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1

Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

Gray, P. [ed.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. We are also bathed in a sea of natural radiation coming from the sun and deep space. Living systems have adapted to these levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Other activities, such as flying at high altitudes, expose us to elevated levels of NORM. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose-based standards. So when is TENORM a problem? Where is it a problem? That depends on when, where, and whom you talk to! We will start by reviewing background radioactivity, then we will proceed to the geology, mobility, and variability of these radionuclides. We will then review some of the industrial sectors affected by TENORM, followed by a brief discussion on regulatory aspects of the issue.

Egidi, P.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in Cargo at US Borders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the U.S. and other countries, large numbers of vehicles pass through border crossings each day. The illicit movement of radioactive sources is a concern that has resulted in the installation of radiation detection and identification instruments at border crossing points. This activity is judged to be necessary because of the possibility of an act of terrorism involving a radioactive source that may include any number of dangerous radionuclides. The problem of detecting, identifying, and interdicting illicit radioactive sources is complicated by the fact that many materials present in cargo are somewhat radioactive. Some cargo contains naturally occurring radioactive material or technologically-enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material that may trigger radiation portal monitor alarms. Man-made radioactive sources, especially medical isotopes, are also frequently observed and produce alarms. Such nuisance alarms can be an operational limiting factor for screening of cargo at border crossings. Information about the nature of the radioactive materials in cargo that can interfere with the detection of radionuclides of concern is necessary. This paper provides such information for North American cargo, but the information may also be of use to border control officials in other countries. (PIET-43741-TM-361)

Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Evans, John C.; Hensley, Walter K.; Lepel, Elwood A.; McDonald, Joseph C.; Schweppe, John E.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Strom, Daniel J.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included.

Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Canada nuclear and radiological regulatory responsibilities are shared between the provinces/territories and the federal government. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) regulates nuclear fuel cycle materials and man?made radionuclides under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (2000). The provinces and territories regulate NORM arising from industrial activities not involving the nuclear fuel cycle materials. Present guidelineCanadian Guidelines for the Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)was published in 2000 in order to bring uniformity to the management of NORM?related procedures to provide adequate radiation protection for workers and the general public. The basic premise of these guidelines is that the NORM?related activities should not be posing any greater hazard than those activities regulated under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act; these concepts are described in this paper.

Anar S. Baweja; Bliss L. Tracy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) in Canada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Canada, nuclear and radiological regulatory responsibilities are shared between the provinces/territories and the federal government. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) regulates nuclear fuel cycle materials and man-made radionuclides under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (2000). The provinces and territories regulate NORM arising from industrial activities, not involving the nuclear fuel cycle materials. Present guideline--Canadian Guidelines for the Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)--was published in 2000 in order to bring uniformity to the management of NORM-related procedures to provide adequate radiation protection for workers and the general public. The basic premise of these guidelines is that the NORM-related activities should not be posing any greater hazard than those activities regulated under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act; these concepts are described in this paper.

Baweja, Anar S.; Tracy, Bliss L. [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

7

In-situ remediation of naturally occurring radioactive materials with high-permeability hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis addresses the problem of removal of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials, NORM, and describes an effective alternative to the current treatment method for their removal. High-pen-meability fracturing, recently established...

Demarchos, Andronikos Stavros

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

8

Radiological Dose Assessment Related to Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials Generated by the Petroleum Industry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tebes is affiliated with the University of Illinois. Tebes is affiliated with the University of Illinois. ANL/EAD-2 Radiological Dose Assessment Related to Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials Generated by the Petroleum Industry by K.P. Smith, D.L. Blunt, G.P. Williams, and C.L. Tebes * Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 September 1996 Work sponsored by the United States Department of Energy, Office of Policy iii CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii NOTATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

Background in the context of land contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive material  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The financial implications of choosing a particular threshold for clearance of radioactively contaminated land are substantial, particularly when one considers the volume of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) created each year by the production and combustion of fossil fuels and the exploitation of industrial minerals. Inevitably, a compromise needs to be reached between the level of environmental protection sought and the finite resources available for remediation. In the case of natural series radionuclides, any anthropogenic input is always superimposed on the inventory already present in the soil; this 'background' inventory is conventionally disregarded when assessing remediation targets. Unfortunately, the term is not well defined and the concept of 'background dose' is open to alternative interpretations. In this paper, we address the issue of natural background from a geochemical rather than from a solely radiological perspective, illustrating this with an example from the china clay industry. We propose a simple procedure for decision making based on activity concentrations of primordial radionuclides and their progeny. Subsequent calculations of dose need to take into account the mineralogical and chemical characteristics of the contamination, which in the case of NORM are invariably reflected in uranium series disequilibrium.

