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Sample records for nauru navajo navaho

  1. Nauru Island Effect Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolar Photovoltaic(MillionNature and Origin of the CuprateNature andNauru

  2. Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck

    2010-07-15

    During Nauru99 it was noted that the island was producing small clouds that advected over the ARM site. The Nauru Island Effect Study was run for 1.5 years and the methodology developed to detect the occurrence. Nauru ACRF downwelling SW, wind direction, and air temperature data are used, along with downwelling SW data from Licor radiometers located on the southern end of the island near the airport landing strip. A statistical analysis and comparison of data from the two locations is used to detect the likely occurrence of an island influence on the Nauru ACRF site data

  3. Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck

    During Nauru99 it was noted that the island was producing small clouds that advected over the ARM site. The Nauru Island Effect Study was run for 1.5 years and the methodology developed to detect the occurrence. Nauru ACRF downwelling SW, wind direction, and air temperature data are used, along with downwelling SW data from Licor radiometers located on the southern end of the island near the airport landing strip. A statistical analysis and comparison of data from the two locations is used to detect the likely occurrence of an island influence on the Nauru ACRF site data

  4. Nauru

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  5. Navajo Electrification Demonstraiton Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Ahasteen, Project Manager

    2006-07-17

    This is a final technical report required by DOE for the Navajo Electrification Demonstration Program, This report covers the electric line extension project for Navajo families that currently without electric power.

  6. Nauru: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  7. NAVAJO ELECTRIFICATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry W. Battiest

    2008-06-11

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year project which addresses the electricity needs of the unserved and underserved Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. The program serves to cumulatively provide off-grid electricty for families living away from the electricty infrastructure, line extensions for unserved families living nearby (less than 1/2 mile away from) the electricity, and, under the current project called NEDP-4, the construction of a substation to increase the capacity and improve the quality of service into the central core region of the Navajo Nation.

  8. ARM - PI Product - Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  9. Protection of Navajo Sacred Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazzie, Elerina

    2008-07-31

    . In an article written in the Gallup Independent on Thursday November 15, 2007, state representative Tom Udall stated that there was no cancer on 22 the Navajo reservation before uranium mining. Now there are reports of lung cancer. There is a lot... of information that is not known by the Navajos, such as how many are living near abandoned uranium mines. There are 1,300 abandoned uranium mines across the reservation and more and more people are getting sick without realizing it. 11 Water is sacred...

  10. DOE Tribal Intern Focuses on Integrating Energy Policy and Navajo...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Tribal Intern Focuses on Integrating Energy Policy and Navajo Cultural Values DOE Tribal Intern Focuses on Integrating Energy Policy and Navajo Cultural Values July 22, 2014 -...

  11. Final Report - Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project - FY2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth L. Craig, Interim General Manager

    2007-03-31

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year projects which addresses the needs of unserved Navajo Nation residents without basic electricity services. The Navajo Nation is the United States' largest tribe, in terms of population and land. An estimated 18,000 Navajo Nation homes do not have basic grid-tied electricity--and this third year of funding, known as NEDP-3, provided 351 power line extensions to Navajo families.

  12. Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO): Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO)- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission (NHLCO), together with its partners, will conduct a feasibility study (FS) of a program to develop renewable energy on the Paragon-Bisti ranch lands in northwestern New Mexico, which were set aside under the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act for the benefit of relocatees (defined as Navajo families living on Hopi Partitioned Lands as of December 22, 1974).

  13. Sandia Energy - Sandia Labs to Share Expertise with Navajo Nation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Energy Surety Energy Grid Integration News Wind Energy News & Events Solar Energy Assurance Sandia Labs to Share Expertise with Navajo Nation Previous Next Sandia Labs...

  14. Project Reports for Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO): Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO)- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission (NHLCO), together with its partners, will conduct a feasibility study (FS) of a program to develop renewable energy on the Paragon-Bisti ranch lands in northwestern New Mexico, which were set aside under the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act for the benefit of relocatees (defined as Navajo families living on Hopi Partitioned Lands as of December 22, 1974).

  15. Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona: Electron microscopic characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Chen

    Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona Abstract Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone at Black Mesa, Arizona-field dissolution rate discrepancy. At Black Mesa, feldspars in the Navajo Sandstone are dissolving at $105 times

  16. Navajo-Hopi Land Commission Renewable Energy Development Project (NREP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Benally, Deputy Director,

    2012-05-15

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO), a Navajo Nation executive branch agency has conducted activities to determine capacity-building, institution-building, outreach and management activities to initiate the development of large-scale renewable energy - 100 megawatt (MW) or larger - generating projects on land in Northwestern New Mexico in the first year of a multi-year program. The Navajo Hopi Land Commission Renewable Energy Development Project (NREP) is a one year program that will develop and market a strategic business plan; form multi-agency and public-private project partnerships; compile site-specific solar, wind and infrastructure data; and develop and use project communication and marketing tools to support outreach efforts targeting the public, vendors, investors and government audiences.

  17. Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurlbut, D. J.; Haase, S.; Brinkman, G.; Funk, K.; Gelman, R.; Lantz, E.; Larney, C.; Peterson, D.; Worley, C.; Liebsch, E.

    2012-01-01

    Pursuant to the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced in 2009 its intent to issue rules for controlling emissions from Navajo Generating Station that could affect visibility at the Grand Canyon and at several other national parks and wilderness areas. The final rule will conform to what EPA determines is the best available retrofit technology (BART) for the control of haze-causing air pollutants, especially nitrogen oxides. While EPA is ultimately responsible for setting Navajo Generating Station's BART standards in its final rule, it will be the U.S. Department of the Interior's responsibility to manage compliance and the related impacts. This study aims to assist both Interior and EPA by providing an objective assessment of issues relating to the power sector.

  18. Pressures on Arizona Water and Energy Policy: Case Study of the Navajo Generating Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    , the Navajo Generating Station (NGS), that is among the dirtiest coal power plants in the country1 Pressures on Arizona Water and Energy Policy: Case Study of the Navajo Generating Station Sonya largest user of energy in the state of Arizona. It is powered by a coal plant in Northern Arizona

  19. Navajo Coal Combustion and Respiratory Health Near Shiprock, New Mexico

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bunnell, Joseph E.; Garcia, Linda V.; Furst, Jill M.; Lerch, Harry; Olea, Ricardo A.; Suitt, Stephen E.; Kolker, Allan

    2010-01-01

    Indoor air pollution has been identified as a major risk factor for acute and chronic respiratory diseases throughout the world. In the sovereign Navajo Nation, an American Indian reservation located in the Four Corners area of the USA, people burn coal in their homes for heat. To explore whether/how indoor coal combustion might contribute to poor respiratory health of residents, this study examined respiratory health data, identified household risk factors such as fuel and stove type and use, analyzed samples of locally used coal, and measured and characterized fine particulate airborne matter inside selected homes. In twenty-five percent ofmore »homes surveyed coal was burned in stoves not designed for that fuel, and indoor air quality was frequently found to be of a level to raise concerns. The average winter 24-hour PM 2.5 concentration in 20 homes was 36.0? ? g/ m 3 . This is the first time that PM 2.5 has been quantified and characterized inside Navajo reservation residents' homes. « less

  20. Navajo Generating Station and Clean-Energy Alternatives: Options for Renewables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurlbut, D. J.; Haase, S.; Turchi, C. S.; Burman, K.

