaging and FIBSEM serial sectioning have been applied to compare three-dimensional elemental mapping of the LSM, YSZ, and pore phases in the SOFC cathode microstructure. The microstructural characterization of an SOFC cathode is reported based on these measurements. The results presented demonstrate the viability of x-ray nanotomography as a quantitative characterization technique and provide key insights into the SOFC cathode microstructure.

  4. Kinetics of liquid-mediated crystallization of amorphous Ge from multi-frame dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Santala, M. K.; Raoux, S.; Campbell, G. H.

    2015-12-24

    The kinetics of laser-induced, liquid-mediated crystallization of amorphous Ge thin films were studied using multi-frame dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM), a nanosecond-scale photo-emission transmission electron microscopy technique. In these experiments, high temperature gradients are established in thin amorphous Ge films with a 12-ns laser pulse with a Gaussian spatial profile. The hottest region at the center of the laser spot crystallizes in ~100 ns and becomes nano-crystalline. Over the next several hundred nanoseconds crystallization continues radially outward from the nano-crystalline region forming elongated grains, some many microns long. The growth rate during the formation of these radial grains is measuredmore » with time-resolved imaging experiments. Crystal growth rates exceed 10 m/s, which are consistent with crystallization mediated by a very thin, undercooled transient liquid layer, rather than a purely solid-state transformation mechanism. The kinetics of this growth mode have been studied in detail under steady-state conditions, but here we provide a detailed study of liquid-mediated growth in high temperature gradients. Unexpectedly, the propagation rate of the crystallization front was observed to remain constant during this growth mode even when passing through large local temperature gradients, in stark contrast to other similar studies that suggested the growth rate changed dramatically. As a result, the high throughput of multi-frame DTEM provides gives a more complete picture of the role of temperature and temperature gradient on laser crystallization than previous DTEM experiments.« less

  5. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2011-10-10

    The capture and storage of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in deep geologic formations represents one of the most promising options for mitigating the impacts of greenhouse gases on global warming. In this regard, mineral-fluid interactions are of prime importance since such reactions can result in the long term sequestration of CO2 by trapping in mineral phases. Recently it has been recognized that interactions with neat to water-saturated non-aqueous fluids are of prime importance in understanding mineralization reactions since the introduced CO2 is likely to contain water initially or soon after injection and the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is less dense than the aqueous phase which can result in a buoyant scCO2 plume contacting the isolating caprock. As a result, unraveling the molecular/microscopic mechanisms of mineral transformation in neat to water saturated scCO2 has taken on an added important. In this study, we are examining the interfacial reactions of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) over a range of water contents up to and including complete water saturation in scCO2. The surface precipitates that form on the reacted forsterite grains are extremely fragile and difficult to experimentally characterize. In order to address this issue we have developed experimental protocols for preparing and imaging electron-transparent samples from fragile structures. These electron-transparent samples are then examined using a combination of STEM/EDX, FIB-TEM, and helium ion microscope (HIM) imaging (Figures 1-3). This combination of capabilities has provided unique insight into the geochemical processes that occur on scCO2 reacted mineral surfaces. The experimental procedures and protocols that have been developed also have useful applications for examining fragile structures on a wide variety of materials. This research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  6. Probing the Degradation Mechanisms in Electrolyte Solutions for Li-ion Batteries by In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Mehdi, Beata L.; Parent, Lucas R.; Gu, Meng; Park, Chiwoo; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Yaohui; Arslan, Ilke; Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Chong M.; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-02-21

    One of the goals in the development of new battery technologies is to find new electrolytes with increased electrochemical stability. In-situ (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) using an electrochemical fluid cell provides the ability to rapidly and directly characterize electrode/electrolyte interfacial reactions under battery relevant electrochemical conditions. Furthermore, as the electron beam itself causes a localized electrochemical reaction when it interacts with the electrolyte, the breakdown products that occur during the first stages of battery operation can potentially be simulated and characterized using a straightforward in-situ liquid stage (without electrochemical biasing capabilities). In this paper, we have studied the breakdown of a range of inorganic/salt complexes that are used in state-of-the-art Li-ion battery systems. The results of the in-situ (S)TEM experiments matches with previous stability tests performed during battery operation and the breakdown products and mechanisms are also consistent with known mechanisms. This analysis indicates that in-situ liquid stage (S)TEM observations can be used to directly test new electrolyte designs and provide structural insights into the origin of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation mechanism.

  7. Lithium electrodeposition dynamics in aprotic electrolyte observed in situ via transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leenheer, Andrew Jay; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh; Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Sullivan, John P.; Harris, Charles Thomas

    2015-03-18

    Electrodeposited metallic lithium is an ideal negative battery electrode, but nonuniform microstructure evolution during cycling leads to degradation and safety issues. A better understanding of the Li plating and stripping processes is needed to enable practical Li-metal batteries. Here we use a custom microfabricated, sealed liquid cell for in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to image the first few cycles of lithium electrodeposition/dissolution in liquid aprotic electrolyte at submicron resolution. Cycling at current densities from 1 to 25 mA/cm2 leads to variations in grain structure, with higher current densities giving a more needle-like, higher surface area deposit. The effect of the electron beam was explored, and it was found that, even with minimal beam exposure, beam-induced surface film formation could alter the Li microstructure. The electrochemical dissolution was seen to initiate from isolated points on grains rather than uniformly across the Li surface, due to the stabilizing solid electrolyte interphase surface film. As a result, we discuss the implications for operando STEM liquid-cell imaging and Li-battery applications.

  8. Directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography of grain boundary oxidation in a Ni-Al binary alloy exposed to high-temperature water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-10-30

    Intergranular oxidation of a Ni-4Al alloy exposed to hydrogenated, high-temperature water was characterized using directly correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. These combined analyses revealed that discrete, well-separated oxides (NiAl2O4) precipitated along grain boundaries in the metal. Aluminum was depleted from the grain boundary between oxides and also from one side of the boundary as a result of grain boundary migration. The discrete oxide morphology, disconnected from the continuous surface oxidation, suggests intergranular solid-state internal oxidation of Al. Keywords: oxidation; grain boundaries; nickel alloys; atom probe tomography; transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  9. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks onmore » the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.« less

  10. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks on the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.

  11. Atomic-resolution study of polarity reversal in GaSb grown on Si by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosseini Vajargah, S.; Woo, S. Y.; Botton, G. A.; Ghanad-Tavakoli, S.; Kleiman, R. N.; Preston, J. S.

    2012-11-01

    The atomic-resolved reversal of the polarity across an antiphase boundary (APB) was observed in GaSb films grown on Si by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). The investigation of the interface structure at the origin of the APB reveals that coalescence of two domains with Ga-prelayer and Sb-prelayer causes the sublattice reversal. The local strain and lattice rotation distributions of the APB, attributed to the discordant bonding length at the APB with the surrounding GaSb lattice, were further studied using the geometric phase analysis technique. The crystallographic characteristics of the APBs and their interaction with other planar defects were observed with HAADF-STEM. The quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated images confirms the observed polarities in the acquired HAADF-STEM data. The self-annihilation mechanism of the APBs is addressed based on the rotation induced by anti-site bonds and APBs' faceting.

  12. Interaction potentials of anisotropic nanocrystals from the trajectory sampling of particle motion using in situ liquid phase transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Qian; Cho, Hoduk; Manthiram, Karthish; Yoshida, Mark; Ye, Xingchen; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2015-03-23

    We demonstrate a generalizable strategy to use the relative trajectories of pairs and groups of nanocrystals, and potentially other nanoscale objects, moving in solution which can now be obtained by in situ liquid phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the interaction potentials between nanocrystals. Such nanoscale interactions are crucial for collective behaviors and applications of synthetic nanocrystals and natural biomolecules, but have been very challenging to measure in situ at nanometer or sub-nanometer resolution. Here we use liquid phase TEM to extract the mathematical form of interaction potential between nanocrystals from their sampled trajectories. We show the power ofmore » this approach to reveal unanticipated features of nanocrystal–nanocrystal interactions by examining the anisotropic interaction potential between charged rod-shaped Au nanocrystals (Au nanorods); these Au nanorods assemble, in a tip-to-tip fashion in the liquid phase, in contrast to the well-known side-by-side arrangements commonly observed for drying-mediated assembly. These observations can be explained by a long-range and highly anisotropic electrostatic repulsion that leads to the tip-selective attachment. As a result, Au nanorods stay unassembled at a lower ionic strength, as the electrostatic repulsion is even longer-ranged. Our study not only provides a mechanistic understanding of the process by which metallic nanocrystals assemble but also demonstrates a method that can potentially quantify and elucidate a broad range of nanoscale interactions relevant to nanotechnology and biophysics.« less

  13. Real time nanoscale structural evaluation of gold structures on Si (100) surface using in-situ transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rath, A. E-mail: ashutosh.phy@gmail.com E-mail: pvsatyam22@gmail.com; Juluri, R. R.; Satyam, P. V. E-mail: ashutosh.phy@gmail.com E-mail: pvsatyam22@gmail.com

    2014-05-14

    Transport behavior of gold nanostructures on Si(100) substrate during annealing under high vacuum has been investigated using in-situ real time transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A comparative study has been done on the morphological changes due to annealing under different vacuum environments. Au thin films of thickness ∼2.0 nm were deposited on native oxide covered silicon substrate by using thermal evaporation system. In-situ real time TEM measurements at 850 °C showed the isotropic growth of rectangular/square shaped gold-silicon alloy structures. During the growth, it is observed that the alloying occurs in liquid phase followed by transformation into the rectangular shapes. For similar system, ex-situ annealing in low vacuum (10{sup −2} millibars) at 850 °C showed the spherical gold nanostructures with no Au-Si alloy formation. Under low vacuum annealing conditions, the rate of formation of the oxide layer dominates the oxide desorption rate, resulting in the creation of a barrier layer between Au and Si, which restricts the inter diffusion of Au in to Si. This work demonstrates the important role of interfacial oxide layer on the growth of nanoscale Au-Si alloy structures during the initial growth. The time dependent TEM images are presented to offer a direct insight into the fundamental dynamics of the sintering process at the nanoscale.

  14. Imaging individual lanthanum atoms in zeolite Y by scanning transmission electron microscopy: evidence of lanthanum pair sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Pinghong; Lu, Jing; Aydin, C.; Debefve, Louise M.; Browning, Nigel D.; Chen, Cong-Yan; Gates, Bruce C.

    2015-09-01

    Images of La-exchanged NaY zeolite obtained with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) show that about 80% of the La cations were present as site-isolated species, with the remainder in pair sites. The distance between La cations in the pair sites ranged from 1.44 to 3.84 , consistent with the presence of pairs of cations tilted at various angles with respect to the support surface. The actual distance between La cations in the pair sites is inferred to be approximately 3.84 , which is shorter than the distance between the nearest Al sites in the zeolite (4.31 ). The results therefore suggest the presence of dimeric structures of La cations bridged with OH groups, and the presence of such species has been inferred previously on the basis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (W. Grnert, U. Sauerlandt, R. Schlgl, H.G. Karge, J. Phys. Chem., 97 (1993) 1413).

  15. Structure of low-density nanoporous dielectrics revealed by low-vacuum electron microscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kucheyev, S O; Toth, M; Baumann, T F; Hamza, A V; Ilavsky, J; Knowles, W R; Thiel, B L; Tileli, V; van Buuren, T; Wang, Y M; Willey, T M

    2006-06-05

    We use low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy to image directly the ligament and pore size and shape distributions of representative aerogels over a wide range of length scales ({approx} 10{sup 0}-10{sup 5} nm). The images are used for unambiguous, real-space interpretation of small-angle scattering data for these complex nanoporous systems.

  16. A low energy electron microscopy study of the initial growth, structure, and thermal stability of 4,4{sup '}-biphenyldicarboxylic acid domains on Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khokhar, Fawad S.; Gastel, Raoul van; Schwarz, Daniel; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2011-09-28

    The growth of 4,4{sup '}-biphenyldicarboxylic acid (BDA) on Cu(001) has been studied using low energy electron microscopy and selective area low energy electron diffraction. The emergence of large islands and hydrogen bonding to perpendicularly oriented, adjacent molecules is confirmed. The two benzene rings of adsorbed BDA are twisted along the molecular axis. Unconventional growth of the domains, followed by a second nucleation stage, is observed at room temperature. This unanticipated feature is attributed to the accumulation of stress in the islands. Ostwald ripening in the films and the decay of BDA domains at 448 K exhibits features that are consistent with diffusion limited behavior.

  17. GHz laser-free time-resolved transmission electron microscopy: A stroboscopic high-duty-cycle method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Jiaqi; Zhu, Yimei; Ha, Gwanghui; Jing, Chunguang; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Reed, Bryan W.; Lau, June W.

    2015-11-10

    In this study, a device and a method for producing ultrashort electron pulses with GHz repetition rates via pulsing an input direct current (dc) electron beam are provided. The device and the method are based on an electromagnetic-mechanical pulser (EMMP) that consists of a series of transverse deflecting cavities and magnetic quadrupoles. The EMMP modulates and chops the incoming dc electron beam and converts it into pico- and sub-pico-second electron pulse sequences (pulse trains) at >1 GHz repetition rates, as well as controllably manipulates the resulting pulses. Ultimately, it leads to negligible electron pulse phase-space degradation compared to the incoming dc beam parameters. The temporal pulse length and repetition rate for the EMMP can be continuously tunable over wide ranges.

  18. GHz laser-free time-resolved transmission electron microscopy: A stroboscopic high-duty-cycle method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qiu, Jiaqi; Zhu, Yimei; Ha, Gwanghui; Jing, Chunguang; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Reed, Bryan W.; Lau, June W.

    2015-11-10

    In this study, a device and a method for producing ultrashort electron pulses with GHz repetition rates via pulsing an input direct current (dc) electron beam are provided. The device and the method are based on an electromagnetic-mechanical pulser (EMMP) that consists of a series of transverse deflecting cavities and magnetic quadrupoles. The EMMP modulates and chops the incoming dc electron beam and converts it into pico- and sub-pico-second electron pulse sequences (pulse trains) at >1 GHz repetition rates, as well as controllably manipulates the resulting pulses. Ultimately, it leads to negligible electron pulse phase-space degradation compared to the incomingmore » dc beam parameters. The temporal pulse length and repetition rate for the EMMP can be continuously tunable over wide ranges.« less

  19. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in-situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-11-19

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. By comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  20. High resolution low dose transmission electron microscopy real-time imaging and manipulation of nano-scale objects in the electron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Jr., R. Malcolm; Barnes, Zack; Sawatari, Chie; Kondo, Tetsuo

    2008-02-26

    The present invention includes a method, apparatus and system for nanofabrication in which one or more target molecules are identified for manipulation with an electron beam and the one or more target molecules are manipulated with the electron beam to produce new useful materials.

  1. Temperature-induced martensite in magnetic shape memory Fe{sub 2}MnGa observed by photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, Catherine; Scholl, Andreas; Kainuma, R.; Elmers, Hans-Joachim; Omori, Toshihiro

    2012-01-18

    The magnetic domain structure in single crystals of a Heusler shape memory compound near the composition Fe{sub 2}MnGa was observed during phase transition by photoelectron emission microscopy at Beamline 11.0.1.1 of the Advanced Light Source. The behavior is comparable with recent observations of an adaptive martensite phase in prototype Ni{sub 2}MnGa, although the pinning in the recent work is an epitaxial interface and in this work the e#11;ective pinning plane is a boundary between martensitic variants that transform in a self-accommodating way from the single crystal austenite phase present at high temperatures. Temperature dependent observations of the twinning structure give information as to the coupling behavior between the magnetism and the structural evolution.

  2. Current Titles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Various

    2006-06-01

    This booklet is published for those interested in current research being conducted at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. The NCEM is a DOE-designated national user facility and is available at no charge to qualified researchers. Access is controlled by an external steering committee. Interested researchers may contact Jane Cavlina, Administrator, at 510/486-6036.

  3. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foundry/NCEM Users' Meeting Draws a Crowd Nearly 300 scientific users and prospective users of the Molecular Foundry and the National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) came to Berkeley Lab from across the nation and around the world to attend the 2014 Annual Users' Meeting of these two facilities. The two-day event, which was held August 25-26, drew a number of prominent speakers including former Berkeley Lab director and Secretary of Energy Steve Chu, as well as Chris Murray from the

  4. Combining nanocalorimetry and dynamic transmission electron microscopy for in situ characterization of materials processes under rapid heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grapes, Michael D.; LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; LaVan, David A.; Weihs, Timothy P.

    2014-08-15

    Nanocalorimetry is a chip-based thermal analysis technique capable of analyzing endothermic and exothermic reactions at very high heating and cooling rates. Here, we couple a nanocalorimeter with an extremely fast in situ microstructural characterization tool to identify the physical origin of rapid enthalpic signals. More specifically, we describe the development of a system to enable in situ nanocalorimetry experiments in the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM), a time-resolved TEM capable of generating images and electron diffraction patterns with exposure times of 30 ns500 ns. The full experimental system consists of a modified nanocalorimeter sensor, a custom-built in situ nanocalorimetry holder, a data acquisition system, and the DTEM itself, and is capable of thermodynamic and microstructural characterization of reactions over a range of heating rates (10{sup 2} K/s10{sup 5} K/s) accessible by conventional (DC) nanocalorimetry. To establish its ability to capture synchronized calorimetric and microstructural data during rapid transformations, this work describes measurements on the melting of an aluminum thin film. We were able to identify the phase transformation in both the nanocalorimetry traces and in electron diffraction patterns taken by the DTEM. Potential applications for the newly developed system are described and future system improvements are discussed.

  5. A transmission electron microscopy study of the deformation behavior underneath nanoindents in nano-scale Al-TiN multilayered composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharyya, Dhriti; Mara, Nathan A; Dickerson, Patricia O; Misra, Amit; Hoagland, R G

    2009-01-01

    Nano-scale multilayered Al-TiN composites were deposited with DC magnetron sputtering technique in two different layer thickness ratios - Al:TiN = 1:1 and Al:TiN = 9:1. The Al layer thickness varied from 2 nm to 450 nm. The hardness of the samples was tested by nanoindentation using a Berkovich tip. Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) was carried out on samples extracted with Focused Ion Beam (FIB) from below the nanoindents. This paper presents the results of the hardness tests in the Al-TiN multilayers with the two different thickness ratios and the observations from the cross-sectional TEM studies of the regions underneath the indents. These studies showed remarkable strength in the multilayers, as well as some very interesting deformation behavior in the TiN layers at extremely small length scales, where the hard TiN layers undergo co-deformation with the Al layers.

  6. Atomic arrangement at ZnTe/CdSe interfaces determined by high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonef, Bastien; Rouvire, Jean-Luc; Jouneau, Pierre-Henri; Bellet-Amalric, Edith; Grard, Lionel; Mariette, Henri; Andr, Rgis; Bougerol, Catherine; Grenier, Adeline

    2015-02-02

    High resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography experiments reveal the presence of an intermediate layer at the interface between two binary compounds with no common atom, namely, ZnTe and CdSe for samples grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy under standard conditions. This thin transition layer, of the order of 1 to 3 atomic planes, contains typically one monolayer of ZnSe. Even if it occurs at each interface, the direct interface, i.e., ZnTe on CdSe, is sharper than the reverse one, where the ZnSe layer is likely surrounded by alloyed layers. On the other hand, a CdTe-like interface was never observed. This interface knowledge is crucial to properly design superlattices for optoelectronic applications and to master band-gap engineering.

  7. Element-specific study of epitaxial NiO/Ag/CoO/Fe films grown on vicinal Ag(001) using photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Y.; Li, J.; Tan, A.; Jin, E.; Son, J.; Park, J. S.; Doran, A.; Young, A. T.; Scholl, A.; Arenholz, E.; Wu, J.; Hwang, C.; Zhao, H. W.; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2011-01-10

    NiO/Ag/CoO/Fe single crystalline films are grown epitaxially on a vicinal Ag(001) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy and investigated by photoemission electron microscopy. We find that after zero-field cooling, the in-plane Fe magnetization switches from parallel to perpendicular direction of the atomic steps of the vicinal surface at thinner CoO thickness but remains in its original direction parallel to the steps at thicker CoO thickness. CoO and NiO domain imaging result shows that both CoO/Fe and NiO/CoO spins are perpendicularly coupled, suggesting that the Fe magnetization switching may be associated with the rotatable-frozen spin transition of the CoO film.

  8. EXTRACTION OF FRACTURE-MECHANICS AND TRANSMISSION-ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY SAMPLES FROM TRITIUM-EXPOSED RESERVOIRS USING ELECTRIC-DISCHARGE MACHINING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, M; Ken Imrich, K; Michael Tosten, M

    2006-08-31

    The Enhanced Surveillance Campaign is funding a program to investigate tritium aging effects on the structural properties of tritium reservoir steels. The program is designed to investigate how the structural properties of reservoir steels change during tritium service and to examine the role of microstructure and reservoir manufacturing on tritium compatibility. New surveillance tests are also being developed that can better gauge the long-term effects of tritium and its radioactive decay product, helium-3, on the properties of reservoir steels. In order to conduct these investigations, three types of samples are needed from returned reservoirs: tensile, fracture mechanics, and transmission-electron microscopy (TEM). An earlier report demonstrated how the electric-discharge machining (EDM) technique can be used for cutting tensile samples from serial sections of a 3T reservoir and how yield strength, ultimate strength and elongation could be measured from those samples. In this report, EDM was used successfully to section sub-sized fracture-mechanics samples from the inner and outer walls of a 3T reservoir and TEM samples from serial sections of a 1M reservoir. This report fulfills the requirements for the FY06 Level 3 milestone, TSR 15.1 ''Cut Fracture-Mechanics Samples from Tritium-Exposed Reservoir'' and TSR 15.2 ''Cut Transmission-electron-microscopy foils from Tritium-Exposed Reservoir'' for the Enhance Surveillance Campaign (ESC). This was in support of ESC L2-1870 Milestone-''Provide aging and lifetime assessments of selected components and materials for multiple enduring stockpile systems''.

  9. Rapid Laser Induced Crystallization of Amorphous NiTi Films Observed by Nanosecond Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy (DTEM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaGrange, T; Campbell, G H; Browning, N D; Reed, B W; Grummon, D S

    2010-03-01

    The crystallization processes of the as-deposited, amorphous NiTi thin films have been studied in detail using techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry and, in-situ TEM. The kinetic data have been analyzed in terms of Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolomogrov (JMAK) semi-empirical formula. The kinetic parameters determined from this analysis have been useful in defining process control parameters for tailoring microstructural features and shape memory properties. Due to the commercial push to shrink thin film-based devices, unique processing techniques have been developed using laser-based annealing to spatially control the microstructure evolution down to sub-micron levels. Nanosecond, pulse laser annealing is particularly attractive since it limits the amount of peripheral heating and unwanted microstructural changes to underlying or surrounding material. However, crystallization under pulsed laser irradiation can differ significantly from conventional thermal annealing, e.g., slow heating in a furnace. This is especially true for amorphous NiTi materials and relevant for shape memory thin film based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications. There is little to no data on the crystallization kinetics of NiTi under pulsed laser irradiation, primarily due to the high crystallization rates intrinsic to high temperature annealing and the spatial and temporal resolution limits of standard techniques. However, with the high time and spatial resolution capabilities of the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the rapid nucleation events occurring from pulsed laser irradiation can be directly observed and nucleation rates can be quantified. This paper briefly explains the DTEM approach and how it used to investigate the pulsed laser induced crystallization processes in NiTi and to determine kinetic parameters.

