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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives...

2

Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAVAL SPENT FUEL RAIL SHIPMENT NAVAL SPENT FUEL RAIL SHIPMENT ACCIDENT EXERCISE OBJECTIVES * Familiarize stakeholders with the Naval spent fuel ACCIDENT EXERCISE OBJECTIVES Familiarize stakeholders with the Naval spent fuel shipping container characteristics and shipping practices * Gain understanding of how the NNPP escorts who accompany the spent fuel shipments will interact with civilian emergency services representatives g y p * Allow civilian emergency services agencies the opportunity to evaluate their response to a pp y p simulated accident * Gain understanding of how the communications links that would be activated in an accident involving a Naval spent fuel shipment would work 1 NTSF May 11 ACCIDENT EXERCISE TYPICAL TIMELINE * Conceptual/Organizational Meeting - April 6 E R T i d it t t d TYPICAL TIMELINE

3

Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel disposal Container System Description Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers/waste packages are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred underground through the access drifts using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System provides long term confinement of the naval spent nuclear fuel (SNF) placed within the disposal containers, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval operations. The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time and limits radionuclide release thereafter. The waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum credible handling and rockfall loads, limits the waste form temperature after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Each naval SNF disposal container will hold a single naval SNF canister. There will be approximately 300 naval SNF canisters, composed of long and short canisters. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinder walls and lids. An exterior label will provide a means by which to identify a disposal container and its contents. Different materials will be selected for the waste package inner and outer cylinders. The two metal cylinders, in combination with the Emplacement Drift System, drip shield, and the natural barrier will support the design philosophy of defense-in-depth. The use of materials with different properties prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The inner cylinder and inner cylinder lids will be constructed of stainless steel while the outer cylinder and outer cylinder lids will be made of high-nickel alloy.

N. E. Pettit

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

4

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D, Part B: Naval spent nuclear fuel management  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the following attachments: transportation of Naval spent nuclear fuel; description of Naval spent nuclear receipt and handling at the Expended Core Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; comparison of storage in new water pools versus dry container storage; description of storage of Naval spent nuclear fuel at servicing locations; description of receipt, handling, and examination of Naval spent nuclear fuel at alternate DOE facilities; analysis of normal operations and accident conditions; and comparison of the Naval spent nuclear fuel storage environmental assessment and this environmental impact statement.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

EIS-0251: Department of the Navy Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Container System for the Management of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel (November 1996)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Final Environmental Impact Statement addresses six general alternative systems for the loading, storage, transport, and possible disposal of naval spent nuclear fuel following examination.

6

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs, Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D: Part A, Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Management  

SciTech Connect

Volume 1 to the Department of Energy`s Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement evaluates a range of alternatives for managing naval spent nuclear fuel expected to be removed from US Navy nuclear-powered vessels and prototype reactors through the year 2035. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) considers a range of alternatives for examining and storing naval spent nuclear fuel, including alternatives that terminate examination and involve storage close to the refueling or defueling site. The EIS covers the potential environmental impacts of each alternative, as well as cost impacts and impacts to the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program mission. This Appendix covers aspects of the alternatives that involve managing naval spent nuclear fuel at four naval shipyards and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Kesselring Site in West Milton, New York. This Appendix also covers the impacts of alternatives that involve examining naval spent nuclear fuel at the Expended Core Facility in Idaho and the potential impacts of constructing and operating an inspection facility at any of the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities considered in the EIS. This Appendix also considers the impacts of the alternative involving limited spent nuclear fuel examinations at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. This Appendix does not address the impacts associated with storing naval spent nuclear fuel after it has been inspected and transferred to DOE facilities. These impacts are addressed in separate appendices for each DOE site.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Container System for the Management of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0251  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Document ID 51 Document ID 51 Commenter: Daniel Nix - Western Interstate Energy Board, Colorado Response to Comment: A. The Navy extended the comment period from 45 to 60 days (ending July 18, 1996) in response to requests from the state of Nevada. A further extension could not be provided because of the need to complete the EIS to support actions required under a court agreement among the Department of Energy, Navy, and State of Idaho covering spent fuel management at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. B.&D. The Board's comment is correct that the EIS is limited to naval spent nuclear fuel and Navy- generated special case waste. The Board's comment is incorrect in the implication that transportation to Yucca Mountain is supported by the EIS. The proposed action of this EIS

8

Spent Fuel Background Report Volume I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an overview of current spent nuclear fuel management in the DOE complex. Sources of information include published literature, internal DOE documents, interviews with site personnel, and information provided by individual sites. Much of the specific information on facilities and fuels was provided by the DOE sites in response to the questionnaire for data for spent fuels and facilities data bases. This information is as accurate as is currently available, but is subject to revision pending results of further data calls. Spent fuel is broadly classified into three categories: (a) production fuels, (b) special fuels, and (c) naval fuels. Production fuels, comprising about 80% of the total inventory, are those used at Hanford and Savannah River to produce nuclear materials for defense. Special fuels are those used in a wide variety of research, development, and testing activities. Special fuels include fuel from DOE and commercial reactors used in research activities at DOE sites. Naval fuels are those developed and used for nuclear-powered naval vessels and for related research and development. Given the recent DOE decision to curtail reprocessing, the topic of main concern in the management of spent fuel is its storage. Of the DOE sites that have spent nuclear fuel, the vast majority is located at three sites-Hanford, INEL, and Savannah River. Other sites with spent fuel include Oak Ridge, West Valley, Brookhaven, Argonne, Los Alamos, and Sandia. B&W NESI Lynchburg Technology Center and General Atomics are commercial facilities with DOE fuel. DOE may also receive fuel from foreign research reactors, university reactors, and other commercial and government research reactors. Most DOE spent fuel is stored in water-filled pools at the reactor facilities. Currently an engineering study is being performed to determine the feasibility of using dry storage for DOE-owned spent fuel currently stored at various facilities. Delays in opening the deep geologic repository and the decision to phase out reprocessing of production fuels are extending the need for interim storage. The report describes the basic storage conditions and the general SNF inventory at individual DOE facilities.

Abbott, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

clean clean Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications US Department of Energy/ Office of Naval Research Shipboard Fuel Cell Workshop Washington, DC March 29, 2011 FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. *FuelCell Energy, Inc. *Renewable and Liquid Fuels Experience *HTPEM Fuel Cell Stack for Shipboard APU *Solid Oxide Experience and Applications DOE-ONR Workshop FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. FuelCell Energy, Inc. * Premier developer of fuel cell technology - founded in 1969 * Over 50 power installations in North America, Europe, and Asia * Industrial, commercial, utility

10

EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs SUMMARY This EIS considers programmatic (DOE-wide) alternative approaches to safely, efficiently, and responsibly manage existing and projected quantities of spent nuclear fuel until the year 2035. This amount of time may be required to make and implement a decision on the ultimate disposition of spent nuclear fuel. DOE's spent nuclear fuel responsibilities include fuel generated by DOE production, research, and development reactors; naval reactors; university and foreign research reactors; domestic non-DOE reactors such as those at the National Institute

11

Spent-fuel-storage alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Intermodal transportation of spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

Concepts for transportation of spent fuel in rail casks from nuclear power plant sites with no rail service are under consideration by the US Department of Energy in the Commercial Spent Fuel Management program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report identifies and evaluates three alternative systems for intermodal transfer of spent fuel: heavy-haul truck to rail, barge to rail, and barge to heavy-haul truck. This report concludes that, with some modifications and provisions for new equipment, existing rail and marine systems can provide a transportation base for the intermodal transfer of spent fuel to federal interim storage facilities. Some needed land transportation support and loading and unloading equipment does not currently exist. There are insufficient shipping casks available at this time, but the industrial capability to meet projected needs appears adequate.

Elder, H.K.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Management of HFIR spent fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been unable to ship its spent fuel off-site for reprocessing since 1985. The HFIR storage pools are expected to fill up by the end of 1994. If a management alternative to existing HFIR pool storage is not identified and implemented by that time, the HFIR will be forced to shut down. This study identified and investigated five alternatives to managing the HFIR spent fuel, to determine the feasibility of implementing each in time to prevent shutdown of the HFIR: (1) increasing HFIR pool storage capacity, (2) storing the spent fuel at another ORNL pool, (3) storing the spent fuel in one or more hot cells at ORNL, (4) shipping the spent fuel off-site for reprocessing or storage elsewhere, and (5) installing a dedicated dry storage facility at ORNL. Of the alternatives investigated, only two could prevent the shutdown of the HFIR in the near term: increasing HFIR pool storage capacity or shipping the spent fuel off-site. Both options have been vigorously pursued because neither is assured of success, and at least one of the options must be successfully implemented if the HFIR is to continue operation. In addition, a third option was selected for implementation as an intermediate-term storage solution: installing a dedicated dry storage facility for the HFIR. An intermediate-term storage solution is needed because neither of the short-term solutions could ensure long-term continued operation of the HFIR.

Green, V.M.; Begovich, J.M.; Flanagan, G.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lotts, A.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Spent graphite fuel element processing  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy currently sponsors two programs to demonstrate the processing of spent graphite fuel elements. General Atomic in San Diego operates a cold pilot plant to demonstrate the processing of both US and German high-temperature reactor fuel. Exxon Nuclear Idaho Company is demonstrating the processing of spent graphite fuel elements from Rover reactors operated for the Nuclear Rocket Propulsion Program. This work is done at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, where a hot facility is being constructed to complete processing of the Rover fuel. This paper focuses on the graphite combustion process common to both programs.

Holder, N.D.; Olsen, C.W.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Spent Fuel Pool Accident Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent fuel pools (SFPs) at nuclear reactor sites contain used fuel assemblies, control rods, used radioactive sources, and used instrumentation. Cooling of the used fuel is required to remove the decay heat generated by radioactive decay.BackgroundThe SFPs include heat removal systems to provide methods to cool the used fuel and inventory makeup systems as backup methods to preserve water inventory if the SFP cooling system is ineffective. These two methods ...

2013-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

16

Intermodal transfer of spent fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of the international standardization of containerized cargo handling in ports around the world, maritime shipment handling is particularly uniform. Thus, handier exposure parameters will be relatively constant for ship-truck and ship-rail transfers at ports throughout the world. Inspectors' doses are expected to vary because of jurisdictional considerations. The results of this study should be applicable to truck-to-rail transfers. A study of the movement of spent fuel casks through ports, including the loading and unloading of containers from cargo vessels, afforded an opportunity to estimate the radiation doses to those individuals handling the spent fuels with doses to the public along subsequent transportation routes of the fuel. A number of states require redundant inspections and for escorts over long distances on highways; thus handlers, inspectors, escort personnel, and others who are not normally classified as radiation workers may sustain doses high enough to warrant concern about occupational safety. This paper addresses the question of radiation safety for these workers. Data were obtained during, observation of the offloading of reactor spent fuel (research reactor spent fuel, in this instance) which included estimates of exposure times and distances for handlers, inspectors and other workers during offloading and overnight storage. Exposure times and distance were also for other workers, including crane operators, scale operators, security personnel and truck drivers. RADTRAN calculational models and parameter values then facilitated estimation of the dose to workers during incident-free ship-to-truck transfer of spent fuel.

Neuhauser, K.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Weiner, R.F. (Western Washington Univ., Bellingham, WA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Spent fuel characteristics & disposal considerations  

SciTech Connect

The fuel used in commercial nuclear power reactors is uranium, generally in the form of an oxide. The gas-cooled reactors developed in England use metallic uranium enclosed in a thin layer of Magnox. Since this fuel must be processed into a more stable form before disposal, we will not consider the characteristics of the Magnox spent fuel. The vast majority of the remaining power reactors in the world use uranium dioxide pellets in Zircaloy cladding as the fuel material. Reactors that are fueled with uranium dioxide generally use water as the moderator. If ordinary water is used, the reactors are called Light Water Reactors (LWR), while if water enriched in the deuterium isotope of hydrogen is used, the reactors are called Heavy Water reactors. The LWRs can be either pressurized reactors (PWR) or boiling water reactors (BWR). Both of these reactor types use uranium that has been enriched in the 235 isotope to about 3.5 to 4% total abundance. There may be minor differences in the details of the spent fuel characteristics for PWRs and BWRs, but for simplicity we will not consider these second-order effects. The Canadian designed reactor (CANDU) that is moderated by heavy water uses natural uranium without enrichment of the 235 isotope as the fuel. These reactors run at higher linear power density than LWRs and produce spent fuel with lower total burn-up than LWRs. Where these difference are important with respect to spent fuel management, we will discuss them. Otherwise, we will concentrate on spent fuel from LWRs.

Oversby, V.M.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Industry Spent Fuel Storage Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Industry Spent Fuel Storage Handbook (8220the Handbook8221) addresses the relevant aspects of at-reactor spent (or used) nuclear fuel (SNF) storage in the United States. With the prospect of SNF being stored at reactor sites for the foreseeable future, it is expected that all U.S. nuclear power plants will have to implement at-reactor dry storage by 2025 or shortly thereafter. The Handbook provides a broad overview of recent developments for storing SNF at U.S. reactor sites, focusing primarily on at...

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

19

Spent fuel integrity during transportation  

SciTech Connect

The conditions of recent shipments of light water reactor spent fuel were surveyed. The radioactivity level of cask coolant was examined in an attempt to find the effects of transportation on LWR fuel assemblies. Discussion included potential cladding integrity loss mechanisms, canning requirements, changes of radioactivity levels, and comparison of transportation in wet or dry media. Although integrity loss or degradation has not been identified, radioactivity levels usually increase during transportation, especially for leaking assemblies.

Funk, C.W.; Jacobson, L.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment (SFTRA) Draft NUREG-2125 Overview for National Transportation Stakeholders Forum John Cook Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation 1 SFTRA Overview Contents * Project and review teams * Purpose and goals * Basic methodology * Improvements relative to previous studies * Draft NUREG structure and format * Routine shipment analysis and results * Accident condition analysis and results * Findings and conclusions * Schedule 2 SFTRA Research and Review Teams * Sandia National Laboratory Research Team [$1.8M; 9/06-9/12] - Doug Ammerman - principal investigator - Carlos Lopez - thermal - Ruth Weiner - RADTRAN * NRC's SFTRA Technical Review Team - Gordon Bjorkman - structural

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

HTGR spent fuel storage study  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a study of alternate methods of storing high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) spent fuel. General requirements and design considerations are defined for a storage facility integral to a fuel recycle plant. Requirements for stand-alone storage are briefly considered. Three alternate water-cooled storage conceptual designs (plug well, portable well, and monolith) are considered and compared to a previous air-cooled design. A concept using portable storage wells in racks appears to be the most favorable, subject to seismic analysis and economic evaluation verification.

Burgoyne, R.M.; Holder, N.D.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Dependence of transuranic content in spent fuel on fuel burnup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the increasing demand for nuclear energy results in larger spent fuel volume, implementation of longer fuel cycles incorporating higher burnup are becoming common. Understanding the effect of higher burnup on the spent ...

Reese, Drew A. (Drew Amelia)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Nondestructive Spent Fuel Assay Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

09-01188, ANS Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management IV, Hiltonanalysis of spent nuclear fuel via nuclear resonanceNondestructive Spent Fuel Assay Using Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Transportation of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. industrys limited efforts at licensing transportation packages characterized as high-capacity, or containing high-burnup (>45 GWd/MTU) commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), or both, have not been successful considering existing spent-fuel inventories that will have to be eventually transported. A holistic framework is proposed for resolving several CSNF transportation issues. The framework considers transportation risks, spent-fuel and cask-design features, and defense-in-depth in context of pre...

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

25

Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL- Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent Fuel withSwinhoe. “Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent FuelS. Tobin, “Measurement of Plutonium in Spent Nuclear Fuel by

Tobin, S. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Behavior of spent fuel under unsaturated conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the performance of spent fuel in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, spent fuel fragments are being exposed to small and intermittent amounts of simulated groundwater under unsaturated conditions. Both the leachate and the visual appearance of the spent fuel have been characterized for 581 days of testing. The amount of Am and Cm measured in the leachates was one to two orders of magnitude greater than that released from spent fuel under saturated conditions. The cause of this difference has not been firmly identified but may be attributable to the presence of large amounts of actinide-containing colloids in the leachate of the unsaturated tests.

Finn, P.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Bates, J.K.; Wolf, S.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation: An Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent nuclear fuel comprises a fraction of the hazardous materials packages shipped annually in the United States. In fact, at the present time, fewer than 100 packages of spent nuclear fuel are shipped annually. At the onset of spent fuel shipments to the proposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada, repository, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) expects to ship 400 - 500 spent fuel transport casks per year over the life of the facility. This study summarizes work on transportation cask design and testing, regulato...

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

28

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Execution Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project supports the Hanford Site Mission to cleanup the Site by providing safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Site spent nuclear fuel in a manner that reduces hazards by staging it to interim onsite storage and deactivates the 100 K Area facilities.

LEROY, P.G.

2000-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

29

TEPP - Spent Nuclear Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Spent Nuclear Fuel - Spent Nuclear Fuel TEPP - Spent Nuclear Fuel This scenario provides the planning instructions, guidance, and evaluation forms necessary to conduct an exercise involving a highway shipment of spent nuclear fuel. This exercise manual is one in a series of five scenarios developed by the Department of Energy Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program. Responding agencies may include several or more of the following: local municipal and county fire, police, sheriff, and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel; state, local, and federal emergency response teams; emergency response contractors;and other emergency response resources that could potentially be provided by the carrier and the originating facility (shipper). Spent Nuclear Fuel.docx More Documents & Publications

30

Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay Brian J. Quiter ?of Pu isotopes in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Given the lowU and 239 Pu in spent nuclear fuel using NRF. II. PERFORMING

Quiter, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Plutonium in Spent Nuclear Fuel by Self-Induced X-ray,”Requirements for Spent Nuclear Fuel Recycling Facility –Content in PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel,” European Safeguards R&D

Tobin, S. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Idaho Spent Fuel Facility (ISFF) Project, Appropriate Acquisition...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Spent Fuel Facility (ISFF) Project, Appropriate Acquisition Strategy Lessons Learned Report, NNSA, Feb 2010 Idaho Spent Fuel Facility (ISFF) Project, Appropriate Acquisition...

33

Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment SFTRA Overview Contents Project and review teams Purpose and goals Basic methodology...

34

Rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements in which a plurality of aligned rows of upright enclosures of generally square cross-sectional areas contain vertically disposed fuel elements. The enclosures are fixed at the lower ends thereof to a base. Pockets are formed between confronting walls of adjacent enclosures for receiving high absorption neutron absorbers, such as Boral, cadmium, borated stainless steel and the like for the closer spacing of spent fuel elements.

Rubinstein, Herbert J. (Los Gatos, CA); Clark, Philip M. (San Jose, CA); Gilcrest, James D. (San Jose, CA)

1978-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

35

Spent fuel transportation in the United States: commercial spent fuel shipments through December 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to provide updated transportation information on light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel in the United States. Historical data are presented on the quantities of spent fuel shipped from individual reactors on an annual basis and their shipping destinations. Specifically, a tabulation is provided for each present-fuel shipment that lists utility and plant of origin, destination and number of spent-fuel assemblies shipped. For all annual shipping campaigns between 1980 and 1984, the actual numbers of spent-fuel shipments are defined. The shipments are tabulated by year, and the mode of shipment and the casks utilized in shipment are included. The data consist of the current spent-fuel inventories at each of the operating reactors as of December 31, 1984. This report presents historical data on all commercial spent-fuel transportation shipments have occurred in the United States through December 31, 1984.

Not Available

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Apparatus for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies of the type comprising an array of fuel pins disposed within an outer metal shell or shroud. A spent fuel assembly is first compacted in a known manner and then incrementally sheared using fixed and movable shear blades having matched laterally projecting teeth which slidably intermesh to provide the desired shearing action. Incremental advancement of the fuel assembly after each shear cycle is limited to a distance corresponding to the lateral projection of the teeth to ensure fuel assembly breakup into small uniform segments which are amenable to remote chemical processing.

Weil, Bradley S. (Knoxville, TN); Metz, III, Curtis F. (Knoxville, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Method for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies of the type wherein a plurality of long metal tubes packed with ceramic fuel are supported in a spaced apart relationship within an outer metal shell or shroud which provides structural support to the assembly. Spent nuclear fuel assemblies are first compacted in a stepwise manner between specially designed gag-compactors and then sheared into short segments amenable to chemical processing by shear blades contoured to mate with the compacted surface of the fuel assembly.

Weil, Bradley S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Watson, Clyde D. (Knoxville, TN)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Integrated process for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process for recovering nuclear fuel from spent fuel assemblies that employs a single canister process container. The cladding and fuel are oxidized in the container, the fuel is dissolved and removed from the container for separation from the aqueous phase, the aqueous phase containing radioactive waste is returned to the container. This container is also the disposal vessel. Add solidification agents and compress container for long term storage.

Forsberg, C.W.

1991-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

39

Facts and issues of direct disposal of spent fuel; Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews those facts and issues that affect the direct disposal of spent reactor fuels. It is intended as a resource document for those impacted by the current Department of Energy (DOE) guidance that calls for the cessation of fuel reprocessing. It is not intended as a study of the specific impacts (schedules and costs) to the Savannah River Site (SRS) alone. Commercial fuels, other low enriched fuels, highly enriched defense-production, research, and naval reactor fuels are included in this survey, except as prevented by rules on classification.

Parks, P.B.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Department of Energy's Spent Nuclear Fuel Canisters andTransporta...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

nuclear fuel generated from research and development, plutonium production, and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (Naval Reactors). Under current national policy, the Department...

42

Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Decision Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) made a FY98 commitment to the Department of Energy (DOE) to recommend a technology for the disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The two technologies being considered, direct co-disposal and melt and dilute, had been previously selected from a group of eleven potential SNF management technologies by the Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team chartered by the DOE''s Office of Spent Fuel Management. To meet this commitment, WSRC organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and ultimately provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE on a preferred SNF alternative management technology.

Shedrow, C.B.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

43

SEU43 fuel bundle shielding analysis during spent fuel transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic task accomplished by the shielding calculations in a nuclear safety analysis consist in radiation doses calculation, in order to prevent any risks both for personnel protection and impact on the environment during the spent fuel manipulation, transport and storage. The paper investigates the effects induced by fuel bundle geometry modifications on the CANDU SEU spent fuel shielding analysis during transport. For this study, different CANDU-SEU43 fuel bundle projects, developed in INR Pitesti, have been considered. The spent fuel characteristics will be obtained by means of ORIGEN-S code. In order to estimate the corresponding radiation doses for different measuring points the Monte Carlo MORSE-SGC code will be used. Both codes are included in ORNL's SCALE 5 programs package. A comparison between the considered SEU43 fuel bundle projects will be also provided, with CANDU standard fuel bundle taken as reference. (authors)

Margeanu, C. A.; Ilie, P.; Olteanu, G. [Inst. for Nuclear Research Pitesti, No. 1 Campului Street, Mioveni 115400, Arges County (Romania)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Spent fuel treatment at ANL-West  

SciTech Connect

At Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-West) there are several thousand kilograms of metallic spent nuclear fuel containing bond sodium. This fuel will be treated in the Fuel Cycle Facility at ANL-West to produce stable waste forms for storage and disposal. The treatment operations will employ a pyrochemical process that also has applications for treating most of the fuel types within the Department of Energy complex. The treatment equipment is in its last stage of readiness, and operations will begin in the Fall of 1994.

Goff, K.M.; Benedict, R.W.; Levinskas, D.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Pyrochemical Treatment of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Over the last 10 years, pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel has progressed from demonstration activities to engineering-scale production operations. As part of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative within the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology, pyrochemical treatment operations are being performed as part of the treatment of fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II at the Idaho National Laboratory. Integral to these treatment operations are research and development activities that are focused on scaling further the technology, developing and implementing process improvements, qualifying the resulting high-level waste forms, and demonstrating the overall pyrochemical fuel cycle.

K. M. Goff; K. L. Howden; G. M. Teske; T. A. Johnson

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Spent nuclear fuel project integrated schedule plan  

SciTech Connect

The Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrated Schedule Plan establishes the organizational responsibilities, rules for developing, maintain and status of the SNF integrated schedule, and an implementation plan for the integrated schedule. The mission of the SNFP on the Hanford site is to provide safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Hanford SNF in a manner which stages it to final disposition. This particularly involves K Basin fuel.

Squires, K.G.

1995-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

47

Perils of plutonium [spent nuclear fuel storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the security of the ponds at reactor sites where radioactive spent fuel are being stored. A recent report by a panel of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, said that attacks by knowledgeable terrorists with access ...

P. P. Predd

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Record of Decision for a Dry Storage Container System for the Management of Navel Spent Nuclear Fuel, January 7, 1997  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 5 / Wednesday, January 8, 1997 / Notices Department of the Navy Record of Decision for a Dry Storage Container System for the Management of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969; the Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA procedures, 40 CFR Parts 1500-1508; and Chief of Naval Operations Environmental and Natural Resources Program Manual, OPNAV Instruction 5090.1B; the Department of the Navy announces its decision to implement the preferred alternative (dual-purpose canisters) identified in the final Environmental Impact Statement for a Container System for the Management of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel (EIS) dated November 1996. The Department of

49

Safeguards Guidance for Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

during shipping off- site. A third case involves the use of a spent fuel conditioning hot cell or facility. In this case, the spent fuel would be reduced in volume by removing...

50

Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for safeguards of LEU and MOX spent fuel,” Internationalsystems in use today (Safeguards Mox Python Detector, 1 Fork

Tobin, S. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

The report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel discusses the technical, regulatory, and economic aspects of spent-fuel storage at nuclear reactors. The report is intended to provide legislators state officials and citizens in the Midwest with information on spent-fuel inventories, current and projected additional storage requirements, licensing, storage technologies, and actions taken by various utilities in the Midwest to augment their capacity to store spent nuclear fuel on site.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Nuclear Fuel Assembly and Related Methods for Spent Nuclear ...  

Nuclear Fuel Assembly and Related Methods for Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing and Management Note: The technology described above is an early stage ...

53

Spent fuel pool analysis using TRACE code  

SciTech Connect

The storage requirements of Spent Fuel Pools have been analyzed with the purpose to increase their rack capacities. In the past, the thermal limits have been mainly evaluated with conservative codes developed for this purpose, although some works can be found in which a best estimate code is used. The use of best estimate codes is interesting as they provide more realistic calculations and they have the capability of analyzing a wide range of transients that could affect the Spent Fuel Pool. Two of the most representative thermal-hydraulic codes are RELAP-5 and TRAC. Nowadays, TRACE code is being developed to make use of the more favorable characteristics of RELAP-5 and TRAC codes. Among the components coded in TRACE that can be used to construct the model, it is interesting to use the VESSEL component, which has the capacity of reproducing three dimensional phenomena. In this work, a thermal-hydraulic model of the Maine Yankee spent fuel pool using the TRACE code is developed. Such model has been used to perform a licensing calculation and the results obtained have been compared with experimental measurements made at the pool, showing a good agreement between the calculations predicted by TRACE and the experimental data. (authors)

Sanchez-Saez, F.; Carlos, S.; Villanueva, J. F.; Martorell, S. [Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Universitat Politenica de Valencia, Cami de Vera s/n, 46021, Valencia (Spain)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Spent Fuel Working Group Report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is storing large amounts of spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials (herein referred to as RINM). In the past, the Department reprocessed RINM to recover plutonium, tritium, and other isotopes. However, the Department has ceased or is phasing out reprocessing operations. As a consequence, Department facilities designed, constructed, and operated to store RINM for relatively short periods of time now store RINM, pending decisions on the disposition of these materials. The extended use of the facilities, combined with their known degradation and that of their stored materials, has led to uncertainties about safety. To ensure that extended storage is safe (i.e., that protection exists for workers, the public, and the environment), the conditions of these storage facilities had to be assessed. The compelling need for such an assessment led to the Secretary`s initiative on spent fuel, which is the subject of this report. This report comprises three volumes: Volume I; Summary Results of the Spent Fuel Working Group Evaluation; Volume II, Working Group Assessment Team Reports and Protocol; Volume III; Operating Contractor Site Team Reports. This volume presents the overall results of the Working Group`s Evaluation. The group assessed 66 facilities spread across 11 sites. It identified: (1) facilities that should be considered for priority attention. (2) programmatic issues to be considered in decision making about interim storage plans and (3) specific vulnerabilities for some of these facilities.

O`Toole, T.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Spent nuclear fuel project detonation phenomena of hydrogen/oxygen in spent fuel containers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Movement of Spent N Reactor fuels from the Hanford K Basins near the Columbia River to Dry interim storage facility on the Hanford plateau will require repackaging the fuel in the basins into multi-canister overpacks (MCOs), drying of the fuel, transporting the contained fuel, hot conditioning, and finally interim storage. Each of these functions will be accomplished while the fuel is contained in the MCOs by several mechanisms. The principal source of hydrogenand oxygen within the MCOs is residual water from the vacuum drying and hot conditioning operations. This document assesses the detonation phenomena of hydrogen and oxygen in the spent fuel containers. Several process scenarios have been identified that could generate detonation pressures that exceed the nominal 10 atmosphere design limit ofthe MCOS. Only 42 grams of radiolized water are required to establish this condition.

Cooper, T.D.

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Nondestructive verification and assay systems for spent fuels  

SciTech Connect

This is an interim report of a study concerning the potential application of nondestructive measurements on irradiated light-water-reactor (LWR) fuels at spent-fuel storage facilities. It describes nondestructive measurement techniques and instruments that can provide useful data for more effective in-plant nuclear materials management, better safeguards and criticality safety, and more efficient storage of spent LWR fuel. In particular, several nondestructive measurement devices are already available so that utilities can implement new fuel-management and storage technologies for better use of existing spent-fuel storage capacity. The design of an engineered prototype in-plant spent-fuel measurement system is approx. 80% complete. This system would support improved spent-fuel storage and also efficient fissile recovery if spent-fuel reprocessing becomes a reality.

Cobb, D.D.; Phillips, J.R.; Bosler, G.E.; Eccleston, G.W.; Halbig, J.K.; Hatcher, C.R.; Hsue, S.T.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques -- Preliminary Modeling Results Emphasizing Integration among Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL- Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel withSwinhoe. “Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent FuelS. Tobin, “Measurement of Plutonium in Spent Nuclear Fuel by

Tobin, S. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Spent Nuclear Fuel Project operational staffing plan  

SciTech Connect

Using the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project`s current process flow concepts and knowledge from cognizant engineering and operational personnel, an initial assessment of the SNF Project radiological exposure and resource requirements was completed. A small project team completed a step by step analysis of fuel movement in the K Basins to the new interim storage location, the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This analysis looked at fuel retrieval, conditioning of the fuel, and transportation of the fuel. This plan describes the staffing structure for fuel processing, fuel movement, and the maintenance and operation (M&O) staffing requirements of the facilities. This initial draft does not identify the support function resources required for M&O, i.e., administrative and engineering (technical support). These will be included in future revisions to the plan. This plan looks at the resource requirements for the SNF subprojects, specifically, the operations of the facilities, balances resources where applicable, rotates crews where applicable, and attempts to use individuals in multi-task assignments. This plan does not apply to the construction phase of planned projects that affect staffing levels of K Basins.

Debban, B.L.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Transportation capabilities study of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates current capabilities for transporting spent nuclear fuel owned by the US Department of Energy. Currently licensed irradiated fuel shipping packages that have the potential for shipping the spent nuclear fuel are identified and then matched against the various spent nuclear fuel types. Also included are the results of a limited investigation into other certified packages and new packages currently under development. This study is intended to support top-level planning for the disposition of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel inventory.

Clark, G.L.; Johnson, R.A.; Smith, R.W. [Packaging Technology, Inc., Tacoma, WA (United States); Abbott, D.G.; Tyacke, M.J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Systems impacts of spent fuel disassembly alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three studies were completed to evaluate four alternatives to the disposal of intact spent fuel assemblies in a geologic repository. A preferred spent fuel waste form for disposal was recommended on consideration of (1) package design and fuel/package interaction, (2) long-term, in-repository performance of the waste form, and (3) overall process performance and costs for packaging, handling, and emplacement. The four basic alternative waste forms considered were (1) end fitting removal, (2) fission gas venting, (3) disassembly and close packing, and (4) shearing/immobilization. None of the findings ruled out any alternative on the basis of waste package considerations or long-term performance of the waste form. The third alternative offers flexibility in loading that may prove attractive in the various geologic media under consideration, greatly reduces the number of packages, and has the lowest unit cost. These studies were completed in October, 1981. Since then Westinghouse Electric Corporation and the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation have completed studies in related fields. This report is now being published to provide publicly the background material that is contained within. 47 references, 28 figures, 31 tables.

Not Available

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Pyroprocess for processing spent nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a pyroprocess for processing spent nuclear fuel. The spent nuclear fuel is chopped into pieces and placed in a basket which is lowered in to a liquid salt solution. The salt is rich in ZrF.sub.4 and containing alkali or alkaline earth fluorides, and in particular, the salt chosen was LiF-50 mol % ZrF.sub.4 with a eutectic melting point of 500.degree. C. Prior to lowering the basket, the salt is heated to a temperature of between 550.degree. C. and 700.degree. C. in order to obtain a molten solution. After dissolution the oxides of U, Th, rare earth and other like oxides, the salt bath solution is subject to hydro-fluorination to remove the oxygen and then to a fluorination step to remove U as gaseous UF.sub.6. In addition, after dissolution, the basket contains PuO.sub.2 and undissolved parts of the fuel rods, and the basket and its contents are processed to remove the Pu.

Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Lockport, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Microsoft Word - spent nuclear fuel report.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel at the Savannah River Site DOE/IG-0727 May 2006 REPORT ON MANAGEMENT OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TABLE OF CONTENTS Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Details of Finding 1 Recommendations 2 Comments 3 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology 4 2. Prior Audit Reports 5 3. Management Comments 6 SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL MANGEMENT Page 1 Details of Finding H-Canyon The Department of Energy's (Department) spent nuclear fuel Operations program at the Savannah River Site (Site) will likely require Extended H-Canyon to be maintained at least two years beyond defined operational needs. The Department committed to maintain H-Canyon operational readiness to provide a disposal path for

63

EIS-0279: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management, Aiken, South Carolina | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

79: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management, Aiken, South Carolina 79: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management, Aiken, South Carolina EIS-0279: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management, Aiken, South Carolina SUMMARY The proposed DOE action considered in this environmental impact statement (EIS) is to implement appropriate processes for the safe and efficient management of spent nuclear fuel and targets at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken County, South Carolina, including placing these materials in forms suitable for ultimate disposition. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 5, 2013 EIS-0279: Amended Record of Decision Spent Nuclear Fuel Management at the Savannah River Site April 1, 2013 EIS-0279-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Management (DOE/EIS-0279-SA-01 and

64

Investigation of the condition of spent-fuel pool components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is currently projected that spent nuclear fuel, which is discharged from the reactor and then stored in water pools, may remain in those pools for several decades. Other studies have addressed the expected integrity of the spent fuel during extended water storage; this study assesses the integrity of metallic spent fuel pool components. Results from metallurgical examinations of specimens taken from stainless steel and aluminum components exposed in spent fuel pools are presented. Licensee Event Reports (LERs) relating to problems with spent fuel components were assessed and are summarized to define the types of operational problems that have occurred. The major conclusions of this study are: aluminum and stainless steel spent fuel pool components have a good history of performance in both deionized and borated water pools. Although some operational problems involving pool components have occurred, these problems have had minimal impacts.

Kustas, F.M.; Bates, S.O.; Opitz, B.E.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Perez, J.M. Jr.; Farnsworth, R.K.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Spent fuel management fee methodology and computer code user's manual.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The methodology and computer model described here were developed to analyze the cash flows for the federal government taking title to and managing spent nuclear fuel. The methodology has been used by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate the spent fuel disposal fee that will provide full cost recovery. Although the methodology was designed to analyze interim storage followed by spent fuel disposal, it could be used to calculate a fee for reprocessing spent fuel and disposing of the waste. The methodology consists of two phases. The first phase estimates government expenditures for spent fuel management. The second phase determines the fees that will result in revenues such that the government attains full cost recovery assuming various revenue collection philosophies. These two phases are discussed in detail in subsequent sections of this report. Each of the two phases constitute a computer module, called SPADE (SPent fuel Analysis and Disposal Economics) and FEAN (FEe ANalysis), respectively.

Engel, R.L.; White, M.K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Spent fuel handling and packaging program. Management summary report  

SciTech Connect

Objective is to design, develop, and demonstrate a spent fuel package for geologic storage and disposal; to design, license, and construct the facilities to produce this package; and to develop and demonstrate technology for the dry, passive surface storage of spent fuel. Progress is reported on engineering and system studies, technical R and D studies, demonstrations, project support studies, spent fuel facility project, and program management.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

HTGR Spent Fuel Treatment Program. HTGR Spent Fuel Treatment Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The spent fuel treatment (SFT) program plan addresses spent fuel volume reduction, packaging, storage, transportation, fuel recovery, and disposal to meet the needs of the HTGR Lead Plant and follow-on plants. In the near term, fuel refabrication will be addressed by following developments in fresh fuel fabrication and will be developed in the long term as decisions on the alternatives dictate. The formulation of this revised program plan considered the implications of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) which, for the first time, established a definitive national policy for management and disposal of nuclear wastes. Although the primary intent of the program is to address technical issues, the divergence between commercial and government interests, which arises as a result of certain provisions of the NWPA, must be addressed in the economic assessment of technically feasible alternative paths in the management of spent HTGR fuel and waste. This new SFT program plan also incorporates a significant cooperative research and development program between the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany. The major objective of this international program is to reduce costs by avoiding duplicate efforts.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

President Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility The Reagan Administration announces a nuclear energy policy that anticipates the establishment of a facility for the storage of...

69

Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Down Spectroscopy for Direct Pu Mass Measurements,” 8thof reasons for quantifying plutonium (Pu) in spent fuel suchas independently verifying the Pu content declared by a

Tobin, S. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Spent Fuel Disposal Trust Fund (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Any licensee operating a nuclear power plant in this State shall establish a segregated Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Trust Fund...

71

Anode Materials for Reprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to consume current stockpiles, uranium dioxide spent nuclear fuel will be .... and Synthesis of Intermetallic Clathrates for Energy Storage and Recovery.