    2012-06-01

    In January 2012, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory delivered to the Department of the Interior the first part of a study on Navajo Generating Station (Navajo GS) and the likely impacts of BART compliance options. That document establishes a comprehensive baseline for the analysis of clean energy alternatives, and their ability to achieve benefits similar to those that Navajo GS currently provides. This analysis is a supplement to NREL's January 2012 study. It provides a high level examination of several clean energy alternatives, based on the previous analysis. Each has particular characteristics affecting its relevance as an alternative to Navajo GS. It is assumed that the development of any alternative resource (or portfolio of resources) to replace all or a portion of Navajo GS would occur at the end of a staged transition plan designed to reduce economic disruption. We assume that replacing the federal government's 24.3% share of Navajo GS would be a cooperative responsibility of both the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) and the Central Arizona Water Conservation District (CAWCD).

  1. A Feasibility Study to Evaluate Wind Energy Potential on the Navajo Nation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Battiest

    2012-11-30

    The project, A Feasibility Study to Evaluate Wind Energy Potential on the Navajo Nation, is funded under a solicitation issued by the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program. Funding provided by the grant allowed the Navajo Nation to measure wind potential at two sites, one located within the boundaries of the Navajo Nation and the other off-reservation during the project period (September 5, 2005 - September 30, 2009). The recipient for the grant award is the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (NTUA). The grant allowed the Navajo Nation and NTUA manage the wind feasibility from initial site selection through the decision-making process to commit to a site for wind generation development. The grant activities help to develop human capacity at NTUA and help NTUA to engage in renewable energy generation activities, including not only wind but also solar and biomass. The final report also includes information about development activities regarding the sited included in the grant-funded feasibility study.

  2. TWP Nauru Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  3. Weatherization assistance program. Final monitoring report for Arizona, California, the Navajo Nation, and Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    Stroud, Inc., was awarded a contract by the Department of Energy San Francisco Operations Office (DOE-SAN) to evaluate the weatherization programs for selected grantees and subgrantees in Arizona, California, the Navajo Nation, and Nevada. This final report summarizes both the findings and the recommendations that emerged from the forty (40) visits to grantees and subgrantees. The remarks are not intended to be detailed and exhaustive. Specific problems, achievements, and recommendations are to be found in the narrative reports. But some findings and traits are sufficiently general that they warrant being included in this final report. The recommendations reflect those general characteristics.

  4. Bayesian models for elevated disease risk due to exposure to uranium mine and mill waste on the Navajo Nation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huerta, Gabriel

    ForReview Only Bayesian models for elevated disease risk due to exposure to uranium mine and mill of Pharmacy, Community Environmental Health Program Keywords: abandoned uranium mines, conditionally specified to ex- posure to uranium mine and mill waste on the Navajo Nation Glenn A. Stark University of New

  5. Cleanup of inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Sites in the Navajo Nation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, B.

    1994-12-31

    The U.S. Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) in 1978 to address potential and significant radiation health hazards to the public from active and inactive mill operations. Title I to the UMTRCA identified sites to be designated for remedial action. These include four uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) sites in the Navajo Nation. These sites are located in Shiprock, New Mexico; Tuba City, Arizona; Cane Valley, Arizona; and Halchita, Utah. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was directed to select and execute a plan of remedial action that provides long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials and satisfies the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards and other applicable laws and regulations.

  6. Weatherization assistance program: Final monitoring report for Arizona; California; the Navajo Nation; Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    Stroud, Inc., was awarded a contract by the Department of Energy San Francisco Operations Office (DOE-SAN) to evaluate the weatherization program for selected grantees and subgrantees in Arizona, California, the Navajo Nation, and Nevada. The provisions of the contract specified an initial year and renewable optional periods of two (2) additional years. This report covers the monitoring of grantees and subgrantees for the first option year, or what is the second year of the contract. The first two (2) weeks of the second year's activities were devoted to scheduling the agencies to be monitored. The actual field monitoring began on October 14, 1986, and was completed on May 22, 1987. During this seven-month period, thirty-five (35) agencies were visited and evaluated under this contract.

  7. Lessons Learned: Tribal Community Engagement, Remediation and Restoration of a Uranium Mine Tailings Site, Navajo Nation - 12484

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadsworth, Donald K. [New World Environmental Inc., Livermore California 94550 (United States); Hicks, Allison H. [New World Environmental Inc., Irvine California 92614 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    In May, 2011 New World Environmental Inc. was awarded a contract by the Navajo Nation Environmental Protection Agency to remediate an illegal radioactive waste disposal site located in the Navajo Nation. The initial scope included the excavation and shipment of an estimated 3,000 cubic yards of Uranium mine tailings and associated industrial waste. In this instance Stakeholders were supportive of the project, remediation and restoration, yet the movement of residual radioactive materials through tribal communities was a controversial issue. Other Stakeholder issues included site security, water sources for remediation activities, local residents' temporary re-location and care of livestock, right of way permissions and local workforce development. This presentation recaps the technical and non-technical issues encountered in the remediation and restoration the seven acre site and the outreach to surrounding communities. Cultural and equity issues resulting from historical problems associated with this and other sites in the immediate area and education and training. (authors)

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - Nauru99 Campaign

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  9. ARM - TWP Nauru Site-Inactive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Nauru'99: Scaling of Radiosondes by

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  11. Preliminary Analysis of the Nauru Island Effect Study Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. Navajo Tribal Utility Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  13. Navajo Wind Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  14. Navajo Tribal Utility Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation,National Marine Fisheries ServiceFuelInformation

  15. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2010-08-11

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  16. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2012-05-14

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  17. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2012-05-14

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  18. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2012-05-14

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  19. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Nauru (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  20. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Nauru (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2010-10-05

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  1. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  2. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  3. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  4. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  5. Remote Sensing Observations from MTI Satellites and GMS Over Tropical Island of Nauru

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  6. The Impact of the Annual Cycle on Cloudiness at Manus and Nauru

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. Using ARM TWP Nauru Observations to Evaluate a Simple Thermodynamic Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. USING ARM TWP NAURU OBSERVATIONS TO EVALUATE A SIMPLE THERMODYNAMIC MODEL OF THE SUBCLOUD LAYER UNDER FAIR-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    data sets. A comparison of the observed cloud base height with the LCL calculated from the surface UNDER FAIR- WEATHER CUMULUS CONDITIONS Albrecht, B. University of Miami Kollias, P. Brookhaven National for application in fair-weather cumulus regimes is used to develop a diagnostic model of the near surface

  9. Winning the Future: Navajo-Hopi Land Commission Leverages DOE...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    has completed a feasibility study to develop a solar photovoltaic (PV) renewable energy project on the 22,000-acre Paragon-Bisti Solar Ranch in northwestern New Mexico....

  10. Collaboration and Communication: DOE and Navajo Nation Tour Uranium...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the use of technical approaches for controlling and mitigating erosion. Due to the geology of the desert southwest, where many LM disposal sites are located, and the area's...

  11. Synapsid Burrows in the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riese, David

    2011-05-03

    stream_size 320552 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Riese_ku_0099M_11565_DATA_1.pdf.txt stream_source_info Riese_ku_0099M_11565_DATA_1.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8...

  12. Navajo County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  13. Collaboration and Communication: DOE and Navajo Nation Tour Uranium Mine

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  14. Navajo Tribal Utility Association Smart Grid Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation,National Marine Fisheries ServiceFuelInformation Tribal

  15. . 16 (9. ).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Malta, Mauritius, Namibia, Nauru, New Zealand, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palau, Papua

  16. -TOEFL ITP -(S-TOPIK, TOEFL, IELTS, TEPS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Malta, Ma uritius, Namibia, Nauru, New Zealand, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palau, Papua

  17. University Health Center Name The University of Georgia UGA ID # 81

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissinger, Jessica

    - Iran Myanmar Singapore Yemen Colombia Iraq Namibia Solomon Islands Zambia Comoros Japan Nauru Somalia

  18. Symposium Registration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mexico. Micronesia. Moldova. Monaco. Mongolia. Montenegro. Morocco. Mozambique. Myanmar. Namibia. Nauru. Nepal. Netherlands. Netherlands Antilles.