  10. An in-situ study of magnetic domain structures in undercooled Fe-29.5 at. %Pd magnetostrictive alloys by Lorentz microscopy and electron holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Wen; Xu, Xianhui; Liu, Jian E-mail: xiawxing@nimte.ac.cn; Xia, Weixing E-mail: xiawxing@nimte.ac.cn; Yan, Aru

    2015-04-28

    Understanding of correlation between magnetic domain structure and functional properties is of importance for the magnetic field driven phase transition (e.g., martensitic transformation) or microstructure variation (e.g., twin boundary motion) materials. In this work, we report a Fe-29.5 at. %Pd shape memory alloy treated by undercooling processing upon a degree of 320?K below the liquid temperature. The effect of high undercooling on the solidified microstructure and martensitic transformation temperatures was investigated. By in-situ Lorentz transmission electron microscopy and electron holography, magnetic domain structure and the field-induced domain wall motion behavior in as-cast and undercooled samples have been schematically studied. The irregular domain structure can be observed in these alloys. On the application of a field up to 300?Oe, the domain walls for both samples are able to move along the direction of the external magnetic field, but structural transition and rearrangement of variants are not observed in the undercooled alloy. The large magnetostriction of Fe-29.5 at. %Pd undercooled alloy originates from the irregular domain walls motion instead of the rearrangement of martensitic twin variants.

  11. In-situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy observation of silicon nanocrystal nucleation in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, T. C.-J. Wu, L.; Lin, Z.; Jia, X.; Puthen-Veettil, B.; Zhang, T.; Conibeer, G.; Perez-Wurfl, I.; Kauffmann, Y.; Rothschild, A.

    2014-08-04

    Solid-state nucleation of Si nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix was observed at temperatures as low as 450?C. This was achieved by aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) with real-time in-situ heating up to 600?C. This technique is a valuable characterization tool especially with the recent interest in Si nanostructures for light emitting devices, non-volatile memories, and third-generation photovoltaics which all typically require a heating step in their fabrication. The control of size, shape, and distribution of the Si nanocrystals are critical for these applications. This experimental study involves in-situ observation of the nucleation of Si nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix fabricated through radio frequency co-sputtering. The results show that the shapes of Si nanocrystals in amorphous SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrices are irregular and not spherical, in contrast to many claims in the literature. Furthermore, the Si nanocrystals are well confined within their layers by the amorphous SiO{sub 2}. This study demonstrates the potential of in-situ HRTEM as a tool to observe the real time nucleation of Si nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix. Furthermore, ideas for improvements on this in-situ heating HRTEM technique are discussed.

  12. The structures and dynamics of atomic and molecular adsorbates on metal surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Hyungsuk Alexander

    1996-12-01

    Studies of surface structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules on metal surfaces are presented. My research has focused on understanding the nature of adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions through surface studies of coverage dependency and coadsorption using both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). The effect of adsorbate coverage on the surface structures of sulfur on Pt(111) and Rh(111) was examined. On Pt(111), sulfur forms p(2x2) at 0.25 ML of sulfur, which transforms into a more compressed ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30{degrees} at 0.33 ML. On both structures, it was found that sulfur adsorbs only in fcc sites. When the coverage of sulfur exceeds 0.33 ML, it formed more complex c({radical}3x7)rect structure with 3 sulfur atoms per unit cell. In this structure, two different adsorption sites for sulfur atoms were observed - two on fcc sites and one on hcp site within the unit cell.

  13. Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal Nanoparticles by Correlation with Atomic Resolution Electron Microscopy and Field Evaporation Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Vurpillot, F.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-03-26

    Metal-dielectric composite materials, specifically metal nanoparticles supported on or embedded in metal oxides, are widely used in catalysis. The accurate optimization of such nanostructures warrants the need for detailed three-dimensional characterization. Atom probe tomography is uniquely capable of generating sub-nanometer structural and compositional data with part-per-million mass sensitivity, but there are reconstruction artifacts for composites containing materials with strongly differing fields of evaporation, as for oxide-supported metal nanoparticles. By correlating atom probe tomography with scanning transmission electron microscopy for Au nanoparticles embedded in an MgO support, deviations from an ideal topography during evaporation are demonstrated directly, and correlated with compositional errors in the reconstructed data. Finite element simulations of the field evaporation process confirm that protruding Au nanoparticles will evolve on the tip surface, and that evaporation field variations lead to an inaccurate assessment of the local composition, effectively lowering the spatial resolution of the final reconstructed dataset. Cross-correlating the experimental data with simulations results in a more detailed understanding of local evaporation aberrations during APT analysis of metal-oxide composites, paving the way towards a more accurate three-dimensional characterization of this technologically important class of materials.

  14. Investigation of defect clusters in ion-irradiated Ni and NiCo using diffuse X-ray scattering and electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olsen, Raina J.; Jin, Ke; Lu, Chenyang; Beland, Laurent K.; Wang, Lumin M.; Bei, Hongbin; Specht, Eliot D.; Larson, Bennett C.

    2016-01-01

    The nature of defect clusters in Ni and Nimore » $$_{50}$$Co$$_{50}$$ (NiCo) irradiated at room temperature with 2–16 MeV Ni ions is studied using asymptotic diffuse X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Analysis of the scattering data provides separate size distributions for vacancy and interstitial type defect clusters, showing that both types of defect clusters have a smaller size and higher density in NiCo than in Ni. Diffuse scattering results show good quantitative agreement with TEM results for cluster sizes greater than 4 nm diameter, but find that the majority of vacancy clusters are under 2 nm in NiCo, which, if not detected, would lead to the conclusion that defect density was actually lower in the alloy. Interstitial dislocation loops and stacking fault tetrahedra are identified by TEM. Lastly comparison of diffuse scattering lineshapes to those calculated for dislocation loops and SFTs indicates that most of the vacancy clusters are SFTs.« less

  15. Demonstration of an Electrochemical Liquid Cell for Operando Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of the Lithiation/Delithiation Behavior of Si Nanowire Battery Anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R.; Mehdi, Beata L.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Mcdowell, Matthew T.; Sacci, Robert L.; Xu, Wu; Connell, Justin G.; Xu, Pinghong; Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Chen, Xilin; Zhang, Yaohui; Perea, Daniel E.; Evans, James E.; Lauhon, Lincoln; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Browning, Nigel D.; Cui, Yi; Arslan, Ilke; Wang, Chong M.

    2013-12-11

    Over the last few years, in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of lithium ion batteries using an open-cell configuration have helped us to gain fundamental insights into the structural and chemical evolution of the electrode materials in real time. In the standard open-cell configuration, the electrolyte is either solid lithium oxide or an ionic liquid, which is point-contacted with the electrode. This cell design is inherently different from a real battery, where liquid electrolyte forms conformal contact with electrode materials. The knowledge learnt from open cells can deviate significantly from the real battery, calling for operando TEM technique with conformal liquid electrolyte contact. In this paper, we developed an operando TEM electrochemical liquid cell to meet this need, providing the configuration of a real battery and in a relevant liquid electrolyte. To demonstrate this novel technique, we studied the lithiation/delithiation behavior of single Si nanowires. Some of lithiation/delithation behaviors of Si obtained using the liquid-cell are consistent with the results from the open-cell studies. However, we also discovered new insights different from the open cell configuration - the dynamics of the electrolyte and, potentially, a future quantitative characterization of the SEI layer formation and structural and chemical evolution.

  16. Direct comparison between X-ray nanotomography and scanning electron microscopy for the microstructure characterization of a solid oxide fuel cell anode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quey, R.; Suhonen, H.; Laurencin, J.; Cloetens, P.; Bleuet, P.

    2013-04-15

    X-ray computed nanotomography (nano-CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been applied to characterize the microstructure of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) anode. A direct comparison between the results of both methods is conducted on the same region of the microstructure to assess the spatial resolution of the nano-CT microstructure, SEM being taken as a reference. A registration procedure is proposed to find out the position of the SEM image within the nano-CT volume. It involves a second SEM observation, which is taken along an orthogonal direction and gives an estimate reference SEM image position, which is then refined by an automated optimization procedure. This enables an unbiased comparison between the cell porosity morphologies provided by both methods. In the present experiment, nano-CT is shown to underestimate the number of pores smaller than 1 ?m and overestimate the size of the pores larger than 1.5 ?m. - Highlights: ? X-ray computed nanotomography (nano-CT) and SEM are used to characterize an SOFC anode. ? A methodology is proposed to compare the nano-CT and SEM data on the same region. ? The spatial resolution of the nano-CT data is assessed from that comparison.

  17. Investigation of defect clusters in ion-irradiated Ni and NiCo using diffuse X-ray scattering and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Raina J.; Jin, Ke; Lu, Chenyang; Beland, Laurent K.; Wang, Lumin M.; Bei, Hongbin; Specht, Eliot D.; Larson, Bennett C.

    2016-01-01

    The nature of defect clusters in Ni and Ni$_{50}$Co$_{50}$ (NiCo) irradiated at room temperature with 2–16 MeV Ni ions is studied using asymptotic diffuse X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Analysis of the scattering data provides separate size distributions for vacancy and interstitial type defect clusters, showing that both types of defect clusters have a smaller size and higher density in NiCo than in Ni. Diffuse scattering results show good quantitative agreement with TEM results for cluster sizes greater than 4 nm diameter, but find that the majority of vacancy clusters are under 2 nm in NiCo, which, if not detected, would lead to the conclusion that defect density was actually lower in the alloy. Interstitial dislocation loops and stacking fault tetrahedra are identified by TEM. Lastly comparison of diffuse scattering lineshapes to those calculated for dislocation loops and SFTs indicates that most of the vacancy clusters are SFTs.

  18. Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis of Fuel/Matrix Interaction Layers in Highly-Irradiated UMo Dispersion Fuel Plates with Al and AlSi Alloy Matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Brandon D. Miller; Jian Gan; Adam B. Robinson; Pavel Medvedev; James Madden; Dan Wachs; Mitch Meyer

    2014-04-01

    In order to investigate how the microstructure of fuel/matrix-interaction (FMI) layers change during irradiation, different U7Mo dispersion fuel plates have been irradiated to high fission density and then characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Specifially, samples from irradiated U7Mo dispersion fuel elements with pure Al, Al2Si and AA4043 (~4.5 wt.%Si) matrices were SEM characterized using polished samples and samples that were prepared with a focused ion beam (FIB). Features not observable for the polished samples could be captured in SEM images taken of the FIB samples. For the Al matrix sample, a relatively large FMI layer develops, with enrichment of Xe at the FMI layer/Al matrix interface and evidence of debonding. Overall, a significant penetration of Si from the FMI layer into the U7Mo fuel was observed for samples with Si in the Al matrix, which resulted in a change of the size (larger) and shape (round) of the fission-gas bubbles. Additionally, solid-fission-product phases were observed to nucleate and grow within these bubbles. These changes in the localized regions of the microstructure of the U7Mo may contribute to changes observed in the macroscopic swelling of fuel plates with AlSi matrices.

  19. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Analytical Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analytical Microscopy Analytical microscopy uses various high-resolution techniques to obtain information about materials on the atomic scale. It is one of the most powerful tools available for understanding a material's basic structure, chemistry, and morphology. We use two complementary types of analytical microscopy - electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy - together with a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools to capture data about photovoltaic (PV) materials

  20. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2016 Time: 11:00 am Speaker: Ondrej Krivanek, Nion Title: Atomic-Resolution and Vibrational Studies of Materials by Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Location: 67-3111 Chemla Room Abstract: Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes (AC-STEMs) are able to form electron probes as small as 0.5 Å in diameter, and they can image and spectroscopically analyze single atoms in-situ. NCEM and Nion have pioneered many of these advances. Nion's main

  1. Evolution of titania nanotubes-supported WO{sub x} species by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortes-Jacome, M.A.; Angeles-Chavez, C.; Morales, M.; Lopez-Salinas, E.; Toledo-Antonio, J.A.

    2007-10-15

    Structural evolution of WO{sub x} species on the surface of titania nanotubes was followed by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy. A total of 15 wt% of W atoms were loaded on the surface of a hydroxylated titania nanotubes by impregnation with ammonium metatungstate solution and then, the sample was thermally treated in a Linkam cell at different temperatures in nitrogen flow. The band characteristic of the W=O bond was observed at 962 cm{sup -1} in the dried sample, which vanished between 300 and 700 deg. C, and reappear again after annealing at 800 deg. C, along with a broad band centered at 935 cm{sup -1}, attributed to the v{sub 1} vibration of W=O in tetrahedral coordination. At 900 and 1000 deg. C, the broad band decomposed into four bands at 923, 934, 940 and 950 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to the symmetric and asymmetric vibration of W=O bonds in Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 7} phases as determined by X-ray diffraction and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The structure of the nanotubular support was kept at temperatures below 450 deg. C, thereafter, it transformed into anatase being stabilized at temperatures as high as 900 deg. C. At 1000 deg. C, anatase phase partially converted into rutile. After annealing at 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell of ca. 5 nm thickness, composed of sodium tungstate nanoclusters, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase. - Graphical abstract: Titania nanotubes loaded with 15 wt% W atoms were characterized from room temperature (rt) to 1000 deg. C by thermo-Raman spectroscopy in N{sub 2}. At 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell thickness of ca. 5 nm composed by nanoclusters of sodium tungstate, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase.

  2. Direct imaging of crystal structure and defects in metastable Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} by quantitative aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Ulrich; Lotnyk, Andriy Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2014-03-24

    Knowledge about the atomic structure and vacancy distribution in phase change materials is of foremost importance in order to understand the underlying mechanism of fast reversible phase transformation. In this Letter, by combining state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with image simulations, we are able to map the local atomic structure and composition of a textured metastable Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin film deposited by pulsed laser deposition with excellent spatial resolution. The atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy investigations display the heterogeneous defect structure of the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase. The obtained results are discussed. Highly oriented Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin films appear to be a promising approach for further atomic-resolution investigations of the phase change behavior of this material class.

  3. X-ray microscopy. Beyond ensemble averages

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ice, Gene E.; Budai, John D.

    2015-01-01

    This work exemplifies emerging tools to characterize local materials structure and dynamics, made possible by powerful X-ray synchrotron and transmission electron microscopy methods.

  4. X-ray microscopy. Beyond ensemble averages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ice, Gene E.; Budai, John D.

    2015-06-23

    This work exemplifies emerging tools to characterize local materials structure and dynamics, made possible by powerful X-ray synchrotron and transmission electron microscopy methods.

  5. Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Rate Testing and Analytical Electron Microscopy of Alloy 600 as a Function of Pourbaix Space and Microstructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Lewis; S.A. Attanasio; D.S. Morton; G.A. Young

    2000-10-04

    Stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth rate tests and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) studies were performed over a broad range of environments and heat treatments of Alloy 600. This effort was conducted to correlate bulk environmental conditions such as pH and electrochemical potential (EcP) with the morphology of the SCC crack. Development of a library of AEM morphologies formed by SCC in different environments is an important step in identifying the conditions that lead to SCC in components. Additionally, AEM examination of stress corrosion cracks formed in different environments and microstructures lends insight into the mechanism(s) of stress corrosion cracking. Testing was conducted on compact tension specimens in three environments: a mildly acidic oxidizing environment containing sulfate ions, a caustic environment containing 10% NaOH, and hydrogenated near-neutral buffered water. Additionally, stress corrosion cracking testing of a smooth specimen was conducted in hydrogenated steam. The following heat treatments of Alloy 600 were examined: mill annealed at 980 C (near-neutral water), mill annealed at 1010 C (steam), sensitized (acid and caustic), and mill annealed + healed to homogenize the grain boundary Cr concentration (caustic). Crack growth rate (CGR) testing showed that sensitized Alloy 600 tested in the mildly acidic, oxidizing environment containing sulfate ions produced the fastest cracking ({approx} 8.8 {micro}m/hr at 260 C), and AEM examination revealed evidence of sulfur segregation to the crack tip. The caustic environment produced slower cracking ({approx} 0.4 {micro}m/hr at 307 C) in the mill annealed + healed heat treatment but no observed cracking in the sensitized condition. In the caustic environment, fully oxidized carbides were present in the crack wake but not ahead of the crack tip. In near-neutral buffered water at 338 C, the CGR was a function of dissolved hydrogen in the water and exhibited a maximum (0.17 {micro}m/hr) near the transition between Ni and NiO stability. The cracks in near-neutral hydrogenated water exhibited Cr-rich spinels and NiO-type oxides but no significant oxidation of grain boundary carbides. No clear effect of dissolved hydrogen on the crack wake morphology was apparent. In hydrogenated steam testing of a smooth specimen (CGR estimated as {approx} 0.7 {micro}m/hr at 399 C), metallic nickel nodules were evident in both the crack wake and on the specimen surface. Oxide particles having a similar size and shape to the microstructural carbides were found in the crack wake, suggesting that these particles are carbides that were oxidized by contact with the steam. The present results show that different environments often produce unique crack tip morphologies that can be identified via AEM.

  6. Fine precipitation scenarios of AlZnMg(Cu) alloys revealed by advanced atomic-resolution electron microscopy study Part I: Structure determination of the precipitates in AlZnMg(Cu) alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J.Z.; Chen, J.H.; Yuan, D.W.; Wu, C.L.; Zhu, J.; Cheng, Z.Y.

    2015-01-15

    Although they are among the most important precipitation-hardened materials for industry applications, the high-strength AlZnMg(Cu) alloys have thus far not yet been understood adequately about their underlying precipitation scenarios in relation with the properties. This is partly due to the fact that the structures of a number of different precipitates involved in electron microscopy in association with quantitative image simulations have to be employed; a systematic study of these hardening precipitates in different alloys is also necessary. In Part I of the present study, it is shown that there are five types of structurally different precipitates including the equilibrium η-phase precipitate. Using two state-of-the-art atomic-resolution imaging techniques in electron microscopy in association with quantitative image simulations, we have determined and clarified all the unknown precipitate structures. It is demonstrated that atomic-resolution imaging can directly suggest approximate structure models, whereas quantitative image analysis can refine the structure details that are much smaller than the resolution of the microscope. This combination is crucially important for solving the difficult structure problems of the strengthening precipitates in AlZnMg(Cu) alloys. - Highlights: Part I: • We determine and verify all the key precipitate structures in AlMgZn(Cu) alloys. • We employ aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). • We use aberration-corrected high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) for the investigations. • We obtain atomic-resolution images of the precipitates and model their structures. • We refine all precipitate structures with quantitative image simulation analysis. Part II: • The hardening precipitates in AlZnMg alloys shall be classified into two groups. • Two precipitation scenarios coexist in the alloys. • The precipitation behavior of such an alloy depends on the alloy's composition. • Very detailed phase/structure transformations among the precipitates are revealed.

  7. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Andreas Schmid Staff Scientist, NCEM akschmid@lbl.gov 510.486.4564 Research Interests SPLEEM (Spin Polarized Low Energy Electron Microscopy) for the study of surface and thin film magnetic microstructures and their dynamic behavior. In-situ investigations of growth and structure of thin films, effect of environmental factors (sample temperature, deposition flux, applied magnetic fields, etc.). Nanostructure self-assembly at surfaces. Development of new techniques and instrumentation. All

  8. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Christian Kisielowski Staff Scientist, NCEM cfkisielowski@lbl.gov 510.486.4716 Biography Christian Kisielowski was awarded his PhD in natural sciences and his habilitation in physics performing spectroscopic studies on defects in semiconductors at the University of Cologne, Germany in 1985 and 1990, respectively. Thereafter, he joined AT&T Bell Laboratories (1991 - 1994) where he established a new quantitative method for image analyses in high resolution electron microscopy (QUANTITEM). From

  9. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for

  10. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for

  11. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for

  12. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Wednesday, 26 September 2007 00:00 Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material

  13. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Molecular Foundry Logo Released Following the merge of the Molecular Foundry and the National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) at the start of FY 2015, a new logo has been created to represent the newly integrated center. The logo, as well as the design package that accompanies it, was developed professionally and guided by input from staff and users throughout the Foundry. Signifying a sense of place that integrates seven distinct scientific facilities, the new logo features a clean

  14. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for

  15. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for

  16. Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for

  17. Electrostatically focused addressable field emission array chips (AFEA's) for high-speed massively parallel maskless digital E-beam direct write lithography and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Clarence E.; Baylor, Larry R.; Voelkl, Edgar; Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Whealton, John H.; Whitson, John C.; Wilgen, John B.

    2002-12-24

    Systems and methods are described for addressable field emission array (AFEA) chips. A method of operating an addressable field-emission array, includes: generating a plurality of electron beams from a pluralitly of emitters that compose the addressable field-emission array; and focusing at least one of the plurality of electron beams with an on-chip electrostatic focusing stack. The systems and methods provide advantages including the avoidance of space-charge blow-up.

  18. Using real-time electron microscopy to explore the effects of transition-metal composition on the local thermal stability in charged LixNiyMnzCo1-y-zO2 cathode materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hwang, Sooyeon; Kim, Seung Min; Bak, Seong -Min; Kim, Se Young; Cho, Byung -Won; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Lee, Jeong Yong; Stach, Eric A.; Chang, Wonyoung

    2015-05-08

    In this study, we use in-situ transmission electron microcopy (TEM) to investigate the thermal decomposition that occurs at the surface of charged LixNiyMnzCo1-y-zO2 (NMC) cathode materials of different composition (with y, z=0.8, 0.1 and 0.6, 0.2 and 0.4, 0.3), after they have been charged to their practical upper limit voltage (4.3V). By heating these materials inside the TEM, we are able to directly characterize near surface changes in both their electronic structure (using electron energy loss spectroscopy) and crystal structure and morphology (using electron diffraction and bright-field imaging). The most Ni-rich material (y, z = 0.8, 0.1) is found tomore » be thermally unstable at significantly lower temperatures than the other compositions – this is manifested by changes in both the electronic structure and the onset of phase transitions at temperatures as low as 100°C. Electron energy loss spectroscopy indicates that the thermally induced reduction of Ni ions drives these changes, and that this is exacerbated by the presence of an additional redox reaction that occurs at 4.2V in the y, z = 0.8, 0.1 material. Exploration of individual particles shows that there are substantial variations in the onset temperatures and overall extent of these changes. Of the compositions studied, the composition of y, z = 0.6, 0.2 has the optimal combination of high energy density and reasonable thermal stability. The observations herein demonstrate that real time electron microscopy provide direct insight into the changes that occur in cathode materials with temperature, allowing optimization of different alloy concentrations to maximize overall performance.« less

  19. Correlation between microstructure and thermionic electron emission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and energy ... OSMIUM; RUTHENIUM; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; THIN FILMS; X-RAY DIFFRACTION; X-RAY ...

