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1

CO2 Emissions - Nauru  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nauru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nauru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nauru...

2

TWP Nauru Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru Site Nauru Site TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Nauru Site Location: 0° 31' 15.6" S, 166° 54' 57.60" E Altitude: 7.1 meters The Nauru facility was established in November 1998 as the second TWP climate research station. It is situated in the Denigomodu district on Nauru Island, the Republic of Nauru, which is located in the western South Pacific, approximately 1,200 miles northeast of Papua New Guinea. The ARM Program selected this location because it is on the eastern edge of the Pacific warm pool under La Niña conditions, which affect weather patterns

3

ARM - TWP Nauru Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru Site Nauru Site TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Nauru Site Location: 0° 31' 15.6" S, 166° 54' 57.60" E Altitude: 7.1 meters The Nauru facility was established in November 1998 as the second TWP climate research station. It is situated in the Denigomodu district on Nauru Island, the Republic of Nauru, which is located in the western South Pacific, approximately 1,200 miles northeast of Papua New Guinea. The ARM Program selected this location because it is on the eastern edge of the Pacific warm pool under La Niña conditions, which affect weather patterns

4

Case Closed on Nauru Island Effect  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Closed on Nauru Island Effect Closed on Nauru Island Effect For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight The tiny 4-kilometer-by-6-kilometer island of Nauru is isolated in the equatorial Pacific Ocean with naught but a few small scattered islands for thousands of kilometers around. Thus, the ARM measurements made there are intended to represent the larger surrounding oceanic area. But decades of phosphate mining have left large barren karst fields as the predominant land surface over most of the center of the island, making it much more susceptible to solar heating than typical tropical vegetated surfaces. During the Nauru99 campaign, small cumulus clouds were observed at times forming over the center of the island, advecting over the ARM site

5

ARM - PI Product - Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsNauru Island Effect Detection Data Set Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Nauru Island Effect...

6

Quantification of the Impact of Nauru Island on ARM Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nauru Island at times generates low clouds that impact low-level cloud statistics and downwelling shortwave radiation measurements made at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) site. This study uses five years of Nauru data to ...

Charles N. Long; Sally A. McFarlane

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Nauru: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nauru: Energy Resources Nauru: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-0.5333333,"lon":166.9166667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

8

Navajo Electrification Demonstraiton Project  

SciTech Connect

This is a final technical report required by DOE for the Navajo Electrification Demonstration Program, This report covers the electric line extension project for Navajo families that currently without electric power.

Larry Ahasteen, Project Manager

2006-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

9

NAVAJO ELECTRIFICATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year project which addresses the electricity needs of the unserved and underserved Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. The program serves to cumulatively provide off-grid electricty for families living away from the electricty infrastructure, line extensions for unserved families living nearby (less than 1/2 mile away from) the electricity, and, under the current project called NEDP-4, the construction of a substation to increase the capacity and improve the quality of service into the central core region of the Navajo Nation.

Terry W. Battiest

2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

10

Radiosonde Humidity Soundings and Microwave Radiometers during Nauru99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During JuneJuly 1999, the NOAA R/V Ron H. Brown (RHB) sailed from Australia to the Republic of Nauru where the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates a long-term climate observing station. During July, ...

Edgeworth R. Westwater; B. Boba Stankov; Domenico Cimini; Yong Han; Joseph A. Shaw; Barry M. Lesht; Carles N. Long

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Clouds and Shortwave Fluxes at Nauru. Part II: Shortwave Flux Closure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The datasets currently being collected by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program on the islands of Nauru and Manus represent the longest time series of ground-based cloud measurements in the tropical western Pacific region. In this ...

Sally A. McFarlane; K. Franklin Evans

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Modification of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer by a Small Island: Observations from Nauru  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nauru, a small island in the tropical Pacific, generates cloud plumes that may grow to over 100-km lengths. This study uses observations to examine the mesoscale disturbance of the marine atmospheric boundary layer by the island that produces ...

Stuart Matthews; Jrg M. Hacker; Jason Cole; Jeffrey Hare; Charles N. Long; R. Michael Reynolds

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Final Report - Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project - FY2004  

SciTech Connect

The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year projects which addresses the needs of unserved Navajo Nation residents without basic electricity services. The Navajo Nation is the United States' largest tribe, in terms of population and land. An estimated 18,000 Navajo Nation homes do not have basic grid-tied electricity--and this third year of funding, known as NEDP-3, provided 351 power line extensions to Navajo families.

Kenneth L. Craig, Interim General Manager

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Final Report - Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project - FY2004  

SciTech Connect

The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year projects which addresses the needs of unserved Navajo Nation residents without basic electricity services. The Navajo Nation is the United States' largest tribe, in terms of population and land. An estimated 18,000 Navajo Nation homes do not have basic grid-tied electricity--and this third year of funding, known as NEDP-3, provided 351 power line extensions to Navajo families.

Kenneth L. Craig, Interim General Manager

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Using ARM TWP Nauru Observations to Evaluate a Simple Thermodynamic Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using ARM TWP Nauru Observations to Evaluate a Simple Thermodynamic Model Using ARM TWP Nauru Observations to Evaluate a Simple Thermodynamic Model of the Subcloud Layer Under Fair-Weather Cumulus Conditions Albrecht, Bruce University of Miami Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National Laboratory Category: Modeling Marine boundary layer clouds are fundamental in regulating the vertical structure of water vapor and entropy in the lowest 2 km of the Earth's atmosphere. The observations from the ARM TWP-Nauru site provide a unique opportunity to study these clouds and the associated boundary layer structure. In this study an atmospheric mixed layer representation of the subcloud layer for application in fair-weather cumulus regimes is used to develop a diagnostic model of the near surface temperature and moisture associated with a given surface temperature and wind speed. This model

16

Lab partners with Navajo Nation on uranium mine project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

> Around the Lab > atl043013navajo 04302013 Lab partners with Navajo Nation on uranium mine project Linda A Lucchetti, LLNL, (925) 422-5815, lucchetti1@llnl.gov...

17

Navajo Tribal Utility Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Place Arizona Utility Id 13314 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Navajo Tribal Utility Association Smart Grid Project was awarded $4,991,750 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $10,611,849. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png

18

Navajo Tribal Utility Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Authority Utility Authority (Redirected from Navajo Tribal Utility Association) Jump to: navigation, search Name Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Place Arizona Utility Id 13314 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Navajo Tribal Utility Association Smart Grid Project was awarded $4,991,750 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $10,611,849.

19

Remote Sensing Observations from MTI Satellites and GMS Over Tropical Island of Nauru  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remote Sensing Observations from MTI Satellites and Remote Sensing Observations from MTI Satellites and GMS Over Tropical Island of Nauru W. M. Porch, P. Chylek, and B. Henderson Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico Introduction The observations of island cloud trails have revealed a strong relationship between the character and frequency of occurrence of island cloud trails and the Tropical Ocean Southern Oscillation (MacFarlane et al. 2004 a, b). Island cloud trails from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement (ARM) facility of Nauru persist for more than 50 km (Nordeen et al. 2001) and resemble ship trail clouds found in the Eastern Ocean Margins (Porch et al. 1999). Island trail clouds are much more frequently observed during La Niña periods than El Niño periods (Figure 1). This

20

EIS-0231: Navajo Transmission Project | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31: Navajo Transmission Project 31: Navajo Transmission Project EIS-0231: Navajo Transmission Project SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to by Dine Power Authority, a Navajo Nation enterprise, to construct, operate, and maintain a 500 kilovolt (kV) transmission line planned to deliver electric power from the Four Comers area in northwestern New Mexico across northern Arizona to a terminus in southeastern Nevada. The proposed project, the Navajo Transmission Project, is currentiy planned to be in service in the year 2001 and operate for about 50 years. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 1, 1996 EIS-0231: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Draft Environmental Impact Statement Navajo Transmission Project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nauru navajo navaho" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Navajo Tribal Utility Association Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Navajo Tribal Utility Association Smart Grid Project Navajo Tribal Utility Association Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Navajo Tribal Utility Association Country United States Headquarters Location Ft. Defiance, Arizona Additional Benefit Places New Mexico, Utah Recovery Act Funding $4991750 Total Project Value $10611849 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Navajo Tribal Utility Association Smart Grid Project Coordinates 35.7444602°, -109.0764828° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

22

Navajo-Hopi Land Commission Renewable Energy Development Project (NREP)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO), a Navajo Nation executive branch agency has conducted activities to determine capacity-building, institution-building, outreach and management activities to initiate the development of large-scale renewable energy - 100 megawatt (MW) or larger - generating projects on land in Northwestern New Mexico in the first year of a multi-year program. The Navajo Hopi Land Commission Renewable Energy Development Project (NREP) is a one year program that will develop and market a strategic business plan; form multi-agency and public-private project partnerships; compile site-specific solar, wind and infrastructure data; and develop and use project communication and marketing tools to support outreach efforts targeting the public, vendors, investors and government audiences.

Thomas Benally, Deputy Director,

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

LM Continues to Work with the Navajo Nation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Continues to Work with the Navajo Nation Continues to Work with the Navajo Nation LM Continues to Work with the Navajo Nation January 9, 2013 - 4:00pm Addthis What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment LM continues to work with the Navajo Nation to perform long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) at four Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I sites located on the Navajo Nation. Compliance activities include monitoring and maintaining engineered disposal cells, as well as remediating groundwater. The Navajo Nation encompasses more than 27,000 square miles in the southwestern United States. Uranium exploration, mining, and milling occurred in the Four Corners area; nearly 4 million tons of uranium ore were extracted from Navajo lands.

24

Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (Utah) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Authority (Utah) Authority (Utah) Jump to: navigation, search Name Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Place Utah Utility Id 13314 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0967/kWh Commercial: $0.1150/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (Utah). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

25

Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (New Mexico) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico) Mexico) Jump to: navigation, search Name Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Place New Mexico Utility Id 13314 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1000/kWh Commercial: $0.1170/kWh Industrial: $0.0605/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (New Mexico). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

26

Navajo Transmission Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . SUMRY INTRODUCTION Din6 Power Authority @PA), a Navajo Nation enterprise, proposes to construct, operate, and maintain a 500 kilovolt (kV) transmission line planned to deliver electric power from the Four Comers area in northwestern New Mexico across northern Arizona to a terminus in southeastern Nevada. The proposed project, the Navajo Transmission Project ~), is currentiy planned to be in service in the year 2001 and operate for about 50 years. The preparation of an environment impact statement @IS) is required because of Federal government involvement, which includes (1) granting rights-of-way across Federrd and tribal lands and (2) certain participation by Western Area Power Administration ~estem), and agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In accordance the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 ~PA), Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations

27

Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and Impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pursuant to the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced in 2009 its intent to issue rules for controlling emissions from Navajo Generating Station that could affect visibility at the Grand Canyon and at several other national parks and wilderness areas. The final rule will conform to what EPA determines is the best available retrofit technology (BART) for the control of haze-causing air pollutants, especially nitrogen oxides. While EPA is ultimately responsible for setting Navajo Generating Station's BART standards in its final rule, it will be the U.S. Department of the Interior's responsibility to manage compliance and the related impacts. This study aims to assist both Interior and EPA by providing an objective assessment of issues relating to the power sector.

Hurlbut, D. J.; Haase, S.; Brinkman, G.; Funk, K.; Gelman, R.; Lantz, E.; Larney, C.; Peterson, D.; Worley, C.; Liebsch, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Navajo Generating Station and Clean-Energy Alternatives: Options for Renewables  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In January 2012, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory delivered to the Department of the Interior the first part of a study on Navajo Generating Station (Navajo GS) and the likely impacts of BART compliance options. That document establishes a comprehensive baseline for the analysis of clean energy alternatives, and their ability to achieve benefits similar to those that Navajo GS currently provides. This analysis is a supplement to NREL's January 2012 study. It provides a high level examination of several clean energy alternatives, based on the previous analysis. Each has particular characteristics affecting its relevance as an alternative to Navajo GS. It is assumed that the development of any alternative resource (or portfolio of resources) to replace all or a portion of Navajo GS would occur at the end of a staged transition plan designed to reduce economic disruption. We assume that replacing the federal government's 24.3% share of Navajo GS would be a cooperative responsibility of both the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) and the Central Arizona Water Conservation District (CAWCD).

Hurlbut, D. J.; Haase, S.; Turchi, C. S.; Burman, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

A Feasibility Study to Evaluate Wind Energy Potential on the Navajo Nation  

SciTech Connect

The project, A Feasibility Study to Evaluate Wind Energy Potential on the Navajo Nation, is funded under a solicitation issued by the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program. Funding provided by the grant allowed the Navajo Nation to measure wind potential at two sites, one located within the boundaries of the Navajo Nation and the other off-reservation during the project period (September 5, 2005 - September 30, 2009). The recipient for the grant award is the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (NTUA). The grant allowed the Navajo Nation and NTUA manage the wind feasibility from initial site selection through the decision-making process to commit to a site for wind generation development. The grant activities help to develop human capacity at NTUA and help NTUA to engage in renewable energy generation activities, including not only wind but also solar and biomass. The final report also includes information about development activities regarding the sited included in the grant-funded feasibility study.

Terry Battiest

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and Impacts (Revised), Energy Analysis, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Navajo Generating Station Navajo Generating Station Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and Impacts David J. Hurlbut, Scott Haase, Gregory Brinkman, Kip Funk, Rachel Gelman, Eric Lantz, Christina Larney, David Peterson, Christopher Worley National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Liebsch HDR Engineering, Inc. Prepared under Task No. WFJ5.1000 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-53024 * Revised March 2012 Contract No. DE-AC36-08G028308 Produced under direction of the U.S. Department of the Interior by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Interagency Agreement R11PG30024 and Task No. WFJ5.1000. ERRATA SHEET NREL REPORT/PROJECT NUMBER: NREL/TP-6A20-53024 DOE NUMBER: N/A TITLE: Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and

31

Meteorological Processes Affecting the Transport of Emissions from the Navajo Generating Station to Grand Canyon National Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1990 Navajo Generating Station (NGS) Winter Visibility Study, a network of surface and upper-air meteorological measurement systems was operated in and around Grand Canyon National Park to investigate atmospheric processes in complex ...

Charles G. Lindsey; Jun Chen; Timothy S. Dye; L. Willard Richards; Donald L. Blumenthal

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Navajo Generating Station and Clean-Energy Alternatives: Options for Renewables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Navajo Generating Station and Clean-Energy Alternatives: Options for Renewables D.J. Hurlbut, S. Haase, C.S. Turchi, and K. Burman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Produced under direction of the U.S. Department of the Interior by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Interagency Agreement R11PG30024 and Task No WFJ5.1000. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-54706 June 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Navajo Generating Station and

33

Nauru'99: Scaling of Radiosondes by  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ground-Based Profiling of Atmospheric Temperature and Humidity. In Proceedings of the SPIE Int'l. Symp. on Optical Appl. Sci. and Engineering, Vol. 1540, pp.681-686, San Diego,...

34

"1. Palo Verde","Nuclear","Arizona Public Service Co",3937 "2. Navajo","Coal","Salt River Project",2250  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona" Arizona" "1. Palo Verde","Nuclear","Arizona Public Service Co",3937 "2. Navajo","Coal","Salt River Project",2250 "3. Gila River Power Station","Gas","Gila River Power Station LP",2060 "4. Springerville","Coal","Tucson Electric Power Co",1618 "5. Glen Canyon Dam","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",1312 "6. Santan","Gas","Salt River Project",1227 "7. Mesquite Generating Station","Gas","Mesquite Power LLC",1073 "8. Harquahala Generating Project","Gas","New Harquahala Generating Co, LLC",1054 "9. Hoover Dam","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",1040

35

Nauru - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Provides data, forecasts, country analysis brief and other analyses, focusing on the energy industry including oil, natural gas and electricity.

36

Navajo Wind Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Wind Energy Place Atlanta, Georgia Zip 30318 Sector Wind energy Product Atalanta-based but China-focused wind project developer. Coordinates 33.748315°, -84.391109° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.748315,"lon":-84.391109,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

The Impact of the Annual Cycle on Cloudiness at Manus and Nauru  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

averaged over the period 1975-2002. 2 Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 22-26, 2004 Australian monsoon. This pattern should...

38

Vertical Velocity Statistics in Fair-Weather Cumuli at the ARM TWP Nauru Climate Research Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fair-weather cumuli are fundamental in regulating the vertical structure of water vapor and entropy in the lowest 23 km of the earths atmosphere over vast areas of the oceans. In this study, a long record of profiling cloud radar observations ...

Pavlos Kollias; Bruce Albrecht

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

40

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nauru navajo navaho" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

42

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

43

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

44

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Nauru (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

45

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

46

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Nauru (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

47

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

48

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

49

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/home.cfm?attr=24 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadian-national-energy-use-database Language: "English,French" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

50

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Agency/Company /Organization: various Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan, Create Early Successes Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Guide/manual, Presentation, Video User Interface: Website Website: ttp://www.bioenergylists.org/ Cost: Free Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

51

Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.hbefa.net/e/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/handbook-emission-factors-road-transp Language: "English,French,German" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

52

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy Impacts Website: toolkits.reeep.org/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-and-energy-efficienc Language: "English,Chinese,French,Portuguese,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

53

IGES-Market Mechanism Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES-Market Mechanism Group IGES-Market Mechanism Group Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IGES-Market Mechanism Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Training materials Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/index.html Cost: Free Language: "English, Japanese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

54

Eco TransIT World | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eco TransIT World Eco TransIT World Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Eco TransIT World Focus Area: Low Carbon Communities Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: www.ecotransit.org/index.en.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/eco-transit-world Language: "English,Dutch,French,German,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

55

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iisd.org/cristaltool/ Cost: Free Language: "English, French, Portuguese, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

56

Miljoforden Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miljoforden Website Miljoforden Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Miljoforden Website Focus Area: Natural Gas Topics: Deployment Data Website: www.miljofordon.se/in-english/this-is-miljofordon-se Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/miljoforden-website Language: "English,Swedish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

57

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Focus Area: Propane Topics: Socio-Economic Website: theicct.org/sites/default/files/publications/Retrosp_final_bilingual.p Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/overview-china's-vehicle-emission-con Language: "English,Chinese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

58

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Agency/Company /Organization: Solar Energy International Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Solar PV Resource Type: Training materials User Interface: Other Website: www.solarenergy.org/bookstore/photovoltaics-design-installation-manual Cost: Paid Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

59

OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water User Interface: Website Website: www.solarthermalworld.org/ Cost: Free UN Region: Caribbean, South America Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Proven√ßal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√ºk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

60

Freight Best Practice Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Freight Best Practice Website Freight Best Practice Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Freight Best Practice Website Focus Area: Public Transit Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.freightbestpractice.org.uk/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/freight-best-practice-website Language: "English,Welsh" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

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61

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=o3470 Language: "Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

62

Sustainable Logistics Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Logistics Website Sustainable Logistics Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Logistics Website Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Best Practices Website: www.duurzamelogistiek.nl/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/sustainable-logistics-website Language: "English,Dutch" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

63

Column Water Vapor Statistics and Their Relationship to Deep Convection, Vertical and Horizontal Circulation, and Moisture Structure at Nauru  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relationships among relatively high-frequency probability distribution functions (pdfs) of anomalous column water vapor (cwv), precipitating deep convection, and the vertical and horizontal structures of circulation and tropospheric moisture are ...