  19. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2011-02-07

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  20. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  1. Winning the Future: Navajo-Hopi Land Commission Leverages DOE Grant to

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyThe U.S.Lacledeutilities.Energy Thefull swing, andWindEnergy CarltonAdvance

  2. LM Continues to Work with the Navajo Nation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S. DepartmentJeanKeyLANLLG: Order4 LM 21-14 NEPA

  3. DOE Tribal Intern Focuses on Integrating Energy Policy and Navajo Cultural

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 2015 GATEWAY Takes onandField||Transfers

  4. Second Five-Year Plan to Address Uranium Contamination in the Navajo Nation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTIONEnergy Scientists AssessSecond Annual PostPage|

  5. Uranium and other heavy metals in the plant-animal-human food chain near abandoned mining sites and structures in an American Indian community in northwestern New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel-Nakamura, Christine

    2013-01-01

    of risk maps to minimize uranium exposures in the NavajoThe Navajo people and uranium mining. Albuquerque, NM:toxicity of natural uranium: A review. Reviews on

  6. Decolonizing cartographies : sovereignty, territoriality, and maps of meaning in the uranium landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voyles, Traci Brynne

    2010-01-01

    uranium mining .. 176!Doug, “The History of Uranium Mining and the Navajo People,”The Navajo People and Uranium Mining, University of New

  7. Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences: December 2014...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    States). National Climatic Data Center (1997) 50 Statistical methods for environmental pollution monitoring Gilbert, R.O. (1987) 37 ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru...

  8. Legal and Economic Factors Determining Success and Failure in the Fight against Organized Crime: An Empirical Assessment of the Palermo Convention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buscaglia, Edgardo

    2008-01-01

    Islami Slovak Repub India Barbados Andora Estonia NauruThailand Costa Rica Italy Barbados Slovak Andora India RepubIslami India Slovak Repub Barbados Estonia Belgium Oman

  9. Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and Impacts (Revised), Energy Analysis, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolar Photovoltaic(MillionNature and Origin of the

  10. EA-2008: Colorado River Storage Project Programmatic Operations and Maintenance Project; Coconino, Maricopa, Navajo, and Yavapai Counties (Arizona) and San Juan County (Utah)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of Western’s programmatic operations and management (O&M) process and an integrated vegetation management (IVM) program on the Colorado River Storage Project System. O&M activities would consist of aerial and ground patrols, regular and preventive maintenance, inspections and repairs, and road repair. The IVM program would remove vegetation to protect facilities from fire, control the spread of noxious weeds to protect environmental quality, establish and maintain stable, low-growing plant communities in the ROW, and activities for public and worker safety around transmission lines and other facilities.

  11. DOE/EA-2008: Colorado River Storage Project Programmatic Operations and Maintenance Project; Coconino, Maricopa, Navajo, and Yavapai Counties (Arizona) and San Juan County (Utah)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of Western’s programmatic operations and management (O&M) process and an integrated vegetation management (IVM) program on the Colorado River Storage Project System. O&M activities would consist of aerial and ground patrols, regular and preventive maintenance, inspections and repairs, and road repair. The IVM program would remove vegetation to protect facilities from fire, control the spread of noxious weeds to protect environmental quality, establish and maintain stable, low-growing plant communities in the ROW, and activities for public and worker safety around transmission lines and other facilities.

  12. To'Hajilee Economic Development, Inc.- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The To'Hajiilee Chapter of the Navajo Nation (previously called and occasionally referred to as the Cañoncito Band of Navajos) is engaged in the development of a solar electricity generation facility (solar project).

  13. Project Reports for To'Hajilee Economic Development, Inc.- 2012 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The To'Hajiilee Chapter of the Navajo Nation (previously called and occasionally referred to as the Cañoncito Band of Navajos) is engaged in the development of a solar electricity generation facility (solar project).

  14. CX-012764: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kayenta-Navajo 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Access Road Maintenance Coconini and Navajo Counties, Arizona CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41872 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  15. Uranium and other heavy metals in the plant-animal-human food chain near abandoned mining sites and structures in an American Indian community in northwestern New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel-Nakamura, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The Navajo people and uranium mining. Albuquerque, NM:2002). The history of uranium mining and the Navajo people.Key, C.R. (2000). Uranium mining and lung cancer among

  16. SCM Forcing Data Derived from NWP Analyses

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jakob, Christian

    2008-01-15

    Forcing data, suitable for use with single column models (SCMs) and cloud resolving models (CRMs), have been derived from NWP analyses for the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites of Manus Island and Nauru.

  17. Program Update: 1st Quarter 2015 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Successful Transition from Mound Site to Mound Business Park Continues; Second Five-Year Plan to Address Uranium Contamination in the Navajo Nation; Nuclear Weapons Program...

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Landing Construction and Insulator Replacement Navajo County, Arizona A. Brief Description of Ptoposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to conduct routine...

  19. CX-012355: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    55: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-012355: Categorical Exclusion Determination Kayenta-Navajo 230-kilovolt Transmission Line Landing Construction and Insulator Replacement,...

  20. Microsoft Word - S05802_FY09 Year-End AST.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Faculty... 22 3.14.4 DOE Office of Engineering and Technology (EM-22) ... 22 3.14.5 Navajo Nation...

  1. Decolonizing cartographies : sovereignty, territoriality, and maps of meaning in the uranium landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voyles, Traci Brynne

    2010-01-01

    Figure 8 Colorado Plateau uranium district, Life magazine in146! Figure 12 Navajo Nation and uranium industry162! Figure 14 An undated poster protesting uranium

  2. Radiation effects in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B.; Yazzie, A.; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T.; Leavitt, C.P.

    1999-04-01

    Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

  3. Feasibility Study for Paragon - Bisti Solar Ranch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benally, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO) and Navajo Nation (NN) plan to develop renewable energy (RE) projects on the Paragon-Bisti Ranch (PBR) lands, set aside under the Navajo Hopi Land Settlement Act (NHLSA) for the benefit of Relocatees. This feasibility study (FS), which was funded under a grant from DOE’s Tribal Energy Program (TEP), was prepared in order to explore the development of the 22,000-acre PBR in northwestern New Mexico for solar energy facilities. Topics covered include: • Site Selection • Analysis of RE, and a Preliminary Design • Transmission, Interconnection Concerns and Export Markets • Financial and Economic Analysis • Environmental Study • Socioeconomic and Cultural Factors • Next Steps.

  4. Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    should cease until the condor(s) leaves on its own. The Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife (928-871-6450), or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (602-242-0210),...

  5. ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Palo Verde","Nuclear","Arizona Public Service Co",3937 2,"Navajo","Coal","Salt River...

  6. Atmospheric and soil-gas monitoring for surface leakage at the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on their San Juan Basin coal-bed methane pilot test site near Navajo City, New Mexico. Nearly 18,407 short tons...

  7. Len Necefer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Len Necefer is a member of the Navajo Tribe from Tsaile, Arizona and a participant in the 2014 DOE Tribal Energy Program Summer Internship Program at Sandia National Laboratories. He graduated with...

  8. Memories of War: Exploring Victim-Victimizer Perspectives in Critical Content-Based Instruction in Japanese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kubota, Ryuko

    2012-01-01

    hazards related to uranium mining. In 2005, the governmentUnited States banned uranium mining on Navajo land in 2005of uranium, making Canada’s uranium mining industry keen to

  9. COPR Alumni Class of 2012 | Director's Council of Public Representativ... file:///C:/Users/donahjm/Documents/Unzipped/COPR Website/COPR_... COPR Alumni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    with the Navajo Nation Human Research Review Board. She also serves as a trainer/facilitator for J. Dalton and Disease Prevention. Ms. Naughton is a graduate of the Southern New England School of Law. She and her

  10. Celebrating National Native American Heritage Month at the Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an Inuit hunter's ordeal when his dog team comes across a murder in the frozen Arctic Ocean. Director Blackhouse Lowe's Shimasani portrayed a 1920's scene of a Navajo...