  20. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and NCEM Staff Gather to Identify Scientific Synergies The Molecular Foundry and NCEM staff participated in a Scientific Retreat on November 4-5 - formerly the dates of our joint Annual User Meeting that was canceled due to the government shutdown - to discuss new scientific opportunities in nanoscience and electron scattering that are of interest to the two centers. The retreat focused on the ways that the scientific achievements of the Molecular Foundry and NCEM benefit from increasingly close

  1. Analytical electron microscopy investigation of elemental composition and bonding structure at the Sb-doped Ni-fully-silicide/SiO{sub 2} interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawasaki, Naohiko; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Otsuka, Yuji; Hashimoto, Hideki; Kurata, Hiroki; Isoda, Seiji

    2011-03-15

    It is very important to control the elemental composition and bonding structure at the gate electrode/gate dielectrics interface in metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor devices because this determines the threshold voltage of the gate electrode. In this study, we investigated the structure at the interface between the antimony (Sb)-doped nickel-fully-silicide gate electrode and SiO{sub 2} dielectrics by employing high-spatial resolution techniques such as energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy using a scanning transmission electron microscope. In one region, we found a thin nickel layer at the NiSi/SiO{sub 2} interface originating from the migration of native oxide at the face of the poly-silicon. In another region, a Sb pileup was detected at the NiSi/SiO{sub 2} interface where the Ni L{sub 3}-edge spectrum showed Ni-Sb bonding, then it was suggested that Sb atoms exist at the bottom of NiSi, substituting for Si atoms in NiSi.

  2. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Wednesday, 30 November 2005 00:00 Electron and x-ray...

  3. Characterisation of amorphous silica in air-oxidised Ti3SiC2 at 500-1000 °C using secondary-ion mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, W K; Low, I M; Hanna, J V

    2010-05-18

    In this paper we have described the use of secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), solid state {sup 29}Si magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to detect the existence of amorphous silica in Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} oxidised at 500-1000 C. The formation of amorphous SiO{sub 2} and growth of crystalline TiO{sub 2} with temperature was monitored using dynamic SIMS and synchrotron radiation diffraction. A duplex structure with an outer TiO{sub 2}-rich layer and an inner mixed layer of SiO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} was observed. Results of NMR and TEM verified for the first time the direct evidence of amorphous silica formation during the oxidation of Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} at the temperature range 500-1000 C.

  4. Evaluation of stacking faults and associated partial dislocations in AlSb/GaAs (001) interface by aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, C.; Ge, B. H.; Cui, Y. X.; Li, F. H.; Zhu, J.; Yu, R.; Cheng, Z. Y.

    2014-11-15

    The stacking faults (SFs) in an AlSb/GaAs (001) interface were investigated using a 300 kV spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The structure and strain distribution of the single and intersecting (V-shaped) SFs associated with partial dislocations (PDs) were characterized by the [110] HRTEM images and geometric phase analysis, respectively. In the biaxial strain maps ?{sub xx} and ?{sub yy}, a SF can be divided into several sections under different strain states (positive or negative strain values). Furthermore, the strain state for the same section of a SF is in contrast to each other in ?{sub xx} and ?{sub yy} strain maps. The modification in the strain states was attributed to the variation in the local atomic displacements for the SF in the AlSb film on the GaAs substrate recorded in the lattice image. Finally, the single SF was found to be bounded by two 30 PDs. A pair of 30 PDs near the heteroepitaxial interface reacted to form a Lomer-Cottrell sessile dislocation located at the vertices of V-shaped SFs with opposite screw components. The roles of misfit dislocations, such as the PDs, in strain relaxation were also discussed.

  5. Chemical Imaging Analysis of Environmental Particles Using the Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy Technique: Microanalysis Insights into Atmospheric Chemistry of Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-01-21

    Airborne fly ash from coal combustion may represent a source of bioavailable iron (Fe) in the open ocean. However, few studies have been made focusing on Fe speciation and distribution in coal fly ash. In this study, chemical imaging of fly ash has been performed using a dual-beam FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope) system for a better understanding of how simulated atmospheric processing modify the morphology, chemical compositions and element distributions of individual particles. A novel approach has been applied for cross-sectioning of fly ash specimen with a FIB in order to explore element distribution within the interior of individual particles. Our results indicate that simulated atmospheric processing causes disintegration of aluminosilicate glass, a dominant material in fly ash particles. Aluminosilicate-phase Fe in the inner core of fly ash particles is more easily mobilized compared with oxide-phase Fe present as surface aggregates on fly ash spheres. Fe release behavior depends strongly on Fe speciation in aerosol particles. The approach for preparation of cross-sectioned specimen described here opens new opportunities for particle microanalysis, particular with respect to inorganic refractive materials like fly ash and mineral dust.

  6. Electron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron thermal transport within magnetic islands in the reversed-field pinch a... H. D. Stephens, 1,b͒ D. J. Den Hartog, 1,3 C. C. Hegna, 1,2 and J. A. Reusch 1 1 Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA 2 Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA 3 Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of

  7. Electronic structure, magnetic properties, and magnetostructural...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ALUMINIUM; ANTIFERROMAGNETISM; APPROXIMATIONS; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; CERIUM; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE; EUROPIUM; FERROMAGNETISM; GROUND STATES; ...

  8. X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance Print Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries power most portable electronics and are becoming more widely used in...

  9. Fine precipitation scenarios of AlZnMg(Cu) alloys revealed by advanced atomic-resolution electron microscopy study Part II: Fine precipitation scenarios in AlZnMg(Cu) alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J.Z.; Chen, J.H.; Liu, Z.R.; Wu, C.L.

    2015-01-15

    Although they are among the most important precipitation-hardened materials for industry applications, the high-strength AlZnMg(Cu) alloys have thus far not yet been understood adequately about their underlying precipitation scenarios in relation with the properties. This is partly due to the fact that the structures of a number of different precipitates involved in the alloys are unknown, and partly due to the complexity that the precipitation behaviors of the alloys may be closely related to the alloy's composition. In Part I of the present study, we have determined all the unknown precipitate structures in the alloys. Here in Part II, using atomic-resolution electron microscopy in association with the first principles energy calculations, we further studied and correlated the phase/structure transformation/evolution among these hardening precipitates in relation with the alloy's composition. It is shown that there are actually two coexisting classes of hardening precipitates in these alloys: the first class includes the η′-precipitates and their early-stage Guinier–Preston (GP-η′) zones; the second class includes the precursors of the equilibrium η-phase (referred to η{sub p}, or η-precursor) and their early-stage Guinier–Preston (GP-η{sub p}) zones. The two coexisting classes of precipitates correspond to two precipitation scenarios. - Highlights: • We determine and verify all the key precipitate structures in AlMgZn(Cu) alloys. • We employ aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). • We use aberration-corrected high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) for the investigations. • We obtain atomic-resolution images of the precipitates and model their structures. • We refine all precipitate structures with quantitative image simulation analysis. • The hardening precipitates in AlZnMg alloys shall be classified into two groups. • Two precipitation scenarios coexist in the alloys. • The precipitation behavior of such an alloy depends on the alloy's composition. • Very detailed phase/structure transformations among the precipitates are revealed.

  10. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oxidation of light paraffins and olefins, as well as the partial oxidation of methanol. We present HAADF-STEM investigations of various complex oxide phases and show that...

  11. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of aluminophosphates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulan, J.G.; Gronsky, R. ); Szostak, R. ); Sorby, K. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-04-01

    VPI-5 transforms to AlPO{sub 4}-8 under mild thermal treatment (100{degree}C, 18 hrs). HRTEM micrographs, oriented normal to the c axis, show extensive defect-free regions in VPI-5, while slip planes normal to the c axis are found in AlPO{sub 4}-8. Analysis of the HRTEM data, in conjunction with infrared and thermal analysis, adsorption studies and x-ray powder diffraction, has lead to a proposed structure for AlPO{sub 4}-8. Though the sheets containing the 18 member rings which define the pores in VPI-5 remain intact in AlPO{sub 4}-8, reduction in the porosity is attributed to blockages created by the movement of these sheets relative to each other. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  12. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Memoriam: Gareth Thomas (1932-2014) Gareth Thomas, founder of Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) and one of the world's foremost experts on electron microscopy, passed away on February 7. He was 81. A native of Wales, Thomas earned his Ph.D. in metallurgy from Cambridge University, and joined the UC Berkeley (UCB) faculty in 1960. He became a UCB professor of metallurgy and a faculty scientist at Berkeley Lab, then known as Lawrence Berkeley Lab (LBL), in 1966. At a

  13. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chinn, Diane; Stolz, Christopher J.; Wu, Zhouling; Huber, Robert; Weinzapfel, Carolyn

    2006-07-11

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

  14. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holtom, Gary R.; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  15. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print Thursday, 22 January 2015 12:10 X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics.

  16. Analytical Microscopy. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Measurements and Charactization (Fact Sheet).

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MAJOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY Special Features Lateral Resolution Typical Applications Analytical Technique System FEI F20 (UT) Phillips CM30 Transmission electron microscopy Structural and compositional analysis and lattice imaging 0.23 nm High-resolution, EDS Field-emission scanning transmission electron microscopy Structural, electronic, and compositional analysis; elemental mapping; lattice imaging 0.19 nm for HRTEM; 0.14 nm for Z-contrast STEM High-resolution,

  17. Orientation imaging microscopy of polycrystalline sodium chloride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staiger, M.P.; Kolbeinsson, I.; Newman, J.; Woodfield, T.; Sato, T.

    2010-04-15

    A novel preparation technique is described that makes possible grain size analysis of polycrystalline NaCl using orientation imaging microscopy via electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The preparation methodology is specifically developed to overcome difficulties in preparing microporous NaCl for microscopy. The grain size and crystallographic texture of polycrystalline NaCl samples, prepared via solution pressure and sintered in the range of 650-780 deg. C, were able to be measured successfully with EBSD. The limitations of the preparation technique for EBSD analysis of NaCl are also discussed.

  18. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in...

  19. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with...

  20. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  1. Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tunneling Microscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems with Virtual Scanning Tunneling Microscopy You ...

  2. Microscopy of photoionisation processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aseyev, S A; Mironov, B N; Minogin, V G; Cherkun, Aleksandr P; Chekalin, Sergei V

    2013-04-30

    A method is demonstrated which combines the ionisation of free molecules by a sharply focused femtosecond laser beam and projection microscopy in a divergent electric field. The electric field is produced in vacuum between a metallic tip and a flat positionsensitive charged particle detector. The method enables investigation of photoionisation processes in low-density gases with a subdiffraction spatial resolution and can be used as well in profile measurements for sharply focused, intense laser beams. In a demonstration experiment, a femtosecond laser beam with a peak intensity of {approx}10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2} was focused to a 40-{mu}m-diameter waist in vacuum near a millimetre-size tip and {approx}2-{mu}m spatial resolution was achieved. According to our estimates, the use of a sharper tip will ensure a submicron spatial resolution, which is a crucial condition for the spatial diagnostics of sharply focused short-wavelength VUV radiation and X-rays. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  3. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  4. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  5. Using real-time electron microscopy to explore the effects of transition-metal composition on the local thermal stability in charged LixNiyMnzCo1-y-zO2 cathode materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Sooyeon; Kim, Seung Min; Bak, Seong -Min; Kim, Se Young; Cho, Byung -Won; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Lee, Jeong Yong; Stach, Eric A.; Chang, Wonyoung

    2015-05-08

    In this study, we use in-situ transmission electron microcopy (TEM) to investigate the thermal decomposition that occurs at the surface of charged LixNiyMnzCo1-y-zO2 (NMC) cathode materials of different composition (with y, z=0.8, 0.1 and 0.6, 0.2 and 0.4, 0.3), after they have been charged to their practical upper limit voltage (4.3V). By heating these materials inside the TEM, we are able to directly characterize near surface changes in both their electronic structure (using electron energy loss spectroscopy) and crystal structure and morphology (using electron diffraction and bright-field imaging). The most Ni-rich material (y, z = 0.8, 0.1) is found to be thermally unstable at significantly lower temperatures than the other compositions – this is manifested by changes in both the electronic structure and the onset of phase transitions at temperatures as low as 100°C. Electron energy loss spectroscopy indicates that the thermally induced reduction of Ni ions drives these changes, and that this is exacerbated by the presence of an additional redox reaction that occurs at 4.2V in the y, z = 0.8, 0.1 material. Exploration of individual particles shows that there are substantial variations in the onset temperatures and overall extent of these changes. Of the compositions studied, the composition of y, z = 0.6, 0.2 has the optimal combination of high energy density and reasonable thermal stability. The observations herein demonstrate that real time electron microscopy provide direct insight into the changes that occur in cathode materials with temperature, allowing optimization of different alloy concentrations to maximize overall performance.

  6. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics. Using soft x-ray ptychography, researchers at the ALS have demonstrated the highest-resolution

  7. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics. Using soft x-ray ptychography, researchers at the ALS have demonstrated the highest-resolution

  8. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics. Using soft x-ray ptychography, researchers at the ALS have demonstrated the highest-resolution

  9. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics. Using soft x-ray ptychography, researchers at the ALS have demonstrated the highest-resolution

  10. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics. Using soft x-ray ptychography, researchers at the ALS have demonstrated the highest-resolution

  11. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics. Using soft x-ray ptychography, researchers at the ALS have demonstrated the highest-resolution

  12. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics. Using soft x-ray ptychography, researchers at the ALS have demonstrated the highest-resolution

  13. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit imposed by the characteristics of the x-ray optics. Using soft x-ray ptychography, researchers at the ALS have demonstrated the highest-resolution

  14. Probing graphene defects and estimating graphene quality with optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Shen [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology (HINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kyu Jang, Sung [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jae Song, Young, E-mail: yjsong@skku.edu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sungjoo, E-mail: leesj@skku.edu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology (HINT), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-27

    We report a simple and accurate method for detecting graphene defects that utilizes the mild, dry annealing of graphene/Cu films in air. In contrast to previously reported techniques, our simple approach with optical microscopy can determine the density and degree of dislocation of defects in a graphene film without inducing water-related damage or functionalization. Scanning electron microscopy, confocal Raman and atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis were performed to demonstrate that our nondestructive approach to characterizing graphene defects with optimized thermal annealing provides rapid and comprehensive determinations of graphene quality.

  15. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peter Ercius Staff Scientist, NCEM percius@lbl.gov 510.486.4634 Biography Peter Ercius graduated from Cornell University with a B.S. in applied and engineering physics in 2003. He remained at Cornell and completed a Ph.D. in applied and engineering physics with Professor David Muller in 2009. His dissertation project involved three-dimensional imaging of semiconductor devices using STEM. He then joined NCEM as a collaborative postdoctoral researcher for 2 years to implement electron tomography

  16. Digital field ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sijbrandij, S.J.; Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.; Thomson, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    Due to environmental concerns, there is a trend to avoid the use of chemicals needed to develop negatives and to process photographic paper, and to use digital technologies instead. Digital technology also offers the advantages that it is convenient, as it enables quick access to the end result, allows image storage and processing on computer, allows rapid hard copy output, and simplifies electronic publishing. Recently significant improvements have been made to the performance and cost of camera-sensors and printers. In this paper, field ion images recorded with two digital cameras of different resolution are compared to images recorded on standard 35 mm negative film. It should be noted that field ion images exhibit low light intensity and high contrast. Field ion images were recorded from a standard microchannel plate and a phosphor screen and had acceptance angles of {approximately} 60{degree}. Digital recordings were made with a Digital Vision Technologies (DVT) MICAM VHR1000 camera with a resolution of 752 x 582 pixels, and a Kodak DCS 460 digital camera with a resolution of 3,060 x 2,036 pixels. Film based recordings were made with Kodak T-MAX film rated at 400 ASA. The resolving power of T-MAX film, as specified by Kodak, is between 50 and 125 lines per mm, which corresponds to between 1,778 x 1,181 and 4,445 x 2,953 pixels, i.e. similar to that from the DCS 460 camera. The intensities of the images were sufficient to be recorded with standard fl:1.2 lenses with exposure times of less than 2 s. Many digital cameras were excluded from these experiments due to their lack of sensitivity or the inability to record a full frame image due to the fixed working distance defined by the vacuum system. The digital images were output on a Kodak Digital Science 8650 PS dye sublimation color printer (300 dpi). All field ion micrographs presented were obtained from a Ni-Al-Be specimen.

  17. Electron-beam-evaporated thin films of hafnium dioxide for fabricating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electron-beam-evaporated thin films of hafnium dioxide for fabricating electronic devices ... The authors analyzed the thin films using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy ...

  18. X-Ray Microscopy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Microscopy X-Ray Microscopy This group exploits the unique capabilities of hard X-ray microscopy to visualize and understand the structure and behavior of hybrid,...

  19. Visualizing Individual Carbon Nanotubes with Optical Microscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Published Article: Visualizing Individual Carbon Nanotubes with Optical Microscopy Title: Visualizing Individual Carbon Nanotubes with Optical Microscopy Authors: Novak, Michael A. ...

  20. Reflected beam illumination microscopy using a microfluidics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reflected beam illumination microscopy using a microfluidics device - progress report 6152014. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reflected beam illumination microscopy ...

  1. In situ transmission electron microscopy study of electrochemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number: SC0001160 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: ACS Nano; Journal Volume: 7; Related Information: NEES partners with University of Maryland...

  2. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  3. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  4. Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  5. Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  6. Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  7. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  8. Electron Microscopy Catalysis Projects: Success Stories from the High

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) held the Electrolytic Hydrogen Production Workshop on February 27-28, 2014, at The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, to discuss and share information on the research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) needs for enabling low-cost, effective hydrogen production from all types of water electrolysis systems, both centralized and

  9. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Wednesday, 30 November 2005 00:00 Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes

  10. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Electron Probe Microanalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Probe Microanalysis Electron Probe Microanalysis is an elemental analysis technique which uses a focused beam of high energy electrons to non-destructively ionize a solid specimen surface for inducing emission of characteristic x-rays. Electron probe microanalysis is used to map the chemical composition of the top surface layer of solid-state materials. As with scanninge electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) probes the surface of a sample with high-energy electrons,

  11. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Callahan, Daniel E; Parvin, Bahram

    2013-10-01

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  12. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Callahan, Daniel E.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-06-09

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time: quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  13. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Callahan, Daniel E.; Parvin, Bahram

    2011-05-24

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  14. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations

  15. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations

  16. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations

  17. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations

  18. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations

  19. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations

  20. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations

  1. Analytical Microscopy and Imaging Science | Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analytical Microscopy and Imaging Science An image of interconnecting yellow and red particles NREL uses transmission/scanning electron and scanning probe techniques to measure the chemical, structural, morphological, electrical, interfacial, and luminescent properties on the nano to Angstrom scale. We investigate such properties in a wide range of photovoltaic and semiconducting materials, with particular emphasis on extended defects and interfaces and how these affect device performance. A

  2. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q watermore » and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.« less

  3. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.

  4. Full information acquisition in piezoresponse force microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Somnath, Suhas; Belianinov, Alex; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-12-28

    The information flow from the tip-surface junction to the detector electronics during the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) imaging is explored using the recently developed general mode (G-mode) detection. Information-theory analysis suggests that G-mode PFM in the non-switching regime, close to the first resonance mode, contains a relatively small (100 - 150) number of components containing significant information. The first two primary components are similar to classical PFM images, suggesting that classical lock-in detection schemes provide high veracity information in this case. At the same time, a number of transient components exhibit contrast associated with surface topography, suggesting pathway to separatemore » the two. The number of significant components increases considerably in the non-linear and switching regimes and approaching to cantilever resonances, precluding the use of classical lock-in detection and necessitating the use of band excitation or G-mode detection schemes. As a result, the future prospects of full information imaging in SPM are discussed.« less

  5. Full information acquisition in piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somnath, Suhas; Belianinov, Alex; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-12-28

    The information flow from the tip-surface junction to the detector electronics during the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) imaging is explored using the recently developed general mode (G-mode) detection. Information-theory analysis suggests that G-mode PFM in the non-switching regime, close to the first resonance mode, contains a relatively small (100 - 150) number of components containing significant information. The first two primary components are similar to classical PFM images, suggesting that classical lock-in detection schemes provide high veracity information in this case. At the same time, a number of transient components exhibit contrast associated with surface topography, suggesting pathway to separate the two. The number of significant components increases considerably in the non-linear and switching regimes and approaching to cantilever resonances, precluding the use of classical lock-in detection and necessitating the use of band excitation or G-mode detection schemes. As a result, the future prospects of full information imaging in SPM are discussed.

  6. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Field Emission Auger Electron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectroscopy with Scanning Auger Microscopy Field Emission Auger Electron Spectroscopy with Scanning Auger Microscopy In Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), we bombard a sample surface with a focused beam of high-energy (2- to 10-kV) electrons. The incident electrons lose energy to the sample atoms, generating Auger electrons that have discrete kinetic energies characteristic of the emitting atoms. This technique is particularly useful for determining the elemental composition of the surface

  7. Coupling EELS/EFTEM Imaging with Environmental Fluid Cell Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unocic, Raymond R; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Insight into dynamically evolving electrochemical reactions and mechanisms encountered in electrical energy storage (EES) and conversion technologies (batteries, fuel cells, and supercapacitors), materials science (corrosion and oxidation), and materials synthesis (electrodeposition) remains limited due to the present lack of in situ high-resolution characterization methodologies. Electrochemical fluid cell microscopy is an emerging in-situ method that allows for the direct, real-time imaging of electrochemical processes within a fluid environment. This technique is facilitated by the use of MEMS-based biasing microchip platforms that serve the purpose of sealing the highly volatile electrolyte between two electron transparent SiNx membranes and interfacing electrodes to an external potentiostat for controlled nanoscale electrochemislly experiments [!]. In order to elucidate both stmctural and chemical changes during such in situ electrochemical experiments, it is impmtant to first improve upon the spatial resolution by utilizing energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) (to minimize chromatic aben ation), then to detennine the chemical changes via electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). This presents a formidable challenge since the overall thickness through which electrons are scattered through the multiple layers of the cell can be on the order of hundreds of nanometers to microns, scattering through which has the deleterious effect of degrading image resolution and decreasing signal-to noise for spectroscopy [2].

  8. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print Thursday, 22 January 2015 12:10 X-ray microscopy...

  9. Electronic modulations in a single wall carbon nanotube induced...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE; GOLD; SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY; SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; SPECTROSCOPY; SURFACES Word Cloud More Like This Full Text Journal Articles DOI: 10.10631.4907613

  10. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scanning Probe Microscopy Photo of NREL researcher using scanning probe microscope. Capability of use with ultra-high vacuum makes NREL Scanning Probe Microscopy particularly valuable for certain applications. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) provides surface images at up to atomic scale and other valuable high-resolution data. SPM encompasses a group of techniques that use very sharp tips that scan extremely closely (several nm) to or in contact with the material being analyzed. The interaction

  11. Microscopy (XSD-MIC) | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microdiffraction, fluorescence tomography, coherent diffraction, and synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy (SX-STM) This website is intended to provide useful...