Benjamin R. Lintner; Christopher E. Holloway; J. David Neelin

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Navajo County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

110.1402594° 110.1402594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.4019765,"lon":-110.1402594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

65

Compiled by Rosie Dayzie (Navajo) | Intern High School Counselor PAYINGFORCOLLEGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and culture. · Montana-Wyoming Tribal Leaders Council Blackfeet, Northern Arapaho, Eastern Shoshone, Fort Peck

Provancher, William

66

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1a)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

67

ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1a)  

SciTech Connect

The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

Renata McCoy; Shaocheng Xie

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

68

Preserving the U.S. Underground and Alternative Press of the 1960s and '70s: History, Prospects, and Microform Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reporter, Washington, DC, 1985- , UMI Navajo Times, WindowWashington, DC Native Sun, Detroit, MI Navajo Times, Window

Tsang, Daniel C

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Development of risk maps to minimize uranium exposures in the Navajo Churchrock mining district  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009 deLemos et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Jamie L Delemos; Doug Brugge; A Cajero; Mallery Downs; John L Durant; Christine M George; Sarah Henio-adeky; Teddy Nez; Thomas Manning; Tommy Rock; Bess Seschillie; Chris Shuey; Johnnye Lewis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A Climatology of Surface Cloud Radiative Effects at the ARM Tropical Western Pacific Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud radiative effects on surface downwelling fluxes are investigated using datasets from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) sites in the tropical western Pacific Ocean (TWP) region. The Nauru Island (Republic of Nauru) and ...

Sally A. McFarlane; Charles N. Long; Julia Flaherty

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Power Marketing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remarketing Effort Hoover Coordinating Committee Meeting FY2011 - June 7 Mead Transformer Presentation Navajo Navajo Surplus Marketing Parker-Davis Parker-Davis Project...

72

Local Option Transportation Taxes in the United States (Part Two: "State-by-State Findings")  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

five counties (Coconino, Navajo, Pima, Pinal, and Yavapai)Paz, Navajo, Pima, Pinal, Yavapai, and Yuma counties. These7 Three counties (Gila, Maricopa, and Pinal) have adopted

Goldman, Todd; Corbett, Sam; Wachs, Martin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Bayesian models for elevated disease risk due to exposure to uranium mine and mill waste on the Navajo Nation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Pharmacy, Community Environmental Health Program Keywords: abandoned uranium mines, conditionally specified of hypertension. Keywords: abandoned uranium mines, conditionally specified logistic regression, hyperten- sion, and it is home to more than 180,000 people (US Census, 2000). There are 520 abandoned uranium mines and 5

Huerta, Gabriel

74

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Case Closed on Nauru Island Effect Case Closed on Nauru Island Effect Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Long CN and SA McFarlane. 2012. "Quantification of the impact of Nauru Island on ARM measurements." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 51(3), 628-636. McFarlane SA, CN Long, and DM Flynn. 2005. "Impact of island-induced clouds on surface measurements: analysis of the ARM Nauru Island Effect Study data." Journal of Applied Meteorology, 44, 1045-1065. Conceptual model of the Nauru Island Effect and production of cloud plume. Approximate ARM Nauru site location is shown on the western side of the

75

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observations of High-Level Cirrus Clouds by the NOAA Depolarization Lidar During Nauru99 J. M. Intrieri and S. Sandberg National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

76

campbell-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Micropulse Lidar Data Sets and Initial Observations at Nauru Island J. R. Campbell and D. L. Hlavka Science Systems and Applications Inc. National Aeronautics and Space...

77

Co-Designing Sustainable Communities: The Identification and Incorporation of Social Performance Metrics in Native American Sustainable Housing and Renewable Energy System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

policy, the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (NTUA) has been pursuing renewable energy power generation from wind

Shelby, Ryan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Twenty-Four-Hour Observations of the Marine Boundary Layer Using Shipborne NOAA High-Resolution Doppler Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shipborne observations obtained with the NOAA high-resolution Doppler lidar (HRDL) during the 1999 Nauru (Nauru99) campaign were used to study the structure of the marine boundary layer (MBL) in the tropical Pacific Ocean. During a day with weak ...

Volker Wulfmeyer; Tijana Janji?

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2010 [Data Announcements, Facility News] 5, 2010 [Data Announcements, Facility News] New Datastream Identifies Nauru Data Influenced by Clouds Bookmark and Share A new data set that identifies periods when Nauru data may be affected by island-influenced clouds has been produced by Chuck Long, site scientist for the ARM Tropical Western Pacific site. The Nauru island effect (NIE) data set currently covers the period from September 2005 to May 2010 and will be updated periodically as new data are obtained. This data set will help scientists in their analysis of cloud and radiation data at Nauru and will enable them to perform more relevant comparisons of observations and model results. This conceptual model of the Nauru island effect phenomenon shows the location of the ARM and auxiliary Licor shortwave radiometer sites.

80

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Plumes Observed at Nauru Using GMS Imagery Plumes Observed at Nauru Using GMS Imagery M. L. Nordeen, D. R. Doelling, D. Pethick, and L. Nguyen Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis Atmospheric Sciences Division National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction As part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, the Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station 2 (ARCS-2) was placed on the leeward side of the island of Nauru (0.521°S, 166.916°E) to monitor the equatorial Tropical Western Pacific (TWP). We hoped the measurements of radiation and cloud properties from Nauru would represent the surrounding ocean. Observations at the ARCS-2 started during the Nauru99 (mid June to mid July 1999) field campaign. During this campaign, island-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nauru navajo navaho" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modification of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer by a Small Island: Modification of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer by a Small Island: Observations from Nauru Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Matthews, S., J. M. Hacker, J. Cole, J. Hare, C. N. Long, and R. M. Reynolds, (2007): Modification of the atmospheric boundary layer by a small island: observations from Nauru, MWR, Vol. 135, No. 3, pages 891–905. Figure 1. Illustration of daytime heating producing a thermal internal boundary layer effect over Nauru, which in turn produces cumulous clouds above the boundary layer. Figure 2. Illustration of Nauru heat-island produced by convective rolls forming cloud streets. Figure 3. Satellite images of Nauru on December 13, 2000 showing the cloud

82

Texas - State Energy Profile Data - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

ATA, Chevron, Citgo, Coastal, Conoco, DSE, Explorer, Exxon, Koch, Longhorn, Magellan, Mobil, Navajo, Phillips, Pride, Shell, Sigmor, SFPP, TEPPCO, Texaco, ...

83

Early and sustained interventions which strongly feature mentoring are essential in help-ing Native American and Latino students navigate an unfamiliar academic system that is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Navajo) is the largest, with 170,000 members. Others include the Oglala Sioux, Cherokee Nation, Blackfeet

Benitez-Nelson, Claudia

84

Preserving the U.S. Underground and Alternative Press of the 1960s and '70s: History, Prospects, and Microform Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oklahoma City, OK Utah Navajo Baa Hane, Blanding, UT Ute Bulletin, Fort Duchesne, UT Vision on the Wind,

Tsang, Daniel C

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

clements-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru: The Second ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site Nauru: The Second ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site W. E. Clements, F. J. Barnes, and L. Jones ARM Tropical Western Pacific Program Office University of California Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico M. Ivey Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, California A. Koontz Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington T. P. Ackerman and J. H. Mather The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania P. Lefale South Pacific Regional Environmental Progamme Apia, Western Samoa A. Pitcher and J. Cain Nauru Department of Island Development and Industry Nauru Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation (a) Measurement (ARM) Program was created in 1989 as part of the U.S. Global Change Research Program to improve the treatment of atmospheric

86

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NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru Island Effect Study - Nauru Island Effect Study - Installation and Preliminary Data K. B. Widener and C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Abstract A limited suite of instrumentation was installed on the windward side of Nauru to help in understanding the effect the island has on downwind development of clouds. This is of specific interest since the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmosphere Radiation and Cloud Station-2 (ARCS-2) site is on the leeward side of the island. This poster presents the instruments, data streams, and preliminary data from this study. Background During the first Department of Energy (DOE)/ARM Nauru99 Workshop held at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), various results were presented that indicated there indeed is an island

87

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NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of the Daily Cycle Comparison of the Daily Cycle of Lower-Tropospheric Winds Over the Open Ocean and Those Above a Small Island L. M. Hartten and W. M. Angevine Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Aeronomy Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The Nauru99 Intensive Operational Period (IOP) took place from June 16, 1999, (Day 167) to July 15, 1999, (Day 196) on and near the Republic of Nauru (0.5° S, 166.9° E). Nauru is a small (4 km by 6 km) island surrounded by a reef that is exposed at low tide (Figure 1). A narrow coastal belt encircles a sparsely vegetated 30 to 60 m high plateau comprised of coral pinnacles and phosphate-bearing rock. Figure 1. The Republic of Nauru. The 915-MHz profiler was located at "P"; the Atmospheric Radiation

88

ARM - Visiting the TWP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PacificVisiting the TWP PacificVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Visiting the TWP Nauru Island from the air. Nauru Island from the air. The Tropical Western Pacific site consists of three diverse climate research facilities in Papua New Guinea, the Republic of Nauru, and Australia. Each facility has its own operating procedures and health and safety issues. Safety First! Before visiting any of the three TWP facilities, you must do the following: Submit a Site and Computer Access Request Form Read the Safety Plan for the facility you plan to visit: TWP Site Visit Safety Procedure

89

Evaluating Single Column Models using an ensemble approach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sites at Manus and Nauru. The SCMs of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) forecasts model are being evaluated...

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1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pacific. This cruise, which has been designated Nauru99, was preceded by a cruise in a monsoon region (Jasmine) and followed by two cruise legs near the island of Kwajalein...

91

Moisture Vertical Structure, Column Water Vapor, and Tropical Deep Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical structure of the relationship between water vapor and precipitation is analyzed in 5 yr of radiosonde and precipitation gauge data from the Nauru Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site. The first vertical principal component of ...

Christopher E. Holloway; J. David Neelin

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

DOE/SC-ARM-13-001 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru, and Darwin sites. The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) is now deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to support the Two-Column Aerosol Campaign (TCAP). The TCAP campaign...

93

DOE/SC-ARM-13-007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru, and Darwin sites. The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) is now deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to support the Two-Column Aerosol Campaign (TCAP). The TCAP campaign...

94

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tenth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, San Antonio, Texas, March 13-17, 2000 1 Profiler, Radiometer, SST, and Meteorological Observations from the RV Mirai During Nauru99 W....

95

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tenth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, San Antonio, Texas, March 13-17, 2000 1 Nauru99 Ship and Buoy Intercomparison J. E. Hare and A. A. Grachev Cooperative Institute for...

96

post-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ETL Instrumentation on RV Ronald H. Brown for the Nauru99 Campaign M. J. Post, C. W. Fairall, D. A. Hazen, R. M. Hardesty, W. L. Eberhard, and B. E. Martner National Oceanic and...

97

Flow over Small Heat Islands: A Numerical Sensitivity Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional nonlinear model with physical parameterizations was applied to simulate the observed diurnal variation on the 5-km-wide flat tropical island of Nauru in the trade wind zone. Both the model and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (...

Hannu Savijrvi; Stuart Matthews

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for a walk down memory lane at the ARM Nauru site to help commemorate the site decommissioning, recognized at a closing reception on September 23, 2013. Kim Nitschke (white...

99

A Simulation Study of Shallow Moist Convection and Its Impact on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By comparing regional model simulations with the observations collected at the southern Great Plains (SGP) site and the tropical western Pacific (TWP) Nauru site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) project, this paper evaluates the ...

Ping Zhu; Christopher S. Bretherton

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Seasonal Variability in Clouds and Radiation at the Manus ARM Site  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program operates three climate observation stations in the tropical western Pacific region. Two of these sites, located on Manus island in Papua New Guinea and on the island republic of Nauru, have been operating for over five years. This data set provides an opportunity to examine variability in tropical cloudiness on a wide range of time scales. The focus of this study is on the annual cycle. The most obvious manifestation of the annual cycle in this region is the oscillation of monsoon convection between Asia and Australia. The impact of the annual cycle on Manus and Nauru is more subtle; however, analysis of radiation and cloud observations from the Manus and Nauru ARM sites reveals links to the annual monsoon cycle. One such link relates to the proximity of Manus to the Maritime Continent, the collection of islands separating the Pacific and Indian oceans. Convection over the large islands in the maritime continent exhibits a distinct annual cycle. Outflow from large-island convection is shown to modulate the cirrus population over Manus. During neutral or cool ENSO periods, convection over Nauru is relatively suppressed. During such periods, Nauru is shown to exhibit an annual cycle in local convective activity. During the inactive season, cirrus are often found near the tropopause over Nauru. These clouds are not formed directly by the outflow from convection. The seasonality and source of these clouds is also examined. Identifying the source of cirrus observed at Manus and Nauru is important because of the potential dependence of cirrus properties on the source of convection.

Mather, Jim H.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nauru navajo navaho" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Spring 2004  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Turbines Power Remote Navajo Homesteads Turbines Power Remote Navajo Homesteads Some families on the Navajo Reservation are seeing things in a new light-a light powered by electricity from the wind. Larry Ahasteen, renewable energy specialist for the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (NTUA), and regional crews combine photovoltaic (PV) systems and small wind turbines to create hybrid systems that produce electricity for remote Navajo households. "We use Mother Nature to generate power," Ahasteen said. "We want to use both the wind and the sun. The sun doesn't shine all the time." It's estimated that 18,000 remote households on the Navajo Reservation do without electricity. The reservation spans 26,000 miles across three states, and the cost to extend the electrical grid averages about $27,000 per mile. Some families

102

Microsoft Word - 111012 OCP Comments final.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Electrical Districts Association Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (also New Mexico, Utah) Salt River Project COLORADO Colorado Springs Utilities Intermountain Rural Electric...

103

Microsoft PowerPoint - Perry.ppt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MIDPOINT AREA LOS ANGELES AREA ALBUQUERQUE AREA NAVAJO DENVER AREA MOJAVE HOOVER PHOENIX AREA LANGDON HOT SPRINGS HELLS CANYON CHIEF JOSEPH BURNS PINTO FOUR CORNERS SHASTA LANGDON...

104

Tribal Case Studies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority. Source: Western Area Power Administration. Tribal Energy Program College Student Internship Papers The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of...

105

Decolonizing cartographies : sovereignty, territoriality, and maps of meaning in the uranium landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under Sacred Ground: a History of Navajo Oil, 1922-1982,history, by the end of this process of legal and political wrangling, oil

Voyles, Traci Brynne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Decolonizing cartographies : sovereignty, territoriality, and maps of meaning in the uranium landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 8 Colorado Plateau uranium district, Life magazine in146! Figure 12 Navajo Nation and uranium industry162! Figure 14 An undated poster protesting uranium

Voyles, Traci Brynne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

JM Butler - NJSP 2006 Training Workshop December 5-6 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Profiles African-American 1148 Afro-Caribbean 0 Sierra Leone 109 Caucasian 1655 Hispanic 686 Japan 163 Korea 182 Thailand 52 Navajo 146 ...

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

108

mitochondrial DNA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Profiles African-American 1148 Afro-Caribbean 0 Sierra Leone 109 Caucasian 1655 Hispanic 686 Japan 163 Korea 182 Thailand 52 Navajo 146 ...

2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

109

Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agency Careers November 17, 2011 - 3:15pm Addthis Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Native American student...

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1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Energy Budget Surface Energy Budget Measurements from Nauru99 C. W. Fairall, J. E. Hare, A. A. Grachev, and A. B. White National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) research vessel (R/V) Ronald H. Brown conducted a series of measurements in transit to and in the vicinity of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site on Nauru in June-July 1999 as part of a joint NOAA-Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program intensive study of air-sea interaction and cloud/radiative processes in the tropical western Pacific. This cruise, which has been designated Nauru99, was a follow-up to an earlier study at Manus Island (Post et al. 1997). Also participating in

111

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air-Sea Temperatures Measured With Scanning Air-Sea Temperatures Measured With Scanning Microwave and Infrared Radiometers in Nauru99 J. A. Shaw and J. H. Churnside National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado E. R. Westwater and Y. Han Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. Cimini University of L'Aquila Coppito L'Aquila, Italy Introduction Previously we described the deployment of two scanning radiometers on the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) R/V Ronald H. Brown (RHB) in the Tropical Western Pacific during the Nauru99 cruise, primarily in the vicinity of Nauru Island at about 0° latitude, 166° E

112

Microsoft Word - Gage-KS.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intercomparisons of Cloud Observations Intercomparisons of Cloud Observations from the AL S-band Profiler and the ETL K-band Millimeter-Wave Cloud Radar on the R/V Ronald H. Brown during Nauru99 K. S. Gage and D. A. Carter National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Aeronomy Laboratory Boulder, Colorado P. E. Johnston and C. R. Williams Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado M. Ryan Science Technology Corporation Boulder, Colorado D. Hazen and B. W. Orr National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction Nauru99 took place in the western and central Pacific during June and July 1999. During Nauru99, a diverse suite of instruments was located on the research vessel (R/V) Ronald H. Brown to measure cloud

113

Radiation effects in the environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yazzie, A. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ (United States). Dept. of History; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leavitt, C.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

SUMMARY REPORT For MONITORTNG AND MITIGATlON OF MESA VERDE CACTUS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SUMMARY REPORT SUMMARY REPORT For MONITORTNG AND MITIGATlON OF MESA VERDE CACTUS (SCLEROCACTUS MESAEVERDAE) NAVAJO TRIBAL UTILITY AUTHORITY POWERLINE UMTRA GROUND WATER PROJECT, SHIPROCK SlTE ON NAVAJO NATION TRIBAL LAND IN SAN JUAN COUNTY, NEW MEXICO Prepared For: S. M. STOLLER CORPORATION GRAND JUNCTION, COLORADO On Behalf of DEPARTMENT O W ENERGY GRAND JUNCTION, COLORADO Prepared By: ECOSPHERE ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES NAVAJO FISH AND WJLDLIli'E PERMIT #000802-001 FARIVWGTON, NEW MEXICO NOVEMBER 2003 RECORD COP\' TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1 LOCATION ... . . , , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 WORK SUMMA 3 LIST OF PREPARER 7 CONSULTATION AND COORDINATION ...... ........ .. ,, . . . . . . . . 7 ATTACHMENTS ATTACHMENT A NFWD September 30,2002 Letter EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

115

by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cable-ready) 25; 5 ft. patio umbrella 12; 24" Navajo loom 25, 4 table lamps (some brass, some brass & glass) 15 each; portable whirlpool bath unit 30; various quality...

116

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

should cease until the condor(s) leaves on its own. The Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife (928-871-6450), or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (602-242-0210),...

117

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 370 of 9,094 results. Article LM Continues to Work with the Navajo Nation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) continues to work with the...

118

Transport of a Power Plant Tracer Plume over Grand Canyon National Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological and air-quality data, as well as surface tracer concentration values, were collected during 1990 to assess the impacts of Navajo Generating Station (NGS) emissions on Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) air quality. These data have ...