  11. VALUE AS A SOCIOLOGICAL CONCEPT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawley, Amos H.

    1976-01-01

    and John M. Roberts, titled "A Study of Values."! The purpose of their study was to discover "how values function in organizing behavior." The study dealt with five culturally differentiated groups-Zuni, Navajo, Mormon, Spanish-American, and Texan... in a number of respects, a finding the significance of which can be readily appreciated. Some, such as the Zuni, Navajo, and Mormon.s engage in cooperative behavior, while the Texans practice self-reliance. The Mormons are enmeshed in a theocratic...

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) Site.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is one of the four fixed sites. It consists of three climate research facilities; the Manus facility on Los Negros Island in Manus, Papua New Guinea (established in 1996); the Nauru facility on Nauru Island, Republic of Nauru (1998); and the Darwin facility in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia (2002). The operations are supported by government agencies in each host country. Covering the area roughly between 10 degrees N and 10 degrees S of the equator and from 130 degrees E to 167 degrees E, the TWP locale includes a region that plays a large role in the interannual variability observed in the global climate system. More than 250,000 TWP data sets from 1996 to the present reside in the ARM Archive. Begin at the TWP information page for links or access data directly from the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  13. The Relocation and Employment Assistance Programs, 1948-1970: Federal Indian Policy and the Early Development of the Denver Indian Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ono, Azusa

    2004-03-01

    it necessary to offer off-reservation employment opportunities to the Navajos and Hopis. In 1948, the BIA launched a job-placement program for these two tribes and opened placement offices in Denver, Los Angeles, and Salt Lake City.15 More than 90 percent..., the Department of the Interior established a new Field Placement Office in Chicago. It then transformed the original Navajo-Hopi placement offices in Denver, Los Angeles, and Salt Lake City to Field Relocation Offices to serve other Indian tribes.40 That year...

  14. A Model Evaluation Data Set for the Tropical ARM Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jakob, Christian

    2008-01-15

    This data set has been derived from various ARM and external data sources with the main aim of providing modelers easy access to quality controlled data for model evaluation. The data set contains highly aggregated (in time) data from a number of sources at the tropical ARM sites at Manus and Nauru. It spans the years of 1999 and 2000. The data set contains information on downward surface radiation; surface meteorology, including precipitation; atmospheric water vapor and cloud liquid water content; hydrometeor cover as a function of height; and cloud cover, cloud optical thickness and cloud top pressure information provided by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP).

  15. A Model Evaluation Data Set for the Tropical ARM Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jakob, Christian

    This data set has been derived from various ARM and external data sources with the main aim of providing modelers easy access to quality controlled data for model evaluation. The data set contains highly aggregated (in time) data from a number of sources at the tropical ARM sites at Manus and Nauru. It spans the years of 1999 and 2000. The data set contains information on downward surface radiation; surface meteorology, including precipitation; atmospheric water vapor and cloud liquid water content; hydrometeor cover as a function of height; and cloud cover, cloud optical thickness and cloud top pressure information provided by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP).

  16. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXuRodLongwave Radiation in the ECMWFPhase DeterminationNauru

  17. Executive Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah Evan Racah 1517546HasExecutive5 Nauru Island

  18. Executive Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah Evan Racah 1517546HasExecutive5 Nauru

  19. clements-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos AlamosSimulation Initiative ccsi.jpglibfabric:Nauru: The Second ARM

  20. climate | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos AlamosSimulation Initiative ccsi.jpglibfabric:Nauru: The Second

  1. clothiaux-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos AlamosSimulation Initiative ccsi.jpglibfabric:Nauru: The Second1

  2. clough-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos AlamosSimulation Initiative ccsi.jpglibfabric:Nauru: The

  3. cmarquardt | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos AlamosSimulation Initiative ccsi.jpglibfabric:Nauru: Thecmarquardt

  4. cmcarlin | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos AlamosSimulation Initiative ccsi.jpglibfabric:Nauru:

  5. co2 capture meeting | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos AlamosSimulation Initiative ccsi.jpglibfabric:Nauru:2012 NETL CO2

  6. co2 capture meeting | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos AlamosSimulation Initiative ccsi.jpglibfabric:Nauru:2012 NETL

  7. co2-use-reuse | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos AlamosSimulation Initiative ccsi.jpglibfabric:Nauru:2012 NETLCarbon

  8. co2_ch4exchange | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos AlamosSimulation Initiative ccsi.jpglibfabric:Nauru:2012

  9. coNCePTuaL -- A Network Correctness and Performance Testing Language

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos AlamosSimulation Initiative ccsi.jpglibfabric:Nauru:2012coNCePTuaL

  10. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Navajo Generating Station and Clean-Energy Alternatives: Options for Renewables D.J. Hurlbut, S. Haase, C.S. Turchi, and K. Burman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Produced under direction of the U

  11. CX-010681: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Herbicide Application at Two Substations: Kayenta and Long House Valley Located on the Navajo Nation During Fiscal Year 2014 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/01/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region"

  12. To'Hajilee Economic Development, Inc.- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of Cañoncito Band of Navajos for this project is to successfully complete a feasibility analysis to make informed decisions on technology selection, development, financing, and management of a large solar energy farm planned to be built on trust lands held by our Cañoncito Band.

  13. Stochastic modeling of the variation of velocity and permeability as a function of effective pressure using the Bed-of-Nails asperity-deformation model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genova Barazarte, Ezequiel

    2009-05-15

    of confining and pore-fluid pressures in a deep-sea chalk showed that the best-fitting asperity-deformation model is sensitive to the effective-pressure model. Measurements of permeability in a Navajo-sandstone specimen as a function of confining pressure were...

  14. Hindawi Publishing Corporation Journal of Environmental and Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    risk factors such as fuel and stove type and use, analyzed samples of locally used coal, and measured 260525, 14 pages doi:10.1155/2010/260525 Research Article Navajo Coal Combustion and Respiratory Health burn coal in their homes for heat. To explore whether/how indoor coal combustion might contribute

  15. Project Reports for To'Hajilee Economic Development, Inc.- 2010 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The goal of Cañoncito Band of Navajos for this project is to successfully complete a feasibility analysis to make informed decisions on technology selection, development, financing, and management of a large solar energy farm planned to be built on trust lands held by our Cañoncito Band.

  16. CX-010544: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Glen Canyon Switchyard - 230 Kilovolt Wavetrap Removal - TZ9A2 on the Navajo Line CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 06/21/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  17. PUERTO RICO / U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    of Rhode Island University of Connecticut University of Delaware University of Maryland College Park AMERICAN SAMOA HAWAII ALASKA Northwest Indian College Diné College Navajo Technical College D-Q University Tribal College Haskell Indian Nations University Oglala Lakota College Si Tanka Univ. Sisseton Wahpeton

  18. Reclamation Rural Water Act 56th Annual NM Water Conf., New Water New Energy: A Conference Linking Desalination and Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Desalination and Renewable Energy 71 Reclamation Rural Water Act: Southwestern Navajo Rural Water Supply Index); the energy and water nexus in Arizona; renewable energy for water transmission; and is now researching new techniques for using renewable energy for desalination in an off grid setting. Kevin Black Sr

  19. Auxiliary Information for "Wind-blown sandstones cemented by sulfate and clay minerals in Gale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Woodward

    Auxiliary Information for "Wind-blown sandstones cemented by sulfate and clay minerals in Gale. Sharp exhibit features consistent with eolian sandstones that may be cemented by sulfates. As described to features observed in terrestrial eolian sandstones such as the Navajo sandstone in the southwestern U