72

Spent Nuclear Fuel project integrated safety management plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is being revised in its entirety and the document title is being revised to ``Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Integrated Safety Management Plan.

Daschke, K.D.

1996-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

73

Arrival condition of spent fuel after storage, handling, and transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study conducted to determine the probable arrival condition of spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel after handling and interim storage in spent fuel storage pools and subsequent handling and accident-free transport operations under normal or slightly abnormal conditions. The objective of this study was to provide information on the expected condition of spent LWR fuel upon arrival at interim storage or fuel reprocessing facilities or at disposal facilities if the fuel is declared a waste. Results of a literature survey and data evaluation effort are discussed. Preliminary threshold limits for storing, handling, and transporting unconsolidated spent LWR fuel are presented. The difficulty in trying to anticipate the amount of corrosion products (crud) that may be on spent fuel in future shipments is also discussed, and potential areas for future work are listed. 95 references, 3 figures, 17 tables.

Bailey, W.J.; Pankaskie, P.J.; Langstaff, D.C.; Gilbert, E.R.; Rising, K.H.; Schreiber, R.E.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Testing of the CANDU Spent Fuel Storage Basket Package  

SciTech Connect

The paper described the results of testing for a CANDU Spent Fuel Storage Basket Package Prototype intended to be used for transport and storage of the CANDU spent fuel bundles within NPP CANDU Cernavoda, Romania. The results obtained proved that the objectives of those tests were achieved

Vieru, G.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

75

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and S.J. Thompson,“Determining Plutonium in Spent Fuel withTobin, “Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent FuelFluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

Ludewigt, Bernhard A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Examining 239Pu and 240Pu Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements on Spent Fuel for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay,” Inst. of Nucl.239 Pu content in spent nuclear fuel [4, 5]. Development ofin the context of spent nuclear fuel, summarizes the results

Quiter, Brian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Nondestructive verification and assay systems for spent fuels. Technical appendixes  

SciTech Connect

Six technical appendixes are presented that provide important supporting technical information for the study of the application of nondestructive measurements to spent-fuel storage. Each appendix addresses a particular technical subject in a reasonably self-contained fashion. Appendix A is a comparison of spent-fuel data predicted by reactor operators with measured data from reprocessors. This comparison indicates a rather high level of uncertainty in previous burnup calculations. Appendix B describes a series of nondestructive measurements at the GE-Morris Operation Spent-Fuel Storage Facility. This series of experiments successfully demonstrated a technique for reproducible positioning of fuel assemblies for nondestructive measurement. The experimental results indicate the importance of measuring the axial and angular burnup profiles of irradiated fuel assemblies for quantitative determination of spent-fuel parameters. Appendix C is a reasonably comprehensive bibliography of reports and symposia papers on spent-fuel nondestructive measurements to April 1981. Appendix D is a compendium of spent-fuel calculations that includes isotope production and depletion calculations using the EPRI-CINDER code, calculations of neutron and gamma-ray source terms, and correlations of these sources with burnup and plutonium content. Appendix E describes the pulsed-neutron technique and its potential application to spent-fuel measurements. Although not yet developed, the technique holds the promise of providing separate measurements of the uranium and plutonium fissile isotopes. Appendix F describes the experimental program and facilities at Los Alamos for the development of spent-fuel nondestructive measurement systems. Measurements are reported showing that the active neutron method is sensitive to the replacement of a single fuel rod with a dummy rod in an unirradiated uranium fuel assembly.

Cobb, D.D.; Phillips, J.R.; Baker, M.P.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Spent nuclear fuel discharges from U.S. reactors 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent Nuclear Fuel Discharges from US Reactors 1994 provides current statistical data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the US. This year`s report provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities at these reactors. Detailed statistics on the data are presented in four chapters that highlight 1994 spent fuel discharges, storage capacities and inventories, canister and nonfuel component data, and assembly characteristics. Five appendices, a glossary, and bibliography are also included. 10 figs., 34 tabs.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Cold Demonstration of a Spent Nuclear Fuel Dry Transfer System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a spent nuclear fuel dry transfer system (DTS) has moved from the design phase to demonstration of major components. Use of an on-site DTS allows utilities with limited crane capacities or other plant restrictions to take advantage of large efficient storage systems. This system also permits utilities to transfer spent fuel from loaded storage casks to transport casks without returning to their fuel storage pool, a circumstance that may arise during the decommissioning process.

1999-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

80

Spent Fuel Transportation Package Performance Study - Experimental Design Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous studies of spent nuclear fuel transportation accident risks have been performed since the late seventies that considered shipping container design and performance. Based in part on these studies, NRC has concluded that the level of protection provided by spent nuclear fuel transportation package designs under accident conditions is adequate. [1] Furthermore, actual spent nuclear fuel transport experience showcase a safety record that is exceptional and unparalleled when compared to other hazardous materials transportation shipments. There has never been a known or suspected release of the radioactive contents from an NRC-certified spent nuclear fuel cask as a result of a transportation accident. In 1999 the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated a study, the Package Performance Study, to demonstrate the performance of spent fuel and spent fuel packages during severe transportation accidents. NRC is not studying or testing its current regulations, a s the rigorous regulatory accident conditions specified in 10 CFR Part 71 are adequate to ensure safe packaging and use. As part of this study, NRC currently plans on using detailed modeling followed by experimental testing to increase public confidence in the safety of spent nuclear fuel shipments. One of the aspects of this confirmatory research study is the commitment to solicit and consider public comment during the scoping phase and experimental design planning phase of this research.

Snyder, A. M.; Murphy, A. J.; Sprung, J. L.; Ammerman, D. J.; Lopez, C.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Loss of spent fuel pool cooling PRA: Model and results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This letter report documents models for quantifying the likelihood of loss of spent fuel pool cooling; models for identifying post-boiling scenarios that lead to core damage; qualitative and quantitative results generated for a selected plant that account for plant design and operational practices; a comparison of these results and those generated from earlier studies; and a review of available data on spent fuel pool accidents. The results of this study show that for a representative two-unit boiling water reactor, the annual probability of spent fuel pool boiling is 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and the annual probability of flooding associated with loss of spent fuel pool cooling scenarios is 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}. Qualitative arguments are provided to show that the likelihood of core damage due to spent fuel pool boiling accidents is low for most US commercial nuclear power plants. It is also shown that, depending on the design characteristics of a given plant, the likelihood of either: (a) core damage due to spent fuel pool-associated flooding, or (b) spent fuel damage due to pool dryout, may not be negligible.

Siu, N.; Khericha, S.; Conroy, S.; Beck, S.; Blackman, H.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Regeneration of ammonia borane spent fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A necessary target in realizing a hydrogen (H{sub 2}) economy, especially for the transportation sector, is its storage for controlled delivery, presumably to an energy producing fuel cell. In this vein, the U.S. Department of Energy's Centers of Excellence (CoE) in Hydrogen Storage have pursued different methodologies, including metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, and sorbents, for the expressed purpose of supplanting gasoline's current > 300 mile driving range. Chemical H{sub 2} storage has been dominated by one appealing material, ammonia borane (H{sub 3}N-BH{sub 3}, AB), due to its high gravimetric capacity of H{sub 2} (19.6 wt %) and low molecular weight (30.7 g mol{sup -1}). In addition, AB has both hydridic and protic moieties, yielding a material from which H{sub 2} can be readily released in contrast to the loss of H{sub 2} from C{sub 2}H{sub 6} which is substantially endothermic. As such, a number of publications have described H{sub 2} release from amine boranes, yielding various rates depending on the method applied. The viability of any chemical H{sub 2} storage system is critically dependent on efficient recyclability, but reports on the latter subject are sparse, invoke the use of high energy reducing agents, and suffer from low yields. Our group is currently engaged in trying to find and fully demonstrate an energy efficient regeneration process for the spent fuel from H{sub 2} depleted AB with a minimum number of steps. Although spent fuel composition depends on the dehydrogenation method, we have focused our efforts on the spent fuel resulting from metal-based catalysis, which has thus far shown the most promise. Metal-based catalysts have produced the fastest rates for a single equivalent of H{sub 2} released from AB and up to 2.5 equiv. of H{sub 2} can be produced within 2 hours. While ongoing work is being carried out to tailor the composition of spent AB fuel, a method has been developed for regenerating the predominant product, polyborazylene (PB) which can be obtained readily from the decomposition of borazine or from nickel carbene catalyst dehydrogenation. In this cycle, the PB is digested with benzenedithiol to yield two products which can both be converted to AB using Bu{sub 3}SnH and BU{sub 2}SnH{sub 2} as reductants. However, in a real world situation the process becomes more complicated for several reasons. Bu{sub 2}SnH{sub 2} is thermally unstable and therefore not viable in a process scale operation. This has led to the development of Bu{sub 3}SnH as the sole reductant although this requires an additional amine exchange step in order to facilitate the reduction to an amine-borane which can then be converted to AB. The tin by-products also need to be recycled in order to maximize the overall energy efficiency and therefore minimize the overall cost of the process. In addition, on an industrial scale, the mass of the tin reductant generates significant cost due to the manipulation of the relatively large quantities involved so reducing the mass at this stage would be of vast significance. We will discuss further developments made to the tin recycle component of the cycle (including methods to minimize tin usage) and investigate new methods of reduction of the digested products, primarily focusing on lighter reductants, including lighter analogs of Bu{sub 2}SnH{sub 2} and Bu{sub 3}SnH. These advances will have a significant impact on the cost of production and therefore the viability of AB as a fuel. Minimization of tin reagents and their recycle will contribute to reduction of the overall cost of AB regeneration and all stages of AB regeneration have been demonstrated.

Sutton, Andrew David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davis, Benjamin L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gordon, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Application of ALARA principles to shipment of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

The public exposure from spent fuel shipment is very low. In view of this low exposure and the perfect safety record for spent fuel shipment, existing systems can be considered satisfactory. On the other hand, occupational exposure reduction merits consideration and technology improvement to decrease dose should concentrate on this exposure. Practices that affect the age of spent fuel in shipment and the number of times the fuel must be shipped prior to disposal have the largest impact. A policy to encourage a 5-year spent fuel cooling period prior to shipment coupled with appropriate cask redesign to accommodate larger loads would be consistent with ALARA and economic principles. And finally, bypassing high population density areas will not in general reduce shipment dose.

Greenborg, J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Murphy, D.W. Burnett, R.A.; Lewis, J.R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Spent fuel test project, Climax granitic stock, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is a test of dry geologic storage of spent nuclear reactor fuel. The SFT-C is located at a depth of 420 m in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site. Eleven canisters of spent commercial PWR fuel assemblies are to be stored for 3 to 5 years. Additional heat is supplied by electrical heaters, and more than 800 channels of technical information are being recorded. The measurements include rock temperature, rock displacement and stress, joint motion, and monitoring of the ventilation air volume, temperature, and dewpoint.

Ramspott, L.D.

1980-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

85

West Valley facility spent fuel handling, storage, and shipping experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The result of a study on handling and shipping experience with spent fuel are described in this report. The study was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and was jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The purpose of the study was to document the experience with handling and shipping of relatively old light-water reactor (LWR) fuel that has been in pool storage at the West Valley facility, which is at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center at West Valley, New York and operated by DOE. A subject of particular interest in the study was the behavior of corrosion product deposits (i.e., crud) deposits on spent LWR fuel after long-term pool storage; some evidence of crud loosening has been observed with fuel that was stored for extended periods at the West Valley facility and at other sites. Conclusions associated with the experience to date with old spent fuel that has been stored at the West Valley facility are presented. The conclusions are drawn from these subject areas: a general overview of the West Valley experience, handling of spent fuel, storing of spent fuel, rod consolidation, shipping of spent fuel, crud loosening, and visual inspection. A list of recommendations is provided. 61 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The effect of fuel type in unsaturated spent fuel tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two well-characterized types of spent nuclear fuel (ATM-103 and ATM-106) were tested under simulated unsaturated conditions with simulated groundwater at 90{degree}C. The actinides present in the leachate were measured after periods of approximately 60, 120, and 275 days. The vessels were acid stripped after 120 and 275 days. Both colloidal and soluble actinide species were detected in the leachates which had pHs ranging from 4 to 7. Alpha spectroscopy studies of filtered and unfiltered leachates showed that large amounts of actinides may be bound in colloids. The uranium phases identified in the colloids were schoepite and soddyite. The actinide release behavior of the two fuels appears to be different. The ATM-106 fuel began to release actinides later than the ATM-103 fuel, but after 275 days, it had released more. The amount of americium released from the two fuels was a higher percentage of the maximum amount of americium present than was the percentage of the simultaneous amount of uranium released.

Finn, P.A.; Gong, M.; Bates, J.K.; Emery, J.W.; Hoh, J.C.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Experience in Using Fills for Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fills for SNF Waste Packages Experience in Using Fills for Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages The use of other fill materials in waste packages has been investigated by several...

88

Risk and Responsibility Sharing in Nuclear Spent Fuel Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the responsibility of American utilities in the long-term management of spent nuclear fuel was limited to the payment of a fee. This narrow involvement did not result in faster ...

De Roo, Guillaume

89

Method for storing spent nuclear fuel in repositories  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for storing radioactive spent fuel in repositories containing sulfur as the storage medium is disclosed. Sulfur is non-corrosive and not subject to radiation damage. Thus, storage periods of up to 100 years are possible.

Schweitzer, Donald G. (Bayport, NY); Sastre, Cesar (Shoreham, NY); Winsche, Warren (Bellport, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Handbook on Neutron Absorber Materials for Spent Nuclear Fuel Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook is intended to become a single source of information regarding technical characteristics of neutron absorber materials that have been used for storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel as well as to provide a summary of users' experience.

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

91

Spent nuclear fuel Canister Storage Building CDR Review Committee report  

SciTech Connect

The Canister Storage Building (CSB) is a subproject under the Spent Nuclear Fuels Major System Acquisition. This subproject is necessary to design and construct a facility capable of providing dry storage of repackaged spent fuels received from K Basins. The CSB project completed a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) implementing current project requirements. A Design Review Committee was established to review the CDR. This document is the final report summarizing that review

Dana, W.P.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Spent Fuel Background Report Volume II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Volume II contains tables that describe DOE fuel storage facilities and the fuel contained in those facilities.

Abbott, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Neutron Generators for Spent Fuel Assay  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. DOE has initiated a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in, and detect the diversion of pins from, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies with non-destructive assay (NDA). The 14 NDA techniques being studied include several that require an external neutron source: Delayed Neutrons (DN), Differential Die-Away (DDA), Delayed Gammas (DG), and Lead Slowing-Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This report provides a survey of currently available neutron sources and their underlying technology that may be suitable for NDA of SNF assemblies. The neutron sources considered here fall into two broad categories. The term 'neutron generator' is commonly used for sealed devices that operate at relatively low acceleration voltages of less than 150 kV. Systems that employ an acceleration structure to produce ion beam energies from hundreds of keV to several MeV, and that are pumped down to vacuum during operation, rather than being sealed units, are usually referred to as 'accelerator-driven neutron sources.' Currently available neutron sources and future options are evaluated within the parameter space of the neutron generator/source requirements as currently understood and summarized in section 2. Applicable neutron source technologies are described in section 3. Commercially available neutron generators and other source options that could be made available in the near future with some further development and customization are discussed in sections 4 and 5, respectively. The pros and cons of the various options and possible ways forward are discussed in section 6. Selection of the best approach must take a number of parameters into account including cost, size, lifetime, and power consumption, as well as neutron flux, neutron energy spectrum, and pulse structure that satisfy the requirements of the NDA instrument to be built.

Ludewigt, Bernhard A

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) spent fuel transportation and handling facility models  

SciTech Connect

A spent fuel logistics study was conducted in support of the US DOE program to develop facilities for preparing spent unreprocessed fuel from commercial LWRs for geological storage. Two computerized logistics models were developed. The first one was the site evaluation model. Two studies of spent fuel handling facility and spent fuel disposal facility siting were completed; the first postulates a single spent fuel handling facility located at any of six DOE laboratory sites, while the second study examined siting strategies with the spent fuel repository relative to the spent fuel handling facility. A second model to conduct storage/handling facility simulations was developed. (DLC)

Andrews, W.B.; Bower, J.C.; Burnett, R.A.; Engel, R.L.; Rolland, C.W.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Nuclear Fuel Data Survey, Form RW-859. This form is used to collect data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States, and the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors. These data are important to the design and operation of the equipment and facilities that DOE will use for the future acceptance, transportation, and disposal of spent fuels. The data collected and presented identifies trends in burnup, enrichment, and spent nuclear fuel discharged form commercial light-water reactor as of December 31, 1993. The document covers not only spent nuclear fuel discharges; but also site capacities and inventories; canisters and nonfuel components; and assembly type characteristics.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The impact of dry spent-fuel storage on decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several utilities have made decisions to decommission nuclear plants. Other utilities are currently investigating the economic and technical feasibility of decommissioning versus continued operations. As a result, assessments are being made to determine the impact of dry spent-fuel storage on decommissioning. This assessment is being made on a comparison of wet and dry storage (including modifications to current wet storage systems). Not only are the capital and operating costs of the equipment or modifications being evaluated, but staffing levels, interference with other decommissioning activities, and the ability to eventually transfer the fuel to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all factor into the assessments. In the case of the Rancho Seco nuclear generating station, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) developed three objectives related to spent-fuel disposition to support the safe and economical closure of the plant. These objectives are as follows: 1. Minimize occupational and public radiation exposure. 2. Minimize decommissioning costs, including the need to maintain the spent-fuel pool. 3. Prepare the fuel for DOE acceptance. These rather universal goals are being met for Rancho Seco through the use of a canister-based spent-fuel storage and transportation system, the NUHOMS system. This paper discusses the economic and technical impacts of dry spent-fuel storage on decommissioning, more specifically as it relates to the decommissioning of the Rancho Seco plant.

Bowser, R.C.; Taylor, M. Jr. (Pacific Nuclear, San Jose, CA (United States)); Miller, K.R. (Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Herald, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

President Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility | Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > President Reagan Calls for a National Spent ... President Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility October 08, 1981

98

Demonstration of a transportable storage system for spent nuclear fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the joint demonstration project between the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the use of a transportable storage system for the long-term storage and subsequent transport of spent nuclear fuel. SMUD's Rancho Seco nuclear generating station was shut down permanently in June 1989. After the shutdown, SMUD began planning the decommissioning process, including the disposition of the spent nuclear fuel. Concurrently, Congress had directed the Secretary of Energy to develop a plan for the use of dual-purpose casks. Licensing and demonstrating a dual-purpose cask, or transportable storage system, would be a step toward achieving Congress's goal of demonstrating a technology that can be used to minimize the handling of spent nuclear fuel from the time the fuel is permanently removed from the reactor through to its ultimate disposal at a DOE facility. For SMUD, using a transportable storage system at the Rancho Seco Independent Spent-Fuel Storage Installation supports the goal of abandoning Rancho Seco's spent-fuel pool as decommissioning proceeds.

Shetler, J.R.; Miller, K.R.; Jones, R.E. (Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Herald, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Separator assembly for use in spent nuclear fuel shipping cask  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separator assembly for use in a spent nuclear fuel shipping cask has a honeycomb-type wall structure defining parallel cavities for holding nuclear fuel assemblies. Tubes formed of an effective neutron-absorbing material are embedded in the wall structure around each of the cavities and provide neutron flux traps when filled with water.

Bucholz, James A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Shippingport Spent Fuel Canister (SSFC) Design Report Project W-518  

SciTech Connect

The SSFC Design Report Describes A spent fuel canister for Shippingport Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies. The design of the SSFC is a minor modification of the MCO. The modification is limited to the Shield Plug which remains unchanged with regard to interfaces with the canister shell. The performance characteristics remain those for the MCO, which bounds the payload of the SSFC.

JOHNSON, D.M.

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Overview of the spent nuclear fuel project at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project`s mission at Hanford is to {open_quotes}Provide safe, economic and environmentally sound management of Hanford spent nuclear fuel in a manner which stages it to final disposition.{close_quotes} The inventory of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Hanford Site covers a wide variety of fuel types (production reactor to space reactor) in many facilities (reactor fuel basins to hot cells) at locations all over the Site. The 2,129 metric tons of Hanford SNF represents about 80% of the total US Department of Energy (DOE) inventory. About 98.5% of the Hanford SNF is 2,100 metric tons of metallic uranium production reactor fuel currently stored in the 1950s vintage K Basins in the 100 Area. This fuel has been slowly corroding, generating sludge and contaminating the basin water. This condition, coupled with aging facilities with seismic vulnerabilities, has been identified by several groups, including stakeholders, as being one of the most urgent safety and environmental concerns at the Hanford Site. As a direct result of these concerns, the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project was recently formed to address spent fuel issues at Hanford. The Project has developed the K Basins Path Forward to remove fuel from the basins and place it in dry interim storage. Alternatives that addressed the requirements were developed and analyzed. The result is a two-phased approach allowing the early removal of fuel from the K Basins followed by its stabilization and interim storage consistent with the national program.

Daily, J.L. [Dept. of Energy, Richland, WA (United States). Richland Operations Office; Fulton, J.C.; Gerber, E.W.; Culley, G.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Integrated Strategy for Spent Fuel Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NRC's NRC's Integrated Strategy for NRC s Integrated Strategy for Spent Fuel Management Earl Easton 1 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission May 25, 2010 Road to Yucca Mountain * 20+ years of preparation for the licensing i review * DOE application received in June 2008 and accepted for review in September 2008 * President Obama pursues alternatives to Yucca Mountain * DOE motion to withdraw in March 2010 2 * DOE motion to withdraw in March 2010 * Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future 2 Growing Spent Fuel Inventory Cumulative Used Nuclear Fuel Scenarios 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 Metric Tons 3 - 50,000 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 2050 Year Reference: Crozat, March 2010 Integrated Strategy * In response to the evolving national debate on spent fuel management strategy, NRC initiated a number of actions:

103

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

09-01188, ANS Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management IV, HiltonParameter Library Spent Nuclear Fuel Transmission detector (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to

Ludewigt, Bernhard A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material---ATM-105  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characterization data obtained to data are described for Approved Testing Material 105 (ATM-105), which is spent fuel from Bundles CZ346 and CZ348 of the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant, a boiling-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-105 consists of 88 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 2400 GJ/kgM (28 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of about 1%. Characterization data include (1) descriptions of as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report.

Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

CASMO-2 spent-fuel-rack criticality analysis  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, utilities have needed to increase their spent-fuel storage capacity. Both Maine Yankee pressurized water reactor (PWR) and Vermont Yankee boiling water reactor (BWR) have increased their spent-fuel rack capacity by decreasing the canister center-to-center spacing while adding fixed poison. Licensing criticality analysis of such changes in spent-fuel rack design have been performed at Yankee Atomic Electric Co. (YAEC) using NITAWL-KENO-IV and the 123-group XSDRN library. However, KENO/Monte Carlo analysis has inherent drawbacks when applied to spent-fuel rack design and modification. These include statistical uncertainty and long computer time. In contrast, the transport theory code, CASMO-2, provides deterministic and fast criticality analysis. Also, since collapsed and transport-corrected cross sections are generated, PDQ can be used to analyze large array problems which are prohibitively expensive using KENO. In this work, the authors apply the CASMO-PDQ methodology to the Maine Yankee and Vermont Yankee high-density spent-fuel rack designs, and compare the final results against KENO.

Napolitano, D.G.; Heinrichs, D.P.; Gorski, J.P.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The burnup dependence of light water reactor spent fuel oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Over the temperature range of interest for dry storage or for placement of spent fuel in a permanent repository under the conditions now being considered, UO{sub 2} is thermodynamically unstable with respect to oxidation to higher oxides. The multiple valence states of uranium allow for the accommodation of interstitial oxygen atoms in the fuel matrix. A variety of stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric phases is therefore possible as the fuel oxidizers from UO{sub 2} to higher oxides. The oxidation of UO{sub 2} has been studied extensively for over 40 years. It has been shown that spent fuel and unirradiated UO{sub 2} oxidize via different mechanisms and at different rates. The oxidation of LWR spent fuel from UO{sub 2} to UO{sub 2.4} was studied previously and is reasonably well understood. The study presented here was initiated to determine the mechanism and rate of oxidation from UO{sub 2.4} to higher oxides. During the early stages of this work, a large variability in the oxidation behavior of samples oxidized under nearly identical conditions was found. Based on previous work on the effect of dopants on UO{sub 2} oxidation and this initial variability, it was hypothesized that the substitution of fission product and actinide impurities for uranium atoms in the spent fuel matrix was the cause of the variable oxidation behavior. Since the impurity concentration is roughly proportional to the burnup of a specimen, the oxidation behavior of spent fuel was expected to be a function of both temperature and burnup. This report (1) summarizes the previous oxidation work for both unirradiated UO{sub 2} and spent fuel (Section 2.2) and presents the theoretical basis for the burnup (i.e., impurity concentration) dependence of the rate of oxidation (Sections 2.3, 2.4, and 2.5), (2) describes the experimental approach (Section 3) and results (Section 4) for the current oxidation tests on spent fuel, and (3) establishes a simple model to determine the activation energies associated with spent fuel oxidation (Section 5).

Hanson, B.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material: ATM-106  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characterization data obtained to date are described for Approved Testing Material (ATM)-106 spent fuel from Assembly BT03 of pressurized-water reactor Calvert Cliffs No. 1. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well- characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCWRM) program. ATM-106 consists of 20 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 3700 GJ/kgM (43 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of /approximately/10%. Characterization data include (1) as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (6) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel rod are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report. 12 refs., 110 figs., 81 tabs.

Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material--ATM-104  

SciTech Connect

The characterization data obtained to date are described for Approved Testing Material 104 (ATM-104), which is spent fuel from Assembly DO47 of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Unit 1), a pressurized-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-104 consists of 128 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 42 MWd/kgM and expected fission gas release of about 1%. A variety of analyses were performed to investigate cladding characteristics, radionuclide inventory, and redistribution of fission products. Characterization data include (1) fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling history; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) and electron probe microanalyses (EPMA); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding.

Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Elements present in leach solutions from unsaturated spent fuel tests  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary results for the composition of the leachate from unsaturated tests at 90{degrees}C with spent fuel for 55--134 days with J-13 groundwater are reported. The pH of the leachate solutions was found to be acidic, ranging from 4 to 7. The actinide concentrations were 10{sup 5} greater than those reported for saturated spent fuel tests in which the leachate pH was 8. We also found that most species in the leachate were present as colloids containing both americium and curium. The presence of actinides in a form not currently included in repository radionuclide transport models provides information that can be used in spent fuel reaction modeling, the performance assessment of the repository and the design of the engineering barrier system. This report was prepared as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

Finn, P.A.; Bates, J.K.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Hafenrichter, L.D.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Information handbook on independent spent fuel storage installations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this information handbook, the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission describes (1) background information regarding the licensing and history of independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs), (2) a discussion of the licensing process, (3) a description of all currently approved or certified models of dry cask storage systems (DCSSs), and (4) a description of sites currently storing spent fuel in an ISFSI. Storage of spent fuel at ISFSIs must be in accordance with the provisions of 10 CFR Part 72. The staff has provided this handbook for information purposes only. The accuracy of any information herein is not guaranteed. For verification or for more details, the reader should refer to the respective docket files for each DCSS and ISFSI site. The information in this handbook is current as of September 1, 1996.

Raddatz, M.G.; Waters, M.D.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Status of Proposed Repository for Latin-American Spent Fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report compiles preliminary information that supports the premise that a repository is needed in Latin America and analyzes the nuclear situation (mainly in Argentina and Brazil) in terms of nuclear capabilities, inventories, and regional spent-fuel repositories. The report is based on several sources and summarizes (1) the nuclear capabilities in Latin America and establishes the framework for the need of a permanent repository, (2) the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) approach for a regional spent-fuel repository and describes the support that international institutions are lending to this issue, (3) the current situation in Argentina in order to analyze the Argentinean willingness to find a location for a deep geological repository, and (4) the issues involved in selecting a location for the repository and identifies a potential location. This report then draws conclusions based on an analysis of this information. The focus of this report is mainly on spent fuel and does not elaborate on other radiological waste sources.

Ferrada, J.J.

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

112

Mission Need Statement: Idaho Spent Fuel Facility Project  

SciTech Connect

Approval is requested based on the information in this Mission Need Statement for The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to develop a project in support of the mission established by the Office of Environmental Management to "complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research". DOE-ID requests approval to develop the Idaho Spent Fuel Facility Project that is required to implement the Department of Energy's decision for final disposition of spent nuclear fuel in the Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain. The capability that is required to prepare Spent Nuclear Fuel for transportation and disposal outside the State of Idaho includes characterization, conditioning, packaging, onsite interim storage, and shipping cask loading to complete shipments by January 1,2035. These capabilities do not currently exist in Idaho.

Barbara Beller

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Mission Need Statement: Idaho Spent Fuel Facility Project  

SciTech Connect

Approval is requested based on the information in this Mission Need Statement for The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to develop a project in support of the mission established by the Office of Environmental Management to "complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research". DOE-ID requests approval to develop the Idaho Spent Fuel Facility Project that is required to implement the Department of Energy's decision for final disposition of spent nuclear fuel in the Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain. The capability that is required to prepare Spent Nuclear Fuel for transportation and disposal outside the State of Idaho includes characterization, conditioning, packaging, onsite interim storage, and shipping cask loading to complete shipments by January 1,2035. These capabilities do not currently exist in Idaho.

Barbara Beller

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Preliminary study on direct recycling of spent PWR fuel in PWR system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary study on direct recycling of PWR spent fuel to support SUPEL (Straight Utilization of sPEnt LWR fuel in LWR system) scenario has been conducted. Several spent PWR fuel compositions in loaded PWR fuel has been evaluated to obtain the criticality of reactor. The reactor can achieve it criticality for U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel is at least 4.0 a% with the minimum fraction of the spent fuel in the core is 15.0 %. The neutron spectra become harder with the escalating of U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel as well as the amount of the spent fuel in the core.

Waris, Abdul; Nuha; Novitriana; Kurniadi, Rizal; Su'ud, Zaki [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

115

Remote Inspection Devices for Spent Reactor Enriched Uranium Fuel Elements  

SciTech Connect

A remote video inspection was developed and deployed in Argentina for the detailed inspection of highly radioactive spent reactor fuel (SNF) as a prerequisite to its shipment to the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the United States for long-term storage and disposition. The fuel is highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent assemblies dating from 1967 to 1989 and aluminum clad uranium-aluminum alloy of a typical material test reactor design. The specialized video system was designed for low cost, high portability, easy setup, and ease of usage, while accommodating the differing electrical systems (i.e. 110/60 Hz, 220/50 Hz) between the United States and Argentina.

Heckendorn, F.M.

2001-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

116

Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Containers: UseCoatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance2006 ABSTRACT Spent nuclear fuel contains fissionable

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - III: Spent DUPIC Fuel Disposal Cost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposal costs of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and DUPIC fuels have been estimated based on available literature data and the engineering design of a spent CANDU fuel disposal facility by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The cost estimation was carried out by the normalization concept of total electricity generation. Therefore, the future electricity generation scale was analyzed to evaluate the appropriate capacity of the high-level waste disposal facility in Korea, which is a key parameter of the disposal cost estimation. Based on the total electricity generation scale, it is concluded that the disposal unit costs for spent CANDU natural uranium, CANDU-DUPIC, and PWR fuels are 192.3, 388.5, and 696.5 $/kg heavy element, respectively.

Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hangbok; Roh, Gyuhong; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

K Basin spent nuclear fuel characterization  

SciTech Connect

The results of the characterization efforts completed for the N Reactor fuel stored in the Hanford K Basins were Collected and summarized in this single referencable document. This summary provides a ''road map'' for what was done and the results obtained for the fuel characterization program initiated in 1994 and scheduled for completion in 1999 with the fuel oxidation rate measurement under moist inert atmospheres.

LAWRENCE, L.A.

1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

119

Reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections, 1984 to 2020  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original spent fuel utility data base (SFDB) has been adjusted to produce agreement with the EIA nuclear energy generation forecast. The procedure developed allows the detail of the utility data base to remain intact, while the overall nuclear generation is changed to match any uniform nuclear generation forecast. This procedure adjusts the weight of the reactor discharges as reported on the SFDB and makes a minimal (less than 10%) change in the original discharge exposures in order to preserve discharges of an integral number of fuel assemblies. The procedure used in developing the reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections, as well as the resulting data bases themselves, are described in detail in this report. Discussions of the procedure cover the following topics: a description of the data base; data base adjustment procedures; addition of generic power reactors; and accuracy of the data base adjustments. Reactor-specific discharge and storage requirements are presented. Annual and cumulative discharge projections are provided. Annual and cumulative requirements for additional storage are shown for the maximum at-reactor (AR) storage assumption, and for the maximum AR with transshipment assumption. These compare directly to the storage requirements from the utility-supplied data, as reported in the Spent Fuel Storage Requirements Report. The results presented in this report include: the disaggregated spent fuel discharge projections; and disaggregated projections of requirements for additional spent fuel storage capacity prior to 1998. Descriptions of the methodology and the results are included in this report. Details supporting the discussions in the main body of the report, including descriptions of the capacity and fuel discharge projections, are included. 3 refs., 6 figs., 12 tabs.

Heeb, C.M.; Libby, R.A.; Holter, G.M.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Subcritical transmutation of spent nuclear fuel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A series of fuel cycle simulations were performed using CEA's reactor physics code ERANOS 2.0 to analyze the transmutation performance of the Subcritical Advanced Burner… (more)

Sommer, Christopher Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Annual report, FY 1979 Spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International meetings under the BEFAST program and under INFCE Working Group No. 6 during 1978 and 1979 continue to indicate that no cases of fuel cladding degradation have developed on pool-stored fuel from water reactors. A section from a spent fuel rack stand, exposed for 1.5 y in the Yankee Rowe (PWR) pool had 0.001- to 0.003-in.-deep (25- to 75-..mu..m) intergranular corrosion in weld heat-affected zones but no evidence of stress corrosion cracking. A section of a 304 stainless steel spent fuel storage rack exposed 6.67 y in the Point Beach reactor (PWR) spent fuel pool showed no significant corrosion. A section of 304 stainless steel 8-in.-dia pipe from the Three Mile Island No. 1 (PWR) spent fuel pool heat exchanger plumbing developed a through-wall crack. The crack was intergranular, initiating from the inside surface in a weld heat-affected zone. The zone where the crack occurred was severely sensitized during field welding. The Kraftwerk Union (Erlangen, GFR) disassembled a stainless-steel fuel-handling machine that operated for 12 y in a PWR (boric acid) spent fuel pool. There was no evidence of deterioration, and the fuel-handling machine was reassembled for further use. A spent fuel pool at a Swedish PWR was decontaminated. The procedure is outlined in this report.

Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Bailey, W.J.; Schreiber, R.E.; Kustas, F.M.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Spent fuel utilization in a compact traveling wave reactor  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, several innovative designs of nuclear reactors are proposed. One of them is Traveling Wave Reactor (TWR). The unique characteristic of a TWR is the capability of breeding its own fuel in the reactor. The reactor is fueled by mostly depleted, natural uranium or spent nuclear fuel and a small amount of enriched uranium to initiate the fission process. Later on in the core, the reactor gradually converts the non-fissile material into the fissile in a process like a traveling wave. In this work, a TWR with spent nuclear fuel blanket was studied. Several parameters such as reactivity coefficients, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron generation lifetime, and fission power, were analyzed. The discharge burnup composition was also analyzed. The calculation is performed by a continuous energy Monte Carlo code McCARD.

Hartanto, Donny; Kim, Yonghee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology 373-1 Kusong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

123

Air Shipment of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Romania to Russia  

SciTech Connect

Romania successfully completed the world’s first air shipment of spent nuclear fuel transported in Type B(U) casks under existing international laws and without shipment license special exceptions when the last Romanian highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel was transported to the Russian Federation in June 2009. This air shipment required the design, fabrication, and licensing of special 20 foot freight containers and cask tiedown supports to transport the eighteen TUK 19 shipping casks on a Russian commercial cargo aircraft. The new equipment was certified for transport by road, rail, water, and air to provide multi modal transport capabilities for shipping research reactor spent fuel. The equipment design, safety analyses, and fabrication were performed in the Russian Federation and transport licenses were issued by both the Russian and Romanian regulatory authorities. The spent fuel was transported by truck from the VVR S research reactor to the Bucharest airport, flown by commercial cargo aircraft to the airport at Yekaterinburg, Russia, and then transported by truck to the final destination in a secure nuclear facility at Chelyabinsk, Russia. This shipment of 23.7 kg of HEU was coordinated by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR), as part of the U.S. Department of Energy Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), in close cooperation with the Rosatom State Atomic Energy Corporation and the International Atomic Energy Agency, and was managed in Romania by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). This paper describes the planning, shipment preparations, equipment design, and license approvals that resulted in the safe and secure air shipment of this spent nuclear fuel.

Igor Bolshinsky; Ken Allen; Lucian Biro; Alexander Buchelnikov

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki [Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 Nuclear Physics and Bio (Indonesia); Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nuclear Physics and Bio Physics Research Group, Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Gedung Fisika, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

125

Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques NGSI Research Overview and Update on NDA Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Non-CN-184/137 Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel withthe Direct Measurement of Plutonium in Spent LWR Fuels by

A., V. Mozin, S.J. Tobin, L.W. Cambell, J.R. Cheatham, C.R. Freeman, C.J. Gesh,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques -- Preliminary Modeling Results Emphasizing Integration among Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Content in PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel,” European Safeguards R&Dof Plutonium in Spent Nuclear Fuel by Self-Induced X- ray,”high fissile content spent fuel. ” Nuclear Technology, 140,

Tobin, S. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Time to 4% hydrogen within the Shippingport spent fuel canisters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A calculation was performed to determine the time necessary for the hydrogen concentration within the Shippingport Spent Fuel Canister (SSFC) to reach 4%. The SSFC was assumed to be loaded with 4 fuel assemblies, each irradiated to 24,600 Mwd/MTU, and containing 2.49 L of water (conservative calculation of water remaining after one hour of drip drying). The time was found to range from 1386 days to 3540 days.

MARUSICH, R.M.; RITTMANN, P.D.