D Read; G D Read; M C Thorne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Alternatives for the disposal of NORM (naturally occurring radioactive materials) wastes in Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the Texas wastes containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) have been disposed of in a uranium mill tailings impoundment. There is currently no operating disposal facility in Texas to accept these wastes. As a result, some wastes containing extremely small amounts of radioactivity are sent to elaborate disposal sites at extremely high costs. The Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority has sponsored a study to investigate lower cost, alternative disposal methods for certain wastes containing small quantities of NORM. This paper presents the results of a multipathway safety analysis of various scenarios for disposing of wastes containing limited quantities of NORM in Texas. The wastes include pipe scales and sludges from oil and gas production, residues from rare-earth mineral processing, and water treatment resins, but exclude large-volume, diffuse wastes (coal fly ash, phosphogypsum). The purpose of the safety analysis is to define concentration and quantity limits for the key nuclides of NORM that will avoid dangerous radiation exposures under different waste disposal scenarios.

Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C. (Rogers Associates Engineering Corporation, Salt Lake City, UT (USA)); Pollard, C.G. (Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority, Austin (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

An overview of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the petroleum industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil and gas extraction and processing operations sometimes accumulate naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) at concentrations above normal in by-product waste streams. Results from NORM surveys indicate that radionuclide concentrations can be quite variable, ranging from undetectable to extremely high levels. To date, efforts to characterize the geographic distribution of NORM have been limited by poor statistical representation. In addition, the fate of NORM in the environment has not been fully defined, and few human health risk assessment have been conducted. Both the petroleum industry and regulators are becoming increasingly concerned about the presence of NORM. At present, most existing federal environmental regulations do not address oil and gas NORM, and only a few states have developed regulatory programs. Available data suggest that the occurrence of NORM (and associated health risks) is significant enough to warrant increased regulatory control. However, before these regulations can be developed, additional research is needed to (1) better characterize the occurrence and distribution of NORM throughout the industry, (2) quantify hazards posed by NORM to industry workers and the general public, and (3) develop effective waste treatment and minimization technologies that will lower the risk associated with NORM and reduce disposal costs.

Smith, K.P.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Naturally occurring heavy radioactive elements in the geothermal microcosm of the Los Azufres (Mexico) volcanic complex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Los Azufres geothermal complex of central Mexico is characterized by fumaroles and boiling hot-springs. The fumaroles form habitats for extremophilic mosses and ferns. Physico-chemical measurements of two relatively pristine fumarolic microcosms point to their resemblance with the paleo-environment of earth during the Ordovician and Devonian periods. These geothermal habitats were analysed for the distribution of elemental mass fractions in the rhizospheric soil (RS), the native volcanic substrate (VS) and the sediments (S), using the new high-sensitivity technique of polarized x-ray energy dispersive fluorescence spectrometry (PEDXRF) as well as instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) for selected elements. This work presents the results for the naturally occurring heavy radioactive elements (NOHRE) Bi, Th and U but principally the latter two. For the RS, the density was found to be the least and the total organic matter content the most. Bi was found to be negligibly present in all substrate types. The average Th and U mass fractions in the RS were higher than in the VS and about equal to their average mass fractions in the S. The VS mass fraction of Th was higher, and of U lower, than the mass fractions in the earth's crust. In fact for the fumaroles of one site, the average RS mass fractions of these elements were higher than the averaged values for S (without considering the statistical dispersion). The immobilization of the NOHRE in the RS is brought about by the bio-geochemical processes specific to these extremophiles. Its effectiveness is such that despite the small masses of these plants, it compares with, or may sometimes exceed, the immobilization of the NOHRE in the S by the abiotic and aggressive chemical action of the hot-springs. These results indicate that the fumarolic plants are able to transform the volcanic substrate to soil and to affect the NOHRE mass fractions even though these elements are not plant nutrients. Mirrored back to the paleo times when such plant types were ubiquitous, it would mean that the first plants contributed significantly to pedogenesis and the biogeochemical recycling of even the heaviest and radioactive elements. Such plants may potentially be useful for the phytostabilisation of soil moderately contaminated by the NOHRE. Furthermore where applicable, geochronology may require taking into account the influence of the early plants on the NOHRE distributions.

W.A. Abuhani; N. Dasgupta-Schubert; L.M. Villaseor; D. Garca Avila; L. Surez; C. Johnston; S.E. Borjas; S.A. Alexander; S. Landsberger; M.C. Surez

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Results of the European Commission Marina II Study Part IIeffects of discharges of naturally occurring radioactive material  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enhanced levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are produced through various industrial operations and may lead to discharges to the marine environment. A recent study, called MARINA II, carried out for the European Commission considered discharges of radionuclides from the NORM industries to north European marine waters and their consequences. There are two main sources that were considered in the study. The use of phosphogypsum during the production of phosphoric acid by the fertiliser industry and the pumping of oil and gas from the continental shelf in the North Sea which produces large quantities of water contaminated with enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides. Discharges of alpha emitting radionuclides from these two industries have contributed significantly to the total input of alpha emitters to north European waters over the period 19812000 (data were not available prior to 1981). Discharges due to the use of phosphogypsum have declined since the early 1990s and are now very low. Discharges from the oil and gas industries stabilised in the second half of the 1990s and are now the major contributor to alpha discharges to the region. As most European countries do not report discharges of radioactivity with the water produced during extraction, there is considerable uncertainty in the discharges used in the study. The impact of the discharges has been estimated both in terms of the effect on non-human biota and the radiological impact for people. In the 1980s the radiation dose rates to marine biota in the region around a phosphate plant on the north-west coast of England were as high due to the discharges from the phosphate plant as those near to the Sellafield reprocessing plant due to its discharges. In recent years the additional dose to marine biota in this region due to the past NORM discharges is of the same order of magnitude as the natural background. The collective dose rate was estimated to determine the radiological impact on people. The peak collective dose rate from the NORM industries occurred in 1984 and was just over 600 manSv y?1. The collective dose rate fell with time as discharges from the phosphate industry reduced and was estimated as under 200 manSv y?1 in 2000.