  12. Scanning Probe Microscopy with Spectroscopic Molecular Recognition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    capable of 5 nm Chemical differentiation of surface features Applications and Industries Atomic force microscopy to study biological and chemical samples Chemical differentiation...

  13. Radiation-thermoacoustic microscopy of condensed media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyamshev, L.M.; Chelnokov, B.I.

    1984-07-01

    Possibilities are discussed for the application of scanning radiation-thermoacoustic microscopy, using different types of radiation, for microstructure analysis. (AIP)

  14. Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith (Patent) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Patent: Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith A microwave microscope including a probe tip electrode vertically positionable over a sample and projecting downwardly from the end of a cantilever. A transmission line connecting the tip electrode to the electronic control system extends along the cantilever and is separated from a ground plane at the bottom of the

  15. 3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone at the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale 3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone at the Nanoscale Scientists studying osteoporosis and other skeletal diseases are interested in the 3D structure of bone and its responses to conditions such as weightlessness, radiation (of particular interest to astronauts) and vitamin D deficiency. The current gold standard, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), provides 3D images of trabeculae, the small interior struts of bone tissue, and electron microscopy can

  16. X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance Print Wednesday, 28 October 2015 00:00 Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries power most portable electronics and are becoming more widely used in large-scale applications like electric vehicles. Scientists have long observed that lithium iron phosphate nanoparticles are one of the best performing battery electrode materials, able to repeatedly charge and

  17. Viewing spin structures with soft x-ray microscopy (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Viewing spin structures with soft x-ray microscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Viewing spin structures with soft x-ray microscopy The spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment marks the basic unit for magnetic properties of matter. Magnetism, in particular ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism is described by a collective order of these spins, where the interaction between individual spins reflects a competition between exchange, anisotropy and

  18. Microscopy & microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Michael, Joseph R.

    2016-01-08

    The article provides information about an upcoming conference from the program chair. The Microscopy Society of America (MSA), the Microanalysis Society (MAS), and the International Metallographic Society (IMS) invite participation in Microscopy & Microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio, July 24 through July 28, 2016.

  19. New Microscopy Patent Awarded | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Microscopy Patent Awarded Congratulations to former Ames Laboratory staff Ning Fang and Wei Sun for being awarded a new patent, "Auto-calibrated scanning-angle prism-type total...

  20. Optoacoustic Microscopy for Investigation of Material

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanostructures-Embracing the Ultrasmall, Ultrafast, and the Invisible (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Optoacoustic Microscopy for Investigation of Material Nanostructures-Embracing the Ultrasmall, Ultrafast, and the Invisible Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optoacoustic Microscopy for Investigation of Material Nanostructures-Embracing the Ultrasmall, Ultrafast, and the Invisible The goal of this grant was the development of a new type of scanning acoustic

  1. Optoacoustic Microscopy for Investigation of Material

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanostructures-Embracing the Ultrasmall, Ultrafast, and the Invisible (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Optoacoustic Microscopy for Investigation of Material Nanostructures-Embracing the Ultrasmall, Ultrafast, and the Invisible Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optoacoustic Microscopy for Investigation of Material Nanostructures-Embracing the Ultrasmall, Ultrafast, and the Invisible × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech

  2. Understanding the Structural and Electronic Evolution of Li2MnO3 During

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Irradiation Via Electron Microscopy - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research November 17, 2014, Research Highlights Understanding the Structural and Electronic Evolution of Li2MnO3 During Electron Irradiation Via Electron Microscopy In-situ electron beam irradiation induces localized pockets of damage (a) and (b) characterized by the Mn atoms migrating to occupy Li sites, as shown in the annular bright field image of (c). This effect is clearly visible in an intensity line profile

  3. Electron radiography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher

    2005-05-17

    A system capable of performing radiography using a beam of electrons. Diffuser means receive a beam of electrons and diffuse the electrons before they enter first matching quadrupoles where the diffused electrons are focused prior to the diffused electrons entering an object. First imaging quadrupoles receive the focused diffused electrons after the focused diffused electrons have been scattered by the object for focusing the scattered electrons. Collimator means receive the scattered electrons and remove scattered electrons that have scattered to large angles. Second imaging quadrupoles receive the collimated scattered electrons and refocus the collimated scattered electrons and map the focused collimated scattered electrons to transverse locations on an image plane representative of the electrons' positions in the object.

  4. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the ?-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.

  5. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane andmore » freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.« less

  6. Ultrafast Optical Microscopy of Single Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ultrafast Optical Microscopy of Single Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide Flakes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Optical Microscopy of Single Monolayer Molybdenum ...

  7. Scanning Photocurrent Microscopy of Si and Ge nanowires (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Scanning Photocurrent Microscopy of Si and Ge nanowires Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scanning Photocurrent Microscopy of Si and Ge nanowires You are ...

  8. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Data Explorer Search Results Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy Title: Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy Methods and ...

  9. Optoacoustic Microscopy for Investigation of MaterialNanostructures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microscopy for Investigation of Material Nanostructures-Embracing the Ultrasmall, Ultrafast, and the Invisible Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optoacoustic Microscopy ...

  10. High-Resolution Photocurrent Microscopy Using Near-FieldCathodolumine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High-Resolution Photocurrent Microscopy Using Near-Field Cathodoluminescence of Quantum Dots. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High-Resolution Photocurrent Microscopy ...

  11. Fidelity imaging for atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosal, Sayan Salapaka, Murti

    2015-01-05

    Atomic force microscopy is widely employed for imaging material at the nanoscale. However, real-time measures on image reliability are lacking in contemporary atomic force microscopy literature. In this article, we present a real-time technique that provides an image of fidelity for a high bandwidth dynamic mode imaging scheme. The fidelity images define channels that allow the user to have additional authority over the choice of decision threshold that facilitates where the emphasis is desired, on discovering most true features on the sample with the possible detection of high number of false features, or emphasizing minimizing instances of false detections. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of fidelity imaging.

  12. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Atomic Force Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic Force Microscopy Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) operates in several modes. In contact mode, a tip that is attached to a cantilever is scanned over the sample surface, while the force between tip and sample is measured. While the tip is scanned laterally, the force is kept constant by moving the cantilever/tip assembly up and down, so that the deflection of the cantilever is kept constant. The vertical movement of the cantilever/tip assembly is recorded and used to generate an image of the

  13. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  14. Electron Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Pierre Kennepohl1,2 and Edward Solomon1* 1Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Electron transfer, or the act of moving an electron from one place to another, is amongst the simplest of chemical processes, yet certainly one of the most critical. The process of efficiently and controllably moving electrons around is one of the primary regulation mechanisms in biology. Without stringent control of electrons in living organisms, life could simply not exist. For example,

  15. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galvis, J. A.; Herrera, E.; Buendía, A.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.; Azpeitia, J.; Luccas, R. F.; Munuera, C.; García-Hernandez, M.; and others

    2015-01-15

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor β-Bi{sub 2}Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert.

  16. Seeing through walls at the nanoscale: Microwave microscopy of enclosed objects and processes in liquids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Kolmakov, Andrei; Tselev, Alexander; Ievlev, Anton V.

    2016-02-11

    Here, noninvasive in situ nanoscale imaging in liquid environments is a current imperative in the analysis of delicate biomedical objects and electrochemical processes at reactive liquid–solid interfaces. Microwaves of a few gigahertz frequencies offer photons with energies of ≈10 μeV, which can affect neither electronic states nor chemical bonds in condensed matter. Here, we describe an implementation of scanning near-field microwave microscopy for imaging in liquids using ultrathin molecular impermeable membranes separating scanning probes from samples enclosed in environmental cells. We imaged a model electroplating reaction as well as individual live cells. Through a side-by-side comparison of the microwave imagingmore » with scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate the advantage of microwaves for artifact-free imaging.« less

  17. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials Print X-ray microscopy is powerful in that it can probe large volumes of material at high spatial resolution with...

  18. Defect and damage evolution quantification in dynamically-deformed metals using orientation-imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, George T., III; Livescu, Veronica; Cerreta, Ellen K

    2010-03-18

    Orientation-imaging microscopy offers unique capabilities to quantify the defects and damage evolution occurring in metals following dynamic and shock loading. Examples of the quantification of the types of deformation twins activated, volume fraction of twinning, and damage evolution as a function of shock loading in Ta are presented. Electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) examination of the damage evolution in sweeping-detonation-wave shock loading to study spallation in Cu is also presented.

  19. X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance Print Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries power most portable electronics and are becoming more widely used in large-scale applications like electric vehicles. Scientists have long observed that lithium iron phosphate nanoparticles are one of the best performing battery electrode materials, able to repeatedly charge and discharge in an extremely reversible manner, but the precise mechanism responsible for their performance

  20. X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance Print Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries power most portable electronics and are becoming more widely used in large-scale applications like electric vehicles. Scientists have long observed that lithium iron phosphate nanoparticles are one of the best performing battery electrode materials, able to repeatedly charge and discharge in an extremely reversible manner, but the precise mechanism responsible for their performance

  1. X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance Print Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries power most portable electronics and are becoming more widely used in large-scale applications like electric vehicles. Scientists have long observed that lithium iron phosphate nanoparticles are one of the best performing battery electrode materials, able to repeatedly charge and discharge in an extremely reversible manner, but the precise mechanism responsible for their performance

  2. X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance Print Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries power most portable electronics and are becoming more widely used in large-scale applications like electric vehicles. Scientists have long observed that lithium iron phosphate nanoparticles are one of the best performing battery electrode materials, able to repeatedly charge and discharge in an extremely reversible manner, but the precise mechanism responsible for their performance

  3. X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance Print Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries power most portable electronics and are becoming more widely used in large-scale applications like electric vehicles. Scientists have long observed that lithium iron phosphate nanoparticles are one of the best performing battery electrode materials, able to repeatedly charge and discharge in an extremely reversible manner, but the precise mechanism responsible for their performance

  4. X-Ray Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microscopy Reveals How Crystal Mechanics Drive Battery Performance Print Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries power most portable electronics and are becoming more widely used in large-scale applications like electric vehicles. Scientists have long observed that lithium iron phosphate nanoparticles are one of the best performing battery electrode materials, able to repeatedly charge and discharge in an extremely reversible manner, but the precise mechanism responsible for their performance has

  5. Consumer Electronics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  6. Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Virtual Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems with Virtual Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems with Virtual Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Authors: Pelliccione, M. ; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC /UC, Santa Barbara ; Bartel, J. ; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. ; Sciambi, A. ; /Stanford U.,

  7. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chengyu Song, Senior Scientific Engineering Associate, NCEM email 510.486.6751 John Turner, Scientific Engineering Associate, NCEM email 510.486.5700 Teresa Williams,...

  8. Thermal expansion recovery microscopy: Practical design considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mingolo, N. Martnez, O. E.

    2014-01-15

    A detailed study of relevant parameters for the design and operation of a photothermal microscope technique recently introduced is presented. The technique, named thermal expansion recovery microscopy (ThERM) relies in the measurement of the defocusing introduced by a surface that expands and recovers upon the heating from a modulated source. A new two lens design is presented that can be easily adapted to commercial infinite conjugate microscopes and the sensitivity to misalignment is analyzed. The way to determine the beam size by means of a focus scan and the use of that same scan to verify if a thermoreflectance signal is overlapping with the desired ThERM mechanism are discussed. Finally, a method to cancel the thermoreflectance signal by an adequate choice of a nanometric coating is presented.

  9. Complete information acquisition in scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    In the last three decades, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has emerged as a primary tool for exploring and controlling the nanoworld. A critical part of the SPM measurements is the information transfer from the tip-surface junction to a macroscopic measurement system. This process reduces the many degrees of freedom of a vibrating cantilever to relatively few parameters recorded as images. Similarly, the details of dynamic cantilever response at sub-microsecond time scales of transients, higher-order eigenmodes and harmonics are averaged out by transitioning to millisecond time scale of pixel acquisition. Hence, the amount of information available to the external observer ismore » severely limited, and its selection is biased by the chosen data processing method. Here, we report a fundamentally new approach for SPM imaging based on information theory-type analysis of the data stream from the detector. This approach allows full exploration of complex tip-surface interactions, spatial mapping of multidimensional variability of material s properties and their mutual interactions, and SPM imaging at the information channel capacity limit.« less

  10. Complete information acquisition in scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    In the last three decades, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has emerged as a primary tool for exploring and controlling the nanoworld. A critical part of the SPM measurements is the information transfer from the tip-surface junction to a macroscopic measurement system. This process reduces the many degrees of freedom of a vibrating cantilever to relatively few parameters recorded as images. Similarly, the details of dynamic cantilever response at sub-microsecond time scales of transients, higher-order eigenmodes and harmonics are averaged out by transitioning to millisecond time scale of pixel acquisition. Hence, the amount of information available to the external observer is severely limited, and its selection is biased by the chosen data processing method. Here, we report a fundamentally new approach for SPM imaging based on information theory-type analysis of the data stream from the detector. This approach allows full exploration of complex tip-surface interactions, spatial mapping of multidimensional variability of material s properties and their mutual interactions, and SPM imaging at the information channel capacity limit.

  11. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy (Patent) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOEPatents Data Explorer Search Results Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy Title: Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of

  12. Stimulation Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stimulation Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy What is STED? Stimulation Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy is a super resolution microscopy tool that captures super resolution images on a nanometer scale. A donut-shaped red light switches off surrounding molecules, allowing only those in the center to fluoresce. At the nanoscale, light microscopes cannot tell features apart. Because light moves as waves and the particles of light are so close together, the lens used cannot focus all of the

  13. Ultrafast Optical Microscopy of Single Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Flakes (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Ultrafast Optical Microscopy of Single Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide Flakes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Optical Microscopy of Single Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide Flakes We performed ultrafast optical microscopy on single flakes of atomically thin CVD-grown molybdenum disulfide, using non-degenerate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to excite and probe carriers above and below the indirect and direct band gaps. These

  14. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Prev Next Title: X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Authors: Turner, Joshua J. ; Huang, Xiaojing ; Krupin, Oleg ; Seu, Keoki A. ; Parks, Daniel ; Kevan,...

  15. "A Novel Objective for EUV Microscopy and EUV Lithography" Inventors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Novel Objective for EUV Microscopy and EUV Lithography" Inventors ..--.. Manfred Bitter, Kenneth Hill, Philip Efthimion. This invention is a new x-ray scheme for stigmatic...

  16. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and fluorescence microscopy of green algae Citation Details In-Document Search ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  17. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accepted Manuscript: Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae Prev Next Title: Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence ...

  18. Ultrasonic-Based Mode-Synthesizing Atomic Force Microscopy -...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microscopy in the industry Sufficiently flexible for compatibility with spectroscopic approaches such as Raman spectroscopy Easily adaptable to scanning near-field ultrasonic...

  19. In Situ Photoelectron Emission Microscopy of a Thermally Induced Martensitic Transformation in a CuZnAI Shape Memory Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Gang; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.; Cai, Mingdong; Langford, Stephen C.; Dickinson, J T.

    2006-02-27

    Photoemission electron microscopy, in conjunction with photoemission spectroscopy, reflectivity, and surface roughness measurements, is used to study the thermally-induced martensitic transformation in a CuZnAI shape memory alloy. Real-time phase transformation is observed as a nearly instantaneous change of photoelectron intensity, accompanied by microstructural deformation and displacement due to the shape memory effect. The difference in the photoelectron intensity before and after the phase transformation is attributed to the concomitant change of work function as measured by photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoemission electron microscopy is shown to be a valuable new technique facilitating the study of phase transformations in shape memory alloys, and provides real-time information on microstructural changes and phase-dependent electronic properties.

  20. Measuring inside damage of individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jinyin; Bai, Lili; Zhao, Guanqi; Sun, Xuhui E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn; Zhong, Jun E-mail: jzhong@suda.edu.cn; Wang, Jian

    2014-06-16

    The electronic structure of individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been probed using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Although transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show that the exterior of the MWCNTs are clean and straight; the inside structure of some of the MWCNTs is much less well ordered, as revealed by STXM. The amorphization of the interior tubes can be introduced in the growth or modification processes. Moreover, TEM measurement with high dose may also lead to the inside damage. Our results reveal that the structure of individual MWCNTs can be complex and suggest that electronic structure measurements are an important tool for characterizing carbon nanomaterials.

  1. Electron tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suyama, Motohiro; Fukasawa, Atsuhito; Arisaka, Katsushi; Wang, Hanguo

    2011-12-20

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  2. Electronic system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robison, G H; Dickson, J F

    1960-11-15

    An electronic system is designed for indicating the occurrence of a plurality of electrically detectable events within predetermined time intervals. The system comprises separate input means electrically associated with the events under observation an electronic channel associated with each input means, including control means and indicating means; timing means adapted to apply a signal from the input means after a predetermined time to the control means to deactivate each of the channels; and means for resetting the system to its initial condition after the observation of each group of events. (D.L.C.)

  3. ELECTRONIC SYSTEM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robison, G.H. et al.

    1960-11-15

    An electronic system is described for indicating the occurrence of a plurality of electrically detectable events within predetermined time intervals. It is comprised of separate input means electrically associated with the events under observation: an electronic channel associated with each input means including control means and indicating means; timing means associated with each of the input means and the control means and adapted to derive a signal from the input means and apply it after a predetermined time to the control means to effect deactivation of each of the channels; and means for resetting the system to its initial condition after observation of each group of events.

  4. [Band electronic structures and crystal packing forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    We investigated the electronic and structural properties of low-dimensional materials and explored the structure-property correlations governing their physical properties. Progress was made on how to interpret the scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy images of layered materials and on how to account for charge density wave instabilities in 2-D metals. Materials studied included transition metal chalcogenides, transition metal halides, organic conducting salts, Mo bronzes, A[sub 2]PdH[sub 2], fullerenes, squarate tetrahydrate polymers Fe, Cu(C[sub 4]O[sub 4])4[center dot]H[sub 2]O, BEDT salts, etc.

  5. Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lai, Keji; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2012-09-11

    A microwave microscope including a probe tip electrode vertically positionable over a sample and projecting downwardly from the end of a cantilever. A transmission line connecting the tip electrode to the electronic control system extends along the cantilever and is separated from a ground plane at the bottom of the cantilever by a dielectric layer. The probe tip may be vertically tapped near or at the sample surface at a low frequency and the microwave signal reflected from the tip/sample interaction is demodulated at the low frequency. Alternatively, a low-frequency electrical signal is also a non-linear electrical element associated with the probe tip to non-linearly interact with the applied microwave signal and the reflected non-linear microwave signal is detected at the low frequency. The non-linear element may be semiconductor junction formed near the apex of the probe tip or be an FET formed at the base of a semiconducting tip.

  6. Exploring Local Electrostatic Effects with Scanning Probe Microscopy: Implications for Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Triboelectricity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Balke, Nina; Maksymovych, Petro; Jesse, Stephen; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Li, Qian; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-09-25

    The implementation of contact mode Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) utilizes the electrostatic interactions between tip and sample when the tip and sample are in contact with each other. Surprisingly, the electrostatic forces in contact are large enough to be measured even with tips as stiff as 4.5 N/m. As for traditional non-contact KPFM, the signal depends strongly on electrical properties of the sample, such as the dielectric constant, and the tip-properties, such as the stiffness. Since the tip is in contact with the sample, bias-induced changes in the junction potential between tip and sample can be measured with highermore » lateral and temporal resolution compared to traditional non-contact KPFM. Significant and reproducible variations of tip-surface capacitance are observed and attributed to surface electrochemical phenomena. Lastly, observations of significant surface charge states at zero bias and strong hysteretic electromechanical responses at non-ferroelectric surface have significant implications for fields such as triboelectricity and piezoresponse force microscopy.« less

  7. Actuatable capacitive transducer for quantitative nanoindentation combined with transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, Oden L; Asif, Syed Amanula Syed; Cyrankowski, Edward; Kounev, Kalin

    2013-06-04

    An actuatable capacitive transducer including a transducer body, a first capacitor including a displaceable electrode and electrically configured as an electrostatic actuator, and a second capacitor including a displaceable electrode and electrically configured as a capacitive displacement sensor, wherein the second capacitor comprises a multi-plate capacitor. The actuatable capacitive transducer further includes a coupling shaft configured to mechanically couple the displaceable electrode of the first capacitor to the displaceable electrode of the second capacitor to form a displaceable electrode unit which is displaceable relative to the transducer body, and an electrically-conductive indenter mechanically coupled to the coupling shaft so as to be displaceable in unison with the displaceable electrode unit.

  8. Actuatable capacitive transducer for quantitative nanoindentation combined with transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, Oden L.; Asif, S. A. Syed; Cyrankowski, Edward; Kounev, Kalin

    2010-09-21

    An actuatable capacitive transducer including a transducer body, a first capacitor including a displaceable electrode and electrically configured as an electrostatic actuator, and a second capacitor including a displaceable electrode and electrically configured as a capacitive displacement sensor, wherein the second capacitor comprises a multi-plate capacitor. The actuatable capacitive transducer further includes a coupling shaft configured to mechanically couple the displaceable electrode of the first capacitor to the displaceable electrode of the second capacitor to form a displaceable electrode unit which is displaceable relative to the transducer body, and an electrically-conductive indenter mechanically coupled to the coupling shaft so as to be displaceable in unison with the displaceable electrode unit.-

  9. Proceedings of the seventh international conference on high voltage electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, R.M.; Gronsky, R.; Westmacott, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    Eight-four papers are arranged under the following headings: high resolution, techniques and instrumentation, radiation effects, in-situ and phase transformations, minerals and ceramics, and semiconductors and thin films. Twenty-three papers were abstracted separately for the data base; three of the remainder had previously been abstracted. (DLC)

  10. Comparison of synchrotron x-ray microanalysis with electron and proton microscopy for individual particle analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, K.H.; van Langevelde, F.; Adams, F.C.; Vis, R.D.; Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L.; Jones, K.W.; Bowen, D.K.

    1991-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the evaluation of the use of synchrotron/radiation induced x-ray fluorescences ({mu}-SRXRF) as implemented at two existing X-ray microprobes for the analysis of individual particles. As representative environmental particulates, National Institutes of Science and Technology (NIST) K227, K309, K441 and K961 glass microspheres were analyzed using two types of X-ray micro probes: the white light microprobe at beamline X26A of the monochromatic (15 keV) X-ray microprobe at station 7.6 of the SRS. For reference, the particles were also analyzed with microanalytical techniques more commonly employed for individual particles analysis such as EPMA and micro-PIXE.

  11. Comparison of synchrotron x-ray microanalysis with electron and proton microscopy for individual particle analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, K.H.; van Langevelde, F.; Adams, F.C. ); Vis, R.D. ); Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L. ); Jones, K.W. ); Bowen, D.K. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the evaluation of the use of synchrotron/radiation induced x-ray fluorescences ({mu}-SRXRF) as implemented at two existing X-ray microprobes for the analysis of individual particles. As representative environmental particulates, National Institutes of Science and Technology (NIST) K227, K309, K441 and K961 glass microspheres were analyzed using two types of X-ray micro probes: the white light microprobe at beamline X26A of the monochromatic (15 keV) X-ray microprobe at station 7.6 of the SRS. For reference, the particles were also analyzed with microanalytical techniques more commonly employed for individual particles analysis such as EPMA and micro-PIXE.

