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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Directorate, Washington ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Directorate, Washington, DC. NVLAP Lab Code: 100565-10. Address and Contact Information: Naval Reactors ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

2

2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Naval Nuclear Propulsion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program The...

3

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Directorate, Washington ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Directorate, Washington, DC. NVLAP Lab Code: 100565-0. Address and Contact Information: ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

4

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Directorate, Washington ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Directorate, Washington, DC. NVLAP Lab Code: 100565-2. Address and Contact Information: Point Loma, Bldg. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

5

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants In naval nuclear propulsion plants, fissioning of uranium atoms in the reactor core produces heat. Because the fission process also produces...

6

More About NNSA's Naval Reactors Office | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Naval Reactors Office The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program provides militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensures their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. This...

7

Naval applications study areas  

SciTech Connect

This memorandum discusses study areas and items that will require attention for the naval studies of the utilization of nuclear propulsion in a submarine-based missile system.

Hadley, J. W.

1962-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

8

Reactors for nuclear electric propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Propulsion is the key to space exploitation and power is the key to propulsion. This paper examines the role of nuclear fission reactors as the primary power source for high specific impulse electric propulsion systems for space missions of the 1980s and 1990s. Particular mission applications include transfer to and a reusable orbital transfer vehicle from low-Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit, outer planet exploration and reconnaissance missions, and as a versatile space tug supporting lunar resource development. Nuclear electric propulsion is examined as an indispensable component in space activities of the next two decades.

Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

LASL nuclear rocket propulsion program  

SciTech Connect

The immediate objective of the LASL nuclear propulsion (Rover) program is the development of a heat exchanger reactor system utilizing uranium-graphite fuel elements and ammonia propellant. This program is regarded as the first step in the development of nuclear propulsion systems for missiles. The major tasks of the program include the investigation of materials at high temperatures, development of fuel elements, investigation of basic reactor characteristics, investigation of engine control problems, detailed engine design and ground testing. The organization and scheduling of the initial development program have been worked out in some detail. Only rather general ideas exist concerning the projection of this work beyond 1958.

Schreiber, R.E.

1956-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed Prometheus Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to JPL  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The proposed PROMETHEUS nuclear reactor high tier safety requirements are consistent with the long standing safety culture of the Naval Reactors Program and its commitment to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment. In addition, the philosophy on which these requirements are based is consistent with the Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group recommendations on space nuclear propulsion safety (Reference 1), DOE Nuclear Safety Criteria and Specifications for Space Nuclear Reactors (Reference 2), the Nuclear Space Power Safety and Facility Guidelines Study of the Applied Physics Laboratory.

D. Kokkinos

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

11

NUCLEAR PROPULSION--AN EMERGING TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

The use of nuclear energy in the space programs is discussed. Nuclear rocket development is reviewed, and the Nevada rocket development station, nuclear electric propulsion and power generation, and advanced research projects are discussed. (J.R.D.)

Finger, H.B.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Pure Nuclear Fusion Bomb Propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent progress towards the non-fission ignition of thermonuclear micro-explosions raises the prospect for a revival of the nuclear bomb propulsion idea, both for the fast transport of large payloads within the solar system and the launch into earth orbit without the release of fission products into the atmosphere. To reach this goal three areas of research are of importance: 1)Compact thermonuclear ignition drivers. 2)Fast ignition and deuterium burn. 3)Space-craft architecture involving magnetic insulation and GeV electrostatic potentials

Winterberg, F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Management of Naval Reactors' Cyber Security Program, OIG-0884  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Naval Reactors' Naval Reactors' Cyber Security Program DOE/IG-0884 April 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 12, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Management of Naval Reactors' Cyber Security Program" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Naval Reactors Program (Naval Reactors), an organization within the National Nuclear Security Administration, provides the military with safe and reliable nuclear propulsion plants to power warships and submarines. Naval Reactors maintains responsibility for activities supporting the United States Naval fleet nuclear propulsion systems, including research and

14

The Department of Energy's Spent Nuclear Fuel Canisters andTransporta...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

nuclear fuel generated from research and development, plutonium production, and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (Naval Reactors). Under current national policy, the Department...

15

Powering the Nuclear Navy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The National Nuclear Security Administration Powering the Nuclear Navy Home > Our Mission > Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program...

16

More About NNSA's Naval Reactors Office | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to skip to the main content Facebook Flickr RSS Twitter YouTube More About NNSA's Naval Reactors Office | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the...

17

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs, Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D: Part A, Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Management  

SciTech Connect

Volume 1 to the Department of Energy`s Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement evaluates a range of alternatives for managing naval spent nuclear fuel expected to be removed from US Navy nuclear-powered vessels and prototype reactors through the year 2035. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) considers a range of alternatives for examining and storing naval spent nuclear fuel, including alternatives that terminate examination and involve storage close to the refueling or defueling site. The EIS covers the potential environmental impacts of each alternative, as well as cost impacts and impacts to the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program mission. This Appendix covers aspects of the alternatives that involve managing naval spent nuclear fuel at four naval shipyards and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Kesselring Site in West Milton, New York. This Appendix also covers the impacts of alternatives that involve examining naval spent nuclear fuel at the Expended Core Facility in Idaho and the potential impacts of constructing and operating an inspection facility at any of the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities considered in the EIS. This Appendix also considers the impacts of the alternative involving limited spent nuclear fuel examinations at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. This Appendix does not address the impacts associated with storing naval spent nuclear fuel after it has been inspected and transferred to DOE facilities. These impacts are addressed in separate appendices for each DOE site.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Statement on Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Statement on Defense Nuclear

19

FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactor Programs before the House Appropriations Committee, Energy and Water Development Subcommittee | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear ...

20

Statement on Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Statement on Defense Nuclear

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactor Programs before the House Appropriations Committee, Energy and Water Development Subcommittee | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear ...

22

Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel disposal Container System Description Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers/waste packages are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred underground through the access drifts using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System provides long term confinement of the naval spent nuclear fuel (SNF) placed within the disposal containers, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval operations. The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time and limits radionuclide release thereafter. The waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum credible handling and rockfall loads, limits the waste form temperature after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Each naval SNF disposal container will hold a single naval SNF canister. There will be approximately 300 naval SNF canisters, composed of long and short canisters. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinder walls and lids. An exterior label will provide a means by which to identify a disposal container and its contents. Different materials will be selected for the waste package inner and outer cylinders. The two metal cylinders, in combination with the Emplacement Drift System, drip shield, and the natural barrier will support the design philosophy of defense-in-depth. The use of materials with different properties prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The inner cylinder and inner cylinder lids will be constructed of stainless steel while the outer cylinder and outer cylinder lids will be made of high-nickel alloy.

N. E. Pettit

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

23

Nuclear propulsion apparatus with alternate reactor segments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

1. Nuclear propulsion apparatus comprising: A. means for compressing incoming air; B. nuclear fission reactor means for heating said air; C. means for expanding a portion of the heated air to drive said compressing means; D. said nuclear fission reactor means being divided into a plurality of radially extending segments; E. means for directing a portion of the compressed air for heating through alternate segments of said reactor means and another portion of the compressed air for heating through the remaining segments of said reactor means; and F. means for further expanding the heated air from said drive means and the remaining heated air from said reactor means through nozzle means to effect reactive thrust on said apparatus.

Szekely, Thomas (Santa Monica, CA)

1979-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

24

Contributions Regarding the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility to use a nuclear reactor for airplanes propulsion was investigated taking in to account 2 possible solutions: the direct cycle (where the fluid pass through the reactor's core) and the indirect cycle (where the fluid is passing through a heat exchanger). Taking in to account the radioprotection problems, the only realistic solution seems to be the indirect cycle, where the energy transfer should be performed by a heat exchanger that must work at very high speed of the fluid. The heat exchanger will replace the classical burning room. We had performed a more precise theoretical study for the nuclear jet engine regarding the performances of the nuclear reactor, of the heat exchanger and of the jet engine. It was taken in to account that in the moment when the burning room is replaced by a heat exchanger, a new model for gasodynamic process from the engine must be performed. Studies regarding the high flow speed heat transfer were performed.

Mitrica, Bogdan; Petre, Marian; Dima, Mihai Octavian [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering-IFIN HH, Magurele, 077125 (Romania); Stanciu, Virgil [POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Bucharest, 060042 (Romania); Petre, Carmelia; Precup, Irinel [University of Bucharest, Bucharest, 050107 (Romania)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

25

Ultrahigh Specific Impulse Nuclear Thermal Propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research on nuclear thermal propulsion systems (NTP) have been in forefront of the space nuclear power and propulsion due to their design simplicity and their promise for providing very high thrust at reasonably high specific impulse. During NERVA-ROVER program in late 1950's till early 1970's, the United States developed and ground tested about 18 NTP systems without ever deploying them into space. The NERVA-ROVER program included development and testing of NTP systems with very high thrust (~250,000 lbf) and relatively high specific impulse (~850 s). High thrust to weight ratio in NTP systems is an indicator of high acceleration that could be achieved with these systems. The specific impulse in the lowest mass propellant, hydrogen, is a function of square root of absolute temperature in the NTP thrust chamber. Therefor optimizing design performance of NTP systems would require achieving the highest possible hydrogen temperature at reasonably high thrust to weight ratio. High hydrogen exit temperature produces high specific impulse that is a diret measure of propellant usage efficiency.

Anne Charmeau; Brandon Cunningham; Samim Anghaie

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

26

Nuclear modules for space electric propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of interplanetary cargo and piloted missions requires calculations of the performances and masses of subsystems to be integrated in a final design. In a preliminary and scoping stage the designer needs to evaluate options iteratively by using fast computer simulations. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in the development of models and calculational procedures for the analysis (neutronic and thermal hydraulic) of power sources for nuclear electric propulsion. The nuclear modules will be integrated into the whole simulation of the nuclear electric propulsion system. The vehicles use either a Brayton direct-conversion cycle, using the heated helium from a NERVA-type reactor, or a potassium Rankine cycle, with the working fluid heated on the secondary side of a heat exchanger and lithium on the primary side coming from a fast reactor. Given a set of input conditions, the codes calculate composition. dimensions, volumes, and masses of the core, reflector, control system, pressure vessel, neutron and gamma shields, as well as the thermal hydraulic conditions of the coolant, clad and fuel. Input conditions are power, core life, pressure and temperature of the coolant at the inlet of the core, either the temperature of the coolant at the outlet of the core or the coolant mass flow and the fluences and integrated doses at the cargo area. Using state-of-the-art neutron cross sections and transport codes, a database was created for the neutronic performance of both reactor designs. The free parameters of the models are the moderator/fuel mass ratio for the NERVA reactor and the enrichment and the pitch of the lattice for the fast reactor. Reactivity and energy balance equations are simultaneously solved to find the reactor design. Thermalhydraulic conditions are calculated by solving the one-dimensional versions of the equations of conservation of mass, energy, and momentum with compressible flow. 10 refs., 1 tab.

Difilippo, F.C.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION DEPARTMENT NUCLEAR SAFETY GUIDE  

SciTech Connect

The limitations and operating techniques which were in effect at ANPD for the prevention of criticality accidents are summarized. The standards followed by the atomic industry were followed; however, the safe mass of U/sup 235/ moderated with beryllium oxide and hydrogeneous materials was based upon criticality experiments conducted at ANPD. Although the guide was primarily for the use of the ANPD nuclear safety control organization, it may also be of assistance to designers and operating management in maintaining nuclear safety. (auth)

Pryor, W.A.

1961-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Audit Report - Naval Reactors Information Technology System Development Efforts, IG-0879  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Naval Reactors Information Naval Reactors Information Technology System Development Efforts DOE/IG-0879 December 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits & Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 21, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ADMINISTRATOR, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on the "Naval Reactors Information Technology System Development Efforts" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Naval Reactors Program (Naval Reactors), an organization within the National Nuclear Security Administration, was established to provide the military with safe and reliable nuclear propulsion plants to power warships and submarines. Naval Reactors maintains responsibility

29

Tutorial on nuclear thermal propulsion safety for Mars  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Safety is the prime design requirement for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP). It must be built in at the initiation of the design process. An understanding of safety concerns is fundamental to the development of nuclear rockets for manned missions to Mars and many other applications that will be enabled or greatly enhanced by the use of nuclear propulsion. To provide an understanding of the basic issues, a tutorial has been prepared. This tutorial covers a range of topics including safety requirements and approaches to meet these requirements, risk and safety analysis methodology, NERVA reliability and safety approach, and life cycle risk assessments.

Buden, D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Tutorial on nuclear thermal propulsion safety for Mars  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Safety is the prime design requirement for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP). It must be built in at the initiation of the design process. An understanding of safety concerns is fundamental to the development of nuclear rockets for manned missions to Mars and many other applications that will be enabled or greatly enhanced by the use of nuclear propulsion. To provide an understanding of the basic issues, a tutorial has been prepared. This tutorial covers a range of topics including safety requirements and approaches to meet these requirements, risk and safety analysis methodology, NERVA reliability and safety approach, and life cycle risk assessments.

Buden, D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

THE NUCLEAR ROCKET: NEW POWERPLANT FOR SPACE VEHICLE PROPULSION  

SciTech Connect

A fundamental and practical survey is made of nuclear rocket application to space vehicle propulsion. The engine is described and propellant and radiation effects are discussed. Project Rover is summarized and performance requirements for a space vehicle are discussed. It is concluded that nuclear rockets can provide substantial performance, reliability, and economic advantages for difficult space missions. (T.R.H.)

Schmidt, H.R.; Decker, R.S.

1960-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Comprehensive Technical Report, General Electric Direct-Air-Cycle Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program; Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Application Studies  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one of twenty-one summarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company. This portion describes the studies of advanced applications of nuclear reactors that were performed, including various types of aircraft, missiles, space vehicles, ships, and portable power plants.

Comassar, S.

1962-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

Handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests  

SciTech Connect

A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

Shipers, L.R.; Allen, G.C.

1992-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

34

Effluent treatment options for nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

Shipers, L.R.; Brockmann, J.E.

1992-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

35

Technology survey and performance scaling for the design of high power nuclear electric power and propulsion systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High power nuclear electric propulsion systems have the capability to enable many next-generation space exploration applications. To date, use of electric primary propulsion in flight… (more)

White, Daniel B., Jr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Recapturing NERVA-Derived Fuels for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is working with NASA to examine fuel options for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion applications. Extensive development and testing was performed on graphite-based fuels during the Nuclear Engineer Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) and Rover programs through the early 1970s. This paper explores the possibility of recapturing the technology and the issues associated with using it for the next generation of nuclear thermal rockets. The issues discussed include a comparison of today's testing capabilities, analysis techniques and methods, and knowledge to that of previous development programs and presents a plan to recapture the technology for a flight program.

Qualls, A L [ORNL; Hancock, Emily F [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Development of NERVA reactor for space nuclear propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general technology development and demonstration of a Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA), a joint AEC-NASA program, was undertaken successfully in the 1960's and terminated in 1971 for lack of a specific mission. Detailed flight engine specifications were defined and several candidate designs which would satisfy these specifications were completed just prior to termination of these efforts. However, the technology interest continued and efforts were extended during the early 1970's to consider space power applications including a manned Mars mission and dual mode (propulsion power and electrical power) operation. Subsequent efforts have continued in developing electric power applications. Light-weight solid core reactor nuclear power sources have been conceptually studied based upon this technology. This paper provides a short summary of the technology that evolved in this very complex and frequently changing program with some specific references to the Mars mission propulsion application as it evolved from the NERVA development program.

Holman, R.R.; Pierce, B.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Space nuclear power, propulsion, and related technologies.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is one of the nation's largest research and development (R&D) facilities, with headquarters at Albuquerque, New Mexico; a laboratory at Livermore, California; and a test range near Tonopah, Nevada. Smaller testing facilities are also operated at other locations. Established in 1945, Sandia was operated by the University of California until 1949, when, at the request of President Truman, Sandia Corporation was formed as a subsidiary of Bell Lab's Western Electric Company to operate Sandia as a service to the U.S. Government without profit or fee. Sandia is currently operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by AT&T Technologies, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of AT&T. Sandia's responsibility is national security programs in defense and energy with primary emphasis on nuclear weapon research and development (R&D). However, Sandia also supports a wide variety of projects ranging from basic materials research to the design of specialized parachutes. Assets, owned by DOE and valued at more than $1.2 billion, include about 600 major buildings containing about 372,000 square meters (m2) (4 million square feet [ft2]) of floor space, located on land totalling approximately 1460 square kilometers (km2) (562 square miles [mi]). Sandia employs about 8500 people, the majority in Albuquerque, with about 1000 in Livermore. Approximately 60% of Sandia's employees are in technical and scientific positions, and the remainder are in crafts, skilled labor, and administrative positions. As a multiprogram national laboratory, Sandia has much to offer both industrial and government customers in pursuing space nuclear technologies. The purpose of this brochure is to provide the reader with a brief summary of Sandia's technical capabilities, test facilities, and example programs that relate to military and civilian objectives in space. Sandia is interested in forming partnerships with industry and government organizations, and has already formed several cooperative alliances and agreements. Because of the synergism of multiple governmental and industrial sponsors of many programs, Sandia is frequently able to provide complex technical solutions in a relatively short time, and often at lower cost to a particular customer. They have listed a few ongoing programs at Sandia related to space nuclear technology as examples of the possible synergisms that could result from forming teams and partnerships with related technologies and objectives.

Berman, Marshall

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Space nuclear power, propulsion, and related technologies.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is one of the nation's largest research and development (R&D) facilities, with headquarters at Albuquerque, New Mexico; a laboratory at Livermore, California; and a test range near Tonopah, Nevada. Smaller testing facilities are also operated at other locations. Established in 1945, Sandia was operated by the University of California until 1949, when, at the request of President Truman, Sandia Corporation was formed as a subsidiary of Bell Lab's Western Electric Company to operate Sandia as a service to the U.S. Government without profit or fee. Sandia is currently operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by AT&T Technologies, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of AT&T. Sandia's responsibility is national security programs in defense and energy with primary emphasis on nuclear weapon research and development (R&D). However, Sandia also supports a wide variety of projects ranging from basic materials research to the design of specialized parachutes. Assets, owned by DOE and valued at more than $1.2 billion, include about 600 major buildings containing about 372,000 square meters (m2) (4 million square feet [ft2]) of floor space, located on land totalling approximately 1460 square kilometers (km2) (562 square miles [mi]). Sandia employs about 8500 people, the majority in Albuquerque, with about 1000 in Livermore. Approximately 60% of Sandia's employees are in technical and scientific positions, and the remainder are in crafts, skilled labor, and administrative positions. As a multiprogram national laboratory, Sandia has much to offer both industrial and government customers in pursuing space nuclear technologies. The purpose of this brochure is to provide the reader with a brief summary of Sandia's technical capabilities, test facilities, and example programs that relate to military and civilian objectives in space. Sandia is interested in forming partnerships with industry and government organizations, and has already formed several cooperative alliances and agreements. Because of the synergism of multiple governmental and industrial sponsors of many programs, Sandia is frequently able to provide complex technical solutions in a relatively short time, and often at lower cost to a particular customer. They have listed a few ongoing programs at Sandia related to space nuclear technology as examples of the possible synergisms that could result from forming teams and partnerships with related technologies and objectives.

Berman, Marshall

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Nuclear rockets: High-performance propulsion for Mars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new impetus to manned Mars exploration was introduced by President Bush in his Space Exploration Initiative. This has led, in turn, to a renewed interest in high-thrust nuclear thermal rocket propulsion (NTP). The purpose of this report is to give a brief tutorial introduction to NTP and provide a basic understanding of some of the technical issues in the realization of an operational NTP engine. Fundamental physical principles are outlined from which a variety of qualitative advantages of NTP over chemical propulsion systems derive, and quantitative performance comparisons are presented for illustrative Mars missions. Key technologies are described for a representative solid-core heat-exchanger class of engine, based on the extensive development work in the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs (1955 to 1973). The most driving technology, fuel development, is discussed in some detail for these systems. Essential highlights are presented for the 19 full-scale reactor and engine tests performed in these programs. On the basis of these tests, the practicality of graphite-based nuclear rocket engines was established. Finally, several higher-performance advanced concepts are discussed. These have received considerable attention, but have not, as yet, developed enough credibility to receive large-scale development.

Watson, C.W.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Current Development of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion technologies at the Center for Space Nuclear Research  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power and propulsion has been considered for space applications since the 1950s. Between 1955 and 1972 the US built and tested over twenty nuclear reactors / rocket engines in the Rover/NERVA programs1. The Aerojet Corporation was the prime contractor for the NERVA program. Modern changes in environmental laws present challenges for the redevelopment of the nuclear rocket. Recent advances in fuel fabrication and testing options indicate that a nuclear rocket with a fuel composition that is significantly different from those of the NERVA project can be engineered; this may be needed to ensure public support and compliance with safety requirements. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is pursuing a number of technologies, modeling and testing processes to further the development of safe, practical and affordable nuclear thermal propulsion systems.

Robert C. O'Brien; Steven K. Cook; Nathan D. Jerred; Steven D. Howe; Ronald Samborsky; Daniel Brasuell

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Nuclear electric propulsion : assessing the design of Project Prometheus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high fuel efficiency of electric propulsion makes it a viable alternative for long-distance space travel. Project Prometheus was a NASA-led project that sought to demonstrate that distant electric propulsion missions ...

Goycoolea, Martin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Near-Earth Object Interception Using Nuclear Thermal Rock Propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Planetary defense has drawn wide study: despite the low probability of a large-scale impact, its consequences would be disastrous. The study presented here evaluates available protection strategies to identify bottlenecks limiting the scale of near-Earth object that could be deflected, using cutting-edge and near-future technologies. It discusses the use of a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) as a propulsion device for delivery of thermonuclear payloads to deflect or destroy a long-period comet on a collision course with Earth. A ‘worst plausible scenario’ for the available warning time (10 months) and comet approach trajectory are determined, and empirical data are used to make an estimate of the payload necessary to deflect such a comet. Optimizing the tradeoff between early interception and large deflection payload establishes the ideal trajectory for an interception mission to follow. The study also examines the potential for multiple rocket launch dates. Comparison of propulsion technologies for this mission shows that NTR outperforms other options substantially. The discussion concludes with an estimate of the comet size (5 km) that could be deflected usingNTRpropulsion, given current launch capabilities.

X-L. Zhang; E. Ball; L. Kochmanski; S. D. Howe

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Technology survey and performance scaling for the design of high power nuclear electric power and propulsion systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High power nuclear electric propulsion systems have the capability to enable many next-generation space exploration applications. To date, use of electric primary propulsion in flight systems has been limited to low-power, ...

White, Daniel B., Jr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Assessment of a hot hydrogen nuclear propulsion fuel test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subsequent to the announcement of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), several studies and review groups have identified nuclear thermal propulsion as a high priority technology for development. To achieve the goals of SEI to place man on Mars, a nuclear rocket will operate at near 2700K and in a hydrogen environment at near 60 atmospheres. Under these conditions, the operational lifetime of the rocket will be limited by the corrosion rate at the hydrogen/fuel interface. Consequently, the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been evaluating requirements and design issues for a test facility. The facility will be able to directly heat fuel samples by electrical resistance, microwave deposition, or radio frequency induction heating to temperatures near 3000K. Hydrogen gas at variable pressure and temperatures will flow through the samples. The thermal gradients, power density, and operating times envisioned for nuclear rockets will be duplicated as close as reasonable. The post-sample flow stream will then be scrubbed and cooled before reprocessing. The baseline design and timetable for the facility will be discussed. 7 refs.

Watanabe, H.H.; Howe, S.D.; Wantuck, P.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Nuclear Electric Propulsion: A “Better, Safer, Cheaper” Transportation System for Human Exploration of Mars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NASA has completed a preliminary mission and systems study of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems for “split?sprint” human exploration and related robotic cargo missions to Mars. This paper describes the study

John S. Clark; Jeffrey A. George; Leon P. Gefert; Michael P. Doherty; Robert J. Sefcik

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

REIMR - A Process for Utilizing Liquid Rocket Propulsion-Oriented 'Lessons Learned' to Mitigate Development Risk in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a summary overview of a study conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA-MSFC) during the initial phases of the Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program to evaluate a large number of technical problems associated with the design, development, test, evaluation and operation of several major liquid propellant rocket engine systems (i.e., SSME, Fastrac, J-2, F-1). One of the primary results of this study was the identification of the 'Fundamental Root Causes' that enabled the technical problems to manifest, and practices that can be implemented to prevent them from recurring in future propulsion system development efforts, such as that which is currently envisioned in the field of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP). This paper will discus the Fundamental Root Causes, cite some examples of how the technical problems arose from them, and provide a discussion of how they can be mitigated or avoided in the development of an NTP system.

Ballard, Richard O. [Nuclear and Advanced Propulsion Systems Engineering Branch, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, AL 35812 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

Space nuclear power system and the design of the nuclear electric propulsion OTV  

SciTech Connect

Payload increases of three to five times that of the Shuttle/Centaur can be achieved using nuclear electric propulsion. Various nuclear power plant options being pursued by the SP-100 Program are described. These concepts can grow from 100 kW/sub e/ to 1MW/sub e/ output. Spacecraft design aspects are addressed, including thermal interactions, plume interactions, and radiation fluences. A baseline configuration is described accounting for these issues. Safety aspects of starting the OTV transfer from an altitude of 300 km indicate no significant additional risk to the biosphere.

Buden, D.; Garrison, P.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

MOA: Magnetic Field Oscillating Amplified Thruster and its Application for Nuclear Electric and Thermal Propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 60 years after the later Nobel laureate Hannes Alfven had published a letter stating that oscillating magnetic fields can accelerate ionised matter via magneto-hydrodynamic interactions in a wave like fashion, the technical implementation of Alfven waves for propulsive purposes has been proposed, patented and examined for the first time by a group of inventors. The name of the concept, utilising Alfven waves to accelerate ionised matter for propulsive purposes, is MOA - Magnetic field Oscillating Amplified thruster. Alfven waves are generated by making use of two coils, one being permanently powered and serving also as magnetic nozzle, the other one being switched on and off in a cyclic way, deforming the field lines of the overall system. It is this deformation that generates Alfven waves, which are in the next step used to transport and compress the propulsive medium, in theory leading to a propulsion system with a much higher performance than any other electric propulsion system. Based on computer simulations, which were conducted to get a first estimate on the performance of the system, MOA is a highly flexible propulsion system, whose performance parameters might easily be adapted, by changing the mass flow and/or the power level. As such the system is capable to deliver a maximum specific impulse of 13116 s (12.87 mN) at a power level of 11.16 kW, using Xe as propellant, but can also be attuned to provide a thrust of 236.5 mN (2411 s) at 6.15 kW of power. While space propulsion is expected to be the prime application for MOA and is supported by numerous applications such as Solar and/or Nuclear Electric Propulsion or even as an 'afterburner system' for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, other terrestrial applications can be thought of as well, making the system highly suited for a common space-terrestrial application research and utilisation strategy. (authors)

Frischauf, Norbert [QASAR Technologie(s) GmbH, Johann Gottekgasse 39, A-1230, Vienna (Austria); Hettmer, Manfred; Grassauer, Andreas; Bartusch, Tobias [QASAR Technologie(s) GmbH, Johann Gottekgasse 39, A-1230, Vienna (Austria); Koudelka, Otto [Institute of Communication Networks and Satellite Communication, Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 12/I, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A review of the Los Alamos effort in the development of nuclear rocket propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the achievements of the Los Alamos nuclear rocket propulsion program and describes some specific reactor design and testing problems encountered during the development program along with the progress made in solving these problems. The relevance of these problems to a renewed nuclear thermal rocket development program for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) is discussed. 11 figs.

Durham, F.P.; Kirk, W.L.; Bohl, R.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D, Part B: Naval spent nuclear fuel management  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the following attachments: transportation of Naval spent nuclear fuel; description of Naval spent nuclear receipt and handling at the Expended Core Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; comparison of storage in new water pools versus dry container storage; description of storage of Naval spent nuclear fuel at servicing locations; description of receipt, handling, and examination of Naval spent nuclear fuel at alternate DOE facilities; analysis of normal operations and accident conditions; and comparison of the Naval spent nuclear fuel storage environmental assessment and this environmental impact statement.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

EIS-0251: Department of the Navy Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Container System for the Management of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel (November 1996)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Final Environmental Impact Statement addresses six general alternative systems for the loading, storage, transport, and possible disposal of naval spent nuclear fuel following examination.

53

Small Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion: Interim Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests requires high performance propulsion systems to support missions beyond low Earth orbit. A robust space exploration program will include robotic outer planet and crewed missions to a variety of destinations including the moon, near Earth objects, and eventually Mars. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. In NASA's recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option for the human exploration of Mars because of its high thrust and high specific impulse ({approx}900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. The recently announced national space policy2 supports the development and use of space nuclear power systems where such systems safely enable or significantly enhance space exploration or operational capabilities. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted under the Rover/NERVA, GE-710 and ANL nuclear rocket programs (1955-1973). Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. The primary and significantly larger Rover/NERVA program focused on graphite type fuels. Research, development, and testing of high temperature graphite fuels was conducted. Reactors and engines employing these fuels were designed, built, and ground tested. The GE-710 and ANL programs focused on an alternative ceramic-metallic 'cermet' fuel type consisting of UO2 (or UN) fuel embedded in a refractory metal matrix such as tungsten. The General Electric program examined closed loop concepts for space or terrestrial applications as well as open loop systems for direct nuclear thermal propulsion. Although a number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion were proposed and designed, none were built. This report summarizes status results of evaluations of small nuclear reactor designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion.

Bruce G. Schnitzler

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Aerothermodynamics, Comprehensive Technical Report, Direct Air Cycle, General Electric's Air Craft Nuclear Propulsion Program  

SciTech Connect

This is one of twenty-one volumes summarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company. This volume summarizes the methods and techquies developed for use in the thermal design of nuclear reactors associated with that program.

Noyes, R.N.

1961-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

55

An Overview of Facilities and Capabilities to Support the Development of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abstract. The future of American space exploration depends on the ability to rapidly and economically access locations of interest throughout the solar system. There is a large body of work (both in the US and the Former Soviet Union) that show that Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is the most technically mature, advanced propulsion system that can enable this rapid and economical access by its ability to provide a step increase above what is a feasible using a traditional chemical rocket system. For an NTP system to be deployed, the earlier measurements and recent predictions of the performance of the fuel and the reactor system need to be confirmed experimentally prior to launch. Major fuel and reactor system issues to be addressed include fuel performance at temperature, hydrogen compatibility, fission product retention, and restart capability. The prime issue to be addressed for reactor system performance testing involves finding an affordable and environmentally acceptable method to test a range of engine sizes using a combination of nuclear and non-nuclear test facilities. This paper provides an assessment of some of the capabilities and facilities that are available or will be needed to develop and test the nuclear fuel, and reactor components. It will also address briefly options to take advantage of the greatly improvement in computation/simulation and materials processing capabilities that would contribute to making the development of an NTP system more affordable. Keywords: Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP), Fuel fabrication, nuclear testing, test facilities.

James Werner; Sam Bhattacharyya; Mike Houts

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

REACTOR AND SHIELD PHYSICS. Comprehensive Technical Report, General Electric Direct-Air-Cycle, Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program.  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one of twenty-one summarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company. This volume describes the experimental and theoretical work accomplished in the areas of reactor and shield physics.

Edwards, W.E.; Simpson, J.D.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Overview of nuclear MHD power conversion for multi-megawatt electric propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of recent research findings on space applications of nuclear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power for generation of multi klb f electric thrust at thousands of seconds of specific impulse is presented. The high operating temperatures of the nuclear MHD system and potential for direct coupling of the output power to the electric thruster system are characterizing features that allow for design of ultracompact and ultralight nuclear electric propulsion systems. Order of magnitude figures for some mission-critical parameters are collated from various engineering analyses. Specific mass and specific impulse values highlight the inherent benefits of further research and development investment in MHD power.