M. Betti; L. Aldave de las Heras; A. Janssens; E. Henrich; G. Hunter; M. Gerchikov; M. Dutton; A.W. van Weers; S. Nielsen; J. Simmonds; A. Bexon; T. Sazykina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Larry J. Garside Organization Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 1973 Report Number Open File Report 94-2 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Citation Larry J. Garside (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology). 1973. Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada. Reno, NV: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Report No.: Open File Report 94-2. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Radioactive_Mineral_Occurences_in_Nevada&oldid=690513"

15

Properties of Natural Radiation and Radioactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ubiquitous natural sources of radiation and radioactive material (naturally occurring radioactive material, NORM) have exposed humans throughout history. To these natural sources have been added technologically-enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) sources and human-made (anthropogenic) sources. This chapter describes the ubiquitous radiation sources that we call background, including primordial radionuclides such as 40K, 87Rb, the 232Th series, the 238U series, and the 235U series; cosmogenic radionuclides such as 3H and 14C; anthropogenic radionuclides such as 3H, 14C, 137Cs, 90Sr, and 129I; radiation from space; and radiation from technologically-enhanced concentrations of natural radionuclides, particularly the short-lived decay products of 222Rn ("radon") and 220Rn ("thoron") in indoor air. These sources produce radiation doses to people principally via external irradiation or internal irradiation following intakes by inhalation or ingestion. The effective doses from each are given, with a total of 3.11 mSv y-1 (311 mrem y-1) to the average US resident. Over 2.5 million US residents receive over 20 mSv y-1 (2 rem y-1), primarily due to indoor radon. Exposure to radiation from NORM and TENORM produces the largest fraction of ubiquitous background exposure to US residents, on the order of 2.78 mSv (278 mrem) or about 89%. This is roughly 45% of the average annual effective dose to a US resident of 6.2 mSv y-1 (620 mrem y-1) that includes medical (48%), consumer products and air travel (2%), and occupational and industrial (0.1%). Much of this chapter is based on National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) Report No. 160, "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States," for which the author chaired the subcommittee that wrote Chapter 3 on "Ubiquitous Background Radiation."

Strom, Daniel J.

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

16

Tetrahedral boron in naturally occurring tourmaline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evidence for boron in both trigonal and tetrahedral coordination has been found in {sup 11}B magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of natural, inclusion-free specimens of aluminum-rich lithian tourmaline from granitic pregmatites.

Tagg, S.L.; Cho, H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab.; Dyar, M.D. [Mount Holyoke Coll., South Hadley, MA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geography; Grew, E.S. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Appendix II. Calculation of Slope Factors for Naturally Occurring Radionuclides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix II. Calculation of Slope Factors for Naturally Occurring Radionuclides In developing calculates the slope factors for the naturally occurring radionuclides under consideration. The Radionuclide products with half-lives of less than 6 months). As explained below, naturally occurring radionuclides

18

Committed effective dose from naturally occuring radionuclides in shellfish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recognizing their importance in the average Malaysian daily diet, the radioactivity concentrations in mollusc- and crustacean-based food have been determined for key naturally occuring radionuclides. Fresh samples collected from various maritime locations around peninsular Malaysia have been processed using standard procedures; the radionuclide concentrations being determined using an \\{HPGe\\} ?-ray spectrometer. For molluscs, assuming secular equilibrium, the range of activities of 238U (226Ra), 232Th (228Ra) and 40K were found to be 3.280.35 to 5.340.52, 1.200.21 to 2.440.21 and 1186 to 28114Bqkg?1 dry weight, respectively. The respective values for crustaceans were 3.020.57 to 4.700.52, 1.380.21 to 2.400.35 and 21611 to 31615Bqkg?1. The estimated average daily intake of radioactivity from consumption of molluscs are 0.37Bqkg?1 for 238U (226Ra), 0.16Bqkg?1 for 232Th (228Ra) and 18Bqkg?1 for 40K; the respective daily intake values from crustaceans are 0.36Bqkg?1, 0.16Bqkg?1 and 23Bqkg?1. Associated annual committed effective doses from molluscs are estimated to be in the range 21.3 to 34.7?Sv for 226Ra, 19.3 to 39.1?Sv for 228Ra and 17.0 to 40.4?Sv for 40K. For crustaceans, the respective dose ranges are 19.6 to 30.5?Sv, 22.0 to 38.4?Sv and 31.1 to 45.5?Sv, being some several times world average values.