  20. A conceptual model for the origin of fault damage zone structures in high-porosity sandstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowie, Patience

    A conceptual model for the origin of fault damage zone structures in high-porosity sandstone Zoe K-porosity sandstones. Damage zone deformation has been particularly well constrained for two 4-km-long normal faults formed in the Navajo Sandstone of central Utah, USA. For these faults the width of the damage zone

  1. Collaborative Research: ARM observations for the development and evaluation of models and parameterizations of cloudy boundary layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Bruce,

    2013-07-12

    This is a collaborative project with Dr. Ping Zhu at Florida International University. It was designed to address key issues regarding the treatment of boundary layer cloud processes in climate models with UM’s research focusing on the analyses of ARM cloud radar observations from MMCR and WACR and FIU’s research focusing on numerical simulations of boundary layer clouds. This project capitalized on recent advancements in the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) processing and the development of the WACR (at the SGP) to provide high temporal and spatial resolution Doppler cloud radar measurements for characterizing in-cloud turbulence, large-eddy circulations, and high resolution cloud structures of direct relevance to high resolution numerical modeling studies. The principal focus of the observational component of this collaborative study during this funding period was on stratocumulus clouds over the SGP site and fair-weather cumuli over the Nauru site. The statistical descriptions of the vertical velocity structures in continental stratocumulus clouds and in the Nauru shallow cumuli that are part of this study represents the most comprehensive observations of the vertical velocities in boundary layer clouds to date and were done in collaboration with Drs. Virendra Ghate and Pavlos Kollias.

  2. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix E. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-07-01

    This document provides Appendix E of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP) presented in 1988 for the stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings at the Mexican Hat, Utah site. The RAP was developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. The RAP has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action.

  3. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Annual status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The purpose, scope, history, requirements, and management organization of the UMTRA Program are summarized in the Introduction. The remainder of the report describes progress made during the past year (F 1980) and discusses future plants and activities. Early emphasis has been on the four highest-priority sites because of their proximity to population centers. These sites are: (1) Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; (2) Salt Lake City, Utah; (3) Durango, Colorado; and (4) Shiprock, New Mexico (Navajo Reservation). To date, twenty-five vicinity properties near the Canonsburg site and two such properties near the Salt Lake City site have been designated for remedial action. A research effort was undertaken at a major vicinity property, the Mountain States Supply Company in Salt Lake City, to study the effects of heating-and-ventilating-system modification on indoor radon-daughter concentrations. A cooperative agreement was executed between DOE and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. A similar agreement with the State of Utah is expected to be executed in early FY 1981. Further, it is expected that additional cooperative agreements will be negotiated during FY 1981 with the States of Colorado and Wyoming and the Navajo Nation. It is expected that the processing site at Canonsburg, PA (the Canonsburg Industrial Park) will be acquired during FY 1981. Draft Environmental Impact Statements for the four highest-priority sites will be completed during FY 1981.

  4. ToHajiilee Economic Development, Inc.(TEDI) Feasibility Study for Utility-Scale Solar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burpo, Rob

    2012-02-29

    ToÃ?Â?Hajiilee Economic Development, Inc. (TEDI) is the economic development entity representing the ToHajiilee Chapter of the Navajo Nation, also known as the CaÃ?Â?oncito Band of Navajo (CBN). Using DOE funding, TEDI assembled a team of qualified advisors to conduct a feasibility study for a utility-scale 30 MW Photovoltaic (PV) solar power generation facility on TEDI trust lands. The goal for this project has been to gather information and practical business commitments to successfully complete the feasibility analysis. The TEDI approach was to successively make informed decisions to select an appropriate technology best suited to the site, determine environmental viability of the site, secure options for the sale of generated power, determine practicality of transmission and interconnection of power to the local grid, and secure preliminary commitments on project financing. The feasibility study has been completed and provides TEDI with a practical understanding of its business options in moving forward with developing a solar project on CBN tribal lands. Funding from DOE has allowed TEDI and its team of professional advisors to carefully select technology and business partners and build a business model to develop this utility-scale solar project. As a result of the positive feasibility findings, TEDI is moving forward with finalizing all pre-construction activities for its major renewable energy project.

  5. Modification to the Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Volume 1, Text, Attachments 1--6. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1989-01-01

    This document provides the modifications to the 1988 Remedial Action Plan (RAP) of the contaminated materials at the Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah. The text detailing the modifications and attachments 1 through 6 are provided with this document. The RAP was developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents.

  6. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Text, Appendices A--C. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-07-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Appendices A,B, and C are provided as part of this document. Appendix A presents regulatory compliance issues, Appendix B provides details of the engineering design, and Appendix C presents the radiological support plan.

  7. Mineral industries of Australia, Canada, and Oceania (including a discussion of Antarctica's mineral resources). Mineral perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbell, C.L.; Lyday, T.Q.; Newman, H.H.

    1985-12-01

    The Bureau of Mines report gives the mineral industry highlights of two of the world's major mineral producing countries, Australia and Canada, and seven Pacific island nations or territories--Fiji, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Republic of Nauru, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu. The mineral resources of Antarctica are also discussed. Because of the size of the Australian and Canadian mineral industries, summary reviews are presented for each of the States, Provinces, or Territories. The most current information available from all nations is given on major minerals or mineral-commodity production, share of world production, and reserves. Reported also are significant mining companies, locations and capacities of their main facilities, and their share of domestic production. Other information is provided on mineral-related trade with the United States, government mineral policy, energy production-consumption and trade, the mining industry labor force, and prospects for the mineral industry. Maps show the locations of selected mineral deposits, oilfields and gasfields, mines, and processing facilities including iron and steel plants, nonferrous smelters and refineries, and cement plants, as well as infrastructure pertinent to the mineral industry.

  8. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Class II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, Thomas C.

    2000-07-28

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced-oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m{sup 3}) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  9. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey Jr., Thomas C.

    2003-02-06

    The primary objective of this project was to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced-oil-recovery technology in the Paradox Basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  10. Status of activities on the inactive uranium mill tailings sites remedial action program. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    This report on the status of the Office of Environment's program for inactive uranium mill tailings sites is an analysis of the current status and a forecast of future activities of the Office of Environment. The termination date for receipt of information was September 30, 1980. Aerial radiological surveys and detailed ground radiological assessments of properties within the communities in the vicinity of the designated processing sites in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Boise, Idaho led to the designation of an initial group of vicinity properties for remedial action. The potential health effects of the residual radioactive materials on or near these properties were estimated, and the Assistant Secretary for Environment recommended priorities for performing remedial action to the Department's Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy. In designating these properties and establishing recommended priorities for performing remedial action, the Office of Environment consulted with the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, representatives from the affected State and local governments, and individual property owners. After notifying the Governors of each of the affected States and the Navajo Nation of the Secretary of Energy's designation of processing sites within their areas of jurisdiction and establishment of remedial action priorities, a Sample Cooperative Agreement was developed by the Department in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and provided to the affected States and the Navajo Nation for comments. During September 1980, a Cooperative Agreement with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for the designated Canonsburg processing site was executed by the Department. It is anticipated that a Cooperative Agreement between the State of Utah and the Department to perform remedial actions at the designated Salt Lake City site will be executed in the near future.

  11. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-02-01

    This document is a revision of the original Mexiacan Hat Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. This RAP has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Section 2.0 presents the EPA standards, including a discussion of their objectives. Section 3. 0 summarizes the present site characteristics and provides a definition of site-specific problems. Section 4.0 is the site design for the proposed action. Section 5.0 presents the water resources protection strategy. Section 6.0 summarizes the plan for ensuring health and safety protection for the surrounding community and the on- site workers. Section 7.0 lists the responsibilities of the project participants. Section 8.0 describes the features of the long-term surveillance and maintenance plan.