  12. New insights from in-situ electron microscopy into capacity loss...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Abstract not provided. Authors: Talin, Albert Alec ; Bartelt, Norman Charles ; Leite, Marina ; Ruzmetov, Dmitry ; Zhipeng, Li ; Bendersky, Leonid Publication Date: 2013-09-01 OSTI ...

  13. New insights from in-situ electron microscopy into capacity loss...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Abstract not provided. Authors: Talin, Albert Alec ; Leite, Marina ; Ruzmetov, Dmitry ; Li, Zhipeng ; Bendersky, Leonid ; Kolmakov, Andrei ; Bartelt, Norman Charles. Publication ...

  14. Identification of concrete deteriorating minerals by polarizing and scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregerova, Miroslava; Vsiansky, Dalibor

    2009-07-15

    The deterioration of concrete represents one of the most serious problems of civil engineering worldwide. Besides other processes, deterioration of concrete consists of sulfate attack and carbonation. Sulfate attack results in the formation of gypsum, ettringite and thaumasite in hardened concrete. Products of sulfate attack may cause a loss of material strength and a risk of collapse of the concrete constructions. The authors focused especially on the microscopical research of sulfate attack. Concrete samples were taken from the Charles Bridge in Prague, Czech Republic. A succession of degrading mineral formation was suggested. Microscope methods represent a new approach to solving the deterioration problems. They enable evaluation of the state of concrete constructions and in cooperation with hydro-geochemistry, mathematics and statistics permit prediction of the durability of a structure. Considering the number of concrete constructions and their age, research of concrete deterioration has an increasing importance. The results obtained can also be useful for future construction, because they identify the risk factors associated with formation of minerals known to degrade structures.

  15. Macromolecular organization of the cellulolytic enzyme complex of Clostridium thermocellum as revealed by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, F.; Coughlan, M.P.; Mori, Y.; Ljungdahl, L.G.

    1987-12-01

    Clostridium thermocellum JW20 and YM4 both synthesize cellulolytic enzyme complexes, cellulosomes, when grown on medium containing cellulose. In the early stages of cultivation, the cellulosomes from both species exist as tightly packed complexes (tight cellulosomes). These subsequently decompose to loosely packed complexes (loose cellulosomes) and ultimately to free polypeptides. Examination of the loose cellulosomal particles showed that the contain rows of equidistantly spaced, similarly sized polypeptide subunits, with an apparently identical orientation arranged parallel to the major axis of the cellulosome. It is postulated that on binding of a cellulose chain alongside such a row of subunits a simultaneous multicutting event occurs that leads to the release of cellooligosaccharides of four cellobiose units in length (C/sub 4/). Rows of smaller-sized subunits with lower center-to-center distances, which are also present in the cellulosome, subsequently cleave the C/sub 4/ fragments (or cellulose) to C/sub 2/ (cellotetraose) or C/sub 1/ (cellobiose). In this way the cellulosome can catalyze the complete hydrolysis of cellulose.

  16. Parallel, distributed and GPU computing technologies in single-particle electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmeisser, Martin; Heisen, Burkhard C.; Luettich, Mario; Busche, Boris; Hauer, Florian; Koske, Tobias; Knauber, Karl-Heinz; Stark, Holger

    2009-07-01

    An introduction to the current paradigm shift towards concurrency in software. Most known methods for the determination of the structure of macromolecular complexes are limited or at least restricted at some point by their computational demands. Recent developments in information technology such as multicore, parallel and GPU processing can be used to overcome these limitations. In particular, graphics processing units (GPUs), which were originally developed for rendering real-time effects in computer games, are now ubiquitous and provide unprecedented computational power for scientific applications. Each parallel-processing paradigm alone can improve overall performance; the increased computational performance obtained by combining all paradigms, unleashing the full power of todays technology, makes certain applications feasible that were previously virtually impossible. In this article, state-of-the-art paradigms are introduced, the tools and infrastructure needed to apply these paradigms are presented and a state-of-the-art infrastructure and solution strategy for moving scientific applications to the next generation of computer hardware is outlined.

  17. Charge ordering in stoichiometric FeTe: Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Wei; Yin, Wei -Guo; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi -Kun; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-04

    In this study, we use scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to reveal a unique stripy charge order in a parent phase of iron-based superconductors in stoichiometric FeTe epitaxy films. The charge order has unusually the same—usually half—period as the spin order. We also found highly anisotropic electron band dispersions being large and little along the ferromagnetic (crystallographic b) and antiferromagnetic (a) directions, respectively. Our data suggest that the microscopic mechanism is likely of the Stoner type driven by interatomic Coulomb repulsion Vij, and that Vij and charge fluctuations, so far much neglected, are important to the understanding of iron-based superconductors.

  18. ELECTRONIC MULTIPLIER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collier, D.M.; Meeks, L.A.; Palmer, J.P.

    1961-01-31

    S>An electronic multiplier is described for use in analog computers. Two electrical input signals are received; one controls the slope of a saw-tooth voltage wave while the other controls the time duration of the wave. A condenser and diode clamps are provided to sustain the crest voltage reached by the wave, and for storing that voltage to provide an output signal which is a steady d-c voltage.

  19. Electron Bernstein

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bernstein wave emission from an overdense reversed field pinch plasma P. K. Chattopadhyay, J. K. Anderson, T. M. Biewer, D. Craig, and C. B. Forest a) Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 R. W. Harvey CompX, Del Mar, California 92014 A. P. Smirnov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia ͑Received 11 October 2001; accepted 20 November 2001͒ Blackbody levels of emission in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies have been observed from an overdense (␻ pe

  20. ELECTRON GUN

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christofilos, N.C.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1960-04-01

    A pulsed electron gun capable of delivering pulses at voltages of the order of 1 mv and currents of the order of 100 amperes is described. The principal novelty resides in a transformer construction which is disposed in the same vacuum housing as the electron source and accelerating electrode structure of the gun to supply the accelerating potential thereto. The transformer is provided by a plurality of magnetic cores disposed in circumferentially spaced relation and having a plurality of primary windings each inductively coupled to a different one of the cores, and a helical secondary winding which is disposed coaxially of the cores and passes therethrough in circumferential succession. Additional novelty resides in the disposition of the electron source cathode filament input leads interiorly of the transformer secondary winding which is hollow, as well as in the employment of a half-wave filament supply which is synchronously operated with the transformer supply such that the transformer is pulsed during the zero current portions of the half-wave cycle.

  1. Sparse sampling and reconstruction for electron and scanning probe microscope imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Hyrum; Helms, Jovana; Wheeler, Jason W.; Larson, Kurt W.; Rohrer, Brandon R.

    2015-07-28

    Systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy are provided herein. In a general embodiment, the systems and methods for conducting electron or scanning probe microscopy with an undersampled data set include: driving an electron beam or probe to scan across a sample and visit a subset of pixel locations of the sample that are randomly or pseudo-randomly designated; determining actual pixel locations on the sample that are visited by the electron beam or probe; and processing data collected by detectors from the visits of the electron beam or probe at the actual pixel locations and recovering a reconstructed image of the sample.

  2. Magnetic spectroscopy and microscopy of functional materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, C.A.

    2011-01-28

    Heusler intermetallics Mn{sub 2}Y Ga and X{sub 2}MnGa (X; Y =Fe, Co, Ni) undergo tetragonal magnetostructural transitions that can result in half metallicity, magnetic shape memory, or the magnetocaloric effect. Understanding the magnetism and magnetic behavior in functional materials is often the most direct route to being able to optimize current materials for todays applications and to design novel ones for tomorrow. Synchrotron soft x-ray magnetic spectromicroscopy techniques are well suited to explore the the competing effects from the magnetization and the lattice parameters in these materials as they provide detailed element-, valence-, and site-specifc information on the coupling of crystallographic ordering and electronic structure as well as external parameters like temperature and pressure on the bonding and exchange. Fundamental work preparing the model systems of spintronic, multiferroic, and energy-related compositions is presented for context. The methodology of synchrotron spectroscopy is presented and applied to not only magnetic characterization but also of developing a systematic screening method for future examples of materials exhibiting any of the above effects. The chapter progression is as follows: an introduction to the concepts and materials under consideration (Chapter 1); an overview of sample preparation techniques and results, and the kinds of characterization methods employed (Chapter 2); spectro- and microscopic explorations of X{sub 2}MnGa/Ge (Chapter 3); spectroscopic investigations of the composition series Mn{sub 2}Y Ga to the logical Mn{sub 3}Ga endpoint (Chapter 4); and a summary and overview of upcoming work (Chapter 5). Appendices include the results of a Think Tank for the Graduate School of Excellence MAINZ (Appendix A) and details of an imaging project now in progress on magnetic reversal and domain wall observation in the classical Heusler material Co{sub 2}FeSi (Appendix B).

  3. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Turner Scientific Engineering Associate, NCEM jhturner@lbl.gov 510.486.5700

  4. X-ray optics for scanning fluorescence microscopy and other applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryon, R.W.; Warburton, W.K.

    1992-05-01

    Scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy is analogous to scanning electron microscopy. Maps of chemical element distribution are produced by scanning with a very small x-ray beam. Goal is to perform such scanning microscopy with resolution in the range of <1 to 10 {mu}m, using standard laboratory x-ray tubes. We are investigating mirror optics in the Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) configuration. K-B optics uses two curved mirrors mounted orthogonally along the optical axis. The first mirror provides vertical focus, the second mirror provides horizontal focus. We have used two types of mirrors: synthetic multilayers and crystals. Multilayer mirrors are used with lower energy radiation such as Cu K{alpha}. At higher energies such as Ag K{alpha}, silicon wafers are used in order to increase the incidence angles and thereby the photon collection efficiency. In order to increase the surface area of multilayers which reflects x-rays at the Bragg angle, we have designed mirrors with the spacing between layers graded along the optic axis in order to compensate for the changing angle of incidence. Likewise, to achieve a large reflecting surface with silicon, the wafers are placed on a specially designed lever arm which is bent into a log spiral by applying force at one end. In this way, the same diffracting angle is maintained over the entire surface of the wafer, providing a large solid angle for photon collection.

  5. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Centurion, M.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K.; Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D.; Nguyen, M. N.; Reid, A. H.; Shen, X.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Vecchione, T.; Vetter, S. L.; Wu, J.; Yang, J.; Dürr, H. A.; Wang, X. J.

    2015-07-01

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  6. Imaging space charge regions in Sm-doped ceria using electrochemical strain microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Qian Nataly; Li, Jiangyu; Adler, Stuart B.

    2014-11-17

    Nanocrystalline ceria exhibits a total conductivity several orders of magnitude higher than microcrystalline ceria in air at high temperature. The most widely accepted theory for this enhancement (based on fitting of conductivity data to various transport and kinetic models) is that relatively immobile positively charged defects and/or impurities accumulate at the grain boundary core, leading to a counterbalancing increase in the number of mobile electrons (small polarons) within a diffuse space charge region adjacent to each grain boundary. In an effort to validate this model, we have applied electrochemical strain microscopy to image the location and relative population of mobile electrons near grain boundaries in polycrystalline Sm-doped ceria in air at 20200?C. Our results show the first direct (spatially resolved) evidence that such a diffuse space charge region does exist in ceria, and is localized to both grain boundaries and the gas-exposed surface.

  7. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing...

  8. In situ Nanotomography and Operando Transmission X-ray Microscopy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Operando Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Micron-sized Ge Particles in Battery Anodes Friday, August 29, 2014 Ge fig1 Figure 1. Schematic of the irreversible...

  9. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Work performed on ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 Citation: J.J. Turner et al., "X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures," Phys....

  10. High-Resolution Photocurrent Microscopy Using Near-Field

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cathodoluminescence of Quantum Dots. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect High-Resolution Photocurrent Microscopy Using Near-Field Cathodoluminescence of Quantum Dots. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High-Resolution Photocurrent Microscopy Using Near-Field Cathodoluminescence of Quantum Dots. Abstract not provided. Authors: Talin, Albert Alec Publication Date: 2013-05-01 OSTI Identifier: 1145404 Report Number(s): SAND2013-4169J 453180 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource

  11. NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NEAR-IR TWO PHOTON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF SILICA NANOPARTICLES FUNCTIONALIZED WITH ISOLATED SENSITIZED Yb(III) CENTERS Bright nano objects emitting in the near infrared with a maximal cross section of 41.4 x 103 GM (Goppert Mayer), were

  12. Reflected beam illumination microscopy using a microfluidics device -

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    progress report 6/15/2014. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Reflected beam illumination microscopy using a microfluidics device - progress report 6/15/2014. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reflected beam illumination microscopy using a microfluidics device - progress report 6/15/2014. Abstract not provided. Authors: James, Conrad D. ; Finnegan, Patrick Sean ; Renzi, Ronald F. Publication Date: 2014-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 1171452 Report Number(s):

  13. Localized surface plasmon assisted contrast microscopy for ultrathin transparent specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Feifei; Lu, Dylan; Aguinaldo, Ryan; Ma, Yicong; Sinha, Sunil K.; Liu, Zhaowei

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate a high contrast imaging technique, termed localized surface plasmon assisted contrast microscopy, by combining localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) and dark-field microscopy technique. Due to the sensitive response of LSPR to the refractive index of the surrounding media, this technique is capable of converting a small refractive index difference to a change in scattering intensity, resulting in a high-contrast, diffraction limited image of a thin unstained specimen with small, gradual refractive-index variation.

  14. Ultra-sensitive Magnetic Microscopy with an Atomic Magnetometer (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Ultra-sensitive Magnetic Microscopy with an Atomic Magnetometer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultra-sensitive Magnetic Microscopy with an Atomic Magnetometer The PowerPoint presentation focused on research goals, specific information about the atomic magnetometer, response and resolution factors of the SERF magnetometer, FC+AM systems, tests of field transfer and resolution on FC, gradient cancellation, testing of AM performance, ideas

  15. The Ren Group - Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ren Group Home Research Members Publications Contacts/Links NEWS Dec 15, 2012 Host an Electron Tomography Workshop with Peter Ercius at NCEM from Jan. 16-18th, 2013. Nov 20, 2012 Four postdoc positions are open in implementation of individual-particle electron tomography. April 30, 2012 Gang Ren received Irvine Page Investigator Research Finalist Award from ATVB 2012. April 9, 2012 The CETP research is under spotlight of Department of Energy. February 21, 2012 IPET method is under the spotlight.

  16. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal Lian, Tianquan 14 SOLAR ENERGY The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer...

  17. Ultra-bright pulsed electron beam with low longitudinal emittance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zolotorev, Max

    2010-07-13

    A high-brightness pulsed electron source, which has the potential for many useful applications in electron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electron scattering experiments, and electron holography has been described. The source makes use of Cs atoms in an atomic beam. The source is cycled beginning with a laser pulse that excites a single Cs atom on average to a band of high-lying Rydberg nP states. The resulting valence electron Rydberg wave packet evolves in a nearly classical Kepler orbit. When the electron reaches apogee, an electric field pulse is applied that ionizes the atom and accelerates the electron away from its parent ion. The collection of electron wave packets thus generated in a series of cycles can occupy a phase volume near the quantum limit and it can possess very high brightness. Each wave packet can exhibit a considerable degree of coherence.

  18. Open Source Scanning Probe Microscopy Control Software package GXSM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahl, P.; Wagner, T.; Moller, R.; Klust, A.

    2010-05-01

    GXSM is a full featured and modern scanning probe microscopy (SPM) software. It can be used for powerful multidimensional image/data processing, analysis, and visualization. Connected to an instrument, it is operating many different flavors of SPM, e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy or, in general, two-dimensional multichannel data acquisition instruments. The GXSM core can handle different data types, e.g., integer and floating point numbers. An easily extendable plug-in architecture provides many image analysis and manipulation functions. A digital signal processor subsystem runs the feedback loop, generates the scanning signals, and acquires the data during SPM measurements. The programmable GXSM vector probe engine performs virtually any thinkable spectroscopy and manipulation task, such as scanning tunneling spectroscopy or tip formation. The GXSM software is released under the GNU general public license and can be obtained via the internet.

  19. X-ray microscopy at CNM | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray microscopy at CNM X-Ray Nanoprobe Beamline 1 of 5 X-Ray Nanoprobe Beamline Jörg Maser (left) and Robert Winarski, of Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials, X-Ray Microscopy Group, at the hard X-ray nanoprobe beamline on Advanced Photon Source (APS) Sector 26. The nanoprobe uses brilliant X-rays with photon energies from 3 to 30 keV to probe the properties of nanoscale materials with a spatial resolution of 30 nm. The system provides a combination of scanning-probe and full-field

  20. Phase contrast and operation regimes in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, Sergio

    2014-04-07

    In amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy the attractive and the repulsive force regimes induce phase shifts above and below 90°, respectively. In the more recent multifrequency approach, however, multiple operation regimes have been reported and the theory should be revisited. Here, a theory of phase contrast in multifrequency atomic force microscopy is developed and discussed in terms of energy transfer between modes, energy dissipation and the kinetic energy and energy transfer associated with externally driven harmonics. The single frequency virial that controls the phase shift might undergo transitions in sign while the average force (modal virial) remains positive (negative)

  1. Variable temperature electrochemical strain microscopy of Sm-doped ceria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jesse, Stephen; Morozovska, A. N.; Kalinin, Sergei V; Eliseev, E. A.; Yang, Nan; Doria, Sandra; Tebano, Antonello

    2013-01-01

    Variable temperature electrochemical strain microscopy has been used to study the electrochemical activity of Sm-doped ceria as a function of temperature and bias. The electrochemical strain microscopy hysteresis loops have been collected across the surface at different temperatures and the relative activity at different temperatures has been compared. The relaxation behavior of the signal at different temperatures has been also evaluated to relate kinetic process during bias induced electrochemical reactions with temperature and two different kinetic regimes have been identified. The strongly non-monotonic dependence of relaxation behavior on temperature is interpreted as evidence for water-mediated mechanisms.

  2. Electronic and structural characteristics of zinc-blende wurtzite biphasic homostructure GaN nanowires

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Ayres, Virginia M.; Petkov, Mihail P.; Halpern, Joshua B.; He, Maoqi; Baczewski, Andrew D.; McElroy, Kaylee; Crimp, Martin A.; Zhang, Jiaming; Shaw, Harry C.

    2016-02-01

    Here, we report a new biphasic crystalline wurtzite/zinc-blende homostructure in gallium nitride nanowires. Cathodoluminescence was used to quantitatively measure the wurtzite and zinc-blende band gaps. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to identify distinct wurtzite and zinc-blende crystalline phases within single nanowires through the use of selected area electron diffraction, electron dispersive spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and fast Fourier transform techniques. A mechanism for growth is identified.

  3. Synthesis of metal silicide at metal/silicon oxide interface by electronic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    excitation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Synthesis of metal silicide at metal/silicon oxide interface by electronic excitation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synthesis of metal silicide at metal/silicon oxide interface by electronic excitation The synthesis of metal silicide at the metal/silicon oxide interface by electronic excitation was investigated using transmission electron microscopy. A platinum silicide, α-Pt{sub 2}Si, was successfully formed at the

  4. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Aguiar, Jeffery A.

    2015-09-15

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to determine the chemistry and oxidation state of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 thin film battery electrodes in liquid cells for in situ scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). Using the L2,3 white line intensity ratio method we determine the oxidation state of Mn and Ti in a liquid electrolyte solvent and discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity.

  5. Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2006-08-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices.

  6. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-08-04

    Scanning probe microscopy may include a method for generating a band excitation (BE) signal and simultaneously exciting a probe at a plurality of frequencies within a predetermined frequency band based on the excitation signal. A response of the probe is measured across a subset of frequencies of the predetermined frequency band and the excitation signal is adjusted based on the measured response.

  7. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colin Ophus Project Scientist, NCEM clophus@lbl.gov 510.486.5663 Biography Colin Ophus received his PhD in Materials Engineering from the University of Alberta in Canada. There he studied the growth of polycrystalline and amorphous metal thin films with deposition experiments and simulations. He has used microfabrication techniques including physical and chemical vapor deposition, chemical etching, and optical and electron beam lithography. He is also proficient in analysis techniques including

  8. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jim Ciston Staff Scientist, NCEM jciston@lbl.gov 510.495.8072 Biography Jim Ciston obtained his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from Northwestern University in 2009 for his work on the structural determination of hydrogen atom positions and bonding charge density at crystal surfaces through the use of advanced electron diffraction and high resolution imaging techniques. From 2009-2011, he was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at Brookhaven National Laboratory where he also served as

  9. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Newly Developed Tool Enables Remote Researchers to Take a Deeper Look at Interfaces An international team of researchers working at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and remotely operating instruments at the National Center for Electron Microcopy (NCEM) via the Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) recently developed a new technique called Standing Wave Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy, or SWARPES, to unlock the vast potential of metal oxide interfaces, especially those buried in subsurface

  10. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shaping the Future of Nanocrystals The first direct observations of how facets form and develop on platinum nanocubes point the way towards more sophisticated and effective nanocrystal design and reveal that a nearly 150 year-old scientific law describing crystal growth breaks down at the nanoscale. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers used several highly sophisticated transmission electron microscopes at NCEM through a user project, as well as an advanced high-resolution,

  11. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  12. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, John S.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  13. Multifrequency spectrum analysis using fully digital G Mode-Kelvin probe force microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Collins, Liam F.; Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Somnath, Suhas; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-02-11

    Since its inception over two decades ago, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has become the standard technique for characterizing electrostatic, electrochemical and electronic properties at the nanoscale. In this work, we present a purely digital, software-based approach to KPFM utilizing big data acquisition and analysis methods. General Mode (G-Mode) KPFM, works by capturing the entire photodetector data stream, typically at the sampling rate limit, followed by subsequent de-noising, analysis and compression of the cantilever response. We demonstrate that the G-Mode approach allows simultaneous multi-harmonic detection, combined with on-the-fly transfer function correction required for quantitative CPD mapping. The KPFM approach outlinedmore » in this work significantly simplifies the technique by avoiding cumbersome instrumentation optimization steps (i.e. lock in parameters, feedback gains etc.), while also retaining the flexibility to be implemented on any atomic force microscopy platform. We demonstrate the added advantages of G-Mode KPFM by allowing simultaneous mapping of CPD and capacitance gradient (C') channels as well as increased flexibility in data exploration across frequency, time, space, and noise domains. As a result, G-Mode KPFM is particularly suitable for characterizing voltage sensitive materials or for operation in conductive electrolytes, and will be useful for probing electrodynamics in photovoltaics, liquids and ionic conductors.« less

  14. Cross-sectional electrostatic force microscopy of thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballif, C.; Moutinho, H. R.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2001-01-15

    In a recent work, we showed that atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful technique to image cross sections of polycrystalline thin films. In this work, we apply a modification of AFM, namely, electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), to investigate the electronic properties of cleaved II--VI and multijunction thin-film solar cells. We cleave the devices in such a way that they are still working with their nominal photovoltaic efficiencies and can be polarized for the measurements. This allows us to differentiate between surface effects (work function and surface band bending) and bulk device properties. In the case of polycrystalline CdTe/CdS/SnO{sub 2}/glass solar cells, we find a drop of the EFM signal in the area of the CdTe/CdS interface ({+-}50 nm). This drop varies in amplitude and sign according to the applied external bias and is compatible with an n-CdS/p-CdTe heterojunction model, thereby invalidating the possibility of a deeply buried n-p CdTe homojunction. In the case of a triple-junction GaInP/GaAs/Ge device, we observe a variation of the EFM signal linked to both the material work-function differences and to the voltage bias applied to the cell. We attempt a qualitative explanation of the results and discuss the implications and difficulties of the EFM technique for the study of such thin-film devices.