Jun Chen; Robert Bornstein; Charles G. Lindsey

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glen Canyon-Shiprock 230-kV Transmission Line Coconino, Navajo, and Apache Counties, Arizona, and San Juan County, New Mexico A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power...

120

Census Snapshot: Arizona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

couples (0.68%), and Pinal County with 398 couples (0.65%).County sex couples of all households Apache Cochise Coconino Gila Graham Greenlee La Paz Maricopa Mohave Navajo Pima Pinal

Romero, Adam P; Rosky, Clifford J; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Gates, Gary J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nauru navajo navaho" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Obama Administration Announces Additional $63,817,400 for Local...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AZ Mohave County 408,700 AZ Navajo County 473,900 AZ Pima County 3,981,900 AZ Pinal County 2,060,800 AZ Yavapai County 548,200 AZ Yuma County 427,700 In addition,...

122

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boundary Layer Cloud Climatology at the ARM TWP Nauru Boundary Layer Cloud Climatology at the ARM TWP Nauru Site P. Kollias Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science/ Environmental Technology Laboratory University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado B.A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida Introduction Boundary layer (BL) clouds are fundamental in regulating the vertical structure of water vapor and entropy in the lowest 2 km of the Earth's atmosphere. Data on fair-weather cumuli have also received relatively little recent attention compared with marine stratocumulus clouds. Studies made thirty years ago, Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX, 1969) and the Atlantic Trade- Wind Experiment (ATEX, 1969), provided key analyses (Augstein et al., 1973; Holland and Rassmusen,

123

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Island-Induced Cloud Plumes Influence Tropical Atmospheric Measurements, Island-Induced Cloud Plumes Influence Tropical Atmospheric Measurements, Surface Radiation Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: McFarlane, S.A., Long, C.N., and Flynn, D., Nauru Island Effect Study, Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, March 22 to 26, 2004, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Nauru Island, about 1,200 miles northeast of Papua New Guinea in the western South Pacific, is one of three instrumented island sites that comprise ARM's Tropical Western Pacific locale. A key objective of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to identify interactions between the processes that determine the radiative properties of an atmospheric column, including

124

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boundary Layer Structure and Fair-Weather Cumulus Characteristics at the Boundary Layer Structure and Fair-Weather Cumulus Characteristics at the TWP ARM Site - Comparisons with Other Tropical and Subtropical Sites Albrecht, B. and Kollias, P., University of Miami Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Fair-weather cumuli are fundamental in regulating the vertical structure of water vapor and entropy in the lowest 2 km of the Earths atmosphere over vast areas of the oceans. Boundary layer structures and cloud characteristics observed at Nauru (ARM TWP) during suppressed convective conditions are compared with those observed at other tropical and subtropical sites. Over three years of data from the mm-wavelength cloud radar and ceilometer observations at the Nauru site are analyzed and a statistical description of the field of fair weather cumulus is inferred.

125

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave Flux Closure Experiments at Nauru Shortwave Flux Closure Experiments at Nauru S. A. McFarlane and K. F. Evans University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado E. J. Mlawer Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts E. E. Clothiaux The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction The absorption and distribution of shortwave radiation in the atmosphere is one of the main drivers of the climate system. Through extensive satellite studies the Earth radiation budget has been well characterized and general circulation model (GCM) simulations of top of the atmosphere fluxes generally agree well with observations (Li et al. 1997). However, measurements and model estimates of the amount of shortwave radiation absorbed in the atmosphere differ by up to 30 W/m

126

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LIRAD Analysis of TWP Cirrus at Nauru LIRAD Analysis of TWP Cirrus at Nauru R. T. Austin, C. Mitrescu, and G. L. Stephens Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Introduction The purpose of this work is to implement algorithms for retrieval of high-cloud emittance and optical depth using lidar-radiometer (LIRAD) analysis based on available continuous data streams from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites. Routine, continuous operation of the micropulse lidar (MPL), infrared thermometer (IRT), microwave radiometer (MWR), and frequent sonde soundings should allow for near-continuous retrieval of LIRAD products, subject to time and accuracy limitations described later in this paper. Initial development of

127

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Radiosonde Comparisons May Improve Past and Present Humidity Data Tropical Radiosonde Comparisons May Improve Past and Present Humidity Data Submitter: Westwater, E. R., University of Colorado Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Westwater, E.R., B.B. Stankov, D.Cimini, Y. Han, J.A. Shaw, B.M. Lesht, C.N. Long, 2003, Radiosonde Humidity Soundings and Microwave Radiometers during Nauru99, Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, Vol. 21. ARM's Nauru99 campaign provided a rare opportunity to compare original and corrected land-based radiosonde temperature and humidity measurements with those obtained at sea. (ARM photo) Key Contributors: B. B. Stankov, D. Cimini, Y. Han, J. A Shaw, B. M. Lesht, C. N. Long Along the equator in the Central Pacific, DOE's Atmospheric Radiation

128

Executive Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Nauru Island Effect Study (NIES) IOP Science Plan June 2001 Chuck Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ARM TWP Site Scientist, NIES IOP Lead Scientist Richland, Washington Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research C. Long., DOE/SC-ARM-0505 Contents 1. Background ............................................................................................................................... 1 2. Scientific Requirement.............................................................................................................. 5 3. Experimental Approach ............................................................................................................

129

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multicomponent seismic analysis and calibration to improve recovery from algal mounds: application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado Multicomponent seismic analysis and calibration to improve recovery from algal mounds: application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado DE-FG26-02NT15451 Project Goal The project is designed to: Promote development of both discovered and undiscovered oil reserves contained within algal mounds on the Ute Mountain Ute, Southern Ute, and Navaho native-controlled lands. Promote the use of advanced technology and expand the technical capability of the Native American oil exploration corporations by direct assistance in the current project and dissemination of technology to other tribes. Develop the most cost-effective approach to using non-invasive seismic imaging to reduce the risk in exploration and development of algal mound reservoirs on surrounding Native American lands.

130

HQ State HQ City Name of Primary Selectee Project Type Project Title and Brief Project Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total Project Value Total Project Value Including Cost Share AZ Fort Defiance Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Company Smart Grid Workforce Training (Topic B) Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Smart Grid Workforce Training Program - Develop a workforce that is well-trained and committed to the mission of modernizing NTUA's distribution services, including an expeditious and well- built smart grid system. The training program is designed to maximize employment opportunities for citizens of the Navajo Nation located on the reservation. Arizona New Mexico $704,486 $1,408,971 $704,486 $1,408,971 Glendale Glendale Community College Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs (Topic A) Southern California Utility Initiative - Expand training curricula and programs in the Southern California region. The project will raise awareness and

131

EIS-0231: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Draft Environmental Impact Statement 1: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0231: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Draft Environmental Impact Statement Navajo Transmission Project This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to by Dine Power Authority, a Navajo Nation enterprise, to construct, operate, and maintain a 500 kilovolt (kV) transmission line planned to deliver electric power from the Four Comers area in northwestern New Mexico across northern Arizona to a terminus in southeastern Nevada. The proposed project, the Navajo Transmission Project, is currentiy planned to be in service in the year 2001 and operate for about 50 years. EIS-0231-DEIS-1996.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1470: Final Environmental Assessment EIS-0256: Final Environmental Impact Statement

132

HQ State HQ City Name of Primary Selectee Project Type Project Title and Brief Project Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Participant Participant Share Total Project Value Including Cost Share AZ Fort Defiance Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Company Smart Grid Workforce Training (Topic B) Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Smart Grid Workforce Training Program - Develop a workforce that is well-trained and committed to the mission of modernizing NTUA's distribution services, including an expeditious and well-built smart grid system. The training program is designed to maximize employment opportunities for citizens of the Navajo Nation located on the reservation. Arizona New Mexico $704,486 $704,486 $1,408,972 $704,486 $704,486 $1,408,972 Glendale Glendale Community College Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs (Topic A) Southern California Utility Initiative - Expand training curricula and

133

SHIPROCK.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shiprock Shiprock Disposal Site Site Description and History Regulatory Setting Disposal Site The Shiprock site is the location of a former uranium and vanadium ore-processing facility within the Navajo Nation in the northwest corner of New Mexico near the town of Shiprock, approximately 28 miles west of Farmington. Kerr-McGee built the mill and operated the facility from 1954 until 1963. Vanadium Corporation of America purchased the mill and operated it until it closed in 1968. The milling operations created process- related wastes and radioactive tailings, a predominantly sandy material. The mill, ore storage area, raffinate ponds (ponds that contain spent liquids from the milling process), and tailings piles occupied approximately 230 acres leased from the Navajo Nation. In 1983, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Navajo Nation entered into an agreement for site cleanup.

134

Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 11, 2013 April 11, 2013 C-SR-10 Uintah Mine, Colorado, LM Uranium Lease Tracts Abandoned Uranium Mines Report to Congress: LM Wants Your Input The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is seeking stakeholder input on an abandoned uranium mines report to Congress. January 9, 2013 LM Continues to Work with the Navajo Nation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) continues to work with the Navajo Nation to perform long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) at four Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I sites located on the Navajo Nation January 8, 2013 A Northern Saw-Whet Owl is captured for banding during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November Saw What? Saw Whet!

135

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glen Canyon-Shiprock 230-kV Transmission Line Glen Canyon-Shiprock 230-kV Transmission Line Coconino, Navajo, and Apache Counties, Arizona, and San Juan County, New Mexico A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to survey and inspect all areas along the Glen Canyon-Shiprock (Glen Canyon-Navajo, Kayenta-Navajo, and Kayenta-Shiprock) transmission line to conduct routine vegetation management inspection and danger tree removal on the transmission line. Trained crews will measure electrical clearance distances between the conductor and tree branches and cut down any trees that meet or exceed the allowable clearance distance. Any "danger" trees and vegetation that constitute an electrical hazard to the lines will be removed. Individual trees will be cut, lopped, and scattered within the existing

136

monument valley.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

The The Monument Valley Processing Site is located on the Navajo Nation in northeastern Arizona, about 15 miles south of Mexican Hat, Utah. A uranium-ore processing mill operated at the site from 1955 to 1968 on property leased from the Navajo Nation. The mill closed in 1968, and control of the site reverted to the Navajo Nation. Most of the mill buildings were removed shortly thereafter. The milling process produced radioactive mill tailings, a predominantly sandy material. From 1955 until 1964, ore at the site was processed by mechanical milling using an upgrader, which crushed the ore and separated it by grain size. The finer-grained material, which was higher in uranium content, was shipped to other mills for chemical processing. Coarser-grained material was stored on site. These source materials and other site-related contamination were removed during surface remediation at the

137

SWP.Aneth.factsheet.919  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reid Grigg / Brian McPherson NMT reid@prrc.nmt.edu / brian@nmt.edu Reid Grigg / Brian McPherson NMT reid@prrc.nmt.edu / brian@nmt.edu Field Test Information: Field Test Name Paradox Basin, Utah: Aneth EOR-Sequestration Test Location Near Bluff, Utah Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Source 150,000 tons/year; CO 2 sourced from McElmo Dome, CO Resolute Natural Resources Company Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Navajo Nation Oil and Gas Company Summary of Field Test Site and Operations General Geology and Target Reservoirs: The Aneth oil field, discovered in 1956, is one of the largest in the nation. Because the field is on Navajo Nation land, mineral royalties go to the Navajo Nation and are utilized in many ways, including a broad scholarship fund. Aneth is located on the McElmo-Cortez CO

138

monument valley.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

The Monument Valley processing site is located on the The Monument Valley processing site is located on the Navajo Nation in northeastern Arizona, about 15 miles south of Mexican Hat, Utah. A uranium-ore-processing mill operated at the site from 1955 to 1968 on property leased from the Navajo Nation. The mill closed in 1968, and control of the site reverted to the Navajo Nation. Most of the mill buildings were removed shortly thereafter. The milling process produced radioactive mill tailings, a predominantly sandy material. From 1955 until 1964, ore at the site was processed by mechanical milling using an upgrader, which crushed the ore and separated it by grain size. The finer-grained material, which was higher in uranium content, was shipped to other mills for chemical processing. Coarser-grained material was stored on site.

139

A comparison of genetic map distance and linkage disequilibrium between 15 polymorphic dinucleotide repeat loci in two populations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linkage disequilibrium has recently been used to map the diastrophic dysplasia gene in a Finnish sample. One advantage of this method is that the large pedigrees required by some other methods are unnecessary. Another advantage is that linkage disequilibrium mapping capitalizes on the cumulative history of recombination events, rather than those occurring within the sampled individuals. A potential limitation of linkage disequilibrium mapping is that linkage equilibrium is likely to prevail in all but the most isolated populations, e.g., those which have recently experienced founder effects or severe population bottlenecks. In order to test the method`s generality, we examined patterns of linkage disequilibrium between pairs of loci within a known genetic map. Two populations were analyzed. The first population, Navajo Indians (N=45), is an isolate that experienced a severe bottleneck in the 1860`s. The second population, Maryland Caucasians (N=45), is cosmopolitan. We expected the Navajo sample to display more linkage disequilibrium than the Caucasian sample, and possibly that the Navajo disequilibrium pattern would reflect the genetic map. Linkage disequilibrium coefficients were estimated between pairs of alleles at different loci using maximum likelihood. The genetic isolate structure of Navajo Indians is confirmed by the DNA typings. Heterozygosity is lower than in the Caucasians, and fewer different alleles are observed. However, a relationship between genetic map distance and linkage disequilibrium could be discerned in neither the Navajo nor the Maryland samples. Slightly more linkage disequilibrium was observed in the Navajos, but both data sets were characterized by very low disequilibrium levels. We tentatively conclude that linkage disequilibrium mapping with dinucleotide repeats will only be useful with close linkage between markers and diseases, even in very isolated populations.

Urbanek, M.; Goldman, D.; Long, J.C. [Lab. of Neurogenetics, Rockville, MD (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Comparison of the CALIPSO satellite and ground-based observations of cirrus clouds at the ARM TWP sites  

SciTech Connect

Statistics of ice cloud macrophysical and optical properties from the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite are compared with those from ground-based lidar observations over a 31 month period. Ground-based lidar observations are taken from the micropulse lidars (MPL) at the three Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) tropical western pacific (TWP) sites: Manus, Nauru and Darwin. CALIPSO observations show a larger cloud fraction at high altitudes while the ground-based MPLs show a larger cloud fraction at low altitudes. The difference in mean ice cloud top and base heights at the Manus and Nauru sites are all within 0.51 km, although differences are statistically significant. Mean ice cloud geometrical thickness agree to within 0.05 km at the Manus and Nauru sites. Larger differences exist at Darwin due to excessive degradation of the MPL output power during our sampling period. Both sets of observations show thicker clouds during the nighttime which may be real but could also be partially an artifact of the decreased signal-to-noise ratio during the daytime. The number of ice cloud layers per profile are also shown to be consistent after accounting for the difference in spatial resolution. For cloud optical depths, four different retrieval methods are compared, two for each set of observations. All products show that the majority of ice cloud optical depths ({approx}60%) fall below an optical depth of 0.2. For most comparisons all four retrievals agree to within the uncertainty intervals. We find that both CALIPSO retrievals agree best to ground-based optical depths when the lidar ratio in the latter is retrieved instead of set to a fixed value. Also thoroughly compared is the cloud properties for the subset of ice clouds which reside in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL).

Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Q.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nauru navajo navaho" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ARM - Site Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PacificInstruments PacificInstruments TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Tropical Western Pacific [ Installed at 3 facilities ] AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Installed at 2 facilities ] CSAPR C-Band ARM Precipitation Radar Cloud Properties Browse Data [ Installed at 3 facilities ] CSPHOT Cimel Sunphotometer Aerosols, Radiometric Browse Data [ Single installation ] DISDROMETER Impact Disdrometer Surface Meteorology Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] DL Doppler Lidar Cloud Properties Browse Data [ Installed at 3 facilities ]

142

ARM - Site Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Darwin SiteInstruments Darwin SiteInstruments TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Central Facility, Darwin, Australia [ Single installation ] AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] CSPHOT Cimel Sunphotometer Aerosols, Radiometric Browse Data [ Single installation ] DISDROMETER Impact Disdrometer Surface Meteorology Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] DL Doppler Lidar Cloud Properties Browse Data [ Single installation ] GNDRAD Ground Radiometers on Stand for Upwelling Radiation Radiometric Browse Plots

143

Shandiin/DOE intertribal energy programs: technology transfer series  

SciTech Connect

This project entailed the continuation of solar design and construction workshops for the Navajo, Hopi, and Apache Tribes, including tribal planners, tribal staff, engineers, architects, and installers of energy systems. The project also entailed the continuation of support for the development of an energy self-sufficient community school system for the many rural Navajo communities. Great emphasis was placed in completing the second phase of development of the intertribal computer network. The development of this network will greatly benefit our nation in increased efficiency and coordination of tribal energy programs. A series of workshops was held in energy programs training for planners from the Navajo, Hopi, and Apache Tribes. The initial assessment of this program concludes that the greatest impact and return came from the Navajo Tribe's Division of Economic Development, with lesser impact upon the Community Development branches of the Hopi and Apache Tribes. The impact of microcomputer technologies upon the tribes has been shown to be profound, and the development of the intertribal computer network can be seen as a true asset to both the tribes and to the nation.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Energy and Health Convening Lead Author (CLA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transparent Cost Database on OpenEI Leads: Austin Brown, Ryan McKeel The Transparent Cost Database provides and downloadable. http://en.openei.org/wiki/Transparent_Cost_Database Renewable Electricity Futures Study Authors) level. Additional states are being added. http://en.openei.org/wiki/GRR Navajo Generating Station

145

CX-010544: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Glen Canyon Switchyard - 230 Kilovolt Wavetrap Removal - TZ9A2 on the Navajo Line CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 06/21/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

146

CX-010681: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"Herbicide Application at Two Substations: Kayenta and Long House Valley Located on the Navajo Nation During Fiscal Year 2014 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/01/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region"

147

Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) has established a formal environmental protection, auditing, monitoring, and planning program. Western markets power from 56 hydroelectric power generating plants in its service area. Additionally, Western markets the US entitlement from the Navajo coal-fired plant near Page, Arizona. The significant environmental projects and issues Western was involved with in 1996 are discussed in this report.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

EA-1388: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

388: Finding of No Significant Impact 388: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1388: Finding of No Significant Impact Groundwater Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site The U.S. Department of Energy is proposing three ground water compliance strategies for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. These proposed strategies were derived through consultation with representatives of the Navajo UMTRA Program, the Navajo Environmental Protection Agency, and other agencies. The strategies are designed to minimize risk to human health and the environment that result from mill-related constituents in ground water and surface water. Finding of No Significant Impact Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings SIte DOE/EA-1388 (September 2001)

149

mexicanhat.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site at Mexican Hat, Utah. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Site Location and History Regulatory Setting The Mexican Hat disposal site is located on the Navajo Reservation in southeast Utah, 1.5 miles southwest of the town of Mexican Hat and about 10 miles north of the Utah-Arizona border. The site is also the location of a former uranium-ore-processing mill. Texas-Zinc Minerals Corporation constructed the Mexican Hat mill on land leased from the Navajo Nation and operated the facility from 1957 to 1963. Atlas Corporation purchased the mill in 1963 and operated it until it closed in 1965. A sulfuric acid

150

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

J J Proposed Action Title: Herbicide Application at 2 Substations: Kayenta and Long House Valley located on the Navajo Nation during Fiscal Year2014 Program or Field Office: Western Area Power Administration/ Desert Southwest Region Location(s) (City/County/State): Navajo County, AZ Proposed Action Description: Western plans apply pre-emergent, post-emergent, UV Inhibitor herbicides, which will include spray marking dyes, at 2 substations: Kayenta and Long House Valley (see attached list for locational information). This work is needed to maintain the reliability and safety of the bulk electric system. For example, live or dead vegetation sticking up through a grounded work platform adjacent to energized equipment may circumvent the grounding protection resulting in an injury to a worker standing on the platform.