  12. Squirt flow in fully saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvorkin, J.; Mavko, G.; Nur, A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

    1995-01-01

    The authors estimate velocity/frequency dispersion and attenuation in fully saturated rocks by employing the squirt-flow mechanism of solid-fluid interaction. In this model, pore fluid is squeezed from thin soft cracks into the surrounding large pores. Information about the compliance of these soft cracks at low confining pressures is extracted from high-pressure velocity data. The frequency dependence of squirt-induced pressure in the soft cracks is linked with the porosity and permeability of the soft pore space, and the characteristic squirt-flow length. These unknown parameters are combined into one expression that is assumed to be a fundamental rock property that does not depend on frequency. The appropriate value of this expression for a given rock can be found by matching the authors theoretical predictions with the experimental measurements of attenuation or velocity. The low-frequency velocity limits, as given by their model, are identical to those predicted by Gassmann`s formula. The high-frequency limits may significant exceed those given by the Biot theory: the high-frequency frame bulk modulus is close to that measured at high confining pressure. They have applied their model to D`Euville Limestone, Navajo Sandstone, and Westerly Granite. The model realistically predicts the observed velocity/frequency dispersion, and attenuation.

  13. Eolian event stratigraphy - A conceptual framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocurek, G.; Havholm, K.G. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

    1991-03-01

    A basis for eolian event stratigraphy is to distill the impact of events into fundamental processes and products. For accumulation (net deposit through time) to occur, the sediment budget must be positive. If the sediment budget becomes neutral or negative, accumulation ceases and a bypass or erosional super bounding surface, respectively, forms capping the genetic unit. Within the three types of eolian systems (dry, wet, stabilized), the mechanisms of accumulation and super-surface formation differ. In the dry system, accumulation occurs because of areal deceleration of sand-carrying winds. Because of dune-interdune flow conditions, accumulation begins when interdune flats are closed, requiring sand supply, time, and conditions for dune growth at the expense of interdune flats. In the wet system, accumulation of dune and interdune deposits occurs by trapping with a rising water table. Accumulations vary with the nature of the water table rise, proportion of dunes and interdune flats, and interdune topography. In the stabilized system, accumulation occurs with rapid stabilization of elements of active eolian systems; super surfaces form when the causes of stabilization cease. The eolian rock record consists of preserved accumulations and super surfaces. Accumulation space is distinct from preservation space. Preservation space is made by subsidence and water table rise. Without preservation space, an unconformity results. The dominance of subsidence versus water table rise is reflected in dry and wet accumulations respectively, such as the Jurassic Navajo and Entrada sandstones.

  14. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1997-02-01

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, mule, Blue Hogan, heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The reservoir engineering component of the work completed to date included analysis of production data and well tests, comprehensive laboratory programs, and preliminary mechanistic reservoir simulation studies. A comprehensive fluid property characterization program was completed. Mechanistic reservoir production performance simulation studies were also completed.

  15. Environmental assessment: South microwave communication facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to construct, operate, and maintain eight microwave repeater stations in southwestern Colorado, southeastern Utah, and northern Arizona, in order to meet the minimum fade criteria established by the Western Systems Coordinating Council (WSCC) for the operation and protection of electric power systems. The proposed microwave facilities would increase the reliability of communication. This environmental assessment (EA) describes the existing environmental conditions and the impacts from construction of the eight microwave communication facilities. The EA was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the Department of Energy Guidelines (52 FR 47662, December 15, 1987). The proposed project would consist of constructing eight microwave facilities, each of which would include a self-supported lattice tower, an equipment building, a propane tank, distribution lines to provide electric power to the sites, and access roads to the sites. The facilities would be constructed in San Miguel and Montezuma Counties in Colorado, San Juan County, Utah, and Navajo, Apache, Coconino, and Yavapai Counties in Arizona. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-10-08

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1 - September 30, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF has been deployed to China, but the data have not yet been released. The fourth quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. The average exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. HFE represents the AMF statistics for the Shouxian, China, deployment in 2008. FKB represents the AMF statistics for the Haselbach, Germany, past deployment in 2007. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request a research account on the local site data system. The seven computers for the research accounts are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; and the DMF at PNNL. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Because of the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008. For the fourth quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users is down substantially (about 30%) from last quarter. Most of this decrease resulted from a reduction in the ACRF Infrastructure users (e.g., site visits, research accounts, on-site device accounts, etc.) associated with the AMF China deployment. While users had easy access to the previous AMF deployment in Germany that resulted in all-time high user statistics, physical and remote access to on-site accounts are extremely limited for the AMF deployment in China. Furthermore, AMF data have not yet been released from China to the Data Management Facility for processing, which affects Archive user statistics. However, Archive users are only down about 10% from last quarter. Anothe

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report January 1 - March 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-05-22

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period January 1 - March 31, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF is being deployed to China and is not in operation this quarter. The second quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. The average as well as the individual site values exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. FKB represents the AMF statistics for the Haselbach, Germany, past deployment in 2007. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request a research account on the local site data system. The seven computers for the research accounts are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; and the DMF at PNNL. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Because of the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2008. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2007. For the second quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users was nearly as high as the last reporting period, in which a new record high for number of users was established. This quarter, a new record high was established for the number of user days, particularly due to the large number of field campaign activities in conjunction with the AMF deployment in Germany, as well as major field campaigns at the NSA and SGP sites. This quarter, 37% of the Archive users are ARM science-funded principal investigators and 23% of all other facility users are either ARM science-funded principal investigators or ACRF infrastructure personnel. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 52 weeks per year. Time is reported in days instead of hours. I

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-01-24

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1 - December 31, 2007, for the fixed sites and the mobile site. The AMF has been deployed to Germany and this was the final operational quarter. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. Although the average exceeded our goal this quarter, a series of severe weather events (i.e., widespread ice storms) disrupted utility services, which affected the SGP performance measures. Some instruments were covered in ice and power and data communication lines were down for more than 10 days in some areas of Oklahoma and Kansas, which resulted in lost data at the SGP site. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. The AMF completed its mission at the end of this quarter in Haselback, Germany (FKB designation). NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request an account on the local site data system. The eight research computers are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; the DMF at PNNL; and the AMF, currently in Germany. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Due to the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams, and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007. For the first quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users was up significantly from the last reporting period. For the fourth consecutive reporting period, a record high number of Archive users was recorded. In addition, the number of visitors and visitor days set a new record this reporting period particularly due to the large number of field campaign activities in conjunction with the AMF deployment in Germany. It is interesting to note this quarter that

  19. Analysis of Potential Leakage Pathways and Mineralization within Caprocks for Geologic Storage of CO(sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, James