Mayeen Uddin Khandaker; Norfadira Binti Wahib; Yusoff Mohd. Amin; D.A. Bradley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Regulation of naturally occurring radioactive materials in Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......implement those standards. In order to...competency standards, Codes of Practice, Standards and guidance...associated with uranium (and thorium...provision for plans to manage occupational...commissioned a review of operations......

Cameron Jeffries; Riaz Akber; Andrew Johnston; Brad Cassels

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Regulation of naturally occurring radioactive materials in Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......provide an overview of the regulatory approach to managing...been variation in the regulatory approach to implement...makes provision for plans to manage occupational...ARPANSA commissioned a review of operations involving...process to identify when regulatory control is appropriate......

Cameron Jeffries; Riaz Akber; Andrew Johnston; Brad Cassels

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Regulation of naturally occurring radioactive materials in Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......implement those standards. In order to...competency standards, Codes of Practice, Standards and guidance...protection in mining and mineral processing...provision for plans to manage occupational...commissioned a review of operations......

Cameron Jeffries; Riaz Akber; Andrew Johnston; Brad Cassels

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Acoustic scattering by bubbles in naturally occurring mud sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Naturally occurring sediment mud contains bubbles created by decaying vegetable matter. Work reported by Preston Wilson etal. (ca. 2007) has determined via x-ray tomography systems that mud bubbles are not spherical in shape but resemble oblate spheroids and are inhomogeneously distributed. These features are explained in terms of the card-house structure of mud with an adaptation of the fracture mechanics ideas of Boudreau etal. (ca. 2002). The scattering of sound at low frequencies by such nonspherical bubbles has both monopole and dipole components. The scatteredwave associated with the monopole term is proportional to the bubble volume. The dipole term involves an effective entrained mass tensor which is found by a solution of Laplace's equation. All bubbles regardless of shape have a smallest resonance frequency and the scattered radiation near the resonance frequency is monopole in character. Example solutions for the resonance frequencies and the scattering near resonance are given for oblate spheroidal bubbles and a suggested interpolation from low frequencies to resonance frequencies is given. A discussion is also given of how one can make use of the range-evolving form of compact-source generated pulses to infer information about the bubbles near the propagation path.

Allan D. Pierce; Willam M. Carey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Measurement of natural radioactivity from soil samples of Sind, Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Gnbold G., Ganhimeg G. Natural Radioactivity of Some Mongolian Building Materials (2000) National University of Mongolia. INIS Electronic Form No. E16-20002-46. 14 Baeza A. , Del-Rio M., Miro C. Natural radioactivity in soils of the Province......

S. A. Mujahid; S. Hussain

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Natural radioactivity in soil in the Baluchistan province of Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Gnbold G., Ganhimeg G. Natural radioactivity of some Mongolian building materials. (2000) National University of Mongolia, INIS Electronic Form No. E16-20002-46. 17 Baeza A. , Del-Rio M., Miro C. Natural radioactivity in soils of the Province......

S. A. Mujahid; S. Hussain

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Uranium Compounds and Other Natural Radioactivities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radioactive materials and global fallout as it exists in the environment (such as from testing of nuclear explosive devices.) However, any action that has been taken to separate...

26

Issues of natural radioactivity in phosphates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fertilization of phosphorus (P) fertilizers is essential in agricultural production, but phosphates contain in dependence on their origin different amounts of trace elements. The problem of cadmium (Cd) loads and other heavy metals is well known. However, only a limited number of investigations examined the contamination of phosphates with the two heaviest metals, uranium (U) and thorium (Th), which are radioactive. Also potassium (K) is lightly radioactive. Measurements are done n the radioactivity content of phosphates, P fertilizers and soils. The radiation doses to workers and public as well as possible contamination of soils from phosphate rock or fertilizer caused by these elements or their daughter products is of interest with regard to radiation protection. The use of P fertilizers is necessary for a sustainable agriculture, but it involves radioactive contamination of soils. The consequences of the use of P fertilizers is discussed, also with regard to existing and proposed legislation. 11 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

Schnug, E.; Haneklaus, S. [Institute of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, Braunschweig (Germany); Schnier, C. [GKSS-Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany); Scholten, L.C. [KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Mycoflora and naturally occurring mycotoxins in poultry feeds in Argentina  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to determine the mycoflora and mycotoxins natural incidence in poultry feeds from 2 factories in Ro Cuarto, Crdoba. One hundred and thirty samples were taken from May/1996 to May...