151

Water-Balance Cover Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2010, Phoenix, AZ 0, 2010, Phoenix, AZ Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Monument Valley, Arizona, DOE Legacy Waste Site-10281 W.J. Waugh, D.E. Miller, S.A. Morris, and L.R. Sheader S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO E.P. Glenn, D. Moore, and K.C. Carroll University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ L. Benally and M. Roanhorse Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ R.P. Bush U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, CO ABSTRACT The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Navajo Nation, and the University of Arizona are exploring natural and enhanced attenuation remedies for groundwater contamination at a former uranium-ore processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. DOE removed radioactive tailings from the Monument Valley site in 1994. Nitrate and ammonium, waste products of the milling process, remain in an alluvial

152

mexhat.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mexican Hat Disposal Site Mexican Hat Disposal Site Uranium ore was processed near Mexican Hat, Utah, between 1957 and 1963. These operations created process-related waste and tailings, a sandlike waste product containing radioactive materials and other contaminants. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) encapsulated the tailings in an engineered disposal cell in 1989. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission included the Mexican Hat Disposal Cell under general license in 1997. DOE is responsible, under the general license, for the long-term custody, monitoring, and maintenance of the site. The DOE Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTSM) Program at the DOE Grand Junction (Colorado) Office is responsible for the long- term safety and integrity of the disposal site. Because the site is on Navajo Nation land, the Navajo Nation

153

SHIPROCK.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shiprock Disposal Site Shiprock Disposal Site Site Description and History Regulatory Setting Disposal Site The Shiprock site is the location of a former uranium- and vanadium-ore-processing facility within the Navajo Nation in the northwest corner of New Mexico near the town of Shiprock, approximately 28 miles west of Farmington. Kerr-McGee built the mill and operated the facility from 1954 until 1963. Vanadium Corporation of America purchased the mill and operated it until it closed in 1968. The milling operations created process- related wastes and radioactive tailings, a predominantly sandy material. The mill, ore storage area, raffinate ponds (ponds that contain spent liquids from the milling process), and tailings piles occupied approximately 230 acres leased from the Navajo Nation.

154

Chemistry and spectroscopy of a fireball  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the analysis of streak spectra from the 1956 Redwing-Navajo chord experiment and the 1952 Ivy-King experiment. Column densities of O/sub 3/, HNO/sub 2/, NO/sub 2/, and vibrationally excited O/sub 2/ are inferred from the spectra and related to computed column densities of gamma ray and neutron energy deposition. We also describe a fireball radiation transport, hydrodynamics, and chemistry computer model, which we use to make theoretical predictions of the column densities of molecular absorbers outside of a fireball. Computed results for Navajo and King are compared with the experimental data. We also show a computation of radiant power vs time for a generic 1-Mt fireball. 23 figures, 2 tables.

Zinn, J.; Sutherland, C.D.; Mitchell, C.K.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Integrating Two Worlds: A Supportive Pathway for Native American Students |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrating Two Worlds: A Supportive Pathway for Native American Integrating Two Worlds: A Supportive Pathway for Native American Students Integrating Two Worlds: A Supportive Pathway for Native American Students November 18, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director When the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) looked for an institution to get a strong engineering base to recruit from, they turned to Northern Arizona University (NAU), the top recruiter of Native American engineering students in their area. Since 2010, NNSA has funded a 12-week summer internship program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

156

Data:60178ebf-7324-4601-992c-b7fbc4eef51e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

178ebf-7324-4601-992c-b7fbc4eef51e 178ebf-7324-4601-992c-b7fbc4eef51e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Life Support/Senior Citizens Discount Program - Private Area Lighting Sector: Residential Description: Available to all qualified customers located in Navajo Country along existing lines of the Authority, where facilities of adequate capacity and suitable voltage are adjacent to the premises to be served. Source or reference: www.ntua.com/utility_rates/seniordiscount_res001.html Source Parent: Comments

157

Data:3bd37034-34f2-4aa5-b429-cb84e6bca223 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-34f2-4aa5-b429-cb84e6bca223 -34f2-4aa5-b429-cb84e6bca223 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Life Support/Senior Citizens Discount Program - Residential Electric Heat Service Sector: Residential Description: Available to all qualified customers located in Navajo Country along existing lines of the Authority, where facilities of adequate capacity and suitable voltage are adjacent to the premises to be served. Source or reference: www.ntua.com/utility_rates/seniordiscount_res001.html Source Parent:

158

tuba.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Uranium ore was processed near Tuba City, Arizona, Uranium ore was processed near Tuba City, Arizona, between 1956 and 1966. The milling operations created process-related waste and tailings, a sandlike waste product containing radioactive materials and other contaminants. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) encapsulated the tailings in an engineered disposal cell in 1990. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission included the Tuba City Disposal Cell under general license in 1996. DOE is responsible, under the general license, for the long-term custody, monitoring, and maintenance of the site. The DOE Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTSM) Program at the DOE Grand Junction (Colorado) Office is responsible for the long-term safety and integrity of the disposal site. Because the site is on Navajo Nation land, the Navajo Nation retains title to

159

EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing three ground water compliance strategies for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. These proposed strategies were derived through consultation with representatives of the Navajo UMTRA Program, the Navajo Environmental Protection Agency, and other agencies. The strategies are designed to minimize risk to human health and the environment that result from mill-related constituents in ground water and surface water. Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site DOE/EA-1388 (September 2001)

160

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Data from Anemometer Loan Programs  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Maps & Data Maps & Data Printable Version Bookmark and Share Utility-Scale Land-Based Maps Offshore Maps Community-Scale Maps Residential-Scale Maps Anemometer Loan Programs & Data Data from Anemometer Loan Programs This interactive map makes available wind data collected from the Native American anemometer loan program and the Western Area Power Administration anemometer loan program. This page shows the locations where anemometer data collection is complete and reports and data are available. Read about the types of reports available. Text version of Anemometer Data Alaska, Sand Point Alaska, Tanana Alaska, Ugashik Alaska, YKHC - Bethel Alaska, YKHC - Emmonak Alaska, YKHC - Kasayuli Arizona, Hopi Arizona, Hualapai Indian Reservation Arizona, Navajo - Black Mesa Arizona, Navajo - Puerco Ridge

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nauru navajo navaho" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students from High School to College to National Nuclear Security Agency Careers Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students from High School to College to National Nuclear Security Agency Careers November 17, 2011 - 3:15pm Addthis Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director When the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) looked for an institution to get a strong engineering base to recruit from, they turned straight to Northern Arizona University (NAU), the top recruiter of Native

162

Data:Af5d1ceb-cbfa-4f51-9eb1-021a6262d4a1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d1ceb-cbfa-4f51-9eb1-021a6262d4a1 d1ceb-cbfa-4f51-9eb1-021a6262d4a1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Life Support/Senior Citizens Discount Program - Residential Electric Service Sector: Residential Description: Available to all qualified customers located in Navajo Country along existing lines of the Authority, where facilities of adequate capacity and suitable voltage are adjacent to the premises to be served. Source or reference: www.ntua.com/utility_rates/seniordiscount_res001.html Source Parent:

163

Applicant Location Requested DOE Funds Project Summary Feasibility Studies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requested Requested DOE Funds Project Summary Feasibility Studies Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes Pablo, MT $850,000 This project will evaluate the technical and economic viability of a co-generation biomass fuel power plant. The plant would use fuels from tribal forest management activities to provide between 2.5 to 20 megawatts (MW) of electricity to heat tribal buildings or sell on the wholesale market. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Fort Yates, ND $430,982 This project will perform a feasibility study over the course of two years on three tribal sites to support the future development of 50 to 100 MW of wind power. Navajo Hopi Land Commission (NHLCO), Navajo Nation Window Rock, AZ $347,090 This project will conduct a feasibility study to explore potential

164

Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students from High School to College to National Nuclear Security Agency Careers Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students from High School to College to National Nuclear Security Agency Careers November 17, 2011 - 3:15pm Addthis Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director When the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) looked for an institution to get a strong engineering base to recruit from, they turned straight to Northern Arizona University (NAU), the top recruiter of Native

165

Networks on Chips 404 0740-7475/05/$20.00 2005 IEEE Copublished by the IEEE CS and the IEEE CASS IEEE Design & Test of Computers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jackson State University Justice Institute of British Columbia NavajoTechnical College North Carolina A &T Stanford University University of British Columbia, Canada University of Houston, Downtown UniversityIAtIVEs spAN thE ENtIrE CArEEr dEVElopmENt pIpElINE rANgINg from k-12 progrAms through uNdErgrAduAtE ANd gr

De Micheli, Giovanni

166

Prepared by: Assessment Unit Staff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GAMBLE CLALLAM 1 1 ASSINIBOINE 1 1 POTAWATOMIE 1 1 BLACKFEET 1 1 PUEBLO 1 1 BLACKFOOT SIOUX 1 1 PUYALLUP AMERICAN INDIAN 7 3 10 MOHAWK 1 1 BAY MILLS CHIPPEWA 1 1 NAVAJO 3 1 4 BLACKFEET 1 1 NORTHERN CHEYENNE 1 1 - NO DOC 4 2 6 AMERICAN INDIAN 1 1 COLVILLE 1 1 ARAPAHO 1 1 COWLITZ 1 1 BLACKFEET 1 1 HAIDA 1 1 BLACKFOOT

Kaminsky, Werner

167

Prepared by: Assessment Unit Staff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Blackfeet (2); Delaware (2); Grande Ronde (2); Makah (2); Navajo (2); Brotherton (1); Chickasaw (1 2 4 ASSINIBOINE 1 1 MAKAH 3 4 7 SNOHOMISH 2 2 4 BLACKFEET 1 2 3 MANZANITA 1 1 SNOQUALMIE 1 1 2 AMERIND WHITE 1 1 2 2 ARAPAHO 1 1 1 1 BLACKFEET 1 1 1 1 CANADIAN INDIAN 1 1 1 1 CAYUSE 1 1 1 1 CHEROKEE 3

Hochberg, Michael

168

PROGRAMMATIC AGREEMENT OPERATION AND MANAGEMENT OF THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Blackfeet (2); Delaware (2); Grande Ronde (2); Makah (2); Navajo (2); Brotherton (1); Chickasaw (1 2 4 ASSINIBOINE 1 1 MAKAH 3 4 7 SNOHOMISH 2 2 4 BLACKFEET 1 2 3 MANZANITA 1 1 SNOQUALMIE 1 1 2 AMERIND WHITE 1 1 2 2 ARAPAHO 1 1 1 1 BLACKFEET 1 1 1 1 CANADIAN INDIAN 1 1 1 1 CAYUSE 1 1 1 1 CHEROKEE 3

US Army Corps of Engineers

169

ARM - Campaign Instrument - ronbrown  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsronbrown govInstrumentsronbrown Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : NOAA Research Vessel Ron Brown (RONBROWN) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Radiometric, Cloud Properties, Ocean Observations, Surface Meteorology, Atmospheric Profiling Campaigns Nauru99 Campaign [ Download Data ] Tropical Western Pacific, 1999.06.16 - 1999.07.15 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers for the list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Sea surface temperature Aerosol absorption Liquid water content Particle number concentration Cloud fraction

170

TWP Darwin Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Darwin Site Darwin Site TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Darwin Site Location: 12° 25' 28.56" S, 130° 53' 29.75" E Altitude: 29.9 meters The third TWP climate research facility was established in April 2002 in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. The facility is situated adjacent to the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) Meteorological Office near Darwin International Airport. Darwin was chosen because it meets the scientific goal of the ARM Program, providing a unique set of climate regimes that are not seen at the other TWP facilities. Annually, Darwin

171

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Ensemble Single Column  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ensemble Single Column Modelling (ESCM) in the Tropical Western Pacific Ensemble Single Column Modelling (ESCM) in the Tropical Western Pacific Hume, Timothy Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Jakob, Christian BMRC Single column models (SCMs) are useful tools for the evaluation of parameterisations of radiative and moist processes used in general circulation models. Most SCM studies to date have concentrated on regions where there is a sufficiently dense observational network to derive the required forcing data, such as the Southern Great Plains. This poster describes an ensemble single column modelling (ESCM) approach, where an ensemble of SCM forcing data sets are derived from numerical weather prediction (NWP) analyses. The technique is applied to SCM runs at the Manus Island and Nauru ARM sites in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP). It

172

halthore(3)-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sun and Sky Radiometric Measurements at the Sun and Sky Radiometric Measurements at the CART ARM SGP Site R. N. Halthore, S. E. Schwartz, Y. Liu, and P. H. Daum Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York B. N. Holben National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland J. J. Michalsky State University of New York Albany, New York Abstract Cimel sunphotometers/radiometers (CSPHOT) are facility instruments at the three Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) in Oklahoma, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) in Nauru, and North Slope in Alaska (NSA). Here inferred aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water (PW) measurements at the SGP site are compared with measurements using other instruments. Aerosol size distribution derived from direct solar measurements and from the

173

ARM - Campaign Instrument - mirai  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsmirai govInstrumentsmirai Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : JAMSTEC Research Vessel Mirai (MIRAI) Instrument Categories Radiometric, Cloud Properties, Ocean Observations, Surface Meteorology, Atmospheric Profiling Campaigns Nauru99 Campaign [ Download Data ] Tropical Western Pacific, 1999.06.16 - 1999.07.15 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers for the list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Sea surface temperature Liquid water content Cloud fraction CO2 concentration Backscatter depolarization ratio Hydrometeor size

174

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wave Cloud Radar Upgrades: Wave Cloud Radar Upgrades: Review, Status, and Plans K.B. Widener Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington K.P. Moran National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration- Earth System Research Laboratory-Physical Sciences Division Boulder, Colorado Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program currently operates five millimeter-wave cloud radars (MMCRs) at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale's Barrow site, and Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale's Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. Currently, three different signal processors are deployed, and we are in process of upgrading the remaining two radars to provide higher reliability and efficiency along with

175

ARM - VAP Product - armbecldrad  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Productsarmbearmbecldrad Productsarmbearmbecldrad Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1095314 DOI: 10.5439/1039926 Central Facility, Lamont, OK (SGP C1) DOI: 10.5439/1039927 Central Facility, Barrow AK (NSA C1) DOI: 10.5439/1039928 Central Facility, Manus I., PNG (TWP C1) DOI: 10.5439/1039929 Central Facility, Nauru Island (TWP C2) DOI: 10.5439/1039930 Central Facility, Darwin, Australia (TWP C3) [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : ARMBECLDRAD ARMBE: Cloud Radiation measurements Active Dates 1996.01.01 - 2011.01.01 Originating VAP Process ARM Best Estimate Data Products : ARMBE Description The ARMBE Cloud Radiation (ARMBECLDRAD) VAP contains a best estimate of

176

Recent Progress in Retrieving Air Temperature Profiles and Air-Sea Temperature Differences from Infrared and Microwave Scan...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Progress in Retrieving Air Temperature Profiles Recent Progress in Retrieving Air Temperature Profiles and Air-Sea Temperature Differences from Infrared and Microwave Scanning Radiometer Data D. Cimini University of L'Aquila L'Aquila, Italy J. A. Shaw Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Montana State University Bozeman, Montana E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction A system of two scanning radiometers has been developed by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory (ETL) and deployed on the NOAA Ron H. Brown (RHB) Research Vessel (RV) during the Nauru99 cruise in the Tropical Western Pacific,

177

ARM - VAP Product - armbeatm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Productsarmbearmbeatm Productsarmbearmbeatm Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1095313 DOI: 10.5439/1039931 Central Facility, Lamont, OK (SGP C1) DOI: 10.5439/1039932 Central Facility, Barrow AK (NSA C1) DOI: 10.5439/1039933 Central Facility, Manus I., PNG (TWP C1) DOI: 10.5439/1039934 Central Facility, Nauru Island (TWP C2) DOI: 10.5439/1039935 Central Facility, Darwin, Australia (TWP C3) [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : ARMBEATM ARMBE: Atmospheric measurements Active Dates 1994.01.01 - 2012.12.31 Originating VAP Process ARM Best Estimate Data Products : ARMBE Description The ARM Best Estimate Atmospheric Measurements (ARMBEATM) value-added

178

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Examination of Island Effects on Near-Surface Examination of Island Effects on Near-Surface Bulk Meteorology and Air-Sea Fluxes from the Nauru99 Field Program C. W. Fairall and M. J. Post National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado J. E. Hare, A. B. White, and A. A. Grachev Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) research vessel Ronald H. Brown conducted a series of measurements in transit to and in the vicinity of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (DOE/ARM) Program's Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART)

179

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluating the NCEP Global Forecast Model Clouds Evaluating the NCEP Global Forecast Model Clouds Lazarus, S.M. (a), Krueger, S.K. (a), Jenkins, M.A. (a), and Pan, H.-L. (b), University of Utah (a), National Centers for Environmental Prediction (b) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting As part of a collaborative effort with the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), the University of Utah is now archiving (daily) column data from the NCEP Medium Range Forecast (MRF) model. Data are collected for 8 sites, 4 of which directly coincide with ARM facilities at Manus, Nauru, Barrow, and the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF). The bevy of observational data at these locations offers a unique opportunity to evaluate model performance. Because cloud feedback

180

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sizes, Fractional Coverage, and Radar Doppler Moments Profiles of Sizes, Fractional Coverage, and Radar Doppler Moments Profiles of Fair-Weather Cumulus Clouds at the TWP ARM Site Kollias, P., Albrecht B.A., and Dow B.J., University of Miami Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Fair-weather cumuli are fundamental in regulating the vertical structure of water vapor and entropy in the lowest 2 km of the Earth's atmosphere over vast areas of the oceans. Using data from the mm-wavelength cloud radar, the micro-pulse lidar and ceilometer at the Nauru (TWP-ARM) site, a statistical description of the field of fair weather cumulus is inferred. Frequency diagrams of cloud thickness, fractional coverage, updraft-downdraft magnitudes and cloud reflectivity are calculated. The relationship of the statistical behavior of the cumulus field to the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nauru navajo navaho" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Mather, J. H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Liu, Z., University of Washington Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: McFarlane, SA, JH Mather, TP Ackerman, and Z Liu. 2008. "Effect of clouds on the vertical distribution of SW absorption in the Tropics." Journal of Geophysical Research, in press. Daily average all-sky and clear-sky calculated SW column absorption at Manus and Nauru. On average, there is little difference in absorption between the all-sky and clear-sky conditions because of the compensating

182

Ground Truth Collections at the MTI Core Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) selected 13 sites across the continental US and one site in the western Pacific to serve as the primary or core site for collection of ground truth data for validation of MTI science algorithms. Imagery and ground truth data from several of these sites are presented in this paper. These sites are the Comanche Peak, Pilgrim and Turkey Point power plants, Ivanpah playas, Crater Lake, Stennis Space Center and the Tropical Western Pacific ARM site on the island of Nauru. Ground truth data includes water temperatures (bulk and skin), radiometric data, meteorological data and plant operating data. The organizations that manage these sites assist SRTC with its ground truth data collections and also give the MTI project a variety of ground truth measurements that they make for their own purposes. Collectively, the ground truth data from the 14 core sites constitute a comprehensive database for science algorithm validation.