    2012-11-30

    We used a multifaceted approach to investigate the nature of caprocks above, and the interface between, reservoir-­?quality rocks that might serve as targets for carbon storage. Fieldwork in southeastern Utah examined the regional-­? to m-­?scale nature of faults and fractures across the sedimentiological interfaces. We also used microscopic analyses and mechanical modeling to examine the question as to how the contacts between units interact, and how fractures may allow fluids to move from reservoirs to caprock. Regional-­?scale analyses using ASTER data enabled us to identify location of alteration, which led to site-­?specific studies of deformation and fluid flow. In the Jurassic Carmel Formation, a seal for the Navajo Sandstone, we evaluated mesoscale variability in fracture density and morphology and variability in elastic moduli in the Jurassic Carmel Formation, a proposed seal to the underlying Navajo Sandstone for CO{sub 2} geosequestration. By combining mechano-­?stratigraphic outcrop observations with elastic moduli derived from wireline log data, we characterize the variability in fracture pattern and morphology with the observed variability in rock strength within this heterolithic top seal. Outcrop inventories of discontinuities show fracture densities decrease as bed thickness increases and fracture propagation morphology across lithologic interfaces vary with changing interface type. Dynamic elastic moduli, calculated from wireline log data, show that Young’s modulus varies by up to 40 GPa across depositional interfaces, and by an average of 3 GPa across the reservoir/seal interface. We expect that the mesoscale changes in rock strength will affect the distributions of localized stress and thereby influence fracture propagation and fluid flow behavior within the seal. These data provide a means to closely tie outcrop observations to those derived from subsurface data and estimates of subsurface rock strength. We also studied damage zones associated normal faults in the Permian Cedar Mesa Sandstone, southeastern Utah. These faults are characterized by a single slip surfaces and damage zones containing deformation bands, veins, and joints. Field observations include crosscutting relationships, permeability increase, rock strength decrease, and ultraviolet light induced mineral fluorescence within the damage zone. These field observations combined with the interpreted paragenetic sequence from petrographic analysis, suggests a deformation history of reactivation and several mineralization events in an otherwise low-­?permeability fault. All deformation bands and veins fluoresce under ultraviolet light, suggesting connectivity and a shared mineralization history. Pre-­?existing deformation features act as loci for younger deformation and mineralization events, this fault and its damage zone illustrate the importance of the fault damage zone to subsurface fluid flow. We model a simplified stress history in order to understand the importance of rock properties and magnitude of tectonic stress on the deformation features within the damage zone. The moderate confining pressures, possible variations in pore pressure, and the porous, fine-­?grained nature of the Cedar Mesa Sandstone results in a fault damage zone characterized by enhanced permeability, subsurface fluid flow, and mineralization. Structural setting greatly influences fracture spacing and orientation. Three structural settings were examined and include fault proximity, a fold limb of constant dip, and a setting proximal to the syncline hinge. Fracture spacing and dominant fracture orientation vary at each setting and distinctions between regional and local paleo-­?stress directions can be made. Joints on the fold limb strike normal to the fold axis/bedding and are interpreted to be sub-­?parallel to the maximum regional paleo-­?stress direction as there is no fold related strain. Joints proximal to faults and the syncline hinge may have formed under local stress conditions associated with folding and faulting, and

  20. Atmospheric and soil-gas monitoring for surface leakage at the San Juan Basin CO{sub 2} pilot test site at Pump Canyon New Mexico, using perfluorocarbon tracers, CO{sub 2} soil-gas flux and soil-gas hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. Rodney; Strazisar, Brian R.; Wilson, Thomas; H Stanko, Dennis C.

    2012-05-01

    Near-surface monitoring and subsurface characterization activities were undertaken in collaboration with the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on their San Juan Basin coal-bed methane pilot test site near Navajo City, New Mexico. Nearly 18,407 short tons (1.670 × 107 kg) of CO{sub 2} were injected into 3 seams of the Fruitland coal between July 2008 and April 2009. Between September 18 and October 30, 2008, two additions of approximately 20 L each of perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracers were mixed with the CO{sub 2} at the injection wellhead. PFC tracers in soil-gas and in the atmosphere were monitored over a period of 2 years using a rectangular array of permanent installations. Additional monitors were placed near existing well bores and at other locations of potential leakage identified during the pre-injection site survey. Monitoring was conducted using sorbent containing tubes to collect any released PFC tracer from soil-gas or the atmosphere. Near-surface monitoring activities also included CO{sub 2} surface flux and carbon isotopes, soil-gas hydrocarbon levels, and electrical conductivity in the soil. The value of the PFC tracers was demonstrated when a significant leakage event was detected near an offset production well. Subsurface characterization activities, including 3D seismic interpretation and attribute analysis, were conducted to evaluate reservoir integrity and the potential that leakage of injected CO{sub 2} might occur. Leakage from the injection reservoir was not detected. PFC tracers made breakthroughs at 2 of 3 offset wells which were not otherwise directly observable in produced gases containing 20–30% CO{sub 2}. These results have aided reservoir geophysical and simulation investigations to track the underground movement of CO{sub 2}. 3D seismic analysis provided a possible interpretation for the order of appearance of tracers at production wells.

  1. Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Monument Valley, Arizona, DOE Legacy Waste Site—10281

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO; Miller, D.E. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO; Morris, S.A. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO; Sheader, L.R. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO; Glenn, E.P. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; Moore, D. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; Carroll, K.C. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; Benally, L. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ; Roanhorse, M. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ; Bush, R.P. [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, CO; none,

    2010-03-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Navajo Nation, and the University of Arizona are exploring natural and enhanced attenuation remedies for groundwater contamination at a former uranium-ore processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. DOE removed radioactive tailings from the Monument Valley site in 1994. Nitrate and ammonium, waste products of the milling process, remain in an alluvial groundwater plume spreading from the soil source where tailings were removed. Planting and irrigating two native shrubs, fourwing saltbush and black greasewood, markedly reduced both nitrate and ammonium in the source area over an 8-year period. Total nitrogen dropped from 350 mg/kg in 2000 to less than 200 mg/kg in 2008. Most of the reduction is attributable to irrigation-enhanced microbial denitrification rather than plant uptake. However, soil moisture and percolation flux monitoring show that the plantings control the soil water balance in the source area, preventing additional leaching of nitrogen compounds. Enhanced denitrification and phytoremediation also look promising for plume remediation. Microcosm experiments, nitrogen isotopic fractionation analysis, and solute transport modeling results suggest that (1) up to 70 percent of nitrate in the plume has been lost through natural denitrification since the mill was closed in 1968, and (2) injection of ethanol may accelerate microbial denitrification in plume hot spots. A field-scale ethanol injection pilot study is underway. Landscape-scale remote sensing methods developed for the project suggest that transpiration from restored native phreatophyte populations rooted in the aquifer could limit further expansion of the plume. An evaluation of landfarm phytoremediation, the irrigation of native shrub plantings with high nitrate water pumped from the alluvial aquifer, is also underway.

  2. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-07

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), Navajo Community College, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management to reach thousands of students by the three Consortium universities and the affiliate college resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (The term waste or environmental management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration.) (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing training to students and information to faculty feeding into the education programs. (4) Education and technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos Sandia) located in New Mexico, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach program of special interest to pre-college students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the second year.

  3. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-15

    In February, 1990, The Secretary of Energy, James Watkins, approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program proposed by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, ``WERC`` includes as its founding members NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Sandia National Laboratories. The Navajo Community College joined the program later in 1991. The program has the mission of expanding the nation`s capability to address the issues related to management of all types of waste. The program is unique and innovative in many aspects. It provides an integrated approach to this national need, and includes: (1) Education in waste management at the educational institutions resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing hands-on training at the leading edge to students and information feeding into the education programs. (4) Education by technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos & Sandia) located in New Mexico and with the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach programs of special interest to precollege students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the third year.

  4. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-07

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, ``WERC`` includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), Navajo Community College, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management to reach thousands of students by the three Consortium universities and the affiliate college resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (The term waste or environmental management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration.) (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing training to students and information to faculty feeding into the education programs. (4) Education and technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos & Sandia) located in New Mexico, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach program of special interest to pre-college students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the second year.

  5. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-15

    In February, 1990, The Secretary of Energy, James Watkins, approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program proposed by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes as its founding members NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Sandia National Laboratories. The Navajo Community College joined the program later in 1991. The program has the mission of expanding the nation's capability to address the issues related to management of all types of waste. The program is unique and innovative in many aspects. It provides an integrated approach to this national need, and includes: (1) Education in waste management at the educational institutions resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing hands-on training at the leading edge to students and information feeding into the education programs. (4) Education by technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos Sandia) located in New Mexico and with the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach programs of special interest to precollege students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the third year.