Blair M. Smith; Travis W. Knight; Samim Anghaie

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Recapturing Graphite-Based Fuel Element Technology for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

ORNL is currently recapturing graphite based fuel forms for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP). This effort involves research and development on materials selection, extrusion, and coating processes to produce fuel elements representative of historical ROVER and NERVA fuel. Initially, lab scale specimens were fabricated using surrogate oxides to develop processing parameters that could be applied to full length NTP fuel elements. Progress toward understanding the effect of these processing parameters on surrogate fuel microstructure is presented.

Trammell, Michael P [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine operations and the engine and stage design were constrained to fit within the payload volume of the then planned space shuttle. The SNRE core design utilized hexagonal fuel elements and hexagonal structural support elements. The total number of elements can be varied to achieve engine designs of higher or lower thrust levels. Some variation in the ratio of fuel elements to structural elements is also possible. Options for SNRE-based engine designs in the 25,000-lbf thrust range were described in a recent (2010) Joint Propulsion Conference paper. The reported designs met or exceeded the performance characteristics baselined in the DRA 5.0 Study. Lower thrust SNRE-based designs were also described in a recent (2011) Joint Propulsion Conference paper. Recent activities have included parallel evaluation and design efforts on fast spectrum engines employing refractory metal alloy fuels. These efforts include evaluation of both heritage designs from the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and General Electric Company GE-710 Programs as well as more recent designs. Results are presented for a number of not-yet optimized fast spectrum engine options.

Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Nuclear propulsion systems for orbit transfer based on the particle bed reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technology of nuclear direct propulsion orbit transfer systems based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) is described. A 200 megawatt illustrative design is presented for LEO to GEO and other high ..delta..V missions. The PBR-NOTV can be used in a one-way mode with the shuttle or an expendable launch vehicle, e.g., the Titan 34D7, or as a two-way reusable space tug. In the one-way mode, payload capacity is almost three times greater than that of chemical OTV's. PBR technology status is described and development needs outlined.

Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Horn, F.L.; Araj, K.; Benenati, R.; Lazareth, O.; Slovik, G.; Solon, M.; Tappe, W.; Belisle, J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Naval applications program  

SciTech Connect

This memorandum provides an discussion as to the possible application of nuclear ramjet propulsion in a submarine-based missile system. Questions are raised as to modifications required, compatibility with present submarine launch facilities, and missile and booster volume.

Hadley, J. W.

1962-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

62

Preliminary assessment of high power, NERVA-class dual-mode space nuclear propulsion and power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary assessment of the technical feasibility and mass competitiveness of a dual-mode nuclear propulsion and power system based on the NERVA rocket engine has been completed. Results indicate that the coupling of the ROVER reactor to a direct Brayton power conversion system can be accomplished through a number of design features. Furthermore, based on previously published and independently calculated component masses, the dual-mode system was found to have the potential to be mass competitive with propulsion/power systems that use separate reactors. The uncertainties of reactor design modification and shielding requirements were identified as important issues requiring future investigation.

Buksa, J.J.; Kirk, W.L.; Cappiello, M.W. (Nuclear Technology and Engineering Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (US))

1991-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

63

An assessment of testing requirement impacts on nuclear thermal propulsion ground test facility design  

SciTech Connect

Programs to develop solid core nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been under way at the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). These programs have recognized the need for a new ground test facility to support development of NTP systems. However, the different military and civilian applications have led to different ground test facility requirements. The Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as landlord and operator of the proposed research reactor test facilities has initiated an effort to explore opportunities for a common ground test facility to meet both DoD and NASA needs. The baseline design and operating limits of the proposed DoD NTP ground test facility are described. The NASA ground test facility requirements are reviewed and their potential impact on the DoD facility baseline is discussed.

Shipers, L.R.; Ottinger, C.A.; Sanchez, L.C.

1993-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

64

An Integrated Analysis of a NERVA Based Nuclear Thermal Propulsion System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents results and conclusions derived from an integrated analysis of a NERVA based Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) system. The NTP system is sized to generate a thrust of 70,000 N (15,000 lbf), and have a specific impulse (Isp) of 860 s. This implies a reactor that operates at 350 MWth and has a mixed mean propellant outlet temperature of 2760 K. The integrated analysis will require that self-consistent neutronic/thermal-hydraulic/stress analyses be carried out. The major code packages used in this analysis are MCNP, RELAP, and ANSYS. Results from this analysis indicate that nuclear data will have to be re-generated to cover the wide temperature range, zone loading will be necessary to avoid entering the liquidus region for the fuel, and the effectiveness of the ZrC insulator will have implications for bi-modal applications. These results suggest a path forward in the development of a viable NTP system based on a NERVA reactor should initially concentrate on fuel and structural materials and associated coating development. A series of safety related criticality determinations were carried out addressing water immersion following a launch incident.

Ludewig, Hans; Cheng, L.-Y.; Ecker, Lynne; Todosow, Michael [Energy Sciences and Technology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

65

Powering the Nuclear Navy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy Home > About Us > Our Programs > Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program provides militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensures their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. This mission requires the combination of fully trained U.S. Navy men and women with ships that excel in endurance, stealth, speed, and independence from supply chains. NNSA's Navy Reactors Program provides the design, development and operational support required to provide militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensure their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. This budget requests more than $1 billion to power a modern nuclear Navy: Continuation of design and development work for the OHIO-class

66

Investigation of a Sodium Vapor Compressor Jet for Nuclear Propulsion of Aircraft  

SciTech Connect

?Analysis indicates that, in order to achieve supersonic flight with nuclear powered aircraft, a reactor -power plant combination capable of operating at temperatures considerably in excess of current practice must be developed. It is pointed out that there exist two general avenues of approach toward the goal of attaining high temperature reactors and power plants. The first approach involves the continuation and augmentation of research along the lines pursued by the conventional turbo-jet engine manufacturer, namely a search for material coatings or materials that will retain structural strength in high temperature oxidizing atmospheres. The second approach seeks to take advantage of the peculiar characteristics of the compressor-jet engine that permit the operation of the high temperature components in a non-oxidizing atmosphere. The results of a preliminary design study of a supersonic aircraft powered by a high temperature sodium, liquid vapor compressor -jet engine are summarized. The analysis considered, in as much detail as was warranted by the limited experimental information available, the characteristics of the reactor, power plant and airframe involved in determining performance. This study has been conducted for the purpose of guiding future, long -t e r rn , research work along the lines of high temperature reactors and power plants for aircraft propulsion. The sodium vapor compressor -jet is not presented as an engine that is presently considered feasible nor is any attempt made to establish a time table for its development. ?The present status of reactor -power plant combinations of the type discussed in this report is such that the configurations presented and the thermodynamic requirements set forth are highly c onj ectural. However, in light of the promising results thus far obtained from very limited experimentation in the field of high temperature materials not subject to oxidizing atmospheres, it appears worthwhile to continue a research effort along these lines in the expectation of making high temperature, high performance aircraft a reality. This report is based upon studies conducted for the Atomic Energy Commission under Contract AT-40-l-GEN-1064. These studies were concluded on September 1, 1951, and were informally made available to the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Group at ORNL at that time.

Schwartz, H.

1953-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

67

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Container System for the Management of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0251  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Document ID 51 Document ID 51 Commenter: Daniel Nix - Western Interstate Energy Board, Colorado Response to Comment: A. The Navy extended the comment period from 45 to 60 days (ending July 18, 1996) in response to requests from the state of Nevada. A further extension could not be provided because of the need to complete the EIS to support actions required under a court agreement among the Department of Energy, Navy, and State of Idaho covering spent fuel management at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. B.&D. The Board's comment is correct that the EIS is limited to naval spent nuclear fuel and Navy- generated special case waste. The Board's comment is incorrect in the implication that transportation to Yucca Mountain is supported by the EIS. The proposed action of this EIS

68

Comprehensive Technical Report, General Electric Direct-Air-Cycle Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program, Program Summary and References  

SciTech Connect

This is one of twenty-one volumes sumarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company. This volume discusses the background to the General Electric program, and summarizes the various direct-air-cycle nuclear test assemblies and power plants that were developed. Because of the requirements of high performance, low weight, and small size, vast improvements in existing technology were required to meet the flight objectives. The technological progress achieved during the program is also summarized. The last appendix contains a compilation of the abstracts, tables of contents, and reference lists of the other twenty volumes.

Thornton, G.; Rothstein, A.J.

1962-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

69

Analyzing the effects of component reliability on naval Integrated Power System quality of service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Integrated Power System (IPS) is a key enabling technology for future naval vessels and their advanced weapon systems. While conventional warship designs utilize separate power systems for propulsion and shipboard ...

Hawbaker, Benjamin F. (Benjamin Forrest)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Comparison of Methods for Evaluating Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Tie-Tube Designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the fundamental structural components in a nuclear thermal rocket design is the tie tube. Proper cooling and flow modeling is important both for the structural integrity of the reactor core and for proper design of downstream components that operate on the hydrogen exiting the tie tube. Two models have been developed. The first is a spreadsheet-based tool designed for sizing tie-tube components, considering mechanical stress and strain limits, deposited moderator power, thermal expansion along the flow path, and conduction from adjacent fuel blocks. The second is a three-dimensional SINDA/FLUINT model used as a benchmark, containing a complete finite-element fuel block and a 1/6th tie-tube model. This paper discusses the performance of both models, as well as the advantages and limitations of each.

Kapernick, Richard J. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Dixon, David D. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

71

LETTER REPORT. INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS OF SOILS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ARGYLE STREET SEWER LINE AT THE UNITED NUCLEAR CORPORATION NAVAL PRODUCTS SITE, NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) personnel visited the United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Naval Products site on three separate occasions during the months of October and November 2011. The purpose of these visits was to conduct confirmatory surveys of soils associated with the Argyle Street sewer line that was being removed. Soil samples were collected from six different, judgmentally determined locations in the Argyle Street sewer trench. In addition to the six soil samples collected by ORISE, four replicate soil samples were collected by Cabrera Services, Inc. (CSI) for analysis by the ORISE laboratory. Replicate samples S0010 and S0011 were final status survey (FSS) bias samples; S0012 was an FSS systematic sample; and S0015 was a waste characterization sample. Six soil samples were also collected for background determination. Uranium-235 and uranium-238 concentrations were determined via gamma spectroscopy; the spectra were also reviewed for other identifiable photopeaks. Radionuclide concentrations for these soil samples are provided. In addition to the replicate samples and the samples collected by ORISE, CSI submitted three soil samples for inter-laboratory comparison analyses. One sample was from the background reference area, one was from waste characterization efforts (material inside the sewer line), and one was a FSS sample. The inter-laboratory comparison analyses results between ORISE and CSI were in agreement, except for one sample collected in the reference area. Smear results For Argyle Street sewer pipes are tabulated.

Adams, Wade C.

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

72

Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

role in developing science and technology for nuclear power programs, nuclear propulsion, nuclear medicine, and the nation's nuclear weapon program among others. Many...

73

NERVA derivative reactors for thermal and electric propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NERVA derivative reactors (NDRs) have significant flexibility for diverse space power applications that include direct thermal propulsion, steady state power for electric propulsion, and nuclear hybrid propulsion. For illustrations, three NDR designs were developed: one for a 50 kN thrust nuclear propulsion engine, a 6 MWe steady state electric power source, and a dual mode system that produces 50 kN of direct thrust plus 300 kWe of power for electric propulsion. The NDRs are based on demonstrated reactor technologies and state-of-the-art fuel and materials' technologies. The propulsion power systems can be designed for near-term applications (mid-1990 IOC). With additional developments in high temperature fuels, higher performance NDRs can be made available by the turn of the century. 11 refs.

Chi, J.W.H.; Holman, R.R.; Pierce, B.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Advanced Propulsion Concepts at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current interest in advanced propulsion within NASA and research activities in advanced propulsion concepts at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are reviewed. The include high power plasma thrusters such as propulsion systems, in-situ propellant utilization techniques, fusion propulsion systems and methods of using antimatter, offer the potential for either significantly enhancing space transportation capability as compared with that of traditional chemical propulsion, or enabling ambitious new missions.

Stephanie D. Leifer; Robert H. Frisbee; John R. Brophy

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

DOE P 420.1 Department of Energy Nuclear Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE P 420.1 Department of Energy Nuclear Policy DOE P 420.1 Department of Energy Nuclear Policy DOE P 420.1 Department of Energy Nuclear Policy PURPOSE: To document the Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear safety policy. SCOPE: The provisions of this policy apply to all Departmental elements with responsibility for a nuclear facility, except the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is separately covered under Executive Order 12344, Title 50 United States Code, sections 2406 and 2511. This Policy cancels Secretary of Energy Notice 35-91, Nuclear Safety Policy, dated 9-9-91. DOE_P420-1_Final_2-8-11.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE P 420.1 Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy, Approved: 2-08-2011 Technical Basis for U. S. Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy, DOE Policy 420.1, 7/11

76

Laser Propulsion - Quo Vadis  

SciTech Connect

First, an introductory overview of the different types of laser propulsion techniques will be given and illustrated by some historical examples. Second, laser devices available for basic experiments will be reviewed ranging from low power lasers sources to inertial confinement laser facilities. Subsequently, a status of work will show the impasse in which the laser propulsion community is currently engaged. Revisiting the basic relations leads to new avenues in ablative and direct laser propulsion for ground based and space based applications. Hereby, special attention will be devoted to the impact of emerging ultra-short pulse lasers on the coupling coefficient and specific impulse. In particular, laser sources and laser propulsion techniques will be tested in microgravity environment. A novel approach to debris removal will be discussed with respect to the Satellite Laser Ranging (SRL) facilities. Finally, some non technical issues will be raised aimed at the future prospects of laser propulsion in the international community.

Bohn, Willy L. [Institute of Technical Physics, German Aerospace Center (DLR) D-70569 Pfaffenwaldring 38-40, Stuttgart (Germany)

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

77

DOE P 420.1 Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy, Approved: 2-08-2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE P 420.1 Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy, Approved: DOE P 420.1 Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy, Approved: 2-08-2011 DOE P 420.1 Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy, Approved: 2-08-2011 PURPOSE: To document the Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear safety policy. SCOPE: The provisions of this policy apply to all Departmental elements with responsibility for a nuclear facility, except the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is separately covered under Executive Order 12344, Title 50 United States Code, sections 2406 and 2511. This Policy cancels Secretary of Energy Notice 35-91, Nuclear Safety Policy, dated 9-9-91. POLICY: It is the policy of the Department of Energy to design, construct, operate, and decommission its nuclear facilities in a manner that ensures adequate protection of workers, the public, and the environment.

78

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), Stockholm Intl Peace Research Inst, Oxford University Oress 337 p., 1997. Arkin, WM and J Handler, Naval Geochemistry (eds. AC Sigleo and A Hattori), Lewis Publishers, Inc., Chelsea, MI, 97-119, 1985. Brungot, AL

79

Fracture of aluminum naval structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural catastrophic failure of naval vessels due to extreme loads such as underwater or air explosion, high velocity impact (torpedoes), or hydrodynamic loads (high speed vessels) is primarily caused by fracture. ...

Galanis, Konstantinos, 1970-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Tag: Naval Reactors | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Naval Reactors Naval Reactors Tag: Naval Reactors Displaying 1 - 7 of 7... Category: Employees & Retirees "Cook"ing at Y-12 for 70 years We have an enduring mission. Y-12 plays a key role in it. And a nuclear deterrent remains the ultimate insurance policy for America. More... Category: News Y-12 Knows Uranium Y-12 produces many forms of uranium. More... Category: News A Rich Resource Requires Recovery Given the value and scarcity of enriched uranium, Y-12 recycles and reuses as much of it as possible. More... Category: News Seawolf Manufacturing Challenge For decades, attack submarines were either fast or quiet - but never both. The fast subs were so loud that an enemy could hear them long before they were within striking distance. More... Category: News Reliable fuel source

82

Laser Propulsion Standardization Issues  

SciTech Connect

It is a relevant issue in the research on laser propulsion that experimental results are treated seriously and that meaningful scientific comparison is possible between groups using different equipment and measurement techniques. However, critical aspects of experimental measurements are sparsely addressed in the literature. In addition, few studies so far have the benefit of independent confirmation by other laser propulsion groups. In this paper, we recommend several approaches towards standardization of published laser propulsion experiments. Such standards are particularly important for the measurement of laser ablation pulse energy, laser spot area, imparted impulse or thrust, and mass removal during ablation. Related examples are presented from experiences of an actual scientific cooperation between NU and DLR. On the basis of a given standardization, researchers may better understand and contribute their findings more clearly in the future, and compare those findings confidently with those already published in the laser propulsion literature. Relevant ISO standards are analyzed, and revised formats are recommended for application to laser propulsion studies.

Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert [Institute of Technical Physics, German Aerospace Center (DLR), D-70569 Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 38-40 (Germany); Roeser, Hans-Peter [Institute of Space Systems, University of Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31 (Germany); Sinko, John E. [Micro-Nano Global Center of Excellence, Nagoya University (Niue), Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8603 (Japan); Sasoh, Akihiro [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8603 (Japan)

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

83

DOE P 420.1 Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

POLICY POLICY Washington, D.C. Approved: 2-08-2011 SUBJECT: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY POLICY PURPOSE: To document the Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear safety policy. SCOPE: The provisions of this policy apply to all Departmental elements with responsibility for a nuclear facility, except the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is separately covered under Executive Order 12344, Title 50 United States Code, sections 2406 and 2511. This Policy cancels Secretary of Energy Notice 35-91, Nuclear Safety Policy, dated 9-9-91. POLICY: It is the policy of the Department of Energy to design, construct, operate, and decommission its nuclear facilities in a manner that ensures adequate protection of workers, the

84

Naval Petroleum Reserves | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Naval Petroleum Reserves For much of the 20th century, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves served as a contingency source of fuel for the Nation's military. All that...

85

NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY Information Technology Solutions  

power (CHP) or emergency backup power Small, High Efficiency, Recuperated Ceramic Turboshaft Engine NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY T RANSFER ...

86

Progress in colloid propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the early decades of the Space Age, a great deal of work was put into the development of the Colloid Thruster as an electric propulsion system for spacecraft. In spite of the effort by the end of the 70s the programs ...

López Urdiales, Jóse Mariano, 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Deuterium microbomb rocket propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large scale manned space flight within the solar system is still confronted with the solution of two problems: 1. A propulsion system to transport large payloads with short transit times between different planetary orbits. 2. A cost effective lifting of large payloads into earth orbit. For the solution of the first problem a deuterium fusion bomb propulsion system is proposed where a thermonuclear detonation wave is ignited in a small cylindrical assembly of deuterium with a gigavolt-multimegampere proton beam, drawn from the magnetically insulated spacecraft acting in the ultrahigh vacuum of space as a gigavolt capacitor. For the solution of the second problem, the ignition is done by argon ion lasers driven by high explosives, with the lasers destroyed in the fusion explosion and becoming part of the exhaust.

Friedwardt Winterberg

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

88

Hypersonic missile propulsion system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pratt and Whitney is developing the technology for hypersonic components and engines. A supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) database was developed using hydrogen fueled propulsion systems for space access vehicles and serves as a point of departure for the current development of hydrocarbon scramjets. The Air Force Hypersonic Technology (HyTech) Program has put programs in place to develop the technologies necessary to demonstrate the operability, performance and structural durability of an expendable, liquid hydrocarbon fueled scramjet system that operates from Mach 4 to 8. This program will culminate in a flight type engine test at representative flight conditions. The hypersonic technology base that will be developed and demonstrated under HyTech will establish the foundation to enable hypersonic propulsion systems for a broad range of air vehicle applications from missiles to space access vehicles. A hypersonic missile flight demonstration is planned in the DARPA Affordable Rapid Response Missile Demonstrator (ARRMD) program in 2001.

Kazmar, R.R.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Vehicle Technologies Office: Propulsion Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials Manufacturers use propulsion (or powertrain) materials in the components that move vehicles of every size and shape. Conventional vehicles use these materials in components such as the engine, transmission, fuel system, and exhaust after-treatment systems. Electric drive vehicles use propulsion materials in their electric motors and power electronics. Developing advanced propulsion materials is essential to commercializing new, highly efficient automotive technologies that have technical requirements that existing powertrain materials cannot meet. The Vehicle Technology Office's (VTO) research in propulsion materials focuses on four areas: Materials for hybrid and electric drive systems Materials for high efficiency combustion engines Materials to enable energy recovery systems and control exhaust gases

90

Vehicle Technologies Office: Propulsion Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Manufacturers use propulsion (or powertrain) materials in the components that move vehicles of every size and shape. Conventional vehicles use these materials in...

91

AC Propulsion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

founded in 1992 to develop, manufacture, and license system and component technology for electric vehicle drive systems. References AC Propulsion1 LinkedIn Connections...

92

Understanding Classification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

nuclear weapons program, the production of special nuclear material, naval nuclear propulsion, and space power systems. Examples of RD include the designs of nuclear weapons, the...

93

Tag: Naval Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9/all en "Cook"ing at Y-12 for 70 9/all en "Cook"ing at Y-12 for 70 years http://www.y12.doe.gov/employees-retirees/y-12-times/cooking-y-12-70-years

We have an enduring mission. Y-12 plays a key role in it. And a nuclear deterrent remains the ultimate insurance policy for America.

Engineering Challenges in Antiproton Triggered Fusion Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

During the last decade antiproton triggered fusion propulsion has been investigated as a method for achieving high specific impulse, high thrust in a nuclear pulse propulsion system. In general the antiprotons are injected into a pellet containing fusion fuel with a small amount of fissionable material (i.e., an amount less than the critical mass) where the products from the fission are then used to trigger a fusion reaction. Initial calculations and simulations indicate that if magnetically insulated inertial confinement fusion is used that the pellets should result in a specific impulse of between 100,000 and 300,000 seconds at high thrust. The engineering challenges associated with this propulsion system are significant. For example, the antiprotons must be precisely focused. The pellet must be designed to contain the fission and initial fusion products and this will require strong magnetic fields. The fusion fuel must be contained for a sufficiently long time to effectively release the fusion energy, and the payload must be shielded from the radiation, especially the excess neutrons emitted, in addition to many other particles. We will review the recent progress, possible engineering solutions and the potential performance of these systems.

Cassenti, Brice [Department. of Engineering and Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 275 Windsor Avenue, Hattford, CT 06120 (United States); Kammash, Terry [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

95

NAVAL REACTORS PHYSICS HANDBOOK. VOLUME I. SELECTED BASIC TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work is to present the most pertinent parts of the body of physics knowledge which has been built up in the course of the Naval and Shippingport (PWR) Reactor Programs, with the aim of providing a background of understanding for those interested in nuclear core design. Volume 1 of this handbook was planned to bring together topics in the basic theoretical and experimental material which are of especially wide interest, including those common to both thermal and intermediate neutron energy reactor types. The physics design of light water-moderated and -cooled reactors is covered in Volume 2 (classified), and that of intermediate neutron-energy power reactors in Volume 3. The emphasis in Volume 1 is thus on light water reactor systems, and as many recent advances in reactor physics of the Naval and Shippingport Reactor Programs as possible have been included.

Radkowsky, A. ed.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Geothermal energy at Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and at Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station, California. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to determine and evaluate sources of geothermal energy at two military bases in southern California, the Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station. One part of the project focused on the natural geothermal characteristics beneath the naval bases. Another part focused on the geothermal energy produced by oilfield operations on and adjacent to each base. Results of the study are presented here for the US Department of the Navy to use in its program to reduce its reliance on petrolem by the development of different sources of energy. The study was accomplished under a cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy's San Francisco Operations Office and the Department of the Navy's Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California, for joint research and development of geothermal energy at military installations.

Higgins, C.T.; Chapman, R.H.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

EA-1008: Continued Development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Continued Development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (Sitewide), Natrona County, Wyoming EA-1008: Continued Development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (Sitewide), Natrona...

98

EA-1236: Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

236: Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Natrona County, WY EA-1236: Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3,...

99

Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Naval Base Ventura County Standby Generator OptimizationC&H Engineering performed a standby generator optimizationOn Naval Base Ventura County Standby Generator Optimization

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Naval Sea...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Naval Sea Systems Command 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Naval Sea Systems Command fewm13nswcphiladelphiahighres.pdf fewm13nswcphiladelphia.pdf More...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Review of OLED Research at Naval Research Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division at Naval Research Laboratory. Her research is focused on organic light emitting diode (OLED) material and devices. She will discuss the research activities at Naval...

102

CX-008819: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant Project CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 06202012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, Naval Reactors The scope of the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF)...

103

1996 environmental monitoring report for the Naval Reactors Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1996 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The NRF is located on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and contains three naval reactor prototypes and the Expended Core Facility, which examines developmental nuclear fuel material samples, spent naval fuel, and irradiated reactor plant components/materials. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with state and federal regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE).

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

XNJ140E Nuclear Turbojet, Section. 4 Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one of twenty-one summarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company.

Layman, D.C.

1962-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Innovation Approaches to Development and Ground Testing of Advanced Bimodal Space Power and Propulsion Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The last major development effort for nuclear power and propulsion systems ended in 1993. Currently, there is not an initiative at either the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) or the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that requires the development of new nuclear power and propulsion systems. Studies continue to show nuclear technology as a strong technical candidate to lead the way toward human exploration of adjacent planets or provide power for deep space missions, particularly a 15,000 lbf bimodal nuclear system with 115 kW power capability. The development of nuclear technology for space applications would require technology development in some areas and a major flight qualification program. The last major ground test facility considered for nuclear propulsion qualification was the U.S. Air Force/DOE Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Project. Seven years have passed since that effort, and the questions remain the same, how to qualify nuclear power and propulsion systems for future space flight. It can be reasonably assumed that much of the nuclear testing required to qualify a nuclear system for space application will be performed at DOE facilities as demonstrated by the Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor Experiment (NERVA) and Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) programs. The nuclear infrastructure to support testing in this country is aging and getting smaller, though facilities still exist to support many of the technology development needs. By renewing efforts, an innovative approach to qualifying these systems through the use of existing facilities either in the U.S. (DOE's Advance Test Reactor, High Flux Irradiation Facility and the Contained Test Facility) or overseas should be possible.

Hill, T.; Noble, C.; Martinell, J. (INEEL); Borowski, S. (NASA Glenn Research Center)

2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

106

Comparative naval architecture analysis of diesel submarines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many comparative naval architecture analyses of surface ships have been performed, but few published comparative analyses of submarines exist. Of the several design concept papers, reports and studies that have been written ...

Torkelson, Kai Oscar

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The dynamics of naval resource allocation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naval policy planning requires viewing the entire spectrum of annual resource allocation, over a long period. Emerging research into the trade offs between force asset levels and fund flows to support those assets is described. The method underlying ...

Rolf Clark

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Mitch S. Daugherty Nuclear Engineering and Planning Manager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Daugherty also headed the Nuclear Refueling Division, the Nuclear Test Engineering Division, and the NuclearMitch S. Daugherty Nuclear Engineering and Planning Manager Naval Sea Systems Command, Norfolk Naval Shipyard Mitch Daugherty is the Nuclear Engineering and Planning Manager and the senior civilian

109

Magnetohydrodynamic sea water propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental and theoretical investigation of a large scale MHD propulsor has been undertaken whose objectives are to (1) investigate the transient and steady state performance of the thruster over operating parameter ranges that are compatible with achievement of high efficiency, (2) to quantify the principal loss mechanisms within the thruster and (3) to obtain preliminary hydroacoustic data. The performance of the thruster was first investigated theoretically with a 3-D code to quantify the loss mechanisms and identify experimental parameter ranges of interest. The loss mechanisms of interest are ohmic losses within the channel and those resulting from electrical currents at the entrance and exit of the thruster, and enhanced frictional losses. The analysis indicated that the relative importance of the loss mechanisms was a function of the thruster design and operating parameters. The experimental investigation of the large scale propulsor is being conducted on a sea water test facility that was designed to match the capabilities of a large 6-T superconducting magnet. The facility design was such that {approximately}90{degrees} of all losses occurred within the propulsion test train (inlet nozzle, propulsor and diffuser) thus facilitating isolation of the loss mechanisms. The test thruster itself is heavily instrumented to provide local measurements of velocity, pressure, and electric fields. The predicted overall thruster performance and value of the loss mechanisms will be compared with measured values. Comparisons will also be presented of the voltage gradients between electrodes, overall thruster efficiency, axial pressure gradients across the propulsor, change in velocity profiles, axial and vertical current distributions and exit distribution of the electrolytic gases.

Petrick, M.; Thomas, A.; Genens, L.; Libera, J.; Nietert, R.; Bouillard, J.; Pierson, E.; Hill, D.; Picologlou, B.; Ohlsson, O.; Kasprzyk, T.; Berry, G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Magnetohydrodynamic sea water propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental and theoretical investigation of a large scale MHD propulsor has been undertaken whose objectives are to (1) investigate the transient and steady state performance of the thruster over operating parameter ranges that are compatible with achievement of high efficiency, (2) to quantify the principal loss mechanisms within the thruster and (3) to obtain preliminary hydroacoustic data. The performance of the thruster was first investigated theoretically with a 3-D code to quantify the loss mechanisms and identify experimental parameter ranges of interest. The loss mechanisms of interest are ohmic losses within the channel and those resulting from electrical currents at the entrance and exit of the thruster, and enhanced frictional losses. The analysis indicated that the relative importance of the loss mechanisms was a function of the thruster design and operating parameters. The experimental investigation of the large scale propulsor is being conducted on a sea water test facility that was designed to match the capabilities of a large 6-T superconducting magnet. The facility design was such that {approximately}90{degrees} of all losses occurred within the propulsion test train (inlet nozzle, propulsor and diffuser) thus facilitating isolation of the loss mechanisms. The test thruster itself is heavily instrumented to provide local measurements of velocity, pressure, and electric fields. The predicted overall thruster performance and value of the loss mechanisms will be compared with measured values. Comparisons will also be presented of the voltage gradients between electrodes, overall thruster efficiency, axial pressure gradients across the propulsor, change in velocity profiles, axial and vertical current distributions and exit distribution of the electrolytic gases.

Petrick, M.; Thomas, A.; Genens, L.; Libera, J.; Nietert, R.; Bouillard, J.; Pierson, E.; Hill, D.; Picologlou, B.; Ohlsson, O.; Kasprzyk, T.; Berry, G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Performance enhancement using power beaming for electric propulsion earth orbital transporters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electric propulsion Earth orbital transport vehicle (EOTV) can effectively deliver large payloads using much less propellant than chemical transfer methods. By using an EOTV instead of a chemical upper stage, either a smaller launch vehicle can be used for the same satellite mass or larger satellite can be deployed using the same launch vehicle. However, the propellant mass savings from using the higher specific impulse of electric propulsion may not be enough to overcome the disadvantage of the added mass and cost of the electric propulsion power source. Power system limitations have been a major factor delaying the acceptance and use of electric propulsion. This paper outlines the power requirements of electric propulsion technology being developed today, including arcjets, magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and ion engines. Power supply characteristics are discussed for nuclear, solar, and power-beaming systems. Operational characteristics are given for each, as are the impacts of the power supply alternative on the overall craft performance. Because of its modular nature, the power-beaming approach is able to meet the power requirements of all three electric propulsion types. Also, commonality of approach allows different electric propulsion approaches to be powered by a single power supply approach. Power beaming exhibits better flexibility and performance than on-board nuclear or solar power systems.

Dagle, J.E.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fermilab  

Naval Nuclear Propulsion. Information (NNPI) Y N. ... 12.Does this project involve space nuclear, non-commercial power reactor, or radioisotope power source work?

113

The Phenomenology of Nuclear Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

most widely used nuclear fuel is in the form of Uranium Oxide. It is used in hundreds of nuclear power reactors, naval reactors and research reactors. This ceramic fuel form has...

114

Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

safeguards and nonproliferation, environmental management and waste cleanup, and Navy nuclear propulsion systems development resides outside the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science...

115

XNJ140E Nuclear Turbojet, Section 5, Shield; Section 6, Turbomachinery; Section 7. Control System  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one of twenty-one summarizing the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program of the General Electric Company.

Layman, D.C.

1962-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

116

Considerations for Steady-State FRC-Based Fusion Space Propulsion (A23579)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of NASA Advanced Propulsion Workshop On Fusion Propulsion, Huntsville, Alabama, 2000, To Be PublishedNASA Advanced Propulsion Workshop on Fusion Propulsion Huntsville AL, US, 2000978449582

Schaffer, M.J.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

EA-0531: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado EA-0531: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale...