Garrett, A.J.

2001-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

183

ARM - Datastreams - ncepgfsnausfc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsncepgfsnausfc Datastreamsncepgfsnausfc Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : NCEPGFSNAUSFC NCEP GFS: flux variables at Nauru Active Dates 2001.01.01 - 2010.07.26 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties, Surface Properties Originating Instrument National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System (NCEPGFS) Measurements The measurements below provided by this product are those considered scientifically relevant. Measurement Variable Surface albedo albedo1 Surface albedo albedo2 Surface albedo albedo3 Surface albedo albedo4 Precipitation canopy_water Cloud fraction conv_a Cloud base height conv_bpres Cloud top height

184

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Climatology of Cloud & Radiative Properties Derived from GMS-5 Data Over A Climatology of Cloud & Radiative Properties Derived from GMS-5 Data Over the Tropical Western Pacific Nordeen, M.L.(a), Doelling, D.R.(a), Khaiyer, M.M.(a), Rapp, A.D.(a), and Minnis, P.(b), Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. (a), National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Langley Research Center (b) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Satellite derived cloud and radiative properties can provide continuous spatial and temporal coverage over the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP). The TWP is an area with few meteorological stations, but is an interesting region in global climate studies. Starting with the Nauru99 Intensive Operational Period (IOP) (June-July 1999), two years of hourly Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GSM-5) images are used in the

185

ARM - Datastreams - ncepgfsnauflx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsncepgfsnauflx Datastreamsncepgfsnauflx Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : NCEPGFSNAUFLX NCEP GFS: surface variables at Nauru Active Dates 2001.01.01 - 2010.07.26 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State, Cloud Properties, Radiometric, Surface Properties Originating Instrument National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System (NCEPGFS) Measurements The measurements below provided by this product are those considered scientifically relevant. Measurement Variable Surface albedo albedo Precipitation conv_precip Soil heat flux ground_hflx Cloud fraction high_a Planetary boundary layer height hpbl Latent heat flux lat_heat

186

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Importance of Three-Dimensional Solar Importance of Three-Dimensional Solar Radiative Transfer in Small Cumulus Cloud Fields Derived from the NAURU MMCR and MWR K. F. Evans and S. A. McFarlane University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado W. J. Wiscombe National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction The radiative effects of cloud horizontal inhomogeneity may be divided into two parts (e.g., Varnai and Davies 1999): 1) the one-dimensional heterogeneity effect due to optical depth variability, and 2) the horizontal transport effect of light moving between columns. For climate applications in which domain averaged fluxes are important, the independent pixel approximation (IPA) correctly addresses the first effect, but not the second. There is evidence (Cahalan et al. 1994; Barker et al. 1998) that the IPA

187

ARM - TWP Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Contacts TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Contacts Site Oversight - Kim Nitschke, Los Alamos National Laboratory Site Manager - Paul Ortega, Los Alamos National Laboratory Site Operations Manager - Matt Gould, Australian Bureau of Meteorology Site Scientist - Chuck Long, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Tropical Western Pacific Office Mailing Address: Los Alamos National Laboratory PO Box 1663, MS J577 Los Alamos, NM 87545 U.S.A. Shipping Address: SM-30 Bikini Atoll Road TA-51, Bldg. 82, DP 01U Attn: NAME, MS J577 Los Alamos, NM 87545 U.S.A. Phone: 505.667.1186

188

Patterns of Convection in the Tropical Western Pacific  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Patterns of Convection in the Tropical Western Pacific Patterns of Convection in the Tropical Western Pacific J. H. Mather Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Convection is ubiquitous throughout the maritime continent region. However, the frequency of convec- tion is not uniform. While much of this region does not experience seasons to the same degree as one finds in mid-latitudes, the annual cycle of the sun's passage does have a large impact on convection throughout the maritime continent and the tropical western Pacific. The distribution of islands also affects convection in a variety of ways. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has three sites in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region, illustrated in Figure 1. The sites are located on Manus, Nauru, and at Darwin, Australia.

189

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fair - Weather Cumuli Climatology at the TWP ARM Site Fair - Weather Cumuli Climatology at the TWP ARM Site Kollias, P. and Albrecht B.A., University of Miami Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Fair-weather cumuli are fundamental in regulating the vertical structure of water vapor and entropy in the lowest 2 km of the Earths atmosphere over vast areas of the oceans. Over two years of data from the mm-wavelength cloud radar, at the Nauru (TWP-ARM) site, are analyzed and a statistical description of the field of fair weather cumulus is inferred. Frequency diagrams of cloud thickness, fractional coverage, updraft-downdraft magnitudes and cloud reflectivity are calculated for four different classes of fair weather cumuli. Seasonal patterns are identified and their relationship to the thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer (wet-dry

190

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observation of 4-5 Day Meridional Wind Observation of 4-5 Day Meridional Wind and Surface Stress Oscillations During Nauru99 A. A. Grachev and J. E. Hare University of Colorado Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado C. W. Fairall National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The existence of the easterly wave disturbances in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) has been recognized since early studies in the 1940s and 1950s (e.g., Riehl 1945). These synoptic-scale disturbances are westward propagating organized structures moving parallel to the equator. They are observed within the intertropical convergence zone (westward direction is associated with the trade

191

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and Geometric Association over the Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and Geometric Association over the Tropical Western Pacific Warm Pool Jensen, M.P.(a) and DelGenio, A.D.(b), Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, NASA GISS (a), NASA GISS (b) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The radiative and microphysical characteristics for several precipitating anvil systems observed by the TRMM satellite over the Manus or Nauru Island ARM sites are modelled. Reflectivity data from the TRMM Precipitation radar and GMS satellite infrared radiometer measurements are used to parametrize the three-dimensional cloud microphysics of each precipitating cloud system. These parameterized cloud properties are used as input for a

192

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Pacific 2000 Western Pacific 2000 W. E. Clements, F. J. Barnes, L. Jones, and A. Haruta University of California Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico M. Ivey Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico P. Lefale South Pacific Regional Environment Programme Apia, Samoa Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) Program is currently operating two Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Stations (ARCS) in the TWP locale. The first ARCS site was installed on Los Negros Island in Manus Province, Papua New Guinea (PNG), in October 1996. The Tropical Western Pacific Program Office (TWPPO) and the PNG National Weather Service (NWS) have collaborated in operating the Manus site since its installation. Located on Nauru

193

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cirrus Maintenance Cirrus Maintenance M. T. Boehm and J. Verlinde The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites on Manus Island and Nauru in the tropical western Pacific reveal the frequent occurrence of high cirrus layers with lifetimes of several hours to several days. We are investigating the processes responsible for the development and maintenance of these clouds using observations and a cirrus cloud model. In a recent article we described results of a series of model runs designed to test the hypothesis that cloud circulations associated with radiative destabilization of the layer are responsible for the maintenance of high tropical cirrus (Boehm et al. 1999). In spite of significant differences in cloud circulation strength among the

194

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Association of the Cirrus Properties Over the Western Tropical Pacific The Association of the Cirrus Properties Over the Western Tropical Pacific with Tropical Deep Convection Deng, M.(a), Mace, G.G.(a), and Soden, B.J.(b), Univesity of Utah (a), Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (b) The microphysical and radiative properties of upper tropospheric clouds in the tropics are known to have a substantial influence on climate. Observations from long term cloud radar measurements in the tropics show that upper tropospheric clouds are observed above 10 km as much as 40% of the time depending on location. By combining satellite observations with observations from the tropical ARM site on Nauru and Manus Islands we examine the macro and microphysical properties of these clouds in terms of their association with deep convection. The fundamental questions we will

195

Darwin: The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Darwin: The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site Darwin: The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site W. E. Clements and L. Jones Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico T. Baldwin Special Services Unit Australian Bureau of Meteorology Melbourne, Australia K. Nitschke South Pacific Regional Environment Programme Apia, Samoa Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program began operations in its Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale in October 1996 when the first Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) began collecting data on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Two years later, in November 1998 a second ARCS began operations on the island of Nauru in the Central Pacific. Now a third ARCS has begun collecting data in Darwin, Australia. See Figure 1 for

196

Understanding the AIRS, ARM, and MODIS cloud products by cross-comparison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding the AIRS, ARM, and MODIS cloud products by cross-comparison Understanding the AIRS, ARM, and MODIS cloud products by cross-comparison Kahn, Brian Jet Propulsion Laboratory Eldering, Annmarie Jet Propulsion Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties We present comparisons of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) operational cloud top height (CTH) to the active surface-based measurements of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program sites in the tropical Western Pacific. The agreement is found to be consistent to other comparisons of passive IR-derived CTH from other measurement platforms despite the nominal footprint size of 45 km at nadir view. Independent comparisons of CTH to the millimeter-wave cloud radar at Manus Island and the micropulse lidar at Nauru Island indicate that the CTH retrieved by AIRS is statistically significant at the 5% level or less for cirrus cases

197

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TWP TWP Storm Types TWP Storm Types Fig. 1. ARM TWP sites experience different convective clouds within the TWP: (1) ITCZ, (2) SPCZ, (3) Island convection, and (4) Coastal convection. ARM sites: D = Darwin, M = Manus, N = Nauru). Plot color scheme: yellow is cold, blue is warm. 1 2 3 4 M M N N D D 6 December, 2005, 5:30 GMT 6 December, 2005, 5:30 GMT 1. OVERVIEW 1. OVERVIEW A. Previous Work A. Previous Work Tracked clouds with geostationary satellite data to determine the context of the cloud state observed at the ARM Sites, such as the cloud's life-cycle stage and its representativeness of the region. B. Goal B. Goal Expanding classification system for: * Cloud regime classification * Convective regime classification * Subsequent tracking of features' paths and

198

ARM - TWP Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PacificTWP Science PacificTWP Science TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts TWP Science New VSAT dish installed in the Tropical Western Pacific. New VSAT dish installed in the Tropical Western Pacific. The following are the basic science goals of the TWP component of the ARM Climate Research Facility: Determine the magnitude of the surface radiation budget terms and determine their spatial and temporal variability. Identify bulk and optical properties of clouds in the TWP and how these properties affect the radiation budget. Understand the linkages among sea surface temperature,

199

Ensemble Single Column Modeling in the Tropics - Derivation of observed forcing data sets, estimation of observation uncertainty and application to parametrization improvements  

SciTech Connect

The project was carried out in 2 distinct phases. In the first phase we established the general validity of using an ensemble approach to Single Column Modeling (SCM) using the Manus and Nauru sites. In the second phase we derived and applied an ensemble forcing derivation technique to observations. First we derived an ensemble forcing estimate for the TWP-ICE experiment and then by extended the method to provide three wet seasons of ??continuous ensemble forcing? for the Darwin site. The main purpose of using ensemble techniques in SCM simulation is to be able to assess how much of the overall SCM simulation error is due to model errors and how much due to errors in the forcing.

Jakob, Christian

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

200

Microsoft Word - 111012 OCP Comments final.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARIZONA ARIZONA Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Arizona Power Pooling Association Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (also New Mexico, Utah) Salt River Project COLORADO Colorado Springs Utilities Intermountain Rural Electric Association Platte River Power Authority Tri-State Generation & Transmission Association, Inc. (also Nebraska, Wyoming, New Mexico) Yampa Valley Electric Association, Inc. NEVADA Colorado River Commission of Nevada Silver State Energy Association NEW MEXICO Farmington Electric Utility System Los Alamos County City of Truth or Consequences UTAH City of Provo City of St. George South Utah Valley Electric Service District Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

Geothermal development plan: northern Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Much of the northern counties (Apache, Coconino, Gila, Mohave, Navajo and Yavapai) is located in the Colorado Plateau province, a region of low geothermal potential. Two areas that do show some potential are the Flagstaff - San Francisco Peaks area and the Springerville area. Flagstaff is rapidly becoming the manufacturing center of Arizona and will have many opportunities to use geothermal energy to satisfy part of its increasing need for energy. Using a computer simulation model, projections of geothermal energy on line as a function of time are made for both private and city-owned utility development of a resource.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Summary o  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

o o f Shiprock EA Comments and Responsesa - a Only key comments are summarized. Comments that clarify text are not listed. Of the 113 comments received, 39 will result in changes to the EA. In many cases, DOE agreed with comments that did not require changes to the document. b Categories were selected on the basis of key areas addressed by commentors. categoryb Characterization and Modeling Compliance Strategies Ecological Risk GCAP and Remediatlon Deslgn Human Health Risk Monitoring Regulatory Compl~ance and Standards Navajo UMTRA (1-40) 1.5.16,23,24,25,2 7, 3 1 $32.34.35 12,13.14,15,18, 19.21.22 3.8.11,15,22,30, 38.40 4.6,7,9,10.11.13. 17.20 3.15.36.37,38 2,19.28 USFWS (111-113) 111.112. 113 112 Tufts (76-78) 76'77 78 Navajo Dept of Water Resources

203

ToHajiilee Economic Development, Inc.(TEDI) Feasibility Study for Utility-Scale Solar  

SciTech Connect

To??Hajiilee Economic Development, Inc. (TEDI) is the economic development entity representing the ToHajiilee Chapter of the Navajo Nation, also known as the Ca??oncito Band of Navajo (CBN). Using DOE funding, TEDI assembled a team of qualified advisors to conduct a feasibility study for a utility-scale 30 MW Photovoltaic (PV) solar power generation facility on TEDI trust lands. The goal for this project has been to gather information and practical business commitments to successfully complete the feasibility analysis. The TEDI approach was to successively make informed decisions to select an appropriate technology best suited to the site, determine environmental viability of the site, secure options for the sale of generated power, determine practicality of transmission and interconnection of power to the local grid, and secure preliminary commitments on project financing. The feasibility study has been completed and provides TEDI with a practical understanding of its business options in moving forward with developing a solar project on CBN tribal lands. Funding from DOE has allowed TEDI and its team of professional advisors to carefully select technology and business partners and build a business model to develop this utility-scale solar project. As a result of the positive feasibility findings, TEDI is moving forward with finalizing all pre-construction activities for its major renewable energy project.

Burpo, Rob

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

204

Mines in the Four Corners anticipate growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Productive mines in the southwest deplete reserves, while the government drags its heels on new power projects. Production in Arizona and New Mexico has fallen 18% over the last four years to 34.1 million tons. With Chevron Mining's McKinley mine rapidly depleting its reserves the industry will continue to contract. In the last three years at least three large mines in the Four Corners have terminated operations. Three others remain captive operations: BHP Billiton's San Juan Underground and Navajo Surface operations and Peabody Energy's Kayenta surface mine. In 2006 the Black Mesa mine stopped producing coal. These four mines are isolated from the national railways. Peabody's new El Segundo surface mine near Grants, NM is increasing production. If the planned $3 billion Desert Rock coal-fired power plant is built this will present a new market for the Navajo mine. The article gives details about the state of the aforementioned mines and of the new King II coal mine on the northern periphery of the San Juan basin and discusses the state of plans for the Desert Rock Energy Project. 5 photos.

Buchsbaum, L.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Annual status report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose, scope, history, requirements, and management organization of the UMTRA Program are summarized in the Introduction. The remainder of the report describes progress made during the past year (F 1980) and discusses future plants and activities. Early emphasis has been on the four highest-priority sites because of their proximity to population centers. These sites are: (1) Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; (2) Salt Lake City, Utah; (3) Durango, Colorado; and (4) Shiprock, New Mexico (Navajo Reservation). To date, twenty-five vicinity properties near the Canonsburg site and two such properties near the Salt Lake City site have been designated for remedial action. A research effort was undertaken at a major vicinity property, the Mountain States Supply Company in Salt Lake City, to study the effects of heating-and-ventilating-system modification on indoor radon-daughter concentrations. A cooperative agreement was executed between DOE and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. A similar agreement with the State of Utah is expected to be executed in early FY 1981. Further, it is expected that additional cooperative agreements will be negotiated during FY 1981 with the States of Colorado and Wyoming and the Navajo Nation. It is expected that the processing site at Canonsburg, PA (the Canonsburg Industrial Park) will be acquired during FY 1981. Draft Environmental Impact Statements for the four highest-priority sites will be completed during FY 1981.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Text, Appendices A--C. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Appendices A,B, and C are provided as part of this document. Appendix A presents regulatory compliance issues, Appendix B provides details of the engineering design, and Appendix C presents the radiological support plan.

NONE

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A Climatology of Surface Cloud Radiative Effects at the ARM Tropical Western Pacific Sites  

SciTech Connect

Cloud radiative effects on surface downwelling fluxes are investigated using long-term datasets from the three Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The Nauru and Darwin sites show significant variability in sky cover, downwelling radiative fluxes, and surface cloud radiative effect (CRE) due to El Nio and the Australian monsoon, respectively, while the Manus site shows little intra-seasonal or interannual variability. Cloud radar measurement of cloud base and top heights are used to define cloud types so that the effect of cloud type on the surface CRE can be examined. Clouds with low bases contribute 71-75% of the surface shortwave (SW) CRE and 66-74% of the surface longwave (LW) CRE at the three TWP sites, while clouds with mid-level bases contribute 8-9% of the SW CRE and 12-14% of the LW CRE, and clouds with high bases contribute 16-19% of the SW CRE and 15-21% of the LW CRE.