A. Dalcero; C. Magnoli; M. Luna; G. Ancasi; M.M. Reynoso; S. Chiacchiera

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The fate and behaviour of enhanced natural radioactivity with respect to environmental protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In contrast to the monitoring and prevention of occupational radiation risk caused by enhanced natural radioactivity, relatively little attention has been paid to the environmental impact associated with residues containing enhanced activity concentration of naturally occurring radionuclides. Such materials are often deposited directly into the environment, a practice which is strictly forbidden in the management of other types of radioactive waste. In view of the new trends in radiation protection, the need to consider the occurrence of anthropogenically enhanced natural radioactivity as a particular unique case of environmental hazard is quite apparent. Residues containing high activity concentrations of some natural radionuclides differ from radioactive materials arising from the nuclear industry. In addition, the radiation risk is usually combined with the risk caused by other pollutants. As such and to date, there are no precise regulations regarding this matter and moreover, the non-nuclear industry is often not aware of potential environmental problems caused by natural radioactivity. This article discusses aspects of environmental radiation risks caused by anthropogenically enhanced natural radioactivity stored at unauthorised sites. Difficulties and inconclusiveness in the application of recommendations and models for radiation risk assessment are explored. General terms such as 'environmental effects' and the basic parameters necessary to carry out consistent and comparable Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) have been developed and defined. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Features of environmental impact caused by residues containing high activity concentration of natural radionuclides Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definition of an effect of radiation on an ecosystem and novel method for its assessment Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation protection regulation inconclusiveness in the aspects of enhanced natural radioactivity.

Michalik, B., E-mail: b.michalik@gig.eu [Laboratory of Radiometry, Central Mining Institute (GIG), Plac Gwarkow 1, 40-166 Katowice (Poland); Brown, J., E-mail: Justin.Brown@nrpa.no [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA), Grini naeringspark 13, 1361 Osteras Norway (Norway); Krajewski, P., E-mail: krajewski@clor.waw.pl [Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection (CLOR), ul. Konwaliowa 7, 03-194 Warszawa Poland (Poland)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Radioactivity and Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

30

Natural Airborne Radioactivity at Kjeller, Norway  

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... During the last four months of 1957, radon concentrations have varied between about 30 and 1,100 X 10~18 c./cm. ... inversion and low temperature. In order to explain this effect, we suggest that considerable radon exhalation may be trapped in the cooled air which tends to follow the natural water ...

S. H. SMALL; A. LILLEGRAVEN; P. B. STOREB

1958-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

31

Biomedical aspects of natural and manufactured environmental radioactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While weapons testing has altered natural radioactivity background, manufactured radioactivity in most parts of the world constitutes but a very small fraction of the total alpha, beta, and gamma radioactivity in soil, air, water, and the biota. For example, in the early 1970s, we found what appeared to be the highest natural concentration of radioactivity ever reported in fish while attempting to measure the manufactured plutonium ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu) in organs of oceanic tuna. The natural alpha emitter polonium ({sup 210}Po) was discovered in the same organs at orders of magnitude higher concentrations. In particular, the caecum, which is a digestive organ composed of many small closed-ended sacs, contained concentrations of polonium as high as 79 pCi/g of wet tissue and lesser amounts of two manufactured isotopes: 0.0001 pCi/g of plutonium and 0.01 pCi/g of radiocesium ({sup 137}Cs). This equates to {approximately}80 rem/yr of radiation dose to this organ, overwhelmingly from the natural polonium, or {approximately}5000 times higher than is found in the human liver, the highest polonium concentration in man. The average background radiation for humans, for comparison, is {approximately}0.2 rem/yr, but the dose for Japanese, whose diet is high in seafood, is {approximately}15 rem/yr. The question arose: {open_quotes}Are these high concentrations of natural polonium limited to oceanic fish?{close_quotes} To answer this question, polonium was determined in the organs of striped bass and catfish from Lake Mead. In a related study, the plutonium and radiocesium ({sup 137}Cs) distributions in soils were determined to ascertain the impact of weapons testing on the natural background radioactivity of soils.

Hodge, V. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

On the Radio-activity of Natural Gas  

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... Physical Science Series, an account is given of some experiments with a highly radio-active gas obtained from crude petroleum. In this investigation it was found that air drawn through ... emanation from radium. The present writer has extended this investigation to an examination of the natural ...

J. C. MCLENNAN

1904-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

33

Naturally Occurring Radionuclides of Ash Produced by Coal Combustion. The Case of the Kardia Mine in Northern Greece  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

West Macedonia Lignite Center (WMLC), located in Northwest Greece, releases into the atmosphere about 21,400 tons/year of fly ash through the stacks of four coal fired plants. The lignite ash contains naturally occurring radionuclides, which are deposited on the WMLC basin. This work investigates the natural radioactivity of twenty six ash samples, laboratory produced from combustion of lignite, which was sampled perpendicularly to the benches of the Kardia mine. The concentrations of radionuclides {sup 40}K, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 232}Th, were measured spectroscopically and found round one order of magnitude as high as those of lignite. Subsequently the Radionuclide Partitioning Coefficients of radionuclides were calculated and it was found that they are higher for {sup 232}Th, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K, because the latter have closer affinity with the inorganic matrix of lignite. During combustion up to one third of the naturally occurring radioisotopes escape from the solid phase into the flue gases. With comparison to relative global data, the investigated ash has been found to have relatively high radioactivity, but the emissions of the WMLC radionuclides contribute only 0.03% to the mean annual absorbed dose.

Fotakis, M.; Tsikritzis, L.; Tzimkas, N.; Kolovos, N.; Tsikritzi, R. [Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of West Macedonia, Department of Pollution Control Technologies, Koila, Kozani, 50100 (Greece)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

Natural radioactivity measurements in rock samples of Cuihua Mountain National Geological Park, China  

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......samples were stored in gas-tight, radon impermeable...concentrations of the natural radionuclides 226Ra...radiation hazard indices from natural radioactivity of some...radioactive samples from Cyprus characteristic geological...Matiullah, Kenawy M. A. Natural radioactivity in marble......