  15. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C. H.; et al

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatialmore » resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.« less

  16. Atomic-force microscopy and photoluminescence of nanostructured CdTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babentsov, V.; Sizov, F.; Franc, J.; Luchenko, A.; Svezhentsova, E. Tsybrii, Z.

    2013-09-15

    Low-dimensional CdTe nanorods with a diameter of 10-30 nm and a high aspect ratio that reaches 100 are studied. The nanorods are grown by the physical vapor transport method with the use of Bi precipitates on the substrates. In addition, thin films of closely packed CdTe nanorods with the transverse dimensions {approx}(100-200) nm are grown. Atomic-force microscopy shows that the cross sections of all of the nanorods were hexagonally shaped. By photoluminescence measurements, the inference about the wurtzite structure of CdTe is supported, and the structural quality, electron-phonon coupling, and defects are analyzed. On the basis of recent ab initio calculations, the nature of defects responsible for the formation of deep levels in the CdTe layers and bulk crystals are analyzed.

  17. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exquisite chemical, electronic, and bond orientation contrast. The development of diffraction-based methods such as ptychography has, in principle, removed the resolution limit...

  18. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shapiro, D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Miao, H.; Neiman, A. M.; et al

    2005-10-25

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffractionmore » microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.« less

  19. Intermodulation electrostatic force microscopy for imaging surface photo-voltage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borgani, Riccardo Forchheimer, Daniel; Thorn, Per-Anders; Haviland, David B.; Bergqvist, Jonas; Ingans, Olle

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate an alternative to Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for imaging surface potential. The open-loop, single-pass technique applies a low-frequency AC voltage to the atomic force microscopy tip while driving the cantilever near its resonance frequency. Frequency mixing due to the nonlinear capacitance gives intermodulation products of the two drive frequencies near the cantilever resonance, where they are measured with high signal to noise ratio. Analysis of this intermodulation response allows for quantitative reconstruction of the contact potential difference. We derive the theory of the method, validate it with numerical simulation and a control experiment, and we demonstrate its utility for fast imaging of the surface photo-voltage on an organic photo-voltaic material.

  20. A Community of Electrons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plutonium's missing magnetism also provides a groundbreaking insight into the overall nature of matter. November 20, 2015 A Community of Electrons With electronic correlations,...

  1. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in...

  2. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale,...

  3. Consumer Electronics Association Comment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) is the preeminent trade association promoting growth in the $285 billion U.S. consumer electronics industry.

  4. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the

  5. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the

  6. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the

  7. Multifocal Multiphoton Laser-Scanning Structured Illumination Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Whole-Field Detection - Energy Innovation Portal Multifocal Multiphoton Laser-Scanning Structured Illumination Microscopy with Whole-Field Detection Colorado School of Mines Contact CSM About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryThis invention describes a multiphoton imaging process in conjunction with whole field detection which gives it the ability to penetrate deeper into highly scattering media. DescriptionThis system may be used for imaging beyond the diffraction limit in

  8. Single beam Fourier transform digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, A. Chhaniwal, V. K.; Mahajan, S.; Trivedi, V.; Faridian, A.; Pedrini, G.; Osten, W.; Dubey, S. K.; Javidi, B.

    2014-03-10

    Quantitative phase contrast microscopy reveals thickness or height information of a biological or technical micro-object under investigation. The information obtained from this process provides a means to study their dynamics. Digital holographic (DH) microscopy is one of the most used, state of the art single-shot quantitative techniques for three dimensional imaging of living cells. Conventional off axis DH microscopy directly provides phase contrast images of the objects. However, this process requires two separate beams and their ratio adjustment for high contrast interference fringes. Also the use of two separate beams may make the system more vulnerable to vibrations. Single beam techniques can overcome these hurdles while remaining compact as well. Here, we describe the development of a single beam DH microscope providing whole field imaging of micro-objects. A hologram of the magnified object projected on to a diffuser co-located with a pinhole is recorded with the use of a commercially available diode laser and an arrayed sensor. A Fourier transform of the recorded hologram directly yields the complex amplitude at the image plane. The method proposed was investigated using various phase objects. It was also used to image the dynamics of human red blood cells in which sub-micrometer level thickness variation were measurable.

  9. Observation of Materials Processes in Liquids in the Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chong M.; Liao, Honggang; Ross, Frances M.

    2015-01-01

    Materials synthesis and the functioning of devices often indispensably involve liquid media. But direct visualization of dynamic process in liquids, especially with high spatial and temporal resolution, has been challenging. For solid materials, advances in aberration corrected electron microscopy have made observation of atomic level features a routine practice. Here we discuss the extent to which one can take advantage of the resolution of modern electron microscopes to image phenomenon occuring in liquids. We will describe the fundamentals of two different experimental approaches, closed and open liquid cells. We will illustrate the capabilities of each approach by considering processes in batteries and nucleation and growth of nanoparticles from solution. We conclude that liquid cell electron microscopy appears to be duly fulfilling its role for in situ studies of nanoscale processes in liquids, revealing physical and chemical processes otherwise difficult to observe.

  10. Electronic Transitions in f-electron Metals at High Pressures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Electronic Transitions in f-electron Metals at High Pressures: Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electronic Transitions in f-electron Metals at High ...

  11. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticleliquid interface. This knowledge is essential to many semiconductor ...

  12. Invited Review Article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Vos, Winnok H.; Beghuin, Didier; Schwarz, Christian J.; Jones, David B.; Loon, Jack J. W. A. van

    2014-10-15

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as ionizing radiation and microgravity at the cellular and tissue level demands adequate visualization technology. Advanced light microscopy (ALM) is the leading tool for non-destructive structural and functional investigation of static as well as dynamic biological systems. In recent years, technological developments and advances in photochemistry and genetic engineering have boosted all aspects of resolution, readout and throughput, rendering ALM ideally suited for biological space research. While various microscopy-based studies have addressed cellular response to space-related environmental stressors, biological endpoints have typically been determined only after the mission, leaving an experimental gap that is prone to bias results. An on-board, real-time microscopical monitoring device can bridge this gap. Breadboards and even fully operational microscope setups have been conceived, but they need to be rendered more compact and versatile. Most importantly, they must allow addressing the impact of gravity, or the lack thereof, on physiologically relevant biological systems in space and in ground-based simulations. In order to delineate the essential functionalities for such a system, we have reviewed the pending questions in space science, the relevant biological model systems, and the state-of-the art in ALM. Based on a rigorous trade-off, in which we recognize the relevance of multi-cellular systems and the cellular microenvironment, we propose a compact, but flexible concept for space-related cell biological research that is based on light sheet microscopy.

  13. Ultrafast Optical Microscopy of Single Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide Flakes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Seo, Minah; Yamaguchi, Hisato; Mohite, Aditya D.; Boubanga-Tombet, Stephane; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Prasankumar, Rohit P.

    2016-02-15

    We performed ultrafast optical microscopy on single flakes of atomically thin CVD-grown molybdenum disulfide, using non-degenerate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to excite and probe carriers above and below the indirect and direct band gaps. These measurements reveal the influence of layer thickness on carrier dynamics when probing near the band gap. Furthermore, fluence-dependent measurements indicate that carrier relaxation is primarily influenced by surface-related defect and trap states after above-bandgap photoexcitation. Furthermore, the ability to probe femtosecond carrier dynamics in individual flakes can thus give much insight into light-matter interactions in these two-dimensional nanosystems.

  14. Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wail depinning process in permalloy magnetic nanowires Mi-Young Im ', Lars Bocklage^, Guido Meier^ and Peter Fischer' '^ C e ir te r -f o rX ^ a y Optics, Lawrence Berkeley N ational Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA ^ Institut fiir A ngew andte Physik und Zentrum ftir M ikrostrukturforschung, U niversitat Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, 20355 Hamburg, Germany Abstract F u ll-fie ld m a g n e tic tra n sm iss io n x -ra y m ic ro sc o p y at h ig h sp a tia l

  15. Magnetic imaging with full-field soft x-ray microscopies (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Magnetic imaging with full-field soft x-ray microscopies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic imaging with full-field soft x-ray microscopies Authors: Fischer, Peter ; ...

  16. Magnetic imaging with full-field soft x-ray microscopies (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Magnetic imaging with full-field soft x-ray microscopies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic imaging with full-field soft x-ray microscopies You are accessing a ...

  17. Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process in permalloy magnetic nanowires Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the ...

  18. Electronic & magnetic materials and devices at the CNM | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Electronic & magnetic materials and devices at the CNM Graphene Micrograph 1 of 24 Graphene Micrograph Ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy image of a point defect in graphene that has been epitaxially grown on 6H-SiC(0001) (Nathan Guisinger, EMMD Group) at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials. Image: Photo courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory Graphene Micrograph 1 of 24 Graphene Micrograph Ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy image of a point

  19. RHIC electron lenses upgrades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, X.; Altinbas, Z.; Bruno, D.; Binello, S.; Costanzo, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D. M.; Hock, J.; Hock, K.; Harvey, M.; Luo, Y.; Marusic, A.; Mi, C.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T. A.; Pikin, A. I.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Samms, T.; Shrey, T. C.; Schoefer, V.; Tan, Y.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; White, S. M.

    2015-05-03

    In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 100 GeV polarized proton run in 2015, two electron lenses were used to partially compensate for the head-on beam-beam effect for the first time. Here, we describe the design of the current electron lens, detailing the hardware modifications made after the 2014 commissioning run with heavy ions. A new electron gun with 15-mm diameter cathode is characterized. The electron beam transverse profile was measured using a YAG screen and fitted with a Gaussian distribution. During operation, the overlap of the electron and proton beams was achieved using the electron backscattering detector in conjunction with an automated orbit control program.

  20. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transfer (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy

  1. WHOLE CELL TOMOGRAPHY/MOLECULAR BIOLOGY/STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY: Affordable x-ray microscopy with nanoscale resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, James E.; Blackborow, Paul; Horne, Stephen J.; Gelb, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    Biological research spans 10 orders of magnitude from angstroms to meters. While electron microscopy can reveal structural details at most of these spatial length scales, transmission electron tomography only reliably reconstructs three-dimensional (3-D) volumes of cellular material with a spatial resolution between 1-5 nm from samples less than 500 nm thick1. Most biological cells are 2-30 times thicker than this threshold, which means that a cell must be cut into consecutive slices with each slice reconstructed individually in order to approximate the contextual information of the entire cell. Fortunately, due to a larger penetration depth2, X-ray computed tomography bypasses the need to physically section a cell and enables imaging of intact cells and tissues on the micrometer or larger scale with tens to hundreds of nanometer spatial resolution. While the technique of soft x-ray microscopy has been extensively developed in synchrotron facilities, advancements in laboratory x-ray source designs now increase its accessibility by supporting commercial systems suitable for a standard laboratory. In this paper, we highlight a new commercial compact cryogenic soft x-ray microscope designed for a standard laboratory setting and explore its capabilities for mesoscopic investigations of intact prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

  2. Catalac free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  3. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  4. Catalac free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-12-12

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac is described. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator, or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  5. Power Electronics Block Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-12-31

    The software consists of code that will allow rapid prototyping of advanced power electronics for use in renewable energy systems.

  6. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  7. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  8. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  9. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  10. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's

  11. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  12. Direct observation of the structural and electronic changes of Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Patrick J.; Klie, Robert F. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Iddir, Hakim [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Abraham, Daniel P. [Argonne National Laboratory, Chemical Sciences and Engineering, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    This study focuses on the effects of electron beam induced irradiation to the layered oxide Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy are used to characterize structural and electronic transitions in the material during irradiation, with a focus on changes in Mn valence and O content. This truly in situ irradiation allows for specific particle tracking, dose quantification, and real-time observation, while demonstrating many parallels to the oxide's structure evolution observed during electrochemical cycling. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that typical imaging conditions are not severe enough to induce damage to the pristine oxide.

  13. Total-scattering pair-distribution function of organic material from powder electron diffraction data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorelik, Tatiana E.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Schmidt, Martin U.; Kolb, Ute

    2015-04-01

    This paper shows for the first time that pair-distribution function analyses can be carried out on organic and organo-metallic compounds from powder electron diffraction data. Different experimental setups are demonstrated, including selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nanodiffraction in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or nanodiffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) modes. The methods were demonstrated on organo-metallic complexes (chlorinated and unchlorinated copper-phthalocyanine) and on purely organic compounds (quinacridone). The PDF curves from powder electron diffraction data, called ePDF, are in good agreement with PDF curves determined from X-ray powder data demonstrating that the problems of obtaining kinematical scattering data and avoiding beam-damage of the sample are possible to resolve.

  14. Total-scattering pair-distribution function of organic material from powder electron diffraction data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gorelik, Tatiana E.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Schmidt, Martin U.; Kolb, Ute

    2015-04-01

    This paper shows for the first time that pair-distribution function analyses can be carried out on organic and organo-metallic compounds from powder electron diffraction data. Different experimental setups are demonstrated, including selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nanodiffraction in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or nanodiffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) modes. The methods were demonstrated on organo-metallic complexes (chlorinated and unchlorinated copper-phthalocyanine) and on purely organic compounds (quinacridone). The PDF curves from powder electron diffraction data, called ePDF, are in good agreement with PDF curves determined from X-ray powder data demonstrating that the problems of obtaining kinematical scattering datamore » and avoiding beam-damage of the sample are possible to resolve.« less

  15. Cryo diffraction microscopy: Ice conditions and finite supports

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miao, H.; Downing, K.; Huang, X.; Kirz, J.; Marchesini, S.; Nelson, J.; Shapiro, D.; Steinbrener, J.; Stewart, A.; Jacobsen, C.

    2009-09-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution imagesmore » using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.« less

  16. Confocal volume in laser Raman microscopy depth profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Kanematsu, Wataru

    2011-11-15

    To clarify the degradation of confocality in laser Raman microscopy depth profiling (optical sectioning) and the influence of pinhole filtering on it, we investigate the confocal volume in detail based on Gaussian beam optics and scalar wave optics. Theoretical depth profiles of a homogeneous transparent sample for four different pinhole sizes, which are computed using the measured incident beam waist radius w{sub 0} and only a few optical system specific parameters such as a numerical aperture (NA) and a focal length, show a good agreement with the corresponding measured depth profiles. The computed confocal volume demonstrates that the pinhole size affects the actual probe depth as well as the axial resolution and the total intensity loss.

  17. Photothermally excited force modulation microscopy for broadband nanomechanical property measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Ryan Killgore, Jason P.

    2015-11-16

    We demonstrate photothermally excited force modulation microscopy (PTE FMM) for mechanical property characterization across a broad frequency range with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Photothermal excitation allows for an AFM cantilever driving force that varies smoothly as a function of drive frequency, thus avoiding the problem of spurious resonant vibrations that hinder piezoelectric excitation schemes. A complication of PTE FMM is that the sub-resonance cantilever vibration shape is fundamentally different compared to piezoelectric excitation. By directly measuring the vibrational shape of the cantilever, we show that PTE FMM is an accurate nanomechanical characterization method. PTE FMM is a pathway towards the characterization of frequency sensitive specimens such as polymers and biomaterials with frequency range limited only by the resonance frequency of the cantilever and the low frequency limit of the AFM.

  18. Reactor cell assembly for use in spectroscopy and microscopy applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grindstaff, Quirinus; Stowe, Ashley Clinton; Smyrl, Norm; Powell, Louis; McLane, Sam

    2015-08-04

    The present disclosure provides a reactor cell assembly that utilizes a novel design and that is wholly or partially manufactured from Aluminum, such that reactions involving Hydrogen, for example, including solid-gas reactions and thermal decomposition reactions, are not affected by any degree of Hydrogen outgassing. This reactor cell assembly can be utilized in a wide range of optical and laser spectroscopy applications, as well as optical microscopy applications, including high-temperature and high-pressure applications. The result is that the elucidation of the role of Hydrogen in the reactions studied can be achieved. Various window assemblies can be utilized, such that high temperatures and high pressures can be accommodated and the signals obtained can be optimized.

  19. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youvan, Dougalas C.; Silva, Christopher M.; Bylina, Edward J.; Coleman, William J.; Dilworth, Michael R.; Yang, Mary M.

    2003-12-09

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  20. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youvan, Douglas C.; Silva, Christopher M.; Bylina, Edward J.; Coleman, William J.; Dilworth, Michael R.; Yang, Mary M.

    2002-09-24

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  1. Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tittmann, B. R.; Xi, X.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property study of complex biological cell walls. A unique feature of this approach is that both microscopes allow the biological samples to be examined in their natural fluid (water) environment.

  2. Electronic Durability of Flexible Transparent Films from Type-Specific Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J; Iyer, S; Bernhardt, A; Huh, JY; Hudson, S; Fagan, J; Hobbie, E.

    2011-12-11

    The coupling between mechanical flexibility and electronic performance is evaluated for thin films of metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deposited on compliant supports. Percolated networks of type-purified SWCNTs are assembled as thin conducting coatings on elastic polymer substrates, and the sheet resistance is measured as a function of compression and cyclic strain through impedance spectroscopy. The wrinkling topography, microstructure and transparency of the films are independently characterized using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and optical absorption spectroscopy. Thin films made from metallic SWCNTs show better durability as flexible transparent conductive coatings, which we attribute to a combination of superior mechanical performance and higher interfacial conductivity.

  3. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Aguiar, Jeffery A.

    2015-09-15

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to determine the chemistry and oxidation state of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 thin film battery electrodes in liquid cells for in situ scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). Using the L2,3 white line intensity ratio method we determine the oxidation state of Mn and Ti in a liquid electrolyte solvent and discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity.

  4. Electron emitting filaments for electron discharge devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.; Pincosy, P.A.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1983-06-10

    Electrons are copiously emitted by a device comprising a loop-shaped filament made of lanthanum hexaboride. The filament is directly heated by an electrical current produced along the filament by a power supply connected to the terminal legs of the filament. To produce a filament, a diamond saw or the like is used to cut a slice from a bar made of lanthanum hexaboride. The diamond saw is then used to cut the slice into the shape of a loop which may be generally rectangular, U-shaped, hairpin-shaped, zigzag-shaped, or generally circular. The filaments provide high electron emission at a relatively low operating temperature, such as 1600/sup 0/C. To achieve uniform heating, the filament is formed with a cross section which is tapered between the opposite ends of the filament to compensate for nonuniform current distribution along the filament due to the emission of electrons from the filament.

  5. Electron emitting filaments for electron discharge devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Pincosy, Philip A.; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1988-01-01

    Electrons are copiously emitted by a device comprising a loop-shaped filament made of lanthanum hexaboride. The filament is directly heated by an electrical current produced along the filament by a power supply connected to the terminal legs of the filament. To produce a filament, a diamond saw or the like is used to cut a slice from a bar made of lanthanum hexaboride. The diamond saw is then used to cut the slice into the shape of a loop which may be generally rectangular, U-shaped, hairpin-shaped, zigzag-shaped, or generally circular. The filaments provide high electron emission at a relatively low operating temperature, such as 1600.degree. C. To achieve uniform heating, the filament is formed with a cross section which is tapered between the opposite ends of the filament to compensate for non-uniform current distribution along the filament due to the emission of electrons from the filament.

  6. Identifying ferroelectric phase and domain structure using angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K. L.; Huber, J. E.

    2014-03-24

    We used angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy (AR-PFM), vertical PFM (VPFM), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to provide a systematic interpretation of domain patterns in polycrystalline, near-morphotropic lead zirconate titanate. This material was used to illustrate the power of AR-PFM methods in resolving complex domain patterns where multiple phases may be present. AR-PFM was carried out with a 30° rotation interval, and the resulting data were analysed to identify the orientation of the underlying axis of piezoelectricity. The additional information provided by AR-PFM was studied, comparing its capabilities to those of 3-dimensional PFM, consisting of one VPFM image and two orthogonal lateral PFM (LPFM) images. We show that, in certain conditions, using AR-PFM can identify the phases present at the sub-grain scale. This was confirmed using VPFM and EBSD data. Furthermore, the method can discriminate laminated domain patterns that appear similar in VPFM and can reliably expose domain patterns that may not be seen in LPFM data from a single orientation, or even in 3D PFM data.

  7. Macroscopic Ensembles of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes in Bubble Imprints Studied by Polarized Raman Microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ushiba, Shota; Hoyt, Jordan; Masui, Kyoko; Kono, Junichiro; Kawata, Satoshi; Shoji, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    We study the alignment of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in bubble imprints through polarized Raman microscopy. A hemispherical bubble containing SWCNTs is pressed against a glass substrate, resulting in an imprint of the bubble membrane with a coffee ring on the substrate. We find that macroscopic ensembles of aligned SWCNTs are obtained in the imprints, in which there are three patterns of orientations: (i) azimuthal alignment on the coffee ring, (ii) radial alignment at the edge of the membrane, and (iii) random orientation at the center of the membrane. We also find that the alignment of SWCNTs in the imprintsmore » can be manipulated by spinning bubbles. The orientation of SWCNTs on the coffee ring is directed radially, which is orthogonal to the case of unspun bubbles. This approach enables one to align SWCNTs in large quantities and in a short time, potentially opening up a wide range of CNT-based electronic and optical applications.« less

  8. Unveiling Stability Criteria of DNA-Carbon Nanotubes Constructs by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Computational Modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kilina, Svetlana; Yarotski, Dzmitry A.; Talin, A. Alec; Tretiak, Sergei; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    We present a combined approach that relies on computational simulations and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements to reveal morphological properties and stability criteria of carbon nanotube-DNA (CNT-DNA) constructs. Application of STM allows direct observation of very stable CNT-DNA hybrid structures with the well-defined DNA wrapping angle of 63.4 ° and a coiling period of 3.3 nm. Using force field simulations, we determine how the DNA-CNT binding energy depends on the sequence and binding geometry of a single strand DNA. This dependence allows us to quantitatively characterize the stability of a hybrid structure with an optimal π-stacking between DNA nucleotides andmore » the tube surface and better interpret STM data. Our simulations clearly demonstrate the existence of a very stable DNA binding geometry for (6,5) CNT as evidenced by the presence of a well-defined minimum in the binding energy as a function of an angle between DNA strand and the nanotube chiral vector. This novel approach demonstrates the feasibility of CNT-DNA geometry studies with subnanometer resolution and paves the way towards complete characterization of the structural and electronic properties of drug-delivering systems based on DNA-CNT hybrids as a function of DNA sequence and a nanotube chirality.« less

  9. Gaussian approximation and single-spin measurement in magnetic resonance force microscopy with spin noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghunathan, Shesha; Brun, Todd A.; Goan, Hsi-Sheng

    2010-11-15

    A promising technique for measuring single electron spins is magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), in which a microcantilever with a permanent magnetic tip is resonantly driven by a single oscillating spin. The most effective experimental technique is the oscillating cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals (OSCAR) protocol, in which the signal takes the form of a frequency shift. If the quality factor of the cantilever is high enough, this signal will be amplified over time to the point where it can be detected by optical or other techniques. An important requirement, however, is that this measurement process occurs on a time scale that is short compared to any noise which disturbs the orientation of the measured spin. We describe a model of spin noise for the MRFM system and show how this noise is transformed to become time dependent in going to the usual rotating frame. We simplify the description of the cantilever-spin system by approximating the cantilever wave function as a Gaussian wave packet and show that the resulting approximation closely matches the full quantum behavior. We then examine the problem of detecting the signal for a cantilever with thermal noise and spin with spin noise, deriving a condition for this to be a useful measurement.