McFarlane, Sally A.; Long, Charles N.; Flaherty, Julia E.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Microsoft Word - STG CC Notes 6-20 Draft 7-13-06.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 20, 2006 June 20, 2006 11:00 a.m. EST Group Chair: Alex Thrower Participants: Herman Shorty (Navajo Nation), Angela Kordyak (DOE/OGC), Aubrey Godwin, Toby Morales, and Harvey Weatherford (WIEB), Sarah Wochos (CSG/MW), John Giarusso (CSG/NE), Christina Nelson (NCSL), Cloyce Brackett (SSEB), David Crawford (DOE/OGC), Scott Field (WIEB), Frank Moussa (CSG/MW), Conrad Smith (CSG/NE), Ed Walsh, Don Flater (CSG/MW), and Bob Fronczak (AAR). DOE support contractors also participated on the call. Action Items: Responsible Party Action to be Taken Alex Thrower Locate biography of newly-confirmed Director of OCRWM and circulate to members Summary: The purpose of this call was to discuss the status of the following items: 1) the Transportation Classification Guide; 2) the bibliography of publicly available documents;

209

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Glen Canyon to Flagstaff #2 345-kV Transmission Line Access Road Maintenance from Structure 45/4 to 46/1 Continuation Sheet Special Conditions Biological Resources 1. Project sites should be cleaned of trash and other items at the end of each day to minimize the likelihood of attracting California condors. 2. No human interaction is allowed with condor(s), especially non-permitted hazing (i.e., attempts to scare birds away). If condor(s) occur at the project site, all activity should cease until the condor(s) leaves on its own. The Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife (928-871-6450), or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (602-242-0210), should be contacted immediately. 3. Work shall be conducted between August 15 and April 15, generally outside of the breeding season for

210

DOE STGWG Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STGWG Group STGWG Group The State and Tribal Government Working Group (STGWG) is one of the intergovernmental organizations with which the DOE EM office works with. They meet twice yearly for updates to the EM projects. They were formed in 1989. It is comprised of several state legislators and tribal staff and leadership from states in proximity to DOE's environmental cleanup sites of the following states: New York, South Carolina, Ohio, Washington, New Mexico, Idaho, California, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, Nevada, Oregon, Tennessee and Texas. The tribal membership is composed of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Isleta Pueblo, Jemez Pueblo, Navajo Nation, Nez Perce Tribe, Santa Clara Pueblo, Pueblo de San Ildefonso, Seneca Nation of Indians, Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the

211

Photo of the Week: An Express Train to Crescent Junction | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Express Train to Crescent Junction An Express Train to Crescent Junction Photo of the Week: An Express Train to Crescent Junction January 4, 2013 - 1:53pm Addthis In the 1950s, one of the largest uranium deposits in the U.S. was found near Moab, Utah. The Department of Energy began cleaning up the uranium mill tailings from the Moab Site in April 2009, using steel containers to transport more than five million tons of tailings for safe disposal near Crescent Junction, Utah. In this May 2012 photo, one of the trains is shown on the Union Pacific Railroad in Utah, passing a butte capped by a familiar southwest U.S. rock formation known as Navajo Sandstone. | Photo courtesy of the Department of Energy. In the 1950s, one of the largest uranium deposits in the U.S. was found near Moab, Utah. The Department of Energy began cleaning up the uranium

212

Department of Energy Provides Nearly $112 Million to Low-Income Families  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

112 Million to Low-Income 112 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Department of Energy Provides Nearly $112 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization March 29, 2007 - 12:17pm Addthis Funding is First Installment of $204.5 Million in Total Weatherization Grants for FY 2007 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $111.6 million in weatherization grants to 30 states and the Navajo Nation to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families. Weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually. Total Fiscal Year 2007 funding is $204.5 million and will provide weatherization to approximately 70,000 homes. "Weatherization is a valuable way to help save money and energy," DOE Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Alexander

213

Photo of the Week: 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Photo of the Week: 2013 Photo of the Week: 2013 Photo of the Week: 2013 Addthis An Express Train to Crescent Junction 1 of 45 An Express Train to Crescent Junction In the 1950s, one of the largest uranium deposits in the U.S. was found near Moab, Utah. The Department of Energy began cleaning up the uranium mill tailings from the Moab Site in April 2009, using steel containers to transport more than five million tons of tailings for safe disposal near Crescent Junction, Utah. In this May 2012 photo, one of the trains is shown on the Union Pacific Railroad in Utah, passing a butte capped by a familiar southwest U.S. rock formation known as Navajo Sandstone. Image: Department of Energy Date taken: 2013-01-04 09:00 I, Robot Olympics 2 of 45 I, Robot Olympics Last week, students from dozens of local Tennessee high schools gathered at

214

Summary: Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement: DOE/EIS 0472-D, March 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary: Draft ULP PEIS March 2013 Summary: Draft ULP PEIS March 2013 COVER SHEET 1 2 3 Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: The cooperating agencies are U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), 6 Bureau of Land Management (BLM); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); Colorado 7 Department of Transportation (CDOT); Colorado Division of Reclamation, Mining, and Safety 8 (CDRMS); Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW); Mesa County Commission; Montrose County 9 Commission; San Juan County Commission; San Miguel County Board of Commissioners; the 10 Pueblo of Acoma Tribe; the Pueblo de Cochiti Tribe; the Pueblo de Isleta Tribe; the Navajo 11 Nation; and the Southern Ute Indian Tribe. 12 13 Title: Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement 14

215

Data:25620263-6cc2-4293-83d7-ea657d71d243 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20263-6cc2-4293-83d7-ea657d71d243 20263-6cc2-4293-83d7-ea657d71d243 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Large Power Services (Primary Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.ntua.com/utility_rates/large_power_services.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

216

Data:33d66878-9df5-403c-afbc-947a3b5e372f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

78-9df5-403c-afbc-947a3b5e372f 78-9df5-403c-afbc-947a3b5e372f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: General Services Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable for commercial, industrial, institutional, three-phase farm and home service, andall other uses not ordinarily considered as normal residential, home, or farm use. Source or reference: http://www.ntua.com/utility_rates/generalservices.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

217

Blog Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 21, 2012 September 21, 2012 DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office Editor's Note: This announcement was originally posted on the Office of Environmental Management's website. Today the Energyy Department awarded a $20 million contact (estimated value) to a Native American Tribally-Owned Section 8(a) company for administrative support services and information technology support at our Savannah River Operations Office. The company, NOVA Corp. of Window Rock, Arizona, is owned by the Navajo Nation. September 17, 2012 Winners of the 2011 Regional Science Bowl competition (hosted in partnership with the University of Texas - Pan American) pose at the national competition in Washington, DC. | Courtesy of the University of Texas - Pan American HESTEC Program.

218

LTS-O&M Selected Publications | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selected Publications Selected Publications LTS-O&M Selected Publications Waugh, W.J., E.P. Glenn, P.H. Charley, B. Maxwell, and M.K. O'Neill. 2011. Helping Mother Earth Heal: Diné College and Enhanced Natural Attenuation Research at U.S. Department of Energy Uranium Processing Sites on Navajo Land. In: Burger, J. (ed.) Stakeholders and Scientists: Achieving Implementable Solutions to Energy and Environmental Issues. Springer, New York, New York. Benson, C.H., W.J. Waugh, W.H. Albright, and R.P. Bush, 2011. "Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Renovation Field Experiment, Proceedings of Waste Management 2011 Symposium, Phoenix, AZ. Dayvault, J., S. Morrison, and J. Waugh, 2011. "Overview of U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Applied Science and

219

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Management Review Team Conc~~rrence Sign-Off  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Management Review Team Conc~~rrence Sign-Off April 24,2001 ACTION: DRAFT ENVIRONMENT ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER COMPLIANCE ACTIVITIES AT THE URANIUM MILL TAILINGS SITE, SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO ISSUE: DraR Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Shiprock, New Mexico, to the Navajo Nation, federal and tribal regulatoly agencies, and other interested stakeholders for review and comment. RECOMMENDATION: The Management Review Team and the DOE-AL NEPA Compliance Off~cer have determined that this E A meets the requirements of 10 CFR 1021 and implementing g u i d a n p q d is adequate for transmittal to the external stakeholders. DOE-GJO ~ocumen&ana~er ' D. Metzler WE-& NCO J. Robbins

220

shiprock info sheet 08.20.13.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site pond. Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site pond. Tailings Cover Site After Cleanup Groundwater Shiprock Site Background 1951 Uranium found on Navajo Nation lands near Shiprock. 1952 Uranium-ore buying station is established in Shiprock. 1954 Mill is built in Shiprock. 1954-1968 Various companies operate the mill, processing uranium and vanadium ore. During milling operations, chemicals from mill tailings piles and ponds drain into the soil and groundwater. 1968-1973 Mill buildings and equipment are torn down. 1975-1980 Initial cleanup of materials from former milling operations. 1986 Mill tailings are put in a disposal cell and a cover is constructed over the materials. The disposal cell cover is a barrier that prevents radon gas from escaping and reduces the amount of water drainage through the cell.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nauru navajo navaho" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NETL: Carbon Storage - Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing SWP efforts can be found on their website. The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) is led by the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and represents a coalition composed of a diverse group of experts in geology, engineering, economics, public policy, and outreach. The 50 SWP partners represent state and federal agencies, universities, electric utilities, non-governmental organizations, coal, oil and gas companies, and the Navajo Nation. The partners are engaged in several aspects of SWP projects and contribute to the efforts to deploy carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects in the southwestern region of the United States. SWP encompasses Arizona,

222

Data:0d045157-3944-4f7a-9c12-f4145621a734 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

45157-3944-4f7a-9c12-f4145621a734 45157-3944-4f7a-9c12-f4145621a734 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Effective date: 2002/12/05 End date if known: Rate name: 8 module photvoltaic Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.ntua.com/utility_rates/pvrates.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

223

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office September 21, 2012 - 5:16pm Addthis John Hale III John Hale III Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization Editor's Note: This announcement was originally posted on the Office of Environmental Management's website. Today the Energyy Department awarded a $20 million contact (estimated value) to a Native American Tribally-Owned Section 8(a) company for administrative support services and information technology support at our Savannah River Operations Office. The company, NOVA Corp. of Window Rock, Arizona, is owned by the Navajo Nation. NOVA

224

Microsoft Word - SWP.SanJuanBasin.factsheet.10.26.2009.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Investigators Brian McPherson (brian@nmt.edu) and Reid Grigg (reid@prrc.nmt.edu) New Mexico Tech Field Test Information: Field Test Name San Juan Basin, New Mexico: Enhanced Coalbed Methane-Sequestration Test Test Location Near Navajo City, New Mexico Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Source 20,000 - 35,000 tons; CO2 sourced from McElmo Dome, CO ConocoPhillips KinderMorgan CO 2 Company, L.P. Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Summary of Field Test Site and Operations General Geology and Target Reservoirs: The San Juan basin (SJB) is one of the top ranked basins in the world for CO 2 coalbed sequestration because it has: 1) advantageous geology and high methane content; 2) abundant anthropogenic CO

225

Data:32836304-482d-48ae-a5ff-f4e1152af08c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6304-482d-48ae-a5ff-f4e1152af08c 6304-482d-48ae-a5ff-f4e1152af08c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: large power service industrial Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: http://www.ntua.com/utility_rates/large_power_services.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

226

Indian Mineral Leasing Act of 1938 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Act of 1938 Act of 1938 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Indian Mineral Leasing Act Year 1938 Url IndianMineralLeasing1938.jpg Description Provides for leasing of minerals on tribal lands References IMLA[1] United States v. Navajo Nation[2] The Indian Mineral Leasing Act of 1938 (IMLA) provides that "[u]nallotted lands within any Indian reservation," or otherwise under federal jurisdiction, "may, with the approval of the Secretary [of the Interior (Secretary)] ... , be leased for mining purposes, by authority of the tribal council or other authorized spokesmen for such Indians." 25 U.S.C. § 396a. The Act aims to provide Indian tribes with a profitable source of revenue and to foster tribal self-determination by giving Indians a greater

227

Partnership Overview and Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SWP Phase 3 Deployment Project: SWP Phase 3 Deployment Project: Overview and Summary Brian McPherson and Reid Grigg RCSP Annual Review Meeting October 5-7, 2010 Pittsburgh, PA 2 Acknowledgements * Many thanks to the U.S. Department of Energy and NETL for supporting this project * We express our gratitude also to our many industry partners, who have committed a great deal of time, funding and other general support for these projects * The work presented today is co-authored by all partners in the Southwest Partnership 3 Southwest Regional Partnership In all partner states: * major universities * geologic survey * other state agencies * over 50 partners as well as * Western Governors Association * five major utilities * seven energy companies * three federal agencies * the Navajo Nation * many other critical partners

228

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office September 21, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, DOE bill.taylor@srs.gov 803-952-8564 Aiken, SC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a set- aside contract to the NOVA Corp. of Window Rock, Arizona. NOVA will provide administrative support services and information technology support to the Savannah River Operations Office. The firm fixed-price Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity contract with an estimated value of $20 million with a two-year performance period. NOVA Corp. is a Native American Tribally-Owned (Navajo) Section 8(a)

229

Dry Lake Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Dry Lake Wind Farm Facility Dry Lake Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer Iberdrola Renewables Energy Purchaser Iberdrola Renewables Location Navajo County AZ Coordinates 34.635651°, -110.357351° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.635651,"lon":-110.357351,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

230

Data:3b382d0d-c290-48c2-bc3f-933a2381e603 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d-c290-48c2-bc3f-933a2381e603 d-c290-48c2-bc3f-933a2381e603 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: general service commercial Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: http://www.ntua.com/utility_rates/generalservices.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

231

TTG Telecon 9_6_07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9-18-07 9-18-07 1 Summary Tribal Topic Group Teleconference September 6, 2007 Participants Call Lead: Corinne Macaluso (Department of Energy [DOE], Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management [OCRWM]) Other Callers: Amy Alesch (Ysleta del Sur Pueblo), Richard Arnold (Pahrump Paiute Tribe/Consolidated Group of Tribes and organizations [CGTO], Cathy Bohan (DOE/West Valley Demonstration Project), Vicki Best (BSC), Grayden Brown (Pinoleville Pomo), Mike Coplin (Chickasaw Nation), Deanna Domingo (Moapa Band of Paiutes), David Edmunds (Pinoleville Pomo), Greg Fasano (BSC), Bob Fry (NCSL), Jason Garcia (TeMoak Tribe - Wells Band), Josh Garcia (Ysleta del Sur Pueblo), Steve Grey (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory [ LLNL]/Navajo Nation), Elizabeth Helvey (BSC), Paloma Hill (DOE/OCRWM),

232

Data:52133cb4-4dde-4419-8373-c09c2c0aaa28 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cb4-4dde-4419-8373-c09c2c0aaa28 cb4-4dde-4419-8373-c09c2c0aaa28 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Oil and Gas Field Services Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.ntua.com/utility_rates/oil_gas.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

233

TEC/WG Tribal Topic Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conference Call Conference Call December 6, 2005 Group Chair: Jay Jones (DOE/OCRWM) Participating TEC Tribal Topic Group Members: Kevin Clarke (DOE/RL), Kristen Ellis (DOE/CI), Lisa Gover (NTEC), Dan King (Oneida Nation), Corinne Macaluso (DOE/OCRWM), Ellen Ott (DOE/GC), Ted Repasky (CTUIR), Cathy Reynolds (DOE/GC), Lisa Sattler (CSG-MW) Herman Shorty (Navajo Nation), Linda Sikkema (NCSL), Christopher Wells (SSEB) DOE support contractors also participated in this call. Action Items: Responsible Party Action to be Taken Wilda Portner Email potential conference call dates to Tribal representatives who are members of the Topic Group. Ask for their input on which of 2 or 3 dates are the most convenient for the call. Follow up emails with faxes and phone calls as necessary.

234

Rancher Brings Wind Power to Arizona | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rancher Brings Wind Power to Arizona Rancher Brings Wind Power to Arizona Rancher Brings Wind Power to Arizona April 15, 2010 - 5:50pm Addthis On a blustery day in Arizona, thousands gathered at the commemoration of the state's first wind farm. A group of local residents and Interior Department officials were there to celebrate an event that had once seemed unlikely if not impossible. It all started when Bill Elkins got an idea. While on a trip to other Midwest states, he noticed their renewable energy projects and wondered why Arizona couldn't do the same, "I traveled to Oklahoma and New Mexico, and to see the different wind farms and topography, I knew we had that." Bill lives in Navajo County, home to one of the largest Indian reservations in the U.S. He owns and operates the Rocking Chair Ranch. Families like

235

Georgia's 5th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5th congressional district: Energy Resources 5th congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Georgia. US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Georgia's 5th congressional district Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia Smart Grid Project Registered Energy Companies in Georgia's 5th congressional district Ajeetco Alpha Renewable Energy American Process Inc C2 Biofuels Empower Energy Technology Ethanol Capital Funding Future Energy Resources G2 Energy GE Energy Formerly GE Power Systems GE Wind Energy Geoplasma LLC Georgia Power Global Energy Holdings Group formerly Xethanol Corporation Home Depot Foundation International Truck Navajo Wind Energy Plum Combustion

236

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office September 21, 2012 - 5:16pm Addthis John Hale III John Hale III Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization Editor's Note: This announcement was originally posted on the Office of Environmental Management's website. Today the Energyy Department awarded a $20 million contact (estimated value) to a Native American Tribally-Owned Section 8(a) company for administrative support services and information technology support at our Savannah River Operations Office. The company, NOVA Corp. of Window Rock, Arizona, is owned by the Navajo Nation. NOVA

237

Data:Fd21e8e9-333c-4fd4-bc5c-54dc21a88fb4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1e8e9-333c-4fd4-bc5c-54dc21a88fb4 1e8e9-333c-4fd4-bc5c-54dc21a88fb4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: 4 module\240 photovoltaic Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.ntua.com/utility_rates/pvrates.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

238

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 6170 of 28,905 results. 61 - 6170 of 28,905 results. Download CX-010544: Categorical Exclusion Determination Glen Canyon Switchyard - 230 Kilovolt Wavetrap Removal - TZ9A2 on the Navajo Line CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 06/21/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010544-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010546: Categorical Exclusion Determination Liberty Substation Transformer Replacement Project, Maricopa County, Arizona CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 06/06/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010546-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010552: Categorical Exclusion Determination

239

Data:98ac3a64-1e8a-4250-962b-41e8c0e59803 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a64-1e8a-4250-962b-41e8c0e59803 a64-1e8a-4250-962b-41e8c0e59803 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Irrigation Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.ntua.com/utility_rates/Irrigation.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

240

Data:8c2eefc7-f218-470d-b9ed-92623ac3491c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eefc7-f218-470d-b9ed-92623ac3491c eefc7-f218-470d-b9ed-92623ac3491c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: 8 module\lp photovoltaic Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.ntua.com/utility_rates/pvrates.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nauru navajo navaho" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Energy Department Provides $140.3 Million to Low-Income Families for Home  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

140.3 Million to Low-Income Families 140.3 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Energy Department Provides $140.3 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization April 3, 2006 - 9:55am Addthis Funding is first installment of $243 million in total weatherization grants for FY 2006 WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced $140.3 million in weatherization program grants to 31 states and the Navajo Nation to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income families; weatherization can reduce an average home's energy costs by $358 annually. Total Fiscal Year 2006 funding is $243 million and will provide weatherization to approximately 96,560 homes. "Weatherizing your home is a valuable way to save energy and money,"

242

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- MexHat  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Utah Utah Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site This Site All Sites All LM Quick Search Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Key Documents Fact Sheet 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site Communications and Outreach Plan for the Navajo Nation Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Sites Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Mexican Hat, Utah (UMTRCA Title I), Disposal Site San Juan County, Utah Please be green. Do not print these documents unless absolutely necessary. Request a paper copy of any document by submitting a Document Request. All Site Documents All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Fact Sheet

243

CRSP Customers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colorado River Storage Project Management Center's Customer list Colorado River Storage Project Management Center's Customer list Use the filters above the customer list to refine your search. Click the "Clear" to reset the list. Western's full list of customers is available on the Western's Customer Web page. Customer Name Customer Type State Region Project Acoma Pueblo Native American Tribes NM CRSP SLIP Aggregated Energy Services Cooperatives AZ CRSP SLIP AK-Chin Indian Community Native American Tribes AZ CRSP SLIP Alamo Navajo Chapter Native American Tribes NM CRSP SLIP Albuquerque Operation-DOE Federal Agencies NM CRSP SLIP Arizona Electric Power Cooperative Cooperatives AZ CRSP/DSW SLIP/PD Aspen, City of Municipalities CO CRSP SLIP Aztec, City of Municipalities NM CRSP SLIP

244

DSW Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Contact DSW Customers Customer Meetings Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Power Projects Contact DSW Customers Customer Meetings Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates DSW Power Projects Boulder Canyon: Straddling the Colorado River near the Arizona-Nevada border, Hoover Dam in Boulder Canyon creates Lake Mead. River waters turning turbines at Hoover Powerplant produce about 2,074 MW--enough electricity for nearly 8 million people. Western markets this power to public utilities in Arizona, California and Nevada over 53.30 circuit-miles of transmission line. Central Arizona: Authorized in 1968, the Central Arizona Project in Arizona and western New Mexico was built to improve water resources in the Colorado River Basin. Segments of the authorization allowed for Federal participation in the Navajo Generating Station. The Federal share of the powerplant's combined capacity is 547 MW.