Xinwei Lu; Xiaolan Zhang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide and bis(hydroxymethyl) peroxide from gas-phase ozonolysis of naturally occurring alkenes  

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... these compounds, 2-chloropropene, and the naturally-occurring alkenes ethene, /3-pinene, 2-carene and limonene. In every reaction where O3/alkene was ^1, we found BHMP ... .65\t0.84\t0.10

S. Gb; E. Hellpointner; W. V. Turner; F. Ko?te

1985-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

36

The role of naturally occurring waterholes in determining the distribution of Florida Key Deer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of my research was to test the hypothesis that the availability of fresh, naturally occurring water may limit the distribution of Florida Key Deer (Odocoileus virginianus clavium). More specifically, I was trying to determine...

Kim, Ji Yeon

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Natural radioactivity measurements in rock samples of Cuihua Mountain National Geological Park, China  

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......Holm E. The natural radioactivity in phosphate deposits from Sudan. Sci. Total Environ (1995) 162:173-178. 17 Sesana L...24 El-Arabi A. M . Natural radioactivity in sand used in thermal therapy at the Red Sea Coast. J. Environ. Radioact (2005......

Xinwei Lu; Xiaolan Zhang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE COSO EGS PROJECT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE COSO EGS PROJECT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A dramatic decrease in the ratio of chloride to boron was observed in the liquid discharge of a well proposed for EGS development in the Coso geothermal field. The decrease appears to be related to the transformation of some feed zones in the well from liquid-dominated to vapor-dominated. High concentrations of boron are transported to the wellbore in the steam, where it fractionates to the liquid phase flowing in from liquid-dominated feed zones. The high-boron steam is created when the

40

Determination of fallout 137Cs and naturally occuring gamma-ray emitters in sediments  

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With the advent of the nuclear age, a number of radionuclides were introduced into Man's natural radiation environment. Two of these radionuclides, cesium-137 and strontium-90, are of particular interest because of their long half lives and biological importance. Research at the U.S.D.A. Sedimentation Laboratory is being conducted on the movement and redistribution of 137Cs and the naturally occuring gamma-ray emitting radionuclides, thorium, uranium and potassium, in relation to cultural and erosional processes within watersheds. (1,2) This technical note describes the methods used at the U.S.D.A. Sedimentation Laboratory to determine137Cs and the naturally occurring gamma-ray emitters in sediments.

Jerry C. Ritchie; J.R. McHenry

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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41

Naturally occurring arsenic in the groundwater at the Kansas City Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an investigation concerning the presence of arsenic in concentrations exceeding 0.4 mg/L in the groundwater under the Department of Energy's Kansas City Plant (KCP). The study consisted of four distinct phases: a thorough review of the technical literature, a historical survey of arsenic use at the facility, a laboratory study of existing techniques for determining arsenic speciation, and a field program including water, soil, and sediment sampling. The historical survey and literature review demonstrated that plant activities had not released significant quantities of arsenic to the environment but that similar occurrences of arsenic in alluvial groundwater are widespread in the midwestern United States. Laboratory studies showed that a chromatographic separation technique was necessary to accurately determine arsenic speciation for the KCP groundwater samples. Field studies revealed that naturally occurring reducing conditions prevalent in the subsurface are responsible for dissolving arsenic previously sorbed by iron oxides. Indeed, the data demonstrated that the bulk arsenic concentration of site subsoils and sediments is {approximately}7 mg/kg, whereas the arsenic content of iron oxide subsamples is as high as 84 mg/kg. Literature showed that similar concentrations of arsenic in sediments occur naturally and are capable of producing the levels of arsenic found in groundwater monitoring wells at the KCP. The study concludes, therefore, that the arsenic present in the KCP groundwater is the result of natural phenomena. 44 refs., 8 figs., 14 tabs.

Korte, N.E.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Existence of long-lived isomeric states in naturally-occurring neutron-deficient Th isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four long-lived neutron-deficient Th isotopes with atomic mass numbers 211 to 218 and abundances of (1-10)x10{sup -11} relative to {sup 232}Th have been found in a study of naturally-occurring Th using inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry. It is deduced that long-lived isomeric states exist in these isotopes. The hypothesis that they might belong to a new class of long-lived high spin super- and hyperdeformed isomeric states is discussed.

Marinov, A.; Kashiv, Y. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Rodushkin, I. [Analytica AB, Aurorum 10, S-977 75 Luleaa (Sweden); Halicz, L.; Segal, I. [Geological Survey of Israel, 30 Malkhei Israel St., Jerusalem 95501 (Israel); Pape, A. [IPHC-UMR7178, IN2P3-CNRS/ULP, BP 28, F-67037 Strasbourg cedex 2 (France); Gentry, R. V. [Earth Science Associates, P.O. Box 12067, Knoxville, Tennessee 37912-0067 (United States); Miller, H. W. [P. O. Box 1092, Boulder, Colorado 80306-1092 (United States); Kolb, D. [Department of Physics, University GH Kassel, D-34109 Kassel (Germany); Brandt, R. [Kernchemie, Philipps University, D-35041 Marburg (Germany)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Physicochemical Processes Occurring in Long-Term Storage of Liquid Radioactive Waste in Deep Underground Collector Beds  

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Interaction under hydrothermal conditions (pressure 3 MPa; temperature 80-170C; contact time up to 2500 h) of intermediate-level acidic waste with bed rock of the underground repository for liquid radioactive...