  10. Copper intercalation at the interface of graphene and Ir(111) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sicot, M. Fagot-Revurat, Y.; Kierren, B.; Vasseur, G.; Malterre, D.

    2014-11-10

    We report on the intercalation of a submonolayer of copper at 775?K underneath graphene epitaxially grown on Ir(111) studied by means of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 77?K. Nucleation and growth dynamics of Cu below graphene have been investigated, and, most importantly, the intercalation mechanism has been identified. First, LEED patterns reveal the pseudomorphic growth of Cu on Ir under the topmost graphene layer resulting in a large Cu in-plane lattice parameter expansion of about 6% compared to Cu(111). Second, large-scale STM topographs as a function of Cu coverage show that Cu diffusion on Ir below graphene exhibits a low energy barrier resulting in Cu accumulation at Ir step edges. As a result, the graphene sheet undergoes a strong edges reshaping. Finally, atomically-resolved STM images reveal a damaged graphene sheet at the atomic scale after metal intercalation. Point defects in graphene were shown to be carbon vacancies. According to these results, a Cu penetration path beneath graphene is proposed to occur via metal aided defect formation with no or poor self healing of the graphene sheet. This work illustrates the fact that Cu intercalation is harmful for graphene grown on Ir(111) at the atomic scale.

  11. Preparation of scanning tunneling microscopy tips using pulsed alternating current etching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valencia, Victor A.; Thaker, Avesh A.; Derouin, Jonathan; Valencia, Damian N.; Farber, Rachael G.; Gebel, Dana A.; Killelea, Daniel R.

    2015-03-15

    An electrochemical method using pulsed alternating current etching (PACE) to produce atomically sharp scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips is presented. An Arduino Uno microcontroller was used to control the number and duration of the alternating current (AC) pulses, allowing for ready optimization of the procedures for both Pt:Ir and W tips using a single apparatus. W tips prepared using constant and pulsed AC power were compared. Tips fashioned using PACE were sharper than those etched with continuous AC power alone. Pt:Ir tips were prepared with an initial coarse etching stage using continuous AC power followed by fine etching using PACE. The number and potential of the finishing AC pulses was varied and scanning electron microscope imaging was used to compare the results. Finally, tip quality using the optimized procedures was verified by UHV-STM imaging. With PACE, at least 70% of the W tips and 80% of the Pt:Ir tips were of sufficiently high quality to obtain atomically resolved images of HOPG or Ni(111)

  12. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J.; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Jin, Qiaoling; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2015-02-24

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolutionmore » beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub–30-nm resolution structural images and ~90-nm–resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. This combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context.« less

  13. Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  14. Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of the Origins of Anomalous Particle Size Distributions in Supported Metal Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benavidez, Angelica D.; Kovarik, Libor; Genc, Arda; Agrawal, Nitin; Larsson, Elin M.; Hansen, Thomas W.; Karim, Ayman M.; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2012-10-31

    In this Environmental TEM (ETEM) study of supported Pt and Pd model catalysts, individual nanoparticles were tracked during heat treatments at temperatures up to 600C in H2, O2, and vacuum. We found anomalous growth of nanoparticles occurred during the early stages of catalyst sintering wherein some particles started to grow significantly larger than the mean, resulting in a broadening of the particle size distribution. We can rule out sample non-uniformity as a cause for the growth of these large particles, since images were recorded prior to heat treatments. The anomalous growth of these particles may help explain particle size distributions in heterogeneous catalysts which often show particles that are significantly larger than the mean, resulting in a long tail to the right. It has been suggested that particle migration and coalescence could be the likely cause for the broad size distributions. This study shows that anomalous growth of nanoparticles can occur under conditions where Ostwald ripening is the primary sintering mechanism.

  15. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Probing of Native Oxide and Artificial Layers on Silicon Nanoparticles for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Yang; Piper, Daniela M.; Gu, Meng; Travis, Jonathan J.; George, Steven M.; Lee, Se-Hee; Genc, Arda; Pullan, Lee; Liu, Jun; Mao, Scott X.; Zhang, Jiguang; Ban, Chunmei; Wang, Chong M.

    2014-11-25

    Surface modification of silicon nanoparticle via molecular layer deposition (MLD) has been recently proved to be an effective way for dramatically enhancing the cyclic performance in lithium ion batteries. However, the fundamental mechanism as how this thin layer of coating function is not known, which is even complicated by the inevitable presence of native oxide of several nanometers on the silicon nanoparticle. Using in-situ TEM, we probed in detail the structural and chemical evolution of both uncoated and coated silicon particles upon cyclic lithiation/delithation. We discovered that upon initial lithiation, the native oxide layer converts to crystalline Li2O islands, which essentially increases the impedance on the particle, resulting in ineffective lithiation/delithiation, and therefore low coulombic efficiency. In contrast, the alucone MLD coated particles show extremely fast, thorough and highly reversible lithiation behaviors, which are clarified to be associated with the mechanical flexibility and fast Li+/e- conductivity of the alucone coating. Surprisingly, the alucone MLD coating process chemically changes the silicon surface, essentially removing the native oxide layer and therefore mitigates side reaction and detrimental effects of the native oxide. This study provides a vivid picture of how the MLD coating works to enhance the coulombic efficiency and preserve capacity and clarifies the role of the native oxide on silicon nanoparticles during cyclic lithiation and delithiation. More broadly, this work also demonstrated that the effect of the subtle chemical modification of the surface during the coating process may be of equal importance as the coating layer itself.

  16. In-situ scanning electron microscopy study of fracture events during back-end-of-line microbeam bending tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanstreels, K. Zahedmanesh, H.; Bender, H.; Gonzalez, M.; De Wolf, I.; Lefebvre, J.; Bhowmick, S.

    2014-11-24

    This paper demonstrates the direct observation of crack initiation, crack propagation, and interfacial delamination events during in-situ microbeam bending tests of FIB milled BEOL structures. The elastic modulus and the critical force of fracture of the BEOL beam samples were compared for beams of different length and width.

  17. The electron beam hole drilling of silicon nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howitt, D. G.; Chen, S. J.; Gierhart, B. C.; Smith, R. L.; Collins, S. D.

    2008-01-15

    The mechanism by which an intense electron beam can produce holes in thin films of silicon nitride has been investigated using a combination of in situ electron energy loss spectrometry and electron microscopy imaging. A brief review of electron beam interactions that lead to material loss in different materials is also presented. The loss of nitrogen and silicon decreases with decreasing beam energy and although still observable at a beam energy of 150 keV ceases completely at 120 keV. The linear behavior of the loss rate coupled with the energy dependency indicates that the process is primarily one of direct displacement, involving the sputtering of atoms from the back surface of the specimen with the rate controlling mechanism being the loss of nitrogen.

  18. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles on graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnette, Drew [Microelectronics and Photonics Graduate Program, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Roper, D. Keith, E-mail: dkroper@uark.edu [Microelectronics and Photonics Graduate Program, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    Plasmon excitation decay by absorption, scattering, and hot electron transfer has been distinguished from effects induced by incident photons for gold nanoparticles on graphene monolayer using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Gold nano-ellipses were evaporated onto lithographed graphene, which was transferred onto a silicon nitride transmission electron microscopy grid. Plasmon decay from lithographed nanoparticles measured with EELS was compared in the absence and presence of the graphene monolayer. Measured decay values compared favorably with estimated radiative and non-radiative contributions to decay in the absence of graphene. Graphene significantly enhanced low-energy plasmon decay, increasing mode width 38%, but did not affect higher energy plasmon or dark mode decay. This decay beyond expected radiative and non-radiative mechanisms was attributed to hot electron transfer, and had quantum efficiency of 20%, consistent with previous reports.

  19. Atmosphere to Electrons

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Atmosphere to Electrons Enabling the Wind Plant of Tomorrow 2 Atmosphere to Electrons Enabling the Wind Plant of Tomorrow The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) research initiative is focused on improving the performance and reliability of wind plants by establishing an unprecedented under- standing of how the Earth's atmosphere interacts with the wind plants and developing innovative technologies to maximize energy extraction from the wind. The A2e initiative

  20. Ceramic Electron Multiplier

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Comby, G.

    1996-10-01

    The Ceramic Electron Multipliers (CEM) is a compact, robust, linear and fast multi-channel electron multiplier. The Multi Layer Ceramic Technique (MLCT) allows to build metallic dynodes inside a compact ceramic block. The activation of the metallic dynodes enhances their secondary electron emission (SEE). The CEM can be used in multi-channel photomultipliers, multi-channel light intensifiers, ion detection, spectroscopy, analysis of time of flight events, particle detection or Cherenkov imaging detectors. (auth)

  1. Electronic Recordkeeping System Questionnaire

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    43.5 (04/2015) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Electronic Recordkeeping System Questionnaire INSTRUCTIONS: System owners should work in consultation with their organization's records contacts to ensure the accurate completion of a separate questionnaire for each electronic recordkeeping system. Federal regulations require proper address of recordkeeping requirements and disposition before approving new electronic information systems (EIS) or enhancements to existing EISes. OMB Circular A-130 requires

  2. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  3. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectroscopy (ARPES) at ALS Beamline 7.0.1, a team of scientists from the ALS and Germany characterized the electronic band structure and successfully controlled the gap...

  4. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with effectively zero mass and constant velocity, like photons. Graphene's intrinsically low scattering rate from defects...

  5. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen [Knoxville, TN; Kalinin, Sergei V. [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  6. Separation of distinct photoexcitation species in femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; Doughty, Benjamin; Yang, Bing

    2016-02-03

    Femtosecond transient absorption microscopy is a novel chemical imaging capability with simultaneous high spatial and temporal resolution. Although several powerful data analysis approaches have been developed and successfully applied to separate distinct chemical species in such images, the application of such analysis to distinguish different photoexcited species is rare. In this paper, we demonstrate a combined approach based on phasor and linear decomposition analysis on a microscopic level that allows us to separate the contributions of both the excitons and free charge carriers in the observed transient absorption response of a composite organometallic lead halide perovskite film. We found spatialmore » regions where the transient absorption response was predominately a result of excitons and others where it was predominately due to charge carriers, and regions consisting of signals from both contributors. Lastly, quantitative decomposition of the transient absorption response curves further enabled us to reveal the relative contribution of each photoexcitation to the measured response at spatially resolved locations in the film.« less

  7. Raman Microscopy of Lithium-Manganese-Rich Cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruther, Rose E; Callender, Andrew F.; Zhou, Hui; Martha, Surendra; Nanda, Jagjit

    2014-01-01

    Lithium rich, manganese rich composites with general formula xLi2MnO3 (1-x)LiMO2 are promising candidates for high capacity and high voltage cathodes for lithium ion batteries. Lithium rich oxides crystallize as a nanocomposite of layered phases whose structure further evolves with electrochemical cycling. Raman spectroscopy is potentially a powerful tool to monitor the crystal chemistry and correlate phase changes with electrochemical behavior. While several groups have reported Raman spectra of lithium rich oxides, the data show considerable variability in terms of both the vibrational features observed and their interpretation. In this study Raman microscopy is used to investigate lithium-rich manganese-rich cathodes as a function of average charge and electrochemical cycling. LMR-NMC cycled at elevated temperature (60 C) has a modified crystal structure which may account for some of the observed increase in capacity. Contrary to some reports, no growth of a spinel phase is observed. However, analysis of the Raman spectra does indicate the structure of LMR-NMC deviates significantly from an ideal layered phase. The results also highlight the importance of using low laser power and large sample sizes to obtain consistent data sets.

  8. Atomic force microscopy investigation of the giant mimivirus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuznetsov, Yuri G.; Xiao Chuan; Sun Siyang; Raoult, Didier; Rossmann, Michael; McPherson, Alexander

    2010-08-15

    Mimivirus was investigated by atomic force microscopy in its native state following serial degradation by lysozyme and bromelain. The 750-nm diameter virus is coated with a forest of glycosylated protein fibers of lengths about 140 nm with diameters 1.4 nm. Fibers are capped with distinctive ellipsoidal protein heads of estimated Mr = 25 kDa. The surface fibers are attached to the particle through a layer of protein covering the capsid, which is in turn composed of the major capsid protein (MCP). The latter is organized as an open network of hexagonal rings with central depressions separated by 14 nm. The virion exhibits an elaborate apparatus at a unique vertex, visible as a star shaped depression on native particles, but on defibered virions as five arms of 50 nm width and 250 nm length rising above the capsid by 20 nm. The apparatus is integrated into the capsid and not applied atop the icosahedral lattice. Prior to DNA release, the arms of the star disengage from the virion and it opens by folding back five adjacent triangular faces. A membrane sac containing the DNA emerges from the capsid in preparation for fusion with a membrane of the host cell. Also observed from disrupted virions were masses of distinctive fibers of diameter about 1 nm, and having a 7-nm periodicity. These are probably contained within the capsid along with the DNA bearing sac. The fibers were occasionally observed associated with toroidal protein clusters interpreted as processive enzymes modifying the fibers.

  9. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2013-05-28

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  10. Raman Microscopy of Lithium-Manganese-Rich Cathodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ruther, Rose E; Callender, Andrew F.; Zhou, Hui; Martha, Surendra; Nanda, Jagjit

    2014-01-01

    Lithium rich, manganese rich composites with general formula xLi2MnO3 (1-x)LiMO2 are promising candidates for high capacity and high voltage cathodes for lithium ion batteries. Lithium rich oxides crystallize as a nanocomposite of layered phases whose structure further evolves with electrochemical cycling. Raman spectroscopy is potentially a powerful tool to monitor the crystal chemistry and correlate phase changes with electrochemical behavior. While several groups have reported Raman spectra of lithium rich oxides, the data show considerable variability in terms of both the vibrational features observed and their interpretation. In this study Raman microscopy is used to investigate lithium-rich manganese-rich cathodes asmore » a function of average charge and electrochemical cycling. LMR-NMC cycled at elevated temperature (60 C) has a modified crystal structure which may account for some of the observed increase in capacity. Contrary to some reports, no growth of a spinel phase is observed. However, analysis of the Raman spectra does indicate the structure of LMR-NMC deviates significantly from an ideal layered phase. The results also highlight the importance of using low laser power and large sample sizes to obtain consistent data sets.« less

  11. Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application to

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Co microdot magnetic arrays (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application to Co microdot magnetic arrays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application to Co microdot magnetic arrays We demonstrate the addition of depth resolution to the usual two-dimensional images in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), with application to a square array of circular magnetic

  12. Active phase distribution changes within a catalyst particle during Fischer–Tropsch synthesis as revealed by multi-scale microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cats, K. H.; Andrews, J. C.; Stephan, O.; March, K.; Karunakaran, C.; Meirer, F.; de Groot, F. M. F.; Weckhuysen, B. M.

    2016-02-16

    In this study, the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) reaction is one of the most promising processes to convert alternative energy sources, such as natural gas, coal or biomass, into liquid fuels and other high-value products. Despite its commercial implementation, we still lack fundamental insights into the various deactivation processes taking place during FTS. In this work, a combination of three methods for studying single catalyst particles at different length scales has been developed and applied to study the deactivation of Co/TiO2 Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts. By combining transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy-electronmore » energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) we visualized changes in the structure, aggregate size and distribution of supported Co nanoparticles that occur during FTS. At the microscale, Co nanoparticle aggregates are transported over several μm leading to a more homogeneous Co distribution, while at the nanoscale Co forms a thin layer of ~1-2 nm around the TiO2 support. The formation of the Co layer is the opposite case to the “classical” strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) in which TiO2 surrounds the Co, and is possibly related to the surface oxidation of Co metal nanoparticles in combination with coke formation. In other words, the observed migration and formation of a thin CoOx layer are similar to a previously discussed reaction-induced spreading of metal oxides across a TiO2 surface.« less

  13. Electronic Mail Analysis Capability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-08

    Establishes the pilot program to test the Department of Energy (DOE) Electronic Mail Analysis Capability (EMAC), which will be used to monitor and analyze outgoing and incoming electronic mail (e-mail) from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and DOE laboratories that are engaged in nuclear weapons design or work involving special nuclear material. No cancellation.

  14. Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamental length and times scales The magnetic properties of low dimensional solid state ...

  15. Scanning Near-Field Microwave Microscopy of VO2 and CVD Graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Scanning Near-Field Microwave Microscopy of VO2 and CVD Graphene Authors: Tselev, Alexander 1 ; Lavrik, Nickolay V 1 ; Kolmakov, Andrei 2 ; Kalinin, Sergei V 1 + ...

  16. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  17. Electrons and Mirror Symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Krishna

    2007-04-04

    The neutral weak force between an electron and a target particle, mediated by the Z boson, can be isolated by measuring the fractional change under a mirror reflection of the scattering probability of relativistic longitudinally polarized electrons off unpolarized targets. This technique yields neutral weak force measurements at a length scale of 1 femtometer, in contrast to high energy collider measurements that probe much smaller length scales. Study of the variation of the weak force over a range of length scales provides a stringent test of theory, complementing collider measurements. We describe a recent measurement of the neutral weak force between two electrons by the E158 experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. While the weak force between an electron and positron has been extensively studied, that between two electrons had never directly been measured. We conclude by discussing prospects for even more precise measurements at future facilities.

  18. Electrons and Mirror Symmetry

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kumar, Krishna

    2009-09-01

    The neutral weak force between an electron and a target particle, mediated by the Z boson, can be isolated by measuring the fractional change under a mirror reflection of the scattering probability of relativistic longitudinally polarized electrons off unpolarized targets. This technique yields neutral weak force measurements at a length scale of 1 femtometer, in contrast to high energy collider measurements that probe much smaller length scales. Study of the variation of the weak force over a range of length scales provides a stringent test of theory, complementing collider measurements. We describe a recent measurement of the neutral weak force between two electrons by the E158 experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. While the weak force between an electron and positron has been extensively studied, that between two electrons had never directly been measured. We conclude by discussing prospects for even more precise measurements at future facilities.

  19. Electron: Cluster interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheidemann, A.A.; Kresin, V.V.; Knight, W.D.

    1994-02-01

    Beam depletion spectroscopy has been used to measure absolute total inelastic electron-sodium cluster collision cross sections in the energy range from E {approximately} 0.1 to E {approximately} 6 eV. The investigation focused on the closed shell clusters Na{sub 8}, Na{sub 20}, Na{sub 40}. The measured cross sections show an increase for the lowest collision energies where electron attachment is the primary scattering channel. The electron attachment cross section can be understood in terms of Langevin scattering, connecting this measurement with the polarizability of the cluster. For energies above the dissociation energy the measured electron-cluster cross section is energy independent, thus defining an electron-cluster interaction range. This interaction range increases with the cluster size.

  20. Simulations of Gaussian electron guns for RHIC electron lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikin, A.

    2014-02-28

    Simulations of two versions of the electron gun for RHIC electron lens are presented. The electron guns have to generate an electron beam with Gaussian radial profile of the electron beam density. To achieve the Gaussian electron emission profile on the cathode we used a combination of the gun electrodes and shaping of the cathode surface. Dependence of electron gun performance parameters on the geometry of electrodes and the margins for electrodes positioning are presented.

  1. Thin-section microscopy of decayed crystalline marble from the garden sculptures of Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, J.

    2007-11-15

    Sterzing marble, a crystalline white marble used in the late-Baroque garden sculptures of Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna, was studied by means of thin-section and scanning electron microscopy in order to obtain a better understanding of its surface decay caused by atmospheric weathering. Following the classification of distinct phenomena of deterioration by visual on-site inspection, the microstructural features including surface erosion, micro-cracking, soiling, black crust formation, and microbiological infestation are exemplified by microscopical images and are briefly discussed. The results proved useful for evaluating and understanding the various types of marble decay for creating a safer basis for establishing the procedural principles aimed at conservation and maintenance of the sculptures.

  2. Aerogels for electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.W.

    1994-10-01

    In addition to their other exceptional properties, aerogels also exhibit unusual dielectric and electronic properties due to their nano-sized structures and high porosities. For example, aerogels have the lowest dielectric constants measured for a solid material (having values approaching 1.0); they have exceptionally high dielectric resistivities and strengths (i.e., ability to insulate very high voltages); they exhibit low dielectric loss at microwave frequencies; and some aerogels are electrically conductive and photoconductive. These properties are being exploited to provide the next generation of materials for energy storage, low power consumption, and ultra-fast electronics. We are working toward adapting these unusual materials for microelectronic applications, particularly, making thin aerogel films for dielectric substrates and for energy storage devices such as supercapacitors. Measurements are presented in this paper for the dielectric and electronic properties of aerogels, including the dielectric constant, loss factor, dielectric and electrical conductivity, volume resistivity, and dielectric strength. We also describe methods to form and characterize thin aerogel films which are being developed for numerous electronic applications. Finally, some of the electronic applications proposed for aerogels are presented. Commercialization of aerogels for electronics must await further feasibility, prototype development, and cost studies, but they are one of the key materials and are sure to have a major impact on future electronics.

  3. Coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-05-04

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams remains a major challenge in modern accelerator physics. Synchrotron radiation is still too feeble, while the efficiency of two other cooling methods, stochastic and electron, falls rapidly either at high bunch intensities (i.e. stochastic of protons) or at high energies (e-cooling). In this talk a specific scheme of a unique cooling technique, Coherent Electron Cooling, will be discussed. The idea of coherent electron cooling using electron beam instabilities was suggested by Derbenev in the early 1980s, but the scheme presented in this talk, with cooling times under an hour for 7 TeV protons in the LHC, would be possible only with present-day accelerator technology. This talk will discuss the principles and the main limitations of the Coherent Electron Cooling process. The talk will describe the main system components, based on a high-gain free electron laser driven by an energy recovery linac, and will present some numerical examples for ions and protons in RHIC and the LHC and for electron-hadron options for these colliders. BNL plans a demonstration of the idea in the near future.