245

Data:8994cd0e-69f4-4fde-8504-c3df338c32df | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

94cd0e-69f4-4fde-8504-c3df338c32df 94cd0e-69f4-4fde-8504-c3df338c32df No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: 8 module\640-wp system photovoltaic Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.ntua.com/utility_rates/pvrates.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

246

Data:43933ea3-8a27-4493-a9a6-70cf143f8e4a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-8a27-4493-a9a6-70cf143f8e4a -8a27-4493-a9a6-70cf143f8e4a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Public Street, Highway and Private Area Lighting Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.ntua.com/utility_rates/PublicHighwayArea_Lighting.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

247

CX-002235: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

35: Categorical Exclusion Determination 35: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002235: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Drain Line at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/08/2010 Location(s): Tuba City, Arizona Office(s): Legacy Management The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management proposes to replace a drain line that carries waste liquid from a groundwater treatment system to an evaporation pond within the disposal site boundary. The drain line is not functioning as intended or as needed. The Tuba City Disposal Site is located on land owned by the Navajo Nation and held in trust by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. It is located approximately 6 miles northeast of the town of Tuba City, Arizona DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002235.pdf

248

Audit Report: OAS-RA-13-28 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Audit Report: OAS-RA-13-28 July 18, 2013 Costs Incurred by Selected Tribal Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Recipients Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the Department of Energy's (Department) Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program received $3.2 billion to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy use and fossil fuel emissions. The Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy allocated about $2.7 billion of the funds using a population-driven formula to over 2,000 entities including states and territories, cities and counties, and Native American tribes. The Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (NTUA), the Cherokee Nation, Muscogee Creek Nation, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, and Chickasaw Nation received the

249

TEC/WG Tribal Topic Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 4, 2005 - Phoenix, AZ April 4, 2005 - Phoenix, AZ Group Chair: Jay Jones (DOE/OCRWM) Tribal Topic Group Members Present: Nancy Bennett (UNM/ATRI), Kevin Blackwell (DOT/FRA), Kristen Ellis (DOE/CI), Ed Gonzales (ELG), Elizabeth Helvey (BSC), Jeff Hepting (Pueblo of Acoma), Robert Holden (NCAI), Judith Holm (DOE/OCRWM), Dan King (Oneida Nation), Gary Lanthrum (DOE/OCRWM), Bob Lupton (DOE/ORD/IR), Corinne Macaluso (DOE/OCRWM), Ellen Ott (DOE/GC), Jennifer Patric (BAH), Stanley Paytiamo (Pueblo of Acoma), Wilda Portner (SAIC), Willie Preacher (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes), Herman Shorty (Navajo Nation), Linda Sikkema (NCSL), Larry Stern (CVSA), Neil Weber (Pueblo of San Ildefonso), Christopher Wells (SSEB), Stephen White (NAEMT), Andrea Wilkins (NCSL), Corina Williams (Oneida Nation) (NOTE: Other

250

Engineer, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sandra Begay-Campbell Sandra Begay-Campbell Engineer, Sandia National Laboratories Sandra Begay-Campbell Sandra Begay-Campbell Role: Engineer, Sandia National Laboratories Award: Ely S. Parker Award Profile: Sandra Begay-Campbell, a Sandia National Laboratories engineer and a member of the Navajo Nation, was selected for the prestigious Ely S. Parker Award by the American Indian Science and Engineering Society at an honors banquet Oct. 31 in Portland, Ore. Begay-Campbell, who has worked at Sandia for 17 years and is a principal member of the technical staff, received the Lifetime Achievement Award, AISES's highest honor, which recognizes American Indians who have "made significant long-term contributions in the sciences, mathematics, engineering, technology, health, or related fields."

251

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tuba  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arizona Arizona Tuba City Disposal Site, Arizona This Site All Sites All LM Quick Search Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Key Documents Fact Sheet 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site Annual Groundwater Report April 2012 Through March 2013 Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site Communications and Outreach Plan for the Navajo Nation Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Sites Data Validation Package-August 2013 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site Phase I Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Tuba City, Arizona, UMTRA Site

252

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ship  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

New Mexico New Mexico Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site This Site All Sites All LM Quick Search Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Key Documents Fact Sheet Communications and Outreach Plan for the Navajo Nation Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Sites Disposal Site Community Information Sheet 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site Data Validation Package-March 2013 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling Final Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Remediation at the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Site Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Shiprock Disposal Site, Shiprock, New Mexico Internal Links Environmental Sciences Laboratory (ESL) Reports Webpage

253

SWP.SanJuanBasin.factsheet0919  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Investigator Reid Grigg/Brian McPherson NMT reid@prrc.nmt.edu / brian@nmt.edu Field Test Information: Field Test Name San Juan Basin, New Mexico: Enhanced Coalbed Methane-Sequestration Test Test Location Near Navajo City, New Mexico Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Source 20,000 - 35,000 tons; CO2 sourced from McElmo Dome, CO ConocoPhillips KinderMorgan CO 2 Company, L.P. Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Summary of Field Test Site and Operations General Geology and Target Reservoirs: The San Juan basin (SJB) is one of the top ranked basins in the world for CO 2 coalbed sequestration because it has: 1) advantageous geology and high methane content; 2) abundant anthropogenic CO

254

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glen Canyon to Flagstaff #2 345-kV Transmission Line Access Road Maintenance from Structure 45/4 to 46/1 Continuation Sheet Special Conditions Biological Resources 1. Project sites should be cleaned of trash and other items at the end of each day to minimize the likelihood of attracting California condors. 2. No human interaction is allowed with condor(s), especially non-permitted hazing (i.e., attempts to scare birds away). If condor(s) occur at the project site, all activity should cease until the condor(s) leaves on its own. The Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife (928-871-6450), or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (602-242-0210), should be contacted immediately. 3. Work shall be conducted between August 15 and April 15, generally outside of the breeding season for

255

Staff and Contractor Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 4, 2012 October 4, 2012 Dr. Stanley Atcitty, left, and Dr. Imre Gyuk, right, at the Smithsonian, following the 2012 PECASE awards ceremony. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. Meet Dr. Stanley Atcitty, PECASE Winner and DOE Researcher Dr. Stanley Atcitty speaks with Dr. Imre Gyuk about about his experiences in the Navajo community, the impact of power electronics on the nation's electric grid and what led him to engineering. October 2, 2012 In this photo taken in the 1970s, INL's Richard Dickson is measuring background radiation levels using ionization chambers. | Photo courtesy of Richard Dickson. Farewell ERDA, Hello Energy Department Learning to adapt: 35 years ago, the Energy Research and Development

256

Microsoft PowerPoint - Perry.ppt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Congestion Study Western Interconnection Spring 2009 Technical Workshop U.S. DOE 2009 Congestion Study Dean Perry Western Interconnection Transmission Paths 2 BUCKLEY SUNDANCE FT. PECK PEACE CANYON MICA VANCOUVER SEATTLE PRINCE RUPERT AREA AREA COLSTRIP BOISE PORTLAND AREA MALIN TABLE MTN ROUND MTN SALT LAKE CITY AREA MEXICO EL PASO AREA DEVERS LUGO SAN FRANCISCO MIDPOINT AREA LOS ANGELES AREA ALBUQUERQUE AREA NAVAJO DENVER AREA MOJAVE HOOVER PHOENIX AREA LANGDON HOT SPRINGS HELLS CANYON CHIEF JOSEPH BURNS PINTO FOUR CORNERS SHASTA LANGDON CANADA UNITED STATES 66 65 14 8 30 49 31 19 22 34 47 3 35 18 17 20 23 36 45 46 50 51 4 8 48 Data Analyzed ● Actual Power Flow - Hourly samples ● Path Transfer Limits - Hourly samples ● Path Schedules - from electronic scheduling tags - OATI Hourly Firm & Non-firm Net Schedule and schedules in both path directions

257

Status of Texas eastern's synfuels projects. [Kentucky, New Mexico, Wyoming, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The rationale for synfuel project and site selection is outlined and a brief description of four projects is presented. The Tri-State Project is a coal gasification/liquefaction project located on the Ohio River in Henderson County, Kentucky. It will convert about 10 million tons per year of high sulfur coal into SNG, transportation fuels and chemicals. The New Mexico Project is located in northwest N.M. east of the Navajo Indian Reservation. The plant will convert about 10 million tons of coal per year into SNG and methanol using the Lurgi process. The Lake DeSmet Project in north central Wyoming will also employ Lurgi Technology to produce SNG and methanol. The Paraho Oil Shale Module Project would produce 10,000 b/d of synthetic crude from oil shale in eastern Utah.

Homeyer, H.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Department of the Interior and related agencies appropriations for 1976. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Fourth Congress, First Session. Part 8  

SciTech Connect

The following hearings were held: National Park Service--Mining in the parks; National Park Service--Concessions Management; Bureau of Indian Affairs/Navajo and Hopi Relocation Commission (Budget Amendment); Geological Survey--Onshore lease management, to discuss studies of management practices; Energy Research and Development Administration--Budget Amendment request to reflect an analysis of national priorities for balancing energy R and D programs; Federal Energy Administration--Budget Amendment requesting supplemental appropriations for 1,483 positions and $147.6 billion needed because assumptions of regulatory control and conservation programs led to underestimated needs; Outer Continental Shelf Leasing, to consider results of modifications in the leasing program due to concern for state involvement in leasing procedures; and Bureau of Mines--Budget Amendment for supplemental appropriations to allow expansion of Bureau of Mines coal mining effort, with research on extraction procedures for thick seams and environmentally acceptable techniques for stripping. (DCK)

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Novel Approach to Experimental Studies of Mineral Dissolution Kinetics  

SciTech Connect

Currently, DOE is conducting pilot CO{sub 2} injection tests to evaluate the concept of geological sequestration. The injected CO{sub 2} is expected to react with the host rocks and these reactions can potentially alter the porosity, permeability, and mechanical properties of the host or cap rocks. Reactions can also result in precipitation of carbonate-containing minerals that favorably and permanently trap CO{sub 2} underground. Many numerical models have been used to predict these reactions for the carbon sequestration program. However, a firm experimental basis for predicting silicate reaction kinetics in CO{sub 2} injected geological formations is urgently needed to assure the reliability of the geochemical models used for the assessments of carbon sequestration strategies. The funded experimental and theoretical study attempts to resolve this outstanding scientific issue by novel experimental design and theoretical interpretation of silicate dissolution rates at conditions pertinent to geological carbon sequestration. In this four year research grant (three years plus a one year no cost extension), seven (7) laboratory experiments of CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions were carried out. An experimental design allowed the collection of water samples during experiments in situ and thus prevented back reactions. Analysis of the in situ samples delineated the temporal evolution of aqueous chemistry because of CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions. The solid products of the experiments were retrieved at the end of the experimental run, and analyzed with a suite of advanced analytical and electron microscopic techniques (i.e., atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)). As a result, the research project probably has produced one of the best data sets for CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions in terms of both aqueous solution chemistry and solid characterization. Three experiments were performed using the Navajo sandstone. Navajo sandstone is geologically equivalent to the Nugget sandstone, which is a target formation for a regional partnership injection project. Our experiments provided the experimental data on the potential CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions that are likely to occur in the aquifer. Geochemical modeling was performed to interpret the experimental results. Our single mineral (feldspar) experiments addressed a basic research need. i.e., the coupled nature of dissolution and precipitation reactions, which has universal implication to the reaction kinetics as it applied to CO{sub 2} sequestration. Our whole rock experiments (Navajo sandstone) addressed the applied research component, e.g., reacting Navajo sandstone with brine and CO{sub 2} has direct relevance on the activities of a number of regional partnerships. The following are the major findings from this project: (1) The project generated a large amount of experimental data that is central to evaluating CO{sub 2}-water-rock interactions and providing ground truth to predictive models, which have been used and will inevitably be increasingly more used in carbon sequestration. (2) Results from the feldspar experiments demonstrated stronger coupling between dissolution and precipitation reactions. We show that the partial equilibrium assumption did not hold in the feldspar hydrolysis experiments (Zhu and Lu, submitted, Appendix A-2). The precipitation of clay minerals influenced dissolution of primary silicate in a much stronger way as previously envisioned. Therefore, our experimental data indicated a much more complex chemical kinetics as it has been applied to carbon sequestration program in terms of preliminary predictive models of CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions. Adopting this complexity (strong coupling) may influence estimates of mineral trapping and porosity/permeability for geological carbon sequestration. In general, our knowledge of the coupling of different reactions is poor, and we must consider the uncertainties resultin

Chen Zhu

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced- oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

Jr., Chidsey, Thomas C.; Allison, M. Lee

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nauru navajo navaho" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

College Bound American Indian Math and Science Enrichment Program (AIMS). Final report  

SciTech Connect

Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI), was founded in 1971 and is located on 164 acres in northwest Albuquerque, New Mexico in the center of New Mexico`s agricultural and high-tech corridors. SIPI became accredited as a community college in 1993, serves Native Americans nationwide, and is governed by a nationally-tribally appointed Board of Regents (Jicarilla Apache, Joint Oklahoma Tribes, Mescalero Apache, Navajo Nation-Arizona, Navajo Nation-New Mexico, Ten Southern Pueblos, and Eight Northern Pueblos, Southern Ute, Inter-tribal Council of Arizona, and Oglala Sioux). In 1993, The US Department of Education, TRIO Programs no longer funded the Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI) Summer Math and Science Enrichment Program. However, with US Department of Energy funding SIPI was able to continue service to the Native American community under the new title of College Bound American Indian Math and Science (AIMS) Enrichment Program. This new program continued the goals and objectives of the TRIO program with an expanded focus that included students from more Native American communities nationwide. The program also interfaced with a teacher enrichment program (Rural American Indian Science Education-RAISE) sponsored by the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Sandia National Labs (SNL). SIPI in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National (LLNL) Laboratory established a mathematics and science enrichment program at SIPI for students attending rural high schools serving predominantly Native American populations. The primary goal of the program was to provide 9th--12th grade students, mostly Native American, the skills and knowledge, interest and motivation, and strategies to remain in high school and pursue a college education in a math, science, or technology based field. Each year, the program included a six-week intensive residential summer program located at SIPI as well as academic year support activities at the student`s high school. A summary of the program activities during the grant period is given.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a revision of the original Mexiacan Hat Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. This RAP has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Section 2.0 presents the EPA standards, including a discussion of their objectives. Section 3. 0 summarizes the present site characteristics and provides a definition of site-specific problems. Section 4.0 is the site design for the proposed action. Section 5.0 presents the water resources protection strategy. Section 6.0 summarizes the plan for ensuring health and safety protection for the surrounding community and the on- site workers. Section 7.0 lists the responsibilities of the project participants. Section 8.0 describes the features of the long-term surveillance and maintenance plan.

NONE

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Status of activities on the inactive uranium mill tailings sites remedial action program. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment  

SciTech Connect

This report on the status of the Office of Environment's program for inactive uranium mill tailings sites is an analysis of the current status and a forecast of future activities of the Office of Environment. The termination date for receipt of information was September 30, 1980. Aerial radiological surveys and detailed ground radiological assessments of properties within the communities in the vicinity of the designated processing sites in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Boise, Idaho led to the designation of an initial group of vicinity properties for remedial action. The potential health effects of the residual radioactive materials on or near these properties were estimated, and the Assistant Secretary for Environment recommended priorities for performing remedial action to the Department's Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy. In designating these properties and establishing recommended priorities for performing remedial action, the Office of Environment consulted with the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, representatives from the affected State and local governments, and individual property owners. After notifying the Governors of each of the affected States and the Navajo Nation of the Secretary of Energy's designation of processing sites within their areas of jurisdiction and establishment of remedial action priorities, a Sample Cooperative Agreement was developed by the Department in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and provided to the affected States and the Navajo Nation for comments. During September 1980, a Cooperative Agreement with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for the designated Canonsburg processing site was executed by the Department. It is anticipated that a Cooperative Agreement between the State of Utah and the Department to perform remedial actions at the designated Salt Lake City site will be executed in the near future.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Newsletter Signup Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS (red fields are required) Manage subscriptions: Subscribe Unsubscribe Name E-Mail Affiliation Address Address (line 2) City State/Province Zip/Postal Code Country (please select a country) none Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegowina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d'Ivoire Croatia (Hrvatska) Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic East Timor Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France France, Metropolitan French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard and Mc Donald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran (Islamic Republic of) Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People's Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint LUCIA Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia (Slovak Republic) Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands Spain Sri Lanka St. Helena St. Pierre and Miquelon Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Islands Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan, Province of China Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States United States Minor Outlying Islands Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Viet Nam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Wallis and Futuna Islands Western Sahara Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Zimbabwe

265

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012 Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 30. Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State and County Number of Mines Sales (thousand short tons) Average Sales Price (dollars per short ton) Alabama 39 19,021 106.57 Bibb 1 w w Blount 2 w w Fayette 1 w w Franklin 1 w w Jackson 2 w w Jefferson 11 4,298 146.04 Marion 1 w w Tuscaloosa 7 8,599 111.55 Walker 11 2,370 81.88 Winston 2 w w Alaska 1 w w Yukon-Koyukuk 1 w w Arizona 1 w w Navajo 1 w w Arkansas 1 w w Sebastian 1 w w Colorado 12 28,856 37.54 Delta 1 w w Gunnison 2 w w La Plata

266

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

267

Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) has established a formal environmental protection, auditing, monitoring, and planning program that has been in effect since 1978. The significant environmental projects and issues Western was involved with in 1995 are discussed in this annual site environmental report. It is written to show the nature and effectiveness of the environmental protection program. Western operates and maintains nearly 17,000 miles of transmission lines, 257 substations, and various appurtenant power facilities in fifteen central and western states. Western is also responsible for planning, construction, and operation and maintenance of additional federal transmission facilities that may be authorized in the future. There is a combined total of 55 hydroelectric power generating plants in the service area. Additionally, Western markets the US entitlement from the Navajo coal-fired plant near Page, Arizona. The Department of Energy requires the preparation of an annual site environmental report. Because Western has over 400 facilities located in these states, this report addresses the environmental activities in all the facilities as one site.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) has established a formal environmental protection, auditing, monitoring, and planning program which has been in effect since 1978. The significant environmental projects and issues Western was involved with in 1988 are discussed in this annual site environmental report. It is written to demonstrate the nature and effectiveness of the environmental protection program. Western is responsible for the operation and maintenance of 16,376 miles of transmission lines, 254 substations, and various appurtenant power facilities in the above geographic areas. Western also is responsible for planning, construction, and operation and maintenance of additional Federal transmission facilities that may be authorized in the future. There is a combined total of 51 hydroelectric power generating plants in the service areas. Additionally, Western markets the US entitlement from the large Navajo coal-fired plant near Page, Arizona, and power generated at a wind farm in Wyoming. The Department of Energy requires the preparation of an annual site environmental report. Because Western has numerous facilities located in these states, this report was written to address the environmental activities in all of the facilities as one site.