118

The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves To ensure sufficient fuel for the fleet, the Government began withdrawing probable oil-bearing...

119

Title 10, Chapter 641 Pertaining to Naval Petroleum Reserves in U.S.C. |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Title 10, Chapter 641 Pertaining to Naval Petroleum Reserves in Title 10, Chapter 641 Pertaining to Naval Petroleum Reserves in U.S.C. Title 10, Chapter 641 Pertaining to Naval Petroleum Reserves in U.S.C. CITE: 10USC7420 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7421 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7422 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7423 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7424 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7425 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7427 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7428 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7429 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7430 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7431 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7432 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES

120

Progress in revolutionary propulsion physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prior to 1988, traversable wormholes were just science fiction. Prior to 1994, warp drives were just fiction. Since then, these notions matured into published scientific discourse, where key issues and unknowns continue to be raised and investigated. In 2009, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics published a peer-reviewed, expansive technical volume on these and other investigations toward breakthrough propulsion. This paper summarizes the key assertions from that 739-page volume, describing the collective state-of-the-art and candidate research steps that will lead to discovering if, or how, such breakthroughs might finally be achieved. Coverage includes: prerequisites for space drive physics, manipulating gravity or inertia for propulsion, lessons from superconductor experiments, null results with "lifters", implications of photon momentum in media, quantum vacuum physics, and the faster-than-light implications of general relativity and quantum non-locality.

Marc G. Millis

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

HybriDrive Propulsion System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HybriDrive HybriDrive ® Propulsion System Cleaner, smarter power for transit DOE/FTA Fuel Cell Research Priorities Workshop Washington, DC 7 June 2010 Bart W. Mancini Sr. Principal Systems Engineer BAE Systems Ph: 607-770-4103 bart.mancini@baesystems.com 2 Overview 3 * BAE Systems FC Experience / Deployments * Technology gaps/barriers to full commercialization of fuel cell buses * Well-to-wheels energy efficiency and emissions * Cost metrics * Bus integration issues * Fuel cell bus R&D needs * Future plans BAE Systems FC Experience / Deployments 4 * 1998 - Georgetown/FTA/DOE Fuel Cell Bus #1 (still serviceable) * UTC 100 kW Phosphoric Acid FC using on-board Methanol Reformate, Hybrid propulsion & Electric accessories * 2000 - Georgetown/FTA/DOE Fuel Cell Bus #2 (retired) *

122

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is to develop the enabling materials technology for the clean, high-efficiency diesel truck engines of the future. The development of cleaner, higher-efficiency diesel engines imposes greater mechanical, thermal, and tribological demands on materials of construction. Often the enabling technology for a new engine component is the material from which the part can be made. The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE), and the diesel engine companies in the United States, materials suppliers, national laboratories, and universities. A comprehensive research and development program has been developed to meet the enabling materials requirements for the diesel engines of the future. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications.

Sidney Diamond; D. Ray Johnson

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

123

Yangtze Patrol: American Naval Forces in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yangtze Patrol: American Naval Forces in China A Selected, Partially-Annotated Bibliography literature of the United States Navy in China. mvh #12;"Like Chimneys in Summer" The thousands of men who served on the China Station before World War II have been all but forgotten, except in the mythology

124

The NASA-JPL Advanced Propulsion Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper was performed the Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology, under contract with the Aeronautics and Space Administration. Mid-Term Far-Term 5. 7.

Robert Frisbee

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Preliminary design of a solar thermal propulsion technology demonstration experiment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Solar thermal propulsion (STP) is an advanced space propulsion technology wherein solar power is used to directly heat the propellant. It potentially allows for achieving… (more)

GAETANO, ANTONIO

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Power balance in a helicon plasma source for space propulsion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electric propulsion systems provide an attractive option for various spacecraft propulsion applications due to their high specific impulse. The power balance of an electric thruster… (more)

White, Daniel B., Jr

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Enabling Green Energy and Propulsion Systems via Direct Noise...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GE propulsion systems Enabling Green Energy and Propulsion Systems via Direct Noise Computation PI Name: Umesh Paliath PI Email: paliath@ge.com Institution: GE Global Research...

128

Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

clean clean Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications US Department of Energy/ Office of Naval Research Shipboard Fuel Cell Workshop Washington, DC March 29, 2011 FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. *FuelCell Energy, Inc. *Renewable and Liquid Fuels Experience *HTPEM Fuel Cell Stack for Shipboard APU *Solid Oxide Experience and Applications DOE-ONR Workshop FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. FuelCell Energy, Inc. * Premier developer of fuel cell technology - founded in 1969 * Over 50 power installations in North America, Europe, and Asia * Industrial, commercial, utility

129

Ablative Laser Propulsion: An Update, Part II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an updated review of studies on Ablative Laser Propulsion conducted by the Laser Propulsion Group (LPG) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. In particular, we describe the experimental technique developed for determination of specific impulses from plasma plume imaging with an intensified CCD camera.

Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Lin Jun; Thompson, M. Shane [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Information Systems Laboratories, Inc., Brownsboro, Alabama, 35741 (United States)

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Ablative Laser Propulsion: An Update, Part I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an updated review of studies on Ablative Laser Propulsion conducted by the Laser Propulsion Group (LPG) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. In particular, we describe the newest results of our experimental study of specific impulses and coupling coefficients achieved by double-pulsed ablation of graphite, aluminum, copper and lead targets.

Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Cohen, Timothy; Lin Jun; Thompson, M. Shane; Herren, Kenneth A. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Information Systems Laboratories, Inc., Brownsboro, Alabama, 35741 (United States); National Space Science and Technology Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

Doss, E.D. (ed.) (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Sikes, W.C. (ed.) (Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

up by a DER system. Distributed Energy Resources at NavalFebruary 2003. “Distributed Energy Resources in Practice: ARyan. January 2004. “Distributed Energy Resources Customer

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Oil Shale Reserves...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Shale Reserves Site - 013 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Naval Oil Shale Reserves Site (013 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site...

134

13.400 Introduction to Naval Architecture, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to principles of naval architecture, ship geometry, hydrostatics, calculation and drawing of curves of form, intact and damaged stability, hull structure strength calculations and ship resistance. Projects ...

Herbein, David

135

Naval Reserve Force : cost and benefit analysis of reducing the number of Naval Surface Reserve Force operating budget holders ; .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Quadrennial Defense Review 1997 recommended reductions of civilian and military personnel associated with infrastructure. The Naval Reserve Force is aggressively pursuing options to reduce… (more)

Young, Eric Coy

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Saenger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing 'Lightcraft' and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important role in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

Phipps, Claude [Photonic Associates, LLC, 200A Ojo de la Vaca Road, Santa Fe NM 87508 (United States); Bohn, Willy [Bohn Laser Consult, Weinberg Weg 43, Stuttgart (Germany); Lippert, Thomas [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Sasoh, Akihiro [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Schall, Wolfgang [DLR Institute of Technical Physics, Stuttgart (Germany); Sinko, John [Micro-Nano GCOE, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

137

Geothermal energy at Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and at Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station, California. Final Report 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to determine and evaluate sources of geothermal energy at two military bases in southern California, the Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station. One part of the project focused on the natural geothermal characteristics beneath the naval bases. Another part focused on the geothermal energy produced by oilfield operations on and adjacent to each base. Results of the study are presented here for the US Department of the Navy to use in its program to reduce its reliance on petroleum by the development of different sources of energy. The project required research of various reports and data, both published and unpublished, particularly those of the California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil and Gas and of oil companies with leases on or adjacent to the naval bases. Important field investigations included the measurement of well-head temperatures of fluids produced from selected oil wells at each naval base and a detailed gravity survey of the Seal Beach naval base and vicinity. The well-head temperatures were needed to evaluate individual wells as sources of geothermal energy, while the gravity survey attempted to discover subsurface geologic structures that might contain geothermal fluids of temperatures higher than those predicted by the regional geothermal conditions.

Higgins, C.T.; Chapman, R.H.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Success Story: Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Success Story: Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project Success Story: Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project Presentation covers the FUPWG Fall Meeting,...

139

A Tabu Search Heuristic for Resource Management in Naval Warfare  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective utilization of scarce resources, in particular weapon resources, is a prominent issue in naval anti-air warfare. In this paper, defence plans are constructed to guide the allocation and scheduling of different types of defence weapons against ... Keywords: defence plan, naval warfare, resource management, tabu search, weapon

Dale E. Blodgett; Michel Gendreau; François Guertin; Jean-Yves Potvin; René Séguin

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Summary, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and nonproliferation activities, environmental management and waste cleanup, and Navy nuclear propulsion systems development.1 The department has a lead role in insuring that...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey Author USGS Published Publisher Not Provided, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey Citation USGS. Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey [Internet]. 2013. [updated 2013/01/03;cited 2013/11/22]. Available from: http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/bgas/toxics/NAWC-surface.html

142

Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAVAL SPENT FUEL RAIL SHIPMENT NAVAL SPENT FUEL RAIL SHIPMENT ACCIDENT EXERCISE OBJECTIVES * Familiarize stakeholders with the Naval spent fuel ACCIDENT EXERCISE OBJECTIVES Familiarize stakeholders with the Naval spent fuel shipping container characteristics and shipping practices * Gain understanding of how the NNPP escorts who accompany the spent fuel shipments will interact with civilian emergency services representatives g y p * Allow civilian emergency services agencies the opportunity to evaluate their response to a pp y p simulated accident * Gain understanding of how the communications links that would be activated in an accident involving a Naval spent fuel shipment would work 1 NTSF May 11 ACCIDENT EXERCISE TYPICAL TIMELINE * Conceptual/Organizational Meeting - April 6 E R T i d it t t d TYPICAL TIMELINE

143

368 SDSU General Catalog 2013-2014 Naval Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine, and diesel propulsion engines receive in-depth study. Leadership topics in an engineering setting motion vector analysis, formation tactics, and ship employment. Tides, currents, wind, weather

Gallo, Linda C.

144

362 SDSU General Catalog 2012-2013 Naval Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine, and diesel propulsion engines receive in-depth study. Leadership topics in an engineering setting motion vector analysis, formation tactics, and ship employment. Tides, currents, wind, weather

Gallo, Linda C.

145

Assessing Hypothetical Gravity Control Propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gauging the benefits of hypothetical gravity control propulsion is difficult, but addressable. The major challenge is that such breakthroughs are still only notional concepts rather than being specific methods from which performance can be rigorously quantified. A recent assessment by Tajmar and Bertolami used the rocket equation to correct naive misconceptions, but a more fundamental analysis requires the use of energy as the basis for comparison. The energy of a rocket is compared to an idealized space drive for the following cases: Earth-to-orbit, interstellar transit, and levitation. The space drive uses 3.6 times less energy for Earth to orbit. For deep space travel, space drive energy scales as the square of delta-v, while rocket energy scales exponentially. This has the effect of rendering a space drive 150-orders-of-magnitude better than a 17,000-sec Specific Impulse rocket for sending a modest 5000 kg probe to traverse 5 light-years in 50 years. Indefinite levitation, which is impossible for a rocket, could conceivably require 62 MJ/kg for a space drive. Assumption sensitivities and further analysis options are listed to guide further inquires.

Marc G. Millis

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

146

Power balance in a helicon plasma source for space propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric propulsion systems provide an attractive option for various spacecraft propulsion applications due to their high specific impulse. The power balance of an electric thruster based on a helicon plasma source is ...

White, Daniel B., Jr

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes how a microwave thruster can be used for spacecraft propulsion. A microwave thruster is part of a larger class of electric propulsion devices that have higher specific impulse and lower thrust than conventional chemical rocket engines. Examples of electric propulsion devices are given in this presentation and it is shown how these devices have been used to accomplish two recent space missions. The microwave thruster is then described and it is explained how the thrust and specific impulse of the thruster can be measured. Calculations of the gas temperature and plasma properties in the microwave thruster are discussed. In addition a potential mission for the microwave thruster involving the orbit raising of a space station is explored.

Chiravalle, Vincent P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

148

Laser Propulsion - Is it another myth or a real potential?  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses different principles of inducing propulsive power using lasers and examines the performance limits along with pros and cons with respect to different space propulsion applications: satellite launching, orbital transfer, space debris clearing, satellite propulsion, and space travels. It concludes that a use of electrical propulsion, in conjunction with laser power beaming, is the most feasible application with technological and economic advantages for commercial use within the next decades.

Cook, Joung R. [J. Cook and Associates, McLean, Virginia 22101 (United States)

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

149

Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 Disposition Decision Analysis and Timeline  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Report to Congress provides a summary of the analysis supporting DOE's determination to dispose of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 through sale of all right, title, interest on the open market.

150

Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the prices of electricity and gas, that might make PV costprices increase by 10% Distributed Energy Resources at Naval Base Ventura Country Building 1512 over current Public Works levels, then PV

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the affects of energy prices and tariff structures on energythe default SCE tariff, total energy bills for Building 1512$0.1097. This tariff Distributed Energy Resources at Naval

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Measurement Issues In Pulsed Laser Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Various measurement techniques have been used throughout the over 40-year history of laser propulsion. Often, these approaches suffered from inconsistencies in definitions of the key parameters that define the physics of laser ablation impulse generation. Such parameters include, but are not limited to the pulse energy, spot area, imparted impulse, and ablated mass. The limits and characteristics of common measurement techniques in each of these areas will be explored as they relate to laser propulsion. The idea of establishing some standardization system for laser propulsion data is introduced in this paper, so that reported results may be considered and studied by the general community with more certain understanding of particular merits and limitations. In particular, it is the intention to propose a minimum set of requirements a literature study should meet. Some international standards for measurements are already published, but modifications or revisions of such standards may be necessary for application to laser ablation propulsion. Issues relating to development of standards will be discussed, as well as some examples of specific experimental circumstances in which standardization would have prevented misinterpretation or misuse of past data.

Sinko, John E. [Micro-Nano Global Center of Excellence, Nagoya University (Niue), Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert [Institute of Technical Physics, German Aerospace Center (DLR), D-70569 Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 38-40 (Germany); Roeser, Hans-Peter [Institute of Space Systems, University of Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31 (Germany); Sasoh, Akihiro [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

153

Space propulsion by fusion in a magnetic dipole  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The unique advantages of fusion rocket propulsion systems for distant missions are explored using the magnetic dipole configurations as an example. The dipole is found to have features well suited to space applications. Parameters are presented for a system producing a specific power of kW/kg, capable of interplanetary flights to Mars in 90 days and to Jupiter in a year, and of extra-solar-system flights to 1000 astronomical units (the Tau mission) in 20 years. This is about 10 times better specific power performance than nuclear electric fission systems. Possibilities to further increase the specific power toward 10 kW/kg are discussed, as is an approach to implementing the concept through proof-testing on the moon. 20 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Teller, E.; Glass, A.J.; Fowler, T.K. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Hasegawa, A. (AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)); Santarius, J.F. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Fusion Technology Inst.)

1991-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG 7 JUNE 2013 Quick Facts..............................................................................................................................................................4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG ­ 7 JUNE 2013 1 CONTENTS Quick Facts......................................................................................................................................................26 #12;NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG ­ 7 JUNE 2013 2 Curriculum Listing...............................................................................................................................................428 Energy Core Group

155

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG 3 JAN 2013 Quick Facts..............................................................................................................................................................4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG ­ 3 JAN 2013 1 CONTENTS Quick Facts......................................................................................................................................................26 #12;NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG ­ 3 JAN 2013 2 Curriculum Listing ................................................................................................427 Energy Core Group

156

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG 8 MARCH 2013 Quick Facts..............................................................................................................................................................4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG ­ 8 MARCH 2013 1 CONTENTS Quick Facts......................................................................................................................................................26 #12;NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG ­ 8 MARCH 2013 2 Curriculum Listing ................................................................................................428 Energy Core Group

157

Naval petroleum and oil shale reserves: Annual report of operations, FY 1987  

SciTech Connect

Production and reserves, development and exploration, revenues and expenditures, sales, environment and safety, and litigation are discussed for naval petroleum reserves numbers one through three and for naval oil shale reserves. 28 figs., 21 tabs. (ACT)

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

NPS-SCAT electrical power system ; Naval Postgraduate School Solar Cell Array Tester .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Naval Postgraduate School Solar Cell Array Tester (NPS-SCAT) seeks to expand the CubeSat knowledge base and provide learning possibilities at the Naval Postgraduate School.… (more)

Dorn, Lawrence Tyrone.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Norfolk Naval Station - VA 05  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Norfolk Naval Station - VA 05 Norfolk Naval Station - VA 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NORFOLK NAVAL STATION (VA.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Norfolk , Virginia VA.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1993 VA.05-1 Site Operations: Demonstration of extinguishing a uranium fire at the Fire Fighters School for AEC contractors. VA.05-3 VA.05-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited quantity of materials handled VA.05-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium VA.05-2 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - Health and Safety Monitoring during operations only VA.05-2 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

160

Fluidic electrodynamics: Approach to electromagnetic propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on a new methodological approach to electrodynamics based on a fluidic viewpoint. We develop a systematic approach establishing analogies between physical magnitudes and isomorphism (structure-preserving mappings) between systems of equations. This methodological approach allows us to give a general expression for the hydromotive force, thus re-obtaining the Navier-Stokes equation departing from the appropriate electromotive force. From this ground we offer a fluidic approach to different kinds of issues with interest in propulsion, e.g., the force exerted by a charged particle on a body carrying current; the magnetic force between two parallel currents; the Magnus's force. It is shown how the intermingle between the fluid vector fields and electromagnetic fields leads to new insights on their dynamics. The new concepts introduced in this work suggest possible applications to electromagnetic (EM) propulsion devices and the mastery of the principles of producing electric fields of required configuration in plasma medium.

Martins, Alexandre A.; Pinheiro, Mario J. [Institute for Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion and Instituto Superior Tecnico Lisboa, Portugal 351.1.21.841.92.43 (Portugal); Department of Physics and Institute for Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion and Instituto Superior Tecnico Lisboa, Portugal 351.1.21.841.93.22 (Portugal)

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Transactions of the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these papers include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, refractory alloys and high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D. (eds.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Transactions of the fifth symposium on space nuclear power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these paper include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

SERAPHIM: A propulsion technology for fast trains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Segmented Rail Phased Induction Motor (SERAPHIM) is a compact, pulsed linear induction motor (LIM) offering a unique capability for very high speed train propulsion. It uses technology developed for the Sandia coilgun, an electromagnetic launcher designed to accelerate projectiles to several kilometers per second. Both aluminum cylinders and plates were accelerated to a kilometer per second (Mach 3) by passing through a sequence of coils which were energized at the appropriate time. Although this technology was developed for ultra-high velocity, it can be readily adapted to train propulsion for which, at sea level, the power required to overcome air resistance limits the operational speed to a more modest 300 mph. Here, the geometry is reversed. The coils are on the vehicle and the ``projectiles`` are fixed along the roadbed. SERAPHIM operates not by embedding flux in a conductor, but by excluding it. In this propulsion scheme, pairs of closely spaced coils on the vehicle straddle a segmented aluminum reaction rail. A high frequency current is switched on as a coil pair crosses an edge and remains off as they overtake the next segment. This induces surface currents which repel the coil. In essence, the pulsed coils push off segment edges because at the high frequency of operation, the flux has insufficient time to penetrate. In contrast to conventional LIMs, the performance actually improves with velocity, even for a minimal motor consisting of a single coil pair reacting with a single plate. This paper will present results of proof-of-principle tests, electromagnetic computer simulations, and systems analysis. It is concluded that this new linear induction motor can be implemented using existing technology and is a promising alternative propulsion method for very high speed rail transportation.

Kelly, B.; Turman, B.; Marder, B.; Rohwein, G.; Aeschliman, D.; Cowan, B.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The Chameleon Solid Rocket Propulsion Model  

SciTech Connect

The Khoury and Weltman (2004a and 2004b) Chameleon Model presents an addition to the gravitation force and was shown by the author (Robertson, 2009a and 2009b) to present a new means by which one can view other forces in the Universe. The Chameleon Model is basically a density-dependent model and while the idea is not new, this model is novel in that densities in the Universe to include the vacuum of space are viewed as scalar fields. Such an analogy gives the Chameleon scalar field, dark energy/dark matter like characteristics; fitting well within cosmological expansion theories. In respect to this forum, in this paper, it is shown how the Chameleon Model can be used to derive the thrust of a solid rocket motor. This presents a first step toward the development of new propulsion models using density variations verse mass ejection as the mechanism for thrust. Further, through the Chameleon Model connection, these new propulsion models can be tied to dark energy/dark matter toward new space propulsion systems utilizing the vacuum scalar field in a way understandable by engineers, the key toward the development of such systems. This paper provides corrections to the Chameleon rocket model in Robertson (2009b).

Robertson, Glen A. [Institute for Advanced Studies in the Space, Propulsion and Energy Sciences, 265 Ita Ann, Madison, AL 35757 (United States)

2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

Magnetized target fusion and fusion propulsion.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is a thermonuclear fusion concept that is intermediate between the two mainline approaches, magnetic confinement and inertial confinement fusion (MCF and ICF). MTF incorporates some aspects of each and offers advantages over each of the mainline approaches. First, it provides a means of reducing the driver power requirements, thereby admitting a wider range of drivers than ICF. Second, the magnetic field is only used for insulation, not confinement, and the plasma is wall confined, so that plasma instabilities are traded in for hydrodynamic instabilities. However, the degree of compression required to reach fusion conditions is lower than for ICF, so that hydrodynamic instabilities are much less threatening. The standoff driver innovation proposes to dynamically form the target plasma and a gaseous shell that compresses and confines the target plasma. Therefore, fusion target fabrication is traded in for a multiplicity of plasma guns, which must work in synchrony. The standoff driver embodiment of MTF leads to a fusion propulsion system concept that is potentially compact and lightweight. We will discuss the underlying physics of MTF and some of the details of the fusion propulsion concept using the standoff driver approach. We discuss here the optimization of an MTF target design for space propulsion.

Kirkpatrick, R. C. (Ronald C.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Simplest AB-Thermonuclear Space Propulsion and Electric Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author applies, develops and researches mini-sized Micro- AB Thermonuclear Reactors for space propulsion and space power systems. These small engines directly convert the high speed charged particles produced in the thermonuclear reactor into vehicle thrust or vehicle electricity with maximum efficiency. The simplest AB-thermonuclear propulsion offered allows spaceships to reach speeds of 20,000 50,000 km/s (1/6 of light speed) for fuel ratio 0.1 and produces a huge amount of useful electric energy. Offered propulsion system permits flight to any planet of our Solar system in short time and to the nearest non-Sun stars by E-being or intellectual robots during a single human life period. Key words: AB-propulsion, thermonuclear propulsion, space propulsion, thermonuclear power system.

Bolonkin, A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Simplest AB-Thermonuclear Space Propulsion and Electric Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author applies, develops and researches mini-sized Micro- AB Thermonuclear Reactors for space propulsion and space power systems. These small engines directly convert the high speed charged particles produced in the thermonuclear reactor into vehicle thrust or vehicle electricity with maximum efficiency. The simplest AB-thermonuclear propulsion offered allows spaceships to reach speeds of 20,000 50,000 km/s (1/6 of light speed) for fuel ratio 0.1 and produces a huge amount of useful electric energy. Offered propulsion system permits flight to any planet of our Solar system in short time and to the nearest non-Sun stars by E-being or intellectual robots during a single human life period. Key words: AB-propulsion, thermonuclear propulsion, space propulsion, thermonuclear power system.

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

168

Propulsion Materials R&D | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Propulsion Materials Propulsion Materials SHARE Propulsion Materials Improve Powertrains Oak Ridge National Laboratory's transportation research and development in the area of Propulsion Materials is designed to identify and develop advanced materials and processes that improve powertrain system efficiency and reduce emissions. Cutting-edge materials research is crucial to enabling new vehicle technologies that are reliable, fuel efficient, and clean. ORNL researchers, in close collaboration with US industry, are focusing on materials for advanced engines, hybrid and electric drive systems, and vehicle exhaust systems. These materials promote a variety of performance benefits, including lightweighting, higher temperature capabilities, emissions reduction, thermal management, and corrosion mitigation.

169

Enabling Green Energy and Propulsion Systems via Direct Noise...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Umesh Paliath, GE Global Research; Joe Insley, Argonne National Laboratory Enabling Green Energy and Propulsion Systems via Direct Noise Computation PI Name: Umesh Paliath PI...

170

Large-Eddy Simulation for Green Energy and Propulsion Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large-Eddy Simulation for Green Energy and Propulsion Systems PI Name: Umesh Paliath PI Email: paliath@ge.com Institution: General Electric Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation...

171

AUTOMATED RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING AT A RUSSIAN MINISTRY OF DEFENCE NAVAL SITE.  

SciTech Connect

The Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) Program is a cooperative effort between the military establishments of the Kingdom of Norway, the Russian Federation, and the US. This paper discusses joint activities conducted over the past year among Norwegian, Russian, and US technical experts on a project to develop, demonstrate and implement automated radiological monitoring at Russian Navy facilities engaged in the dismantlement of nuclear-powered strategic ballistic missile launching submarines. Radiological monitoring is needed at these facilities to help protect workers engaged in the dismantlement program and the public living within the footprint of routine and accidental radiation exposure areas. By providing remote stand-alone monitoring, the Russian Navy will achieve added protection due to the defense-in-depth strategy afforded by local (at the site), regional (Kola) and national-level (Moscow) oversight. The system being implemented at the Polyaminsky Russian Naval Shipyard was developed from a working model tested at the Russian Institute for Nuclear Safety, Moscow, Russia. It includes Russian manufactured terrestrial and underwater gamma detectors, smart controllers for graded sampling, radio-modems for offsite transmission of the data, and a data fusion/display system: The data fusion/display system is derived from the Norwegian Picasso AMEC Environmental Monitoring software package. This computer package allows monitoring personnel to review the real-time and historical status of monitoring at specific sites and objects and to establish new monitoring protocols as required, for example, in an off-normal accident situation. Plans are being developed to implement the use of this system at most RF Naval sites handling spent nuclear fuel.

MOSKOWITZ,P.D.; POMERVILLE,J.; GAVRILOV,S.; KISSELEV,V.; DANIYLAN,V.; BELIKOV,A.; EGORKIN,A.; SOKOLOVSKI,Y.; ENDREGARD,M.; KROSSHAVN,M.; SUNDLING,C.V.; YOKSTAD,H.

2001-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

172

AUTOMATED RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING AT A RUSSIAN MINISTRY OF DEFENSE NAVAL SITE.  

SciTech Connect

The Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) Program is a cooperative effort between the military establishments of the Kingdom of Norway, the Russian Federation, and the US. This paper discusses joint activities conducted over the past year among Norwegian, Russian, and US technical experts on a project to develop, demonstrate and implement automated radiological monitoring at Russian Navy facilities engaged in the dismantlement of nuclear-powered strategic ballistic missile launching submarines. Radiological monitoring is needed at these facilities to help protect workers engaged in the dismantlement program and the public living within the footprint of routine and accidental radiation exposure areas. By providing remote stand-alone monitoring, the Russian Navy will achieve added protection due to the defense-in-depth strategy afforded by local (at the site), regional (Kola) and national-level (Moscow) oversight. The system being implemented at the Polyaminsky Russian Naval Shipyard was developed from a working model tested at the Russian Institute for Nuclear Safety, Moscow, Russia. It includes Russian manufactured terrestrial and underwater gamma detectors, smart controllers for graded sampling, radio-modems for offsite transmission of the data, and a data fusion/display system: The data fusion/display system is derived from the Norwegian Picasso AMEC Environmental Monitoring software package. This computer package allows monitoring personnel to review the real-time and historical status of monitoring at specific sites and objects and to establish new monitoring protocols as required, for example, in an off-normal accident situation. Plans are being developed to implement the use of this system at most RF Naval sites handling spent nuclear fuel.

MOSKOWITZ,P.D.; POMERVILLE,J.; GAVRILOV,S.; KISSELEV,V.; DANIYLAN,V.; BELIKOV,A.; EGORKIN,A.; SOKOLOVSKI,Y.; ENDREGARD,M.; KROSSHAVN,M.; SUNDLING,C.V.; YOKSTAD,H.

2001-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

173

Microsoft Word - Tan Book.docx  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

REPORT NT-12-4 MAY 2012 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, HEALTH, AND OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE REPORT NAVAL NUCLEAR PROPULSION PROGRAM OFFICE OF NAVAL REACTORS WASHINGTON, D.C. 20585 DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20350 This publication was printed on Recycled Paper i TABLE OF CONTENTS SUMMARY ...................................................................................................................... 1 NAVAL REACTORS PROGRAM BACKGROUND, MISSION, AND FACILITIES ............................................................................................ 2 Background ................................................................................................................ 2 Scope of Report ......................................................................................................... 3

174

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1995 Thesis Advisor: Michael J. Zyda Thesis Co-Advisor: John S. Falby #12;Public reporting burden-18 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATEApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited. THESIS NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey

Zyda, Michael

175

Distributed Energy Resources at Naval Base Ventura County Building 1512  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-55340 Distributed Energy Resources at Naval Base Ventura County Building 1512 Prepared, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;Distributed Energy Resources and the Distributed Energy Program of DOE also provided prior funding to develop and validate the DER-CAM model

176

Estimating the Economic Benefits of Forward-Engaged Naval Forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In preparing for the 1997 quadrennial defense review, US Navy leaders asked us if we could quantify the economic benefits of forward-engaged naval forces and communicate them to policy makers. Until this point, the only evidence of such benefits was ... Keywords: INDUSTRIES--PETROLEUM-NATURAL GAS, MILITARY--COST EFFECTIVENESS

Robert E. Looney; David A. Schrady; Ronald L. Brown

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Recent Development in Hydrogen Peroxide Pumped Propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of a lightweight high performance pump-fed divert and attitude control system (DACS). Increased kinetic Kill Vehicles (KV) capabilities (higher .v and acceleration capability) will especially be needed for boost phase engagements where a lower mass KV DACS enables smaller overall interceptors. To increase KV performance while reducing the total DACS dry mass (<10 kg), requires a design approach that more closely emulates those found in large launch vehicles, where pump-fed propulsion enables high propellant-mass-fraction systems. Miniaturized reciprocating pumps, on a scale compatible with KV applications, offer the potential of a lightweight DACS with both high {Delta}v and acceleration capability, while still enabling the rapid pulsing of the divert thrusters needed in the end-game fly-in. Pumped propulsion uses lightweight low-pressure propellant tanks, as the main vehicle structure and eliminates the need for high-pressure gas bottles, reducing mass and increasing the relative propellant load. Prior work used hydrazine and demonstrated a propellant mass fraction >0.8 and a vehicle propulsion dry mass of {approx}3 kg. Our current approach uses the non-toxic propellants 90% hydrogen peroxide and kerosene. This approach enables faster development at lower costs due to the ease of handling. In operational systems these non-toxic propellants can simplify the logistics for manned environments including shipboard applications. This DACS design configuration is expected to achieve sufficient mass flows to support divert thrusters in the 1200 N to 1330 N (270 lbf to 300 lbf) range. The DACS design incorporates two pairs of reciprocating differential piston pumps (oxidizer and fuel), a warm-gas drive system, compatible bi-propellant thrusters, lightweight valves, and lightweight low-pressure propellant tanks. This paper summarizes the current development status and plans.

Ledebuhr, A G; Antelman, D R; Dobie, D W; Gorman, T S; Jones, M S; Kordas, J F; McMahon, D H; Ng, L C; Nielsen, D P; Ormsby, A E; Pittenger, L C; Robinson, J A; Skulina, K M; Taylor, W G; Urone, D A; Wilson, B A

2004-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

178

ELECTRIC PROPULSION APPLICATIONS FOR SNAP SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The application of SNAP systems to electric propulsion was investigated. A review is given of the basic analysis involved in establishing optimum power levels and payload capabilities for electric spacecraft, and several typical missions are analyzed to determine the usefulness of the SNAP systems which are under development or systems which are based on the current SNAP technology. In general, it is found that SNAP power units in the range of 60 to 180 kw offer significant mission capability when used in conjunction with initial spacecraft weights of about 10,000 lb in a low-level orbit. (auth)

Morse, C.J.