  4. Investigation of Cellular Interactions of Nanoparticles by Helium Ion Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arey, Bruce W.; Shutthanandan, V.; Xie, Yumei; Tolic, Ana; Williams, Nolann G.; Orr, Galya

    2011-06-01

    The helium ion mircroscope (HIM) probes light elements (e.g. C, N, O, P) with high contrast due to the large variation in secondary electron yield, which minimizes the necessity of specimen staining. A defining characteristic of HIM is its remarkable capability to neutralize charge by the implementation of an electron flood gun, which eliminates the need for coating non-conductive specimens for imaging at high resolution. In addition, the small convergence angle in HeIM offers a large depth of field (~5x FE-SEM), enabling tall structures to be viewed in focus within a single image. Taking advantage of these capabilities, we investigate the interactions of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) at the surface of alveolar type II epithelial cells grown at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The increasing use of nanomaterials in a wide range of commercial applications has the potential to increase human exposure to these materials, but the impact of such exposure on human health is still unclear. One of the main routs of exposure is the respiratory tract, where alveolar epithelial cells present a vulnerable target at the interface with ambient air. Since the cellular interactions of NPs govern the cellular response and ultimately determine the impact on human health, our studies will help delineating relationships between particle properties and cellular interactions and response to better evaluate NP toxicity or biocompatibility. The Rutherford backscattered ion (RBI) is a helium ions imaging mode, which backscatters helium ions from every element except hydrogen, with a backscatter yield that depends on the atomic number of the target. Energy-sensitive backscatter analysis is being developed, which when combined with RBI image information, supports elemental identification at helium ion nanometer resolution. This capability will enable distinguishing NPs from cell surface structures with nanometer resolution.

  5. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    momentum because the electrons are restricted to motion in a two-dimensional plane. The Dirac crossing points are at energy ED. 2D Perfection in a 3D World Graphene, a perfect...

  6. Electron Microscope Facility

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    Brookhaven Lab is home to one of only a few Scanning Transmision Electron Microscope (STEM) machines in the world and one of the few that can image single heavy atoms.

  7. Electron Heat Transport Measured

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Transport Measured in a Stochastic Magnetic Field T. M. Biewer, * C. B. Forest, ... limit of s &29; 1, RR assumed the electron heat flux to be diffusive, obeying Fourier's ...

  8. Free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa, Francesco

    1990-01-01

    A high gain, single-pass free electron laser formed of a high brilliance electron injector source, a linear accelerator which imparts high energy to the electron beam, and an undulator capable of extremely high magnetic fields, yet with a very short period. The electron injector source is the first stage (gap) of the linear accelerator or a radial line transformer driven by fast circular switch. The linear accelerator is formed of a plurality of accelerating gaps arranged in series. These gaps are energized in sequence by releasing a single pulse of energy which propagates simultaneously along a plurality of transmission lines, each of which feeds the gaps. The transmission lines are graduated in length so that pulse power is present at each gap as the accelerated electrons pass therethrough. The transmission lines for each gap are open circuited at their ends. The undualtor has a structure similar to the accelerator, except that the transmission lines for each gap are substantially short circuited at their ends, thus converting the electric field into magnetic field. A small amount of resistance is retained in order to generate a small electric field for replenishing the electron bunch with the energy lost as it traverses through the undulator structure.

  9. Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer ... PDF icon ESPE 2008 Peer Review - ABMAS Battery Management System for USCG Applications ...

  10. Power Electronics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems Integration » Power Electronics Power Electronics PowerElectronics graphic.png Power electronics, critical components in PV systems and the larger electric grid, are used to convert electricity from one form to another and deliver it from generation to end consumption. The objective of the Power Electronics activity area is to develop solutions that leverage transformative power electronics technologies-including wide band gap semiconductors, advanced magnetics, thin film capacitors,

  11. Cooling system for electronic components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2015-12-15

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  12. Magnetic domain structure in nanocrystalline Ni-Zn-Co spinel ferrite thin films using off-axis electron holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, D.; Ray, N. M.; Petuskey, W. T.; Smith, D. J.; McCartney, M. R.

    2014-08-28

    We report a study of the magnetic domain structure of nanocrystalline thin films of nickel-zinc ferrite. The ferrite films were synthesized using aqueous spin-spray coating at low temperature (?90?C) and showed high complex permeability in the GHz range. Electron microscopy and microanalysis revealed that the films consisted of columnar grains with uniform chemical composition. Off-axis electron holography combined with magnetic force microscopy indicated a multi-grain domain structure with in-plane magnetization. The correlation between the magnetic domain morphology and crystal structure is briefly discussed.

  13. Electron microscope phase enhancement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jin, Jian; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2010-06-15

    A microfabricated electron phase shift element is used for modifying the phase characteristics of an electron beam passing though its center aperture, while not affecting the more divergent portion of an incident beam to selectively provide a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plan of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. One application of the element is to increase the contrast of an electron microscope for viewing weakly scattering samples while in focus. Typical weakly scattering samples include biological samples such as macromolecules, or perhaps cells. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a ninety degree phase shift as expected. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size aperture is about 5:1. Calculations are underway to determine the feasibility of aspect smaller aspect ratios of about 3:1 and about 2:1.

  14. Morphology of the surface of technically pure titanium VT1-0 after electroexplosive carbonization with a weighed zirconium oxide powder sample and electron beam treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sosnin, Kirill V.; Raykov, Sergey V.; Vaschuk, Ekaterina S.; Budovskikh, Evgenie A. Gromov, Victor E.; Ivanov, Yuri F.

    2014-11-14

    Titanium is carbonized by the electroexplosive method. Formation of a surface alloyed layer and a coating on the treated surface is established by the methods of transmission electron microscopy. The morphology and elemental composition of the alloyed layer are analyzed. A dependence of the structure of the modified layer subjected to electron gun treatment on the absorbed power density is revealed.

  15. Tokyo Electron | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electron Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tokyo Electron Place: Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan Zip: 107-8481 Product: As a leading global supplier of semiconductor production equipment,...

  16. Electronics Stewardship | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electronics Stewardship Mission The team promotes sustainable management of LM's electronic equipment, as deemed appropriate for LM operations and approved by LM, as defined in: ...

  17. Circular free-electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A.; Kurnit, Norman A.; Cooper, Richard K.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency, free electron laser utilizing a circular relativistic electron beam accelerator and a circular whispering mode optical waveguide for guiding optical energy in a circular path in the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator such that the circular relativistic electron beam and the optical energy are spatially contiguous in a resonant condition for free electron laser operation. Both a betatron and synchrotron are disclosed for use in the present invention. A free electron laser wiggler is disposed around the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator for generating a periodic magnetic field to transform energy from the circular relativistic electron beam to optical energy.

  18. Tim Kuneli, Electronics Maintenance Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tim Kuneli, Electronics Maintenance Group Print The recent ALS power supply failure was one of the most challenging projects that Electronics Engineer Technical Superintendent Tim...

  19. Manasa Electronics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manasa Electronics Jump to: navigation, search Name: Manasa Electronics Place: Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh, India Zip: 201 005 Sector: Solar Product: Ghaziabad-based manufacturer of...

  20. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally...

  1. Electron launching voltage monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mendel, Clifford W.; Savage, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    An electron launching voltage monitor measures MITL voltage using a relationship between anode electric field and electron current launched from a cathode-mounted perturbation. An electron launching probe extends through and is spaced from the edge of an opening in a first MITL conductor, one end of the launching probe being in the gap between the MITL conductor, the other end being adjacent a first side of the first conductor away from the second conductor. A housing surrounds the launching probe and electrically connects the first side of the first conductor to the other end of the launching probe. A detector detects the current passing through the housing to the launching probe, the detected current being representative of the voltage between the conductors.

  2. ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brenholdt, I.R.

    1957-11-19

    >An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

  3. Electron launching voltage monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mendel, C.W.; Savage, M.E.

    1992-03-17

    An electron launching voltage monitor measures MITL voltage using a relationship between anode electric field and electron current launched from a cathode-mounted perturbation. An electron launching probe extends through and is spaced from the edge of an opening in a first MITL conductor, one end of the launching probe being in the gap between the MITL conductor, the other end being adjacent a first side of the first conductor away from the second conductor. A housing surrounds the launching probe and electrically connects the first side of the first conductor to the other end of the launching probe. A detector detects the current passing through the housing to the launching probe, the detected current being representative of the voltage between the conductors. 5 figs.

  4. Foil Electron Multiplier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Baldonado, Juan R.; Dors, Eric E.; Harper, Ronnie W.; Skoug, Ruth M.

    2006-03-28

    An apparatus for electron multiplication by transmission that is designed with at least one foil having a front side for receiving incident particles and a back side for transmitting secondary electrons that are produced from the incident particles transiting through the foil. The foil thickness enables the incident particles to travel through the foil and continue on to an anode or to a next foil in series with the first foil. The foil, or foils, and anode are contained within a supporting structure that is attached within an evacuated enclosure. An electrical power supply is connected to the foil, or foils, and the anode to provide an electrical field gradient effective to accelerate negatively charged incident particles and the generated secondary electrons through the foil, or foils, to the anode for collection.

  5. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1991-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion microscopy (FIM), field emission (FE), ion sources, and field desorption mass microscopy (FDMM). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The bibliography covers the period 1990. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references, listed alphabetically by authors, are subdivided into the categories listed in paragraph one above. An Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  6. Anti-contamination device for cryogenic soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Nelson, Johanna; Turner, Joshua; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Jacobsen, Chris

    2011-05-01

    Cryogenic microscopy allows one to view frozen hydrated biological and soft matter specimens with good structural preservation and a high degree of stability against radiation damage. We describe a liquid nitrogen-cooled anti-contamination device for cryogenic X-ray diffraction microscopy. The anti-contaminator greatly reduces the buildup of ice layers on the specimen due to condensation of residual water vapor in the experimental vacuum chamber. We show by coherent X-ray diffraction measurements that this leads to fivefold reduction of background scattering, which is important for far-field X-ray diffraction microscopy of biological specimens.

  7. Electrostrictive and electrostatic responses in contact mode voltage modulated Scanning Probe Microscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliseev, E. A.; Morozovska, A. N.; Ievlev, Anton; Balke, Nina; Maksymovych, Petro; Tselev, Alexander; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Electromechanical response of solids underpins image formation mechanism of several scanning probe microscopy techniques including the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). While the theory of linear piezoelectric and ionic responses are well developed, the contributions of quadratic effects including electrostriction and capacitive tip-surface forces to measured signal remain poorly understood. Here we analyze the electrostrictive and capacitive contributions to the PFM and ESM signals and discuss the implications of the dielectric tip-surface gap on these interactions.

  8. Precision electron polarimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chudakov, Eugene A.

    2013-11-01

    A new generation of precise Parity-Violating experiments will require a sub-percent accuracy of electron beam polarimetry. Compton polarimetry can provide such accuracy at high energies, but at a few hundred MeV the small analyzing power limits the sensitivity. M{\\o}ller polarimetry provides a high analyzing power independent on the beam energy, but is limited by the properties of the polarized targets commonly used. Options for precision polarimetry at ~300 MeV will be discussed, in particular a proposal to use ultra-cold atomic hydrogen traps to provide a 100\\%-polarized electron target for M{\\o}ller polarimetry.

  9. Microelectrode for energy and current control of nanotip field electron emitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lneburg, S.; Mller, M. Paarmann, A. Ernstorfer, R.

    2013-11-18

    Emerging experiments and applications in electron microscopy, holography, and diffraction benefit from miniaturized electron guns for compact experimental setups. We present a highly compact microelectrode integrated field emitter that consists of a tungsten nanotip coated with a few micrometers thick polyimide film followed by a several nanometers thick gold film, both positioned behind the exposed emitter apex by approximately 1030??m. The control of the electric field strength at the nanometer scale tip apex allows suppression, extraction, and energy tuning of field-emitted electrons. The performance of the microelectrode is demonstrated experimentally and supported by numerical simulations.

  10. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface.

  11. [Band electronic structures and crystal packing forces]. Progress report, [March 1992--February 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    We investigated the electronic and structural properties of low-dimensional materials and explored the structure-property correlations governing their physical properties. Progress was made on how to interpret the scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy images of layered materials and on how to account for charge density wave instabilities in 2-D metals. Materials studied included transition metal chalcogenides, transition metal halides, organic conducting salts, Mo bronzes, A{sub 2}PdH{sub 2}, fullerenes, squarate tetrahydrate polymers Fe, Cu(C{sub 4}O{sub 4})4{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, BEDT salts, etc.

  12. MEIC electron cooling program

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is amore » high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.« less

  13. MEIC electron cooling program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.

  14. ELECTRONIC DIGITAL COMPUTER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, J.J. Jr.; Bettis, E.S.; Mann, E.R.

    1957-10-01

    The electronic digital computer is designed to solve systems involving a plurality of simultaneous linear equations. The computer can solve a system which converges rather rapidly when using Von Seidel's method of approximation and performs the summations required for solving for the unknown terms by a method of successive approximations.

  15. Electron beam cutting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mochel, M.E.; Humphreys, C.J.

    1985-04-02

    A method for the cutting of holes 20 Angstroms in diameter, or lines 20 Angstroms wide in a material having positive ionic conduction by the use of a focused electron probe is described. The holes and lines are stable under ambient conditions. 2 figs.

  16. Electron beam cutting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mochel, Margaret E.; Humphreys, Colin J.

    1985-04-02

    A method for the cutting of holes 20 Angstroms in diameter, or lines 20 Angstroms wide in a material having positive ionic conduction by the use of a focused electron probe is described. The holes and lines are stable under ambient conditions.

  17. Magnetic imaging with full-field soft X-ray microscopies (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Magnetic imaging with full-field soft X-ray microscopies Citation Details ... Publication Date: 2013-04-06 OSTI Identifier: 1165116 Report Number(s): LBNL-6392E Journal ID: ISSN ...

  18. Method for detecting cancer in a single cell using mitochondrial correlation microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gourley, Paul L.

    2012-03-06

    A method for distinguishing a normal cell from an abnormal cell, such as, for example a cancer cell or diseased cell, of the same tissue type using mitochondrial correlation microscopy.

  19. Method of detecting cancer in a single cell using mitochondrial correlation microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gourley, Paul L

    2013-06-25

    A method for distinguishing a normal cell from an abnormal cell, such as, for example a cancer cell or diseased cell, of the same tissue type using mitochondrial correlation microscopy.

  20. Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    permalloy magnetic nanowires (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process in permalloy magnetic nanowires Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process in permalloy magnetic nanowires Authors: Im, Mi-Young ; Bocklage, Lars ; Meier, Guido ; Fischer, Peter Publication Date: 2011-10-27 OSTI Identifier: 1172969 Report Number(s): LBNL-5866E DOE Contract Number:

  1. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    algae (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Accepted Manuscript: Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae « Prev Next » Title: Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science (PAGES). This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit

  2. Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism down

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to fundamental length and times scales (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamental length and times scales Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamental length and times scales The magnetic properties of low dimensional solid state matter is of the utmost interest both scientifically as well as technologically. In addition to

  3. Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application to

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Co microdot magnetic arrays (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application to Co microdot magnetic arrays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application to Co microdot magnetic arrays × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is

  4. Stereo soft x-ray microscopy and elemental mapping of hematite and clay suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleber, S.-C.; Thieme, J.; Chao, W.; Fischer, P.

    2008-09-01

    The spatial arrangements of hematite particles within aqueous soil and clay samples are investigated with soft X-ray microscopy, taking advantage of the elemental contrast at the Fe-L edge around E = 707 eV. In combination with stereo microscopy, information about spatial arrangements are revealed and correlated to electrostatic interactions of the different mixtures. Manipulation of a sample mounted to the microscope is possible and particles added while imaging can be detected.

  5. Vibrational Imaging with High Sensitivity via Epidetected Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkmer, Andreas; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Sunney Xie, X.

    2001-07-09

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a novel epidetection scheme for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy that significantly improves the detection sensitivity. Calculations show that epidetected CARS (E-CARS) signals are present for scatterers smaller than the wavelength of light, whereas the large background signals from the surrounding bulk solvent are suppressed by destructive interference. E-CARS microscopy is capable of revealing small intracellular features that are otherwise buried by the strong water CARS signal.

  6. Solid-immersion fluorescence microscopy with increased emission and super resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liau, Z. L.; Porter, J. M.; Liau, A. A.; Chen, J. J.; Salmon, W. C.; Sheu, S. S.

    2015-01-07

    We investigate solid-immersion fluorescence microscopy suitable for super-resolution nanotechnology and biological imaging, and have observed limit of resolution as small as 15?nm with microspheres, mitochondria, and chromatin fibers. We have further observed that fluorescence efficiency increases with excitation power density, implicating appreciable stimulated emission and increased resolution. We discuss potential advantages of the solid-immersion microscopy, including combined use with previously established super-resolution techniques for reaching deeper beyond the conventional diffraction limit.

  7. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Wanli; Fabbri, Jason D.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2012-04-10

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  8. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Wanli; Fabbri, Jason D.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2013-10-29

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  9. The effect of electron-electron interaction induced dephasing on electronic transport in graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahnoj, Sina Soleimani; Touski, Shoeib Babaee; Pourfath, Mahdi E-mail: pourfath@iue.tuwien.ac.at

    2014-09-08

    The effect of dephasing induced by electron-electron interaction on electronic transport in graphene nanoribbons is theoretically investigated. In the presence of disorder in graphene nanoribbons, wavefunction of electrons can set up standing waves along the channel and the conductance exponentially decreases with the ribbon's length. Employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism along with an accurate model for describing the dephasing induced by electron-electron interaction, we show that this kind of interaction prevents localization and transport of electrons remains in the diffusive regime where the conductance is inversely proportional to the ribbon's length.

  10. ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF SOLIDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Damask, A.C.

    1959-11-01

    A method is presented for altering physical properties of certain solids, such as enhancing the usefulness of solids, in which atomic interchange occurs through a vacancy mechanism, electron irradiation, and temperature control. In a centain class of metals, alloys, and semiconductors, diffusion or displacement of atoms occurs through a vacancy mechanism, i.e., an atom can only move when there exists a vacant atomic or lattice site in an adjacent position. In the process of the invention highenergy electron irradiation produces additional vacancies in a solid over those normally occurring at a given temperature and allows diffusion of the component atoms of the solid to proceed at temperatures at which it would not occur under thermal means alone in any reasonable length of time. The invention offers a precise way to increase the number of vacancies and thereby, to a controlled degree, change the physical properties of some materials, such as resistivity or hardness.

  11. ELECTRONIC PHASE CONTROL CIRCUIT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salisbury, J.D.; Klein, W.W.; Hansen, C.F.

    1959-04-21

    An electronic circuit is described for controlling the phase of radio frequency energy applied to a multicavity linear accelerator. In one application of the circuit two cavities are excited from a single radio frequency source, with one cavity directly coupled to the source and the other cavity coupled through a delay line of special construction. A phase detector provides a bipolar d-c output signal proportional to the difference in phase between the voltage in the two cavities. This d-c signal controls a bias supply which provides a d-c output for varying the capacitnce of voltage sensitive capacitors in the delay line. The over-all operation of the circuit is completely electronic, overcoming the time response limitations of the electromechanical control systems, and the relative phase relationship of the radio frequency voltages in the two caviiies is continuously controlled to effect particle acceleration.

  12. Xyce parallel electronic simulator.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Eric Richard; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Santarelli, Keith R.

    2010-05-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users' Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users' Guide.

  13. custom electronic circuitry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    custom electronic circuitry - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  14. Via Electronic Submission

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Via Electronic Submission January 22, 2015 Mr. David Henderson U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Mailstop NE-52 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, Maryland 20874-1290 Re: Excess Uranium Management: Effects of DOE Transfers of Excess Uranium on Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion and Enrichment Industries: Request for Information Dear Mr. Henderson: URENCO USA Inc. ("UUSA, Inc.") appreciates the opportunity to submit comments to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in

  15. Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFord, J.F.

    1993-03-01

    The Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics thrust area is a focal point for computer modeling activities in electronics and electromagnetics in the Electronics Engineering Department of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Traditionally, they have focused their efforts in technical areas of importance to existing and developing LLNL programs, and this continues to form the basis for much of their research. A relatively new and increasingly important emphasis for the thrust area is the formation of partnerships with industry and the application of their simulation technology and expertise to the solution of problems faced by industry. The activities of the thrust area fall into three broad categories: (1) the development of theoretical and computational models of electronic and electromagnetic phenomena, (2) the development of useful and robust software tools based on these models, and (3) the application of these tools to programmatic and industrial problems. In FY-92, they worked on projects in all of the areas outlined above. The object of their work on numerical electromagnetic algorithms continues to be the improvement of time-domain algorithms for electromagnetic simulation on unstructured conforming grids. The thrust area is also investigating various technologies for conforming-grid mesh generation to simplify the application of their advanced field solvers to design problems involving complicated geometries. They are developing a major code suite based on the three-dimensional (3-D), conforming-grid, time-domain code DSI3D. They continue to maintain and distribute the 3-D, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code TSAR, which is installed at several dozen university, government, and industry sites.

  16. Compact electron beam focusing column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persaud, Arun; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani

    2001-07-13

    A novel design for an electron beam focusing column has been developed at LBNL. The design is based on a low-energy spread multicusp plasma source which is used as a cathode for electron beam production. The focusing column is 10 mm in length. The electron beam is focused by means of electrostatic fields. The column is designed for a maximum voltage of 50 kV. Simulations of the electron trajectories have been performed by using the 2-D simulation code IGUN and EGUN. The electron temperature has also been incorporated into the simulations. The electron beam simulations, column design and fabrication will be discussed in this presentation.

  17. ELECTRON COOLING STUDY FOR MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Zhang; Douglas, David R.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    Electron cooling of the ion beams is one critical R&D to achieve high luminosities in JLab's MEIC proposal. In the present MEIC design, a multi-staged cooling scheme is adapted, which includes DC electron cooling in the booster ring and bunched beam electron cooling in the collider ring at both the injection energy and the collision energy. We explored the feasibility of using both magnetized and non-magnetized electron beam for cooling, and concluded that a magnetized electron beam is necessary. Electron cooling simulation results for the newly updated MEIC design is also presented.

  18. Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

    1981-02-11

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  19. Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (PE) Systems Presentations | Department of Energy Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics (PE) Systems Presentations The 2008 Peer Review Meeting for the DOE Energy Storage and Power Electronics Program (ESPE) was held in Washington DC on Sept. 29-30, 2008. Current and completed program projects were presented and reviewed by a group of industry professionals. The 2008 agenda was composed of 28 projects that

  20. High Availability Electronics Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

    2006-12-13

    Availability modeling of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) predicts unacceptably low uptime with current electronics systems designs. High Availability (HA) analysis is being used as a guideline for all major machine systems including sources, utilities, cryogenics, magnets, power supplies, instrumentation and controls. R&D teams are seeking to achieve total machine high availability with nominal impact on system cost. The focus of this paper is the investigation of commercial standard HA architectures and packaging for Accelerator Controls and Instrumentation. Application of HA design principles to power systems and detector instrumentation are also discussed.