  6. Area of Interest 1, CO2 at the Interface. Nature and Dynamics of the Reservoir/Caprock Contact and Implications for Carbon Storage Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mozley, Peter; Evans, James; Dewers, Thomas

    2014-10-31

    We examined the influence of geologic features present at the reservoir/caprock interface on the transmission of supercritical CO2 into and through caprock. We focused on the case of deformation-band faults in reservoir lithologies that intersect the interface and transition to opening-mode fractures in caprock lithologies. Deformation-band faults are exceeding common in potential CO2 injection units and our fieldwork in Utah indicates that this sort of transition is common. To quantify the impact of these interface features on flow and transport we first described the sedimentology and permeability characteristics of selected sites along the Navajo Sandstone (reservoir lithology) and Carmel Formation (caprock lithology) interface, and along the Slickrock Member (reservoir lithology) and Earthy Member (caprock lithology) of the Entrada Sandstone interface, and used this information to construct conceptual permeability models for numerical analysis. We then examined the impact of these structures on flow using single-phase and multiphase numerical flow models for these study sites. Key findings include: (1) Deformation-band faults strongly compartmentalize the reservoir and largely block cross-fault flow of supercritical CO2. (2) Significant flow of CO2 through the fractures is possible, however, the magnitude is dependent on the small-scale geometry of the contact between the opening-mode fracture and the deformation band fault. (3) Due to the presence of permeable units in the caprock, caprock units are capable of storing significant volumes of CO2, particularly when the fracture network does not extend all the way through the caprock. The large-scale distribution of these deformation-bandfault-to-opening-mode-fractures is related to the curvature of the beds, with greater densities of fractures in high curvature regions. We also examined core and outcrops from the Mount Simon Sandstone and Eau Claire Formation reservoir/caprock interface in order to extend our work to a reservoir/caprock pair this is currently being assessed for long-term carbon storage. These analyses indicate that interface features similar to those observed at the Utah sites 3 were not observed. Although not directly related to our main study topic, one byproduct of our investigation is documentation of exceptionally high degrees of heterogeneity in the pore-size distribution of the Mount Simon Sandstone. This suggests that the unit has a greater-than-normal potential for residual trapping of supercritical CO2.

  7. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2006-03-31

    The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed its Phase I program in December 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Many other goals were accomplished on the way to this objective, including (1) analysis of CO{sub 2} storage options in the region, including characterization of storage capacities and transportation options, (2) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} sources, (3) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies employed in the region, (4) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region, (5) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, and (6) assessing and initiating public knowledge and acceptance of possible sequestration approaches. Results of the Southwest Partnership's Phase I evaluation suggested that the most convenient and practical ''first opportunities'' for sequestration would lie along existing CO{sub 2} pipelines in the region. Action plans for six Phase II validation tests in the region were developed, with a portfolio that includes four geologic pilot tests distributed among Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The Partnership will also conduct a regional terrestrial sequestration pilot program focusing on improved terrestrial MMV methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region. The sixth and final validation test consists of a local-scale terrestrial pilot involving restoration of riparian lands for sequestration purposes. The validation test will use desalinated waters produced from one of the geologic pilot tests. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, five major electric utility companies, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs, and the Western Governors Association. This group is continuing its work in the Phase II Validation Program, slated to conclude in 2009.

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operation quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2010-10-26

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) that the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1-September 30, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This fourth quarter comprises a total of 2208 possible hours for the fixed and mobile sites. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has historically had a Central Facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. Beginning in the second quarter of FY2010, the SGP began a transition to a smaller footprint (150 km x 150 km) by rearranging the original instrumentation and new instrumentation made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The Central Facility and 4 extended facilities will remain, but there will be up to 12 new surface characterization facilities, 4 radar facilities, and 3 profiler facilities sited in the smaller domain. This new configuration will provide observations at scales more appropriate to current and future climate models. The transition to the smaller footprint is ongoing through this quarter. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. These sites will also have expanded measurement capabilities with the addition of new instrumentation made available through ARRA funds. It is anticipated that the new instrumentation at all the fixed sites will be in place by the end of calendar year 2011. AMF1 continues its 20-month deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, P

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Sisterson

    2010-01-12

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2010 for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208); for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208); and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues; its OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are the result of downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP locale has historically had a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. Beginning this quarter, the SGP began a transition to a smaller footprint (150 km x 150 km) by rearranging the original and new instrumentation made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The central facility and 4 extended facilities will remain, but there will be up to 16 surface new characterization facilities, 4 radar facilities, and 3 profiler facilities sited in the smaller domain. This new configuration will provide observations at scales more appropriate to current and future climate models. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. These sites will also have expanded measurement capabilities with the addition of new instrumentation made available through ARRA funds. It is anticipated that the new instrumentation at all the fixed sites will be in place within the next 12 months. The AMF continues its 20-month deployment in Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal, that started May 1, 2009. The AMF will also have additional observational capabilities within the next 12 months. Users can participate in field experiments at the sites and mobile facility, or they can participate remotely. Therefore, a variety of mechanisms are provided to users to access site information. Users who have immediate (real-time) needs for data access can request a research account on the local site data systems. This access is particularly useful to users for quick decisions in executing time-dependent activities associated with field campaigns at the fixed sites and mobile facility locations. T

  10. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Grant C. Willis

    2003-09-01

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the fourth quarter of the first project year (April 1 through June 30, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs to the Jurassic Nugget Sandstone and Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation, the major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view, often in three dimensions, of reservoir-facies characteristics and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. The Nugget Sandstone was deposited in an extensive dune field that extended from Wyoming to Arizona. Outcrop analogs are found in the stratigraphically equivalent Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah which displays large-scale dunal cross-strata with excellent reservoir properties and interdunal features such as oases, wadi, and playa lithofacies with poor reservoir properties. Hydrocarbons in the Paradox Formation are stratigraphically trapped in carbonate buildups (or phylloid-algal mounds). Similar carbonate buildups are exposed in the Paradox along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. Reservoir-quality porosity may develop in the types of facies associated with buildups such as troughs, detrital wedges, and fans, identified from these outcrops. When combined with subsurface geological and production data, these outcrop analogs can improve (1) development drilling and production strategies such as horizontal drilling, (2) reservoir-simulation models, (3) reserve calculations, and (4) design and implementation of secondary/tertiary oil recovery programs and other best practices used in the oil fields of Utah and vicinity. During this quarter, technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting the project plans, objectives, and products at a booth at the 2003 annual convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

  11. Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Chidsey

    2007-12-31

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone, or a low-permeability zone at the top of the Nugget. The Nugget Sandstone thrust belt play is divided into three subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored shallow structures, (2) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored deep structures, and (3) Absaroka thrust - Paleozoic-cored shallow structures. Both of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays represent a linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline parallel to the leading edge of the Absaroka thrust. Fields in the shallow Mesozoic subplay produce crude oil and associated gas; fields in the deep subplay produce retrograde condensate. The Paleozoic-cored structures subplay is located immediately west of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays. It represents a very continuous and linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline where the Nugget is truncated against a thrust splay. Fields in this subplay produce nonassociated gas and condensate. Traps in these subplays consist of long, narrow, doubly plunging anticlines. Prospective drilling targets are delineated using high-quality, two-dimensional and three-dimensional seismic data, forward modeling/visualization tools, and other state-of-the-art techniques. Future Nugget Sandstone exploration could focus on more structurally complex and subtle, thrust-related traps. Nugget structures may be present beneath the leading edge of the Hogsback thrust and North Flank fault of the Uinta uplift. The Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone play in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province has produced over 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 93 billion cubic feet (2.6 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity Twin Creek is extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Twin Creek reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and clastic beds, and non-fractured units within the Twin Creek. The Twin Creek Limestone thrust belt play is divided into two subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust-Mesozoic-cored structures and (2) A