1962-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Propulsion and stabilization system for magnetically levitated vehicles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A propulsion and stabilization system for an inductive repulsion type magnetically levitated vehicle which is propelled and stabilized by a system which includes propulsion windings mounted above and parallel to vehicle-borne suspension magnets. A linear synchronous motor is part of the vehicle guideway and is mounted above and parallel to superconducting magnets attached to the magnetically levitated vehicle.

Coffey, Howard T. (Darien, IL)

1993-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

180

Design and Optimization of Future Hybrid and Electric Propulsion Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design and Optimization of Future Hybrid and Electric Propulsion Systems: An Advanced Tool and Optimization of Future Hybrid and Electric Propulsion Systems: An Advanced Tool Integrated in a Complete Hybrid Electric Vehicle ICE Internal Combustion Engine IM Induction Machine IPM Internal Permanent Magnet

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Propulsion and stabilization system for magnetically levitated vehicles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A propulsion and stabilization system for an inductive repulsion type magnetically levitated vehicle which is propelled and stabilized by a system which includes propulsion windings mounted above and parallel to vehicle-borne suspension magnets. A linear synchronous motor is part of the vehicle guideway and is mounted above and parallel to superconducting magnets attached to the magnetically levitated vehicle.

Coffey, H.T.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications  

SciTech Connect

Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

English, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications  

SciTech Connect

Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

English, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

New Technology and Lunar Power Option for Power Beaming Propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Orbit raising missions (LEO to GEO or beyond) are the only missions with enough current traffic to be seriously considered for near-term power beaming propulsion. Even these missions cannot justify the development expenditures required to deploy the required new laser, optical and propulsion technologies or the programmatic risks. To be deployed, the laser and optics technologies must be spin-offs of other funded programs. The manned lunar base nighttime power requirements may justify a major power beaming program with 2MW lasers and large optical systems. New laser and optical technologies may now make this mission plausible. If deployed these systems could be diverted for power beaming propulsion applications. Propulsion options include a thermal system with an Isp near 1000 sec., a new optical coupled thermal system with an Isp over 2000 sec. photovoltaic-ion propulsion systems with an Isp near 3000 sec., and a possible new optical coupled thermal system with an Isp over 2000 sec.

Kare, J; Early, J; Krupke, W; Beach, R

2004-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

185

Heat resistant materials and their feasibility issues for a space nuclear transportation system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of nuclear propulsion concepts based on solid-core nuclear propulsion are being evaluated for a nuclear propulsion transportation system to support the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) involving the reestablishment of a manned lunar base and the subsequent exploration of Mars. These systems will require high-temperature materials to meet the operating conditions with appropriate reliability and safety built into these systems through the selection and testing of appropriate materials. The application of materials for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) and nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems and the feasibility issues identified for their use will be discussed. Some mechanical property measurements have been obtained, and compatibility tests were conducted to help identify feasibility issues. 3 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Olsen, C.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

An Exploration Perspective of Beamed Energy Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

The Vision for Exploration is currently focused on flying the Space Shuttle safely to complete our Space Station obligations, retiring the Shuttle in 2010, then returning humans to the Moon and learning how to proceed to Mars and beyond. The NASA budget still includes funds for science and aeronautics but the primary focus is on human exploration. Fiscal constraints have led to pursuing exploration vehicles that use heritage hardware, particularly existing boosters and engines, with the minimum modifications necessary to satisfy mission requirements. So, pursuit of immature technologies is not currently affordable by NASA. Beamed energy is one example of an immature technology, from a human exploration perspective, that may eventually provide significant benefits for human exploration of space, but likely not in the near future. Looking to the more distant future, this paper will examine some of the criteria that must be achieved by beamed energy propulsion to eventually contribute to human exploration of the solar system. The analysis focuses on some of the implications of increasing the payload fraction of a launch vehicle, with a quick look at trans-lunar injection. As one would expect, there is potential for benefit, and there are concerns. The analysis concludes with an assessment of the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) for some beamed energy propulsion components, indicating that TRL 2 is close to being completed.

Cole, John [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Marshall Space Flight Center, AL 35812 (United States)

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

187

Ongoing Space Nuclear Systems Development in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reliable, long-life power systems are required for ambitious space exploration missions. Nuclear power and propulsion options can enable a bold, new set of missions and introduce propulsion capabilities to achieve access to science destinations that are not possible with more conventional systems. Space nuclear power options can be divided into three main categories: radioisotope power for heating or low power applications; fission power systems for non-terrestrial surface application or for spacecraft power; and fission power systems for electric propulsion or direct thermal propulsion. Each of these areas has been investigated in the United States since the 1950s, achieving various stages of development. While some nuclear systems have achieved flight deployment, others continue to be researched today. This paper will provide a brief overview of historical space nuclear programs in the U.S. and will provide a summary of the ongoing space nuclear systems research, development, and deployment in the United States.

S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Werner; S. Johnson; Michael G. Houts; Donald T. Palac; Lee S. Mason; David I. Poston; A. Lou Qualls

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Research Laboratory - DC 02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Research Laboratory - DC 02 Research Laboratory - DC 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY (DC.02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Washington , D.C. DC.02-4 Evaluation Year: 1987 DC.02-4 Site Operations: Research and development on thermal diffusion. DC.02-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - AEC licensed - Military facility DC.02-4 DC.02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium, Thorium DC.02-2 DC.02-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD DC.02-4 Also see Documents Related to NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY DC.02-1 - AEC Memorandum and Source Material License No. C-3393;

189

Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport - Mississippi Power Partnership Success Story  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Battalion Center Construction Battalion Center Gulfport - Mississippi Power Partnership Success Story Utilities Hardening Project Joe Bosco May 5, 2009 May 5, 2009 * Naval Construction Battalion Center * Established 1942 - Gulfport * Home of Atlantic Fleet Seabees Home of Atlantic Fleet Seabees * Mission: Prepare for & support all facets of the mobilization of construction forces * Naval Construction Battalion Center * 1,100 Acres * 9+ MVA; $3M/yr in Electricity 9+ MVA; $3M/yr in Electricity * One of two Battalion Centers in U.S. * Economic Impact - $500M Mississippi Power Company * Headquartered - Gulfport * Subsidiary y of Southern Comp pany y * Serves 23 counties Southeast Mississippi * 192,000 retail customers * * Generating capacity: 3 166 192 kW Generating capacity: 3,166,192 kW

190

United States Naval Surface Warfare Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Naval Surface Warfare Center Naval Surface Warfare Center Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Address Carderock, 9500 MacArthur Boulevard West Place Bethesda, Maryland Zip 20817 Sector Hydro Phone number (301) 227-1574 Website http://www.dt.navy.mil/hyd/fac Coordinates 38.9782231°, -77.1973878° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9782231,"lon":-77.1973878,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

191

Advanced Fusion Reactors for Space Propulsion and Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

In recent years the methodology proposed for conversion of light elements into energy via fusion has made steady progress. Scientific studies and engineering efforts in advanced fusion systems designs have introduced some new concepts with unique aspects including consideration of Aneutronic fuels. The plant parameters for harnessing aneutronic fusion appear more exigent than those required for the conventional fusion fuel cycle. However aneutronic fusion propulsion plants for Space deployment will ultimately offer the possibility of enhanced performance from nuclear gain as compared to existing ionic engines as well as providing a clean solution to Planetary Protection considerations and requirements. Proton triggered 11Boron fuel (p- 11B) will produce abundant ion kinetic energy for In-Space vectored thrust. Thus energetic alpha particles' exhaust momentum can be used directly to produce high Isp thrust and also offer possibility of power conversion into electricity. p-11B is an advanced fusion plant fuel with well understood reaction kinematics but will require some new conceptual thinking as to the most effective implementation.

Chapman, John J.

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Beamed Energy Propulsion: Research Status And Needs--Part 1  

SciTech Connect

One promising solution to the operationally responsive space is the application of remote electromagnetic energy to propel a launch vehicle into orbit. With beamed energy propulsion, one can leave the power source stationary on the ground or space, and direct heat propellant on the spacecraft with a beam from a fixed station. This permits the spacecraft to leave its power source at home, saving significant amounts of mass, greatly improving performance. This concept, which removes the mass penalty of carrying the propulsion energy source on board the vehicle, was first proposed by Arthur Kantrowitz in 1972; he invoked an extremely powerful ground based laser. The same year Michael Minovich suggested a conceptually similar 'in-space' laser rocket system utilizing a remote laser power station. In the late 1980's, Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funded continuous, double pulse laser and microwave propulsion while Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) funded ablative laser rocket propulsion. Currently AFOSR has been funding the concept initiated by Leik Myrabo, repetitively pulsed laser propulsion, which has been universally perceived, arguably, to be the closest for mid-term applications. This 2-part paper examines the investment strategies in beamed energy propulsion and technical challenges to be overcome. Part 1 presents a world-wide review of beamed energy propulsion research, including both laser and microwave arenas.

Birkan, Mitat [Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Arlington, Virginia, 22203 (United States)

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves annual report of operations for fiscal year 1996  

SciTech Connect

During fiscal year 1996, the Department of Energy continued to operate Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California and Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 in Wyoming through its contractors. In addition, natural gas operations were conducted at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3. All productive acreage owned by the Government at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 in California was produced under lease to private companies. The locations of all six Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves are shown in a figure. Under the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976, production was originally authorized for six years, and based on findings of national interest, the President was authorized to extend production in three-year increments. President Reagan exercised this authority three times (in 1981, 1984, and 1987) and President Bush authorized extended production once (in 1990). President Clinton exercised this authority in 1993 and again in October 1996; production is presently authorized through April 5, 2000. 4 figs. 30 tabs.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

ECR-GDM Thruster for Fusion Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

The concept of the Gasdynamic Mirror (GDM) device for fusion propulsion was proposed by and Lee (1995) over a decade ago and several theoretical papers has supported the feasibility of the concept. A new ECR plasma source has been built to supply power to the GDM experimental thruster previously tested at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The new plasma generator, powered by microwaves at 2.45 or 10 GHz. is currently being tested. This ECR plasma source operates in a number of distinct plasma modes, depending upon the strength and shape of the local magnetic field. Of particular interest is the compact plasma jet issuing form the plasma generator when operated in a mirror configuration. The measured velocity profile in the jet plume is bimodal, possibly as a result of the GDM effect in the ECR chamber of the thruster.

Brainerd, Jerome J.; Reisz, Al [Reisz Engineers 2909 Johnson Rd. Huntsville, Alabama 35805 256-325-2531 (United States)

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

195

2007 Propulsion Materials Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle t echnologies Progra M Less dependence on foreign oil today, and transition to a petroleum-free, emissions-free vehicle tomorrow. 2 0 0 7 a n n u a l p r o g r e s s r e p o r t U.S. Department of Energy Office of Vehicle Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2007 Progress Report for Propulsion Materials Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Vehicle Technologies Advanced Materials Technologies Edward J. Wall Program Manager, OVT Rogelio A. Sullivan Advanced Materials Technologies Team Leader Jerry L. Gibbs Technology Manager January 2008 CONTENTS INTRODUCTION..................................................................................................................................... 1 PROJECT 18518 - MATERIALS FOR HIGH EFFICIENCY ENGINES......................................... 9

196

U.S. Department Of Energy Naval Reactors Laboratory Field Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Of Energy Naval Reactors Laboratory Field Office Knolls Laboratory National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination Summary Form BUILDING A10...

197

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG 7 JUNE 2013 Quick Facts..............................................................................................................................................................4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG ­ 7 JUNE 2013 1 CONTENTS Quick Facts...............................................................................................................................................435 Energy Core Group .............................................................................................................................................438 Certificate in Defense Energy - Curriculum 234

198

Distributed Energy Resources at Naval Base Ventura County Building 1512: A Sensitivity Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Naval Base Ventura County Standby Generator Optimization20 Figure 7: Standby Charge Sensitivity – Separate24 Figure 11: Standby Charge Sensitivity Analysis –

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

DOE Scientist Earns Chairman's Award from Propulsion and Power Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scientist Earns Chairman's Award from Propulsion and Power Scientist Earns Chairman's Award from Propulsion and Power Systems Alliance DOE Scientist Earns Chairman's Award from Propulsion and Power Systems Alliance October 2, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A researcher at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been presented with the Chairman's Award by the Propulsion and Power Systems Alliance (PPSA). Mary Anne Alvin, a physical scientist in NETL's Office of Research and Development, was recognized for her lead role in revitalizing the PPSA Materials Technical Area Team. This prestigious award is only given during a year when outstanding service is observed. The PPSA was formed in 1999 with the mission of improving coordination and collaboration among government agencies to better leverage existing federal

200

Emission spectroscopy for the study of electric propulsion plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Typical electric propulsion devices rely on the acceleration of highly ionized plasmas to produce thrust at specific impulses unattainable with state-of-the-art chemical systems. This thesis examines the use of a miniaturized ...

Matlock, Taylor Scott

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Assessment of propfan propulsion systems for reduced environmental impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current aircraft engine designs tend towards higher bypass ratio, low-speed fan designs for improved fuel burn, reduced emissions and noise. Alternative propulsion concepts include counter-rotating propfans (CRPs) which ...

Peters, Andreas, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Diffusion driven object propulsion in density stratified fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted in order to verify the appropriateness of a two dimensional model of the flow creating diffusion driven object propulsion in density stratified fluids. Initial flow field experiments ...

Lenahan, Conor (Conor P.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Novel turbomachinery concepts for highly integrated airframe/propulsion systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two novel turbomachinery concepts are presented as enablers to advanced flight missions requiring integrated airframe/propulsion systems. The first concept is motivated by thermal management challenges in low-to-high Mach ...

Shah, Parthiv N

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Molecular dynamics modeling of ionic liquids in electrospray propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro-propulsion has been studied for many years due to its applications in small-to-medium sized spacecraft for precise satellite attitude control. Electrospray thrusters are promising thrusters built upon the state of ...

Takahashi, Nanako

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Hypothetical Gravity Control and Implications for Spacecraft Propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A scientific analysis of the conditions under which gravity could be controlled and the implications that an hypothetical manipulation of gravity would have for known schemes of space propulsion have been the scope of a recent study carried out for the European Space Agency. The underlying fundamental physical principles of known theories of gravity were analysed and shown that even if gravity could be modified it would bring somewhat modest gains in terms of launching of spacecraft and no breakthrough for space propulsion.

O. Bertolami; M. Tajmar

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Propulsion engineering study for small-scale Mars missions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rocket propulsion options for small-scale Mars missions are presented and compared, particularly for the terminal landing maneuver and for sample return. Mars landing has a low propulsive {Delta}v requirement on a {approximately}1-minute time scale, but at a high acceleration. High thrust/weight liquid rocket technologies, or advanced pulse-capable solids, developed during the past decade for missile defense, are therefore more appropriate for small Mars landers than are conventional space propulsion technologies. The advanced liquid systems are characterize by compact lightweight thrusters having high chamber pressures and short lifetimes. Blowdown or regulated pressure-fed operation can satisfy the Mars landing requirement, but hardware mass can be reduced by using pumps. Aggressive terminal landing propulsion designs can enable post-landing hop maneuvers for some surface mobility. The Mars sample return mission requires a small high performance launcher having either solid motors or miniature pump-fed engines. Terminal propulsion for 100 kg Mars landers is within the realm of flight-proven thruster designs, but custom tankage is desirable. Landers on a 10 kg scale also are feasible, using technology that has been demonstrated but not previously flown in space. The number of sources and the selection of components are extremely limited on this smallest scale, so some customized hardware is required. A key characteristic of kilogram-scale propulsion is that gas jets are much lighter than liquid thrusters for reaction control. The mass and volume of tanks for inert gas can be eliminated by systems which generate gas as needed from a liquid or a solid, but these have virtually no space flight history. Mars return propulsion is a major engineering challenge; earth launch is the only previously-solved propulsion problem requiring similar or greater performance.

Whitehead, J.

1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

207

Maintenance practices for emergency diesel generator engines onboard United States Navy Los Angeles class nuclear submarines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States Navy has recognized the rising age of its nuclear reactors. With this increasing age comes increasing importance of backup generators. In addition to the need for decay heat removal common to all (naval ...

Hawks, Matthew Arthur

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Beamed Energy Propulsion: Research Status And Needs--Part 2  

SciTech Connect

One promising solution to the operationally responsive space is the application of remote electromagnetic energy to propel a launch vehicle into orbit. With beamed energy propulsion, one can leave the power source stationary on the ground or space, and direct heat propellant on the spacecraft with a beam from a fixed station. This permits the spacecraft to leave its power source at home, saving significant amounts of mass, greatly improving performance. This concept, which removes the mass penalty of carrying the propulsion energy source on board the vehicle, was first proposed by Arthur Kantrowitz in 1972; he invoked an extremely powerful ground based laser. The same year Michael Minovich suggested a conceptually similar 'in-space' laser rocket system utilizing a remote laser power station. In the late 1980's, Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funded continuous, double pulse laser and microwave propulsion while Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) funded ablative laser rocket propulsion. Currently AFOSR has been funding the concept initiated by Leik Myrabo, repetitively pulsed laser propulsion, which has been universally perceived, arguably, to be the closest for mid-term applications. This 2-part paper examines the investment strategies in beamed energy propulsion and technical challenges to be covers Part 2 covers the present research status and needs.

Birkan, Mitat [Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Arlington, Virginia, 22203 (United States)

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

209

Large-Scale Testing and High-Fidelity Simulation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories to Support Space Power and Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, as a Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency, has major responsibility to ensure the safety and security needs of nuclear weapons. As such, with an experienced research staff, Sandia maintains a spectrum of modeling and simulation capabilities integrated with experimental and large-scale test capabilities. This expertise and these capabilities offer considerable resources for addressing issues of interest to the space power and propulsion communities. This paper presents Sandia's capability to perform thermal qualification (analysis, test, modeling and simulation) using a representative weapon system as an example demonstrating the potential to support NASA's Lunar Reactor System.

Dobranich, Dean [Thermal and Reactive Processes Department, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Blanchat, Thomas K. [Fire Science and Technology Department, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

210

CX-007809: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

KAPL-Hillside, Area of Concern-001 (G2/H2 Portion), Remediation Project CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 09/27/2011 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program

211

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Staff Building 114 CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.16, B1.23 Date: 04202012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program http:energy.govnepadownloads...

212

CX-008337: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Compressed Air System Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.31, B2.2 Date: 04/20/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program

213

CX-008341: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applied: B1.15 Date: 04192012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Construction of a multi-story office building in a previously developed...

214

CX-008337: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B1.31, B2.2 Date: 04202012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Renovation of open space within existing Building 8 to allow for the...

215

CX-007824: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applied: B1.15 Date: 02222012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program The scope of the MRTC Office Building project includes construction of a...

216

CX-009403: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B1.16, B2.2, B2.5 Date: 08012011 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program The scope of the Building 20 Fleet Interactive Display Equipment (FIDE)...

217

CX-009245: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applied: B1.15 Date: 08042010 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, Knolls Site The scope of the Building A10 Construction Project includes...

218

CX-008339: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B1.15, B1.16, B1.23 Date: 04202012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Demolition of existing Building 65 to allow for siting and new construction...

219

CX-009405: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applied: B1.15 Date: 08012011 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program The scope of this project includes demolition of existing Building M3 to...

220

AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: INITIATED BY:  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and authorities assigned by Executive Order 12344, codified at 50 U.S.C. Sections 2406 and 2511 and to ensure consistency throughout the joint NavyDOE Naval Nuclear Propulsion...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Microsoft Word - HQ-#465026-v1-NNSA_SD_350_2_-_FINAL_9-6-CLEAN  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and authorities assigned by Executive Order 12344, codified at 50 U.S.C. Sections 2406 and 2511 and to ensure consistency throughout the joint NavyDOE Naval Nuclear Propulsion...

222

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. Annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1992  

SciTech Connect

During fiscal year 1992, the reserves generated $473 million in revenues, a $181 million decrease from the fiscal year 1991 revenues, primarily due to significant decreases in oil and natural gas prices. Total costs were $200 million, resulting in net cash flow of $273 million, compared with $454 million in fiscal year 1991. From 1976 through fiscal year 1992, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves generated more than $15 billion in revenues and a net operating income after costs of $12.5 billion. In fiscal year 1992, production at the Naval Petroleum Reserves at maximum efficient rates yielded 26 million barrels of crude oil, 119 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 164 million gallons of natural gas liquids. From April to November 1992, senior managers from the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves held a series of three workshops in Boulder, Colorado, in order to build a comprehensive Strategic Plan as required by Secretary of Energy Notice 25A-91. Other highlights are presented for the following: Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1--production achievements, crude oil shipments to the strategic petroleum reserve, horizontal drilling, shallow oil zone gas injection project, environment and safety, and vanpool program; Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2--new management and operating contractor and exploration drilling; Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3--steamflood; Naval Oil Shale Reserves--protection program; and Tiger Team environmental assessment of the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Propulsion research on the hybrid plume rocket  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the construction of a tandem mirror plasma propulsion facility, the numerical modelling of the hybrid plume exhaust, and rf heating of the plasma. A preliminary experiment of the ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) heating of plasma ions was carried out. For 2.0 kW ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating) power injected into the central cell and 10 kW ICRH power into the end cell, the results obtained from the probe in the central cell are: n{sub e} = 2.5 {times} 10{sup 16} m{sup {minus}3} and T{sub e} = 80 eV (928,000 K) in the central cell. The estimated values in the end cell are: n{sub I} = 1.25 {times} 10{sup 17} m{sup {minus}3} and T{sub I} = 500 eV (5,797,000 K). The power conversion efficiency was about 80%. The results from time dependent 3-D three fluid numerical modeling indicate that a boundary layer can be formed. The formation of this layer is strongly dependent on neutral jet geometry and injection angle. The ICRH heating of plasma was modeled numerically and power absorption efficiency is about 50%. Analytical analyses was done on slab geometry. 12 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

Chang-Diaz, F.R. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (USA). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center); Yang, T.F. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Plasma Fusion Center)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

EA-0531: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil 31: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado EA-0531: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for a Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 which would be implemented over a five-year period that would encompass a total of 200 wells in Garfield County, Colorado. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 9, 1991 EA-0531: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 August 9, 1991 EA-0531: Finding of No Significant Impact

225

National Nuclear Security Administration Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2011 - 1, 2011 - Page 1 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Denver, Colorado May 11, 2011 Ahmad Al-Daouk Manager, National Security Department (NSD) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Service Center - Albuquerque, NM May 11, 2011 - Page 2 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) * Introduction * NNSA Certifying Official Role * Offsite Source Recovery Project * Waste Shipments * Nuclear Materials Management Planning * Summary May 11, 2011 - Page 3 NNSA Plays a Critical Role: Ensuring our Nation's Security * Maintaining the safety, security and effectiveness of the nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear testing * Reducing the global danger from the proliferation of nuclear weapons and materials * Provide safe and effective nuclear propulsion for the

226

REPORT NT-12-2  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2 2 MAY 2012 OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE FROM U.S. NAVAL NUCLEAR PLANTS AND THEIR SUPPORT FACILITIES NAVAL NUCLEAR PROPULSION PROGRAM DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20350 This publication was printed on Recycled Paper i TABLE OF CONTENTS SUMMARY .................................................................................................................... 1 EXTERNAL RADIATION EXPOSURE .......................................................................... 4 Policy and Limits ...................................................................................................... 4 Source of Radiation ................................................................................................. 5

227

Fallon Naval Air Station Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fallon Naval Air Station Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fallon Naval Air Station Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.38,"lon":-118.65,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

228

Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion. Phase II, MHD propulsion: Testing in a two Tesla test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

Doss, E.D. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sikes, W.C. [ed.] [Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power DOE Operations annual site environmental report 1997  

SciTech Connect

This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power of Boeing North American, Inc. These are identified as Area 4 of the SSFL and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for research and development (R and D), engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields primarily in energy research and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site had research and development laboratories involved with nuclear research. This work was terminated in 1995 and only D and D activities will have potential for impact on the environment. Since 1956, Area 4 has been used for work with nuclear materials, including fabricating nuclear reactor fuels, testing nuclear reactors, and dissembling used fuel elements. This work ended in 1988 and subsequent efforts have been directed toward decommissioning and decontamination of the former nuclear facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring of DOE-sponsored activities to the regulatory agencies responsible for oversight. Information presented here concentrates on Area 4 at SSFL, which is the only area at SSFL where DOE operations were performed.

Robinson, K.S. [ed.

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

230

Water rocket - Electrolysis propulsion and fuel cell power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water Rocket is the collective name for an integrated set of technologies that offer new options for spacecraft propulsion, power, energy storage, and structure. Low pressure water stored on the spacecraft is electrolyzed to generate, separate, and pressurize gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. These gases, stored in lightweight pressure tanks, can be burned to generate thrust or recombined to produce electric power. As a rocket propulsion system, Water Rocket provides the highest feasible chemical specific impulse (-400 seconds). Even higher specific impulse propulsion can be achieved by combining Water Rocket with other advanced propulsion technologies, such as arcjet or electric thrusters. With innovative pressure tank technology, Water Rocket's specific energy [Wh/kg] can exceed that of the best foreseeable batteries by an order of magnitude, and the tanks can often serve as vehicle structural elements. For pulsed power applications, Water Rocket propellants can be used to drive very high power density generators, such as MHD devices or detonation-driven pulse generators. A space vehicle using Water Rocket propulsion can be totally inert and non-hazardous during assembly and launch. These features are particularly important for the timely development and flight qualification of new classes of spacecraft, such as microsats, nanosats, and refuelable spacecraft.

Carter, P H; Dittman, M D; Kare, J T; Militsky, F; Myers, B; Weisberg, A H

1999-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

231

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

States States Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program OPERATING NAVAL NUCLEAR PROPULSION PLANTS AND SHIPPING (RAIL) NAVAL SPENT FUEL SAFELY FOR OVER 45 YEARS SSGN 728 USS Florida CVN 69 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower M-140 Shipping Container NAVAL SPENT FUEL SHIPMENTS NAVAL SPENT FUEL SHIPMENTS * NRC Type B packages * Specially-trained, 24/7 escorts * Government-owned railcars * Location and status constantly monitored * Escort/train crew communications * Rugged fuel * National security shipments Slide 2 NAVAL SPENT FUEL SHIPMENT ACCIDENT EXERCISE BACKGROUND NAVAL SPENT FUEL SHIPMENT ACCIDENT EXERCISE BACKGROUND * Escorted national security shipments. - Exercises provide prime opportunity for outreach, shipment familiarization and emergency response planning. * Regional in nature - 1996 Northwest (Washington/Oregon)

232

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS OF FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL TRANSPORTATION ALONG OTHER THAN~. PRESENTATIVE ROUTE FROM CONCORD NAVAL WEAPO~~ STATION TO IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LADORA TORY Introduction The Department of Energy is planning to transport foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel by rail from the Concord Naval Weapons Station (CNWS), Concord, California, to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The environmental analysis supporting the decision to transport, by rail or truck, foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel from CNWS to the INEEL is contained in +he Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliftration Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor

233

Photon Tools for Fuel Spray Studies in Aerospace Propulsion Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools for Fuel Spray Studies in Aerospace Tools for Fuel Spray Studies in Aerospace Propulsion Systems Kuo-Cheng Lin, 1 Campbell D. Carter, 2 and Stephen A. Schumaker 3 1 Taitech, Inc., 1430 Oak Court, Suite 301, Beavercreek, OH 45430, USA; 2 Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433, USA; 3 Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA 93524, USA Fuel injection plays an important role in establishing stable and efficient combustion inside the combustor of a liquid-fueled aerospace propulsion system. Depending on the application of interest, fuel injection conditions range from high-speed crossflows in the air-breathing propulsion systems to quiescent environments with extremely high pressures in the rocket engines. In addition to the typical liquid

234

FY2001 Progress Report for Automotive Propulsion Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION MATERIALS 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory, Computer Systems Management, Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for their artistic and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2001 Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

235

Fission-Based Electric Propulsion for Interstellar Precursor Missions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews the technology options for a fission-based electric propulsion system for interstellar precursor missions. To achieve a total {Delta}V of more than 100 km/s in less than a decade of thrusting with an electric propulsion system of 10,000s Isp requires a specific mass for the power system of less than 35 kg/kWe. Three possible configurations are described: (1) a UZrH-fueled,NaK-cooled reactor with a steam Rankine conversion system,(2) a UN-fueled gas-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system, and (3) a UN-fueled heat pipe-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system. All three of these systems have the potential to meet the specific mass requirements for interstellar precursor missions in the near term. Advanced versions of a fission-based electric propulsion system might travel as much as several light years in 200 years.

HOUTS,MICHAEL G.; LENARD,ROGER X.; LIPINSKI,RONALD J.; PATTON,BRUCE; POSTON,DAVID; WRIGHT,STEVEN A.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

236

Commander, Naval Base ATTN: Ms. Cheryl Barnett Building N-26  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.J>?j 1.2 1990 .J>?j 1.2 1990 Commander, Naval Base ATTN: Ms. Cheryl Barnett Building N-26 Code N 9 E Norfolk, Virginia 23511-6002 Dear Ms. Barnett: I enjoyed speaking with you on the phone. The Department of Energy (DOE) has established its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) to identify sites formerly utilized by its predecessor agencies in the early days of the nation's atomic energy program and to determine the potential for these sites to contain radiological contamination, related to DOE's past activities, which may require remedial action. When necessary, radiological surveys of individual sites are performed to provide the data necessary to make this necessary determination. As we discussed, in July 1956, the Atomic Energy Commission (a DOE

237

Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2001 at the Naval Reactors Facility are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U. S. Department of Energy.

NONE

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1999 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2000 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

None

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Naval Reactors Facility Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2003 at the Naval Reactors Facility are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy.

None

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

FY2003 Progress Report for Automotive Propulsion Materials Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Propulsion Materials Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Edward Wall Program Manager December 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Propulsion Materials Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Edward Wall Program Manager December 2003 CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................... 1

242

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program: Progress and Highlights  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program was begun in 1997 to support the enabling materials needs of the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program grew out of the technology roadmap for the OHVT and includes efforts in materials for: fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, valve train, air handling, structural components, electrochemical propulsion, natural gas storage, and thermal management. A five-year program plan was written in early 2000, following a stakeholders workshop. The technical issues and planned and ongoing projects are discussed. Brief summaries of several technical highlights are given.

D. Ray Johnson; Sidney Diamond

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

243

Our Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Our Programs Home > About Us > Our Programs Our Programs NNSA's program support is divided into several key program areas including Defense, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors, Emergency Operations, Infrastructure and Environment, Nuclear Security, Management and

244

EA-1236: Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

236: Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum 236: Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Natrona County, WY EA-1236: Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Natrona County, WY SUMMARY This EA evaluates activities that DOE would conduct in anticipation of possible transfer of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) out of Federal operation. Proposed activities would include accelerated plugging and abandoning of uneconomic wells, complete reclamation and restoration of abandoned sites including dismantling surface facilities, batteries, roads, test satellites, electrical distribution systems and associated power poles, when they are no longer needed for production, and the development of the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC).

245

Development Wells At Fallon Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Fallon Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Fallon Naval Air Station Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes As was mentioned previously, the Navy signed a development contract with Ormat in 2005 to produce power from a potential resource on the SE corner of the main side portion of NAS Fallon. Additionally the GPO began additional exploration activities on the Bombing Range 16 in collaboration with the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy. The introduction of $9.1M of Recovery Act funds in early 2009 led to a broadening as well as an

246

Sale of the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Petroleum Reserves » Naval Reserves » Sale of the Elk Services » Petroleum Reserves » Naval Reserves » Sale of the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve Sale of the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve Energy Secretary Federico Pena (left) and Occidental Petroleum's David Hentschel sign the historic transfer agreement with Patricia Godley, DOE's Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, who orchestrated the sale, looking on. Energy Secretary Federico Pena (left) and Occidental Petroleum's David Hentschel sign the historic transfer agreement with Patricia Godley, DOE's Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, who orchestrated the sale, looking on. On February 5, 1998, the Department of Energy and Occidental Petroleum Corporation concluded the largest divestiture of federal property in the history of the U.S. government.