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

SPENT FUEL TRANSFER, STORAGE AND SHIPMENT FOR PL-3  

SciTech Connect

In refueling development studies performed on PL-3 Phase I design, several methods of fuel transfer, storage, and shipment were investigated. An evaluation of the relative merits of the systems and designs under study, as applied to either the BWR or PWR concepts, is made and optimum designs are selected. An analysis of spent fuel shipping cask shielding requirements is presented, along with recommendations for future study in this area. (auth)

Hauenstein, G.C.; Pomeroy, D.L.

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Criticality Risks During Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a best-estimate probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) to quantify the frequency of criticality accidents during railroad transportation of spent nuclear fuel casks. The assessment is of sufficient detail to enable full scrutiny of the model logic and the basis for each quantitative parameter contributing to criticality accident scenario frequencies.

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

130

Preliminary concepts for detecting national diversion of LWR spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary concepts for detecting national diversion of LWR spent fuel during storage, handling and transportation are presented. Principal emphasis is placed on means to achieve timely detection by an international authority. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy/Office of Safeguards and Security (DOE/OSS) as part of the overall Sandia Fixed Facility Physical Protection Program.

Sonnier, C.S.; Cravens, M.N.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Microscopic Examination of a Corrosion Front in Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent uranium oxide nuclear fuel hosts a variety of trace chemical constituents, many of which must be sequestered from the biosphere during fuel storage and disposal. In this paper we present synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy and microscopy findings that illuminate the resultant local chemistry of neptunium and plutonium within spent uranium oxide nuclear fuel before and after corrosive alteration in an air-saturated aqueous environment. We find the plutonium and neptunium in unaltered spent fuel to have a +4 oxidation state and an environment consistent with solid-solution in the UO{sub 2} matrix. During corrosion in an air-saturated aqueous environment, the uranium matrix is converted to uranyl U(VI)O{sub 2}{sup 2+} mineral assemblage that is depleted in plutonium and neptunium relative to the parent fuel. At the corrosion front interface between intact fuel and the uranyl-mineral corrosion layer, we find evidence of a thin ({approx}20 micrometer) layer that is enriched in plutonium and neptunium within a predominantly U{sup 4+} environment. Available data for the standard reduction potentials for NpO{sup 2+}/Np{sup 4+} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}/U{sup 4+} couples indicate that Np(IV) may not be effectively oxidized to Np(V) at the corrosion potentials of uranium dioxide spent nuclear fuel in air-saturated aqueous solutions. Neptunium is an important radionuclide in dose contribution according to performance assessment models of the proposed U. S. repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A scientific understanding of how the UO{sub 2} matrix of spent nuclear fuel impacts the oxidative dissolution and reductive precipitation of neptunium is needed to predict its behavior at the fuel surface during aqueous corrosion. Neptunium would most likely be transported as aqueous Np(V) species, but for this to occur it must first be oxidized from the Np(IV) state found within the parent spent nuclear fuel [1]. In the immediate vicinity of the spent fuel's surface the redox and nucleation behavior is likely to promote/enhance nucleation of NpO{sub 2} and Np{sub 2}O{sub 5}. Alternatively, Np may be incorporated into uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) alteration phases [2]. In some cases, less-soluble elements such as plutonium will be enriched near the surface of the corroding fuel [3]. We have used focused synchrotron x-rays from the MRCAT beam line at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Lab to examine a specimen of spent nuclear fuel that had been subject to 10 years of corrosion testing in an environment of humid air and dripping groundwater at 90 C [4]. We find evidence of a region, approximately 20 microns in thickness, enriched in plutonium and neptunium at the corrosion front that exists between the uranyl silicate alteration mineral rind and the unaltered uranium oxide fuel (Figures 1 and 2). The uranyl silicate is itself found to be depleted in these transuranic elements relative to their abundance relative to uranium in the parent fuel. This suggests a low mobility of these components owing to a resistance to oxidize further in the presence of a UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}/U{sup 4+} couple [5].

J.A> Fortner; A.J. Kropf; R.J. Finch; J.C. Cunnane

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

Locations of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Map of the United States of America showing the locations of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste.

133

Storage of LWR spent fuel in air. Volume 3, Results from exposure of spent fuel to fluorine-contaminated air  

SciTech Connect

The Behavior of Spent Fuel in Storage (BSFS) Project has conducted research to develop data on spent nuclear fuel (irradiated U0{sub 2}) that could be used to support design, licensing, and operation of dry storage installations. Test Series B conducted by the BSFS Project was designed as a long-term study of the oxidation of spent fuel exposed to air. It was discovered after the exposures were completed in September 1990 that the test specimens had been exposed to an atmosphere of bottled air contaminated with an unknown quantity of fluorine. This exposure resulted in the test specimens reacting with both the oxygen and the fluorine in the oven atmospheres. The apparent source of the fluorine was gamma radiation-induced chemical decomposition of the fluoro-elastomer gaskets used to seal the oven doors. This chemical decomposition apparently released hydrofluoric acid (HF) vapor into the oven atmospheres. Because the Test Series B specimens were exposed to a fluorine-contaminated oven atmosphere and reacted with the fluorine, it is recommended that the Test Series B data not be used to develop time-temperature limits for exposure of spent nuclear fuel to air. This report has been prepared to document Test Series B and present the collected data and observations.

Cunningham, M.E.; Thomas, L.E.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Heat Transfer Modeling of Dry Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present work was undertaken to provide heat transfer model that accurately predicts the thermal performance of dry spent nuclear fuel storage facilities. One of the storage configurations being considered for DOE Aluminum-clad Spent Nuclear Fuel (Al-SNF), such as the Material and Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel, is in a dry storage facility. To support design studies of storage options a computational and experimental program has been conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The main objective is to develop heat transfer models including natural convection effects internal to an interim dry storage canister and to geological codisposal Waste Package (WP). Calculated temperatures will be used to demonstrate engineering viability of a dry storage option in enclosed interim storage and geological repository WP and to assess the chemical and physical behaviors of the Al-SNF in the dry storage facilities. The current paper describes the modeling approaches and presents the computational results along with the experimental data.

Lee, S.Y.

1999-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

135

Technical strategy for the management of INEEL spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report presents evaluations, findings, and recommendations of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team. The technical strategy developed by the Task Team includes stabilization, near term storage, packaging, transport, and ultimate disposal. Key issues identified and discussed include waste characterization, criticality, packaging, waste form performance, and special fuels. Current plans focus on onsite needs, and include three central elements: (1) resolution of near-term vulnerabilities, (2) consolidation of storage locations, and (3) achieving dry storage in transportable packages. In addition to the Task Team report, appendices contain information on the INEEL spent fuel inventory; regulatory decisions and agreements; and analyses of criticality, packaging, storage, transportation, and system performance of a geological repository. 16 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Feasibility of x ray fluorescence for spent fuel safeguards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantifying the Pu content in spent nuclear fuel is necessary for many reasons, in particular to verify that diversion or other illicit activities have not occurred. Therefore, safeguarding the world's nuclear fuel is paramount to responsible nuclear regulation and public acceptance, but achieving this goal presents many difficulties from both a technical and economic perspective. The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of NA-24 is funding a large collaborative effort between multiple laboratories and universities to improve spent nuclear fuel safeguards methods and equipment. This effort involves the current work of modeling several different nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. Several are being researched, because no single NDA technique, in isolation, has the potential to properly characterize fuel assemblies and offer a robust safeguards measure. The insights gained from this research, will be used to down-select from the original set a few of the most promising techniques that complement each other. The goal is to integrate the selected instruments to create an accurate measurement system for fuel verification that is also robust enough to detect diversions. These instruments will be fabricated and tested under realistic conditions. This work examines one of the NDA techniques; the feasibility of using x ray emission peaks from Pu and U to gather information about their relative quantities in the spent fuel. X Ray Fluorescence (XRF), is unique compared to the investigated techniques in that it is the only one able to give the elemental ratio of Pu to U, allowing the possibility of a Pu gram quantity for the assembly to be calculated. XRF also presents many challenges, mainly its low penetration, since the low energy x rays of interest are effectively shielded by the first few millimeters of a fuel pin. This paper will explore the results of Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code calculations of spent fuel x ray peaks. The MCNPX simulations will be benchmarked against measurements taken at Oak Ridge. Analysis of the feasibility of XRFs role in spent nuclear fuel safeguards efforts, particularly in the context of the overall NGSI effort will be discussed.

Freeman, Corey Ross [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mozin, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fensin, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; White, Julia M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stafford, Alissa [TAMU; Charlton, William [TAMU

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Spent fuel assembly hardware: Characterization and 10 CFR 61 classification for waste disposal: Volume 1, Activation measurements and comparison with calculations for spent fuel assembly hardware  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consolidation of spent fuel is under active consideration as the US Department of Energy plans to dispose of spent fuel. During consolidation, the fuel pins are removed from an intact fuel assembly and repackaged into a more compact configuration. After repackaging, approximately 30 kg of residual spent fuel assembly hardware per assembly remains that is also radioactive and requires disposal. Understanding the nature of this secondary waste stream is critical to designing a system that will properly handle, package, store, and dispose of the waste. This report presents a methodology for estimating the radionuclide inventory in irradiated spent fuel hardware. Ratios are developed that allow the use of ORIGEN2 computer code calculations to be applied to regions that are outside the fueled region. The ratios are based on the analysis of samples of irradiated hardware from spent fuel assemblies. The results of this research are presented in three volumes. In Volume 1, the development of scaling factors that can be used with ORIGEN2 calculations to estimate activation of spent fuel assembly hardware is documented. The results from laboratory analysis of irradiated spent-fuel hardware samples are also presented in Volume 1. In Volumes 2 and 3, the calculated flux profiles of spent nuclear fuel assemblies are presented for pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors, respectively. The results presented in Volumes 2 and 3 were used to develop the scaling factors documented in Volume 1. 5 refs., 4 figs., 21 tabs.

Luksic, A.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Microsoft Word - spent_fuel_nutt.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decay Heat Decay Heat When a nuclear reactor has been shut down, and nuclear fission is not occurring at a large scale, the major source of heat production will be due to the beta decay of fission fragments. At the moment of reactor shutdown the decay heat is about 6.5% of the previous core power if the reactor has had a long and steady power history. About 1 hour after shutdown, the decay heat will be about 1.5% of the previous core power. After a day, the decay heat falls to 0.4%, and after a week it falls to 0.2%. While there is a large decrease in decay heat after a reactor is shut down, the used nuclear fuel in a reactor core must be continually cooled. This is why all reactors

139

Nuclear Waste Imaging and Spent Fuel Verification by Muon Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the use of cosmic ray muons to image the contents of shielded containers and detect high-Z special nuclear materials inside them. Cosmic ray muons are a naturally occurring form of radiation, are highly penetrating and exhibit large scattering angles on high Z materials. Specifically, we investigated how radiographic and tomographic techniques can be effective for non-invasive nuclear waste characterization and for nuclear material accountancy of spent fuel inside dry storage containers. We show that the tracking of individual muons, as they enter and exit a structure, can potentially improve the accuracy and availability of data on nuclear waste and the contents of Dry Storage Containers (DSC) used for spent fuel storage at CANDU plants. This could be achieved in near real time, with the potential for unattended and remotely monitored operations. We show that the expected sensitivity, in the case of the DSC, exceeds the IAEA detection target for nuclear material accountancy.

Jonkmans, G; Jewett, C; Thompson, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Molten tin reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel is described. Within a containment vessel, a solid plug of tin and nitride precipitates supports a circulating bath of liquid tin therein. Spent nuclear fuel is immersed in the liquid tin under an atmosphere of nitrogen, resulting in the formation of nitride precipitates. The layer of liquid tin and nitride precipitates which interfaces the plug is solidified and integrated with the plug. Part of the plug is melted, removing nitride precipitates from the containment vessel, while a portion of the plug remains solidified to support the liquid tin and nitride precipitates remaining in the containment vessel. The process is practiced numerous times until substantially all of the precipitated nitrides are removed from the containment vessel.

Heckman, Richard A. (Castro Valley, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Prototype spent-fuel canister design, analysis, and test  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories was asked by the US Energy Research and Development Administration (now US Department of Energy) to design the spent fuel shipping cask system for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP). As a part of this task, a canister which holds liquid sodium and the spent fuel assembly was designed, analyzed, and tested. The canister body survived the regulatory Type-B 9.1-m (30-ft) drop test with no apparent leakage. However, the commercially available metal seal used in this design leaked after the tests. This report describes the design approach, analysis, and prototype canister testing. Recommended work for completing the design, when funding is available, is included.

Leisher, W.B.; Eakes, R.G.; Duffey, T.A.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Interim Storage of Hanford Spent Fuel & Associated Sludge  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford site is currently dealing with a number of types of Spent Nuclear Fuel. The route to interim dry storage for the various fuel types branches along two different paths. Fuel types such as metallic N reactor fuel and Shippingport Core 2 Blanket assemblies are being placed in approximately 4 m long canisters which are then stored in tubes below grade in a new canister storage building. Other fuels such as TRIGA{trademark} and Light Water Reactor fuel will be relocated and stored in stand-alone casks on a concrete pad. Varying degrees of sophistication are being applied with respect to the drying and/or evacuation of the fuel interim storage canisters depending on the reactivity of the fuel, the degree of damaged fuel and the previous storage environment. The characterization of sludge from the Hanford K Basins is nearly complete and canisters are being designed to store the sludge (including uranium particles from fuel element cleaning) on an interim basis.

MAKENAS, B.J.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

EIS-0306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear 306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the proposed electrometallurgical treatment of DOE-owned sodium bonded spent nuclear fuel in the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download September 19, 2000 EIS-0306: Record of Decision Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel July 1, 2000 EIS-0306: Final Environmental Impact Statement Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel July 1, 1999 EIS-0306: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Treatment of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel

144

Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Canister Storage Building Functions and Requirements  

SciTech Connect

In 1998, a major change in the technical strategy for managing Multi Canister Overpacks (MCO) while stored within the Canister Storage Building (CSB) occurred. The technical strategy is documented in Baseline Change Request (BCR) No. SNF-98-006, Simplified SNF Project Baseline (MCO Sealing) (FDH 1998). This BCR deleted the hot conditioning process initially adopted for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) as documented in WHC-SD-SNF-SP-005, Integrated Process Strategy for K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel (WHC 199.5). In summary, MCOs containing Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from K Basins would be placed in interim storage following processing through the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility. With this change, the needs for the Hot Conditioning System (HCS) and inerting/pressure retaining capabilities of the CSB storage tubes and the MCO Handling Machine (MHM) were eliminated. Mechanical seals will be used on the MCOs prior to transport to the CSB. Covers will be welded on the MCOs for the final seal at the CSB. Approval of BCR No. SNF-98-006, imposed the need to review and update the CSB functions and requirements baseline documented herein including changing the document title to ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Canister Storage Building Functions and Requirements.'' This revision aligns the functions and requirements baseline with the CSB Simplified SNF Project Baseline (MCO Sealing). This document represents the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Subproject technical baseline. It establishes the functions and requirements baseline for the implementation of the CSB Subproject. The document is organized in eight sections. Sections 1.0 Introduction and 2.0 Overview provide brief introductions to the document and the CSB Subproject. Sections 3.0 Functions, 4.0 Requirements, 5.0 Architecture, and 6.0 Interfaces provide the data described by their titles. Section 7.0 Glossary lists the acronyms and defines the terms used in this document. Section 8.0 References lists the references used for this document.

KLEM, M.J.

2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

145

Criticality Risks During Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a best-estimate probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) to quantify the frequency of criticality accidents during railroad transportation of spent nuclear fuel casks. The assessment is of sufficient detail to enable full scrutiny of the model logic and the basis for each quantitative parameter contributing to criticality accident scenario frequencies. The report takes into account the results of a 2007 peer review of the initial version of this probabilistic risk assessment, which was pu...

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

146

Baseline descriptions for LWR spent fuel storage, handling, and transportation  

SciTech Connect

Baseline descriptions for the storage, handling, and transportation of reactor spent fuel are provided. The storage modes described include light water reactor (LWR) pools, away-from-reactor basins, dry surface storage, reprocessing-facility interim storage pools, and deep geologic storage. Land and water transportation are also discussed. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy/Office of Safeguards and Security as part of the Sandia Laboratories Fixed Facility Physical Protection Program. 45 figs, 4 tables.

Moyer, J.W.; Sonnier, C.S.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Burnup Credit — Technical Basis for Spent-Fuel Burnup Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Present regulatory practices provide as much burnup credit flexibility as can be currently expected. Further progress is achievable by incorporating the negative reactivity effects of a subset of neutron-absorbing fission-product isotopes, and by optimizing the procedural approach for establishing the burnup characteristics of the spent fuel to be loaded in burnup-credit-designed storage and transportation systems. This report describes progress toward developing a technical basis for a cost-effective bu...

2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

148

Waste management plan for Hanford spent nuclear fuel characterization activities  

SciTech Connect

A joint project was initiated between Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to address critical issues associated with the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) stored at the Hanford Site. Recently, particular attention has been given to remediation of the SNF stored in the K Basins. A waste management plan (WMP) acceptable to both parties is required prior to the movement of selected material to the PNL facilities for examination. N Reactor and Single Pass Reactor (SPR) fuel has been stored for an extended period of time in the N Reactor, PUREX, K-East, and K-West Basins. Characterization plans call for transport of fuel material form the K Basins to the 327 Building Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL) in the 300 Area for examination. However, PNL received a directive stating that no examination work will be started in PNL hot cell laboratories without an approved disposal route for all waste generated related to the activity. Thus, as part of the Characterization Program Management Plan for Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel, a waste management plan which will ensure that wastes generated as a result of characterization activities conducted at PNL will be accepted by WHC for disposition is required. This document contains the details of the waste handling plan that utilizes, to the greatest extent possible, established waste handling and disposal practices at Hanford between PNL and WHC. Standard practices are sufficient to provides for disposal of most of the waste materials, however, special consideration must be given to the remnants of spent nuclear fuel elements following examination. Fuel element remnants will be repackaged in an acceptable container such as the single element canister and returned to the K Basins for storage.

Chastain, S.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Spinks, R.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

Spent nuclear fuel storage -- Performance tests and demonstrations  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of heat transfer and shielding performance tests and demonstrations conducted from 1983 through 1992 by or in cooperation with the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Commercial Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The performance tests consisted of 6 to 14 runs involving one or two loadings, usually three backfill environments (helium, nitrogen, and vacuum backfills), and one or two storage system orientations. A description of the test plan, spent fuel load patterns, results from temperature and dose rate measurements, and fuel integrity evaluations are contained within the report.

McKinnon, M.A.; DeLoach, V.A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Method for reprocessing and separating spent nuclear fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Spent nuclear fuels, including actinide fuels, volatile and non-volatile fission products, are reprocessed and separated in a molten metal solvent housed in a separation vessel made of a carbon-containing material. A first catalyst, which promotes the solubility and permeability of carbon in the metal solvent, is included. By increasing the solubility and permeability of the carbon in the solvent, the rate at which actinide oxides are reduced (carbothermic reduction) is greatly increased. A second catalyst, included to increase the affinity for nitrogen in the metal solvent, is added to increase the rate at which actinide nitrides form after carbothermic reduction is complete.

Krikorian, Oscar H. (Danville, CA); Grens, John Z. (Livermore, CA); Parrish, Sr., William H. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Method for reprocessing and separating spent nuclear fuels. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Spent nuclear fuels, including actinide fuels, volatile and nonvolatile fission products, are reprocessed and separated in a molten metal solvent housed in a separation vessel made of a carbon-containing material. A first catalyst, which promotes the solubility and permeability of carbon in the metal solvent, is included. By increasing the solubility and permeability of the carbon in the solvent, the rate at which actinide oxides are reduced (carbothermic reduction) is greatly increased. A second catalyst, included to increase the affinity for nitrogen in the metal solvent, is added to increase the rate at which actinide nitrides form after carbothermic reduction is complete.

Krikorian, O.H.; Grens, J.Z.; Parrish, W.H. Sr.

1982-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

152

DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel program plan  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has produced spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for many years as part of its various missions and programs. The historical process for managing this SNF was to reprocess it whereby valuable material such as uranium or plutonium was chemically separated from the wastes. These fuels were not intended for long-term storage. As the need for uranium and plutonium decreased, it became necessary to store the SNF for extended lengths of time. This necessity resulted from a 1992 DOE decision to discontinue reprocessing SNF to recover strategic materials (although limited processing of SNF to meet repository acceptance criteria remains under consideration, no plutonium or uranium extraction for other uses is planned). Both the facilities used for storage, and the fuel itself, began experiencing aging from this extended storage. New efforts are now necessary to assure suitable fuel and facility management until long-term decisions for spent fuel disposition are made and implemented. The Program Plan consists of 14 sections as follows: Sections 2--6 describe objectives, management, the work plan, the work breakdown structure, and the responsibility assignment matrix. Sections 7--9 describe the program summary schedules, site logic diagram, SNF Program resource and support requirements. Sections 10--14 present various supplemental management requirements and quality assurance guidelines.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Package Misload Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to estimate the probability of misloading a commercial spent nuclear fuel waste package with a fuel assembly(s) that has a reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) outside the waste package design. The waste package designs are based on the expected commercial spent nuclear fuel assemblies and previous analyses (Macheret, P. 2001, Section 4.1 and Table 1). For this calculation, a misloaded waste package is defined as a waste package that has a fuel assembly(s) loaded into it with an enrichment and/or burnup outside the waste package design. An example of this type of misload is a fuel assembly designated for the 21-PWR Control Rod waste package being incorrectly loaded into a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. This constitutes a misloaded 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package, because the reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) of a 21-PWR Control Rod waste package fuel assembly is outside the design of a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. These types of misloads (i.e., fuel assembly with enrichment and/or burnup outside waste package design) are the only types that are evaluated in this calculation. This calculation utilizes information from ''Frequency of SNF Misload for Uncanistered Fuel Waste Package'' (CRWMS M&O 1998) as the starting point. The scope of this calculation is limited to the information available. The information is based on the whole population of fuel assemblies and the whole population of waste packages, because there is no information about the arrival of the waste stream at this time. The scope of this calculation deviates from that specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Risk and Criticality Department'' (BSC 2002a, Section 2.1.30) in that only waste package misload is evaluated. The remaining issues identified (i.e., flooding and geometry reconfiguration) will be addressed elsewhere. The intended use of the calculation is to provide information and inputs to the Preclosure Safety Analysis Department. Before using the results of this calculation, the reader is cautioned to verify that the assumptions made in this calculation regarding the waste stream, the loading process, and the staging of the spent nuclear fuel assemblies are applicable.

A. Alsaed

2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

Interim Storage of Used or Spent Nuclear Fuel Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) supports the safe, controlled, licensed, and regulated interim storage of used nuclear fuel (UNF) (irradiated, spent fuel from a nuclear power reactor) until disposition can be determined and completed. ANS supports the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) determination that “spent fuel generated in any reactor can be stored safely and without significant environmental impacts for at least 30 years beyond the licensed life for operation. ” 1 Current operational and decommissioned nuclear power plants in the United States were licensed with the expectation that the UNF would be stored at the nuclear power plant site until shipment to an interim storage facility, reprocessing plant, or permanent storage. Because of delays in Federal programs and policy issues, utilities have been forced to store UNF. Current means of interim storage of UNF at nuclear power plant sites include storage of discharged fuel in a water-filled pool or in a sealed dry cask, both under safe, controlled, and monitored conditions. This UNF interim storage is designed, managed, and controlled to minimize or preclude potential radiological hazards or material releases. At nuclear power plant sites in the United States and internationally, this interim storage is regulated under site license requirements and technical specifications imposed by the national or state regulator. In the United States, NRC is the licensing and regulatory authority. ANS believes that UNF interim storage

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The synchronous active neutron detection system for spent fuel assay  

SciTech Connect

The authors have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit the unique operating features of a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. This generator and a novel detection system will be applied to the direct measurement of the fissile material content in spent fuel in place of the indirect measures used at present. The technique they are investigating is termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND). It closely follows a method that has been used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed {open_quotes}lock-in{close_quotes} amplifiers. The authors have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. This approach is possible because the Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. The results to date are preliminary but quite promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly. It also appears to be quite resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be nonthermal and penetrating. Although a significant amount of work remains to fully explore the relevant physics and optimize the instrument design, the underlying concept appears sound.

Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

APPLICATIONS OF CURRENT TECHNOLOGY FOR CONTINUOUS MONITORING OF SPENT FUEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advancements in technology have opened many opportunities to improve upon the current infrastructure surrounding the nuclear fuel cycle. Embedded devices, very small sensors, and wireless technology can be applied to Security, Safety, and Nonproliferation of Spent Nuclear Fuel. Security, separate of current video monitoring systems, can be improved by integrating current wireless technology with a variety of sensors including motion detection, altimeter, accelerometer, and a tagging system. By continually monitoring these sensors, thresholds can be set to sense deviations from nominal values. Then alarms or notifications can be activated as needed. Safety can be improved in several ways. First, human exposure to ionizing radiation can be reduced by using a wireless sensor package on each spent fuel cask to monitor radiation, temperature, humidity, etc. Since the sensor data is monitored remotely operator stay-time is decreased and distance from the spent fuel increased, so the overall radiation exposure is reduced as compared to visual inspections. The second improvement is the ability to monitor continuously rather than periodically. If changes occur to the material, alarm thresholds could be set and notifications made to provide advanced notice of negative data trends. These sensor packages could also record data to be used for scientific evaluation and studies to improve transportation and storage safety. Nonproliferation can be improved for spent fuel transportation and storage by designing an integrated tag that uses current infrastructure for reporting and in an event; tracking can be accomplished using the Iridium satellite system. This technology is similar to GPS but with higher signal strength and penetration power, but lower accuracy. A sensor package can integrate all or some of the above depending on the transportation and storage requirements and regulations. A sensor package can be developed using off the shelf technology and applying it to each specific need. There are products on the market for smart meters, industrial lighting control and home automation that can be applied to the Back End Fuel Cycle. With a little integration and innovation a cost effective solution is achievable.

Drayer, R.

2013-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

157

Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding the long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF). SNF is nuclear fuel that has been used as fuel in a reactor...

158

Spent fuel drying system test results (second dry-run)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks have been detected in the basins and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the second dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. With the concurrence of project management, the test protocol for this run, and subsequent drying test runs, was modified. These modifications were made to allow for improved data correlation with drying procedures proposed under the IPS. Details of these modifications are discussed in Section 3.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Accelerator-driven transmutation of spent fuel elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method is described for transmuting higher actinides, plutonium and selected fission products in a liquid-fuel subcritical assembly. Uranium may also be enriched, thereby providing new fuel for use in conventional nuclear power plants. An accelerator provides the additional neutrons required to perform the processes. The size of the accelerator needed to complete fuel cycle closure depends on the neutron efficiency of the supported reactors and on the neutron spectrum of the actinide transmutation apparatus. Treatment of spent fuel from light water reactors (LWRs) using uranium-based fuel will require the largest accelerator power, whereas neutron-efficient high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) or CANDU reactors will require the smallest accelerator power, especially if thorium is introduced into the newly generated fuel according to the teachings of the present invention. Fast spectrum actinide transmutation apparatus (based on liquid-metal fuel) will take full advantage of the accelerator-produced source neutrons and provide maximum utilization of the actinide-generated fission neutrons. However, near-thermal transmutation apparatus will require lower standing

Venneri, Francesco (Los Alamos, NM); Williamson, Mark A. (Los Alamos, NM); Li, Ning (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel strategic plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for safely and efficiently managing DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and SNF returned to the US from foreign research reactors (FRR). The fuel will be treated where necessary, packaged suitable for repository disposal where practicable, and placed in interim dry storage. These actions will remove remaining vulnerabilities, make as much spent fuel as possible ready for ultimate disposition, and substantially reduce the cost of continued storage. The goal is to complete these actions in 10 years. This SNF Strategic Plan updates the mission, vision, objectives, and strategies for the management of DOE-owned SNF articulated by the SNF Strategic Plan issued in December 1994. The plan describes the remaining issues facing the EM SNF Program, lays out strategies for addressing these issues, and identifies success criteria by which program progress is measured. The objectives and strategies in this plan are consistent with the following Em principles described by the Assistance Secretary in his June 1996 initiative to establish a 10-year time horizon for achieving most program objectives: eliminate and manage the most serious risks; reduce mortgage and support costs to free up funds for further risk reduction; protect worker health and safety; reduce generation of wastes; create a collaborative relationship between DOE and its regulators and stakeholders; focus technology development on cost and risk reduction; and strengthen management and financial control.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This is the first National Report prepared under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Managementi hereafter referred to as the "Joint Convention". This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within the United States of America (U.S.). National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management - May 2003

162

EIS-0245: Management of Spent Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

245: Management of Spent Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford 245: Management of Spent Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site - Supplement Analysis, Richland, Washington EIS-0245: Management of Spent Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site - Supplement Analysis, Richland, Washington Overview Overview to be provided. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download August 15, 2011 EIS-0245-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 1, 2001 EIS-0245-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 1, 1998 EIS-0245-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site,

163

EM Safely and Efficiently Manages Spent Nuclear Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Waste Management » Nuclear Materials & Waste » EM Services » Waste Management » Nuclear Materials & Waste » EM Safely and Efficiently Manages Spent Nuclear Fuel EM Safely and Efficiently Manages Spent Nuclear Fuel Dry storage casks at Idaho National Laboratory can safely house spent nuclear fuel for decades. Dry storage casks at Idaho National Laboratory can safely house spent nuclear fuel for decades. EM's mission is to safely and efficiently manage its spent nuclear fuel and prepare it for disposal in a geologic repository. Previously, the Office of Environmental Management's (EM) mission had included the safe and efficient management of its spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and preparation for its disposal in a geologic repository. However, in May 2009, the planned geologic repository at Yucca Mountain was cancelled. The

164

Spent Fuel Pool Cooling and Cleanup During Decommissioning: Experience at Trojan Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operation of original in-plant spent fuel pool facilities at shutdown power plants is expensive compared to available alternatives and can interfere with the decommissioning process. This report describes the approach taken in the Trojan Decommissioning Project to establish independent cooling and cleanup services for the fuel pool until the spent fuel is placed in dry storage.

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Impacts Associated with Transfer of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Spent Fuel Storage Pools to Dry Storage After Five Years of Cooling, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2010, EPRI performed a study of the accelerated transfer of spent fuel from pools to dry storage in response to the threat of terrorist activities at nuclear power plants (report 1021049). Following the March 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, some organizations issued a renewed call for accelerated transfer of used fuel from spent fuel ...

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Safety Basis Implementation Strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Safety Basis Implementation is to ensure that implementation of activities is accomplished in order to support readiness to move spent fuel from K West Basin. Activities may be performed directly by the Safety Basis Implementation Team or they may be performed by other organizations and tracked by the Team. This strategy will focus on five key elements, (1) Administration of Safety Basis Implementation (general items), (2) Implementing documents, (3) Implementing equipment (including verification of operability), (4) Training, (5) SNF Project Technical Requirements (STRS) database system.

TRAWINSKI, B.J.

2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

167

Closure Mechanism and Method for Spent Nuclear Fuel Canisters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A canister is provided for storing, transporting, and/or disposing of spent nuclear fuel. The canister includes a canister shell, a top shield plug disposed within the canister, and a leak-tight closure arrangement. The closure arrangement includes a shear ring which forms a containment boundary of the canister, and which is welded to the canister shell and top shield plug. An outer seal plate, forming an outer seal, is disposed above the shear ring and is welded to the shield plug and the canister.

Doman, Marvin J.

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

168

Evaluation of a Spent Fuel Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) submitted a license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the construction of a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The license application was accepted for formal NRC review in September 2008. Throughout the more than 20-year history of the Yucca Mountain project, EPRI has performed independent assessments of key technical and scientific issues t...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

169

Corrosion of Spent Nuclear Fuel: The Long-Term Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent nuclear fuel, essentially U{sub 2}, accounts for over 95% of the total radioactivity of all of the radioactive wastes in the United States that require disposal, disposition or remediation. The UO{sub 2} in SNF is not stable under oxiding conditions and may also be altered under reducing conditions. The alteration of SNF results in the formation of new uranium phases that can cause the release or retardation of actinide and fission product radionuclides. Over the long term, and depending on the extent to which the secondary uranium phases incorporate fission products and actinides, these alteration phases become the near-field source term.

Rodney C. Ewing

2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

170

Production of metal waste forms from spent fuel treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Treatment of spent nuclear fuel at Argonne National Laboratory consists of a pyroprocessing scheme in which the development of suitable waste forms is being advanced. Of the two waste forms being proposed, metal and mineral, the production of the metal waste form utilizes induction melting to stabilize the waste product. Alloying of metallic nuclear materials by induction melting has long been an Argonne strength and thus, the transition to metallic waste processing seems compatible. A test program is being initiated to coalesce the production of the metal waste forms with current induction melting capabilities.

Westphal, B.R.; Keiser, D.D.; Rigg, R.H.; Laug, D.V.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Closure mechanism and method for spent nuclear fuel canisters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A canister is provided for storing, transporting, and/or disposing of spent nuclear fuel. The canister includes a canister shell, a top shield plug disposed within the canister, and a leak-tight closure arrangement. The closure arrangement includes a shear ring which forms a containment boundary of the canister, and which is welded to the canister shell and top shield plug. An outer seal plate, forming an outer seal, is disposed above the shear ring and is welded to the shield plug and the canister.

Doman, Marvin J. (Monroeville, PA)

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

172

Compact approach to monitored retrievable storage of spent fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent federal waste-management legislation has raised national interest in monitored retrievable storage (MRS) of unprocessed spent fuel from civilian nuclear power plants. We have reviewed the current MRS design approaches, and we have examined an alternative concept that is extremely compact in terms of total land use. This approach may offer substantial advantages in the areas of monitoring and in safeguards against theft, as well as in reducing the chances of groundwater contamination. Total facility costs are roughly estimated and found to be generally competitive with other MRS concepts. 4 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

Muir, D.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Evaluation of Hydrogen Generation from Radiolysis from Breached Spent Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ionizing radiation from spent nuclear fuel (SNF) can cause radiolytic decomposition of water and generation of hydrogen. Factors affecting hydrogen production include the type of radiation (alpha, gamma, and neutron), the radiation (alpha, gamma, and neutron), the linear energy transfer (LET) rates from the radiation, the water chemistry and dissolved gases, and physical conditions such as temperature and pressure. A review of the mechanisms for the radiolytic generation of hydrogen applicable to breached SNF has been performed. A qualitative evaluation of the potential for generation of hydrogen in the pure water used in water-filled shipping casks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is made.

Vinson, D.W.

2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

174

Distribution of characteristics of LWR [light water reactor] spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to develop a collective description of the entire spent fuel inventory in terms of various fuel properties relevant to Approved Testing Materials (ATMs) using information available from the Characteristics Data Base (CBD), which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. A number of light-water reactor (LWR) characteristics were analyzed including assembly class representation, fuel burnup, enrichment, fuel fabrication data, defective fuel quantities, and, at PNL`s specific request, linear heat generation rate (LHGR) and the utilization of burnable poisons. A quantitative relationships was developed between burnup and enrichment for BWRs and PWRs. The relationship shows that the existing BWR ATM is near the center of the burnup-enrichment distribution, while the four PWR ATMs bracket the center of the burnup range but are on the low side of the enrichment range. Fuel fabrication data are based on vendor specifications for new fuel. Defective fuel distributions were analyzed in terms of assembly class and vendor design. LHGR values were calculated from utility data on burnup and effective full-power days; these calculations incorporate some unavoidable assumptions which may compromise the value of the results. Only a limited amount of data are available on burnable poisons at this time. Based on this distribution study, suggestions for additional ATMs are made. These are based on the class and design concepts and include BWR/2,3 barrier fuel, and the WE 17 {times} 17 class with integral burnable poison. Both should be at relatively high burnups. 16 refs., 5 figs., 15 tabs.

Reich, W.J.; Notz, K.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Moore, R.S. [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Technical Review of Non-Destructive Assay Research for the Characterization of Spent Nuclear Fuel Assemblies Being Conducted Under the US DOE NGSI - 11544  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Characterization of Spent Nuclear Fuel Assemblies BeingSociety’s Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management IV, HiltonPlutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel,” 2010 ANS Annual

Croft, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Guidelines for Fabrication, Examination, Testing and Oversight of Spent Nuclear Fuel Dry Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982 and subsequent amendments require the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to receive and be responsible for disposal of spent commercial nuclear power plant fuel from U.S. utilities. However, because of delays in the siting of a permanent federal repository, and with no federal interim storage facilities designated, U.S. utilities have been forced to provide additional spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage capability to accommodate spent fuel discharge requirements. At...

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

177

Cost Impact of Using ISG-8 Rev. 3 for PWR Spent Fuel Pool Criticality Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidance for applying burnup credit in criticality analyses for spent fuel storage and transportation requirements recently changed with the release of Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) 8 Revision 3, Burnup Credit in the Criticality Safety Analyses of PWR Spent Fuel in Transportation and Storage Casks. If ISG-8 Rev. 3 were imposed upon pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel pool (SFP) criticality analyses, the burnup requirements for loading would ...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

178

Examining 239Pu and 240Pu Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements on Spent Fuel for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S.D. Ambers, “Assesment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescencefor Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay,” Inst. of Nucl. Mat. Man. ,clandestine material with nuclear resonance fluorescence,”

Quiter, Brian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

U.S. Spent Nuclear Fuel Data as of December 31, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Spent Nuclear Fuel: The Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects data for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) on the detailed ...

180

Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

This document has been prepared to assist research reactor operators possessing spent fuel containing enriched uranium of United States origin to prepare part of the documentation necessary to ship this fuel to the United States. Data are included on the nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate, and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies. Isotopic masses of U, Np, Pu and Am that are present in spent research reactor fuel are estimated for MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assembly types. The isotopic masses of each fuel assembly type are given as functions of U-235 burnup in the spent fuel, and of initial U-235 enrichment and U-235 mass in the fuel assembly. Photon dose rates of spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are estimated for fuel assemblies with up to 80% U-235 burnup and specific power densities between 0.089 and 2.857 MW/kg[sup 235]U, and for fission product decay times of up to 20 years. Thermal decay heat loads are estimated for spent fuel based upon the fuel assembly irradiation history (average assembly power vs. elapsed time) and the spent fuel cooling time.

Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Managing Spent Nuclear Fuel at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a large inventory of diverse types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This legacy derives from the history of the INL as the National Reactor Testing Station, and from its mission to recover HEU from SNF and to test and examine SNF after irradiation. The INL also has a large diversity of SNF storage facilities, some 50 years old. SNF at INL has many forms—from intact assemblies down to metallurgical mounts, and some fuel has been wet stored for over 40 years. SNF is stored bare or in metal cans under water, or dry in vaults, caissons or casks. Inspection shows varying corrosion and degradation of the SNF and its storage cans. SNF has been stored in 10 different facilities: 5 pools, one cask storage pad, one vault, two generations of caisson facilities, and one modular Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The pools range in age from 40 years old to the most modern in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The near-term objective is to move SNF from older pools to interim dry storage, allowing shutdown and decommissioning of the older facilities. This move involves drying methods that are dependent on fuel type. The long-term objective is to have INL SNF in safe dry storage and ready to be shipped to the National Repository. The unique features of the INL SNF requires special treatments and packaging to meet the proposed repository acceptance criteria and SNF will be repackaged in standardized canisters for shipment and disposal in the National Repository. Disposal will use the standardized canisters that can be co-disposed with High Level Waste glass logs to limit the total fissile material in a repository waste package. The DOE standardized canister also simplifies the repository handling of the multitude of DOE SNF sizes and shapes.

Thomas Hill; Denzel L. Fillmore

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Performance assessment of DOE spent nuclear fuel and surplus plutonium  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, is under consideration by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a potential site for the disposal of the nation`s radioactive wastes in a geologic repository. The wastes consist of commercial spent fuel, DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF), high level waste (HLW), and surplus plutonium. The DOE was mandated by Congress in the fiscal 1997 Energy and Water Appropriations Act to complete a viability assessment (VA) of the repository in September of 1998. The assessment consists of a preliminary design concept for the critical elements of the repository, a total system performance assessment (TSPA), a plan and cost estimate for completion of the license application, and an estimate of the cost to construct and operate the repository. This paper presents the results of the sensitivity analyses that were conducted to examine the behavior of DOE SNF and plutonium waste forms in the environment of the base case repository that was modeled for the TSPA-VA. Fifteen categories of DOE SNF and two Plutonium waste forms were examined and their contribution to radiation dose to humans was evaluated.

Duguid, J.O.; Vallikat, V.; McNeish, J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Dry oxidation and fracture of LWR spent fuels  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the characteristics of oxidation and fracture of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel in dry air. It also discusses their effects on radionuclide releases in the anticipated high-level waste repository environment. A sphere model may describe diffusion-limited formation of lower oxides, such as U{sub 4}O{sub 9}, in the oxidation of the spent fuel (SF) matrix. Detrimental higher oxides, such as U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, may not form at temperatures below a threshold temperature. The nucleation process suggests that a threshold temperature exists. The calculated results regarding fracture properties of the SF matrix agree with experimental observations. Oxidation and fracture of Zircaloy may not be significant under anticipated conditions. Under saturated or unsaturated aqueous conditions, oxidation of the SF matrix is believed to increase the releases of Pu-(239+240), Am-(241+243), C-14, Tc-99, I-129, and Cs-135. Under dry conditions, I-129 releases are likely to be small, unlike C-14, in lower oxides; Cl-36, Tc-99, I-129, and Cs-135 may be released fast in higher oxides. 79 refs.

Ahn, T.M.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation report  

SciTech Connect

This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste issues. In addition, this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages sew be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation report  

SciTech Connect

This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste issues. In addition, this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages will be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Spent Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Report  

SciTech Connect

This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by SSEB in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste Issues. In addition. this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages will be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Fast Reactor Spent Fuel Processing: Experience and Criticality Safety  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses operational and criticality safety experience associated with the Idaho National Laboratory Fuel Conditioning Facility which uses a pyrometallurgical process to treat spent fast reactor metallic fuel. The process is conducted in an inert atmosphere hot cell. The process starts with chopping metallic fuel elements into a basket. The basket is lowered into molten salt (LiCl-KCl) along with a steel mandrel. Active metal fission products, transuranic metals and sodium metal in the spent fuel undergo chemical oxidation and form chlorides. Voltage is applied between the basket, which serves as an anode, and the mandrel, which serves as a cathode, causing metallic uranium in the spent fuel to undergo electro-chemical oxidation thereby forming uranium chloride. Simultaneously at the cathode, uranium chloride undergoes electro-chemical reduction and deposits uranium metal onto the mandrel. The uranium metal and accompanying entrained salt are placed in a distillation furnace where the uranium melts forming an ingot and the entrained salt boils and subsequently condenses in a separate crucible. The uranium ingots are placed in long term storage. During the ten year operating history, over one hundred criticality safety evaluations were prepared. All criticality safety related limits and controls for the entire process are contained in a single document which required over thirty revisions to accommodate the process changes. Operational implementation of the limits and controls includes use of a near real-time computerized tracking system. The tracking system uses an Oracle database coupled with numerous software applications. The computerized tracking system includes direct fuel handler interaction with every movement of material. Improvements to this system during the ten year history include introduction of web based operator interaction, tracking of moderator materials and the development of a plethora database queries to assist in day to day operations as well as obtaining historical information. Over 12,000 driver fuel elements have been processed resulting in the production of 2500 kg of 20% enriched uranium. Also, over one thousand blanket fuel elements have been processed resulting in the production of 2400 kg of depleted uranium. These operations required over 35,000 fissile material transfers between zones and over 6000 transfers between containers. Throughout all of these movements, no mass limit violations occurred. Numerous lessons were learned over the ten year operating history. From a criticality safety perspective, the most important lesson learned was the involvement of a criticality safety practitioner in daily operations. A criticality safety engineer was assigned directly to facility operations, and was responsible for implementation of limits and controls including upkeep of the associated computerized tracking files. The criticality safety engineer was also responsible for conducting fuel handler training activities including serving on fuel handler qualification oral boards, and continually assessing operations from a criticality control perspective. The criticality safety engineer also attended bimonthly project planning meetings to identify upcoming process changes that would require criticality safety evaluation. Finally, the excellent criticality safety record was due in no small part to the continual support, involvement, trust, and confidence of project and operations mana

Chad Pope

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Development of Technical Nuclear Forensics for Spent Research Reactor Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pre-detonation technical nuclear forensics techniques for research reactor spent fuel were developed in a collaborative project with Savannah River National Lab ratory. An inverse analysis method was employed to reconstruct reactor parameters from a spent fuel sample using results from a radiochemical analysis. In the inverse analysis, a reactor physics code is used as a forward model. Verification and validation of different reactor physics codes was performed for usage in the inverse analysis. The verification and validation process consisted of two parts. The first is a variance analysis of Monte Carlo reactor physics burnup simulation results. The codes used in this work are MONTEBURNS and MCNPX/CINDER. Both utilize Monte Carlo transport calculations for reaction rate and flux results. Neither code has a variance analysis that will propagate through depletion steps, so a method to quantify and understand the variance propagation through these depletion calculations was developed. The second verification and validation process consisted of comparing reactor physics code output isotopic compositions to radiochemical analysis results. A sample from an Oak Ridge Research Reactor spent fuel assembly was acquired through a drilling process. This sample was then dissolved in nitric acid and diluted in three different quantities, creating three separate samples. A radiochemical analysis was completed and the results were compared to simulation outputs at different levels ofdetail. After establishing a forward model, an inverse analysis was developed to re-construct the burnup, initial uranium isotopic compositions, and cooling time of a research reactor spent fuel sample. A convergence acceleration technique was used that consisted of an analytical calculation to predict burnup, initial 235U, and 236U enrichments. The analytic calculation results may also be used stand alone or in a database search algorithm. In this work, a reactor physics code is used as a for- ward model with the analytic results as initial conditions in a numerical optimization algorithm. In the numerical analysis, the burnup and initial uranium isotopic com- positions are reconstructed until the iterative spent fuel characteristics converge with the measured data. Upon convergence of the sample’s burnup and initial uranium isotopic composition, the cooling time can be reconstructed. To reconstruct cooling time, the standard decay equation is inverted and solved for time. Two methods were developed. One method uses the converged burnup and initial uranium isotopic compositions along in a reactor depletion simulation. The second method uses an isotopic signature that does not decay out of its mass bin and has a simple production chain. An example would be 137Cs which decays into the stable 137Ba. Similar results are achieved with both methods, but extended shutdown time or time away from power results in over prediction of the cooling time. The over prediction of cooling time and comparison of different burnup reconstruction isotope results are indicator signatures of extended shutdown or time away from power. Due to dynamic operation in time and function, detailed power history reconstruction for research reactors is very challenging. Frequent variations in power, repeated variable shutdown time length, and experimentation history affect the spectrum an individual assembly is burned with such that full reactor parameter reconstruction is difficult. The results from this technical nuclear forensic analysis may be used with law enforcement, intelligence data, macroscopic and microscopic sample characteristics in a process called attribution to suggest or exclude possible sources of origin for a sample.

Sternat, Matthew 1982-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Impact of PWR spent fuel variations on TRU-fueled VHTRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several alternative strategies are being considered as spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management options. Transuranic nuclides (TRU) are responsible for the SNF long-term radiotoxicity beyond the first 500 years. One of the most viable approaches suggests creating new transmutation fuels containing TRUs for use in thermal and fast nuclear reactors. Irradiation of TRUs results in their transmutation and ultimate incineration by fission. The objective of this thesis is to analyze the impact of conventional PWR spent fuel variations on TRU-fueled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) systems. This effort was focused on the prismatic core configuration. The 3D core models were created for use in calculations with the SCALE 5.1 code system. As part of the research effort, basic nuclear characteristics of TRUs were taken into consideration. The potential variations of PWR spent fuel compositions were modeled with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Nuclear Fuel Cycle Simulation System, VISTA. The VHTR configurations with varying TRU compositions were analyzed assuming a single-batch core operation. Their performance was compared to the VHTR cases with low enriched uranium (LEU). The analysis shows that TRUs can be effectively utilized in the VHTR systems. The TRU-fueled VHTRs exhibit favorable performance characteristics.

Alajo, Ayodeji Babatunde

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Critical Review of Practice of Equating the Reactivity of Spent Fuel to Fresh Fuel in Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses for PWR Spent Fuel Pool Storage  

SciTech Connect

This research examines the practice of equating the reactivity of spent fuel to that of fresh fuel for the purpose of performing burnup credit criticality safety analyses for PWR spent fuel pool (SFP) storage conditions. The investigation consists of comparing k{sub inf} estimates based on reactivity equivalent fresh fuel enrichment (REFFE) to k{sub inf} estimates using the actual spent fuel isotopics. Analyses of selected storage configurations common in PWR SFPs show that this practice yields nonconservative results (on the order of a few tenths of a percent) in configurations in which the spent fuel is adjacent to higher-reactivity assemblies (e.g., fresh or lower-burned assemblies) and yields conservative results in configurations in which spent fuel is adjacent to lower-reactivity assemblies (e.g., higher-burned fuel or empty cells). When the REFFE is determined based on unborated water moderation, analyses for storage conditions with soluble boron present reveal significant nonconservative results associated with the use of the REFFE. This observation is considered to be important, especially considering the recent allowance of credit for soluble boron up to 5% in reactivity. Finally, it is shown that the practice of equating the reactivity of spent fuel to fresh fuel is acceptable, provided the conditions for which the REFFE was determined remain unchanged. Determination of the REFFE for a reference configuration and subsequent use of the REFFE for different configurations violates the basis used for the determination of the REFFE and, thus, may lead to inaccurate, and possibly, nonconservative estimates of reactivity. A significant concentration ({approximately}2000 ppm) of soluble boron is typically (but not necessarily required to be) present in PWR SFPs, of which only a portion ({le} 500 ppm) may be credited in safety analyses. Thus, a large subcritical margin currently exists that more than accounts for errors or uncertainties associated with the use of the REFFE. Consequently, the findings presented here do not represent a significant safety concern unless/until the subcritical margin associated with the soluble boron (that is not currently explicitly credited) is offset by the uncertainties associated with burnup credit and/or the expanded allowance of credit for the soluble boron.

Wagner, J.C.; Parks, C.V.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Spent fuel drying system test results (first dry-run)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site. Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the first dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. The empty test apparatus was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The data from this dry-run test can serve as a baseline for the first two fuel element tests, 1990 (Run 1) and 3128W (Run 2). The purpose of this dry-run was to establish the background levels of hydrogen in the system, and the hydrogen generation and release characteristics attributable to the test system without a fuel element present. This test also serves to establish the background levels of water in the system and the water release characteristics. The system used for the drying test series was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, which is located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodology are given in section 3.0, and the experimental results provided in Section 4.0. These results are further discussed in Section 5.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

How much spent (used) fuel is stored at U.S. nuclear power plants ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much spent (used) fuel is stored at U.S. nuclear power plants? In 2002, the most recent year for which EIA has data, there were 161,662 fuel assemblies, or 46,268 ...

193

Trojan Nuclear Plant Decommissioning: Final Survey for the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the final radiological survey for the area where Portland General Electric (PGE) will construct the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at Trojan nuclear power plant. The survey fulfills the requirements for release of this area from Trojan's 10 CFR 50 license before radiation levels increase with spent fuel storage in the ISFSI.

1998-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

194

MANAGING SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL WASTES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) has a large inventory of diverse types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This legacy is in part due to the history of the INL as the National Reactor Testing Station, in part to its mission to recover highly enriched uranium from SNF and in part to it’s mission to test and examine SNF after irradiation. The INL also has a large diversity of SNF storage facility, some dating back 50 years in the site history. The success of the INL SNF program is measured by its ability to: 1) achieve safe existing storage, 2) continue to receive SNF from other locations, both foreign and domestic, 3) repackage SNF from wet storage to interim dry storage, and 4) prepare the SNF for dispositioning in a federal repository. Because of the diversity in the SNF and the facilities at the INL, the INL is addressing almost very condition that may exist in the SNF world. Many of solutions developed by the INL are applicable to other SNF storage sites as they develop their management strategy. The SNF being managed by the INL are in a variety of conditions, from intact assemblies to individual rods or plates to powders, rubble, and metallurgical mounts. Some of the fuel has been in wet storage for over forty years. The fuel is stored bare, or in metal cans and either wet under water or dry in vaults, caissons or casks. Inspections have shown varying degrees of corrosion and degradation of the fuel and the storage cans. Some of the fuel has been recanned under water, and the conditions of the fuel inside the second or third can are unknown. The fuel has been stored in one of 10 different facilities: five wet pools and one casks storage pad, one vault, two generations of caisson facilities, and one modular Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The wet pools range from forty years old to the most modern pool in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The near-term objective is moving the fuel in the older wet storage facilities to interim dry storage facilities, thus permitting the shutdown and decommission of the older facilities. Two wet pool facilities, one at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the other at Test Area North, were targeted for initial SNF movements since these were some of the oldest at the INL. Because of the difference in the SNF materials different types of drying processes had to be developed. Passive drying, as is done with typical commercial SNF was not an option because on the condition of some of the fuel, the materials to be dried, and the low heat generation of some of the SNF. There were also size limitations in the existing facility. Active dry stations were designed to address the specific needs of the SNF and the facilities.

Hill, Thomas J

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Behavior of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Water Pool Storage  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Behavior of Spent Nuclear Behavior of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Water Pool Storage A. 0; Johnson, jr. , I ..: . Prepared Cor the Energy Research and Development Administration under Contract EY-76-C-06-1830 ---- Pat t i ~ < N ~ ~ r ~ t b w t ~ - ! I , ~ I ~ ~ ~ I . I I ~ ) ~ I I ~ ~ N O T I C E T€& - was prepad pnpn4. m w n t of w k spon-d by the Unitd S t . & ) C a u n m ~ (*WU ij*. M t e d $tam w the Wqy R e s e w & a d Ohrsropmcnt ~dmhirmlion, nor m y d thair ewhew,,nq Pny @fw a n t r ~ ~ t 0 ~ 1 , s ~ k m r i t r i l t t q r , ~ , m r tWf ernpfQw, r(tLltm any wartany, s x p r e s or kWld,= w w aAql -9 . o r r w p a m l ~ ~ t y for e~ o r uodruincvr of any infomutim, 9 F p d + d - , or repratants that -would nat 1 d - e privately owned rfghas. ,i PAQFIC NORTHWEST UBORATORY operated b ;"' SArnLLE ' fw the E M R m RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRAT1QN Wk.Cwfraa rv-76c-ts-is38

196

NUCLEAR BOMBS FROM LOW- ENRICHED URANIUM OR “SPENTFUEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional wisdom says that low-enriched uranium is not suitable for making nuclear weapons. However, an article in USA Today claims that “rogue ” states and terrorists have discovered that this is untrue. Not only that, but terrorists could separate plutonium from irradiated fuel (often called “spent fuel”) more easily than previously thought. (584.5495) WISE Amsterdam – Lowenriched uranium (LEU) is uranium containing up to 20 % uranium-235. Uranium with higher enrichment levels is classified as high-enriched, and is subject to international safeguards because it can be used to make nuclear weapons. However, a USA Today article claims that “rogue countries and terrorists” have discovered that it is possible to make nuclear weapons with uranium of lower enrichment, according to classified nuclear threat reports (1). The information is not entirely new. Back in 1996, a standard book on nuclear weapons material stated, “a self-sustaining chain reaction in a nuclear weapon cannot occur in depleted or natural or low-enriched uranium and is only theoretically IN THIS ISSUE: possible in LEU of roughly 10 percent or greater ” (2). Fuel for nuclear power reactors would not be suitable – this is typically enriched to 3-5 % uranium-235. However, for a “rogue state” wanting to make high-enriched uranium, it would take less work to start with nuclear fuel than with natural uranium. It could be done in a “small and easy to hide ” uranium enrichment plant – perhaps similar to the plant which has recently been discovered in Iran (3). Nevertheless, it would still require a substantial operation, since the fuel would need to be converted to uranium hexafluoride, enriched and then reconverted to uranium metal. More significantly, many research reactors use uranium of just under

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Threat Reduction Initiative: Global Threat Reduction Initiative: U.S. Nuclear Remove Program Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance 2007 DOE TEC Meeting Chuck Messick DOE/NNSA/SRS 2 Contents * Program Objective and Policy * Program implementation status * Shipment Information * Operational Logistics * Lessons Learned * Conclusion 3 U.S. Nuclear Remove Program Objective * To play a key role in the Global Threat Reduction Remove Program supporting permanent threat reduction by accepting program eligible material. * Works in conjunction with the Global Threat Reduction Convert Program to accept program eligible material as an incentive to core conversion providing a disposition path for HEU and LEU during the life of the Acceptance Program. 4 Reasons for the Policy

198

Eddy Current Examination of Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Closure Welds  

SciTech Connect

The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has developed standardized DOE SNF canisters for handling and interim storage of SNF at various DOE sites as well as SNF transport to and SNF handling and disposal at the repository. The final closure weld of the canister will be produced remotely in a hot cell after loading and must meet American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section III, Division 3 code requirements thereby requiring volumetric and surface nondestructive evaluation to verify integrity. This paper discusses the use of eddy current testing (ET) to perform surface examination of the completed welds and repair cavities. Descriptions of integrated remote welding/inspection system and how the equipment is intended function will also be discussed.

Arthur D. Watkins; Dennis C. Kunerth; Timothy R. McJunkin

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

ALARA studies on spent fuel and waste casks  

SciTech Connect

In this report, some implications of applying the ALARA concept to cask designs for transporting spent fuel, high-level commercial and defense waste, and remote-handled transuranic waste are investigated. The XSDRNPM, one-dimensional radiation transport code, was used to obtain potential shield designs that would yield total dose rates at 1.8 m from the cask surface of 10, 5, and 2 mrem/h. Gamma shields of depleted uranium, lead, and steel were studied. The capacity of the casks was assumed to be 1, 4, or 7 elements or canisters, and the wastes were 1, 3, 5, and 10 years old. Depending on the dose rate, the cask empty weights and lifetime transportation costs were estimated.

Sutherland, S.H.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This second National Report updates the first National Report published on May 3, 2003, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention). This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel (SF) and radioactive waste management facilities within the United States of America (U.S.). Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

U.S. Spent Nuclear Fuel Data as of December 31, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Home > Nuclear > Spent Nuclear Fuel Home > Nuclear > Spent Nuclear Fuel Release Date: October 1, 2004 Next Release: Late 2010** Spent nuclear fuel data is collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The spent nuclear fuel (SNF) data includes detailed characteristics of SNF generated by commercial U.S. nuclear power plants. From 1983 through 1995 this data was collected annually. Since 1996 this data has been collected every three years. The latest available detailed data covers all SNF discharged from commercial reactors before December 31, 2002, and is maintained in a data base by the EIA. Summary data tables from this data base may be found as indicated below. Table 1. Total U.S. Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Discharges, 1968 - 2002

202

Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay  

SciTech Connect

In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of gamma rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. NRF promises the unique capability of directly quantifying a specific isotope without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as is required in other measurement techniques. We have analyzed the potential of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique for quantitative measurements of Pu isotopes in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Given the low concentrations of 239Pu in SNF and its small integrated NRF cross sections, the main challenge in achieving precise and accurate measurements lies in accruing sufficient counting statistics in a reasonable measurement time. Using analytical modeling, and simulations with the radiation transport code MCNPX that has been experimentally tested recently, the backscatter and transmission methods were quantitatively studied for differing photon sources and radiation detector types. Resonant photon count rates and measurement times were estimated for a range of photon source and detection parameters, which were used to determine photon source and gamma-ray detector requirements. The results indicate that systems based on a bremsstrahlung source and present detector technology are not practical for high-precision measurements of 239Pu in SNF. Measurements that achieve the desired uncertainties within hour-long measurements will either require stronger resonances, which may be expressed by other Pu isotopes, or require quasi-monoenergetic photon sources with intensities that are approximately two orders of magnitude higher than those currently being designed or proposed.This work is part of a larger effort sponsored by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative to develop an integrated instrument, comprised of individual NDA techniques with complementary features, that is fully capable of determining Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies.

Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Ambers, Scott

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Shipper/receiver difference verification of spent fuel by use of PDET  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent fuel storage pools in most countries are rapidly approaching their design limits with the discharge of over 10,000 metric tons of heavy metal from global reactors. Countries like UK, France or Japan have adopted a closed fuel cycle by reprocessing spent fuel and recycling MOX fuel while many other countries opted for above ground interim dry storage for their spent fuel management strategy. Some countries like Finland and Sweden are already well on the way to setting up a conditioning plant and a deep geological repository for spent fuel. For all these situations, shipments of spent fuel are needed and the number of these shipments is expected to increase significantly. Although shipper/receiver difference (SRD) verification measurements are needed by IAEA when the recipient facility receives spent fuel, these are not being practiced to the level that IAEA has desired due to lack of a credible measurement methodology and instrument that can reliably perform these measurements to verify non-diversion of spent fuel during shipment and confirm facility operator declarations on the spent fuel. In this paper, we describe a new safeguards method and an associated instrument, Partial Defect Tester (PDET), which can detect pin diversion from Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Spent Fuel Assemblies in an in-situ condition. The PDET uses multiple tiny neutron and gamma detectors in the form of a cluster and a simple, yet highly precise, gravity-driven system to obtain underwater radiation measurements inside a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent fuel assembly. The method takes advantage of the PWR fuel design which contains multiple guide tubes which can be accessed from the top. The data obtained in such a manner can provide spatial distribution of neutron and gamma flux within a spent fuel assembly. Our simulation study as well as validation measurements indicated that the ratio of the gamma signal to the thermal neutron signal at each detector location normalized to the peak ratio of all the detector locations gives a unique signature that is sensitive to missing pins. The signature is principally dependent on the geometry of the detector locations, and little sensitive to enrichment or burn-up variations. A small variation in the fuel bundle, such as a few missing pins, changes the shape of the signature to enable detection. After verification of the non-diversion of spent fuel pins, the neutron signal and gamma signal are subsequently used to verify the consistency of the operator declaration on the fuel burn-up and cooling time. (authors)

Ham, Y. S.; Sitaraman, S. [Global Security Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Electrochemical cell apparatus having axially distributed entry of a fuel-spent fuel mixture transverse to the cell lengths  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical apparatus is made having a generator section containing axially elongated electrochemical cells, a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet, a gaseous feed oxidant inlet, and at least one gaseous spent fuel exit channel, where the spent fuel exit channel passes from the generator chamber to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet at a mixing apparatus, reformable fuel mixture channel passes through the length of the generator chamber and connects with the mixing apparatus, that channel containing entry ports within the generator chamber, where the axis of the ports is transverse to the fuel electrode surfaces, where a catalytic reforming material is distributed near the reformable fuel mixture entry ports. 2 figures.

Reichner, P.; Dollard, W.J.

1991-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

205

Spent fuel disassembly hardware and other non-fuel bearing components: characterization, disposal cost estimates, and proposed repository acceptance requirements  

SciTech Connect

There are two categories of waste considered in this report. The first is the spent fuel disassembly (SFD) hardware. This consists of the hardware remaining after the fuel pins have been removed from the fuel assembly. This includes end fittings, spacer grids, water rods (BWR) or guide tubes (PWR) as appropriate, and assorted springs, fasteners, etc. The second category is other non-fuel-bearing (NFB) components the DOE has agreed to accept for disposal, such as control rods, fuel channels, etc., under Appendix E of the standard utiltiy contract (10 CFR 961). It is estimated that there will be approximately 150 kg of SFD and NFB waste per average metric ton of uranium (MTU) of spent uranium. PWR fuel accounts for approximately two-thirds of the average spent-fuel mass but only 50 kg of the SFD and NFB waste, with most of that being spent fuel disassembly hardware. BWR fuel accounts for one-third of the average spent-fuel mass and the remaining 100 kg of the waste. The relatively large contribution of waste hardware in BWR fuel, will be non-fuel-bearing components, primarily consisting of the fuel channels. Chapters are devoted to a description of spent fuel disassembly hardware and non-fuel assembly components, characterization of activated components, disposal considerations (regulatory requirements, economic analysis, and projected annual waste quantities), and proposed acceptance requirements for spent fuel disassembly hardware and other non-fuel assembly components at a geologic repository. The economic analysis indicates that there is a large incentive for volume reduction.

Luksic, A.T.; McKee, R.W.; Daling, P.M.; Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Purcell, W.L.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Development of a Reliable Fuel Depletion Methodology for the HTR-10 Spent Fuel Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technical working group formed in 2007 between NNSA and CAEA to develop a reliable fuel depletion method for HTR-10 based on MCNPX and to analyze the isotopic inventory and radiation source terms of the HTR-10 spent fuel. Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Established a fuel depletion methodology and demonstrated its safeguards application; (2) Proliferation resistant at high discharge burnup ({approx}80 GWD/MtHM) - Unfavorable isotopics, high number of pebbles needed, harder to reprocess pebbles; (3) SF should remain under safeguards comparable to that of LWR; and (4) Diversion scenarios not considered, but can be performed.

Chung, Kiwhan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beddingfield, David H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Sang-Yoon [unaffiliated

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

207

Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques -- Preliminary Modeling Results Emphasizing Integration among Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for safeguards of LEU and MOX spent fuel,” Internationalsystems in use today (Safeguards Mox Python Detector, 1 Fork

Tobin, S. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A case study on the influence of THM coupling on the near field safety of a spent fuel repository in sparsely fractured granite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geological disposal of spent CANDU fuel in Canada, a safetyhypothetical repository for spent CANDU fuel in the Canadianbuffer. The waste form: CANDU reactors in Canada are fuelled

Nguyen, T.S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Spent nuclear fuels project characterization data quality objectives strategy  

SciTech Connect

A strategy is presented for implementation of the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process to the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project (SNFP) characterization activities. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are teaming in the characterization of the SNF on the Hanford Site and are committed to the DQO process outlined in this strategy. The SNFP characterization activities will collect and evaluate the required data to support project initiatives and decisions related to interim safe storage and the path forward for disposal. The DQO process is the basis for the activity specific SNF characterization requirements, termed the SNF Characterization DQO for that specific activity, which will be issued by the WHC or PNL organization responsible for the specific activity. The Characterization Plan prepared by PNL defines safety, remediation, and disposal issues. The ongoing Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) requirement and plans and the fuel storage and disposition options studies provide the need and direction for the activity specific DQO process. The hierarchy of characterization and DQO related documentation requirements is presented in this strategy. The management of the DQO process and the means of documenting the DQO process are described as well as the tailoring of the DQO process to the specific need of the SNFP characterization activities. This strategy will assure stakeholder and project management that the proper data was collected and evaluated to support programmatic decisions.

Lawrence, L.A.; Thornton, T.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Redus, K.S.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Structural Integrity of Advanced Claddings During Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal creep is the dominant deformation mechanism of fuel cladding during transportation and dry storage of spent nuclear fuel. Thermal creep data and creep models of Westinghouse ZIRLO and LK3 cladding tubes were generated for use in spent-fuel storage and transportation applications. The final report consists of two volumes. This document (Volume 1) provides the project results obtained on non-irradiated and irradiated standard ZIRLO and non-irradiated optimized ZIRLO claddings.

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

211

Spent Fuel Pool Risk Assessment Integration Framework (Mark I and II BWRs) and Pilot Plant Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the development and pilot application of a generic framework and methodology for conducting a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) for spent fuel pools at BWR plants with Mark I or II containment designs. A key aspect of the study is the consideration of potential synergistic relationships between adverse conditions in the reactor and the spent fuel pool.BackgroundUsed nuclear fuel from the operation of nuclear power plants is typically ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Dry Storage Demonstration for High-Burnup Spent Nuclear Fuel: Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initially, casks for dry storage of spent fuel were licensed for assembly-average burnup of about 35 GWd/MTU. Over the last two decades, the discharge burnup of fuel has increased steadily and now routinely exceeds 45 GWd/MTU. This feasibility study examines the options available for conducting a confirmatory experimental program supporting regulatory acceptance of practical approaches for storing, and later transporting, spent fuel with burnup well in excess of 45 GWd/MTU under a dry, inert atmosphere.

2003-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

213

Technology development program for Idaho Chemical Processing Plant spent fuel and waste management  

SciTech Connect

Acidic high-level radioactive waste (HLW) resulting from fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been solidified to a calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless steel bins enclosed by concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also in storage at the ICPP. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium and called for a shutdown of the reprocessing facilities at the ICPP. A new Spent Fuel and HLW Technology Development program was subsequently initiated to develop technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels and HLW for disposal, in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The Program elements include Systems Analysis, Graphite Fuel Disposal, Other Spent Fuel Disposal, Sodium-Bearing Liquid Waste Processing, Calcine Immobilization, and Metal Recycle/Waste Minimization. This paper presents an overview of the ICPP radioactive wastes and current spent fuels, and describes the Spent Fuel and HLW Technology program in more detail.

Ermold, L.F.; Knecht, D.A.; Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Disposal of defense spent fuel and HLW from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

Acid high-level radioactive waste (HLW) resulting from fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been solidified to a calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless steel bins enclosed by concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also in storage ate the ICPP. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium and called for a shutdown of the reprocessing facilities at the ICPP. A new Spent Fuel and HLW Technology Development program was subsequently initiated to develop technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels and HLW for disposal, in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The Program elements include Systems Analysis, Graphite Fuel Disposal, Other Spent Fuel Disposal, Sodium-Bearing Liquid Waste Processing, Calcine Immobilization, and Metal Recycle/Waste Minimization. This paper presents an overview of the ICPP radioactive wastes and current spent fuels, with an emphasis on the description of HLW and spent fuels requiring repository disposal.

Ermold, L.F.; Loo, H.H.; Klingler, R.D.; Herzog, J.D.; Knecht, D.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Spent Nuclear Fuel Self-Induced XRF to Predict Pu to U Content  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantification of plutonium (Pu) in spent nuclear fuel is an increasingly important safeguards issue. There exists an estimated worldwide 980 metric tons of Pu in the nuclear fuel cycle and the majority is in spent nuclear fuel waiting for long term storage or fuel reprocessing. This study investigates utilizing the measurement of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) from the spent fuel for the quantification of its uranium (U) to Pu ratio. Pu quantification measurements at the front end of the reprocessing plant, the fuel cycle area of interest, would improve input accountability and shipper/receiver differences. XRF measurements were made on individual PWR fuel rods with varying fuel ages and final burn-ups at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in July 2008 and January 2009. These measurements successfully showed that it is possible to measure the Pu x-ray peak at 103.7 keV in PWR spent fuel (~1 percent Pu) using a planar HPGe detector. Prior to these measurement campaigns, the Pu peak has only been measured for fast breeder reactor fuel (~40 percent Pu). To understand the physics of the measurements, several modern physics simulations were conducted to determine the fuel isotopics, the sources of XRF in the spent fuel, and the sources of Compton continuum. Fuel transformation and decay simulations demonstrated the Pu/U measured peak ratio is directly proportional to the Pu/U content and increases linearly as burn-up increases. Spent fuel source simulations showed for 4 to 13 year old PWR fuel with burn-up ranges from 50 to 67 GWd/MTU, initial photon sources and resulting Compton and XRF interactions adequately model the spent fuel measured spectrum and background. The detector simulations also showed the contributions to the Compton continuum from strongest to weakest are as follows: the fuel, the shipping tube, the cladding, the detector can, the detector crystal and the collimator end. The detector simulations showed the relationship between the Pu/U peak ratio and fuel burn-up over predict the measured Pu/U peak but the trend is the same. In conclusion, the spent fuel simulations using modern radiation transport physics codes can model the actual spent fuel measurements but need to be benchmarked.

Stafford, Alissa Sarah

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Technical framework to facilitate foreign spent fuel storage and geologic disposal in Russia  

SciTech Connect

The option of storage and eventual geologic disposal in Russia of spent fuel of US origin used in Taiwan provides a unique opportunity that can benefit many parties. Taiwan has a near term need for a spent fuel storage and geologic disposal solution, available financial resources, but limited prospect for a timely domestic solution. Russia has significant spent fuel storage and transportation management experience, candidate storage and repository sites, but limited financial resources available for their development. The US has interest in Taiwan energy security, national security and nonproliferation interests in Russian spent fuel storage and disposal and interest in the US origin fuel. While it is understood that such a project includes complex policy and international political issues as well as technical issues, the goal of this paper is to begin the discussion by presenting a technical path forward to establish the feasibility of this concept for Russia.

Jardine, L J; Halsey, W G; Cmith, C F

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Interim report spent nuclear fuel retrieval system fuel handling development testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel handling development testing was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project at the Hanford Site. The project will retrieve spent nuclear fuel, clean and remove fuel from canisters, repackage fuel into baskets, and load fuel into a multi-canister overpack (MCO) for vacuum drying and interim dry storage. The FRS is required to retrieve basin fuel canisters, clean fuel elements sufficiently of uranium corrosion products (or sludge), empty fuel from canisters, sort debris and scrap from whole elements, and repackage fuel in baskets in preparation for MCO loading. The purpose of fuel handling development testing was to examine the systems ability to accomplish mission activities, optimization of equipment layouts for initial process definition, identification of special needs/tools, verification of required design changes to support performance specification development, and validation of estimated activity times/throughput. The test program was set up to accomplish this purpose through cold development testing using simulated and prototype equipment; cold demonstration testing using vendor expertise and systems; and graphical computer modeling to confirm feasibility and throughput. To test the fuel handling process, a test mockup that represented the process table was fabricated and installed. The test mockup included a Schilling HV series manipulator that was prototypic of the Schilling Hydra manipulator. The process table mockup included the tipping station, sorting area, disassembly and inspection zones, fuel staging areas, and basket loading stations. The test results clearly indicate that the Schilling Hydra arm cannot effectively perform the fuel handling tasks required unless it is attached to some device that can impart vertical translation, azimuth rotation, and X-Y translation. Other test results indicate the importance of camera locations and capabilities, and of the jaw and end effector tool design. 5 refs., 35 figs., 3 tabs.

Ketner, G.L.; Meeuwsen, P.V.; Potter, J.D.; Smalley, J.T.; Baker, C.P.; Jaquish, W.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Preliminary assessment of costs and risks of transporting spent fuel by barge  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to analyze the costs and risks associated with transporting spent fuel by barge. The barge movements would be made in combination with rail movements to transport spent fuel from plants to a repository. For the purpose of this analysis, three candidate repository sites are analyzed: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Deaf Smith, Texas, and Hanford, Washington. This report complements a report prepared by Sandia National Laboratories in 1984 that analyzes the costs and risks of transporting spent fuel by rail and by truck to nine candidate repository sites.

Tobin, R.L.; Meshkov, N.K.; Jones, R.H.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel acceptance criteria, the mass of uranium and transuranic elements in spent research reactor fuel must be specified. These data are, however, not always known or readily determined. It is the purpose of this report to provide estimates of these data for some of the more common research reactor fuel assembly types. The specific types considered here are MTR, TRIGA and DIDO fuel assemblies. The degree of physical protection given to spent fuel assemblies is largely dependent upon the photon dose rate of the spent fuel material. These data also, are not always known or readily determined. Because of a self-protecting dose rate level of radiation (dose rate greater than 100 ren-x/h at I m in air), it is important to know the dose rate of spent fuel assemblies at all time. Estimates of the photon dose rate for spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are given in this report.

Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Licensing of spent fuel dry storage and consolidated rod storage: A Review of Issues and Experiences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of this study, performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), respond to the nuclear industry's recommendation that a report be prepared that collects and describes the licensing issues (and their resolutions) that confront a new applicant requesting approval from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for dry storage of spent fuel or for large-scale storage of consolidated spent fuel rods in pools. The issues are identified in comments, questions, and requests from the NRC during its review of applicants' submittals. Included in the report are discussions of (1) the 18 topical reports on cask and module designs for dry storage fuel that have been submitted to the NRC, (2) the three license applications for dry storage of spent fuel at independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs) that have been submitted to the NRC, and (3) the three applications (one of which was later withdrawn) for large-scale storage of consolidated fuel rods in existing spent fuel storage pools at reactors that were submitted tot he NRC. For each of the applications submitted, examples of some of the issues (and suggestions for their resolutions) are described. The issues and their resolutions are also covered in detail in an example in each of the three subject areas: (1) the application for the CASTOR V/21 dry spent fuel storage cask, (2) the application for the ISFSI for dry storage of spent fuel at Surry, and (3) the application for full-scale wet storage of consolidated spent fuel at Millstone-2. The conclusions in the report include examples of major issues that applicants have encountered. Recommendations for future applicants to follow are listed. 401 refs., 26 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Tools for LWR spent fuel characterization: Assembly classes and fuel designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Characteristics Data Base (CDB) is sponsored by the DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The CDB provides a single, comprehensive source of data pertaining to radioactive wastes that will or may require geologic disposal, including detailed data describing the physical, quantitative, and radiological characteristics of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. In developing the CDB, tools for the classification of fuel assembly types have been developed. The assembly class scheme is particularly useful for size- and handling-based describes these tools and presents results of their applications in the areas of fuel assembly type identification, characterization of projected discharges, cask accommodation analyses, and defective fuel analyses. Suggestions for additional applications are also made. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Moore, R.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA) Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA)); Notz, K.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Nuclear nonproliferation: Concerns with US delays in accepting foregin research reactors` spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

One key US nonproliferation goal is to discourage use of highly enriched uranium fuel (HEU), which can be used to make nuclear bombs, in civilian nuclear programs worldwide. DOE`s Off-Site Fuels Policy for taking back spent HEU from foreign research reactors was allowed to expire due to environmental reasons. This report provides information on the effects of delays in renewing the Off-Site Fuels Policy on US nonproliferation goals and programs (specifically the reduced enrichment program), DOE`s efforts to renew the fuels policy, and the price to be charged to the operators of foreign reactors for DOE`s activities in taking back spent fuel.

1994-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

223

Efficient regeneration of partially spent ammonia borane fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A necessary target in realizing a hydrogen (H{sub 2}) economy, especially for the transportation sector, is its storage for controlled delivery, presumably to an energy producing fuel cell. In this vein, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Centers of Excellence (CoE) in Hydrogen Storage have pursued different methodologies, including metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, and sorbents, for the expressed purpose of supplanting gasoline's current > 300 mile driving range. Chemical hydrogen storage has been dominated by one appealing material, ammonia borane (H{sub 3}B-NH{sub 3}, AB), due to its high gravimetric capacity of hydrogen (19.6 wt %) and low molecular weight (30.7 g mol{sup -1}). In addition, AB has both hydridic and protic moieties, yielding a material from which H2 can be readily released. As such, a number of publications have described H{sub 2} release from amine boranes, yielding various rates depending on the method applied. Even though the viability of any chemical hydrogen storage system is critically dependent on efficient recyclability, reports on the latter subject are sparse, invoke the use of high energy reducing agents, and suffer from low yields. For example, the DOE recently decided to no longer pursue the use of NaBH{sub 4} as a H{sub 2} storage material, in part because of inefficient regeneration. We thus endeavored to find an energy efficient regeneration process for the spent fuel from H{sub 2} depleted AB with a minimum number of steps.

Davis, Benjamin Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gordon, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stephens, Frances [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dixon, David A [UNIV OF ALABAMA; Matus, Myrna H [UNIV OF ALABAMA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Design Verification and Validation Process  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a description of design verification and validation activities implemented by the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project. During the execution of early design verification, a management assessment (Bergman, 1999) and external assessments on configuration management (Augustenburg, 1999) and testing (Loscoe, 2000) were conducted and identified potential uncertainties in the verification process. This led the SNF Chief Engineer to implement corrective actions to improve process and design products. This included Design Verification Reports (DVRs) for each subproject, validation assessments for testing, and verification of the safety function of systems and components identified in the Safety Equipment List to ensure that the design outputs were compliant with the SNF Technical Requirements. Although some activities are still in progress, the results of the DVR and associated validation assessments indicate that Project requirements for design verification are being effectively implemented. These results have been documented in subproject-specific technical documents (Table 2). Identified punch-list items are being dispositioned by the Project. As these remaining items are closed, the technical reports (Table 2) will be revised and reissued to document the results of this work.

OLGUIN, L.J.

2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

225

A NOVEL APPROACH TO SPENT FUEL POOL DECOMMISSIONING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been at the forefront of developing methods to reduce the cost and schedule of deactivating spent fuel pools (SFP). Several pools have been deactivated at the INL using an underwater approach with divers. These projects provided a basis for the INL cooperation with the Dresden Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 SFP (Exelon Generation Company) deactivation. It represents the first time that a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) SFP was decommissioned using this underwater coating process. This approach has advantages in many aspects, particularly in reducing airborne contamination and allowing safer, more cost effective deactivation. The INL pioneered underwater coating process was used to decommission three SFPs with a total combined pool volume of over 900,000 gallons. INL provided engineering support and shared project plans to successfully initiate the Dresden project. This report outlines the steps taken by INL and Exelon to decommission SFPs using the underwater coating process. The rationale used to select the underwater coating process and the advantages and disadvantages are described. Special circumstances are also discussed, such as the use of a remotely-operated underwater vehicle to visually and radiologically map the pool areas that were not readily accessible. A larger project, the INTEC-603 SFP in-situ (grouting) deactivation, is reviewed. Several specific areas where special equipment was employed are discussed and a Lessons Learned evaluation is included.

R. L. Demmer

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Disposition of ORNL's Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the process of retrieving, repackaging, and preparing Oak Ridge spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for off-site disposition. The objective of the Oak Ridge SNF Project is to safely, reliably, and efficiently manage SNF that is stored on the Oak Ridge Reservation until it can be shipped off-site. The project required development of several unique processes and the design and fabrication of special equipment to enable the successful retrieval, transfer, and repackaging of Oak Ridge SNF. SNF was retrieved and transferred to a hot cell for repackaging. After retrieval of SNF packages, the storage positions were decontaminated and stainless steel liners were installed to resolve the vulnerability of water infiltration. Each repackaged SNF canister has been transferred from the hot cell back to dry storage until off-site shipments can be made. Three shipments of aluminum-clad SNF were made to the Savannah River Site (SRS), and five shipments of non-aluminum-clad SNF are planned to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Through the integrated cooperation of several organizations including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and various subcontractors, preparations for the disposition of SNF in Oak Ridge have been performed in a safe and successful manner.

Turner, D. W.; DeMonia, B. C.; Horton, L. L.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

227

A Novel Approach to Spent Fuel Pool Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The Dresden Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) (Exelon Generation Co.) was decommissioned using a new underwater coating strategy developed in cooperation with the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This was the first time that a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) SFP was decommissioned using this underwater coating approach. This approach has advantages in many aspects, particularly in reducing airborne contamination and in safer, more cost effective deactivation. The process was pioneered at the INL and used to decommission three SFPs with a total combined pool volume of over 900,000 gallons. The INL provided engineering support and shared project plans to successfully initiate the Dresden project. This report outlines the steps taken by the INL and Exelon on the pathway for this activity. The rationale used to select the underwater coating option and the advantages and disadvantages are shown. Special circumstances, such as the use of a remotely operated underwater vehicle to visually and radiologically map the pool areas that were not readily accessible, are discussed. Several specific areas where special equipment was employed are given and a lessons learned evaluation is included.

R.L. Demmer; J.B. Panozzo; R.J. Christensen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Decommissioning the Dresden Unit 1 Spent Fuel Pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1 Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) (Exelon Generation Co.) was decommissioned using a new underwater coating strategy developed in cooperation with the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This was the first time that a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) SFP was decommissioned using this underwater coating approach. This approach has advantages in many aspects, particularly in reducing airborne contamination and in safer, more cost effective deactivation. The process was pioneered at the INL and used to decommission three SFPs with a total combined pool volume of over 900,000 gallons. The INL provided engineering support and shared project plans to successfully initiate the Dresden project. This report outlines the steps taken by the INL and Exelon on the pathway for this activity. The rationale used to select the underwater coating option and the advantages and disadvantages are shown. Special circumstances, such as the use of a remotely operated underwater vehicle to map (visually and radiologically) the pool areas that were not readily accessible, are discussed. Several specific areas where special equipment was employed are given and a lessons learned evaluation is included. (authors)

Demmer, R.L.; Bargelt, R.J. [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-7113 (United States); Panozzo, J.B.; Christensen, R.J. [Exelon Generation Company, LLC, Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Warrenville, IL 60555 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Depleted Uraniuim Dioxide as a Spent-Nuclear-Fuel-Waste Package...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15 DEPLETED URANIUM DIOXIDE AS A SPENT-NUCLEAR-FUEL WASTE-PACKAGE PARTICULATE FILL: FILL BEHAVIOR Charles W. Forsberg Oak Ridge National Laboratory * P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge,...

230

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This Fourth United States of America (U.S.) National Report updates the Third Report published in October 2008, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention). This report reflects developments in the U.S. through June 2011. This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within the U.S.

231

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This Third United States National Report updates the second National Report published in October 2005, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management 1(Joint Convention). This report reflects developments in the United States through September 2008. This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within

232

Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Nuclear Power Reactor Sites December 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Washington, D.C. Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel The picture on the cover is the Connecticut Yankee Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation site in Haddam, Connecticut, with 43 dry storage NRC-licensed dual-purpose (storage and transport) casks. ii Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The House Appropriations Committee Print that accompanied the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008, requests that the U.S. Department of Energy (the Department):

233

International management of spent fuel storage : technical alternatives and constraints, topical report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some of the important technical issues involved in the implementation of a spent fuel storage regime under international auspices are discussed. In particular, we consider: the state of the art as far as the different ...

Miller, Marvin M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Preoperational Environmental Survey for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document represents the report for environmental sampling of soil, vegetation, litter, cryptograms, and small mammals at the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities located in 100 K and 200 East Areas in support of the preoperational environmental survey.

MITCHELL, R.M.

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

235

Concrete Shield Performance of the VSC-17 Spent Nuclear Fuel Cask  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The VSC-17 Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Cask was surveyed for degradation of the concrete shield by radiation measurement, temperature measurement, and ultrasonic testing. No general loss of shielding function was identified.

Koji Shirai

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

EA-1117: Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the management of spent nuclear fuel on the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation to implement the preferred alternative...

237

Assessment of the impacts of spent fuel disassembly alternatives on the Nuclear Waste Isolation System. [Preparing and packaging spent fuel assemblies for geologic disposal  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report was to evaluate four possible alternative methods of preparing and packaging spent fuel assemblies for geologic disposal against the Reference Process of unmodified spent fuel. The four alternative processes were: (1) End fitting removal, (2) Fission gas venting and resealing, (3) Fuel bundle disassembly and close packing of fuel pins, and (4) Fuel shearing and immobilization. Systems analysis was used to develop a basis of comparison of the alternatives. Conceptual processes and facility layouts were devised for each of the alternatives, based on technology deemed feasible for the purpose. Assessments were made of 15 principal attributes from the technical, operational, safety/risk, and economic considerations related to each of the alternatives, including both the surface packaging and underground repository operations. Specific attributes of the alternative processes were evaluated by assigning a number for each that expressed its merit relative to the corresponding attribute of the Reference Process. Each alternative process was then ranked by summing the numbers for attributes in each of the four assessment areas and collectively. Fuel bundle disassembly and close packing of fuel pins was ranked the preferred method of disposal of spent fuel. 63 references, 46 figures, 46 tables.

Not Available

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fresh and Spent Nuclear Fuel Repatriation from the IRT-2000 Research Reactor Facility, Sofia, Bulgaria  

SciTech Connect

The IRT 2000 research reactor, operated by the Bulgarian Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped all of their Russian-origin nuclear fuel from the Republic of Bulgaria to the Russian Federation beginning in 2003 and completing in 2008. These fresh and spent fuel shipments removed all highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Bulgaria. The fresh fuel was shipped by air in December 2003 using trucks and a commercial cargo aircraft. One combined spent fuel shipment of HEU and low enriched uranium (LEU) was completed in July 2008 using high capacity VPVR/M casks transported by truck, barge, and rail. The HEU shipments were assisted by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) and the LEU spent fuel shipment was funded by Bulgaria. This report describes the work, approvals, organizations, equipment, and agreements required to complete these shipments and concludes with several major lessons learned.

K. J. Allen; T. G. Apostolov; I. S. Dimitrov

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Spent Fuel Transportation Applications: Longitudinal Tearing Resulting from Transportation Accidents--A Probabilistic Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a probabilistic treatment of longitudinal tearing of spent fuel rods subjected to dynamic forces that could result from hypothetical spent fuel transportation accidents. Longitudinal tearing represents the failure configuration with the highest potential for occurring during transport because of the effects of radial hydrides on cladding resistance to fracture. Accurate assessment of this failure mode constitutes an important part of a general failure analysis methodology to quantify...

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

240

Conceptual design report for the ICPP spent nuclear fuel dry storage project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conceptual design is presented for a facility to transfer spent nuclear fuel from shipping casks to dry storage containers, and to safely store those containers at ICPP at INEL. The spent fuels to be handled at the new facility are identified and overall design and operating criteria established. Physical configuration of the facility and the systems used to handle the SNF are described. Detailed cost estimate for design and construction of the facility is presented.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

Uncanistered Spent Nuclear fuel Disposal Container System Description Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded with intact uncanistered assemblies and/or individually canistered SNF assemblies and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the access drifts, and emplaced in the emplacement drifts. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container provides long-term confinement of the commercial SNF placed inside, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual SNF assembly temperatures after emplacement, limits the introduction of moderator into the disposal container during the criticality control period, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Multiple boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) disposal container designs are needed to accommodate the expected range of spent fuel assemblies and provide long-term confinement of the commercial SNF. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinder walls, outer cylinder lids (two on the top, one on the bottom), inner cylinder lids (one on the top, one on the bottom), and an internal metallic basket structure. Exterior labels will provide a means by which to identify the disposal container and its contents. The two metal cylinders, in combination with the cladding, Emplacement Drift System, drip shield, and natural barrier, will support the design philosophy of defense-in-depth. The use of materials with different properties prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The inner cylinder and inner cylinder lids will be constructed of stainless steel and the outer cylinder and outer cylinder lid will be made of high-nickel alloy. The basket will assist criticality control, provide structural support, and improve heat transfer. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container System interfaces with the emplacement drift environment and internal waste by transferring heat from the SNF to the external environment and by protecting the SFN assemblies and their contents from damage/degradation by the external environment. The system also interfaces with the SFN by limiting access of moderator and oxidizing agents of the SFN. The waste package interfaces with the Emplacement Drift System's emplacement drift pallets upon which the wasted packages are placed. The disposal container interfaces with the Assembly Transfer System, Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System, Disposal Container Handling System, and Waste Package Remediation System during loading, handling, transfer, emplacement and retrieval of the disposal container/waste package.

NONE

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

242

AIR SHIPMENT OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL FROM ROMANIA AND LIBYA  

SciTech Connect

In June 2009 Romania successfully completed the world’s first air shipment of highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel transported in Type B(U) casks under existing international laws and without special exceptions for the air transport licenses. Special 20-foot ISO shipping containers and cask tiedown supports were designed to transport Russian TUK 19 shipping casks for the Romanian air shipment and the equipment was certified for all modes of transport, including road, rail, water, and air. In December 2009 Libya successfully used this same equipment for a second air shipment of HEU spent nuclear fuel. Both spent fuel shipments were transported by truck from the originating nuclear facilities to nearby commercial airports, were flown by commercial cargo aircraft to a commercial airport in Yekaterinburg, Russia, and then transported by truck to their final destinations at the Production Association Mayak facility in Chelyabinsk, Russia. Both air shipments were performed under the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) as part of the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). The Romania air shipment of 23.7 kg of HEU spent fuel from the VVR S research reactor was the last of three HEU fresh and spent fuel shipments under RRRFR that resulted in Romania becoming the 3rd RRRFR participating country to remove all HEU. Libya had previously completed two RRRFR shipments of HEU fresh fuel so the 5.2 kg of HEU spent fuel air shipped from the IRT 1 research reactor in December made Libya the 4th RRRFR participating country to remove all HEU. This paper describes the equipment, preparations, and license approvals required to safely and securely complete these two air shipments of spent nuclear fuel.

Christopher Landers; Igor Bolshinsky; Ken Allen; Stanley Moses

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques -- Preliminary Modeling Results Emphasizing Integration among Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near 2 MeV in U and 239 Pu,” PHYSICAL REVIEW C 78, 041601(C. Rudy, “Determination of Pu in Spent Fuel Assemblies by X-Induced XRF to Quantify the Pu Content in PWR Spent Nuclear

Tobin, S. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Determining Reactor Flux from Xenon-136 and Cesium-135 in Spent Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to infer the reactor flux from spent fuel or seized fissile material would enhance the tools of nuclear forensics and nuclear nonproliferation significantly. We show that reactor flux can be inferred from the ratios of xenon-136 to xenon-134 and cesium-135 to cesium-137. If the average flux of a reactor is known, the flux inferred from measurements of spent fuel could help determine whether that spent fuel was loaded as a blanket or close to the mid-plane of the reactor. The cesium ratio also provides information on reactor shutdowns during the irradiation of fuel, which could prove valuable for identifying the reactor in question through comparisons with satellite reactor heat monitoring data. We derive analytic expressions for these correlations and compare them to experimental data and to detailed reactor burn simulations. The enrichment of the original uranium fuel affects the correlations by up to 3 percent, but only at high flux.

Hayes, A C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Determining Reactor Flux from Xenon-136 and Cesium-135 in Spent Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to infer the reactor flux from spent fuel or seized fissile material would enhance the tools of nuclear forensics and nuclear nonproliferation significantly. We show that reactor flux can be inferred from the ratios of xenon-136 to xenon-134 and cesium-135 to cesium-137. If the average flux of a reactor is known, the flux inferred from measurements of spent fuel could help determine whether that spent fuel was loaded as a blanket or close to the mid-plane of the reactor. The cesium ratio also provides information on reactor shutdowns during the irradiation of fuel, which could prove valuable for identifying the reactor in question through comparisons with satellite reactor heat monitoring data. We derive analytic expressions for these correlations and compare them to experimental data and to detailed reactor burn simulations. The enrichment of the original uranium fuel affects the correlations by up to 3 percent, but only at high flux.

A. C. Hayes; Gerard Jungman

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

Status report on the Spent-Fuel Test-Climax, Nevada Test Site: a test of dry storage of spent fuel in a deep granite location  

SciTech Connect

The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is located at a depth of 420 m in the Climax granite at the Nevada Test Site. The test array contains 11 canistered PWR fuel assemblies, plus associated electrical simulators and electrical heaters. There are nearly 900 channels of thermal, radiation, stress, displacement, and test control instrumentation. This paper is a general status report on the test, which started in May 1980.

Ramspott, L.D.; Ballou, L.B.; Patrick, W.C.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Analysis of near-term spent fuel transportation hardware requirements and transportation costs  

SciTech Connect

A computer model was developed to quantify the transportation hardware requirements and transportation costs associated with shipping spent fuel in the commercial nucler fuel cycle in the near future. Results from this study indicate that alternative spent fuel shipping systems (consolidated or disassembled fuel elements and new casks designed for older fuel) will significantly reduce the transportation hardware requirements and costs for shipping spent fuel in the commercial nuclear fuel cycle, if there is no significant change in their operating/handling characteristics. It was also found that a more modest cost reduction results from increasing the fraction of spent fuel shipped by truck from 25% to 50%. Larger transportation cost reductions could be realized with further increases in the truck shipping fraction. Using the given set of assumptions, it was found that the existing spent fuel cask fleet size is generally adequate to perform the needed transportation services until a fuel reprocessing plant (FRP) begins to receive fuel (assumed in 1987). Once the FRP opens, up to 7 additional truck systems and 16 additional rail systems are required at the reference truck shipping fraction of 25%. For the 50% truck shipping fraction, 17 additional truck systems and 9 additional rail systems are required. If consolidated fuel only is shipped (25% by truck), 5 additional rail casks are required and the current truck cask fleet is more than adequate until at least 1995. Changes in assumptions could affect the results. Transportation costs for a federal interim storage program could total about $25M if the FRP begins receiving fuel in 1987 or about $95M if the FRP is delayed until 1989. This is due to an increased utilization of federal interim storage facility from 350 MTU for the reference scenario to about 750 MTU if reprocessing is delayed by two years.

Daling, P.M.; Engel, R.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Summary This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed action to construct, operate, monitor, and eventually close a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The EIS evaluates not only impacts from constructing, operating, monitoring, and closing a repository, but also from transporting the materials from 72 commercial and 4 DOE sites to the Yucca Mountain repository site in Nye County, Nevada. Public Comment Opportunities

249

Safeguards-by-Design: Guidance for Independent Spent Fuel Dry Storage Installations (ISFSI)  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the requirements and best practices for implementing international nuclear safeguards at independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs), also known as Away-from- Reactor (AFR) storage facilities. These installations may provide wet or dry storage of spent fuel, although the safeguards guidance herein focuses on dry storage facilities. In principle, the safeguards guidance applies to both wet and dry storage. The reason for focusing on dry independent spent fuel storage installations is that this is one of the fastest growing nuclear installations worldwide. Independent spent fuel storage installations are typically outside of the safeguards nuclear material balance area (MBA) of the reactor. They may be located on the reactor site, but are generally considered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the State Regulator/SSAC to be a separate facility. The need for this guidance is becoming increasingly urgent as more and more nuclear power plants move their spent fuel from resident spent fuel ponds to independent spent fuel storage installations. The safeguards requirements and best practices described herein are also relevant to the design and construction of regional independent spent fuel storage installations that nuclear power plant operators are starting to consider in the absence of a national long-term geological spent fuel repository. The following document has been prepared in support of two of the three foundational pillars for implementing Safeguards-by-Design (SBD). These are: i) defining the relevant safeguards requirements, and ii) defining the best practices for meeting the requirements. This document was prepared with the design of the latest independent dry spent fuel storage installations in mind and was prepared specifically as an aid for designers of commercial nuclear facilities to help them understand the relevant international requirements that follow from a country’s safeguards agreement with the IAEA. If these requirements are understood at the earliest stages of facility design, it will help eliminate the costly retrofit of facilities that has occurred in the past to accommodate nuclear safeguards, and will help the IAEA implement nuclear safeguards worldwide, especially in countries building their first nuclear facilities. It is also hoped that this guidance document will promote discussion between the IAEA, State Regulator/SSAC, Project Design Team, and Facility Owner/Operator at an early stage to ensure that new ISFSIs will be effectively and efficiently safeguarded. This is intended to be a living document, since the international nuclear safeguards requirements may be subject to revision over time. More importantly, the practices by which the requirements are met are continuously modernized by the IAEA and facility operators for greater efficiency and cost effectiveness. As these improvements are made, it is recommended that the subject guidance document be updated and revised accordingly.

Trond Bjornard; Philip C. Durst

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Characteristics of fuel crud and its impact on storage, handling, and shipment of spent fuel. [Fuel crud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion products, called ''crud,'' form on out-of-reactor surfaces of nuclear reactor systems and are transported by reactor coolant to the core, where they deposit on external fuel-rod cladding surfaces and are activated by nuclear reactions. After discharge of spent fuel from a reactor, spallation of radioactive crud from the fuel rods could impact wet or dry storage operations, handling (including rod consolidation), and shipping. It is the purpose of this report to review earlier (1970s) and more recent (1980s) literature relating to crud, its characteristics, and any impact it has had on actual operations. Crud characteristics vary from reactor type to reactor type, reactor to reactor, fuel assembly to fuel assembly in a reactor, circumferentially and axially in an assembly, and from cycle to cycle for a specific facility. To characterize crud of pressurized-water (PWRs) and boiling-water reactors (BWRs), published information was reviewed on appearance, chemical composition, areal density and thickness, structure, adhesive strength, particle size, and radioactivity. Information was also collected on experience with crud during spent fuel wet storage, rod consolidation, transportation, and dry storage. From experience with wet storage, rod consolidation, transportation, and dry storage, it appears crud spallation can be managed effectively, posing no significant radiological problems. 44 refs., 11 figs.

Hazelton, R.F.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Foreign experience on effects of extended dry storage on the integrity of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a survey of foreign experience in dry storage of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors that was carried out for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report reviews the mechanisms for degradation of spent fuel cladding and fuel materials in dry storage, identifies the status and plans of world-wide experience and applications, and documents the available information on the expected long-term integrity of the dry-stored spent fuel from actual foreign experience. Countries covered in this survey are: Argentina, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany (before reunification with the former East Germany), former German Democratic Republic (former East Germany), France, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the former USSR (most of these former Republics are now in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)). Industrial dry storage of Magnox fuels started in 1972 in the United Kingdom; Canada began industrial dry storage of CANDU fuels in 1980. The technology for safe storage is generally considered to be developed for time periods of 30 to 100 years for LWR fuel in inert gas and for some fuels in oxidizing gases at low temperatures. Because it will probably be decades before countries will have a repository for spent fuels and high-level wastes, the plans for expanded use of dry storage have increased significantly in recent years and are expected to continue to increase in the near future.

Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Foreign experience on effects of extended dry storage on the integrity of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a survey of foreign experience in dry storage of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors that was carried out for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report reviews the mechanisms for degradation of spent fuel cladding and fuel materials in dry storage, identifies the status and plans of world-wide experience and applications, and documents the available information on the expected long-term integrity of the dry-stored spent fuel from actual foreign experience. Countries covered in this survey are: Argentina, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany (before reunification with the former East Germany), former German Democratic Republic (former East Germany), France, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the former USSR (most of these former Republics are now in the Commonwealth of Independent States [CIS]). Industrial dry storage of Magnox fuels started in 1972 in the United Kingdom; Canada began industrial dry storage of CANDU fuels in 1980. The technology for safe storage is generally considered to be developed for time periods of 30 to 100 years for LWR fuel in inert gas and for some fuels in oxidizing gases at low temperatures. Because it will probably be decades before countries will have a repository for spent fuels and high-level wastes, the plans for expanded use of dry storage have increased significantly in recent years and are expected to continue to increase in the near future.

Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio program : FY 2004 test and data summary.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. The program also provides significant technical and political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are the input for follow-on modeling studies to quantify respirable hazards, associated radiological risk assessments, vulnerability assessments, and potential cask physical protection design modifications. This document includes an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, during FY 2004. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2004. All available test results, observations, and aerosol analyses plus interpretations--primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests, series 2/5A through 2/9B, using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. Advanced plans and progress are described for upcoming tests with unirradiated, depleted uranium oxide and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC) and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Brucher, Wenzel (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Loiseau, Olivier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Mo, Tin (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Billone, Michael C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Autrusson, Bruno A. (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Young, F. I. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Coats, Richard Lee; Burtseva, Tatiana (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Luna, Robert Earl; Dickey, Roy R.; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Thompson, Nancy Slater (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC); Hibbs, Russell S. (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC); Gregson, Michael Warren; Lange, Florentin (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Tsai, Han-Chung (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Assessment of the risk of transporting spent nuclear fuel by truck  

SciTech Connect

The assessment includes the risks from release of spent fuel materials and radioactive cask cavity cooling water due to transportation accidents. The contribution to the risk of package misclosure and degradation during normal transport was also considered. The results of the risk assessment have been related to a time in the mid-1980's, when it is projected that nuclear plants with an electrical generating capacity of 100 GW will be operating in the U.S. For shipments from reactors to interim storage facilities, it is estimated that a truck carrying spent fuel will be involved in an accident that would not be severe enough to result in a release of spent fuel material about once in 1.1 years. It was estimated that an accident that could result in a small release of radioactive material (primarily contaminated cooling water) would occur once in about 40 years. The frequency of an accident resulting in one or more latent cancer fatalities from release of radioactive materials during a truck shipment of spent fuel to interim storage was estimated to be once in 41,000 years. No accidents were found that would result in acute fatalities from releases of radioactive material. The risk for spent fuel shipments from reactors to reprocessing plants was found to be about 20% less than the risk for shipments to interim storage. Although the average shipment distance for the reprocessing case is larger, the risk is somewhat lower because the shipping routes, on average, are through less populated sections of the country. The total risk from transporting 180-day cooled spent fuel by truck in the reference year is 4.5 x 10/sup -5/ fatalities. An individual in the population at risk would have one chance in 6 x 10/sup 11/ of suffering a latent cancer fatality from a release of radioactive material from a truck carrying spent fuel in the reference year. (DLC)

Elder, H.K.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Severe accidents in spent fuel pools in support of generic safety, Issue 82  

SciTech Connect

This investigation provides an assessment of the likelihood and consequences of a severe accident in a spent fuel storage pool - the complete draining of the pool. Potential mechanisms and conditions for failure of the spent fuel, and the subsequent release of the fission products, are identified. Two older PWR and BWR spent fuel storage pool designs are considered based on a preliminary screening study which tried to identify vulnerabilities. Internal and external events and accidents are assessed. Conditions which could lead to failure of the spent fuel Zircaloy cladding as a result of cladding rupture or as a result of a self-sustaining oxidation reaction are presented. Propagation of a cladding fire to older stored fuel assemblies is evaluated. Spent fuel pool fission product inventory is estimated and the releases and consequences for the various cladding scenarios are provided. Possible preventive or mitigative measures are qualitatively evaluated. The uncertainties in the risk estimate are large, and areas where additional evaluations are needed to reduce uncertainty are identified.

Sailor, V.L.; Perkins, K.R.; Weeks, J.R.; Connell, H.R.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

The proposed DOE action considered in this environmental impact statement (EIS) is to implement appropriate processes for the safe and efficient management of spent nuclear fuel and targets at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken County, South Carolina, including placing these materials in forms suitable for ultimate disposition. Options to treat, package, and store this material are discussed. The material included in this EIS consists of approximately 68 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of spent nuclear fuel 20 MTHM of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at SRS, as much as 28 MTHM of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel from foreign and domestic research reactors to be shipped to SRS through 2035, and 20 MTHM of stainless-steel or zirconium-clad spent nuclear fuel and some Americium/Curium Targets stored at SRS. Alternatives considered in this EIS encompass a range of new packaging, new processing, and conventional processing technologies, as well as the No Action Alternative. A preferred alternative is identified in which DOE would prepare about 97% by volume (about 60% by mass) of the aluminum-based fuel for disposition using a melt and dilute treatment process. The remaining 3% by volume (about 40% by mass) would be managed using chemical separation. Impacts are assessed primarily in the areas of water resources, air resources, public and worker health, waste management, socioeconomic, and cumulative impacts.

N /A

2000-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

257

Electrochemical cell apparatus having axially distributed entry of a fuel-spent fuel mixture transverse to the cell lengths  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical apparatus (10) is made having a generator section (22) containing axially elongated electrochemical cells (16), a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet (28), a gaseous feed oxidant inlet (30), and at least one gaseous spent fuel exit channel (46), where the spent fuel exit channel (46) passes from the generator chamber (22) to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet (28) at a mixing apparatus (50), reformable fuel mixture channel (52) passes through the length of the generator chamber (22) and connects with the mixing apparatus (50), that channel containing entry ports (54) within the generator chamber (22), where the axis of the ports is transverse to the fuel electrode surfaces (18), where a catalytic reforming material is distributed near the reformable fuel mixture entry ports (54).

Reichner, Philip (Plum Borough, PA); Dollard, Walter J. (Churchill Borough, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Of Spent Fuel Elements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Elements An apparatus and method is described for transmuting higher actinides, plutonium and selected fission products in a liquid-fuel subcritical assembly. Available for...

259

BOOK: Safety Related Issues of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 26, 2007... Trends in Nuclear Power, The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Nuclear Science ... Fifteen papers cover aluminum-clad fuel discharged from research ...

260

Separator assembly for use in spent-nuclear-fuel shipping cask. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separator assembly for use in a spent-nuclear-fuel shipping cask has a honeycomb-type wall structure defining parallel cavities for holding nuclear fuel assemblies. Tubes formed of an effective neutron-absorbing material are embedded in the wall structure around each of the cavities and provide neutron flux traps when filled with water.

Bucholz, J.A.

1981-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Directory of Certificates of Compliance for dry spent fuel storage casks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This directory contains Certificates of Compliance for all dry spent fuel storage casks approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Summary Reports of each approved cask model. Later directories will contain a list of cask users, and a list of cask locations. The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on spent fuel storage casks which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Storage of fuel assemblies using these casks must be in accordance with the provisions of 10 CFR Part 72.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Spent Fuel and High-Level Waste Requirements (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spent Fuel and High-Level Waste Requirements (Maine) Spent Fuel and High-Level Waste Requirements (Maine) Spent Fuel and High-Level Waste Requirements (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Public Utilities Commission All proposed nuclear power generation facilities must be certified by the Public Utilities Commission under this statute prior to construction and

263

Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel, OAS-L-13-11  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel OAS-L-13-11 July 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 10, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SENIOR ADVISOR FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FROM: Daniel M. Weeber Assistant Inspector General for Audits and Administration Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Safety Aspects of Wet Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (Department) is responsible for managing and storing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) generated by weapons and research programs and recovered through nonproliferation programs. The SNF consists of irradiated reactor fuel and cut up assemblies containing uranium, thorium and/or plutonium. The Department stores 34 metric tons of heavy metal SNF primarily

264

Spent-fuel composition: a comparison of predicted and measured data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uncertainty in predictions of the nuclear materials content of spent light-water reactor fuel was investigated to obtain guidelines for nondestructive spent-fuel verification and assay. Values predicted by the reactor operator were compared with measured values from fuel reprocessors for six reactors (three PWR and three BWR). The study indicates that total uranium, total plutonium, fissile uranium, fissile plutonium, and total fissile content can be predicted with biases ranging from 1 to 6% and variabilities (1-sigma) ranging from 2 to 7%. The higher values generally are associated with BWRs. Based on the results of this study, nondestructive assay measurements that are accurate and precise to 5 to 10% (1sigma) or better should be useful for quantitative analyses of typical spent fuel.

Thomas, C.C. Jr.; Cobb, D.D.; Ostenak, C.A.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Criticality safety considerations in the geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

Features of geologic disposal which hamper the demonstration that criticality cannot occur therein include possible changes of shape and form, intrusion of water as a neutron moderator, and selective leaching of spent fuel constituents. If the criticality safety of spent fuel disposal depends on burnup, independent measurements verifying the burnup should be performed prior to disposal. The status of nondestructive analysis method which might provide such verification is discussed. Calculations were performed to assess the potential for increasing the allowed size of a spent fuel disposal canister if potential water intrusion were limited by close-packing the enclosed rods. Several factors were identified which severely limited the potential of this application. The theoretical limit of hexagonal close-packing cannot be achieved due to fuel rod bowing. It is concluded that disposal canisters should be sized on the basis of assumed optimum moderation. Several topics for additional research were identified during this limited study.

Gore, B.F.; McNair, G.W.; Heaberlin, S.W.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Quantifying the passive gamma signal from spent nuclear fuel in support of determining the plutonium content in spent nuclear fuel with nondestructive assay  

SciTech Connect

The objective of safeguarding nuclear material is to deter diversions of significant quantities of nuclear materials by timely monitoring and detection. There are a variety of motivations for quantifying plutonium in spent fuel (SF), by means of nondestructive assay (NDA), in order to meet this goal. These motivations include the following: strengthening the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies ability to safeguard nuclear facilities, shipper/receiver difference, input accountability at reprocessing facilities and burnup credit at repositories. Many NDA techniques exist for measuring signatures from SF; however, no single NDA technique can, in isolation, quantify elemental plutonium in SF. A study has been undertaken to determine the best integrated combination of 13 NDA techniques for characterizing Pu mass in spent fuel. This paper focuses on the development of a passive gamma measurement system in support the spent fuel assay system. Gamma ray detection for fresh nuclear fuel focuses on gamma ray emissions that directly coincide with the actinides of interest to the assay. For example, the 186-keV gamma ray is generally used for {sup 235}U assay and the 384-keV complex is generally used for assaying plutonium. In spent nuclear fuel, these signatures cannot be detected as the Compton continuum created from the fission products dominates the signal in this energy range. For SF, the measured gamma signatures from key fission products ({sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 154}Eu) are used to ascertain burnup, cooling time, and fissile content information. In this paper the Monte Carlo modeling set-up for a passive gamma spent fuel assay system will be described. The set-up of the system includes a germanium detector and an ion chamber and will be used to gain passive gamma information that will be integrated into a system for determining Pu in SF. The passive gamma signal will be determined from a library of {approx} 100 assemblies that have been created to examine the capability of all 13 NDA techniques. Presented in this paper is a description of the passive gamma monitoring instrument, explanation of the work completed thus far involving the source set up methodology and the design optimization process, details of key fission product ratios of interest, limitations and key strengths of the measurement technique, and considerations for integrating this technique with other NDA techniques in order to develop a complete spent fuel assay strategy.

Fensin, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Naval Petroleum Reserves | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Naval Petroleum Reserves For much of the 20th century, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves served as a contingency source of fuel for the Nation's military. All that...

268

Evaluation of potential for MSRE spent fuel and flush salt storage and treatment at the INEL  

SciTech Connect

The potential for interim storage as well as for treatment of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment spent fuel at INEL has been evaluated. Provided that some minimal packaging and chemical stabilization prerequisites are satisfied, safe interim storage of the spent fuel at the INEL can be achieved in a number of existing or planned facilities. Treatment by calcination in the New Waste Calcining Facility at the INEL can also be a safe, effective, and economical alternative to treatment that would require the construction of a dedicated facility. If storage at the INEL is chosen for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) spent fuel salts, their transformation to the more stable calcine solid would still be desirable as it would result in a lowering of risks. Treatment in the proposed INEL Remote-Handled Immobilization Facility (RHIF) would result in a waste form that would probably be acceptable for disposal at one of the proposed national repositories. The cost increment imputable to the treatment of the MSRE salts would be a small fraction of the overall capital and operating costs of the facility or the cost of building and operating a dedicated facility. Institutional and legal issues regarding shipments of fuel and waste to the INEL are summarized. The transfer of MSRE spent fuel for interim storage or treatment at the INEL is allowed under existing agreements between the State of idaho and the Department of energy and other agencies of the Federal Government. In contrast, current agreements preclude the transfer into Idaho of any radioactive wastes for storage or disposal within the State of Idaho. This implies that wastes and residues produced from treating the MSRE spent fuel at locations outside Idaho would not be acceptable for storage in Idaho. Present agreements require that all fuel and high-level wastes stored at the INEL, including MSRE spent fuel if received at the INEL, must be moved to a location outside Idaho by the year 2035.