NONE

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Environmental assessment: South microwave communication facilities  

SciTech Connect

Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to construct, operate, and maintain eight microwave repeater stations in southwestern Colorado, southeastern Utah, and northern Arizona, in order to meet the minimum fade criteria established by the Western Systems Coordinating Council (WSCC) for the operation and protection of electric power systems. The proposed microwave facilities would increase the reliability of communication. This environmental assessment (EA) describes the existing environmental conditions and the impacts from construction of the eight microwave communication facilities. The EA was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the Department of Energy Guidelines (52 FR 47662, December 15, 1987). The proposed project would consist of constructing eight microwave facilities, each of which would include a self-supported lattice tower, an equipment building, a propane tank, distribution lines to provide electric power to the sites, and access roads to the sites. The facilities would be constructed in San Miguel and Montezuma Counties in Colorado, San Juan County, Utah, and Navajo, Apache, Coconino, and Yavapai Counties in Arizona. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) has established a formal environmental protection, auditing, monitoring, and planning program which has been in effect since 1978. The significant environmental projects and issues Western was involved with in 1991 are discussed in this annual site environmental report. It is written to demonstrate the nature and effectiveness of the environmental protection program. Western is responsible for the operation and maintenance of 16,664 miles of transmission lines, 265 substations, and various appurtenant power facilities in fifteen central and western states. Western also is responsible for planning, construction, and operation and maintenance of additional federal transmission facilities that may be authorized in the future. There is a combined total of 51 hydroelectric power generating plants in the service area. Additionally, Western markets the US entitlement from the Navajo coal-fired plant near Page, Arizona. The Department of Energy requires the preparation of an annual site environmental report. Because Western has numerous facilities located in these states, this report was written to address the environmental activities in all of the facilities as one site.

NONE

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Rio Grande pipeline introduces LPG to Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Rio Grande Pipeline, a joint venture between Mid-America Pipeline Co., Amoco Pipeline Co. and Navajo Pipeline Co., has broken new ground in the energy industry as the first LPG pipeline to cross the US-Mexico border. Plans for the project were announced in November 1995 and first deliveries started three months ago on March 21, 1997. The 8-inch, 265-mile pipeline originates near Odessa, TX, where it receives an 85-15 propane-butane mix via a connection to Mid-America Pipeline. From Odessa, product moves west through the Texas desert and crosses the Rio Grande River about 15 miles south of El Paso near Clint, TX and extends 20 miles into Mexico. Capacity of the line is 24,000 bpd and it has been averaging about 22,000 bpd since line-fill. All in all, it sounded like a reasonably feasible, routine project. But perceptions can be deceiving, or at least misleading. In other words, the project can be summarized as follows: one river, two cultures and a world of difference. The official border crossing for pipeline construction took place on Dec. 2, 1996, with a directional drill under the Rio Grande River, but in actuality, the joint venture partners were continually bridging differences in language, laws, customs and norms with Pemex and contracted workers from Mexico.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Analysis of Potential Leakage Pathways and Mineralization within Caprocks for Geologic Storage of CO(sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We used a multifaceted approach to investigate the nature of caprocks above, and the interface between, reservoir-?quality rocks that might serve as targets for carbon storage. Fieldwork in southeastern Utah examined the regional-? to m-?scale nature of faults and fractures across the sedimentiological interfaces. We also used microscopic analyses and mechanical modeling to examine the question as to how the contacts between units interact, and how fractures may allow fluids to move from reservoirs to caprock. Regional-?scale analyses using ASTER data enabled us to identify location of alteration, which led to site-?specific studies of deformation and fluid flow. In the Jurassic Carmel Formation, a seal for the Navajo Sandstone, we evaluated mesoscale variability in fracture density and morphology and variability in elastic moduli in the Jurassic Carmel Formation, a proposed seal to the underlying Navajo Sandstone for CO{sub 2} geosequestration. By combining mechano-?stratigraphic outcrop observations with elastic moduli derived from wireline log data, we characterize the variability in fracture pattern and morphology with the observed variability in rock strength within this heterolithic top seal. Outcrop inventories of discontinuities show fracture densities decrease as bed thickness increases and fracture propagation morphology across lithologic interfaces vary with changing interface type. Dynamic elastic moduli, calculated from wireline log data, show that Youngs modulus varies by up to 40 GPa across depositional interfaces, and by an average of 3 GPa across the reservoir/seal interface. We expect that the mesoscale changes in rock strength will affect the distributions of localized stress and thereby influence fracture propagation and fluid flow behavior within the seal. These data provide a means to closely tie outcrop observations to those derived from subsurface data and estimates of subsurface rock strength. We also studied damage zones associated normal faults in the Permian Cedar Mesa Sandstone, southeastern Utah. These faults are characterized by a single slip surfaces and damage zones containing deformation bands, veins, and joints. Field observations include crosscutting relationships, permeability increase, rock strength decrease, and ultraviolet light induced mineral fluorescence within the damage zone. These field observations combined with the interpreted paragenetic sequence from petrographic analysis, suggests a deformation history of reactivation and several mineralization events in an otherwise low-?permeability fault. All deformation bands and veins fluoresce under ultraviolet light, suggesting connectivity and a shared mineralization history. Pre-?existing deformation features act as loci for younger deformation and mineralization events, this fault and its damage zone illustrate the importance of the fault damage zone to subsurface fluid flow. We model a simplified stress history in order to understand the importance of rock properties and magnitude of tectonic stress on the deformation features within the damage zone. The moderate confining pressures, possible variations in pore pressure, and the porous, fine-?grained nature of the Cedar Mesa Sandstone results in a fault damage zone characterized by enhanced permeability, subsurface fluid flow, and mineralization. Structural setting greatly influences fracture spacing and orientation. Three structural settings were examined and include fault proximity, a fold limb of constant dip, and a setting proximal to the syncline hinge. Fracture spacing and dominant fracture orientation vary at each setting and distinctions between regional and local paleo-?stress directions can be made. Joints on the fold limb strike normal to the fold axis/bedding and are interpreted to be sub-?parallel to the maximum regional paleo-?stress direction as there is no fold related strain. Joints proximal to faults and the syncline hinge may have formed under local stress conditions associated with folding and faulting, and

Evans, James

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Indoor air radon  

SciTech Connect

This review concerns primarily the health effects that result from indoor air exposure to radon gas and its progeny. Radon enters homes mainly from the soil through cracks in the foundation and other holes to the geologic deposits beneath these structures. Once inside the home the gas decays (half-life 3.8 d) and the ionized atoms adsorb to dust particles and are inhaled. These particles lodge in the lung and can cause lung cancer. The introduction to this review gives some background properties of radon and its progeny that are important to understanding this public health problem as well as a discussion of the units used to describe its concentrations. The data describing the health effects of inhaled radon and its progeny come both from epidemiological and animal studies. The estimates of risk from these two data bases are consistent within a factor of two. The epidemiological studies are primarily for hard rock miners, although some data exist for environmental exposures. The most complete studies are those of the US, Canadian, and Czechoslovakian uranium miners. Although all studies have some deficiencies, those of major importance include uranium miners in Saskatchewan, Canada, Swedish iron miners, and Newfoundland fluorspar miners. These six studies provide varying degrees of detail in the form of dose-response curves. Other epidemiological studies that do not provide quantitative dose-response information, but are useful in describing the health effects, include coal, iron ore and tin miners in the UK, iron ore miners in the Grangesburg and Kiruna, Sweden, metal miners in the US, Navajo uranium miners in the US, Norwegian niobian and magnitite miners, South African gold and uranium miners, French uranium miners, zinc-lead miners in Sweden and a variety of small studies of environmental exposure. An analysis of the epidemiological studies reveals a variety of interpretation problem areas.172 references.

Cothern, C.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Nonimaging concentrators for solar thermal energy. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A small experimental solar collector test facility has been established on the campus of the University of Chicago. This capability has been used to explore applications of nonimaging optics for solar thermal concentration in three substantially different configurations: (1) a single stage system with moderate concentration on an evacuated absorber (a 5.25X evacuated tube Compound Parabolic Concentrator or CPC), (2) a two stage system with high concentration and a non-evacuated absorber (a 16X Fresnel lens/CPC type mirror) and (3) moderate concentration single stage systems with non-evacuated absorbers for lower temperature (a 3X and a 6.5X CPC). Prototypes of each of these systems have been designed, built and tested. The performance characteristics are presented. In addition a 73 m/sup 2/ experimental array of 3X non-evacuated CPC's has been installed in a school heating system on the Navajo Indian Reservation in New Mexico. The full array has a peak noon time efficiency of approx. 50% at ..delta..T = 50/sup 0/C above ambient and has supplied about half the school's heat load for the past two heating seasons. Several theoretical features of nonimaging concentration have been investigated including their long term energy collecting behavior. The measured performance of the different systems shows clearly that non-tracking concentrators can provide solar thermal energy from moderately high low temperature regimes (> 50/sup 0/C above ambient) up into the mid-temperature region (well above 200/sup 0/C above ambient). The measured efficiency at 220/sup 0/C for the 5.25X CPC was as high or higher than that for any of the commercial tracking systems tested.

Winston, R.

1980-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

275

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed its Phase I program in December 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Many other goals were accomplished on the way to this objective, including (1) analysis of CO{sub 2} storage options in the region, including characterization of storage capacities and transportation options, (2) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} sources, (3) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies employed in the region, (4) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region, (5) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, and (6) assessing and initiating public knowledge and acceptance of possible sequestration approaches. Results of the Southwest Partnership's Phase I evaluation suggested that the most convenient and practical ''first opportunities'' for sequestration would lie along existing CO{sub 2} pipelines in the region. Action plans for six Phase II validation tests in the region were developed, with a portfolio that includes four geologic pilot tests distributed among Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The Partnership will also conduct a regional terrestrial sequestration pilot program focusing on improved terrestrial MMV methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region. The sixth and final validation test consists of a local-scale terrestrial pilot involving restoration of riparian lands for sequestration purposes. The validation test will use desalinated waters produced from one of the geologic pilot tests. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, five major electric utility companies, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs, and the Western Governors Association. This group is continuing its work in the Phase II Validation Program, slated to conclude in 2009.

Brian McPherson

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Author: Thomas C. Chidsey, Petroleum Section Chief, Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT. Venue: International Oil Scouts Association’s 84th annual meeting, Stein Eriksen Lodge, Park City, UT, June 17–20, 2007, (http://www.oilscouts.com/index-main.html [external site]). Abstract: Utah’s natural gas and oil exploration history extends back more than 100 years, fluctuating greatly due to discoveries, price trends, and changing exploration targets. During the boom period of the early 1980s, activity peaked at over 500 wells per year. After slowing in the 1990s, drilling activity has again increased, reaching an all-time peak of 1,058 wells spudded and over 2,000 APDs (application for permit to drill) filed in 2006. This increase in activity has been spurred by high prices for both natural gas and oil and by the perception that Utah is highly prospective and underexplored. In recent years, the proportion of new wells exploring for gas has increased greatly. Total cumulative natural gas production from Utah fields now exceeds 8 Tcf. Recent successful drilling has been expanding reserves by about 10 percent per year, one of the highest rates of gas reserves increase in the country. Although gas production from some fields declined during the late 1990s, two factors caused overall gas production to increase. The development of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) accumulations in the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone play, in particular Drunkards Wash field in central Utah, has increased the State’s annual gas production by 20–30 percent. Also, deeper exploratory and development drilling in the eastern and southern Uinta Basin during the past 5 years has led to discoveries of substantial gas accumulations in tight-sand reservoirs of the Tertiary Wasatch Formation, Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, and Jurassic Entrada and Wingate Sandstones. Significant potential exists for other coalfields (Book Cliffs, Sego, and Wasatch Plateau) around the Uinta Basin to yield CBNG, and the extent of deeper conventional and tight-gas plays remains to be explored. In addition, shale gas reservoirs in the Mississippian Manning Canyon Shale, Pennsylvanian Hermosa Group, and Cretaceous Mancos Shale of central, southeastern, and northeastern Utah, respectively, have tremendous untapped potential. Utah oilfields have produced a cumulative total of 1.3 billion barrels (bbl) of oil. Although annual production decreased from a peak of 41 million bbl in 1985 to 13 million bbl in 2003, the trend has since reversed, and 2005 production reached nearly 17 million bbl. A component (about one-third of the increase) of this turnaround has been the 2004 discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah thrust belt, or "Hingeline." This new field has already produced 3 million bbl of Mississippian-sourced oil from the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in a thrusted anticline formed during the Sevier orogeny. This new oil play is the focus of extensive leasing and exploration activity—comparable to the late 1970s and early 1980s in the Utah-Wyoming salient of the thrust belt to the north.

277

MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the fourth quarter of the first project year (April 1 through June 30, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs to the Jurassic Nugget Sandstone and Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation, the major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view, often in three dimensions, of reservoir-facies characteristics and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. The Nugget Sandstone was deposited in an extensive dune field that extended from Wyoming to Arizona. Outcrop analogs are found in the stratigraphically equivalent Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah which displays large-scale dunal cross-strata with excellent reservoir properties and interdunal features such as oases, wadi, and playa lithofacies with poor reservoir properties. Hydrocarbons in the Paradox Formation are stratigraphically trapped in carbonate buildups (or phylloid-algal mounds). Similar carbonate buildups are exposed in the Paradox along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. Reservoir-quality porosity may develop in the types of facies associated with buildups such as troughs, detrital wedges, and fans, identified from these outcrops. When combined with subsurface geological and production data, these outcrop analogs can improve (1) development drilling and production strategies such as horizontal drilling, (2) reservoir-simulation models, (3) reserve calculations, and (4) design and implementation of secondary/tertiary oil recovery programs and other best practices used in the oil fields of Utah and vicinity. During this quarter, technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting the project plans, objectives, and products at a booth at the 2003 annual convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Grant C. Willis

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transport reactor development unit (TRDU) was modified to accommodate oxygen-blown operation in support of a Vision 21-type energy plex that could produce power, chemicals, and fuel. These modifications consisted of changing the loop seal design from a J-leg to an L-valve configuration, thereby increasing the mixing zone length and residence time. In addition, the standpipe, dipleg, and L-valve diameters were increased to reduce slugging caused by bubble formation in the lightly fluidized sections of the solid return legs. A seal pot was added to the bottom of the dipleg so that the level of solids in the standpipe could be operated independently of the dipleg return leg. A separate coal feed nozzle was added that could inject the coal upward into the outlet of the mixing zone, thereby precluding any chance of the fresh coal feed back-mixing into the oxidizing zone of the mixing zone; however, difficulties with this coal feed configuration led to a switch back to the original downward configuration. Instrumentation to measure and control the flow of oxygen and steam to the burner and mix zone ports was added to allow the TRDU to be operated under full oxygen-blown conditions. In total, ten test campaigns have been conducted under enriched-air or full oxygen-blown conditions. During these tests, 1515 hours of coal feed with 660 hours of air-blown gasification and 720 hours of enriched-air or oxygen-blown coal gasification were completed under this particular contract. During these tests, approximately 366 hours of operation with Wyodak, 123 hours with Navajo sub-bituminous coal, 143 hours with Illinois No. 6, 106 hours with SUFCo, 110 hours with Prater Creek, 48 hours with Calumet, and 134 hours with a Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coal were completed. In addition, 331 hours of operation on low-rank coals such as North Dakota lignite, Australian brown coal, and a 90:10 wt% mixture of lignite and wood waste were completed. Also included in these test campaigns was 50 hours of gasification on a petroleum coke from the Hunt Oil Refinery and an additional 73 hours of operation on a high-ash coal from India. Data from these tests indicate that while acceptable fuel gas heating value was achieved with these fuels, the transport gasifier performs better on the lower-rank feedstocks because of their higher char reactivity. Comparable carbon conversions have been achieved at similar oxygen/coal ratios for both air-blown and oxygen-blown operation for each fuel; however, carbon conversion was lower for the less reactive feedstocks. While separation of fines from the feed coals is not needed with this technology, some testing has suggested that feedstocks with higher levels of fines have resulted in reduced carbon conversion, presumably due to the inability of the finer carbon particles to be captured by the cyclones. These data show that these low-rank feedstocks provided similar fuel gas heating values; however, even among the high-reactivity low-rank coals, the carbon conversion did appear to be lower for the fuels (brown coal in particular) that contained a significant amount of fines. The fuel gas under oxygen-blown operation has been higher in hydrogen and carbon dioxide concentration since the higher steam injection rate promotes the water-gas shift reaction to produce more CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} at the expense of the CO and water vapor. However, the high water and CO{sub 2} partial pressures have also significantly reduced the reaction of (Abstract truncated)

Michael L. Swanson

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity  

SciTech Connect

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone, or a low-permeability zone at the top of the Nugget. The Nugget Sandstone thrust belt play is divided into three subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored shallow structures, (2) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored deep structures, and (3) Absaroka thrust - Paleozoic-cored shallow structures. Both of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays represent a linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline parallel to the leading edge of the Absaroka thrust. Fields in the shallow Mesozoic subplay produce crude oil and associated gas; fields in the deep subplay produce retrograde condensate. The Paleozoic-cored structures subplay is located immediately west of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays. It represents a very continuous and linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline where the Nugget is truncated against a thrust splay. Fields in this subplay produce nonassociated gas and condensate. Traps in these subplays consist of long, narrow, doubly plunging anticlines. Prospective drilling targets are delineated using high-quality, two-dimensional and three-dimensional seismic data, forward modeling/visualization tools, and other state-of-the-art techniques. Future Nugget Sandstone exploration could focus on more structurally complex and subtle, thrust-related traps. Nugget structures may be present beneath the leading edge of the Hogsback thrust and North Flank fault of the Uinta uplift. The Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone play in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province has produced over 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 93 billion cubic feet (2.6 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity Twin Creek is extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Twin Creek reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and clastic beds, and non-fractured units within the Twin Creek. The Twin Creek Limestone thrust belt play is divided into two subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust-Mesozoic-cored structures and (2) A

Thomas Chidsey

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z