247

Design and analysis of a permanent magnet generator for naval applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the electrical and magnetic design and analysis of a permanent magnet generation module for naval applications. Numerous design issues are addressed and several issues are raised about the potential ...

Rucker, Jonathan E. (Jonathan Estill)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

EA-1889: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

89: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants 89: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1889: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA, prepared by the Department of the Navy, evaluates the environmental impacts of the disposal of decommissioned, defueled, naval reactor plants from the USS Enterprise at DOE's Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. DOE participated as a cooperating agency in the preparation of this EA. The Department of the Navy issued its FONSI on August 23, 2012. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download August 23, 2012

249

Modular machinery arrangement and its impact in early-stage naval electric ship design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical power demands for naval surface combatants are projected to rise with the development of increasingly complex and power intensive combat systems. This trend also coincides with the need of achieving maximum fuel ...

Jurkiewicz, David J. (David James)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

EA-1008: Continued Development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (Sitewide), Natrona County, Wyoming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to continue development of the U.S. Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 located in Natrona County, Wyoming over the next...

251

Development of A Mesoscale Ensemble Data Assimilation System at The Naval Research Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has been adopted and implemented at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) for mesoscale and storm-scale data assimilation to study the impact of ensemble assimilation of high-resolution observations, including those ...

Qingyun Zhao; Fuqing Zhang; Teddy Holt; Craig H. Bishop; Qin Xu

252

Application and analysis of stiffened side shell panel failure for naval patrol craft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over their lifetime, naval patrol craft are subjected to many different types of loading scenarios, most of which are perfectly safe. In rare instances, through a variety of different reasons, these craft are loaded beyond ...

Mothander, Matthew K. A., Lieutenant (Matthew Kristian Alden)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Combining Electric and Sail Propulsion for Interplanetary Sample Return  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fast sample return from the outer Solar System would open an entirely new avenue for space science, but the vast distances make this a daunting task. The achievable transit velocity and the need for extra propellant on the return trip limit the feasibility of returning extraterrestrial samples to Earth. To keep the mission duration short enough to be of interest, sample return from objects farther out in the Solar System requires increasingly higher velocities. High specific impulse, electric propulsion reduces the propellant required for the outbound and return trips, but decelerating the spacecraft at the inner Solar System from high velocity still involves a long, inward spiral trajectory. The use of solar sails to rapidly decelerate incoming sample capsules and eliminate propellant is explored in this paper. The sail is essentially a ''solar parachute'' used for braking at the end of the interplanetary return flight, permitting a higher transit speed and truncating the deceleration spiral. In this application the sail is relatively small and manageable since only the sample capsule and its sail are decelerated. A comparison is made between using all-electric propulsion versus combining electric propulsive acceleration with sail deceleration for sample return from the distances of Saturn, Uranus, and Pluto. Solar-sail braking dramatically reduces the return flight time by one-third or more compared to using electric rocket deceleration. To elucidate the technology requirements, wide ranges for both the loaded sail density and electric propulsion specific mass are considered in this initial parametric study.

Noble, Robert

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

254

Variable-reluctance motors for electric vehicle propulsion  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the design, operation, and expected performance of a 60-kW variable-reluctance motor and inverter-designed for electric vehicle propulsion. To substantiate the performance of this system, experimental data obtained with a prototype 3.8-kW motor and inverter are provided.

Vallese, F.J.; Lang, J.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Southwest Division, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Demand Side Management Program Implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper covers some of the major aspects of the development and execution of the Southwest Division, Naval Facilities Engineering Command (SOUTHWESTNAVFACENGCOM) Energy and Water Program. The program covers Naval and Marine facilities in 14 western states. It started from zero in 1992 and has grown to a program which has identified and is in the process of implementing energy and water savings projects totaling over $115,000,000.

Gates, G. G.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Management and Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management and Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Management and Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Management and Administration Home > About Us > Our Programs > Powering the Nuclear Navy > Management and Administration Management and Administration NNSA's Naval Reactors is committed to excellence and dedicated to meeting

257

NALDA (Naval Aviation Logistics Data Analysis) CAI (computer aided instruction)  

SciTech Connect

Data Systems Engineering Organization (DSEO) personnel developed a prototype computer aided instruction CAI system for the Naval Aviation Logistics Data Analysis (NALDA) system. The objective of this project was to provide a CAI prototype that could be used as an enhancement to existing NALDA training. The CAI prototype project was performed in phases. The task undertaken in Phase I was to analyze the problem and the alternative solutions and to develop a set of recommendations on how best to proceed. The findings from Phase I are documented in Recommended CAI Approach for the NALDA System (Duncan et al., 1987). In Phase II, a structured design and specifications were developed, and a prototype CAI system was created. A report, NALDA CAI Prototype: Phase II Final Report, was written to record the findings and results of Phase II. NALDA CAI: Recommendations for an Advanced Instructional Model, is comprised of related papers encompassing research on computer aided instruction CAI, newly developing training technologies, instructional systems development, and an Advanced Instructional Model. These topics were selected because of their relevancy to the CAI needs of NALDA. These papers provide general background information on various aspects of CAI and give a broad overview of new technologies and their impact on the future design and development of training programs. The paper within have been index separately elsewhere.

Handler, B.H. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (USA)); France, P.A.; Frey, S.C.; Gaubas, N.F.; Hyland, K.J.; Lindsey, A.M.; Manley, D.O. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (USA)); Hunnum, W.H. (North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (USA)); Smith, D.L. (Memphis State Univ., TN (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Renewable Energy Optimization Report for Naval Station Newport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2008, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage the development of renewable energy (RE) on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. As part of this effort, EPA is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate RE options at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Newport in Newport, Rhode Island. NREL's Renewable Energy Optimization (REO) tool was utilized to identify RE technologies that present the best opportunity for life-cycle cost-effective implementation while also serving to reduce energy-related carbon dioxide emissions and increase the percentage of RE used at NAVSTA Newport. The technologies included in REO are daylighting, wind, solar ventilation preheating (SVP), solar water heating, photovoltaics (PV), solar thermal (heating and electric), and biomass (gasification and cogeneration). The optimal mix of RE technologies depends on several factors including RE resources; technology cost and performance; state, utility, and federal incentives; and economic parameters (discount and inflation rates). Each of these factors was considered in this analysis. Technologies not included in REO that were investigated separately per NAVSTA Newport request include biofuels from algae, tidal power, and ground source heat pumps (GSHP).

Robichaud, R.; Mosey, G.; Olis, D.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport utilities metering, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed this report for the US Navy`s Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport, Rhode Island (NUWC). The purpose of the report was to review options for metering electricity and steam used in the NUWC compound, and to make recommendations to NUWC for implementation under a follow-on project. An additional NUWC concern is a proposed rate change by the servicing utility, Newport Electric, which would make a significant shift from consumption to demand billing, and what effect that rate change would have on the NUWC utility budget. Automated, remote reading meters are available which would allow NUWC to monitor its actual utility consumption and demand for both the entire NUWC compound and by end-use in individual buildings. Technology is available to perform the meter reads and manipulate the data using a personal computer with minimal staff requirement. This is not meant to mislead the reader into assuming that there is no requirement for routine preventive maintenance. All equipment requires routine maintenance to maintain its accuracy. While PNL reviewed the data collected during the site visit, however, it became obvious that significant opportunities exist for reducing the utility costs other than accounting for actual consumption and demand. Unit costs for both steam and electricity are unnecessarily high, and options are presented in this report for reducing them. Additionally, NUWC has an opportunity to undertake a comprehensive energy resource management program to significantly reduce its energy demand, consumption, and costs.

Carroll, D.M.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport utilities metering, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed this report for the US Navy's Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport, Rhode Island (NUWC). The purpose of the report was to review options for metering electricity and steam used in the NUWC compound, and to make recommendations to NUWC for implementation under a follow-on project. An additional NUWC concern is a proposed rate change by the servicing utility, Newport Electric, which would make a significant shift from consumption to demand billing, and what effect that rate change would have on the NUWC utility budget. Automated, remote reading meters are available which would allow NUWC to monitor its actual utility consumption and demand for both the entire NUWC compound and by end-use in individual buildings. Technology is available to perform the meter reads and manipulate the data using a personal computer with minimal staff requirement. This is not meant to mislead the reader into assuming that there is no requirement for routine preventive maintenance. All equipment requires routine maintenance to maintain its accuracy. While PNL reviewed the data collected during the site visit, however, it became obvious that significant opportunities exist for reducing the utility costs other than accounting for actual consumption and demand. Unit costs for both steam and electricity are unnecessarily high, and options are presented in this report for reducing them. Additionally, NUWC has an opportunity to undertake a comprehensive energy resource management program to significantly reduce its energy demand, consumption, and costs.

Carroll, D.M.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

An Airbreathing Launch Vehicle Design with Turbine-Based Low-Speed Propulsion and Dual Mode Scramjet High-Speed Propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airbreathing launch vehicles continue to be a subject of great interest in the space access community. In particular, horizontal takeoff and horizontal landing vehicles are attractive with their airplane-like benefits and flexibility for future space launch requirements. The most promising of these concepts involve airframe integrated propulsion systems, in which the external undersurface of the vehicle forms part of the propulsion flowpath. Combining of airframe and engine functions in this manner involves all of the design disciplines interacting at once. Design and optimization of these configurations is a most difficult activity, requiring a multi-discipline process to analytically resolve the numerous interactions among the design variables. This paper describes the design and optimization of one configuration in this vehicle class, a lifting body with turbine-based low-speed propulsion. The integration of propulsion and airframe, both from an aero-propulsive and mechanical perspe...

Moses Bouchard Vause; L. W. Taylor Lll; P. L. Moses; P. L. Moses; K. A. Bouchard; K. A. Bouchard; R. F. Vause; R. F. Vause; S. Z. Pinckney; S. Z. Pinckney; L. W. Taylor Iii; S. M. Ferlemann; S. M. Ferlemann; C. P. Leonard; C. P. Leonard; J. S. Robinson; J. S. Robinson; J. G. Martin; J. G. Martin; D. H. Petley; D. H. Petley; J. L. Hunt; J. L. Hunt

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Enabling Green Energy and Propulsion Systems via Direct Noise Computation |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-fidelity simulation of exhaust nozzle under installed configuration High-fidelity simulation of exhaust nozzle under installed configuration Umesh Paliath, GE Global Research; Joe Insley, Argonne National Laboratory Enabling Green Energy and Propulsion Systems via Direct Noise Computation PI Name: Umesh Paliath PI Email: paliath@ge.com Institution: GE Global Research Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 105 Million Year: 2013 Research Domain: Engineering GE Global Research is using the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) to deliver significant improvements in efficiency, (renewable's) yield and lower emissions (noise) for advanced energy and propulsion systems. Understanding the fundamental physics of turbulent mixing has the potential to transform product design for components such as airfoils and

263

MHK Technologies/Wave Energy Propulsion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

< MHK Technologies < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Wave Energy Propulsion.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Kneider Innovations Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Description The device concept is a converter of the vertical potential energy moving wave to push the boat on horizontal kinetic motion Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions The device is compliant for boat navigating on sea and oceans or lakes when water levels are changing cyclicly waves Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 18:32.0 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Wave_Energy_Propulsion&oldid=681483"

264

China's Nuclear Power Program: Options for the US  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The issue of American nuclear cooperation with the People's Republic of China is examined with regards to political relations, commercial benefits to the United States, and nonproliferation. China's interest in nuclear power is examined, and its nuclear program is briefly reviewed from the 1950's to present. China's international nuclear relations with other countries are discussed, and implications for the United States examined, particularly with regards to China's intentions toward nuclear proliferation, danger of diversion of material for nuclear weapons, use of pressurized water reactor technology for Chinese naval reactors, and the terms of the nuclear cooperation agreement. (LEW)

Suttmeier, R.P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

REPORT NT-12-1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

REPORT NT-12-1 REPORT NT-12-1 MAY 2012 ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM U.S. NAVAL NUCLEAR-POWERED SHIPS AND THEIR SUPPORT FACILITIES NAVAL NUCLEAR PROPULSION PROGRAM DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20350 T h is p u b licatio n w a s p rin te d o n R e cycled P ap er ABSTRACT This report assesses the environmental effect of disposal of radioactive wastes originating from U.S. naval nuclear propulsion plants and their support facilities. The total long-lived gamma radioactivity in liquids discharged to all ports and harbors from all naval nuclear-powered ships and supporting tenders, naval bases, and shipyards was less than 0.002 curie in 2011. To put this small quantity of radioactivity into perspective, it is less than the quantity of naturally occurring radioactivity in the volume

266

IEC Thrusters for Space Probe Applications and Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Earlier conceptual design studies (Bussard, 1990; Miley et al., 1998; Burton et al., 2003) have described Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion propulsion to provide a high-power density fusion propulsion system capable of aggressive deep space missions. However, this requires large multi-GW thrusters and a long term development program. As a first step towards this goal, a progression of near-term IEC thrusters, stating with a 1-10 kWe electrically-driven IEC jet thruster for satellites are considered here. The initial electrically-powered unit uses a novel multi-jet plasma thruster based on spherical IEC technology with electrical input power from a solar panel. In this spherical configuration, Xe ions are generated and accelerated towards the center of double concentric spherical grids. An electrostatic potential well structure is created in the central region, providing ion trapping. Several enlarged grid opening extract intense quasi-neutral plasma jets. A variable specific impulse in the range of 1000-4000 seconds is achieved by adjusting the grid potential. This design provides high maneuverability for satellite and small space probe operations. The multiple jets, combined with gimbaled auxiliary equipment, provide precision changes in thrust direction. The IEC electrical efficiency can match or exceed efficiencies of conventional Hall Current Thrusters (HCTs) while offering advantages such as reduced grid erosion (long life time), reduced propellant leakage losses (reduced fuel storage), and a very high power-to-weight ratio. The unit is ideally suited for probing missions. The primary propulsive jet enables delicate maneuvering close to an object. Then simply opening a second jet offset 180 degrees from the propulsion one provides a 'plasma analytic probe' for interrogation of the object.

Miley, George H.; Momota, Hiromu; Wu Linchun; Reilly, Michael P. [Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Teofilo, Vince L. [Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co., Advanced Technology Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Burton, Rodney [Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Dell, Richard; Dell, Dick [Advanced Aerospace Resource Center (AARC), Raleigh, NC (United States); Hargus, William A. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards AFB, CA 217-333-3772 (United States)

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

267

REFRIGERANT-BASED PROPULSION SYSTEM FOR SMALL SPACECRAFT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MR SAT spacecraft under development at UMR requires a propulsion system that can be utilized to perform orbital maneuvers and three-axis attitude control to complete its mission objective of conducting spacecraft formation flight. This thesis documents the research, analysis design and development of the cold gas propulsion system that was integrated in the MR SAT spacecraft. The basis of design and safety requirements stemmed from the AFRL University Nanosat Program competition, in which the UMR SAT project placed third out of eleven schools from across the nation. The MR SAT propulsion system was a primary feature as it implements a refrigerant (R-134a) propellant that has never been flown in space. As detailed in this thesis, through engineering modeling and laboratory testing R-134a is demonstrated to be a feasible propellant for small spacecraft. As the R-134a is stored as a saturated liquid in the tank, it was necessary to analyze the thermodynamic properties of the refrigerant and investigate phase changes for its use as a propellant. Also documented is the hardware selected and the integration into the MR SAT spacecraft, along with the laboratory testing

Carl Reiner Seubert; Dr. Kelly; O. Homan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Performance testing of the AC propulsion ELX electric vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance testing of the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle is described. Test data are presented and analyzed. The ELX vehicle is the first of a series of electric vehicles of interest to the California Air Resources Board. The test series is being conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the US Department of energy and the California Air Resources Board. The tests which were conducted showed that the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle has exceptional acceleration and range performance. when the vehicle`s battery was fully charged, the vehicle can accelerate from 0 to 96 km/h in about 10 seconds. Energy consumption and range tests using consecutive FUDS and HWFET Driving cycles (the all-electric cycle) indicate that the energy economy of the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle with regenerative braking is 97 W{center_dot}h/km, with a range of 153 km (95 miles). Computer simulations performed using the SIMPLEV Program indicate that the vehicle would have a range of 327 km (203 miles) on the all-electric cycle if the lead acid batteries were replaced with NiMH batteries having an energy density of 67 W{center_dot}h/kg. Comparisons of FUDS test data with and without regenerative braking indicated that regenerative braking reduced the energy consumption of the ELX vehicle by approximately 25%.

Kramer, W.E.; MacDowall, R.D.; Burke, A.F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Full fuel-cycle comparison of forklift propulsion systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen has received considerable attention as an alternative to fossil fuels. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) investigates the technical and economic feasibility of promising new technologies, such as hydrogen fuel cells. A recent report for DOE identified three near-term markets for fuel cells: (1) Emergency power for state and local emergency response agencies, (2) Forklifts in warehousing and distribution centers, and (3) Airport ground support equipment markets. This report examines forklift propulsion systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental implications of substituting fuel-cell propulsion for existing technologies based on batteries and fossil fuels. Industry data and the Argonne Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model are used to estimate full fuel-cycle emissions and use of primary energy sources, back to the primary feedstocks for fuel production. Also considered are other environmental concerns at work locations. The benefits derived from using fuel-cell propulsion are determined by the sources of electricity and hydrogen. In particular, fuel-cell forklifts using hydrogen made from the reforming of natural gas had lower impacts than those using hydrogen from electrolysis.

Gaines, L. L.; Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

270

Carl Vinson and pre-war naval legislation 1932-1940  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the end of World War I, the United States Navy was in the midst of a building program designed to make it a "Navy Second to None." However, the post-war desire to avoid involvement in another international conflict led the United States to retreat from the aggressive naval policy of President Woodrow Wilson. America initiated and supported conferences which led to the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922 and the London Naval Treaty of 1930, both of which limited the maximum strength of the world's naval powers. In addition, throughout the 1920's and early 1930's the United States failed to build up to the levels allowed by the treaties, causing the Navy to slowly age toward obsolescence. This situation changed in the period from 1933 to 1940 as Congressman Carl Vinson of Georgia, chairman of the House Naval Affairs Committee, drafted and saw to the passage of legislation designed to once again provide the United States with a powerful navy as part of a strong national defense. Vinson obtained passage of naval construction legislation in 1934, 1937, 1938, and 1940, and supported the annual and supplemental appropriation acts which funded the newly authorized construction. In doing so, Vinson overcame opposition from pacifists and isolationists in Congress who feared America would be drawn into another European war. Vinson also had to persuade fiscal conservatives opposed to increasing the budget deficit that funding naval construction was in the nation's best interests. Additionally, Vinson obtained the often reluctant support of President Franklin Roosevelt to insure final approval of his legislation. This study examines Vinson's efforts to provide the Navy the ships with which it eventually fought World War II. it looks at committee hearings, House and Senate debates, and behind the scenes conferences between Vinson and officials of the Navy Department and Roosevelt Administration which helped decide the course of naval expansion. It shows that while many people contributed passing naval construction legislation, Carl Vinson was the driving force behind the expansion of the Navy. Without Vinson's pre-war legislation, the Navy could not have been prepared to effectively fight the Second World War.

Svonavec, Stephen Charles

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A propulsion and stabilization system are described comprising a series of coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance, and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension. 8 figures.

Rote, D.M.; He, J.; Johnson, L.R.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

272

Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report discusses a propulsion and stabilization system comprising a series of figure 8 coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the figure 8 coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension.

Rote, D.M.; He, Jianliang; Johnson, L.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Nuclear Propelled Vessels and Neutrino Oscillation Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effect of naval nuclear reactors on the study of neutrino oscillations. We find that the presence of naval reactors at unknown locations and times may limit the accuracy of future very long baseline reactor-based neutrino oscillation experiments. At the same time we argue that a nuclear powered surface ship such as a large Russian ice-breaker may provide an ideal source for precision experiments. While the relatively low reactor power would in this case require a larger detector, the source could be conveniently located at essentially any distance from a detector built at an underground location near a shore in a region of the world far away from other nuclear installations. The variable baseline would allow for a precise measurement of backgrounds and greatly reduced systematics from reactor flux and detector efficiency. In addition, once the oscillation measurement is completed, the detector could perform geological neutrino and astrophysical measurements with minimal reactor background.

J. Detwiler; G. Gratta; N. Tolich; Y. Uchida

2002-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

274

Analysis of Advanced Actinide-Fueled Energy Systems for Deep Space Propulsion Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The present study is focused on evaluating higher actinides beyond uranium that are capable of supporting power and propulsion requirements in robotic deep space and… (more)

Guy, Troy Lamar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A Computational Magnetohydrodynamic Model of a Gasdynamic Fusion Space Propulsion System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work advances the gasdynamic mirror (GDM) fusion space propulsion system concept by testing the potential of an advanced aneutronic fusion fuel combination of proton?11boron… (more)

Ohlandt, Chad J. R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

The design and feasibility of a 10 mN chemical space propulsion thruster.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis discusses the design of a ten milli Newton chemical propulsion system for providing approximately 200 m/s delta velocity to a five kg satellite.… (more)

Bruccoleri, Alexander Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

DOE Scientist Earns Chairman's Award from Propulsion and Power Systems Alliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A researcher at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory has been presented with the Chairman's Award by the Propulsion and Power Systems Alliance.

278

September 10, 2003, Board Public Meeting - Naval Reactors Approach to Oversight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 25 22 As I previously mentioned this morning, we will receive testimony from experienced representatives from other organizations. First, I would like to welcome representatives from the U.S. Naval Sea Systems Command, Mr. Thomas Beckett and Mr. Storm Kauffman. If you would be kind enough to give your names and titles so the stenographer can identify you for the record. MR. BECKETT: Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Thomas H. Beckett. I ' m the Deputy Director for Naval Reactors, a joint Department of the Navy/Department of Energy Program. MR. KAUFFMAN: Storm Kauffman. I ' m the Director of Reactor Safety and Analysis for the Naval Reactors Program CHAIRMAN CONWAY: Mr. Beckett. MR. BECKETT: Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and let me thank you and the other Board Members f

279

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Ordnance Test Station - CA 06  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ordnance Test Station - CA 06 Ordnance Test Station - CA 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL ORDNANCE TEST STATION (CA.06) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: China Lake Naval Weapons Center Salt Wells Pilot Plant CA.06-1 Location: Inyokern , California CA.06-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CA.06-1 Site Operations: Naval facility; experimental development work on shape charges and quality castings on a pilot plant scale. CA.06-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive materials were handled at the site CA.06-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated CA.06-1 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None CA.06-1 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see

280

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:23:58 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selection Procedures 20 Naval Officers 20 Other U.S. Military Officers 20 International Students 20 Civilian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Naval Radiological Defense...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

San Francisco , California CA.0-06-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CA.0-06-1 Site Operations: NRC licensed DoD facility which used small quantities of nuclear materials for R&D purposes...

282

Resource constrained scheduling problem at U.S. Naval Shipyards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Submarine repair schedules are some of the most complex schedules seen in project management. Repairs of a nuclear U.S. submarine are resource constrained since resources are divided among approximately thirty shops (e.g. ...

Nawara, Terrence M. (Terrence Michael)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:29:51 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- graduate School a naval university, un- ified in policy, procedure and purpose. In addition to its Naval PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS U.S. Navy officers interested in admis- sion to one of the curricula offered in the submission. Requests for admission or questions regarding admission procedures should be directed to the Dean

284

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:28:55 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, procedures and objectives. In 1973, the Naval Postgraduate School, together with the Naval War College. ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS U.S. Navy officers interested in ad- mission to one- ity of quotas assigned to each country. The procedures for application are con- tained in OPNAV

285

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:29:10 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, procedures and objectives. In 1973, the Naval Postgraduate School, together with the Naval War College or local bookstores, or from other students. ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS U.S. Navy officers. Their admission is subject to availabil- ity of quotas assigned to each country. The procedures for application

286

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:28:34 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, procedures and objectives. In 1973, the Naval Postgraduate School, together with the Naval War College Navy West Coast Match racing cham- pionships. ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS U.S. Navy, and procedural guidance for the Navy's graduate education program. Included is material concerning officer

287

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:29:21 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, procedures and objectives. In 1973, the Naval Postgraduate School, together with the Naval War College MILITARY OFFICERS ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS U.S. Navy officers interested in ad- Military- ity of quotas assigned to each country. The procedures for application are con- 8 #12;GENERAL

288

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:28:45 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, procedures and objectives. In 1973, the Naval Postgraduate School, together with the Naval War College- change system and stocks all required supplies. ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS ACADEMIC of quotas assigned to each country. The procedures for application are con- 10 #12;GENERAL INFORMATION

289

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:29:42 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Naval Postgraduate School, in effect, a naval university, unified in policies, procedures and objec bookstores, or from other students. ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS U. S. Navy officers interested. The procedures for application are contained in OPNAV INSTRUCTION 4950. IE. Corre- spondence must be processed

290

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:28:23 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, procedures and objectives. In 1973, the Naval Postgraduate School, together with the Naval War College Navy West Coast Match racing cham- pionships. ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS U.S. Navy, policy, and procedural guidance for the Navy's graduate education program. Included is material

291

Analysis of operating alternatives for the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Cogeneration Facility at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California  

SciTech Connect

The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwestern Division commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to determine the most cost-effective approach to the operation of the cogeneration facility in the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) at the Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI). Nineteen alternative scenarios were analyzed by PNL on a life-cycle cost basis to determine whether to continue operating the cogeneration facility or convert the plant to emergency-generator status. This report provides the results of the analysis performed by PNL for the 19 alternative scenarios. A narrative description of each scenario is provided, including information on the prime mover, electrical generating efficiency, thermal recovery efficiency, operational labor, and backup energy strategy. Descriptions of the energy and energy cost analysis, operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, emissions and related costs, and implementation costs are also provided for each alternative. A summary table presents the operational cost of each scenario and presents the result of the life-cycle cost analysis.

Parker, S.A.; Carroll, D.M.; McMordie, K.L.; Brown, D.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Shankle, S.A.; Stucky, D.J.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Implementation plan for operating alternatives for the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station cogeneration facility at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to facilitate energy efficiency improvements at federal facilities. This is accomplished by a balanced program of technology development, facility assessment, and use of cost-sharing procurement mechanisms. Technology development focuses upon the tools, software, and procedures used to identify and evaluate energy efficiency technologies and improvements. For facility assessment, FEMP provides metering equipment and trained analysts to federal agencies exhibiting a commitment to improve energy use efficiency. To assist in procurement of energy efficiency measures, FEMP helps federal agencies devise and implement performance contracting and utility demand-side management strategies. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) supports the FEMP mission of energy systems modernization. Under this charter, the Laboratory and its contractors work with federal facility energy managers to assess and implement energy efficiency improvements at federal facilities nationwide. The SouthWestern Division of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command, in cooperation with FEMP, has tasked PNL with developing a plan for implementing recommended modifications to the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) cogeneration plant at the Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI) in San Diego. That plan is detailed in this report.

Carroll, D.M.; Parker, S.A.; Stucky, D.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management for Advanced Vehicle Propulsion Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A critical element to the success of new propulsion technologies that enable reductions in fuel use is the integration of component thermal management technologies within a viable vehicle package. Vehicle operation requires vehicle thermal management systems capable of balancing the needs of multiple vehicle systems that may require heat for operation, require cooling to reject heat, or require operation within specified temperature ranges. As vehicle propulsion transitions away from a single form of vehicle propulsion based solely on conventional internal combustion engines (ICEs) toward a wider array of choices including more electrically dominant systems such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), new challenges arise associated with vehicle thermal management. As the number of components that require active thermal management increase, so do the costs in terms of dollars, weight, and size. Integrated vehicle thermal management is one pathway to address the cost, weight, and size challenges. The integration of the power electronics and electric machine (PEEM) thermal management with other existing vehicle systems is one path for reducing the cost of electric drive systems. This work demonstrates techniques for evaluating and quantifying the integrated transient and continuous heat loads of combined systems incorporating electric drive systems that operate primarily under transient duty cycles, but the approach can be extended to include additional steady-state duty cycles typical for designing vehicle thermal management systems of conventional vehicles. The work compares opportunities to create an integrated low temperature coolant loop combining the power electronics and electric machine with the air conditioning system in contrast to a high temperature system integrated with the ICE cooling system.

Bennion, K.; Thornton, M.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

ADVANCED RADIOISOTOPE HEAT SOURCE AND PROPULSION SYSTEMS FOR PLANETARY EXPLORATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exploration of planetary surfaces and atmospheres may be enhanced by increasing the range and mobility of a science platform. Fundamentally, power production and availability of resources are limiting factors that must be considered for all science and exploration missions. A novel power and propulsion system is considered and discussed with reference to a long-range Mars surface exploration mission with in-situ resource utilization. Significance to applications such as sample return missions is also considered. Key material selections for radioisotope encapsulation techniques are presented.

R. C. O'Brien; S. D. Howe; J. E. Werner

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Hydrogen peroxide-based propulsion and power systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Less toxic, storable, hypergolic propellants are desired to replace nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) and hydrazine in certain applications. Hydrogen peroxide is a very attractive replacement oxidizer, but finding acceptable replacement fuels is more challenging. The focus of this investigation is to find fuels that have short hypergolic ignition delays, high specific impulse, and desirable storage properties. The resulting hypergolic fuel/oxidizer combination would be highly desirable for virtually any high energy-density applications such as small but powerful gas generating systems, attitude control motors, or main propulsion. These systems would be implemented on platforms ranging from guided bombs to replacement of environmentally unfriendly existing systems to manned space vehicles.

Melof, Brian Matthew; Keese, David L.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Ruffner, Judith Alison; Escapule, William Rusty

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Naval Research Laboratory Multiscale Targeting Guidance for T-PARC and TCS-08  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of The Observing System Research and Predictability Experiment (THORPEX) Pacific Asian Regional Campaign (T-PARC) and the Office of Naval Research’s (ONR’s) Tropical Cyclone Structure-08 (TCS-08) experiments, a variety of real-time ...

Carolyn A. Reynolds; James D. Doyle; Richard M. Hodur; Hao Jin

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Our Mission | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Mission | National Nuclear Security Administration Mission | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Home > Our Mission Our Mission NNSA is responsible for the management and security of the nation's nuclear weapons, nuclear nonproliferation, and naval reactor programs. It also responds to nuclear and radiological emergencies in the United States

298

Mitigation action plan sale of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills) Kern County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1, also called {open_quotes}Elk Hills{close_quotes}), a Federally-owned oil and gas production field in Kern County, California, was created by an Executive Order issued by President Taft on September 2, 1912. He signed another Executive Order on December 13, 1912, to establish Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2), located immediately south of NPR-1 and containing portions of the town of Taft, California. NPR-1 was not developed until the 1973-74 oil embargo demonstrated the nation`s vulnerability to oil supply interruptions. Following the embargo, Congress passed the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 which directed that the reserve be explored and developed to its fall economic potential at the {open_quotes}maximum efficient rate{close_quotes} (MER) of production. Since Elk Hills began full production in 1976, it has functioned as a commercial operation, with total revenues to the Federal government through FY 1996 of $16.4 billion, compared to total exploration, development and production costs of $3.1 billion. In February 1996, Title 34 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1996 (P.L. 104-106), referred to as the Elk Hills Sales Statute, directed the Secretary of Energy to sell NPR-1 by February 10, 1998.The Secretary was also directed to study options for enhancing the value of the other Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserve properties such as NPR-2, located adjacent to NPR-1 in Kern County- Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) located in Natrona County, Wyoming; Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and No. 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) located in Garfield County, Colorado; and Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) located in Uintah and Carbon Counties, Utah. The purpose of these actions was to remove the Federal government from the inherently non-Federal function of operating commercial oil fields while making sure that the public would obtain the maximum value from the reserves.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Controlled Antihydrogen Propulsion for NASA's Future in Very Deep Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To world-wide notice, in 2002 the ATHENA collaboration at CERN (in Geneva, Switzerland) announced the creation of order 100,000 low energy antihydrogen atoms. Thus, the concept of using condensed antihydrogen as a low-weight, powerful fuel (i.e., it produces a thousand times more energy per unit weight of fuel than fission/fusion) for very deep space missions (the Oort cloud and beyond) had reached the realm of conceivability. We briefly discuss the history of antimatter research and focus on the technologies that must be developed to allow a future use of controlled, condensed antihydrogen for propulsion purposes. We emphasize that a dedicated antiproton source (the main barrier to copious antihydrogen production) must be built in the US, perhaps as a joint NASA/DOE/NIH project. This is because the only practical sources in the world are at CERN and the proposed facility at GSI in Germany. We outline the scope and magnitude of such a dedicated national facility and identify critical project milestones. We estimate that, starting with the present level of knowledge and multi-agency support, the goal of using antihydrogen for propulsion purposes may be accomplished in ~50 years.