Ougouag, A.M.; Ostby, P.A.; Nebeker, R.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Comparison of selected foreign plans and practices for spent fuel and high-level waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the major parameters for management of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes in selected foreign countries as of December 1989 and compares them with those in the United States. The foreign countries included in this study are Belgium, Canada, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All the countries are planning for disposal of spent fuel and/or high-level wastes in deep geologic repositories. Most countries (except Canada and Sweden) plan to reprocess their spent fuel and vitrify the resultant high-level liquid wastes; in comparison, the US plans direct disposal of spent fuel. The US is planning to use a container for spent fuel as the primary engineered barrier. The US has the most developed repository concept and has one of the earliest scheduled repository startup dates. The repository environment presently being considered in the US is unique, being located in tuff above the water table. The US also has the most prescriptive regulations and performance requirements for the repository system and its components. 135 refs., 8 tabs.

Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Hazelton, R.F.; Bradley, D.J.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Chemical Forms and Distribution of Platinum Group Metals and Technetium During Spent Fuel Reprocessing  

SciTech Connect

Amongst the fission products present in spent nuclear fuel of Nuclear Power Plants there are considerable quantities of platinum group metals (PGMs): ruthenium, rhodium and palladium. At the same time there are considerable amounts of technetium in the spent fuel, the problem of its removal at radiochemical plants being in operation encountering serious difficulties. Increased interest in this radionuclides is due not only to its rather large yield, but to higher mobility in the environment as well. However, the peculiarities of technetium chemistry in nitric acid solutions create certain problems when trying to separate it as a single product in the course of NPP's spent fuel reprocessing. The object of this work was to conduct a comprehensive analysis of platinum group metals and technetium behavior at various stages of spent fuel reprocessing and to seek the decisions which could make it possible to separate its as a single product. The paper will report data on platinum metals (PGM) and technetium distribution in spent fuel reprocessing products. The description of various techniques for palladium recovery from differing in composition radioactive solutions arising from reprocessing is given. (authors)

Pokhitonov, Y. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

SNFP detonation phenomena of hydrogen/oxygen in spent fuel containers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Movement of spent nuclear fuels from the Hanford K Basins near the Columbia River to dry interim storage facility on the Hanford plateau will require repackaging the fuel in the basin into multi-canister overpacks (MCOs), drying of the fuel, transporting the contained fuel, hot conditioning, and finally interim storage. Each of these functions will be accomplished while the fuel is contained in the MCOs. Hydrogen and oxygen can be generated within the MCOs by several mechanisms. The principal source of hydrogen and oxygen within the MCOs is residual water from the vacuum drying and hot conditioning operations. This document assesses the detonation phenomena of hydrogen and oxygen in the spent fuel containers. Several process scenarios have been identified that could generate detonation pressures that exceed the nominal 10 atmosphere design limit of the MCOs. Only 42 grams of radiolized water are required to establish this condition.

Cooper, T.D.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Evaluation of measured LWR spent fuel composition data for use in code validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Burnup credit (BUC) is a concept applied in the criticality safety analysis of spent nuclear fuel in which credit or partial credit is taken for the reduced reactivity worth of the fuel due to both fissile depletion and the buildup of actinides and fission products that act as net neutron absorbers. Typically, a two-step process is applied in BUC analysis: first, depletion calculations are performed to estimate the isotopic content of spent fuel based on its burnup history; second, three-dimensional (3-D) criticality calculations are performed based on specific spent fuel packaging configurations. In seeking licensing approval of any BUC approach (e.g., disposal, transportation, or storage) both of these two computational procedures must be validated. This report was prepared in support of the validation process for depletion methods applied in the analysis of spent fuel from commercial light-water-reactor (LWR) designs. Such validation requires the comparison of computed isotopic compositions with those measured via radiochemical assay to assess the ability of a computer code to predict the contents of spent fuel samples. The purpose of this report is to address the availability and appropriateness of measured data for use in the validation of isotopic depletion methods. Although validation efforts to date at ORNL have been based on calculations using the SAS2H depletion sequence of the SCALE code system, this report has been prepared as an overview of potential sources of validation data independent of the code system used. However, data that are identified as in use in this report refer to earlier validation work performed using SAS2H in support of BUC. This report is the result of a study of available assay data, using the experience gained in spent fuel isotopic validation and with a consideration of the validation issues described earlier. This report recommends the suitability of each set of data for validation work similar in scope to the earlier work.

Hermann, O.W.; DeHart, M.D.; Murphy, B.D.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

SOURCE OF BURNUP VALUES FOR COMMERCIAL SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL ASSEMBLIES  

SciTech Connect

Waste packages are loaded with commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that satisfies the minimum burnup requirements of a criticality loading curve. The burnup value assigned by the originating nuclear utility to each SNF assembly (assigned burnup) is used to load waste packages in compliance with a criticality loading curve. The burnup provided by a nuclear utility has uncertainties, so conservative calculation methods are used to characterize those uncertainties for incorporation into the criticality loading curves. Procedural safety controls ensure that the correct assembly is loaded into each waste package to prevent a misload that could create a condition affecting the safety margins. Probabilistic analyses show that procedural safety controls can minimize the chance of a misload but can not completely eliminate the possibility. Physical measurements of burnup with instrumentation in the surface facility are not necessary due to the conservative calculation methods used to produce the criticality loading curves. The reactor records assigned burnup of a commercial SNF assembly contains about two percent uncertainty, which is increased to five-percent to ensure conservatism. This five-percent uncertainty is accommodated by adjusting the criticality loading curve. Also, the record keeping methods of nuclear utilities are not uniform and the level of detail required by the NRC has varied over the last several decades. Thus, some SNF assemblies may have assigned burnups that are averages for a batch of assemblies with similar characteristics. Utilities typically have access to more detailed core-follow records that allow the batch average burnup to be changed to an assembly specific burnup. Alternatively, an additional safety margin is incorporated into the criticality loading curve to accommodate SNF assemblies with batch average burnups or greater uncertainties due to the methodology used by the nuclear utility. The utility records provide the assembly identifier, initial {sup 235}U enrichment, and time of discharge from the reactor as well as the assigned burnup, but the distribution. of burnup axially along the assembly length is not provided. The axial burnup profile is maintained within acceptable bounds by the operating conditions of the nuclear reactor and is calculated during preparations to reload a reactor, but the actual burnup profile is not measured. The axial burnup profile is important to the determination of the reactivity of a waste package, so a conservative evaluation of the calculated axial profiles for a large database of SNF has been performed. The product of the axial profile evaluation is a profile that is conservative. Thus, there is no need for physical measurement of the axial profile. The assembly identifier is legible on each SNF assembly and the utility records provide the associated characteristics of the assembly. The conservative methodologies used to determine the criticality loading curve for a waste package provide sufficient margin so that criticality safety is assured for preclosure operations even in the event of a misload. Consideration of misload effects for postclosure time periods is provided by the criticality Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) analysis. The conservative approaches used to develop and apply the criticality loading curve are thus sufficiently robust that the utility assigned burnup is an adequate source of burnup values, and additional means of verification of assigned burnup through physical measurements are not needed.

BSC

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

RUSSIAN-ORIGIN HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL SHIPMENT FROM BULGARIA  

SciTech Connect

In July 2008, the Global Threat Reduction Initiative and the IRT 2000 research reactor in Sofia, Bulgaria, operated by the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped 6.4 kilograms of Russian origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to the Russian Federation. The shipment, which resulted in the removal of all HEU from Bulgaria, was conducted by truck, barge, and rail modes of transport across two transit countries before reaching the final destination at the Production Association Mayak facility in Chelyabinsk, Russia. This paper describes the work, equipment, organizations, and approvals that were required to complete the spent fuel shipment and provides lessons learned that might assist other research reactor operators with their own spent nuclear fuel shipments.

Kelly Cummins; Igor Bolshinsky; Ken Allen; Tihomir Apostolov; Ivaylo Dimitrov

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

U.S. Spent Nuclear Fuel Data as of December 31, 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Spent Nuclear Fuel Data, Detailed United States as of December 31, 1998 Spent nuclear fuel data is collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The spent nuclear fuel (SNF) data includes detailed characteristics of SNF generated by commercial U.S. nuclear power plants. From 1983 through 1995 this data was collected annually. Since 1996 this data has been collected every three years. The latest available detailed data covers all SNF discharged from commercial reactors before December 31, 1998, and is maintained in a database by the EIA. Summary data tables from this database may be found as indicated below. The detailed data are available on request from Jim Finucane who can be reached at 202-287-1966 or at

278

An evaluation of near-field host rock temperatures for a spent fuel repository  

SciTech Connect

A repository heat transfer analysis has been performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy's Performance Assessment Scientific Support Program. The objective of this study was to evaluate the near-field thermal environmental conditions for a spent fuel repository system. A spent fuel logistics analysis was performed using a waste management system simulation model, WASTES-II, to evaluate the thermal characteristics of spent fuel received at the repository. A repository-scale thermal analysis was performed using a finite difference heat transfer code, TEMPEST, to evaluate the near-field host rock temperature. The calculated temporal and spatial distributions of near-field host rock temperatures provide input to the repository source term model in evaluations of engineered barrier system performance. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Altenhofen, M.K.; Lowery, P.S.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Comparative economics for DUCRETE spent fuel storage cask handling, transportation, and capital requirements  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes economic differences between a DUCRETE spent nuclear fuel storage cask and a conventional concrete storage cask in the areas of handling, transportation, and capital requirements. The DUCRETE cask is under evaluation as a new technology that could substantially reduce the overall costs of spent fuel and depleted U disposal. DUCRETE incorporates depleted U in a Portland cement mixture and functions as the cask`s primary radiation barrier. The cask system design includes insertion of the US DOE Multi-Purpose Canister inside the DUCRETE cask. The economic comparison is from the time a cask is loaded in a spent fuel pool until it is placed in the repository and includes the utility and overall US system perspectives.

Powell, F.P. [Sierra Nuclear Corp., Roswell, GA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Plan for characterization of K Basin spent nuclear fuel and sludge  

SciTech Connect

This plan outlines a characterization program that supports the accelerated Path Forward scope and schedules for the Spent Nuclear Fuel stored in the Hanford K Basins. This plan is driven by the schedule to begin fuel transfer by December 1997. The program is structured for 4 years and is limited to in-situ and laboratory examinations of the spent nuclear fuel and sludge in the K East and K West Basins. The program provides bounding behavior of the fuel, and verification and acceptability for three different sludge disposal pathways. Fuel examinations are based on two shipping campaigns for the K West Basin and one from the K East Basin. Laboratory examinations include physical condition, hydride and oxide content, conditioning testing, and dry storage behavior.

Lawrence, L.A.; Marschman, S.C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Validation of Inverse Methods Applied to Forensic Analysis of Spent Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inverse depletion/decay methods are useful tools for application to nuclear forensics. Previously, inverse methods were applied to the generic case of predicting the burnup, initial enrichment, and cooling time for selected spent nuclear fuels based on measured actinide and fission product concentrations. These existing measurements were not developed or optimized for use by these inverse techniques, and hence previous work demonstrated the prediction of only the fuel burnup, initial enrichment, and cooling time. Previously, nine spent fuel samples from an online data compilation were randomly selected for study. This work set out to demonstrate the full prediction capabilities using measured isotopic data, but with a more deliberate selection of fuel samples. The current approach is to evaluate nuclides within the same element to see if complementary information can be obtained in addition to the reactor burnup, enrichment, and cooling. Specifically, the reactor power and the fuel irradiation time values are desired to achieve the maximum prediction capabilities of these techniques.

Broadhead, Bryan L [ORNL; Weber, Charles F [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Report on a workshop on transportation-accident scenarios involving spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

Much confusion and skepticism resulted from the scenarios for transportation accidents involving spent fuel that have been presented in environmental impact statements because the supporting assumptions and conclusions from the scenarios did not always appear to be consistent. As a result, the Transportation Technology Center gathered a group whose participants were experts in disciplines related to the transport of spent fuel to consider the scenarios. The group made a number of recommendations about scenario development and about areas in need of further study. This report documents the discussions held and the recommendations and conclusions of the group.

Wilmot, E.L.; McClure, J.D.; Luna, R.E.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix C, Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Mangement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in two related decision making processes concerning: (1) the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the DOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which will focus on the next 10 years; and (2) programmatic decisions on future spent nuclear fuel management which will emphasize the next 40 years. DOE is analyzing the environmental consequences of these spent nuclear fuel management actions in this two-volume Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Volume 1 supports broad programmatic decisions that will have applicability across the DOE complex and describes in detail the purpose and need for this DOE action. Volume 2 is specific to actions at the INEL. This document, which limits its discussion to the Savannah River Site (SRS) spent nuclear fuel management program, supports Volume 1 of the EIS. Following the introduction, Chapter 2 contains background information related to the SRS and the framework of environmental regulations pertinent to spent nuclear fuel management. Chapter 3 identifies spent nuclear fuel management alternatives that DOE could implement at the SRS, and summarizes their potential environmental consequences. Chapter 4 describes the existing environmental resources of the SRS that spent nuclear fuel activities could affect. Chapter 5 analyzes in detail the environmental consequences of each spent nuclear fuel management alternative and describes cumulative impacts. The chapter also contains information on unavoidable adverse impacts, commitment of resources, short-term use of the environment and mitigation measures.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Nano-particles for Spent Nuclear Fuel Separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors III ... Development and Testing Advanced Ferritic Steels for Fast Reactor ...

285

A Second Look at Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis as a Spent Fuel NDA Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many different nondestructive analysis techniques are currently being investigated as a part of the United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) seeking methods to quantify plutonium in spent fuel. Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) is one of these techniques. Having first been explored in the mid-1970s for the analysis of individual spent-fuel pins a second look, using advanced simulation and modeling methods, is now underway to investigate the suitability of the NRTA technique for assaying complete spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The technique is similar to neutron time-of-flight methods used for cross-section determinations but operates over only the narrow 0.1-20 eV range where strong, distinguishable resonances exist for both the plutonium (239, 240, 241,242Pu) and uranium (235,236,238U) isotopes of interest in spent fuel. Additionally, in this energy range resonances exists for six important fission products (99Tc, 103Rh, 131Xe, 133Cs, 145Nd, and 152Sm) which provide additional information to support spent fuel plutonium assay determinations. Initial modeling shows excellent agreement with previously published experimental data for measurements of individual spent-fuel pins where plutonium assays were demonstrated to have a precision of 2-4%. Within the simulation and modeling analyses of this project scoping studies have explored fourteen different aspects of the technique including the neutron source, drift tube configurations, and gross neutron transmission as well as the impacts of fuel burn up, cooling time, and fission-product interferences. These results show that NRTA may be a very capable experimental technique for spent-fuel assay measurements. The results suggest sufficient transmission strength and signal differentiability is possible for assays through up to 8 pins. For an 8-pin assay (looking at an assembly diagonally), 64% of the pins in a typical 17 ? 17 array of a pressurized water reactor fuel assembly can be part of a complete transmission assay measurement with high precision. Analysis of rows with up to 12 pins may also be feasible but with diminished precision. Preliminary data analysis of an NRTA simulation has demonstrated the simplicity of the technique.

James W .Sterbentz; David L. Chichester

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Impact of Microbially Influenced Corrosion on Spent Nuclear Fuel and Storage Life  

SciTech Connect

A study was performed to evaluate if microbial activity could be considered a threat to spent nuclear fuel integrity. The existing data regarding the impact of microbial influenced corrosion (MIC) on spent nuclear fuel storage does not allow a clear assessment to be made. In order to identify what further data are needed, a literature survey on MIC was accomplished with emphasis on materials used in nuclear fuel fabrication, e.g., A1, 304 SS, and zirconium. In addition, a survey was done at Savannah River, Oak Ridge, Hanford, and the INEL on the condition of their wet storage facilities. The topics discussed were the SNF path forward, the types of fuel, ramifications of damaged fuel, involvement of microbial processes, dry storage scenarios, ability to identify microbial activity, definitions of water quality, and the use of biocides. Information was also obtained at international meetings in the area of biological mediated problems in spent fuel and high level wastes. Topics dis cussed included receiving foreign reactor research fuels into existing pools, synergism between different microbes and other forms of corrosion, and cross contamination.

J. H. Wolfram; R. E. Mizia; R. Jex; L. Nelson; K. M. Garcia

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Analysis of Experimental Data for High Burnup PWR Spent Fuel Isotopic Validation - Vandellos II Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is one of the several recent NUREG/CR reports documenting benchmark-quality radiochemical assay data and the use of the data to validate computer code predictions of isotopic composition for spent nuclear fuel, to establish the uncertainty and bias associated with code predictions. The experimental data analyzed in the current report were acquired from a high-burnup fuel program coordinated by Spanish organizations. The measurements included extensive actinide and fission product data of importance to spent fuel safety applications, including burnup credit, decay heat, and radiation source terms. Six unique spent fuel samples from three uranium oxide fuel rods were analyzed. The fuel rods had a 4.5 wt % {sup 235}U initial enrichment and were irradiated in the Vandellos II pressurized water reactor operated in Spain. The burnups of the fuel samples range from 42 to 78 GWd/MTU. The measurements were used to validate the two-dimensional depletion sequence TRITON in the SCALE computer code system.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Storage of spent fuel from the nation`s nuclear reactors: Status, technology, and policy options  

SciTech Connect

Since the beginning of the commercial nuclear electric power industry, it has been recognized that spent nuclear reactor fuel must be able to be readily removed from the reactor vessel in the plant and safely stored on-site. The need for adjacent ready storage is first for safety. In the event of an emergency, or necessary maintenance that requires the removal of irradiated fuel from the reactor vessel, cooled reserve storage capacity for the full amount of fuel from the reactor core must be available. Also, the uranium fuel in the reactor eventually reaches the point where its heat generation is below the planned efficiency for steam production which drives the turbines and generators. It then must be replaced by fresh uranium fuel, with the ``spent fuel`` elements being removed to a safe and convenient storage location near the reactor vessel. The federal nuclear waste repository program, even without delays in the current schedule of disposal becoming available in 2003, will result in a large percentage of the 111 existing operable commercial reactors requiring expansion of their spent fuel storage capacity. How that need can and will be met raises issues of both technology and policy that will be reviewed in this report.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Cost probability analysis of reprocessing spent nuclear fuel in the US G.D. Recktenwald, M.R. Deinert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the sustainability of nuclear power while others argue against them on economic, environmental and security groundsCost probability analysis of reprocessing spent nuclear fuel in the US G.D. Recktenwald, M P48 Keywords: Reprocessing Nuclear power Spent fuel The methods by which nuclear power's radioactive

Deinert, Mark

290

Summary of Preliminary Criticality Analysis for Peach Bottom Fuel in the DOE Standardized Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program is developing a standardized set of canisters for DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF). These canisters will be used for DOE SNF handling, interim storage, transportation, and disposal in the national repository. Several fuels are being examined in conjunction with the DOE SNF canisters. This report summarizes the preliminary criticality safety analysis that addresses general fissile loading limits for Peach Bottom graphite fuel in the DOE SNF canister. The canister is considered both alone and inside the 5-HLW/DOE Long Spent Fuel Co-disposal Waste Package, and in intact and degraded conditions. Results are appropriate for a single DOE SNF canister. Specific facilities, equipment, canister internal structures, and scenarios for handling, storage, and transportation have not yet been defined and are not evaluated in this analysis. The analysis assumes that the DOE SNF canister is designed so that it maintains reasonable geometric integrity. Parameters important to the results are the canister outer diameter, inner diameter, and wall thickness. These parameters are assumed to have nominal dimensions of 45.7-cm (18.0-in.), 43.815-cm (17.25-in), and 0.953-cm (0.375-in.), respectively. Based on the analysis results, the recommended fissile loading for the DOE SNF canister is 13 Peach Bottom fuel elements if no internal steel is present, and 15 Peach Bottom fuel elements if credit is taken for internal steel.

Henrikson, D.J.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : interim final report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to plausible sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks and associated risk assessments. We present details and significant results obtained from this program from 2001 through 2007. Measured aerosol results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; measurements of volatile fission product species enhanced sorption--enrichment factors onto respirable particles; and, status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR, needed for scaling studies. Emphasis is provided on recent Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide pellets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants in surrogate spent fuel test rodlets, plus the latest surrogate cerium oxide results and aerosol laboratory supporting calibration work. The DUO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, plus fission product dopant aerosol particle results are compared with available historical data. We also provide a status review on continuing preparations for the final Phase 4 in this program, tests using individual short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. The source-term data, aerosol results, and program design have been tailored to support and guide follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments. This spent fuel sabotage, aerosol test program was performed primarily at Sandia National Laboratories, with support provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This program has significant input from, and is cooperatively supported and coordinated by both the U.S. and international program participants in Germany, France, and others, as part of the International Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC).

Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Loiseau, Olivier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Klennert, Lindsay A.; Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno A. (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Brucher, Wenzel (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Steyskal, Michele D.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A method for determining the spent-fuel contribution to transport cask containment requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines containment requirements for spent-fuel transport containers that are transported under normal and hypothetical accident conditions. A methodology is described that estimates the probability of rod failure and the quantity of radioactive material released from breached rods. This methodology characterizes the dynamic environment of the cask and its contents and deterministically models the peak stresses that are induced in spent-fuel cladding by the mechanical and thermal dynamic environments. The peak stresses are evaluated in relation to probabilistic failure criteria for generated or preexisting ductile tearing and material fractures at cracks partially through the wall in fuel rods. Activity concentrations in the cask cavity are predicted from estimates of the fraction of gases, volatiles, and fuel fines that are released when the rod cladding is breached. Containment requirements based on the source term are calculated in terms of maximum permissible volumetric leak rates from the cask. Calculations are included for representative cask designs.

Sanders, T.L.; Seager, K.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rashid, Y.R.; Barrett, P.R. [ANATECH Research Corp., La Jolla, CA (United States); Malinauskas, A.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Einziger, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Jordan, H. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant; Duffey, T.A.; Sutherland, S.H. [APTEK, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States); Reardon, P.C. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Evaluation of neutron absorbers for the melt-dilute treatment of aluminum-based spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

Aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (Al-SNF) from foreign and domestic research reactors is being consolidated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for ultimate disposal in the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS). Most of the aluminum-based fuel material contains highly enriched uranium (HEU) (greater than 20 percent {sup 235}U), which poses a proliferation risk and challenges the preclusion of criticality events for disposal periods exceeding 10,000 years.

Vinson, D.W.

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

MELCOR model for an experimental 17x17 spent fuel PWR assembly.  

SciTech Connect

A MELCOR model has been developed to simulate a pressurized water reactor (PWR) 17 x 17 assembly in a spent fuel pool rack cell undergoing severe accident conditions. To the extent possible, the MELCOR model reflects the actual geometry, materials, and masses present in the experimental arrangement for the Sandia Fuel Project (SFP). The report presents an overview of the SFP experimental arrangement, the MELCOR model specifications, demonstration calculation results, and the input model listing.

Cardoni, Jeffrey

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Disposal options for burner ash from spent graphite fuel. Final study report November 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three major disposal alternatives are being considered for Fort St. Vrain Reactor (FSVR) and Peach Bottom Reactor (PBR) spent fuels: direct disposal of packaged, intact spent fuel elements; (2) removal of compacts to separate fuel into high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW); and (3) physical/chemical processing to reduce waste volumes and produce stable waste forms. For the third alternative, combustion of fuel matrix graphite and fuel particle carbon coatings is a preferred technique for head-end processing as well as for volume reduction and chemical pretreatment prior to final fixation, packaging, and disposal of radioactive residuals (fissile and fertile materials together with fission and activation products) in a final repository. This report presents the results of a scoping study of alternate means for processing and/or disposal of fissile-bearing particles and ash remaining after combustion of FSVR and PBR spent graphite fuels. Candidate spent fuel ash (SFA) waste forms in decreasing order of estimated technical feasibility include glass-ceramics (GCs), polycrystalline ceramic assemblages (PCAs), and homogeneous amorphous glass. Candidate SFA waste form production processes in increasing order of estimated effort and cost for implementation are: low-density GCs via fuel grinding and simultaneous combustion and waste form production in a slagging cyclone combustor (SCC); glass or low-density GCs via fluidized bed SFA production followed by conventional melting of SFA and frit; PCAs via fluidized bed SFA production followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) of SFA/frit mixtures; and high-density GCs via fluidized bed SFA production followed by HIPing of Calcine/Frit/SFA mixtures.

Pinto, A.P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

End-of-Life Rod Internal Pressures in Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The end-of-reactor-life (EOL) rod internal pressure (RIP) is the primary protagonist for several evolutionary changes during long-term dry storage, which affect cladding resistance to failure when spent fuel assemblies are subjected to normal and accident conditions of transport. At the maximum temperature attained, either during vacuum drying or dry storage, EOL RIP determines the maximum stress state in the fuel rod cladding, which in turn sets the initial conditions for potential time-dependent ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

297

Determination of the Accuracy of Utility Spent-Fuel Burnup Records  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncertainties in reactor records for fuel assembly burnup are a key consideration in the acceptance of burnup credit by the U.S. NRC. This report summarizes the results of an investigation into uncertainties associated with nuclear power plant burnup records. The results indicate there is an overall uncertainty of about 2 percent in the burnup records, which must be accounted for in spent-fuel applications.

1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

FIELD-DEPLOYABLE SAMPLING TOOLS FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL INTERROGATION IN LIQUID STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

Methodology and field deployable tools (test kits) to analyze the chemical and microbiological condition of aqueous spent fuel storage basins and determine the oxide thickness on the spent fuel basin materials were developed to assess the corrosion potential of a basin. this assessment can then be used to determine the amount of time fuel has spent in a storage basin to ascertain if the operation of the reactor and storage basin is consistent with safeguard declarations or expectations and assist in evaluating general storage basin operations. The test kit was developed based on the identification of key physical, chemical and microbiological parameters identified using a review of the scientific and basin operations literature. The parameters were used to design bench scale test cells for additional corrosion analyses, and then tools were purchased to analyze the key parameters. The tools were used to characterize an active spent fuel basin, the Savannah River Site (SRS) L-Area basin. The sampling kit consisted of a total organic carbon analyzer, an YSI multiprobe, and a thickness probe. The tools were field tested to determine their ease of use, reliability, and determine the quality of data that each tool could provide. Characterization confirmed that the L Area basin is a well operated facility with low corrosion potential.

Berry, T.; Milliken, C.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Hathcock, D.; Heitkamp, M.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

299

Operating experience feedback report: Assessment of spent fuel cooling. Volume 12  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of an independent assessment by a team from the Office of Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data of spent-fuel-pool (SFP) cooling in operating nuclear power plants. The team assessed the likelihood and consequences of an extended loss of SFP cooling and suggested corrective actions, based on their findings.

Ibarra, J.G.; Jones, W.R.; Lanik, G.F.; Ornstein, H.L.; Pullani, S.V.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Spent Nuclear Fuel project photon heat deposition calculation for hygrogen generation within MCO  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three types of water conditions are analyzed for nuclear heat deposition in a MCO: fully flooded, thick film, and thin film. These heat deposition rates within water can be used to determine gas generation during the different phases of Spent Fuel removal and processing for storage.

Lan, J.S.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Preliminary waste acceptance criteria for the ICPP spent fuel and waste management technology development program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to identify requirements to be met by the Producer/Shipper of Spent Nuclear Fuel/High-LeveL Waste SNF/HLW in order for DOE to be able to accept the packaged materials. This includes defining both standard and nonstandard waste forms.

Taylor, L.L.; Shikashio, R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Analysis of the risk of transporting spent nuclear fuel by train  

SciTech Connect

This report uses risk analyses to analyze the safety of transporting spent nuclear fuel for commercial rail shipping systems. The rail systems analyzed are those expected to be used in the United States when the total electricity-generating capacity by nuclear reactors is 100 GW in the late 1980s. Risk as used in this report is the product of the probability of a release of material to the environment and the consequences resulting from the release. The analysis includes risks in terms of expected fatalities from release of radioactive materials due to transportation accidents involving PWR spent fuel shipped in rail casks. The expected total risk from such shipments is 1.3 x 10/sup -4/ fatalities per year. Risk spectrums are developed for shipments of spent fuel that are 180 days and 4 years out-of-reactor. The risk from transporting spent fuel by train is much less (by 2 to 4 orders of magnitude) than the risk to society from other man-caused events such as dam failure.

Elder, H.K.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Review of the natural circulation effect in the Vermont Yankee spent-fuel pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 7429-node, three-dimensional computer model of the Vermont Yankee spent-fuel pool was set up and run using the porous media model of the TEMPEST computer code. The results of this analysis show that natural circulation is sufficient to ensure adequate cooling, regardless of the loading pattern used or the orientation of the cooling system discharge nozzle.

Wheeler, C.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Options for Pursuing Moderator Exclusion for Application to Spent-Fuel Transportation Packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses options for pursuing moderator exclusion, either by itself or in combination with burnup credit, for application to the criticality evaluation of spent nuclear fuel transportation packages. Also, information is provided on how to proceed in developing a request for rulemaking if the industry determines that changes to the existing regulations for streamlining implementation of moderator exclusion are highly desirable.

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Determination of the Accuracy of Utility Spent Fuel Burnup Records (Interim Report)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an initial investigation into the uncertainties associated with the burnup records maintained by nuclear power plants. The results indicate that there is an overall uncertainty of about 2 percent in the burnup records, which must be accounted for in spent fuel applications.

1998-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

306

Options for Pursuing Moderator Exclusion for Application to Spent-Fuel Transportation Packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the concept of moderator exclusion, either by itself or in combination with burnup credit, for application to the criticality evaluation of spent nuclear fuel transportation packages. Information is also provided on how to proceed in the development of regulatory amendments if the industry determines that changes to the existing regulations for streamlining implementation of moderator exclusion are highly desirable.

2004-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

307

Storage of LWR (light-water-reactor) spent fuel in air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental program is being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the oxidation response of light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuels under conditions appropriate to fuel storage in air. The program is designed to investigate several independent variables that might affect the oxidation behavior of spent fuel. Included are temperature (135 to 230{degree}C), fuel burnup (to about 34 MWd/kgM), reactor type (pressurized and boiling water reactors), moisture level in the air, and the presence of a high gamma field. In continuing tests with declad spent fuel and nonirradiated UO{sub 2} specimens, oxidation rates were monitored by weight-gain measurements and the microstructures of subsamples taken during the weighing intervals were characterized by several analytical methods. The oxidation behavior indicated by weight gain and time to form powder will be reported in Volume III of this series. The characterization results obtained from x-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Auger electron spectrometry of oxidized fuel samples are presented in this report. 28 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

Thomas, L.E.; Charlot, L.A.; Coleman, J.E. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Knoll, R.W. (Johnson Controls, Inc., Madison, WI (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Spent Nuclear Fuel Project FY 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan WBS No. 1.4.1, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project portion of the Hanford Strategic Plan for the Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The SNF Project was established to evaluate and integrate the urgent risks associated with N-reactor fuel currently stored at the Hanford site in the K Basins, and to manage the transfer and disposition of other spent nuclear fuels currently stored on the Hanford site. An evaluation of alternatives for the expedited removal of spent fuels from the K Basin area was performed. Based on this study, a Recommended Path Forward for the K Basins was developed and proposed to the U.S. DOE.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Further Evaluation of the Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) Technique for Assaying Plutonium in Spent Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an end-of-year report (Fiscal Year (FY) 2011) for the second year of effort on a project funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241). The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) to assay plutonium in commercial light-water-reactor spent fuel. This project is part of a larger research effort within the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to evaluate methods for assaying plutonium in spent fuel, the Plutonium Assay Challenge. The second-year goals for this project included: (1) assessing the neutron source strength needed for the NRTA technique, (2) estimating count times, (3) assessing the effect of temperature on the transmitted signal, (4) estimating plutonium content in a spent fuel assembly, (5) providing a preliminary assessment of the neutron detectors, and (6) documenting this work in an end of the year report (this report). Research teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and at several universities are also working to investigate plutonium assay methods for spent-fuel safeguards. While the NRTA technique is well proven in the scientific literature for assaying individual spent fuel pins, it is a newcomer to the current NGSI efforts studying Pu assay method techniques having just started in March 2010; several analytical techniques have been under investigation within this program for two to three years or more. This report summarizes work performed over a nine month period from January-September 2011 and is to be considered a follow-on or add-on report to our previous published summary report from December 2010 (INL/EXT-10-20620).

J. W. Sterbentz; D. L. Chichester

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report provides current statistical data on every fuel assembly irradiated in commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States. It also provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the nuclear and electric industries and the general public. It uses data from the mandatory, ``Nuclear Fuel Data`` survey, Form RW-859 for 1992 and historical data collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on previous Form RW-859 surveys. The report was prepared by the EIA under a Memorandum of Understanding with the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

Not Available

1994-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

311

Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : technical review and analysis supplement.  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to provide vital data required to assess the consequences of a terrorist attack on a spent fuel transportation cask. One such attack scenario involves the use of conical shaped charges (CSC), which are capable of damaging a spent fuel transportation cask. In the event of such an attack, the amount of radioactivity that may be released as respirable aerosols is not known with great certainty. Research to date has focused on measuring the aerosol release from single short surrogate fuel rodlets subjected to attack by a small CSC device in various aerosol chamber designs. The last series of three experiments tested surrogate fuel rodlets made with depleted uranium oxide ceramic pellets in a specially designed double chamber aerosol containment apparatus. This robust testing apparatus was designed to prevent any radioactive release and allow high level radioactive waste disposal of the entire apparatus following testing of actual spent fuel rodlets as proposed. DOE and Sandia reviews of the project to date identified a number of issues. The purpose of this supplemental report is to address and document the DOE review comments and to resolve the issues identified in the Sandia technical review.

Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Technology development program for Idaho Chemical Processing Plant spent fuel and waste management  

SciTech Connect

Irradiated nuclear fuel has been reprocessed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) since 1953 to recover uranium-235 and krypton-85 for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The resulting acidic high-level liquid radioactive waste (HLLW) has been solidified to a high-level waste (HLW) calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless-steel bins enclosed in concrete vaults. Residual HLW and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless-steel underground tanks contained in concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also stored at INEL. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium. As a result of the decision to curtail reprocessing the ICPP Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development plan has been implemented to identify acceptable options for disposing of the (1) sodium-bearing liquid radioactive waste, (2) radioactive calcine, and (3) irradiated spent fuel stored at the INEL. The plan was developed jointly by DOE and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc., (WINCO) and with the concurrence of the State of Idaho.

Ermold, L.F.; Knecht, D.A.; Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Measurement of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel by self-induced x-ray fluorescence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct measurement of the plutonium content in spent nuclear fuel is a challenging problem in non-destructive assay. The very high gamma-ray flux from fission product isotopes overwhelms the weaker gamma-ray emissions from plutonium and uranium, making passive gamma-ray measurements impossible. However, the intense fission product radiation is effective at exciting plutonium and uranium atoms, resulting in subsequent fluorescence X-ray emission. K-shell X-rays in the 100 keV energy range can escape the fuel and cladding, providing a direct signal from uranium and plutonium that can be measured with a standard germanium detector. The measured plutonium to uranium elemental ratio can be used to compute the plutonium content of the fuel. The technique can potentially provide a passive, non-destructive assay tool for determining plutonium content in spent fuel. In this paper, we discuss recent non-destructive measurements of plutonium X-ray fluorescence (XRF) signatures from pressurized water reactor spent fuel rods. We also discuss how emerging new technologies, like very high energy resolution microcalorimeter detectors, might be applied to XRF measurements.

Hoover, Andrew S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rudy, Cliff R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Steve J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Charlton, William S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stafford, A [TEXAS A& M; Strohmeyer, D [TEXAS A& M; Saavadra, S [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Using X-ray, K-edge densitometry in spent fuel characterization  

SciTech Connect

There are instances where records for spent nuclear fuel are incomplete, as well as cases where fuel assemblies have deteriorated during storage. To bring these materials into compliance for long term storage will require determination of parameters such as enrichment, total fissionable material, and burnup. To obtain accurate estimates of these parameters will require the combination of information from different inspection techniques. A method which can provide an accurate measure of the total uranium in the spent fuel is X-ray K-edge densitometry. To assess the potential for applying this method in spent fuel characterization, the authors have measured the amount of uranium in stacks of reactor fuel plates containing nuclear materials of different enrichments and alloys. They have obtained good agreement with expected uranium concentrations ranging from 60 mg/cm{sup 2} to 3,000 mg/cm{sup 2}, and have demonstrated that these measurements can be made in a high radiation field (> 200 mR/hr).

Jensen, T.; Aljundi, T.; Gray, J.N.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Analysis of the Reuse of Uranium Recovered from the Reprocessing of Commercial LWR Spent Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an analysis of the factors involved in the reuse of uranium recovered from commercial light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuels (1) by reenrichment and recycling as fuel to LWRs and/or (2) by recycling directly as fuel to heavy-water-reactors (HWRs), such as the CANDU (registered trade name for the Canadian Deuterium Uranium Reactor). Reuse is an attractive alternative to the current Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) baseline plan, which stores the reprocessed uranium (RU) for an uncertain future or attempts to dispose of it as 'greater-than-Class C' waste. Considering that the open fuel cycle currently deployed in the United States already creates a huge excess quantity of depleted uranium, the closed fuel cycle should enable the recycle of the major components of spent fuel, such as the uranium and the hazardous, long-lived transuranic (TRU) actinides, as well as the managed disposal of fission product wastes. Compared with the GNEP baseline scenario, the reuse of RU in the uranium fuel cycle has a number of potential advantages: (1) avoidance of purchase costs of 11-20% of the natural uranium feed; (2) avoidance of disposal costs for a large majority of the volume of spent fuel that is reprocessed; (3) avoidance of disposal costs for a portion of the depleted uranium from the enrichment step; (4) depending on the {sup 235}U assay of the RU, possible avoidance of separative work costs; and (5) a significant increase in the production of {sup 238}Pu due to the presence of {sup 236}U, which benefits somewhat the transmutation value of the plutonium and also provides some proliferation resistance.