E. V. Zakharova; E. P. Kaimin; E. N. Darskaya; K. A. Menyailo

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

High Naturally Occurring Radioactivity in Fossil Groundwater from the Middle East  

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226Ra, 228Ra, and 224Ra?223Ra isotopes were determined by a radon counter (21), ? spectrometer, and delayed coincidence ? counter (22), respectively (see the Supporting Information, Supplementary Text S1). ... This study was supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development, by the Bureau for Global Programs, Field Support and Research, and by the Center for Economic Growth and Agriculture Development, The Middle East Regional Cooperation program (MERC Project M25-060). ... The second series of papers (II) will be dealing with desalination projects in the country. ...

Avner Vengosh; Daniella Hirschfeld; David Vinson; Gary Dwyer; Hadas Raanan; Omar Rimawi; Abdallah Al-Zoubi; Emad Akkawi; Amer Marie; Gustavo Haquin; Shikma Zaarur; Jiwchar Ganor

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

45

Model independent determination of the spin of the {sup 180}Ta naturally occurring isomer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hyperfine structures of the 33715.27 cm{sup -1} and 33706.47 cm{sup -1} transitions from the ground state of singly ionized Ta have been measured by collinear laser spectroscopy. The structures were found to contain a large second order contribution. From fitting the observed hyperfine components for both {sup 181}Ta and the {sup 180}Ta naturally occurring isomer it was possible to determine the first and second order hyperfine structure coefficients. As no model independent determination of the nuclear spin of the {sup 180}Ta isomer has been performed, fitting was attempted for a range of spins. A clear chi-squared minimum is obtained for a nuclear spin of 9, in agreement with model dependent measurements.

Bissell, M. L.; Baczynska, K.; Forest, D. H.; Gardner, M. D.; Tungate, G. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Billowes, J.; Campbell, P.; Cheal, B.; Tordoff, B. [Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Eronen, T.; Moore, I. D.; Aeystoe, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PB 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

B-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT APPENDIX B: CONCEPTS OF RADIOACTIVITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as paper and have a range in air of only an inch or so. Naturally occurring radioactive elements a range in air of several feet. Naturally occurring radioactive elements such as potassium- 40 (K-40) emit: CONCEPTS OF RADIOACTIVITY SOURCES OF RADIATION Radioactivity and radiation are part of the earths natural

Homes, Christopher C.

47

Roles of Naturally Occurring Bacteria in Controlling Iodine-129 Mobility in Subsurface Soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stable iodine 129I Radioactive iodine-129 238U Uranium-238 ABTS 2, 2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid ATP Adenosine-5'-triphosphate Br- Bromide Cl- Chloride CoA Coenzyme A DOE Department of Energy DOE-EM Department... 5.5 Discussion ................................................................................ 95 VI SUMMARY ......................................................................................... 100 6.1 Accumulation of I...

Li, Hsiu-Ping

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

48

RADIOACTIVITY 1997 BNL Site Environmental Report 4 -1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a few inches. Naturally occurring radioactive elements such as potassium-40 emit beta radiation. Gamma by materials such as paper and have a range in air of only an inch or so. Naturally occurring radioactive 4.3 Sources of Radiation Radioactivity and radiation are part of the earth's natural environment

49

MARSAME Appendix B B. SOURCES OF BACKGROUND RADIOACTIVITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consideration is given to issues associated with technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive reports on Exposure of the Population in the United States and Canada from Natural Background Radiation.1 Terrestrial Radioactivity The naturally occurring forms of radioactive elements incorporated into the Earth

50

Response of the NCAR Community Climate Model to the Radiative Forcing by the Naturally Occurring Tropospheric Aerosol  

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We insert the effect of naturally occurring tropospheric aerosols on solar radiation into the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM). The effect of the aerosol depends on concentration and type (continental, maritime), surface albedo, solar zenith ...

James A. Coakley Jr.; Robert D. Cess

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Concentrations of Naturally Occuring Radionuclides and Fission Products in Brick Samples Fabricated and Used in and Around Greater Dhaka City  

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...Radiation Protection Dosimetry Article Concentrations of Naturally Occuring Radionuclides and Fission Products in Brick Samples...measures to minimise the harmful effects of ionising radiation. The radium equivalent activity concentrations......

S. Roy; M.S. Alam; F.K. Miah; B. Alam

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Use of Long-Lived Natural Radioactivity as an Atmospheric Tracer  

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... group of radioactive isotopes for this purpose would be the longer-lived, daughter products of radon radium-D, -E and -F which are naturally present in the atmosphere as ... -F which are naturally present in the atmosphere as a result of the leakage of radon from soils and rocks on the Earth's surface.