Michael Martin Nieto; Michael H. Holzscheiter; Slava G. Turyshev

2004-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

300

Tailoring Laser Propulsion for Future Applications in Space  

SciTech Connect

Pulsed laser propulsion may turn out as a low cost alternative for the transportation of small payloads in future. In recent years DLR investigated this technology with the goal of cheaply launching small satellites into low earth orbit (LEO) with payload masses on the order of 5 to 10 kg. Since the required high power pulsed laser sources are yet not at the horizon, DLR focused on new applications based on available laser technology. Space-borne, i.e. in weightlessness, there exist a wide range of missions requiring small thrusters that can be propelled by laser power. This covers space logistic and sample return missions as well as position keeping and attitude control of satellites.First, a report on the proof of concept of a remote controlled laser rocket with a thrust vector steering device integrated in a parabolic nozzle will be given. Second, the road from the previous ground-based flight experiments in earth's gravity using a 100-J class laser to flight experiments with a parabolic thruster in an artificial 2D-zero gravity on an air cushion table employing a 1-J class laser and, with even less energy, new investigations in the field of laser micro propulsion will be reviewed.

Eckel, Hans-Albert; Scharring, Stefan [German Aerospace Center (DLR)-Institute of Technical Physics, Pfaffenwaldring 38-40, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Radioisotope Electric Propulsion for Deep Space Sample Return  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The need to answer basic questions regarding the origin of the Solar System will motivate robotic sample return missions to destinations like Pluto, its satellite Charon, and objects in the Kuiper belt. To keep the mission duration short enough to be of interest, sample return from objects farther out in the Solar System requires increasingly higher return velocities. A sample return mission involves several complicated steps to reach an object and obtain a sample, but only the interplanetary return phase of the mission is addressed in this paper. Radioisotope electric propulsion is explored in this parametric study as a means to propel small, dedicated return vehicles for transferring kilogram-size samples from deep space to Earth. Return times for both Earth orbital rendezvous and faster, direct atmospheric re-entry trajectories are calculated for objects as far away as 100 AU. Chemical retro-rocket braking at Earth is compared to radioisotope electric propulsion but the limited deceleration capability of chemical rockets forces the return trajectories to be much slower.

Noble, Robert J.; /SLAC

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

302

Evaluation of non-intrusive monitoring for condition based maintenance applications on US Navy propulsion plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thesis explores the use of the Non-intrusive Load Monitor (NILM) in Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) applications on US Navy ships as part of the Office of Naval Research Electric Ship Integration (ESI) Initiative. ...

Greene, William C. (William Calvin)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Thorium dioxide: properties and nuclear applications  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth book on reactor materials published under sponsorship of the Naval Reactors Office of the United States Department of Energy, formerly the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This book presents a comprehensive compilation of the most significant properties of thorium dioxide, much like the book Uranium Dioxide: Properties and Nuclear Applications presented information on the fuel material used in the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor core.

Belle, J.; Berman, R.M. (eds.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Deuterium-Tritium Pulse Propulsion with Hydrogen as Propellant and the Entire Spacecraft as a Gigavolt Capacitor for Ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A deuterium-tritium (DT) nuclear pulse propulsion concept for fast interplanetary transport is proposed utilizing almost all the energy for thrust and without the need for a large radiator: 1. By letting the thermonuclear micro-explosion take place in the center of a liquid hydrogen sphere with the radius of the sphere large enough to slow down and absorb the neutrons of the DT fusion reaction, heating the hydrogen to a fully ionized plasma at a temperature of ~ 105 K. 2. By using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated gigavolt capacitor, igniting the DT micro-explosion with an intense GeV ion beam discharging the gigavolt capacitor, possible if the space craft has the topology of a torus.

Winterberg, Friedwardt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Deuterium-Tritium Pulse Propulsion with Hydrogen as Propellant and the Entire Spacecraft as a Gigavolt Capacitor for Ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A deuterium-tritium (DT) nuclear pulse propulsion concept for fast interplanetary transport is proposed utilizing almost all the energy for thrust and without the need for a large radiator: 1. By letting the thermonuclear micro-explosion take place in the center of a liquid hydrogen sphere with the radius of the sphere large enough to slow down and absorb the neutrons of the DT fusion reaction, heating the hydrogen to a fully ionized plasma at a temperature of ~ 105 K. 2. By using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated gigavolt capacitor, igniting the DT micro-explosion with an intense GeV ion beam discharging the gigavolt capacitor, possible if the space craft has the topology of a torus.

Friedwardt Winterberg

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Radioisotope electric propulsion of sciencecraft to the outer solar system and near-interstellar space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent results are presented in the study of radioisotope electric propulsion as a near-term technology for sending small robotic sciencecraft to the outer Solar System and near-interstellar space. Radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) systems are low-thrust, ion propulsion units based on radioisotope electric generators and ion thrusters. Powerplant specific masses are expected to be in the range of 100 to 200 kg/kW of thrust power. Planetary rendezvous missions to Pluto, fast missions to the heliopause (100 AU) with the capability to decelerate an orbiter for an extended science program and prestellar missions to the first gravitational lens focus of the Sun (550 AU) are investigated.

Noble, R.J.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems ANL/ESD/08-3 Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone (865) 576-8401 fax (865) 576-5728 reports@adonis.osti.gov Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express

308

Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems Energy Systems Division About Argonne National Laboratory Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The Laboratory's main facility is outside Chicago, at 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439. For information about Argonne, see www.anl.gov. Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone (865) 576-8401

309

Application of Energy Storage To Solar Electric Propulsion Orbital Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar electric propulsion uses solar panels to generate power for electric thrusters. Using stored energy makes it possible to thrust through eclipses, but requires that some of the solar power collected during the sunlit portion of the trajectory be used to recharge the storage system. Previous researchers have reported that the required energy storage mass can be prohibitive. However, the use of high-speed flywheels for energy storage can provide advantages. In this paper, we compare the effectiveness of orbit transfers using and without using energy storage. The orbit transfers are developed as sequences of time-optimal circle-to-circle planar transfers from low-Earth orbit to geostationary orbit. We develop techniques for solving the appropriate boundary value problems, and illustrate tradeoffs between solar array and flywheel-battery masses for transfers

Mark W. Marasch; Christopher D. Hall

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials: Recent Progress and Future Plans  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program provides enabling materials technology for the U.S. DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program is based on an industry assessment and the technology roadmap for the OHVT. A five-year program plan was published in 2000. Major efforts in the program are materials for diesel engine fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, and air handling. Additional efforts include diesel engine valve-train materials, structural components, and thermal management. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications. Selected technical issues and planned and ongoing projects as well as brief summaries of several technical highlights are given.

D. Ray Johnson; Sidney Diamond

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

311

Space propulsion by fusion in a magnetic dipole  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design is discussed for a fusion rocket propulsion system based on the magnetic dipole configuration. The dipole is found to have features well suited to space applications. Example parameters are presented for a system producing a specific power of 1 kW/kg, capable of interplanetary flights to Mars in 90 days and to Jupiter in a year, and of extra-solar-system flights to 1000 astronomical units (the Tau mission) in 20 years. This is about 10 times better specific power toward 10 kW/kg are discussed, as in an approach to implementing the concept through proof-testing on the moon. 21 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Teller, E.; Glass, A.J.; Fowler, T.K. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Hasegawa, A. (AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (USA)); Santarius, J.F. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Fusion Technology Inst.)

1991-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

312

Videos from the National Nuclear Safety Administration's (NNSA) YouTube Channel  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

NNSA was established by Congress in 2000 as a separately organized agency within the U.S. Department of Energy, responsible for the management and security of the nation's nuclear weapons, nuclear nonproliferation, and naval reactor programs. NNSA's program support is divided into several key program areas including Defense, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors, Emergency Operations, Infrastructure and Environment, Nuclear Security, Management and Administration and the Office of the Administrator. Each program area is focused on specific challenges. The nuclear security enterprise spans eight sites, including three national laboratories, with more than six decades of cutting-edge nuclear security experience. That history and technical expertise enables NNSA to accomplish its work across its four mission areas. (Copied from http://www.nnsa.energy.gov/aboutus). NNSA has more than 80 videos available on its YouTube channel.

313

Success Story: Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Success Story Success Story Success Story Naval Medical Center San Diego Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project Co-Generation Project Karen Jackson, SDG&E Karen Jackson, SDG&E Project Manager Project Manager Edward Thibodo, NAVFAC SW Edward Thibodo, NAVFAC SW Energy Team Contract Energy Team Contract ' ' s Lead s Lead NAVFAC Contractor NAVFAC Contractor ' ' s Guide: s Guide:   Partnering Philosophy Partnering Philosophy - - " " We W are partners e are partners in every contract we award. Partnering is in every contract we award. Partnering is an attitude that we both work hard to an attitude that we both work hard to develop, an it requires both of us to take develop, an it requires both of us to take some extra risk and trust one another. some extra risk and trust one another.

314

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Office at the University of New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office at the University of Office at the University of New Mexico - NM 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL OFFICE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO (NM.0-03) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Albuquerque , New Mexico NM.0-03-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NM.0-03-1 Site Operations: Site was a transshipment station for equipment to the Los Alamos site. NM.0-03-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD NM.0-03-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None NM.0-03-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD NM.0-03-1 Also see Documents Related to NAVAL OFFICE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO

315

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Ordnance Plant - MI 0-03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Plant - MI 0-03 Plant - MI 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL ORDNANCE PLANT (MI.0-03) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DoD for action Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Centerline , Michigan MI.0-03-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-03-1 Site Operations: Assembled bomb components. MI.0-03-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Referred to DoD MI.0-03-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DoD for action MI.0-03-1 Also see Documents Related to NAVAL ORDNANCE PLANT MI.0-03-1 - DOE Letter; J.Fiore to C.Shafer; Subject: Information on

316

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Proving Ground - VA 0-01  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proving Ground - VA 0-01 Proving Ground - VA 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL PROVING GROUND (VA.0-01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Dahlgren , Virginia VA.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 VA.0-01-1 Site Operations: Site operations were not specified; this site was identified on the 1954 Accountable Station Lists. VA.0-01-1 VA.0-01-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD VA.0-01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD VA.0-01-1 Also see Documents Related to NAVAL PROVING GROUND VA.0-01-1 - DOE Letter; Fiore to Schafer; Referral of DOD or Former

317

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Ordnance Laboratory - MD 0-03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ordnance Laboratory - MD 0-03 Ordnance Laboratory - MD 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL ORDNANCE LABORATORY (MD.0-03 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Naval Ordnance Laboratory - White Oak Location: White Oak Area , Silver Spring , Maryland MD.0-03-1 MD.0-03-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 MD.0-03-2 Site Operations: Research and development - may have involved radioactive materials because the site was identified on a 1955 Accountability Station List. MD.0-03-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - NRC licensed MD.0-03-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Specifically Identified Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None specifically indicated Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD MD.0-03-2

318

Investigation on the continued production of the Naval Petroleum Reserves beyond April 5, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The authority to produce the Naval Petroleum Reserves (NPRs) is due to expire in April 1991, unless extended by Presidential finding. As provided in the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production act of 1976 (Public Law 94-258), the President may continue production of the NPRs for a period of up to three years following the submission to Congress, at least 180 days prior to the expiration of the current production period, of a report that determines that continued production of the NPRs is necessary and a finding by the President that continued production is in the national interest. This report assesses the need to continue production of the NPRs, including analyzing the benefits and costs of extending production or returning to the shut-in status that existed prior to 1976. This continued production study considers strategic, economic, and energy issues at the local, regional, and national levels. 15 figs., 13 tabs.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 1991 the Reserves generating $654 million in revenues, a $52 million increase from the Fy 1990 revenues, reflecting the increase in FY 1991 oil prices during the Gulf War. Total costs were $200 million, resulting in net cash flow of $454 million, compared with $423 million in FY 1990. Revenues for FY 1992 are expected to decrease, reflecting a decrease in production and prices. In FY 1991, production at the NPRs at maximum efficient rates yielded 28 million barrels of crude oil, 125 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 183 million gallons of natural gas liquids. Additional highlights on the following topics are included: legislative change, Naval Petroleum Reserve-1 (NPR-1) exploration, NPR-1 horizontal drilling, NPR-1 shallow oil zone gas injection project, NPR-1 FY 1991-1997 long range plan, NPR-1 environment and safety, NPR-2 exploration drilling, NPR-3 steamflood, Naval Oil Shale Reserves gas migration prevention.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 1991 the Reserves generating $654 million in revenues, a $52 million increase from the Fy 1990 revenues, reflecting the increase in FY 1991 oil prices during the Gulf War. Total costs were $200 million, resulting in net cash flow of $454 million, compared with $423 million in FY 1990. Revenues for FY 1992 are expected to decrease, reflecting a decrease in production and prices. In FY 1991, production at the NPRs at maximum efficient rates yielded 28 million barrels of crude oil, 125 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 183 million gallons of natural gas liquids. Additional highlights on the following topics are included: legislative change, Naval Petroleum Reserve-1 (NPR-1) exploration, NPR-1 horizontal drilling, NPR-1 shallow oil zone gas injection project, NPR-1 FY 1991-1997 long range plan, NPR-1 environment and safety, NPR-2 exploration drilling, NPR-3 steamflood, Naval Oil Shale Reserves gas migration prevention.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

U.S. Department of Energy Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves combined financial statements, September 30, 1996 and 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves (NPOSR) produces crude oil and associated hydrocarbons from the Naval Petroleum Reserves (NPR) numbered 1, 2, and 3, and the Naval Oil Shale Reserves (NOSR) numbered 1, 2, and 3 in a manner to achieve the greatest value and benefits to the US taxpayer. NPOSR consists of the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC or Elk Hills), which is responsible for operations of NPR-1 and NPR-2; the Naval Petroleum Oil Shale Reserve in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW), which is responsible for operations of NPR-3, NOSR-1, 2, and 3 and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC); and NPOSR Headquarters in Washington, DC, which is responsible for overall program direction. Each participant shares in the unit costs and production of hydrocarbons in proportion to the weighted acre-feet of commercially productive oil and gas formations (zones) underlying the respective surface lands as of 1942. The participating shares of NPR-1 as of September 30, 1996 for the US Government and Chevron USA, Inc., are listed. This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Department of Energy`s (Department) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves (NPOSR) financial statements as of September 30, 1996.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

NERVA?Derived Concept for a Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Thermal Rocket is an enabling technology for human exploration missions. The “bimodal” NTR (BNTR) provides a novel approach to meeting both propulsion and power requirements of future manned and robotic missions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate tie?tube cooling configurations

Steven P. Fusselman; Stanley K. Borowski; Patrick E. Frye; Stanley V. Gunn; Calvin Q. Morrison

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Electric vehicle battery R D in the context of a propulsion system  

SciTech Connect

A battery system for an electric vehicle should be designed and developed in concert with the other components of the propulsion system. Technology development efforts sponsored by the US Department of Energy are addressing all the constituent electric vehicle component technologies, including the battery subsystem technologies, from the perspective of the complete propulsion system. This approach is considered to be essential for three reasons. First, the ultimate viability of a given battery technology can only be assured in the context of a complete propulsion system. Second, many required battery subsystem technology advancements can only be addressed in concert with the other propulsion system components. Third, development and testing of battery subsystem technologies in conjunction with powertrain subsystem technology development is necessary in order to provide essential information to the battery developer and to the vehicle developer that can not be obtained when battery development is performed as a discrete activity. 7 refs., 6 figs.

Patil, P.G. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Transportation Systems); Christianson, C.C.; Miller, J.F. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Research on simulation of ship electric propulsion system with flywheel energy storage system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flywheel energy storage has been widely used to improve the ground electric power quality. This paper designed a flywheel energy storage device to improve ship electric propulsion system power grid quality. The practical mathematical models of flywheel ...

Chunling Xie; Conghui Zhang; Jen-Yuan James Chang

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

An object-oriented framework for distributed computational simulation of aerospace propulsion systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing and developing new aerospace propulsion systems is time-consuming and expensive. Computational simulation is a promising means for alleviating this cost, but requires a flexible software simulation system capable of integrating advanced multidisciplinary ...

John A. Reed; Abdollah A. Afjeh

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

An impulse framework for hydrodynamic force analysis : fish propulsion, water entry of spheres, and marine propellers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents an impulse framework for analyzing the hydrodynamic forces on bodies in flow. This general theoretical framework is widely applicable, and it is used to address the hydrodynamics of fish propulsion, ...

Epps, Brenden P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The design and feasibility of a 10 mN chemical space propulsion thruster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis discusses the design of a ten milli Newton chemical propulsion system for providing approximately 200 m/s delta velocity to a five kg satellite. The nozzle is the focus of the experimental work, which involves ...

Bruccoleri, Alexander Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

A fully microfabricated two-dimensional electrospray array with applications to space propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the design, fabrication and testing of a fully-integrated planar electrospray thruster array, which could lead to more efficient and precise thrusters for space propulsion applications. The same ...

Gassend, Blaise L. P. (Blaise Laurent Patrick), 1978-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Design and testing of a biomimetic tuna using shape memory alloy induced propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current unmanned undersea vehicles (UUVs) are almost exclusively propeller driven designs, which must inherently be optimized for a particular speed, sacrificing low speed manoeuvrability for cruising efficiency. Recently, biomimetic approaches to underwater ... Keywords: Shape memory alloys, Shape propulsion, Smart structures

Afzal Suleman; Curran Crawford

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Heavy vehicle hybrid propulsion systems R and D program plan, FY 2000-2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the program plan and background information for the Heavy Vehicle Hybrid Propulsion R and D Program sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. The program is a collaboration between industry and government established for the development of advanced hybrid-electric propulsion technology for urban cycle trucks and buses. It targets specific applications to enhance potential market success. Potential end-users are also involved.

None

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Thermal-hydraulics Analysis of a Radioisotope-powered Mars Hopper Propulsion System  

SciTech Connect

Thermal-hydraulics analyses results produced using a combined suite of computational design and analysis codes are presented for the preliminary design of a concept Radioisotope Thermal Rocket (RTR) propulsion system. Modeling of the transient heating and steady state temperatures of the system is presented. Simulation results for propellant blow down during impulsive operation are also presented. The results from this study validate the feasibility of a practical thermally capacitive RTR propulsion system.

Robert C. O'Brien; Andrew C. Klein; William T. Taitano; Justice Gibson; Brian Myers; Steven D. Howe

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Workforce Statistics - NA-30 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NA-30 | National Nuclear Security Administration NA-30 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Workforce Statistics - NA-30 Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA-30 Workforce Statistics - NA-30 Workforce Statistics - Naval Reactors

333

Propulsion Utilizing Laser-Driven Ponderomotive Fields for Deep-Space Missions  

SciTech Connect

The generation of large amplitude electric fields in plasmas by high-power lasers has been studied for several years in the context of high-energy particle acceleration. Fields on the order of GeV/m are generated in the plasma wake of the laser by non-linear ponderomotive forces. The laser fields generate longitudinal and translational electron plasma waves with phase velocities close to the speed of light. These fields and velocities offer the potential to revolutionize spacecraft propulsion, leading to extended deep space robotic probes. Based on these initial calculations, plasma acceleration by means of laser-induced ponderomotive forces appears to offer significant potential for spacecraft propulsion. Relatively high-efficiencies appear possible with proper beam conditioning, resulting in an order of magnitude more thrust than alternative concepts for high I{sub SP} (>10{sup 5} s) and elimination of the primary life-limiting erosion phenomena associated with conventional electric propulsion systems. Ponderomotive propulsion readily lends itself to beamed power which might overcome some of the constraints of power-limited propulsion concepts. A preliminary assessment of the impact of these propulsion systems for several promising configurations on mission architectures has been conducted. Emphasizing interstellar and interstellar-precursor applications, performance and technical requirements are identified for a number of missions. The use of in-situ plasma and gas for propellant is evaluated as well.

Williams, George J.; Gilland, James H. [Ohio Aerospace Institute, NASA GRCMS 16-1 Cleveland, OH 44135 216-433-9622 (United States)

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

334

Radioisotope electric propulsion for robotic science missions to near-interstellar space  

SciTech Connect

The use of radioisotope electric propulsion for sending small robotic probes on fast science missions several hundred astronomical units (AU) from the Sun is investigated. Such missions would address a large variety of solar, interstellar, galactic and cosmological science themes from unique vantage points at 100 to 600 AU, including parallax distance measurements for the entire Milky Way Galaxy, sampling of the interstellar medium and imaging of cosmological objects at the gravitational lens foci of the Sun ({ge} 550 AU). Radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) systems are low-thrust, ion propulsion units based on multi-hundred watt, radioisotope electric generators and ion thrusters. In a previous work, the flight times for rendezvous missions to the outer planets (< 30 AU) using REP were found to be less than fifteen years. However fast prestellar missions to several hundred AU are not possible unless the probe`s energy can be substantially increased in the inner Solar System so as to boost the final hyperbolic excess velocity. In this paper an economical hybrid propulsion scheme combining chemical propulsion and gravity assist in the inner Solar System and radioisotope electric propulsion in the outer Solar System is studied which enables fast prestellar missions. Total hyperbolic excess velocities of 15 AU/year and flight times to 550 AU of about 40 years are possible using REP technology that may be available in the next decade.

Noble, R.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Double row loop-coil configuration for high-speed electrodynamic maglev suspension, guidance, propulsion and guideway directional switching  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A stabilization and propulsion system comprising a series of loop-coils arranged in parallel rows wherein two rows form a magnetic rail. Levitation and lateral stability is provided when the induced field in the magnetic rails interacts with the superconducting magnets (SCM) mounted on the magnetic levitation vehicle. A multiphase propulsion system interconnects specific coils in a given magnetic rail and interacts with the SCM to produce a propulsion force to the vehicle.

He, J.; Rote, D.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Propulsion Tractor Beams  

SciTech Connect

Manipulation of objects at a distance has already been achieved with no small measure of success in the realm of microscopic objects on the scale size of nanometers to micrometers in applications including laser trapping and laser tweezers. However, there has been relatively little effort to apply such remote control to macroscopic systems. A space tractor beam could be applied to a wide range of applications, including removal of orbital debris, facilitation of spacecraft docking, adjustment of satellite attitude or orbital position, etc. In this paper, an ablative laser propulsion tractor beam is demonstrated based on radiation from a CO{sub 2} laser. Cooperative, layered polymer targets were used for remote impulse generation using a CO{sub 2} laser. The use of a structured ablatant enabling switching between thrust directional parity (i.e., forward or reverse) and imparting torque to a remote target. Fluence-dependent results are presented in the context of polymer ablation modeling work and with consideration of confined ablation effects.

Sinko, John E. [Micro-Nano Global Center of Excellence, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan); Schlecht, Clifford A. [Institute for Materials and Complexity, Saint Louis, MO 63112 (United States)

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

337

MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) undersea propulsion: A novel concept with renewed interest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the reasons for the national and international renewed interest in the concept of MHD seawater propulsion. The main advantages of this concept are presented, together with some of the technical challenges that need to be overcome to achieve reliability, performance, and stealth. The paper discusses in more detail some of the technical issues and loss mechanisms influencing the thruster performance in terms of its electrical efficiency. Among the issues discussed are the jet losses and nozzle efficiency. Ohmic losses and frictional losses inside the thruster. Also discussed are the electrical end losses caused by the fringing magnetic field near the end of the electrodes. It has been shown that the frictional and end losses can have strong adverse effects on the thruster performance. Furthermore, a parametric study has been performed to investigate the effects of several parameters on the performance of the MHD thrusters. Those parameters include the magnetic field, thruster diameter, all roughness, flow velocity, and electrical load factor. The results of the parametric study indicate that the thruster efficiency increases with the strength of the magnetic field and thruster diameter, and decreases with the wall roughness and the flow velocity. 8 refs., 8 figs.

Doss, E.D.; Geyer, H.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Roy, G.D. (Office of Naval Research, Arlington, VA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Evaluation of pulse power devices in electric vehicle propulsion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of pulse power devices in electric vehicle propulsion systems to load level the main energy storage battery has been studied. Both high energy density capacitors (ultracapacitors) and high power density, bipolar batteries are considered. Computer simulations of vehicle operation with hybrid (two power source) powertrains indicated the energy storage capacities of the pulse power devices required to load level the main battery are 300 to 500 Wh for the capacitors and 5 to 10 Ah for the bipolar batteries can be reduced from 79 W/kg to about 40 W/kg depending on the vehicle gradeability (speed, percent grade, and length of grade) desired. Evaluation of the status of the technology for the pulse power devices indicated that for both devices, improvements in technology are needed before the devices can be used in EV applications. In the case of the ultracapacitor, the energy density of present devices are 1 to 2 Wh/kg. A minimum energy density of about 5 Wh/kg is needed for electric vehicle applications. Progress in increasing the energy density of ultracapacitors has been rapid in recent years and the prospects for meeting the 5 Wh/kg requirement for EVs appear to be good. For bipolar batteries, a minimum power density of 500 W/kg is needed and the internal resistance must be reduced by about a factor of ten from that found in present designs.

Burke, A.F. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Dowgiallo, E.J. (USDOE, Washington, DC (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

SERAPHIM: A magnetic propulsion scheme for fast trains  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are attempting to develop and demonstrate a new type of linear synchronous induction motor capable of propelling a vehicle at high speed. The technology, based on a passive guideway containing sequential aluminum plates, was developed in Sandia`s electromagnetic launch program. As such, it was called a ``re-connection gun`` and launched an aluminum plate from between pairs of pancake coils. In the proposed propulsion scheme, the plates are fixed and the coils move. Pairs of closely spaced pancake coils on the vehicle straddle vertically mounted aluminum plates in the roadbed. The current in the coils is turned on when the plate is fully covered, peaks at some optimal time, and decreases to zero before separation. This induces currents in the plate which interact with the coil current to produce repulsive forces. In essence, the pulsed coils push off the edge of the plate because at the high frequency of operation, the current has insufficient time to fully penetrate. Since no embedded flux is required, the efficiency actually increases with speed. This concept has been named SERAPHIM, for SEgmented RAil PHased Induction Motor.

Marder, B.M.; Frost, C.A.; Lipinski, R.J.; Cowan, M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Record of Decision for a Dry Storage Container System for the Management of Navel Spent Nuclear Fuel, January 7, 1997  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 5 / Wednesday, January 8, 1997 / Notices Department of the Navy Record of Decision for a Dry Storage Container System for the Management of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969; the Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA procedures, 40 CFR Parts 1500-1508; and Chief of Naval Operations Environmental and Natural Resources Program Manual, OPNAV Instruction 5090.1B; the Department of the Navy announces its decision to implement the preferred alternative (dual-purpose canisters) identified in the final Environmental Impact Statement for a Container System for the Management of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel (EIS) dated November 1996. The Department of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Annual Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Annual Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration Annual Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Annual Reports Home > Our Mission > Powering the Nuclear Navy > Annual Reports Annual Reports NNSA's Naval Reactors is committed to providing information about its operations. Environmental Monitoring Report NT-12-1 - May 2012 - ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND DISPOSAL OF

342

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. Annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During fiscal year 1993, the reserves generated $440 million in revenues, a $33 million decrease from the fiscal year 1992 revenues, primarily due to significant decreases in oil and natural gas prices. Total costs were $207 million, resulting in net cash flow of $233 million, compared with $273 million in fiscal year 1992. From 1976 through fiscal year 1993, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves generated $15.7 billion in revenues for the US Treasury, with expenses of $2.9 billion. The net revenues of $12.8 billion represent a return on costs of 441 percent. See figures 2, 3, and 4. In fiscal year 1993, production at the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves at maximum efficient rates yielded 25 million barrels of crude oil, 123 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 158 million gallons of natural gas liquids. The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves has embarked on an effort to identify additional hydrocarbon resources on the reserves for future production. In 1993, in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, the Department initiated a project to assess the oil and gas potential of the program`s oil shale reserves, which remain largely unexplored. These reserves, which total a land area of more than 145,000 acres and are located in Colorado and Utah, are favorably situated in oil and gas producing regions and are likely to contain significant hydrocarbon deposits. Alternatively the producing assets may be sold or leased if that will produce the most value. This task will continue through the first quarter of fiscal year 1994.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Naval petroleum and oil shale reserves: Annual report of operations, Fiscal Year 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market prices for curde oil experienced their greatest decline in history during 1986, with substantial effect on the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. Sales procedures which had served the Department well in prior years during periods when oil prices were stable or rising were found inadequate to cope with these declines, and new sales procedures were developed and implemented. Congressional concern that the Government receive fair prices from Naval Petroleum Reserves (NPR) petroleum sales also led to Public Law No. 99-413, enacted on August 29, 1986, which amended title 10, United States Code, Chapter 641. This law sets a minimum price, using two criteria, under which petroleum from the NPR cannot be sold. Notwithstanding the decline in oil and gas prices, revenues from the sale of NPR petroleum totaled $763 million in 1986. Although this represented a 41% decline from 1985 receipts, the 1986 revenues well exceeded net program expenditures of $157 million. Because of the decline in prevailing oil prices during the second quarter of 1986, major cost reductions of $3.4 million were implemented at NPR-3, and even greater reductions are planned for 1987 to ensure the profitability of that field. The decline in energy prices also affected plans to protect natural gas underlying Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 3 (NOSR-3). Two of 14 planned wells were drilled and are available for production. Unfortunately, efforts to sell gas from these wells have been unsuccessful, and further drilling has been delayed until the gas market is stronger. 16 figs., 20 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center RMOTC at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RMOTC RMOTC The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC), is an operating oil field focusing on environmentally-balanced energy technologies and alternatives, and is the premiere energy testing and demonstration field in the nation. 3 3 * the opportunity to explore environmentally- balanced solutions to the nation's energy issues * opportunities to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate a variety of energy related technologies * a chance to collaborate with top professionals in the energy, environmental technology, and engineering fields * shared industry knowledge through technology transfer via reports, journal articles, and presentations Located within the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) near Casper, Wyoming, RMOTC offers: RMOTC Offers Solutions 4 4 The Administration and Engineering

345

Quality assurance assessment of new efficient lighting systems for Naval ships. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Ballasts and lamps, which have been selected to replace existing lamp/ballast systems based on improved performance, were tested to determine if they meet standard Naval MIL specifications. Fifty ballasts manufactured by Advance Transformer Corporation and Universal Manufacturing Corp., and 100 lamps manufactured by GTE were tested to determine their quality assurance and durability. These components met all of the MIL specifications that lamp/ballast systems in use must meet. In addition, these new systems have an improved system efficacy, 62 lumens per watt, and lower third harmonics, which will reduce the need for generating capacity for lighting on ships.