DelCul, Guillermo D [ORNL; Trowbridge, Lee D [ORNL; Renier, John-Paul [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Williams, Kent Alan [ORNL; Spencer, Barry B [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program. Annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on the progress of activities during fiscal year 1993 in the Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). As a new program, efforts are just getting underway toward addressing major issues related to the fuel and waste stored at the ICPP. The SF&WMTDP has the following principal objectives: Investigate direct dispositioning of spent fuel, striving for one acceptable waste form; determine the best treatment process(es) for liquid and calcine wastes to minimize the volume of high level radioactive waste (HLW) and low level waste (LLW); demonstrate the integrated operability and maintainability of selected treatment and immobilization processes; and assure that implementation of the selected waste treatment process is environmentally acceptable, ensures public and worker safety, and is economically feasible.

Bryant, J.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP) progress with respect to remote operation and maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing an Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process (ACP) to reduce the volume of spent fuel, and the construction of the ACP facility (ACPF) for a demonstration of its technical feasibility has been completed. In 2006 two inactive demonstrations were performed with simulated fuels in the ACPF. Accompanied by process equipment performance tests, its remote operability and maintainability were also tested during that time. Procedures for remote operation tasks are well addressed in this study and evaluated thoroughly. Also, remote maintenance and repair tasks are addressed regarding some important modules with a high priority order. The above remote handling test's results provided a lot of information such as items to be revised to improve the efficiency of the remote handling tasks. This paper deals with the current status of ACP and the progress of remote handling of ACPF. (authors)

Lee, Hyo Jik; Lee, Jong Kwang; Park, Byung Suk [NURE Lab, KAERI: 1045 Daedeokdaero, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ji Sup [Spent Fuel Technology Development Division, KAERI: 1045 Daedeokdaero, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Plutonium Discharge Rates and Spent Nuclear Fuel Inventory Estimates for Nuclear Reactors Worldwide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a preliminary survey and analysis of the five primary types of commercial nuclear power reactors currently in use around the world. Plutonium mass discharge rates from the reactors’ spent fuel at reload are estimated based on a simple methodology that is able to use limited reactor burnup and operational characteristics collected from a variety of public domain sources. Selected commercial reactor operating and nuclear core characteristics are also given for each reactor type. In addition to the worldwide commercial reactors survey, a materials test reactor survey was conducted to identify reactors of this type with a significant core power rating. Over 100 material or research reactors with a core power rating >1 MW fall into this category. Fuel characteristics and spent fuel inventories for these material test reactors are also provided herein.

Brian K. Castle; Shauna A. Hoiland; Richard A. Rankin; James W. Sterbentz

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Apparatus and method for reprocessing and separating spent nuclear fuels. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for separating and reprocessing spent nuclear fuels includes a separation vessel housing a molten metal solvent in a reaction region, a reflux region positioned above and adjacent to the reaction region, and a porous filter member defining the bottom of the separation vessel in a supporting relationship with the metal solvent. Spent fuels are added to the metal solvent. A nonoxidizing nitrogen-containing gas is introduced into the separation vessel, forming solid actinide nitrides in the metal solvent from actinide fuels, while leaving other fission products in solution. A pressure of about 1.1 to 1.2 atm is applied in the reflux region, forcing the molten metal solvent and soluble fission products out of the vessel, while leaving the solid actinide nitrides in the separation vessel.

Krikorian, O.H.; Grens, J.Z.; Parrish, W.H. Sr.; Coops, M.S.

1982-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

320

Determining plutonium mass in spent fuel using Cf-252 interrogation with prompt neutron detection  

SciTech Connect

{sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron (CIPN) detection is proposed as one of 14 NDA techniques to determine Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies (FAs). CIPN is a low-cost and portable instrument, and it looks like a modified fork detector combined with an active interrogation source. Fission chamber (FC) is chosen as neutron detector because of its insensitivity to {gamma} radiation. The CIPN assay is comprised of two measurements, a background count and an active count, without and with the {sup 252}Cf source next to the fuel respectively. The net signal above background is primarily due to the multiplication of Cf source neutrons caused by the fissile content. The capability of CIPN to detect diversion and to determine fissile content was quantified using MCNPX simulations. New schemes were proposed (such as burnup and cooling time correction, etc.) and the results show that the fissile content of a target spent fuel assembly can be determined using CIPN signal.

Hu, Jianwei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Equipment concepts for dry intercask transfer of spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a study of preconceptual design and analysis of four intercask transfer concepts. The four concepts are: a large shielded cylindrical turntable that contains an integral fuel handling machine (turntable concept); a shielded fuel handling machine under which shipping and storage casks are moved horizontally (shuttle concept); a small hot cell containing equipment for transferring fuel between shipping and storage casks (that enter and leave the cell on carts) in a bifurcated trench (trench concept); and a large hot cell, shielded by an earthen berm, that houses equipment for handling fuel between casks that enter and leave the cell on a single cart (igloo concept). The casks considered in this study are most of the transport casks currently operable in the USA, and the storage casks designated REA-2023 and GNS Castor-V. Exclusive of basic services assumed to be provided at the host site, the design and capital costs are estimated to range from $9 to $13 million. The portion of capital costs for portable equipment (for potential later use at another site) was estimated to range from 70% to 98%, depending on the concept. Increasing portability from a range of 70 to 90% to 98% adds $2 to 4 million to the capital costs. Operating costs are estimated at about $2 million/year for all concepts. Implementation times range from about 18 months for the more conventional systems to 40 months for the more unique systems. Times and costs for relocation to another site are 10 to 14 months and about $1 million, plus shipping costs and costs of new construction at the new site. All concepts have estimated capacities for fuel transfer at least equal to the criterion set for this study. Only the hot cell concepts have capability for recanning or repair of canisters. Some development is believed to be required for the turntable and shuttle concepts, but none for the other two concepts.

Schneider, K.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Apparatus and method for reprocessing and separating spent nuclear fuels. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Spent nuclear fuels, including actinide fuels, volatile and non-volatile fission products, are reprocessed and separated in a molten metal solvent housed in the reaction region of a separation vessel which includes a reflux region positioned above the molten tin solvent. The reflux region minimizes loss of evaporated solvent during the separation of the actinide fuels from the volatile fission products. Additionally, inclusion of the reflux region permits the separation of the more volatile fission products (noncondensable) from the less volatile ones (condensable).

Krikorian, O.H.; Grens, J.Z.; Parrish, W.H. Sr.

1982-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

323

THE ECONOMICS OF REPROCESSING vs DIRECT DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the economics of reprocessing versus direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The breakeven uranium price at which reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) and recycling the resulting plutonium and uranium in LWRs would become economic is assessed, using central estimates of the costs of different elements of the nuclear fuel cycle (and other fuel cycle input parameters), for a wide range of range of potential reprocessing prices. Sensitivity analysis is performed, showing that the conclusions reached are robust across a wide range of input parameters. The contribution of direct disposal or reprocessing and recycling to electricity cost is also assessed. The choice of particular central estimates and ranges for the input parameters of the fuel cycle model is justified through a review of the relevant literature. The impact of different fuel cycle approaches on the volume needed for geologic repositories is briefly discussed, as are the issues surrounding the possibility of performing separations and transmutation on spent nuclear fuel to reduce the need for additional repositories. A similar analysis is then performed of the breakeven uranium price at which deploying fast neutron breeder reactors would become competitive compared with a once-through fuel cycle in LWRs, for a range of possible differences in capital cost between LWRs and fast neutron reactors. Sensitivity analysis is again provided, as are an analysis of the contribution to electricity cost, and a justification of the choices of central estimates and ranges for the input parameters. The equations used in the economic model are derived and explained in an appendix. Another appendix assesses the quantities of uranium likely to be recoverable worldwide in the future at a range of different possible future prices.

Matthew Bunn; Steve Fetter; John P. Holdren; Bob van der Zwaan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Recovery of Technetium and Iodine from Spent ATW TRISO Type Fuels.  

SciTech Connect

The Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) program is being developed to determine the feasibility of separating and transmutating the transactinides (Pu-Cm) and long-lived fission product (99Tc and 129I) from spent LWR fuel. Several types of ATW fuels have been suggested to transmutate the Pu-Cm fraction including TRISO type fuels. An ATW TRISO fuel would consist of a Pu-Cm oxide kernel surrounded by several layers of pyrolytic carbon, a layer of SiC, and an outer layer of pyrolytic carbon. Processing of the spent ATW fuel would involve the crush, burn, and leach approach used on normal TRISO fuels. This report describes experiments that determine the potential behavior of the two long-lived fission products, 99Tc and 129I, in this processing. Iodine can be removed and trapped during the burning of the carbon from the fuel. Some technetium may volatilize in the latter stages of the burn but the bulk of it will have to be recovered after dissolution of the oxide residue.

Schroeder, N. C. (Norman C.); Attrep, Moses

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Air Shipment of Highly Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel from Romania  

SciTech Connect

Romania safely air shipped 23.7 kilograms of Russian origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel from the VVR S research reactor at Magurele, Romania, to the Russian Federation in June 2009. This was the world’s first air shipment of spent nuclear fuel transported in a Type B(U) cask under existing international laws without special exceptions for the air transport licenses. This shipment was coordinated by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR), part of the U.S. Department of Energy Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), in cooperation with the Romania National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN), the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), and the Russian Federation State Corporation Rosatom. The shipment was transported by truck to and from the respective commercial airports in Romania and the Russian Federation and stored at a secure nuclear facility in Russia where it will be converted into low enriched uranium. With this shipment, Romania became the 3rd country under the RRRFR program and the 14th country under the GTRI program to remove all HEU. This paper describes the work, equipment, and approvals that were required to complete this spent fuel air shipment.

K. J. Allen; I. Bolshinsky; L. L. Biro; M. E. Budu; N. V. Zamfir; M. Dragusin

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Integrated data base report - 1994: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel and commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes. Except for transuranic wastes, inventories of these materials are reported as of December 31, 1994. Transuranic waste inventories are reported as of December 31, 1993. All spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste data reported are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program contaminated environmental media, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the calendar-year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Design of a System to Retrieve Sludge from the K East Spent Fuel Basin at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the Sludge Retrieval System (SRS), which was designed to safely remove radioactive sludge from the K East spent fuel basin at the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. Basin water and sludge have the potential to leak to the environment due to the age and condition of the basins. Since the 100 K Area spent fuel basins are located next to the Columbia River, the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project mission includes the safe removal, containment, and transportation of sludge from the basins to a secure storage location. The scope of the SRS includes: (1) a system capable of retrieving sludge from the K East basin floor, pits, and fuel canisters; (2) separation of debris from sludge, where debris is defined as any material greater than 0.64 cm (0.25 in.) in diameter; (3) collection of sludge particles in a container that can be transported away from the basin; and (4) modifications to the K East basin to allow installation of the SRS. The SRS was designed by Fluor Federal Services. Changes to the designed system were made by Fluor Hanford as a result of full-scale testing performed after design. This paper discusses this testing, as well as operation and control of the system. Construction and startup testing was initially scheduled to be complete by the end of December 2002. Startup of the system is now expected in April 2003.

TWITCHELL, A.L.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Environmental Statements, Availability, Etc., Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8679 8679 Thursday June 1, 1995 Part III Department of Energy Environmental Statements, Availability, Etc.; Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs: Notice 28680 Federal Register / Vol. 60, No. 105 / Thursday, June 1, 1995 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy has issued a Record of Decision on Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs. The Record of Decision includes a Department-wide decision to

329

Results from Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Series 3 spent fuel dissolution tests  

SciTech Connect

The dissolution and radionuclide release behavior of spent fuel in groundwater is being studied by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), formerly the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Specimens prepared from pressurized water reactor fuel rod segments were tested in sealed stainless steel vessels in Nevada Test Site J-13 well water at 85{degree}C and 25{degree}C. The test matrix included three specimens of bare-fuel particles plus cladding hulls, two fuel rod segments with artificially defected cladding and water-tight end fittings, and an undefected fuel rod section with watertight end fittings. Periodic solution samples were taken during test cycles with the sample volumes replenished with fresh J-13 water. Test cycles were periodically terminated and the specimens restarted in fresh J-13 water. The specimens were run for three cycles for a total test duration of 15 months. 22 refs., 32 figs., 26 tabs.

Wilson, C.N.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The Czech National R&D Program of Nuclear Incineration of PWR Spent Fuel in a Transmuter with Liquid Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The principle drawbacks of any kind of solid nuclear fuel are listed and briefly analysed in the first part of the paper. On the basis of this analysis, the liquid fuel concept and its benefits are introduced and briefly described in the following parts of the paper allowing to develop new reactor systems for nuclear incineration of spent fuel from conventional reactors and a new clean source of energy. As one of the first realistic attempts to utilise the advantages of liquid fuel, the reactor/blanket system with molten fluoride salts in the role of fuel and coolant simultaneously, as incorporated in the accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) being proposed in [1], has been proposed for a deeper, both theoretical and experimental studies in [2]. There will be a preliminary design concept of an experimental assembly LA-0 briefly introduced in the paper which is under preparation in the Czech Republic for such a project [3]. 1

M. Hron

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Nuclide Composition Benchmark Data Set for Verifying Burnup Codes on Spent Light Water Reactor Fuels  

SciTech Connect

To establish a nuclide composition benchmark data set for the verification of burnup codes, destructive analyses of light water reactor spent-fuel samples, which were cut out from several heights of spent-fuel rods, were carried out at the analytical laboratory at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The 16 samples from three kinds of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rods and the 18 samples from two boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel rods were examined. Their initial {sup 235}U enrichments and burnups were from 2.6 to 4.1% and from 4 to 50 GWd/t, respectively. One PWR fuel rod and one BWR fuel rod contained gadolinia as a burnable poison. The measurements for more than 40 nuclides of uranium, transuranium, and fission product elements were performed by destructive analysis using mass spectrometry, and alpha-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry. Burnup for each sample was determined by the {sup 148}Nd method. The analytical methods and the results as well as the related irradiation condition data are compiled as a complete benchmark data set.

Nakahara, Yoshinori; Suyama, Kenya; Inagawa, Jun; Nagaishi, Ryuji; Kurosawa, Setsumi; Kohno, Nobuaki; Onuki, Mamoru; Mochizuki, Hiroki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

2002-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Melted and Granulated Depleted Uranium Dioxide for Use in Containers for Spent Nuclear Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Melted and Granulated Depleted Uranium Dioxide for Use in Containers for Spent Nuclear Fuel Melted and Granulated Depleted Uranium Dioxide for Use in Containers for Spent Nuclear Fuel Vitaly T. Gotovchikov a , Victor A. Seredenko a , Valentin V. Shatalov a , Vladimir N. Kaplenkov a , Alexander S. Shulgin a , Vladimir K. Saranchin a , Michail A. Borik a∗ , Charles W. Forsberg b , All-Russian Research Institute of Chemical Technology (ARRICT) 33, Kashirskoe ave., Moscow, Russia, 115409, E-mail: chem.conv@ru.net Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Bethel Wall Road, P.O. Box 2008, MS-6165, Oak Ridge, TN, USA, 37831 Abstract - Induction cold crucible melters (ICCM) have the potential to be a very-low-cost high-throughput method for the production of DUO 2 for SNF casks. The proposed work would develop these melters for this specific application. If a

333

Activities of the OECD/NEA Expert Group on Assay Data for Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management of spent nuclear fuel is a key issue for many NEA member countries. In nuclear criticality safety, the decision of many countries to advance burnup credit as part of their licensing strategy has heightened recent interest in experimental data needed to validate computer codes used in burnup credit calculations. This paper discusses recent activities of an Expert Group on assay data, formed under the OECD/NEA/NSC/WPNCS (Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety) to help coordinate isotopic assay data activities and facilitate international collaboration between NEA member countries developing or implementing burnup credit methodologies. Recent activities of the Expert Group are described, focusing on the planned expansion of the Spent Fuel Isotopic Composition Database (SFCOMPO), and preparation of a state-of-the-art report on assay data that includes sections on recommended radiochemical analysis methods, techniques, and lessons learned from previous experiments.

Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Rugama, Yolanda [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Molten tin reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel elements. [Patent application; continuous process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel is described. Within a containment vessel, a solid plug of tin and nitride precipitates supports a circulating bath of liquid tin therein. Spent nuclear fuel is immersed in the liquid tin under an atmosphere of nitrogen, resulting in the formation of nitride precipitates. The layer of liquid tin and nitride precipitates which interfaces the plug is solidified and integrated with the plug. Part of the plug is melted, removing nitride precipitates from the containment vessel, while a portion of the plug remains solidified to support te liquid tin and nitride precipitates remaining in the containment vessel. The process is practiced numerous times until substantially all of the precipitated nitrides are removed from the containment vessel.

Heckman, R.A.

1980-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

335

Assessment of the Fingerprinting Method for Spent Fuel Verification in MACSTOR KN-400 CANDU Dry Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power has built a new modular type of dry storage facility, known as MACSTOR KN-400 at Wolsong reactor site. The building has the capacity to store up to 24000 CANDU spent fuel bundles in a 4 rows by 10 columns arrangement of silos. The MACSTOR KN-400 consists of 40 silos; each silo has 10 storage baskets, each of which can store 60 CANDU spent fuel bundles. The development of an effective method for spent fuel verification at the MACSTOR KN-400 storage facility is necessary in order for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to meet with safeguards regulations. The IAEA is interested in having a new effective method of re-verification of the nuclear material in the MACSTOR KN-400 dry storage facility in the event of any loss of continuity of knowledge, which occasionally happens when the installed seals fail. In the thesis work, MCNP models of central and corner structures of the MACSTOR KN-400 facility are developed, since both have different types of re-verification system. Both gamma and neutron simulations were carried out using the MCNP models developed for MACSTOR KN-400. The CANDU spent fuel bundle with discharge burnup of 7.5 GWD/t (burned at specific power of 28.39 MW/t) and 10 years cooled was considered for radiation source term estimation. For both the structures, MCNP simulations of gamma transport were done by including Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detector inside the re-verification tube. Gamma analyses for different spent fuel bundle diversion scenarios were carried out. It was observed that for diversion scenarios wherein the bundles are removed from the inner portions of the basket (opposite side of the collimator of the re-verification tube), it was difficult to conclude whether diversion has taken place based on the change in gamma radiation signals. Similar MCNP simulations of neutron transport were carried out by integrating helium-3 detector inside the re-verification tube and the results obtained for various diversion scenarios were encouraging and can be used to detect some spent fuel diversion cases. In the central structure, it was observed that addition of moderating material between the spent fuel and the detector increased the sensitivity of the detecting system for various diversion cases for neutron simulations. In the worst scenario, the diverting state could divert 14 spent fuel bundles from each of 10 baskets in a silo from the basket region opposite to the collimator of the re-verification tube. The non-detection probability for this scenario is close to 1. This diversion cannot be easily detected using the currently designed detection system. In order to increase the detection probability, either the design of the facility must be changed or other safeguard methods, such as containment and surveillance methods must be used for safeguarding the nuclear material at the facility.

Gowthahalli Chandregowda, Nandan

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Test storage of spent reactor fuel in the Climax granite at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

A test of retrievable dry geologic storage of spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial nuclear reactor is underway at the Nevada Test Site. This generic test is located 420 m below the surface in the Climax granitic stock. Eleven canisters of spent fuel approximately 2.3 years out of reactor core (about 2 kW/canister thermal output) will be emplaced in a storage drift along with 6 electrical simulator canisters and their effects will be compared. Two adjacent drifts will contain electrical heaters, which will be operated to simulate within the test array the thermal field of a large repository. The test objectives, technical concepts and rationale, and details of the test are stated and discussed.

Ramspott, L.D.; Ballou, L.B.

1980-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

337

On the Development of a Distillation Process for the Electrometallurgical Treatment of Irradiated Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the spent fuel treatment program at the Idaho National Laboratory, a vacuum distillation process is being employed for the recovery of actinide products following an electrorefining process. Separation of the actinide products from a molten salt electrolyte and cadmium is achieved by a batch operation called cathode processing. A cathode processor has been designed and developed to efficiently remove the process chemicals and consolidate the actinide products for further processing. This paper describes the fundamentals of cathode processing, the evolution of the equipment design, the operation and efficiency of the equipment, and recent developments at the cathode processor. In addition, challenges encountered during the processing of irradiated spent nuclear fuel in the cathode processor will be discussed.

B.R. Westphal; K.C. Marsden; J.C. Price; D.V. Laug

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Process and apparatus for recovery of fissionable materials from spent reactor fuel by anodic dissolution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical process and apparatus for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from spent metal clad fuel pins is disclosed. The process uses secondary reactions between U.sup.+4 cations and elemental uranium at the anode to increase reaction rates and improve anodic efficiency compared to prior art processes. In another embodiment of the process, secondary reactions between Cd.sup.+2 cations and elemental uranium to form uranium cations and elemental cadmium also assists in oxidizing the uranium at the anode.

Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Orland Park, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Wolson, Raymond D. (Lockport, IL); Gay, Eddie C. (Park Forest, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Conceptual design of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor spent-fuel shipping cask  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Details of a baseline conceptual design of a spent fuel shipping cask for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) are presented including an assessment of shielding, structural, thermal, fabrication and cask/plant interfacing problems. A basis for continued cask development and for new technological development is established. Alternates to the baseline design are briefly presented. Estimates of development schedules, cask utilization and cost schedules, and of personnel dose commitments during CRBR in-plant handling of the cask are also presented.

Pope, R.B.; Diggs, J.M. (eds.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Disposition Options for Hanford Site K-Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel Sludge  

SciTech Connect

This report provides summary-level information about a group of options that have been identified for the disposition of spent-nuclear-fuel sludge in the K-Basins at the Hanford Site. These options are representative of the range of likely candidates that may be considered for disposition of the sludge. The product of each treatment option would be treated sludge that would meet waste acceptance requirements for disposal as transuranic (TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

Mellinger, George B.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Gerber, Mark A.; Naft, Barry N.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Walton, Terry L.

2004-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Separation of uranium from technetium in recovery of spent nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uranium and technetium in the product stream of the Purex process for recovery of uranium in spent nuclear fuel are separated by (1) contacting the aqueous Purex product stream with hydrazine to reduce Tc/sup +7/ therein to a reduced species, and (2) contacting said aqueous stream with an organic phase containing tributyl phosphate and an organic diluent to extract uranium from said aqueous stream into said organic phase.

Pruett, D.J.; McTaggart, D.R.

1983-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Alternative Approaches to Assessing the Performance and Suitability of Yucca Mountain for Spent Fuel Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) model has been applied to the candidate spent fuel and high level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Building on earlier work, this report details recent modifications to EPRI's TSPA Integrated Multiple Assumptions and Release Code (IMARC), as applied to Yucca Mountain. The report includes performance analyses using IMARC as well as additional analyses and input to provide greater insight. The report also provides recommendat...

1998-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

343

Program on Technology Innovation: EPRI Yucca Mountain Spent Fuel Repository Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is moving to prepare and submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to initiate construction of a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the storage of spent nuclear fuel and high level radioactive waste. Throughout the nearly 20-year history of the project, EPRI has performed independent assessments of technical and scientific issues considered important to eventual repository licensing. This report presents background on the overal...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

344

Separation of uranium from technetium in recovery of spent nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uranium and technetium in the product stream of the Purex process for recovery of uranium in spent nuclear fuel are separated by (1) contacting the aqueous Purex product stream with hydrazine to reduce Tc.sup.+7 therein to a reduced species, and (2) contacting said aqueous stream with an organic phase containing tributyl phosphate and an organic diluent to extract uranium from said aqueous stream into said organic phase.

Pruett, David J. (Knoxville, TN); McTaggart, Donald R. (Knoxville, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Handbook of Neutron Absorber Materials for Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation and Storage Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook is intended to become a single source of information regarding technical characteristics of neutron absorber materials that have been used for storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel as well as to provide a summary of users' experience. The second edition of this handbook was published in 2006. This third edition, the 2009 Edition, updates materials covered in the 2006 Edition, presents new products introduced since 2006, and reflects recent realignments of neutron absorber suppliers.

2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

346

Climatic Corrosion Considerations for Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations in Marine Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been clearly demonstrated in laboratory and field studies plus field experience with actual and simulated components that the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel can occur at ambient temperatures in marine-type environments. Therefore, the SCC concerns for spent fuel storage canisters identified in a November 2004 presentation by Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) and Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) representatives are clearly warra...

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

347

Program on Technology Innovation: EPRI Yucca Mountain Spent Fuel Repository Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is moving to prepare and submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to initiate construction of a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the storage of spent nuclear fuel and high level radioactive waste. Throughout the more than 20-year history of the project, EPRI has performed independent assessments of technical and scientific issues considered important to eventual repository licensing. This report presents background on the ove...

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

Recovery of fissile materials from plutonium residues, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes  

SciTech Connect

A new process is proposed that converts complex feeds containing fissile materials into a chemical form that allows the use of existing technologies (such as PUREX and ion exchange) to recover the fissile materials and convert the resultant wastes to glass. Potential feed materials include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and (3) uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, and organics. 14 refs., 4 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Depleted uranium oxides as spent-nuclear-fuel waste-package invert and backfill materials  

SciTech Connect

A new technology has been proposed in which depleted uranium, in the form of oxides or silicates, is placed around the outside of the spent nuclear fuel waste packages in the geological repository. This concept may (1) reduce the potential for repository nuclear criticality events and (2) reduce long-term release of radionuclides from the repository. As a new concept, there are significant uncertainties.

Forsberg, C.W.; Haire, M.J.

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

350

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of a Spent Fuel Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is moving to prepare and submit a license application to initiate construction of a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the storage of spent nuclear fuel and high level radioactive waste. Throughout the more than 20-year history of the project, EPRI has performed independent assessments of technical and scientific issues that are considered important to the eventual licensing of the repository. This report provides background on the overall project and d...

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Federal fees and contracts for storage and disposal of spent LWR fuel  

SciTech Connect

The methodology for establishing a fee for federal spent fuel storage and disposal services is explained along with a presentation of the cost centers and cost data used to calculate the fee. Results of the initial fee calculation and the attendant sensitivity studies are also reviewed. The current status of the fee update is presented. The content of the proposed contract for federal services is briefly reviewed.

Clark, H.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Design Verification Report Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

SciTech Connect

The Sub-project W379, ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building (CSB),'' was established as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project. The primary mission of the CSB is to safely store spent nuclear fuel removed from the K Basins in dry storage until such time that it can be transferred to the national geological repository at Yucca Mountain Nevada. This sub-project was initiated in late 1994 by a series of studies and conceptual designs. These studies determined that the partially constructed storage building, originally built as part of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project, could be redesigned to safely store the spent nuclear fuel. The scope of the CSB facility initially included a receiving station, a hot conditioning system, a storage vault, and a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine (MHM). Because of evolution of the project technical strategy, the hot conditioning system was deleted from the scope and MCO welding and sampling stations were added in its place. This report outlines the methods, procedures, and outputs developed by Project W379 to verify that the provided Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs): satisfy the design requirements and acceptance criteria; perform their intended function; ensure that failure modes and hazards have been addressed in the design; and ensure that the SSCs as installed will not adversely impact other SSCs. Because this sub-project is still in the construction/start-up phase, all verification activities have not yet been performed (e.g., canister cover cap and welding fixture system verification, MCO Internal Gas Sampling equipment verification, and As-built verification.). The verification activities identified in this report that still are to be performed will be added to the start-up punchlist and tracked to closure.

PICKETT, W.W.

2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

353

Fate of Noble Metals during the Pyroprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

During the pyroprocessing of spent nuclear fuel by electrochemical techniques, fission products are separated as the fuel is oxidized at the anode and refined uranium is deposited at the cathode. Those fission products that are oxidized into the molten salt electrolyte are considered active metals while those that do not react are considered noble metals. The primary noble metals encountered during pyroprocessing are molybdenum, zirconium, ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, and technetium. Pyroprocessing of spent fuel to date has involved two distinctly different electrorefiner designs, in particular the anode to cathode configuration. For one electrorefiner, the anode and cathode collector are horizontally displaced such that uranium is transported across the electrolyte medium. As expected, the noble metal removal from the uranium during refining is very high, typically in excess of 99%. For the other electrorefiner, the anode and cathode collector are vertically collocated to maximize uranium throughput. This arrangement results in significantly less noble metals removal from the uranium during refining, typically no better than 20%. In addition to electrorefiner design, operating parameters can also influence the retention of noble metals, albeit at the cost of uranium recovery. Experiments performed to date have shown that as much as 100% of the noble metals can be retained by the cladding hulls while affecting the uranium recovery by only 6%. However, it is likely that commercial pyroprocessing of spent fuel will require the uranium recovery to be much closer to 100%. The above mentioned design and operational issues will likely be driven by the effects of noble metal contamination on fuel fabrication and performance. These effects will be presented in terms of thermal properties (expansion, conductivity, and fusion) and radioactivity considerations. Ultimately, the incorporation of minor amounts of noble metals from pyroprocessing into fast reactor metallic fuel will be shown to be of no consequence to reactor performance.

B.R. Westphal; D. Vaden; S.X. Li; G.L. Fredrickson; R.D. Mariani

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGY AND FIELD DEPLOYABLE SAMPLING TOOLS FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL INTERROGATION IN LIQUID STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

This project developed methodology and field deployable tools (test kits) to analyze the chemical and microbiological condition of the fuel storage medium and determine the oxide thickness on the spent fuel basin materials. The overall objective of this project was to determine the amount of time fuel has spent in a storage basin to determine if the operation of the reactor and storage basin is consistent with safeguard declarations or expectations. This project developed and validated forensic tools that can be used to predict the age and condition of spent nuclear fuels stored in liquid basins based on key physical, chemical and microbiological basin characteristics. Key parameters were identified based on a literature review, the parameters were used to design test cells for corrosion analyses, tools were purchased to analyze the key parameters, and these were used to characterize an active spent fuel basin, the Savannah River Site (SRS) L-Area basin. The key parameters identified in the literature review included chloride concentration, conductivity, and total organic carbon level. Focus was also placed on aluminum based cladding because of their application to weapons production. The literature review was helpful in identifying important parameters, but relationships between these parameters and corrosion rates were not available. Bench scale test systems were designed, operated, harvested, and analyzed to determine corrosion relationships between water parameters and water conditions, chemistry and microbiological conditions. The data from the bench scale system indicated that corrosion rates were dependent on total organic carbon levels and chloride concentrations. The highest corrosion rates were observed in test cells amended with sediment, a large microbial inoculum and an organic carbon source. A complete characterization test kit was field tested to characterize the SRS L-Area spent fuel basin. The sampling kit consisted of a TOC analyzer, a YSI multiprobe, and a thickness probe. The tools were field tested to determine their ease of use, reliability, and determine the quality of data that each tool could provide. Characterization was done over a two day period in June 2011, and confirmed that the L Area basin is a well operated facility with low corrosion potential.

Berry, T.; Milliken, C.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Hathcock, D.; Heitkamp, M.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

355

Dry halide method for separating the components of spent nuclear fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a nonaqueous, single method for processing multiple spent nuclear fuel types by separating the fission- and transuranic products from the nonradioactive and fissile uranium product. The invention has four major operations: exposing the spent fuels to chlorine gas at temperatures preferably greater than 1200.degree. C. to form volatile metal chlorides; removal of the fission product chlorides, transuranic product chlorides, and any nickel chloride and chromium chloride in a molten salt scrubber at approximately 400.degree. C.; fractional condensation of the remaining volatile chlorides at temperatures ranging from 164.degree. C. to 2.degree. C.; and regeneration and recovery of the transferred spent molten salt by vacuum distillation. The residual fission products, transuranic products, and nickel- and chromium chlorides are converted to fluorides or oxides for vitrification. The method offers the significant advantages of a single, compact process that is applicable to most of the diverse nuclear fuels, minimizes secondary wastes, segregates fissile uranium from the high level wastes to resolve potential criticality concerns, segregates nonradioactive wastes from the high level wastes for volume reduction, and produces a common waste form glass or glass-ceramic.

Christian, Jerry Dale (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Thomas Russell (Rigby, ID); Kessinger, Glen F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Foreign travel report: Visits to UK, Belgium, Germany, and France to benchmark European spent fuel and waste management technology  

SciTech Connect

The ICPP WINCO Spent Fuel and Waste Management Development Program recently was funded by DOE-EM to develop new technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels, sodium-bearing liquid waste, and calcine to a form suitable for disposal. European organizations are heavily involved, in some cases on an industrial scale in areas of waste management, including spent fuel disposal and HLW vitrification. The purpose of this trip was to acquire first-hand European efforts in handling of spent reactor fuel and nuclear waste management, including their processing and technical capabilities as well as their future planning. Even though some differences exist in European and U.S. DOE waste compositions and regulations, many aspects of the European technologies may be applicable to the U.S. efforts, and several areas offer potential for technical collaboration.

Ermold, L.F.; Knecht, D.A.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Predicting fissile content of spent nuclear fuel assemblies with the passive neutron Albedo reactivity technique and Monte Carlo code emulation  

SciTech Connect

There is a great need in the safeguards community to be able to nondestructively quantify the mass of plutonium of a spent nuclear fuel assembly. As part of the Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative, we are investigating several techniques, or detector systems, which, when integrated, will be capable of quantifying the plutonium mass of a spent fuel assembly without dismantling the assembly. This paper reports on the simulation of one of these techniques, the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity with Fission Chambers (PNAR-FC) system. The response of this system over a wide range of spent fuel assemblies with different burnup, initial enrichment, and cooling time characteristics is shown. A Monte Carlo method of using these modeled results to estimate the fissile content of a spent fuel assembly has been developed. A few numerical simulations of using this method are shown. Finally, additional developments still needed and being worked on are discussed.

Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

358

Assessment of Incident-Free Transport for Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel to Yucca Mountain Using RADTRAN 5.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the incident-free radiological impacts associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel to the proposed Yucca Mountain repository using the RADTRAN 5.5 computer code developed by Sandia National Laboratories.

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

359

Spent Nuclear Fuel Project technical baseline document. Fiscal year 1995: Volume 1, Baseline description  

SciTech Connect

This document is a revision to WHC-SD-SNF-SD-002, and is issued to support the individual projects that make up the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project in the lower-tier functions, requirements, interfaces, and technical baseline items. It presents results of engineering analyses since Sept. 1994. The mission of the SNFP on the Hanford site is to provide safety, economic, environmentally sound management of Hanford SNF in a manner that stages it to final disposition. This particularly involves K Basin fuel, although other SNF is involved also.

Womack, J.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cramond, R. [TRW (United States); Paedon, R.J. [SAIC (United States)] [and others

1995-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

360

REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR TECHNICAL NUCLEAR FORENSICS  

SciTech Connect

Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) refers to the collection, analysis and evaluation of pre- and post-detonation radiological or nuclear materials, devices, and/or debris. TNF is an integral component, complementing traditional forensics and investigative work, to help enable the attribution of discovered radiological or nuclear material. Research is needed to improve the capabilities of TNF. One research area of interest is determining the isotopic signatures of research reactors. Research reactors are a potential source of both radiological and nuclear material. Research reactors are often the least safeguarded type of reactor; they vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power, and burn-up. Many research reactors are fueled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU), up to {approx}93% {sup 235}U, which could potentially be used as weapons material. All of them have significant amounts of radiological material with which a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) could be built. Therefore, the ability to attribute if material originated from or was produced in a specific research reactor is an important tool in providing for the security of the United States. Currently there are approximately 237 operating research reactors worldwide, another 12 are in temporary shutdown and 224 research reactors are reported as shut down. Little is currently known about the isotopic signatures of spent research reactor fuel. An effort is underway at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze spent research reactor fuel to determine these signatures. Computer models, using reactor physics codes, are being compared to the measured analytes in the spent fuel. This allows for improving the reactor physics codes in modeling research reactors for the purpose of nuclear forensics. Currently the Oak Ridge Research reactor (ORR) is being modeled and fuel samples are being analyzed for comparison. Samples of an ORR spent fuel assembly were taken by SRNL for analytical and radiochemical analysis. The fuel assembly was modeled using MONTEBURNS(MCNP5/ ORIGEN2.2) and MCNPX/CINDER90. The results from the models have been compared to each other and to the measured data.

Nichols, T.; Beals, D.; Sternat, M.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A compact breed and burn fast reactor using spent nuclear fuel blanket  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long-life breed-and-burn (B and B) type fast reactor has been investigated from the neutronics points of view. The B and B reactor has the capability to breed the fissile fuels and use the bred fuel in situ in the same reactor. In this work, feasibility of a compact sodium-cooled B and B fast reactor using spent nuclear fuel as blanket material has been studied. In order to derive a compact B and B fast reactor, a tight fuel lattice and relatively large fuel pin are used to achieve high fuel volume fraction. The core is initially loaded with an LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) fuel and a metallic fuel is used in the core. The Monte Carlo depletion has been performed for the core to see the long-term behavior of the B and B reactor. Several important parameters such as reactivity coefficients, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron generation lifetime, fission power, and fast neutron fluence, are analyzed through Monte Carlo reactor analysis. Evolution of the core fuel composition is also analyzed as a function of burnup. Although the long-life small B and B fast reactor is found to be feasible from the neutronics point of view, it is characterized to have several challenging technical issues including a very high fast neutron fluence of the structural materials. (authors)

Hartanto, D.; Kim, Y. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Planning Document for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Cleanliness Inspection Process (OCRWM)  

SciTech Connect

The Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Process Validation Procedure (Shen 1999) requires that a specified quantity of fuel processed through the Primary Cleaning Machine (PCM) be inspected for cleanliness during initial operational and process validation testing. Specifically, these inspections are performed to confirm that the PCM adequately cleans the fuel elements of canister sludge. The results of these inspections will be used to demonstrate that residual quantities of canister particulate on fuel elements loaded into Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) are within projected levels used to establish safety basis limits (Sloughter 1998). The fuel inspections performed as part of the validation process will be conducted during the Hot Operations portion of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI) of the Fuel Retrieval and Integrated Water Treatment Systems (Pajunen 1999). Hot Operations testing constitutes Phases 3 and 4 of the PSI. The fuel assemblies in all candidate canisters will be thoroughly inspected during these test phases (highly degraded fuel assemblies are exempt from inspection). During subsequent production operation of the FRS, only periodic (every tenth canister) inspections for cleanliness will be performed and documented. This document describes the specific processes and techniques that will be applied in performing the cleanliness inspections, and the methodology used to verify that the documented inspection results conform to Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) requirements. The procedures and processes presented here are in conformance with the Quality Assurance Program Plan for Implementation of the OCRWM Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (QAPP-OCRWM-001).

PITNER, A.L.

2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

Test plan for long-term, low-temperature oxidation of BWR spent fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary studies indicated the need for more spent fuel oxidation data in order to determine the probable behavior of spent fuel in a tuff repository. Long-term, low-temperature testing was recommended in a comprehensive technical approach to (1) confirm the findings of the short-term thermogravimetric analysis tests; (2) evaluate the effects of variables such as burnup, atmospheric moisture,and fuel type on the oxidation rate; and (3) extend the oxidation data base to representative repository temperatures and better define the temperature dependence of the operative oxidation mechanisms. This document presents the test plan to study the effects of atmospheric moisture and temperature on oxidation rate and phase formation using a large number of boiling-water reactor fuel samples. Tests will run for up to two years, use characterized fragmented and pulverized fuel samples, cover a temperature range of 110{degree}C to 175{degree}C, and be conducted with an atmospheric moisture content ranging from <{minus}55{degree}C to {approximately}80{degree}C dew point. After testing, the samples will be examined and made available for leaching testing. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Einziger, R.E.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Use of filler materials to aid spent nuclear fuel dry storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of filler materials (also known as stabilizer or encapsulating materials) was investigated in conjunction with the dry storage of irradiated light water reactor (LWR) fuel. The results of this investigation appear to be equally valid for the wet storage of fuel. The need for encapsulation and suitable techniques for closing was also investigated. Various materials were reviewed (including solids, liquids, and gases) which were assumed to fill the void areas within a storage can containing either intact or disassembled spent fuel. Materials were reviewed and compared on the basis of cost, thermal characteristics, and overall suitability in the proposed environment. A thermal analysis was conducted to yield maximum centerline and surface temperatures of a design basis fuel encapsulated within various filler materials. In general, air was found to be the most likely choice as a filler material for the dry storage of spent fuel. The choice of any other filler material would probably be based on a desire, or need, to maximize specific selection criteria, such as surface temperatures, criticality safety, or confinement.

Anderson, K.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

DOE/EIS-0218-SA-3: Supplement Analysis for the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program (November 2004)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FOREIGN SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL ACCEPTANCE PROGRAM NOVEMBER 2004 DOE/EIS-0218-SA-3 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Washington, DC Final Supplement Analysis for the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program Final i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1. Introduction.............................................................................................................................................. 1 2. Background .............................................................................................................................................. 1 3. The Proposed Action ...............................................................................................................................

366

SCALE Validation Experience Using an Expanded Isotopic Assay Database for Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of measured isotopic assay data to validate computer code predictions of spent fuel compositions applied in burnup-credit criticality calculations is an essential component for bias and uncertainty determination in safety and licensing analyses. In recent years, as many countries move closer to implementing or expanding the use of burnup credit in criticality safety for licensing, there has been growing interest in acquiring additional high-quality assay data. The well-known open sources of assay data are viewed as potentially limiting for validating depletion calculations for burnup credit due to the relatively small number of isotopes measured (primarily actinides with relatively few fission products), sometimes large measurement uncertainties, incomplete documentation, and the limited burnup and enrichment range of the fuel samples. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recently initiated an extensive isotopic validation study that includes most of the public data archived in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) electronic database, SFCOMPO, and new datasets obtained through participation in commercial experimental programs. To date, ORNL has analyzed approximately 120 different spent fuel samples from pressurized-water reactors that span a wide enrichment and burnup range and represent a broad class of assembly designs. The validation studies, completed using SCALE 5.1, are being used to support a technical basis for expanded implementation of burnup credit for spent fuel storage facilities, and other spent fuel analyses including radiation source term, dose assessment, decay heat, and waste repository safety analyses. This paper summarizes the isotopic assay data selected for this study, presents validation results obtained with SCALE 5.1, and discusses some of the challenges and experience associated with evaluating the results. Preliminary results obtained using SCALE 6 and ENDF/B-VII cross sections libraries are also briefly summarized. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been performing spent-fuel isotopic validation studies using the depletion analysis methods in the SCALE [1] code system for the past 20 years. These studies involve comparisons of calculated inventories against measured isotopic composition data obtained from destructive radiochemical analysis of commercial spent nuclear fuel samples. The results of these benchmark studies are used to quantify the bias and uncertainties associated with isotopic calculations and ultimately determine appropriate margins for uncertainty that can be applied in safety-related analyses such as burnup credit in criticality calculations, decay heat analysis, and source terms. Previous studies using several versions of SCALE and nuclear data libraries have been published in multiple validation reports [2-6] that evaluate selected experimental data obtained largely from public sources. A study was recently initiated at ORNL with the objectives of updating and expanding the validation calculations using a comprehensive database of experimental isotopic assay data that includes isotopic composition data obtained from both publicly available sources and international commercial programs. As part of the study, an extensive isotopic database of nearly 120 measured spent fuel samples with an expanded range of initial enrichments and burnup values compared to previously analyzed data was reviewed and analyzed. The calculations were performed using two-dimensional (2-D) assembly models and a consistent set of modeling assumptions using the SCALE 5.1 code system and ENDF/B-V 44-group cross section library. As part of the current study, detailed benchmark modeling information and measurement data are being documented in a format that is readily usable for validating depletion and decay codes. The work is being extended to include analysis results using SCALE 6 and the ENDF/B-VII 238-group cross section library. This paper describes the isotopic composition data evaluated in this study and highlights the pre

Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Initial measurements of BN-350 spent fuel in dry storage casks using the dual slab verification detonator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dual Slab Verification Detector (DSVD) has been developed, built, and characterized by Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as part of the dry storage safeguards system for the spent fuel from the BN-350 fast reactor. The detector consists of two rows of 3He tubes embedded in a slab of polyethylene which has been designed to be placed on the outer surface of the dry storage cask. By performing DSVD measurements at several different locations around the outer surface of the DUC, a signature 'fingerprint' can be established for each DUC based on the neutron flux emanating from inside the dry storage cask. The neutron fingerprint for each individual DUC will be dependent upon the spatial distribution of nuclear material within the cask, thus making it sensitive to the removal of a certain amount of material from the cask. An initial set of DSVD measurements have been performed on the first set of dry storage casks that have been loaded with canisters of spent fuel and moved onto the dry storage pad to both establish an initial fingerprint for these casks as well as to quantify systematic uncertainties associated with these measurements. The results from these measurements will be presented and compared with the expected results that were determined based on MCNPX simulations of the dry storage facility. The ability to safeguard spent nuclear fuel is strongly dependent on the technical capabilities of establishing and maintaining continuity of knowledge (COK) of the spent fuel as it is released from the reactor core and either reprocessed or packaged and stored at a storage facility. While the maintenance of COK is often done using continuous containment and surveillance (C/S) on the spent fuel, it is important that the measurement capabilities exist to re-establish the COK in the event of a significant gap in the continuous CIS by performing measurements that independently confirm the presence and content of Plutonium (Pu) in the spent fuel. The types of non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements that can be performed on the spent fuel are strongly dependent on the type of spent fuel that is being safeguarded as well as the location in which the spent fuel is being stored. The BN-350 Spent Fuel Disposition Project was initiated to improve the safeguards and security of the spent nuclear fuel from the BN-350 fast-breeder reactor and was developed cooperatively to meet the requirements of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as well as the terms of the 1993 CTR and MPC&A Implementing Agreements. The unique characteristics of fuel from the BN-350 fast-breeder reactor have allowed for the development of an integrated safeguards measurement program to inventory, monitor, and if necessary, re-verify Pu content of the spent fuel throughout the lifetime of the project. This approach includes the development of a safeguards measurement program to establish and maintain the COK on the spent fuel during the repackaging and eventual relocation of the spent-fuel assemblies to a long-term storage site. As part of the safeguards measurement program, the Pu content of every spent-fuel assembly from the BN-350 reactor was directly measured and characterized while the spent-fuel assemblies were being stored in the spent-fuel pond at the BN-350 facility using the Spent Fuel Coincidence Counter (SFCC). Upon completion of the initial inventory of the Pu content of the individual spent-fuel assemblies, the assemblies were repackaged into welded steel canisters that were filled with inert argon gas and held either four or six individual spent-fuel assemblies depending on the type of assembly that was being packaged. This repackaging of the spent-fuel assemblies was performed in order to improve the stability of the spent-fuel assemblies for long-term storage and increase the proliferation resistance of the spent fuel. To maintain the capability of verifying the presence of the spent-fuel assemblies inside the welded steel canisters, measurements were performed on the canis

Santi, Peter Angelo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Browne, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freeman, Corey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Parker, Robert F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Richard B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Near-field heat transfer at the spent fuel test-climax: a comparison of measurements and calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spent Fuel Test in the Climax granitic stock at the DOE Nevada Test Site is a test of the feasibility of storage and retrieval of spent nuclear reactor fuel in a deep geologic environment. Eleven spent fuel elements, together with six thermally identical electrical resistance heaters and 20 peripheral guard heaters, are emplaced 420 m below surface in a three-drift test array. This array was designed to simulate the near-field effects of thousands of canisters of nuclear waste and to evaluate the effects of heat alone, and heat plus ionizing radiation on the rock. Thermal calculations and measurements are conducted to determine thermal transport from the spent fuel and electrical resistance heaters. Calculations associated with the as-built Spent Fuel Test geometry and thermal source histories are presented and compared with thermocouple measurements made throughout the test array. Comparisons in space begin at the spent fuel canister and include the first few metres outside the test array. Comparisons in time begin at emplacement and progress through the first year of thermal loading in this multi-year test.

Patrick, W.C.; Montan, D.N.; Ballou, L.B.

1981-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

369

Studies and research concerning BNFP. Spent fuel disassembly and canning program at Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP) preliminary process assessment studies  

SciTech Connect

Studies being performed to assess nuclear fuel disassembly and encapsulation to enhance spent fuel storage have not revealed any conditions which unfavorably impact the feasibility of the concept. The studies are aimed at evaluating various issues warranting resolution preliminary to licensing a facility for this spent fuel management concept. The areas assessed are potential accidents and their results; maximum temperature level of canned fuel rods; radiation exposure to personnel during operation and fuel storage; criticality risks during storage and as a result of abnormal incidents; physical security requirements and material accountability measures; the impact of safeguards on economics; and a license schedule projection.

Tepp, H.G.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS OF FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL TRANSPORTATION ALONG OTHER THAN~. PRESENTATIVE ROUTE FROM CONCORD NAVAL WEAPO~~ STATION TO IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LADORA TORY Introduction The Department of Energy is planning to transport foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel by rail from the Concord Naval Weapons Station (CNWS), Concord, California, to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The environmental analysis supporting the decision to transport, by rail or truck, foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel from CNWS to the INEEL is contained in +he Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliftration Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor

371

DEMONSTRATION OF LONG-TERM STORAGE CAPABILITY FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN L BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy decisions for the ultimate disposition of its inventory of used nuclear fuel presently in, and to be received and stored in, the L Basin at the Savannah River Site, and schedule for project execution have not been established. A logical decision timeframe for the DOE is following the review of the overall options for fuel management and disposition by the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC). The focus of the BRC review is commercial fuel; however, the BRC has included the DOE fuel inventory in their review. Even though the final report by the BRC to the U.S. Department of Energy is expected in January 2012, no timetable has been established for decisions by the U.S. Department of Energy on alternatives selection. Furthermore, with the imminent lay-up and potential closure of H-canyon, no ready path for fuel disposition would be available, and new technologies and/or facilities would need to be established. The fuel inventory in wet storage in the 3.375 million gallon L Basin is primarily aluminum-clad, aluminum-based fuel of the Materials Test Reactor equivalent design. An inventory of non-aluminum-clad fuel of various designs is also stored in L Basin. Safe storage of fuel in wet storage mandates several high-level 'safety functions' that would be provided by the Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) of the storage system. A large inventory of aluminum-clad, aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel, and other nonaluminum fuel owned by the U.S. Department of Energy is in wet storage in L Basin at the Savannah River Site. An evaluation of the present condition of the fuel, and the Structures, Systems, or Components (SSCs) necessary for its wet storage, and the present programs and storage practices for fuel management have been performed. Activities necessary to validate the technical bases for, and verify the condition of the fuel and the SSCs under long-term wet storage have also been identified. The overall conclusion is that the fuel can be stored in L Basin, meeting general safety functions for fuel storage, for an additional 50 years and possibly beyond contingent upon continuation of existing fuel management activities and several augmented program activities. It is concluded that the technical bases and well-founded technologies have been established to store spent nuclear fuel in the L Basin. Methodologies to evaluate the fuel condition and characteristics, and systems to prepare fuel, isolate damaged fuel, and maintain water quality storage conditions have been established. Basin structural analyses have been performed against present NPH criteria. The aluminum fuel storage experience to date, supported by the understanding of the effects of environmental variables on materials performance, demonstrates that storage systems that minimize degradation and provide full retrievability of the fuel up to and greater than 50 additional years will require maintaining the present management programs, and with the recommended augmented/additional activities in this report.

Sindelar, R.; Deible, R.

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

372

High Energy Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy for Plutonium Assay of Spent Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct measurement of plutonium in spent reactor fuel is an unmet challenge in international safeguards. In this simulation study, we investigate the use of the delayed gamma rays from fission product nuclei to determine the amount of fissile isotopes (Pu-239, Pu-241, and U-235) in irradiated light water reactor fuel assemblies. Fission is stimulated with an interrogating neutron source, and the radiation from the short lived fission products is measured. This measured gamma spectrum is then fit to a linear combination of spectra from pure Pu-239, Pu-241, and U-235 to determine the proportion of fissile isotopes present. In this paper, we describe the modelling and analysis methods used to represent the background of radioemissions from long-lived isotopes originally present in the spent fuel and the short time scale delayed gamma signal. Results are presented for simulations using a nominal instrument design on a library of fuel assemblies with burnups ranging from 0 to 60 GWd/MTU.

Campbell, Luke W.; Misner, Alex C.; Smith, Leon E.; Reese, Steve; Robinson, Joshua

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

373

Thermal analysis for a spent reactor fuel storage test in granite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A test is conducted in which spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial nuclear power reactor are emplaced in the Climax granite at the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site. In this generic test, 11 canisters of spent PWR fuel are emplaced vertically along with 6 electrical simulator canisters on 3 m centers, 4 m below the floor of a storage drift which is 420 m below the surface. Two adjacent parallel drifts contain electrical heaters, operated to simulate (in the vicinity of the storage drift) the temperature fields of a large repository. This test, planned for up to five years duration, uses fairly young fuel (2.5 years out of core) so that the thermal peak will occur during the time frame of the test and will not exceed the peak that would not occur until about 40 years of storage had older fuel (5 to 15 years out of core) been used. This paper describes the calculational techniques and summarizes the results of a large number of thermal calculations used in the concept, basic design and final design of the spent fuel test. The results of the preliminary calculations show the effects of spacing and spent fuel age. Either radiation or convection is sufficient to make the drifts much better thermal conductors than the rock that was removed to create them. The combination of radiation and convection causes the drift surfaces to be nearly isothermal even though the heat source is below the floor. With a nominal ventilation rate of 2 m{sup 3}/s and an ambient rock temperature of 23{sup 0}C, the maximum calculated rock temperature (near the center of the heat source) is about 100{sup 0}C while the maximum air temperature in the drift is around 40{sup 0}C. This ventilation (1 m{sup 3}/s through the main drift and 1/2 m{sup 3}/s through each of the side drifts) will remove about 1/3 of the heat generated during the first five years of storage.

Montan, D.N.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Initial evaluation of dry storage issues for spent nuclear fuels in wet storage at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has evaluated the basis for moving selected spent nuclear fuels in the CPP-603 and CPP-666 storage pools at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from wet to dry interim storage. This work is being conducted for the Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company as part of the effort to determine appropriate conditioning and dry storage requirements for these fuels. These spent fuels are from 22 test reactors and include elements clad with aluminum or stainless steel and a wide variety of fuel materials: UAl{sub x}, UAl{sub x}-Al and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al cermets, U-5% fissium, UMo, UZrH{sub x}, UErZrH, UO{sub 2}-stainless steel cermet, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-stainless steel cermet. The study also included declad uranium-zirconium hydride spent fuel stored in the CPP-603 storage pools. The current condition and potential failure mechanisms for these spent fuels were evaluated to determine the impact on conditioning and dry storage requirements. Initial recommendations for conditioning and dry storage requirements are made based on the potential degradation mechanisms and their impacts on moving the spent fuel from wet to dry storage. Areas needing further evaluation are identified.

Guenther, R.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Lund, A.L.; Gilbert, E.R. [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves To ensure sufficient fuel for the fleet, the Government began withdrawing probable oil-bearing...

376

Issues relating to spent nuclear fuel storage on the Oak Ridge Reservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, about 2,800 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is stored in the US, 1,000 kg of SNF (or about 0.03% of the nation`s total) are stored at the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. However small the total quantity of material stored at Oak Ridge, some of the material is quite singular in character and, thus, poses unique management concerns. The various types of SNF stored at Oak Ridge will be discussed including: (1) High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and future Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) fuels; (2) Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuels, including Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR) and Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) fuels; (3) Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel; (4) Homogeneous Reactor Experiment (HRE) fuel; (5) Miscellaneous SNF stored in Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) Solid Waste Storage Areas (SWSAs); (6) SNF stored in the Y-12 Plant 9720-5 Warehouse including Health. Physics Reactor (HPRR), Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP-) 10A, and DOE Demonstration Reactor fuels.

Klein, J.A.; Turner, D.W.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Management of spent nuclear fuel on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

On June 1, 1995, DOE issued a Record of Decision [60 Federal Register 28680] for the Department-wide management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF); regionalized storage of SNF by fuel type was selected as the preferred alternative. The proposed action evaluated in this environmental assessment is the management of SNF on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) to implement this preferred alternative of regional storage. SNF would be retrieved from storage, transferred to a hot cell if segregation by fuel type and/or repackaging is required, loaded into casks, and shipped to off-site storage. The proposed action would also include construction and operation of a dry cask SNF storage facility on ORR, in case of inadequate SNF storage. Action is needed to enable DOE to continue operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor, which generates SNF. This report addresses environmental impacts.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Planning Document for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Cleanliness Inspection Process (OCRWM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Process Validation Procedure (Stegen 2000) requires that a specified quantity of fuel processed through the Primary Cleaning Machine (PCM) be assessed for cleanliness during initial operational and process validation testing. Specifically, these assessments are visual examinations of the fuel, performed to confirm that the PCM adequately cleans the fuel elements of canister sludge. The results of these examinations will be used to demonstrate that residual quantities of canister particulate on fuel elements loaded into Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) are within projected levels used to establish safety basis limits (Sloughter 2000). The fuel assessments, performed as part of the validation process, will be conducted during the Hot Operations portion of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI) of the Fuel Retrieval and Integrated Water Treatment Systems (Pajunen 2000). Hot Operations testing constitutes Phases 3 and 4 of the PSI. The fuel assemblies in all candidate canisters will be thoroughly examined during these test phases (highly degraded fuel assemblies that qualify as scrap are exempt from evaluation). During subsequent production operation of the FRS, only periodic examinations for cleanliness will be performed and documented. This document describes the specific processes and techniques that will be applied in performing the cleanliness assessments, and the methodology used to verify that the documented assessment results conform to Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) requirements. The procedures and processes presented here are in conformance with the Quality Assurance Program Plan for Implementation of the OCRWM Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project (QAPP-OCRWM-001).

PITNER, A.L.

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

379

COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage): A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 3, Validation assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) computer code validation effort. COBRA-SFS, while refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses, is a lumped-volume thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code that predicts temperature and velocity distributions in a wide variety of systems. Through comparisons of code predictions with spent fuel storage system test data, the code's mathematical, physical, and mechanistic models are assessed, and empirical relations defined. The six test cases used to validate the code and code models include single-assembly and multiassembly storage systems under a variety of fill media and system orientations and include unconsolidated and consolidated spent fuel. In its entirety, the test matrix investigates the contributions of convection, conduction, and radiation heat transfer in spent fuel storage systems. To demonstrate the code's performance for a wide variety of storage systems and conditions, comparisons of code predictions with data are made for 14 runs from the experimental data base. The cases selected exercise the important code models and code logic pathways and are representative of the types of simulations required for spent fuel storage system design and licensing safety analyses. For each test, a test description, a summary of the COBRA-SFS computational model, assumptions, and correlations employed are presented. For the cases selected, axial and radial temperature profile comparisons of code predictions with test data are provided, and conclusions drawn concerning the code models and the ability to predict the data and data trends. Comparisons of code predictions with test data demonstrate the ability of COBRA-SFS to successfully predict temperature distributions in unconsolidated or consolidated single and multiassembly spent fuel storage systems.

Lombardo, N.J.; Cuta, J.M.; Michener, T.E.; Rector, D.R.; Wheeler, C.L.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Concrete Shield Performance of the VSC-17 Spent Nuclear Fuel Cask  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2003, representatives from the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) requested development of a project with the objective of determining the performance of a concrete spent nuclear fuel storage cask. Radiation and environmental effects may cause chemical alteration of the concrete that could result in excessive cracking, spalling, and loss of compressive strength. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) project team and CRIEPI representatives identified the Ventilated Storage Cask (VSC-17) spent nuclear fuel storage cask as a candidate to study cask performance, because it had been used to store fuel as part of a dry cask storage demonstration project for more than 15 years. The project involved investigating the properties of the concrete shield. INL performed a survey of the cask in the summers of 2003 and 2004. Preliminary cask evaluations performed in 2003 indicated that the cask has no visual degradation. However, a 4-5 mrem/hr step-change in the radiation levels about halfway up the cask and a localized hot spot beneath an upper air vent indicate that there may be variability in the density of the concrete or localized cracking. In 2005, INL and CRIEPI scientists performed additional surveys on the VSC-17 cask. This document summarizes the methods used on the VSC-17 to evaluate the cask for compressive strength, concrete cracking, concrete thickness, and temperature distribution.

Sheryl L. Morton; Philip L. Winston; Toshiari Saegusa; Koji Shirai; Akihiro Sasahara; Takatoshi Hattori

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval spent fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sampling and analysis plan for the preoperational environmental survey of the spent nuclear fuel project facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sampling and analysis plan will support the preoperational environmental monitoring for construction, development, and operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities, which have been designed for the conditioning and storage of spent nuclear fuels; particularly the fuel elements associated with the operation of N-Reactor. The SNF consists principally of irradiated metallic uranium, and therefore includes plutonium and mixed fission products. The primary effort will consist of removing the SNF from the storage basins in K East and K West Areas, placing in multicanister overpacks, vacuum drying, conditioning, and subsequent dry vault storage in the 200 East Area. The primary purpose and need for this action is to reduce the risks to public health and safety and to the environment. Specifically these include prevention of the release of radioactive materials into the air or to the soil surrounding the K Basins, prevention of the potential migration of radionuclides through the soil column to the nearby Columbia River, reduction of occupational radiation exposure, and elimination of the risks to the public and to workers from the deterioration of SNF in the K Basins.

MITCHELL, R.M.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A validated methodology for evaluating burnup credit in spent fuel casks  

SciTech Connect

The concept of allowing reactivity credit for the transmuted state of spent fuel offers both economic and risk incentives. This paper presents a general overview of the technical work being performed in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to resolve issues related to the implementation of burnup credit. An analysis methodology is presented along with information representing the validation of the method against available experimental data. The experimental data that are applicable to burnup credit include chemical assay data for the validation of the isotopic prediction models, fresh fuel critical experiments for the validation of criticality calculations for various cask geometries, and reactor restart critical data to validate criticality calculations with spent fuel. The methodology has been specifically developed to be simple and generally applicable, therefore giving rise to uncertainties or sensitivities which are identified and quantified in terms of a percent bias in k{sub eff}. Implementation issues affecting licensing requirements and operational procedures are discussed briefly. 24 refs., 3 tabs.

Brady, M.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Sanders, T.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Analysis of dose consequences arising from the release of spent nuclear fuel from dry storage casks.  

SciTech Connect

The resulting dose consequences from releases of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) residing in a dry storage casks are examined parametrically. The dose consequences are characterized by developing dose versus distance curves using simplified bounding assumptions. The dispersion calculations are performed using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS2) code. Constant weather and generic system parameters were chosen to ensure that the results in this report are comparable with each other and to determine the relative impact on dose of each variable. Actual analyses of site releases would need to accommodate local weather and geographic data. These calculations assume a range of fuel burnups, release fractions (RFs), three exposure scenarios (2 hrs and evacuate, 2 hrs and shelter, and 24 hrs exposure), two meteorological conditions (D-4 and F-2), and three release heights (ground level - 1 meter (m), 10 m, and 100 m). This information was developed to support a policy paper being developed by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff on an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) and monitored retrievable storage installation (MRS) security rulemaking.

Durbin, Samuel G.; Morrow, Charles W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Foreign programs for the storage of spent nuclear power plant fuels, high-level waste canisters and transuranic wastes  

SciTech Connect

The various national programs for developing and applying technology for the interim storage of spent fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and TRU wastes are summarized. Primary emphasis of the report is on dry storage techniques for uranium dioxide fuels, but data are also provided concerning pool storage.

Harmon, K.M.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Predictions of dry storage behavior of zircaloy clad spent fuel rods using deformation and fracture map analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predictions of the maximum initial allowable temperature required to achieve a 40-year life in dry storage are made for Zircaloy clad spent fuel. Maximum initial dry storage temperatures of 420/sup 0/C for 1 year fuel cladding subjected to a constant stress of 70 MPa are predicted. The technique utilized in this work is based on the deformation and fracture map methodology. Maps are presented for temperatures between 50 and 850/sup 0/C stresses between 5 and 500 MPa. These maps are combined with a life fraction rule to predict the time to rupture of Zircaloy clad spent Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel subjected to various storage conditions.

Tarn, J.C.L.; Madsen, N.H.; Chin, B.A.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Spent nuclear fuel shipping cask handling capabilities of commercial light water reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an evaluation of the cask handling capabilities of those reactors which are operating or under construction. A computerized data base that includes cask handling information was developed with information from the literature and utility-supplied data. The capability of each plant to receive and handle existing spent fuel shipping casks was then evaluated. Modal fractions were then calculated based on the results of these evaluations and the quantities of spent fuel projected to be generated by commercial nuclear power plants through 1998. The results indicated that all plants are capable of receiving and handling truck casks. Up to 118 out of 130 reactors (91%) could potentially handle the larger and heavier rail casks if the maximum capability of each facility is utilized. Design and analysis efforts and physical modifications to some plants would be needed to achieve this high rail percentage. These modifications would be needed to satisfy regulatory requirements, increase lifting capabilities, develop rail access, or improve other deficiencies. The remaining 12 reactors were determined to be capable of handling only the smaller truck casks. The percentage of plants that could receive and handle rail casks in the near-term would be reduced to 64%. The primary reason for a plant to be judged incapable of handling rail casks in the near-term was a lack of rail access. The remaining 36% of the plants would be limited to truck shipments. The modal fraction calculations indicated that up to 93% of the spent fuel accumulated by 1998 could be received at federal storage or disposal facilities via rail (based on each plant's maximum capabilities). If the near-term cask handling capabilities are considered, the rail percentage is reduced to 62%.

Daling, P.M.; Konzek, G.J.; Lezberg, A.J.; Votaw, E.F.; Collingham, M.I.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Outlooks of HLW Partitioning Technologies Usage for Recovering of Platinum Metals from Spent Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing practice of management of high level waste (HLW) generated by NPPs, call for a task of selective separation of the most dangerous long-lived radionuclides with the purpose of their subsequent immobilization and disposal. HLW partitioning allows to reduce substantially the cost of vitrified product storage owing to isolation of the most dangerous radionuclides, such as transplutonium elements (TPE) into separate fractions of small volumes, intended for ultimate storage. By now numerous investigations on partitioning of HLW of various composition have been carried out in many countries and a lot of processes permitting to recover cesium, strontium, TPE and rare earth elements (REE) have been already tested. Apart from enumerated radionuclides, a fair quantity of palladium and rhodium presents in spent fuel, but the problem of these elements recovery has not yet been decided at the operating radiochemical plants. A negative effect of platinum group metals (PGM) occurrence is determined by the formation of separate metal phase, which not only worsens the conditions of glass-melting but also shortens considerably the service life of the equipment. At the same time, the exhaustion of PGMs natural resources may finally lead to such a growth of their costs that the spent nuclear fuel would became a substituting source of these elements industrial production. Allowing above mentioned, it is of interest to develop the technique for ''reactor'' palladium and rhodium recovery process which would be compatible with HLW partitioning and could be realized using the same facilities. In the report the data on platinum metals distribution in spent fuel reprocessing products and the several flowsheets for palladium separation from HLW are presented.

Pokhitonov, Y. A.; Estimantovskiy, V.; Romanovski, v.; Zatsev, B.; Todd, T.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

388

Truck and rail charges for shipping spent fuel and nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed techniques for calculating estimates of nuclear-waste shipping costs and compiled a listing of representative data that facilitate incorporation of reference shipping costs into varius logistics analyses. The formulas that were developed can be used to estimate costs that will be incurred for shipping spent fuel or nuclear waste by either legal-weight truck or general-freight rail. The basic data for this study were obtained from tariffs of a truck carrier licensed to serve the 48 contiguous states and from various rail freight tariff guides. Also, current transportation regulations as issued by the US Department of Transportation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission were investigated. The costs that will be incurred for shipping spent fuel and/or nuclear waste, as addressed by the tariff guides, are based on a complex set of conditions involving the shipment origin, route, destination, weight, size, and volume and the frequency of shipments, existing competition, and the length of contracts. While the complexity of these conditions is an important factor in arriving at a ''correct'' cost, deregulation of the transportation industry means that costs are much more subject to negotiation and, thus, the actual fee that will be charged will not be determined until a shipping contract is actually signed. This study is designed to provide the baseline data necessary for making comparisons of the estimated costs of shipping spent fuel and/or nuclear wastes by truck and rail transportation modes. The scope of the work presented in this document is limited to the costs incurred for shipping, and does not include packaging, cask purchase/lease costs, or local fees placed on shipments of radioactive materials.

McNair, G.W.; Cole, B.M.; Cross, R.E.; Votaw, E.F.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Vision and framework for technical and management support to facilitate foreign spent fuel storage and geologic disposal in Russia  

SciTech Connect

This ''Technical and Management Support'' program would facilitate the transfer of spent fuel from commercial power plants in Taiwan to a storage and geologic repository site near Krasnoyarsk, Russia. This program resolves issues of disposition of Taiwan spent fuel (including US origin fuel) and provides revenue for Russia to develop an integrated spent fuel storage and radioactive waste management system including a geologic repository. LLNL has ongoing contracts and collaborations with all the principal parties and is uniquely positioned to facilitate the development of such a program. A three-phase approach over 20 years is proposed: namely, an initial feasibility investigation followed by an engineering development phase, and then implementation.

Halsey, W G; Jardine, L J; Smith, C F

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Certification challenges in the development of an innovative high payload capacity spent fuel transportation cask  

SciTech Connect

The design approach and certification strategy used in the development of an innovative transportation cask for legal weight truck shipments of spent nuclear fuel is presented. The proposed approach represents a significant departure from conventional cask designs in that it uses titanium alloy, a material with a high strength-to-weight ratio which has no precedent in transportation cask certification. The significant increase in payload obtainable with the proposed approach, and the associated benefits such as reduced life cycle costs, lower personnel exposure, and lower transportation accident risks are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Mair, B.R.; Severson, M.J.; Ciez, A.P. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Process and apparatus for recovery of fissionable materials from spent reactor fuel by anodic dissolution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical process and apparatus for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from spent metal clad fuel pins is disclosed. The process uses secondary reactions between U{sup +4} cations and elemental uranium at the anode to increase reaction rates and improve anodic efficiency compared to prior art processes. In another embodiment of the process, secondary reactions between Cd{sup +2} cations and elemental uranium to form uranium cations and elemental cadmium also assists in oxidizing the uranium at the anode. 5 figs.

Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.; Wolson, R.D.; Gay, E.C.

1989-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

Integrated data base report--1995: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information in this report summarizes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) data base for inventories, projections, and characteristics of domestic spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. This report is updated annually to keep abreast of continual waste inventory and projection changes in both the government and commercial sectors. Baseline information is provided for DOE program planning purposes and to support DOE program decisions. Although the primary purpose of this document is to provide background information for program planning within the DOE community, it has also been found useful by state and local governments, the academic community, and some private citizens.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Group in Support of Criticality, DBE, TSPA-LA  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the basis for grouping the over 250 Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) types in support of analyses for final repository disposal. For each of the required analyses, the parameters needed in conducting the analyses were identified and reviewed. The grouping proposed for the three types of analyses (criticality, design basis events, and total system performance assessment) are based on the similarities of DOE SNF as a function of these parameters. As necessary, further justifications are provided to further reduce the DOE SNF grouping in support of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System’s preclosure and postclosure safety cases.

Henry Loo

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Melt-Dilute Form of AI-Based Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Criticality Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Criticality analysis of the proposed melt-dilute (MD) form of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF), under geologic repository conditions, was performed [1] following the methodology documented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report [2]. This methodology evaluates the potential for nuclear criticality for a waste form in a waste package. Criticality calculations show that even with waste package failure, followed by degradation of material within the waste package and potential loss of neutron absorber materials, sub-critical conditions can be readily demonstrated for the MD form of aluminum-based SNF.

D. Vinson; A. Serika

2002-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

395

Design Verification Report Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sub-project W379, ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building (CSB),'' was established as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project. The primary mission of the CSB is to safely store spent nuclear fuel removed from the K Basins in dry storage until such time that it can be transferred to the national geological repository at Yucca Mountain Nevada. This sub-project was initiated in late 1994 by a series of studies and conceptual designs. These studies determined that the partially constructed storage building, originally built as part of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project, could be redesigned to safely store the spent nuclear fuel. The scope of the CSB facility initially included a receiving station, a hot conditioning system, a storage vault, and a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine (MHM). Because of evolution of the project technical strategy, the hot conditioning system was deleted from the scope and MCO welding and sampling stations were added in its place. This report outlines the methods, procedures, and outputs developed by Project W379 to verify that the provided Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs): satisfy the design requirements and acceptance criteria; perform their intended function; ensure that failure modes and hazards have been addressed in the design; and ensure that the SSCs as installed will not adversely impact other SSCs. The original version of this document was prepared by Vista Engineering for the SNF Project. The purpose of this revision is to document completion of verification actions that were pending at the time the initial report was prepared. Verification activities for the installed and operational SSCs have been completed. Verification of future additions to the CSB related to the canister cover cap and welding fixture system and MCO Internal Gas Sampling equipment will be completed as appropriate for those components. The open items related to verification of those requirements are noted in section 3.1.5 and will be tracked as part of the CSB Facility action tracking system.

BAZINET, G.D.

2000-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

396

ENRICO FERMI FAST REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL CRITICALLY CALCULATIONS: INTACT MODE  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this calculation is to perform intact mode and partially degraded mode criticality evaluations of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Enrico Fermi (EF) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) co-disposed in a 5 Defense High-Level Waste (5-DHLW) Waste Package (WP) and emplaced in a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The criticality evaluations estimate the values of the effective neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, a measure of nuclear criticality potential, for the 5-DHLW/DOE SNF WP with intact or partially degraded internal configurations. These evaluations contribute to the WP design.

A.S. Mobasheran

1999-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

397

What are Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste ?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are materials from nuclear power plants and government defense programs. These materials contain highly radioactive elements, such as cesium, strontium, technetium, and neptunium. Some of these elements will remain radioactive for a few years, while others will be radioactive for millions of years. Exposure to such radioactive materials can cause human health problems. Scientists worldwide agree that the safest way to manage these materials is to dispose of them deep underground in what is called a geologic repository.

DOE

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Preliminary design specification for Department of Energy standardized spent nuclear fuel canisters. Volume 2: Rationale document  

SciTech Connect

This document (Volume 2) is a companion document to a preliminary design specification for the design of canisters to be used during the handling, storage, transportation, and repository disposal of Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This document contains no procurement information, such as the number of canisters to be fabricated, explicit timeframes for deliverables, etc. However, this rationale document does provide background information and design philosophy in order to help engineers better understand the established design criteria (contained in Volume 1 respectively) necessary to correctly design and fabricate these DOE SNF canisters.

1998-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

399

COMMERCIAL SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL ASSEMBLY WASTE VOLUME AND WEIGHT ESTIMATION FOR 63,000 MTU  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to create a high-level estimation of the weights and volume of the commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies, at the time of repository receipt, that will comprise 63,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) waste. The results of this calculation are for informational purposes only and are not intended to be used as input to design documents. This calculation was prepared in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q REV 00 ICN 0, Calculations.

B.A. Colton

1999-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

400

Progress on High Energy Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy for Direct Assay of Pu in Spent Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct, nondestructive measurement of fissile and fissionable isotopes in spent fuel is not yet possible. Current methods which infer plutonium content through proxy measurements and confirmatory burnup calculations have relatively large uncertainty and do not satisfy the desire for a measurement that is independent of operator declarations. We are currently exploring the High Energy Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy (HEDGS) technique for direct, independent Pu measurement in light-water reactor fuels. HEDGS exploits the unique distribution of fission-product nuclei from each of the fissile isotopes. Fission is stimulated in the sample with a source of interrogating neutrons, and delayed gamma rays from the decay of the short-lived fission-product nuclei are measured. The measured gamma spectrum from the unknown sample is then fit with a linear combination of gamma spectra from pure U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241, as deduced from the known fission-product yield curves and decay properties of the fission-product nuclei, to determine the original proportions of these fissile isotopes. In previous work, we performed preliminary modeling studies of HEDGS on idealized single fuel pins of various burnups. Here, we report progress on extending our GEANT-based modeling tools to efficiently model full pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies using variance reduction techniques specific to the background emissions and induced signal, as appropriate. Predicted performance for a nominal HEDGS instrument design, is reported for the assay of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 in spent fuel assemblies ranging from fresh to 60 GWd/MTU in burnup.

Campbell, Luke W.; Smith, Leon E.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

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