Verderber, R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:29:32 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- graduate School in effect, a naval univer- sity, unified in policies, procedures and ob- jectives. In 1973;GENERAL INFORMATION ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS U.S. Navy officers interested in admis- sion to availability of quotas assigned to each country. The procedures for application are contained in OPNAV

347

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:24:38 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organizations 18 Student Council 18 Selection Procedures 19 Naval Officers 19 Other U.S. Military Officers 19 in matters involving curricula, facilities, procedures and policies deemed worthy of attention. The OSAC. SELECTION PROCEDURES NAVAL OFFICERS Selection for the Navy fully funded graduate education program is based

348

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:25:15 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20 Selection Procedures 20 Naval Officers 20 Other U.S. Military Officers 20 International Military administration. It functions in an advisory capacity in matters involving curricula, facilities, procedures graduate education program. SELECTION PROCEDURES NAVAL OFFICERS Selection for the Navy fully funded

349

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:23:11 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for Executive Education 11 NPS Curricula Summary 13 ADMISSIONS 16 Selection Procedures 16 Naval SELECTION PROCEDURES NAVAL OFFICERS Selection for the Navy fully funded graduate education program is based may be admitted to most curricula. The procedures for application are available from the Security

350

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:27:00 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15 Faculty Organizations 16 Student Council 17 Admissions 18 Selection Procedures 18 Naval Officers, procedures and policies deemed worthy of attention. The OSAC is comprised of thirty-five student for the Navy's fully funded graduate education program. SELECTION PROCEDURES NAVAL OFFICERS Selection

351

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:23:43 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organizations 17 Student Council 17 ADMISSIONS 18 Selection Procedures 18 Naval Officers 18 Other U.S. Military. It functions in an advisory capacity in matters involving curricula, facilities, procedures and policies deemed funded graduate education program. SELECTION PROCEDURES NAVAL OFFICERS Selection for the Navy fully

352

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:24:49 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council 18 Selection Procedures 19 Naval Officers 19 Other U.S. Military Officers 19 International involving curricula, facilities, procedures and policies deemed worthy of attention. The OSAC is comprised. SELECTION PROCEDURES NAVAL OFFICERS Selection for the Navy fully funded graduate education program is based

353

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:24:27 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selection Procedures 20 Naval Officers 20 Other U.S. Military Officers 20 International Military Officers 20 administration. It functions in an advisory capacity in matters involving curricula, facilities, procedures funded graduate education program. SELECTION PROCEDURES NAVAL OFFICERS Selection for the Navy fully

354

Development of Liquid-Vapor Core Reactors with MHD Generator for Space Power and Propulsion Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Any reactor that utilizes fuel consisting of a fissile material in a gaseous state may be referred to as a gaseous core reactor (GCR). Studies on GCRs have primarily been limited to the conceptual phase, mostly due to budget cuts and program cancellations in the early 1970's. A few scientific experiments have been conducted on candidate concepts, primarily of static pressure fissile gas filling a cylindrical or spherical cavity surrounded by a moderating shell, such as beryllium, heavy water, or graphite. The main interest in this area of nuclear power generation is for space applications. The interest in space applications has developed due to the promise of significant enhancement in fuel utilization, safety, plant efficiency, special high-performance features, load-following capabilities, power conversion optimization, and other key aspects of nuclear power generation. The design of a successful GCR adapted for use in space is complicated. The fissile material studied in the pa st has been in a fluorine compound, either a tetrafluoride or a hexafluoride. Both of these molecules have an impact on the structural material used in the making of a GCR. Uranium hexafluoride as a fuel allows for a lower operating temperature, but at temperatures greater than 900K becomes essentially impossible to contain. This difficulty with the use of UF6 has caused engineers and scientists to use uranium tetrafluoride, which is a more stable molecule but has the disadvantage of requiring significantly higher operating temperatures. Gas core reactors have traditionally been studied in a steady state configuration. In this manner a fissile gas and working fluid are introduced into the core, called a cavity, that is surrounded by a reflector constructed of materials such as Be or BeO. These reactors have often been described as cavity reactors because the density of the fissile gas is low and criticality is achieved only by means of the reflector to reduce neutron leakage from the core. Still there are problems of containment since many of the proposed vessel materials such as W or Mo have high neutron cross sections making the design of a critical system difficult. There is also the possibility for a GCR to remain in a subcritical state, and by the use of a shockwave mechanism, increase the pressure and temperature inside the core to achieve criticality. This type of GCR is referred to as a shockwave-driven pulsed gas core reactor. These two basic designs were evaluated as advance concepts for space power and propulsion.

Samim Anghaie

2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

355

DATE: REPLY TO ATINOF SUBJECT: DEPA RT MEN T OF E NERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPLY TO ATINOF SUBJECT: DEPA RT MEN T OF E NERGY Memorandum January 17, 2013 John McKenzie, NA-30 FY 2013 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) PLANNING SUMMARY ro Gregory H. Woods, General Counsel Attached please find the 2013 Annual National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Planning Summary for Naval Reactors ( NR). This is in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 451.1 B, Section 4.d. The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program is

356

110101BenefitsNuclearFission.ppt [Read-Only]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Nuclear Fission to Benefits of Nuclear Fission to the Civilian Space Program Gary Langford Fission Project Manager NASA MSFC NERAC Nov. 6, 2001 2 * Outer solar system exploration. * Planetary or lunar surface missions (robotic or human). * High-performance propulsion for human missions. * Advanced applications. Uses of Nuclear Fission in the Civilian Space Program Highly advanced propulsion, extremely high power surface applications. 3 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 Phase 1 * 10-500 kW NEP * 10-500 kW spacecraft & surface powerplants Phase 3 * 10-1000 MW, 0.1-1 kg/kW NEP * >2000 s Isp gas/plasma-based NTR Phase 2 * 1-100 MW, 1-10 kg/kW NEP * 900-1000 s Isp solid- core NTR * Multi-MW space & surface powerplants Kuiper Belt Exploration Triton Lander Europa Ocean Science Station Pluto Orbiter Large Asteroids Io Volcanic Observer

357

FY2001 Annual Progress Report for the Vehicle Propulsion & Ancillary Subsystems Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROPULSION & PROPULSION & ANCILLARY SUBSYSTEMS 2 0 0 1 A N N UA L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory and Computer Systems Management, Inc., for their artistic and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY 2001 Annual Progress Report for the Vehicle Propulsion & Ancillary Subsystems Program

358

HybriDrive Propulsion System Cleaner, smarter power for transit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0.99R-8 Crude Oil D 26.0% Diesel Vehicle Liquid Fuel Transportation and Storage 0.99R-11 Emissions source for electrolysis is "clean" Zero Emission. · 30% US electricity is "clean": Nuclear, Hydro, Wind

359

Innovative Confinement Concepts Workshop 2000 (Book of Abstracts)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Torus Nuclear Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion VehicleTorus Nuclear Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion Vehicle

Celata, Christine; Accelerator and Fusion Research Staff

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Performance comparison between thrusters PPS1350 and the Phall 1 in optimal trajectories using flybies and solar electric propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spacecraft propulsion system has passed for diverse evolutions, leaving combustion engines and arriving at ion propulsion. The future interplanetary missions will probably use the conventional chemical rockets to leave the sphere of influence of ... Keywords: applied mathematics, astrodynamics, celestial mechanics, flyby, space trajectories

Denilson Paulo Souza Dos Santos; Antonio Fernando Bertachini De Almeida Prado

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Links | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home > Field Offices > Welcome to the NNSA Production Office > Links Home > Field Offices > Welcome to the NNSA Production Office > Links Links NNSA HQ National Nuclear Security Administration Advanced Simulation & Computing NNSA Graduate Program NNSA Small Business Program Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Field Offices NNSA Albuquerque Complex Kansas City Field Office Livermore Field Office Los Alamos Field Office Naval Reactors Idaho Branch Office Nevada Field Office Sandia Field Office DOE Oak Ridge Sites Oak Ridge Office Oak Ridge National Laboratory UCOR Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board American Museum of Science and Energy City of Oak Ridge Plants Laboratories Bechtel Nevada Bettis Laboratory Kansas City Plant Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

362

Preserving Nuclear Grade Knowledge  

SciTech Connect

When people think of the government they think of the President, or Congress, or the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), but there are thousands of people in government-related jobs doing things most don’t really notice everyday. You can find them everywhere, from the space science folks at NASA, to the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) watching out for the bad guys. There are Rangers, and Social Workers, Nurses and Agricultural Managers. They are people working to keep the many facets of the USA rolling. One very diverse bunch is The Department of Energy (DOE) , a group who is expanding the ways we make and save energy to power our cars, homes, and businesses. Tucked away under the DOE is the National Nuclear Security Administration, the NNSA is an agency that maintains the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. It works to reduce global danger from weapons of mass destruction. It provides the U.S. Navy with safe nuclear propulsion, and it responds to nuclear and radiological emergencies in the United States and abroad, and it supports efforts in science and technology*. (* DOE/NNSA/KCP website info)

Lange, Bob

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

363

PROCEEDINGS OF AEROSPACE NUCLEAR SAFETY, OCTOBER 1-4, 1963, ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts were prepared for 18 of the 28 papers presented; 8 were previously abstracted in NSA. Topics covered include safety programs and philosophy, nuclear safety aspects of SNAP desigu and of propulsion reactor design, environmental factors, and re-entry and postmission disposal. (R.E.U.)

Dunlap, R.E. ed.

1964-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Optimization of direct drive induction motors for electric ship propulsion with high speed propellers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct drive electric ship propulsion can offer increased flexibility and reduced overall fuel consumption compared to geared mechanical systems [Davis 1987, Doerry 2007]. As a well-established technology, induction motors are a dependable and economical ... Keywords: AC motors, induction motor drives, induction motors, thermal analysis

S. C. Englebretson; J. L. Kirtley, Jr; C. Chryssostomidis

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Exact solution of a Brownian inchworm model for self-propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the exact solution of a Brownian inchworm model of a self-propelled elastic dimer which has recently been proposed in [K. V. Kumar \\textit{et al}, Phys. Rev. E \\textbf{77}, 020102(R) (2008)] as a unifying model for the propulsion mechanisms of DNA helicase, polar rods on a vibrated surface, crawling keratocytes, and Myosin VI.

A. Baule; K. Vijay Kumar; Sriram Ramaswamy

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

366

Performance analysis of the combined EDS maglev propulsion, levitation, and guidance system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis of the Japanese maglev system which uses only one set of coils in the guideway for combined levitation, propulsion, and guidance functions is presented in this paper. This preliminary study, using the dynamic circuit approach, indicates that the system is very promising.

He, J.L.; Coffey, H.T.; Rote, D.M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Design Methodology of a Hybrid Propulsion Driven Electric Powered Miniature Tailsitter Unmanned Aerial Vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contrary to the manned tailsitter aircraft concepts, which have been shelved and forgotten after mid 1960's, the unmanned versions of these concepts have become popular. Since, tailsitter type UAVs combine both vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) operation ... Keywords: Electric propulsion, Tailsitter, UAV, VTOL

Mirac Aksugur; Gokhan Inalhan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Fourth international symposium on automotive propulsion systems. Volume I. [Eighteen papers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A pre-conference draft is given (in five volumes) of the proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Automotive Propulsion Systems, held April 18-22, 1977, in Washington, D.C. Volume I contains eighteen papers; a separate abstract was prepared for each for ERDA Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

Not Available

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Solar Power Satellites: Creating the Market for Beamed Energy Propulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beamed energy advocates must investigate the potential of major markets like space based solar satellites and space-based nuclear waste disposal. For BEP to succeed, its proponents must work with these possible users to generate interest and resources needed to develop BEP.

Coopersmith, Jonathan [Dept. of History, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

370

Department of Energy, Office of Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Request for Records Disposition Authority Leave Blank (NARA Use Only) (See Instructions on reverse) Job Number I / {£. 0- _~ To. National Archives and Records Administration (NIR) NI-'-r 3 7- 6 6 J Washington, DC 20408 Date Received 1 From (Agencyor establishment) Department of Energy Notification to Agency 2 MajorSubdivrsion In accordance with the provisions of 44 Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy USC 3303a. the disposition request. In- cluding amendments. ISapproved except for 3 Minorsubcrvrsron Items that may be marked "disposrtron not Office of Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves approved" or "withdrawn" In column 10 4 Nameof Personwith whom to confer 5 Telephone (Includearea code) [ Pamela Gentel 301-903-1856 6 Agency Certification

371

Major General Harold Holesinger The Adjutant General Illinois Kilitary and Naval Dept.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

General Harold Holesinger General Harold Holesinger The Adjutant General Illinois Kilitary and Naval Dept. 1301 North MacArthur Boulevard Springfield, Illinois 62702-2399 Dear General Holesinger: I am enclosing a copy of the radiological survey report for the National Guard Armory, Chicago, Illinois. Although the data ncted in the report indicate levels of radioactivity in excess of current guidelines, the radioactive residues presently there do not pose a health hazard provided they were not disturbed in the past and will not be disturbed in the future; i.e., no excavation, building, or construction that would disturb the areas in which contamination was found. Based on these data and on an authority record review, the National Guard Armory property is being authorized for remedial action and will be

372

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center RMOTC at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OILFIELD TESTING OILFIELD TESTING OILFIELD TESTING CENTER CENTER 2 2 HISTORY OF TEAPOT DOME Mark Milliken 3 3 TEAPOT DOME LOCATION 4 4 Salt Creek 670 MMBBLS 722 BCF Teapot Dome 27 MMBBLS 57 BCF N P R - 3 Cumulative Production 5 5 The Great White Fleet December 1907 - February 1909 6 6 THE END OF COAL-FIRED SHIPS * 2-week cruising time. * Labor and time intensive cleaning and reloading. * At the mercy of foreign countries for coal supply. * 1912: All battleships will be oil-powered. Great White Fleet 7 7 NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES ARE BORN * 1908: Dr. Otis Smith, USGS Director, recommends DOI retain oil lands for fuel reserve for Navy. * 1909: Taft withdraws 3,000,000 acres in Wyoming and California. * 1910: Concern over the President's authority to withdraw lands, so Congress passed the Pickett Act. * 1910: Taft issues a 2nd land withdrawal executive

373

FEMP ESPC Success Story - U.S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a m a m ESPC Success Stories Environmental Stewardship and Cost Savings These photographs chronicle the installation of the wind turbines at John Paul Jones Hill, Guantanamo Bay. The four wind turbine towers are about 185 feet high. The blade lengths are 90 feet. The top of the blades are about 275 feet off the g round. The blades rotate at a maximum of 22 RPM, or a rotation every three seconds. This translates to a blade tip speed of 140 mph. During construction there were as many as 20 workers on the project. However, operating the wind turbines will only take one part-time staff-person who will check on them daily. Photos courtesy of: Jeffrey M. Johnston, Public Works Officer, Guantanamo Bay; Paul DelSignore, NFESC; Daniel Ingold, NORESCO. U.S. NAVAL STATION

374

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Supply Depot AEC Warehouse - NY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Supply Depot AEC Warehouse - Supply Depot AEC Warehouse - NY 36 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL SUPPLY DEPOT, AEC WAREHOUSE (NY.36) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Building 546 , Scotia , New York NY.36-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.36-1 Site Operations: This facility served as a storage and transshipment point for feed materials between the Hanford and commercial metal fabricators in the northeastern states. NY.36-1 NY.36-2 NY.36-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD NY.36-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium, Thorium Metals NY.36-1 NY.36-2 NY.36-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD NY.36-1

375

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center RMOTC at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Renewable Energy Scoping Meeting & Renewable Energy Scoping Meeting March 26, 2004 2 2 RMOTC The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC), is an operating oil field focusing on environmentally-balanced energy technologies and alternatives, and is the premiere energy testing and demonstration field in the nation. 3 3 * the opportunity to explore environmentally- balanced solutions to the nation's energy issues * opportunities to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate a variety of energy related technologies * a chance to collaborate with top professionals in the energy, environmental technology, and engineering fields * shared industry knowledge through technology transfer via reports, journal articles, and presentations Located within the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) near Casper, Wyoming, RMOTC offers:

376

Quality assurance assessment of new efficient lighting systems for naval ships. Final report. Revision  

SciTech Connect

Ballasts and lamps, which have been selected to replace existing lamp/ballast systems based on improved performance, were tested to determine if they meet standard Naval MIL specifications. Fifty ballasts manufactured by Advance Transformer Corporation and Universal Manufacturing Corporation and 100 lamps manufactured by GTE were tested to determine their quality assurance and durability. These components met all of the MIL specifications that lamp/ballast systems in use must meet. These new systems have an improved system efficacy, 62 lumens per watt, and lower third harmonics, which will reduce the need for generating capacity for lighting on ships. An addendum to the original study describes the assessment of the performance of the advanced ballast system with a new F-17 fluorescent lamp. The results indicate the system performs reliably and shows increased efficacy. This new lamp/ballast system reduces the harmonic content to within Navy limits, and improves the power factor, resulting in a 50% reduction in line current.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.; Dumm, C.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs SUMMARY This EIS considers programmatic (DOE-wide) alternative approaches to safely, efficiently, and responsibly manage existing and projected quantities of spent nuclear fuel until the year 2035. This amount of time may be required to make and implement a decision on the ultimate disposition of spent nuclear fuel. DOE's spent nuclear fuel responsibilities include fuel generated by DOE production, research, and development reactors; naval reactors; university and foreign research reactors; domestic non-DOE reactors such as those at the National Institute

378

Admiral John M. Richardson | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

U.S. 6th Fleet; Chief of Staff, U.S. Naval Forces Europe and U.S. Naval Forces Africa, in Naples, Italy; and Commander, Naval Submarine Forces in Norfolk, Virginia. His...

379

CX-008818: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Utility Corridor Extension CX(s) Applied: B4.7, B4.11, B5.2, B5.5 Date: 06/13/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, Bettis Site

380

CX-008338: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Security Upgrades Major Construction Project CX(s) Applied: B1.11, B1.15, B1.16, B1.23, B2.2 Date: 04/20/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

"The Fourth Dimension of Naval Tactics": The U.S. Navy and Public Relations, 1919-1939  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prior to 1917, the United States Navy only utilized public relations techniques during times of war or to attract recruits into naval service. Following World I, the Navy confronted several daunting problems, including the postwar demobilization of naval assets, the proposed creation of an independent air service, and a public desire for naval arms limitation which many officers believed would endanger the Navy's ability to fulfill its missions. These issues threatened the generous support that the Navy had received from Congress for a quarter of a century, and also hampered the service's attempts to incorporate new weapons systems into its arsenal and recruit high-quality manpower. In response to these challenges, the Navy developed a peacetime public relations capability during the interwar period, despite the fact that many senior naval officials placed a low priority on public relations. Their attitude led subordinates in different parts of the Navy Department to perform public relations tasks despite lacking official orders to carry out such work. Such efforts were haphazard, redundant, handicapped by tradition, and dependent largely upon individual initiative. To augment its meager capabilities, the Navy relied upon external groups, such as the Navy League, to lobby the public for naval expansion. The service also developed formal and informal ties to the mass media, particularly the rapidly expanding motion picture industry. These disparate elements attempted to convince the public that the Navy was a haven for morally upright masculine behavior, a service able to integrate aircraft and submarines into its force structure and keep their operators safe, and a vital national asset with value beyond basic national defense. During the interwar period, the Navy expanded and reorganized the ways in which it courted public opinion. By forging ties with motion picture studios, radio broadcasters, and the print media, it was able to improve the image of the service, attract high quality recruits, and gained the public support for its drive to gain the resources needed to modernize and expand the fleet. During the same era, naval officials became more adept at minimizing the negative impact of the accidents linked to the development of aviation and submarines. Developments of the era laid the foundation for the institutional development of public relations and enhanced media relations during World War II and in the decades that followed.

Wadle, Ryan David

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

NERVA-Derived Concept for a Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Thermal Rocket is an enabling technology for human exploration missions. The 'bimodal' NTR (BNTR) provides a novel approach to meeting both propulsion and power requirements of future manned and robotic missions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate tie-tube cooling configurations, NTR performance, Brayton cycle performance, and LOX-Augmented NTR (LANTR) feasibility to arrive at a point of departure BNTR configuration for subsequent system definition.

Fusselman, Steven P.; Frye, Patrick E.; Gunn, Stanley V.; Morrison, Calvin Q. [The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power, P. O. Box 7922, Canoga Park, CA 91309-7922 (United States); Borowski, Stanley K. [NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

2005-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

383

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:34:19 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the Naval Auxiliary Air Station to house trans- sonic and supersonic wind tunnels and jet com- bustion pits tunnels and jet com- bustion pits. The third and next building increment is expected to comprise a General

384

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Container System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Navy (Lead Agency) the Navy (Lead Agency) Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Department of Energy (Cooperating Agency) - DOE/EIS-0251 Prepared in accordance with: National Environmental Policy Act Section 102 (2) (C) FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR A CONTAINER SYSTEM FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF NAVAL SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL Contact: William Knoll Department of the Navy Code NAVSEA 08U 2531 Jefferson Davis Highway Arlington, VA 22242-5160 Telephone Number: 703-602-8229 Abstract: This Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) addresses six general alternative systems for the loading, storage, transport, and possible disposal of naval spent nuclear fuel following examination. It supersedes the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Container System for the Management of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel dated May 1996.

385

Using Net-Zero Energy Projects to Enable Sustainable Economic Redevelopment at the Former Brunswick Air Naval Base  

SciTech Connect

A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites. The Brunswick Naval Air Station is a naval air facility and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Super Fund site that is being cleaned up, and closed down. The objective of this report is not only to look at the economics of individual renewable energy technologies, but also to look at the systemic benefits that can be gained when cost-effective renewable energy technologies are integrated with other systems and businesses in a community; thus multiplying the total monetary, employment, and quality-of-life benefits they can provide to a community.

Huffman, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, Casper, Wyoming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary environmental findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW) conducted June 6 through 17, 1988. NPOSR consists of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Wyoming, the Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) in Colorado and the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) in Utah. NOSR-2 was not included in the Survey because it had not been actively exploited at the time of the on-site Survey. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, lead and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with NPOSR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at NPOSR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team has developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified at NOSR-3 during the on-site Survey. There were no findings associated with either NPR-3 or NOSR-1 that required Survey-related sampling and Analysis. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Summary report. The Summary Report will reflect the final determinations of the NPOSR-CUW Survey and the other DOE site-specific Surveys. 110 refs., 38 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Report to the President on agreements and programs relating to the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy monitors commercial natural gas production activities along the boundaries of Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 1 and Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 3, which are located in Garfield County, Colorado, and were created in the early part of this century to provide a future source of shale oil for the military. In response to the private sector`s drilling of natural gas wells along the south and southwest boundaries of the Reserves, which began in the early 1980`s, the Department developed a Natural Gas Protection Program to protect the Government`s resources from drainage due to the increasing number of commercial gas wells contiguous to Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 3. This report provides an update of the Gas Protection Program being implemented and the agreements that have been placed in effect since December 19, 1991, and also includes the one communitized well containing Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 lands. The Protection Program employs two methods to protect the Government`s resources: (1) sharing with the private sector in the costs and production of wells by entering into ``communitization`` agreements; and (2) drilling wholly-owned Government wells to ``offset`` commercial wells that threaten to drain natural gas from the Reserves. The methods designed to protect the Government`s resources are achieving their objective of abating gas drainage and migration. As a result of the Protection Program, the Department of Energy is able to produce natural gas and either sell its share on the open market or transfer it for use at Government facilities. The Natural Gas Protection Program is a reactive, ongoing program that is continually revised as natural gas transportation constraints, market conditions, and nearby commercial production activities change.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A sodium-sulfur battery for the ETX-II propulsion system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Canadian built 52 kWh sodium-sulphur battery is being integrated with the ETX-II powertrain. The propulsion system thus formed is being installed in a Ford Aerostar compact-size van for test and development purposes. The selection and design of the traction battery, as an integral part of the propulsion system, will be outlined in this paper along with the projected performance of the test bed vehicle under both highway and urban driving conditions. The results of a battery optimization study will also be discussed. Braking energy recovery (regeneration) is an important part of the ETX-II system capability and needs to be carefully managed when used with sodium-sulphur batteries. This will be discussed to show its effect on the system performance.

Altmejd, M. (Powerplex Technologies, Inc., Downsview, ON (Canada)); Dzieciuch, M. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

A sodium-sulfur battery for the ETX-II propulsion system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Canadian built 52 kWh sodium-sulphur battery is being integrated with the ETX-II powertrain. The propulsion system thus formed is being installed in a Ford Aerostar compact-size van for test and development purposes. The selection and design of the traction battery, as an integral part of the propulsion system, will be outlined in this paper along with the projected performance of the test bed vehicle under both highway and urban driving conditions. The results of a battery optimization study will also be discussed. Braking energy recovery (regeneration) is an important part of the ETX-II system capability and needs to be carefully managed when used with sodium-sulphur batteries. This will be discussed to show its effect on the system performance.

Altmejd, M. [Powerplex Technologies, Inc., Downsview, ON (Canada); Dzieciuch, M. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Eagle-Picher nickel-iron battery program is to develop a nickel-iron battery for use in the propulsion of electric and electric-hybrid vehicles. To date, the program has concentrated on the characterization, fabrication and testing of the required electrodes, the fabrication and testing of full-scale cells, and finally, the fabrication and testing of full-scale (270 AH) six (6) volt modules. Electrodes of the final configuration have now exceeded 1880 cycles and are showing minimal capacity decline. Full-scale cells have presently exceeded 600 cycles and are tracking the individual electrode tests almost identically. Six volt module tests have exceeded 500 cycles, with a specific energy of 48 Wh/kg. Results to date indicate the nickel-iron battery is beginning to demonstrate the performance required for electric vehicle propulsion.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Final sitewide environmental assessment for continued development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), Natrona County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Secretary of Energy is required by law to explore, prospect, conserve, develop, use, and operate the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. The Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-258), requires that the Naval Petroleum Reserves be produced at their maximum efficient rate (MER), consistent with sound engineering practices, for a period of six years. To fulfill this mission, DOE is proposing continued development activities which would include the drilling of approximately 250 oil production and injection (gas, water, and steam) wells, the construction of between 25 and 30 miles of associated gas, water, and steam pipelines, the installation of several production and support facilities, and the construction of between 15 and 20 miles of access roads. These drilling and construction estimates include any necessary activities related to the operation of the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). The purpose of RMOTC will be to provide facilities and necessary support to government and private industry for testing and evaluating new oilfield and environmental technologies, and to transfer these results to the petroleum industry through seminars and publications. Continued development activities either have no potential to result in adverse environmental impacts or would only result in adverse impacts that could be readily mitigated. The small amounts of disturbed surface area will be reclaimed to its original natural state when production operations terminate. The preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and the DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 73 refs.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1999 through September 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks.

Johnson, D.R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Experimental Investigation of the Reflection Mode Micro Laser Propulsion under Highly Frequent and Multi Pulse Laser  

SciTech Connect

Micro laser propulsion used for some space tasks of micro-satellites are preferred to providing small thrust and high specific impulse while keeping power consumption low. Most previous work on micro laser propulsion are about transmission mode (T-mode) using a CW laser. In this article, a pulsed fiber laser is used to study the micro laser propulsion performance under reflection mode. Multi pulse (ranged from 100 to 2000) tests are conducted on a double base propellant with the vacuum less than 10 Pa. The laser frequency is 20 kHz and two kinds of instantaneous power density 4.77x10{sup 6} W/cm{sup 2} and 2.39x10{sup 7} W/cm{sup 2} are used. It is found that the momentum coupling coefficient C{sub m} and the mean thrust F increases with the increasing pulse numbers, which is different to the previous work. By adjusting the irradiation time T, it is easy to get a large mean thrust, up to mN. When the energy density is the same, C{sub m}, I{sub sp}, F and {eta} increase with the increasing power density. Also I{sub sp} and {eta} are very low, laser ablation is insufficiently under the current condition. 3D Morphology of the ablation hole is obtained by confocal microscope for the first time.

Zhang Xinghua; Cai Jian [Microelectronic Equipment Technology Department, Institute of Microelectronics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100029 (China); Li Long [Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230027 (China)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Propulsion Area Scaling With Polyoxymethylene Propellant  

SciTech Connect

The topic of area scaling is of great importance in the laser propulsion field, including applications to removal of space debris and to selection of size ranges for laser propulsion craft in air or vacuum conditions. To address this issue experimentally, a CO{sub 2} laser operating at up to 10 J was used to irradiate targets. Experiments were conducted in air and vacuum conditions over a range of areas from about 0.05-5 cm{sup 2} to ablate flat polyoxymethylene targets at several fluences. Theoretical effects affecting area scaling, such as rarefaction waves, thermal diffusion, and diffraction, are discussed in terms of the experimental results. Surface profilometry was used to characterize the ablation samples. A CFD model is used to facilitate analysis, and key results are compared between experimental and model considerations. The dependence of key laser propulsion parameters, including the momentum coupling coefficient and specific impulse, are calculated based on experimental data, and results are compared to existing literature data.

Sinko, John E. [Micro-Nano Global Center of Excellence, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8603 (Japan); Ichihashi, Katsuhiro; Ogita, Naoya; Sakai, Takeharu; Sasoh, Akihiro [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8603 (Japan); Tsukiyama, Yosuke [Micro-Nano Global Center of Excellence, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8603 (Japan); Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8603 (Japan); Umehara, Noritsugu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8603 (Japan)

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

395

ICENES '91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, [mu]-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Safe testing nuclear rockets economically  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several studies over the past few decades have recognized the need for advanced propulsion to explore the solar system. As early as the 1960s, Werner Von Braun and others recognized the need for a nuclear rocket for sending humans to Mars. The great distances, the intense radiation levels, and the physiological response to zero-gravity all supported the concept of using a nuclear rocket to decrease mission time. These same needs have been recognized in later studies, especially in the Space Exploration Initiative in 1989. One of the key questions that has arisen in later studies, however, is the ability to test a nuclear rocket engine in the current societal environment. Unlike the RoverMERVA programs in the 1960s, the rocket exhaust can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. As a consequence, previous studies have examined the feasibility of building a large-scale version of the Nuclear Furnace Scrubber that was demonstrated in 1971. We have investigated an alternative that would deposit the rocket exhaust along with any entrained fission products directly into the ground. The Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust, or SAFE, concept would allow variable sized engines to be tested for long times at a modest expense. A system overview, results of preliminary calculations, and cost estimates of proof of concept demonstrations are presented. The results indicate that a nuclear rocket could be tested at the Nevada Test Site for under $20 M.

Howe, S. D. (Steven D.); Travis, B. J. (Bryan J.); Zerkle, D. K. (David K.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Distributed Energy Resources at Naval Base Ventura County Building1512: A Sensitivity Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second of a two-part study by BerkeleyLab of a DER (distributed energy resources) system at Navy Base VenturaCounty (NBVC). First, a preliminary assessment ofthe cost effectivenessof distributed energy resources at Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC)Building 1512 was conducted in response to the base s request for designassistance to the Federal Energy Management Program (Bailey and Marnay,2004). That report contains a detailed description of the site and theDER-CAM (Consumer Adoption Model) parameters used. This second reportcontains sensitivity analyses of key parameters in the DER system modelof Building 1512 at NBVC and additionally considers the potential forabsorption-powered refrigeration.The prior analysis found that under thecurrent tariffs, and given assumptions about the performance andstructure of building energy loads and available generating technologycharacteristics, installing a 600 kW DER system with absorption coolingand recovery heat capabilities could deliver cost savings of about 14percent, worth $55,000 per year. However, under current conditions, thisstudy also suggested that significant savings could be obtained ifBuilding 1512 changed from its current direct access contract to a SCETOU-8 (Southern California Edison time of use tariff number 8) ratewithout installing a DER system. Evaluated on this tariff, the potentialsavings from installation of a DER system would be about 4 percent of thetotal bill, or $16,000 per year.

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2005-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

398

Oil shale resources of the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 1, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The resource of potential oil represented by Green River Formation oil shale on Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 1 (NOSR No. 1) in the southeast corner of Colorado's Piceance Creek Basin is evaluated in detail. NOSR No. 1 is the site of intensive long-term oil-shale development studies and is the source of innumerable oil-shale samples for all manner of testing. A brief history of these studies is presented. This oil-shale resource is defined from oil-yield assay data on 33 cores plotted as histograms and correlated into cross sections. Contour maps of thickness, richness and oil resource in place are presented for the Mahogany Zone, the rich zone in the Mahogany zone, and for 2 units beneath and 5 units above the Mahogany zone. Total oil shale resource on NOSR No. 1 is 20.4 billion barrels of which 17.4 billion barrels are particularly suitable for development by vertical modified in-place processes. A previously unknown Mahogany zone outcrop providing much additional development access is described. Now under sole control of the US Department of Energy (DOE), NOSR No. 1 offers DOE a unique site for oil shale testing and development.

Smith, J.W.; Beard, T.N.; Trudell, L.G.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Nuclear power systems for Lunar and Mars exploration  

SciTech Connect

Initial studies of a variety of mission scenarios for the new Space Exploration Initiative, and the technologies necessary to enable or significantly enhance them, have identified the development of advanced space power systems - whether solar, chemical or nuclear - to be of prime importance. Lightweight, compact, reliable power systems for planetary rovers and a variety of surface vehicles, utility surface power, and power for advanced propulsion systems were identified as critical needs for these missions. This paper discusses these mission scenarios, the concomitant power system requirements; the power system options considered and identifies the significant potential benefits of nuclear power for meeting the power needs of the above applications.

Sovie, R.J.; Bozek, J.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low Earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to Earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant.

Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed

Hideo Harada

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Naval Station Newport Wind Resource Assessment. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites, and The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Naval Station Newport Naval Station Newport Wind Resource Assessment A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites, and The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center Robi Robichaud, Jason Fields, and Joseph Owen Roberts Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-52801 February 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Naval Station Newport

403

Single-shaft electric propulsion system technology development program -- ETX-II. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1981, discussions between Ford and General Electric (GE) evolved a concept for an advanced electric vehicle powertrain, which was subsequently presented to the US Department of Energy (DOE) as an unsolicited proposal. The concept involved a combination of technology from Ford and GE that would result in a unique powertrain based on a motor and transmission concentric with the drive wheel axis. Initial work suggested that the entire motor/transaxle combination could be expected to be smaller and lighter than the direct current (dc) motors that were in use in electric vehicles at that time and that the powertrain could be expected to be more efficient than other available powertrains. This program (ETX-I) was awarded to Ford Motor Company and it was established that the most likely first introduction of an electric vehicle would be in the form of a fleet of small commercial vans. The ETX-II propulsion system concept was aimed at advancing the technology through improving the size, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost characteristics of the ETX-I powertrain and by integrating advanced battery technologies compatible with the powertrain to form a complete propulsion system. Unique developments for the ETX-II program included the transaxle, a two-speed automatic transmission and three-phase interior permanent magnet alternating current (ac) motor on a common axis integrated with the rear axle of the test bed van; The traction battery selected for this propulsion system was the sodium-sulfur battery. This was the only advanced technology that had been developed to a point that would allow the test vehicle to have a range of over 160 kilometers (100 miles) without the battery exceeding 25% of the vehicle`s gross weight.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Single-shaft electric propulsion system technology development program -- ETX-II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1981, discussions between Ford and General Electric (GE) evolved a concept for an advanced electric vehicle powertrain, which was subsequently presented to the US Department of Energy (DOE) as an unsolicited proposal. The concept involved a combination of technology from Ford and GE that would result in a unique powertrain based on a motor and transmission concentric with the drive wheel axis. Initial work suggested that the entire motor/transaxle combination could be expected to be smaller and lighter than the direct current (dc) motors that were in use in electric vehicles at that time and that the powertrain could be expected to be more efficient than other available powertrains. This program (ETX-I) was awarded to Ford Motor Company and it was established that the most likely first introduction of an electric vehicle would be in the form of a fleet of small commercial vans. The ETX-II propulsion system concept was aimed at advancing the technology through improving the size, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost characteristics of the ETX-I powertrain and by integrating advanced battery technologies compatible with the powertrain to form a complete propulsion system. Unique developments for the ETX-II program included the transaxle, a two-speed automatic transmission and three-phase interior permanent magnet alternating current (ac) motor on a common axis integrated with the rear axle of the test bed van; The traction battery selected for this propulsion system was the sodium-sulfur battery. This was the only advanced technology that had been developed to a point that would allow the test vehicle to have a range of over 160 kilometers (100 miles) without the battery exceeding 25% of the vehicle's gross weight.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Flight Experiments On Energy Scaling For In-Space Laser Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

As a preparatory study on space-borne laser propulsion, flight experiments with a parabolic thruster were carried out on an air cushion table. The thruster was mounted like a sail on a puck, allowing for laser-driven motion in three degrees of freedom (3 DOF) in artificial weightlessness. Momentum coupling is derived from point explosion theory for various parabolic thruster geometries with respect to energy scaling issues. The experimental data are compared with theoretical predictions and with results from vertical free flights. Experimental results for the air-breakdown threshold and POM ablation inside the thruster are compared with fluence data from beam propagation modeling.

Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert [Institute of Technical Physics, German Aerospace Center, D-70569 Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 38-40 (Germany); Wollenhaupt, Eric; Roeser, Hans-Peter [Institute of Space Systems, University of Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31 (Germany)

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

406

Integrated Modular Propulsion and Regenerative Electro-energy Storage System (IMPRESS) for small satellites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The IMPRESS is a significant advancement in space system technology as it is able to operate alternately as a fuel cell to produce electrical power from stored hydrogen and oxygen and as a water electrolyzer using electrical power to produce hydrogen and oxygen from stored water. The electrolysis of a controllable fraction of stored water can provide high Isp rocket propellants on demand. The heart of the IMPRESS is the Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell (URFC), which produces power and electrolytically regenerates its reactants using a single stack of reversible cells. This integrated approach has several significant advantages over separate (battery) power and propulsion systems.

Mitlitsky, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); de Groot, W. [Nyma, Inc., Brook Park, OH (United States); Butler, L.; McElroy, J. [United Technologies Corp., Windsor Locks, CT (United States). Hamilton Standard Div.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Solid oxide fuel cells for transportation: A clean, efficient alternative for propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells show great promise for providing clean and efficient transportation power. Of the fuel cell propulsion systems under investigation, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is particularly attractive for heavy duty transportation applications that have a relatively long duty cycle, such as locomotives, trucks, and barges. Advantages of the SOFC include a simple, compact system configuration; inherent fuel flexibility for hydrocarbon and alternative fuels; and minimal water management. The specific advantages of the SOFC for powering a railroad locomotive are examined. Feasibility, practicality, and safety concerns regarding SOFCs in transportation applications are discussed, as am the major R D issues.

Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Solid oxide fuel cells for transportation: A clean, efficient alternative for propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells show great promise for providing clean and efficient transportation power. Of the fuel cell propulsion systems under investigation, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is particularly attractive for heavy duty transportation applications that have a relatively long duty cycle, such as locomotives, trucks, and barges. Advantages of the SOFC include a simple, compact system configuration; inherent fuel flexibility for hydrocarbon and alternative fuels; and minimal water management. The specific advantages of the SOFC for powering a railroad locomotive are examined. Feasibility, practicality, and safety concerns regarding SOFCs in transportation applications are discussed, as am the major R&D issues.

Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel ... nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, and projections ...

410

Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1998 thru September 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

Johnson, D.R.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

An Ansatz Regarding Relativistic Space Travel Part II-Propulsion Realities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Travel to the stars can involve a perilous journey in an unfriendly space-time continuum that can include singularities, nonlinear events, gravity as a function of both position and vehicle velocity, and extra dimensional effects discussed in Part I. Such a device may possibly use field propulsion technology. Although several field propulsion schemes exist, a proposed candidate is based upon using an electromagnetic drive that uses a rotating magnetic field superimposed on the spacecraft's stationary or static electric field. This is comparable to a Searl generator and the field interaction would generate an electromagnetic vortex to create nonlinear gravitational effects possibly due to an inverse Gertsenshtein relationship to push against the intrinsic gravitational field of a planet. Moreover, changing alignment of the magnetic field axis with the electric field will induce a margin of lateral controllability. Issues such as assessing this combined effect of using both electric and magnetic fields are discussed. Finally, the need for experimental data is stressed to validate these otherwise very speculative theoretical notions.

Murad, Paul A

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

412

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-07 0 1-07 0 USS Honolulu (SSN 718) and Locals 280 miles from North Pole PROGRAM RECORD * Program founded in 1948 * 5,800 reactor- years of safe operations * 136,000,000 miles safely steamed * 103 operating naval reactors * Welcomed in over 150 ports worldwide and 50 countries BROAD RESPONSIBILITIES * Research, Development, Design * Acquisition, Specification, Construction, Testing * Operation, Training, Maintenance * Overhaul, Refueling, Disposal * Reactor Safety, Radiological Controls, Environmental Safety, Occupational Health * Security, Nuclear Safeguards, Transportation * Administration (Public Information) NAVAL NUCLEAR PROPULSION PROGRAM TEC 1-07 1 WA OR ID MT ND SD WY NE MN WI IA IL MI IN OH KY

413

Nuclear power and nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect

The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described.

Vaughen, V.C.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Space Nuclear Power Plant Pre-Conceptual Design Report, For Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This letter transmits, for information, the Project Prometheus Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) Pre-Conceptual Design Report completed by the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT). This report documents the work pertaining to the Reactor Module, which includes integration of the space nuclear reactor with the reactor radiation shield, energy conversion, and instrumentation and control segments. This document also describes integration of the Reactor Module with the Heat Rejection segment, the Power Conditioning and Distribution subsystem (which comprise the SNPP), and the remainder of the Prometheus spaceship.

B. Levine

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

415

Related Resources - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

416

Publications: Other Resources - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

417

Publications 2005 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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418

Publications 2003 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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419

Contacts - Nuclear Data Program, Nuclear Engineering Division...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

420

Publications 2001 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Publications 2004 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

422

Publications 2009 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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423

Nuclear Criticality Safety: Current Activities - Nuclear Engineering...  

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424

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

425

Nuclear Systems Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

426

Publications 2011 - Nuclear Data Program - Nuclear Engineering...  

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Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

427

US Department of Energy Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves combined financial statements and management overview and supplemental financial and management information, September 30, 1995 and 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountant`s audit of the Department of Energy`s (Department) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves (NPOSR) financial statements as of September 30, 1995. The auditors have expressed an unqualified opinion on the 1995 statements. Their reports on the NPOSR internal control structure and compliance with laws and regulations are also provided.

NONE

1996-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:25:02 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Offices 13 Curricula Summary 14-17 Faculty Organizations 17 Student Council 17 Selection Procedures 18, procedures and policies deemed worthy of attention. The OSAC is comprised of thirty-five student for the Navy's fully funded graduate education program. SELECTION PROCEDURES NAVAL OFFICERS Selection

429

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Propulsion system for a motor vehicle using a bidirectional energy converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A motor vehicle propulsion system includes an electrical energy source and a traction motor coupled to receive electrical energy from the electrical energy source. The system also has a first bus provided electrical energy by the electrical energy source and a second bus of relatively lower voltage than the first bus. In addition, the system includes an electrically-driven source of reaction gas for the electrical energy source, the source of reaction gas coupled to receive electrical energy from the first bus. Also, the system has an electrical storage device coupled to the second bus for storing electrical energy at the lower voltage. The system also includes a bidirectional energy converter coupled to convert electrical energy from the first bus to the second bus and from the second bus to the first bus.

Tamor, Michael Alan (Toledo, OH); Gale, Allan Roy (Livonia, MI)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

A bimodal power and propulsion system based on cermet fuel and heat pipe energy transport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bimodal space reactor systems provide both thermal propulsion for the spacecraft orbital transfer and electrical power to the spacecraft bus once it is on station. These systems have the potential to increase both the available payload in high energy orbits and the available power to that payload. These increased mass and power capabilities can be used to either reduce mission cost by permitting the use of smaller launch vehicles or to provide increased mission performance from the current launch vehicle. A major barrier to the deployment of these bimodal systems has been the cost associated with their development. This paper describes a bimodal reactor system with performance potential to permit more than 70% of the instrumented payload of the Titan IV/Centaur to be launched from the Atlas IIAS. The development cost is minimized by basing the design on existing component technologies.

Polansky, G.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gunther, N.A. [Gunther (Norman A.), San Jose, CA (United States); Rochow, R.F. [Novatech, Lynchburg, VA (United States); Bixler, C.H. [Bixler (Charles H.), Mannford, OK (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Test of relativistic gravity for propulsion at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A design is presented of a laboratory experiment that could test the suitability of relativistic gravity for propulsion of spacecraft to relativistic speeds. An exact time-dependent solution of Einstein's gravitational field equation confirms that even the weak field of a mass moving at relativistic speeds could serve as a driver to accelerate a much lighter payload from rest to a good fraction of the speed of light. The time-dependent field of ultrarelativistic particles in a collider ring is calculated. An experiment is proposed as the first test of the predictions of general relativity in the ultrarelativistic limit by measuring the repulsive gravitational field of bunches of protons in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The estimated 'antigravity beam' signal strength at a resonant detector of each proton bunch is 3 nm/s^2 for 2 ns during each revolution of the LHC. This experiment can be performed off-line, without interfering with the normal operations of the LHC.

Franklin Felber

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

433

Enrichment Zoning Options for the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE)  

SciTech Connect

Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. In NASA’s recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study (NASA-SP-2009-566, July 2009), nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option because of its high thrust and high specific impulse (-900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. Past activities at the NASA Glenn Research Center have included development of highly detailed MCNP Monte Carlo transport models of the SNRE and other small engine designs. Preliminary core configurations typically employ fuel elements with fixed fuel composition and fissile material enrichment. Uniform fuel loadings result in undesirable radial power and temperature profiles in the engines. Engine performance can be improved by some combination of propellant flow control at the fuel element level and by varying the fuel composition. Enrichment zoning at the fuel element level with lower enrichments in the higher power elements at the core center and on the core periphery is particularly effective. Power flattening by enrichment zoning typically results in more uniform propellant exit temperatures and improved engine performance. For the SNRE, element enrichment zoning provided very flat radial power profiles with 551 of the 564 fuel elements within 1% of the average element power. Results for this and alternate enrichment zoning options for the SNRE are compared.

Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Propulsion System Materials Program semiannual progress report for April 1995 through September 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the DOE, NASA, and DOD advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a 5-year program plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. During the course of the Propulsion System Materials Program, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. However, further work is needed to reduce the cost of ceramics to facilitate their commercial introduction, especially in the highly cost-sensitive automotive market. To this end, the direction of the Propulsion System Materials Program is now shifting toward reducing the cost of ceramics to facilitate commercial introduction of ceramic components for near-term engine applications. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported to include near-term (5--10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned. The work elements are as follows: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, low-expansion ceramics, and testing and data base development.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program: Semiannual progress report, April 1996--September 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OTT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1, 2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for contributions to this report.

Johnson, D.R.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Innovative Confinement Concepts Workshop 2000 (Book of Abstracts)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion Vehicle Concept forNuclear Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion Vehicle Concept forfusion reactor-based space propulsion system is proposed as

Celata, Christine; Accelerator and Fusion Research Staff

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Innovative Confinement Concepts Workshop 2000 (Book of Abstracts)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Spherical Torus Nuclear Fusion Reactor Space PropulsionA Spherical Torus Nuclear Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion

Celata, Christine; Accelerator and Fusion Research Staff

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

ICENES `91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems. Program and abstracts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, {mu}-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Nuclear Reactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactions Nuclear reactions and nuclear scattering are used to measure the properties of nuclei. Reactions that exchange energy or nucleons can be used to measure the energies of...

440

Nuclear Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Nuclear Safety information site that provides assistance and resources to field elements in implementation of requirements and resolving nuclear safety, facility safety, and quality assurance issues.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors III ... response of oxide ceramics for nuclear applications through experiment, theory, and ...

442

Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highlights on the recent research activity, carried out by the Italian Community involved in the "Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics" field, will be presented.

M Colonna

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

443

Double row loop-coil configuration for high-speed electrodynamic maglev suspension, guidance, propulsion and guideway directional switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stabilization and propulsion system comprising a series of loop-coils arranged in parallel rows wherein two rows combine to form one of two magnetic rails. Levitation and lateral stability are provided when the induced field in the magnetic rails interacts with the superconducting magnets mounted on the magnetic levitation vehicle. The loop-coils forming the magnetic rails have specified dimensions and a specified number of turns and by constructing differently these specifications, for one rail with respect to the other, the angle of tilt of the vehicle can be controlled during directional switching. Propulsion is provided by the interaction of a traveling magnetic wave associated with the coils forming the rails and the super conducting magnets on the vehicle.

He, Jianliang (Naperville, IL); Rote, Donald M. (Lagrange, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Double row loop-coil configuration for high-speed electrodynamic maglev suspension, guidance, propulsion and guideway directional switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stabilization and propulsion system are disclosed comprising a series of loop-coils arranged in parallel rows wherein two rows combine to form one of two magnetic rails. Levitation and lateral stability are provided when the induced field in the magnetic rails interacts with the superconducting magnets mounted on the magnetic levitation vehicle. The loop-coils forming the magnetic rails have specified dimensions and a specified number of turns and by constructing differently these specifications, for one rail with respect to the other, the angle of tilt of the vehicle can be controlled during directional switching. Propulsion is provided by the interaction of a traveling magnetic wave associated with the coils forming the rails and the superconducting magnets on the vehicle. 12 figs.

He, J.; Rote, D.M.

1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

445

Use of non-petroleum fuels to reduce military energy vulnerabilities: self-sufficient bases and new weapon propulsion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US fossil synfuels program may not have significant impact on domestic fuel supplies until near the year 2000, resulting in a continuing mobility fuels vulnerability for the US military until then. But there are other mobility fuel options for both propulsion systems and stationary base-energy sources, for which the base technology is commercially available or at least demonstrated. For example, for surface propulsion systems, hydrogen-fuel-cell/battery-electric hybrids may be considered; for weapons systems these may offer some new flexibilities, standardization possibilities, and multiple military-controlled fuel-supply options. Hydrogen-fueled aircraft may provide interesting longer-term possibilities in terms of military energy self-sufficiency and multiple supply options, as well as performance specifications. These scenarios will be discussed, along with possibilities for demonstrations in the MX-system ground vehicles.

Freiwald, D.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Research, development and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report for 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first annual report describing progress in the 33-month cooperative program between Argonne National Laboratory and Gould Inc.'s Nickel-Zinc/Electric Vehicle Project. The purpose of the program is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of the nickel-zinc battery for electric vehicle propulsion. The successful completion of the program will qualify the nickel-zinc battery for use in the Department of Energy's demonstration program under the auspices of Public Law 94-413.

Not Available

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile November 7, 2005 - 12:38pm Addthis Will Be Redirected to Naval Reactors, Down-blended or Used for Space Programs WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove up to 200 metric tons (MT) of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU), in the coming decades, from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons and prepare this material for other uses. Secretary Bodman made this announcement while addressing the 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference in Washington, DC.

448

Fusion Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Research...

449

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program Semiannual Progress Report for October 1998 Through March 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OIT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NOX and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulate. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OIT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1,2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and tribological stresses and higher temperatures of advanced designs limit the engine designer; advanced materials allow the design of components that may operate reliably at higher stresses and temperatures, thus enabling more efficient engine designs. Advanced materials also offer the opportunity to improve the emissions, NVH, and performance of diesel engines for pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. The principal areas of research are: (1) Cost Effective High Performance Materials and Processing; (2) Advanced Manufacturing Technology; (3)Testing and Characterization; and (4) Materials and Testing Standards.

Johnson, R.D.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 12610 of 26,764 results. 01 - 12610 of 26,764 results. Page Annual Planning Summaries: Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (NNPP) http://energy.gov/nepa/annual-planning-summaries-naval-nuclear-propulsion-program-nnpp Download Recovery Act Funds at Work: Smart Grid Investment Grant Profiles DOE is working with regional and local utilities and co-ops across the nation to improve the reliability of the grid and helping communities recover faster when disruptions occur. Case studies are... http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/recovery-act-funds-work-smart-grid-investment-grant-profiles Download Operational Plan and Desktop Reference for the Disability Employment Program The Department of Energy's Plan and Desktop Reference for hiring individuals with disabilities. http://energy.gov/hc/downloads/operational-plan-and-desktop-reference-disability-employment-program

451

The Navy seeks to identify responsible sources and obtain information in regard to purchasing renewable power for Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, located in Fallon, NV  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI) for Renewable Generation REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI) for Renewable Generation Opportunities at NAWS China Lake, NAS Fallon, MCAGCC 29 Palms, and MCAS Yuma The Department of Navy (DoN) intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) in early 2009 for renewable energy generation opportunities at Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) China Lake, California; Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, Nevada; Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC) Twentynine Palms, California, and Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Yuma, Arizona. The DoN will consider opportunities for the purchase of renewable power, developer wholesale generation, distributed generation, and the combination of those opportunities. Specifically, the Navy will provide Government land on these installations for large

452

Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. ... see all Nuclear Analytical Chemistry news ... ...

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

453

Future of Nuclear Data for Nuclear Astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear astrophysics is an exciting growth area in nuclear science. Because of the enormous nuclear data needs of this field

Michael S. Smith

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Countering Nuclear Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

455

Nuclear Detonation Detection | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Offices > Office of Nonproliferation Research & Development > Nuclear Detonation Detection Nuclear Detonation Detection Develop, Demonstrate, and...

456

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chernobyl Nuclear Accident | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

457

Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary, research-oriented, analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, we found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700{degrees}F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90, 000 ft lowers peak hot section temperatures to around 2800{degrees}F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature. 24 refs.

Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Silverstein, C.C. (CCS Associates, Bethel Park, PA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Analytical and experimental studies of heat pipe radiation cooling of hypersonic propulsion systems  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary, research-oriented, analytical and experimental studies were completed to assess the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This new approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from an external heat pipe nacelle. For propulsion systems using heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC), it is possible to continue to use hydrocarbon fuels into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 speed range, thereby enhancing the economic attractiveness of commercial or military hypersonic flight. In the second-phase feasibility program recently completed, we found that heat loads produced by considering both convection and radiation heat transfer from the combustion gas can be handled with HPRC design modifications. The application of thermal insulation to ramburner and nozzle walls was also found to reduce the heat load by about one-half and to reduce peak HPRC system temperatures to below 2700{degrees}F. In addition, the operation of HPRC at cruise conditions of around Mach 4.5 and at an altitude of 90, 000 ft lowers peak hot section temperatures to around 2800{degrees}F. An HPRC heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested at Mach 5 conditions of heat flux, heat load, and temperature. 24 refs.

Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Silverstein, C.C. [CCS Associates, Bethel Park, PA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) for high-speed aircraft propulsion. Phase 2 (feasibility) final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos), and CCS Associates are conducting the Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC) for High-Speed Aircraft Propulsion program to determine the advantages and demonstrate the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This innovative approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from adjacent external surfaces. HPRC is viewed as an alternative (or complementary) cooling technique to the use of pumped cryogenic or endothermic fuels to provide regenerative fuel or air cooling of the hot surfaces. The HPRC program has been conducted through two phases, an applications phase and a feasibility phase. The applications program (Phase 1) included concept and assessment analyses using hypersonic engine data obtained from US engine company contacts. The applications phase culminated with planning for experimental verification of the HPRC concept to be pursued in a feasibility program. The feasibility program (Phase 2), recently completed and summarized in this report, involved both analytical and experimental studies.

Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Silverstein, C.C. [CCS Associates, Bethel Park, PA (United States)

1994-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

460

History of Ramjet and Scramjet Propulsion Development for U.S. Navy Missiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this article is to summarize the evolution and development of ramjet engines (and variants thereof) as propulsion systems for missiles flying at supersonic (or faster) flight speeds that have been supported by the U.S. Navy since World War II. Reference 1 provides a discussion on the details of the types of engines under discussion, along with their limitations, and a historical perspective on the evolutionary timescale of ramjets, scramjets, and mixed-cycle engines. Reference 2 presents a similar discussion for U.S. Air Force--developed systems. In this article we summarize programs to develop surface-launched and air-launched subsonic combustion ramjets and scramjets. Table 1 shows the evolutionary history of all of the ramjet and scramjet engine and vehicle concepts and systems included in these discussions. The names, engine types, dates, performance, system constraints, etc., for each are presented. (Some information is not given for reasons of security.) The U.S. Navy has supported and developed a substantial technology base, including a variety of ramjets. This technology base, however, is not nearly as substantial for scramjets and their derivatives. A number of these ramjet engines and ramjet-powered weapon concepts have been flight tested, but none at hypersonic speeds. Only one U.S. Navy ramjet system has ever become operational (the Talos), and it is still being used as a target today (Vandal). SURFACE-LAUNCHED RAMJET DEVELOPMENT

P. J. Waltrup; Michael E. White; Frederick Zarlingo; Edward S. Gravlin

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naval nuclear propulsion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Research and development of advanced nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this program has been to develop and demonstrate an advanced nickel-iron battery suitable for use in electric vehicles. During the course of this contract various steps and modification have been taken to improve Nickel-Iron battery performance while reducing cost. Improvement of the nickel electrode through slurry formulations and substrate changes, as seen with the fiber electrode, were investigated. Processing parameters for impregnation and formation were also manipulated to improve efficiency. Impregnation saw the change of anode type from platinized titanium to the consumable nickel anode. Formation changes were also made allowing for doubled processing capabilities of positive electrodes, a savings in both time and money. A final design change involved the evolution of the NIF-200 from the NIF-220. This change permitted the use of 1.2 mm iron electrodes and maintained the necessary performance characteristics for electric vehicle propulsion. Emphasis on a pilot plant became the main focus during the late 1989--90 period. The pilot plant facility would be a culmination of the program providing the best product at the lowest price.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Multiple pole electromagnetic propulsion system with separated ballistic guidance and electrical current contact surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electromagnetic propulsion system is disclosed having separate rails for ballistic guidance and for carrying current. In this system, one or more pairs of ballistic guidance rails are provided, with each ballistic guidance rail having a pair of current carrying rails joined to it to form a combined rail. Each combined rail is separated electrically from adjacent combined rails by electrically insulating blocks. Each of the current carrying rails in a given combined rail pair have the same electrical polarity, and the polarities alternate between adjacent combined rails. Armatures contact current carrying rails to complete the circuit to generate the accelerating Lorentz force on the armatures. Bore riders on the sabot and/or projectile are in contact with the ballistic guide rails. Separation of the current carrying and ballistic guidance functions increases resistance of the system to rail movement and bending, as well as reduced wear/damage to the rails. In further embodiments, a circumferential over wrap providing compressive force on the rails further increases resistance of the system to rail movement and bending.

Sims, Jr., James R. (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory. Electric and hybrid propulsion systems, No. 1  

SciTech Connect

Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during FY 1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies [Na/S, Li/FeS, Ni/Metal-Hydride, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe]. These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and lie evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most promising R&D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R&D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos IIILaser: Part 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt Pharos III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were employed using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The 2nd Campaign investigated impulse generation with the laser beam focused at grazing incidence across near horizontal target surfaces, with pulse energies ranging from 55 to 186 J, and pulse-widths of 2 to 30 ns FWHM. Laser generated impulse was measured with a horizontal Plexiglas registered ballistic pendulum equipped with either a steel target insert or 0.5 Tesla permanent magnet (NEIT-40), to quantify changes in the momentum coupling coefficient (C{sub M}). Part 2 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 2 results including C{sub M} performance data, and long exposure color photos of LP plasma phenomena.

Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Manka, C. [Space Plasma Branch, Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. (United States)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

465

Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos III Laser: Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt PHAROS III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were tested using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The first campaign investigated impulse generation with the beam oriented almost normal to the target surface, with energies ranging from 23 to 376 J, and pulses of 5 to 30 ns FWHM. Air breakdown/ plasma dynamics were diagnosed with GOI cameras and color photography. Laser generated impulse was quantified with both vertical pendulums and piezoelectric pressure transducers using the standard performance metric, C{sub M}--the momentum coupling coefficient. Part 1 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 1 results including laser plasma diagnostics, pressure gage and vertical pendulum data.

Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Manka, C. [Space Plasma Branch, Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. (United States)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

466

Resonant snubber based soft-switching inverters for electric propulsion drives  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes recently developed soft-switching inverters and proposes two alternative options for electric propulsion drives. The newly developed soft-switching inverter employs an auxiliary switch and a resonant inductor per phase to produce a zero voltage across the main switch so that the main switch can turn on at the zero-voltage condition. Both the auxiliary switch and the resonant inductor are operating at a fractional duty, and thus are small in size as compared to the main inverter circuit components. Operation modes in a complete zero-voltage switching cycle for the single-phase soft-switching inverter are described in detail with graphical explanations. The circuit operation was first verified by a computer simulation and then tested with an 1-kW single-phase and an 100-kW three-phase inverters. Experimental results are presented to show the superior performance in efficiency improvement, EMI reduction, and dv/dt reduction of the proposed soft-switching inverters.

Lai, J.S.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Performance and Economics of a Wind-Diesel Hybrid Energy System: Naval Air Landing Field, San Clemente Island, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the wind resource, economics and operation of the recently installed wind turbines in conjunction with diesel power for the Naval Air Landing Field (NALF), San Clemente Island (SCI), California Project. The primary goal of the SCI wind power system is to operate with the existing diesel power plant and provide equivalent or better power quality and system reliability than the existing diesel system. The wind system is also intended to reduce, as far as possible, the use of diesel fuel and the inherent generation of nitrogen-oxide emissions and other pollutants. The first two NM 225/30 225kW wind turbines were installed and started shake-down operations on February 5, 1998. This report describes the initial operational data gathered from February 1998 through January 1999, as well as the SCI wind resource and initial cost of energy provided by the wind turbines on SCI. In support of this objective, several years of data on the wind resources of San Clemente Island were collected and compared to historical data. The wind resource data were used as input to economic and feasibility studies for a wind-diesel hybrid installation for SCI.

McKenna, E. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Olsen, T. (Timothy Olsen Consulting)

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

468

Proposed natural gas protection program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

As a result of US Department of Energy (DOE) monitoring activities, it was determined in 1983 that the potential existed for natural gas resources underlying the Naval Oil Shales Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 (NOSrs-1 3) to be drained by privately-owned gas wells that were being drilled along the Reserves borders. In 1985, DOE initiated a limited number of projects to protect the Government's interest in the gas resources by drilling its own offset production'' wells just inside the boundaries, and by formally sharing in the production, revenues and costs of private wells that are drilled near the boundaries ( communitize'' the privately-drilled wells). The scope of these protection efforts must be expanded. DOE is therefore proposing a Natural Gas Protection Program for NOSRs-1 3 which would be implemented over a five-year period that would encompass a total of 200 wells (including the wells drilled and/or communitized since 1985). Of these, 111 would be offset wells drilled by DOE on Government land inside the NOSRs' boundaries and would be owned either entirely by the Government or communitized with adjacent private land owners or lessees. The remainder would be wells drilled by private operators in an area one half-mile wide extending around the NOSRs boundaries and communitized with the Government. 23 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

U.S. Department of Energy Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1 quarterly financial statements, March 31, 1997 and 1996  

SciTech Connect

The report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` review of the Department of Energy`s Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1 interim financial statements as of March 31, 1997 and 1996. The review was done in accordance with Statements on Standards for Accounting and Review Services issued by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. A review of interim financial statements consist principally of inquires of NPR-1 personnel and analytical procedures applied to financial data. It is substantially less in scope than an audit in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, the objective of which is the expression of an opinion regarding the financial statements taken as a whole. Accordingly, the certified public accountants do not express such an opinion. The auditors have stated that, except for the omission of certain disclosures, they are not aware of any material modifications that should be made to the financial statements in order for them to be in conformity with the other comprehensive basis of accounting described in Note 1 to the financial statements.

1997-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

470

U.S. Department of Energy Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1 quarterly financial statements, December 31, 1996 and 1995  

SciTech Connect

The report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` review of the Department of Energy`s Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1 interim financial statements as of December 31, 1996 and 1995. The review was done in accordance with Statements on Standards for Accounting and Review Services issued by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. A review of interim financial statements consists principally of inquiries of NPR-1 personnel and analytical procedures applied to financial data. It is substantially less in scope than an audit in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, the objective of which is the expression of an opinion regarding the financial statements take as a whole. Accordingly, the certified public accountants do not express such an opinion. The auditors have stated that, except for the omission of certain disclosures, they are not aware of any material modifications that should be made to the financial statements in order for them to be in conformity with the other comprehensive basis of accounting described in Note 1 to the financial statements.

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

471

Nuclear Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE) Sourcebook. We have evolved and improved! The core mission of the Sourcebook has not changed, however. Our purpose is to facilitate interaction among faculty, students, industry, and government agencies to accomplish nuclear research, teaching and service activities. Since 1986 we have compiled critical information on nuclear

472

Nuclear forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``