W. M. BURTON; N. G. STEWART

1960-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

53

Investigation of Naturally Occurring Radio Nuclides in Shir?kuh Granites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the principle natural radiation resources is Granite which can be dangerous for human because of its radiations. Based on this fact in this research we attempt to specify the activity amount of these natural radio nuclides existing in Shir?kuh Granite of Yazd state. To specify the activity amount of this natural radio nuclides it has been applied the measurement method of Gamma spectroscopy using high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector.

Mohammad Mehdi Mazarei; Mojtaba Zarei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Study finds radioactivity around Los Alamos largely due to natural...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

natural sources The study was subsequently peer reviewed externally by scientists at Colorado State University and internally within the Lab. December 10, 2008 Los Alamos National...

55

Naturally-Occurring Radionuclides In Drinking Water From Surface And Groundwater Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactivity in water for human consumption is under closer scrutiny than ever before and many countries adopted guideline values based on total alpha and total beta activity measurements. Although most waters from surface circulation meet these guidelines, it is frequently found that groundwater exceed guideline values. Results of water analyses by alpha spectrometry clarified that the main radionuclides present are from the uranium decay series, such as uranium isotopes, radium ({sup 226}Ra), radon ({sup 222}Rn), and also {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po. Occasionally, groundwater displayed {sup 226}Ra concentrations higher than 1 Bq L{sup -1} and {sup 222}Rn concentrations above 1000 Bq L{sup -1}. Nevertheless, lack of conformity of these waters with guidelines adopted, generally, is not due to anthropogenic inputs.

Carvalho, F. P.; Madruga, M. J.; Oliveira, J. M.; Lopes, I.; Ferrador, G.; Sequeira, M. M. [Nuclear and Technological Institute (ITN) Department of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 24 JANUARY 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1509 Naturally occurring resonators in random lasing of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLES PUBLISHED ONLINE: 24 JANUARY 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1509 Naturally occurring resonators to trap the SE radiation. This disorder type may be formed owing to refractive-index fluctuations, nr the SE radiation formed in the gain medium outside the excited area. In this case the optical gain needs

Loss, Daniel

57

Natural radioactivity and external gamma radiation exposure at the coastal Red Sea in Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......0.5 - 151 39 1.08 0.27 - (25) Sudan 29.6 6.02 158.4 4.09...Natural radioactivity in sand used in thermal therapy at the Red Sea Coast. J. Environ...in the Red Sea coastal environment of Sudan. Mar. Pollut. Bull. (1998) 36......

S. Harb

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Sulphoraphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells by targeting heat shock proteins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HSPs (27, 70 and 90) and HSF1 are overexpressed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate inhibited HSPs and HSF1 expressions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of HSPs and HSF1 lead to regulation of apoptotic proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins activate of caspases particularly caspase 3 and 9 leading to induction of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins induce caspases leading to induction of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are involved in protein folding, aggregation, transport and/or stabilization by acting as a molecular chaperone, leading to inhibition of apoptosis by both caspase dependent and/or independent pathways. HSPs are overexpressed in a wide range of human cancers and are implicated in tumor cell proliferation, differentiation, invasion and metastasis. HSPs particularly 27, 70, 90 and the transcription factor heat shock factor1 (HSF1) play key roles in the etiology of breast cancer and can be considered as potential therapeutic target. The present study was designed to investigate the role of sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate on HSPs (27, 70, 90) and HSF1 in two different breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells expressing wild type and mutated p53 respectively, vis-a-vis in normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-12F. It was furthermore investigated whether modulation of HSPs and HSF1 could induce apoptosis in these cells by altering the expressions of p53, p21 and some apoptotic proteins like Bcl-2, Bax, Bid, Bad, Apaf-1 and AIF. Sulphoraphane was found to down-regulate the expressions of HSP70, 90 and HSF1, though the effect on HSP27 was not pronounced. Consequences of HSP inhibition was upregulation of p21 irrespective of p53 status. Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, AIF were upregulated followed by down-regulation of Bcl-2 and this effect was prominent in MCF-7 than in MDA-MB-231. However, very little change in the expression of Bid was observed. Alteration in Bcl-2 Bax ratio resulted in the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and activation of caspases 3 and 9 which are in agreement with apoptotic index values. Sulphoraphane therefore can be regarded as a potent inducer of apoptosis due to HSP modulation in breast cancer cells.

Sarkar, Ruma; Mukherjee, Sutapa [Department of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Toxicology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India)] [Department of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Toxicology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India); Biswas, Jaydip [Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India)] [Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India); Roy, Madhumita, E-mail: mitacnci@yahoo.co.in [Department of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Toxicology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India)] [Department of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Toxicology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India)

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

Measurement of natural radioactivity and assessment of associated radiation hazards in soil around Baoji second coal-fired thermal power plant, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......10001 g) were sealed in gas-tight, radon-impermeable...concentrations of the natural radionuclides 226Ra...Comparative study of natural radioactivity levels...radioactive samples from Cyprus characteristic geological...Mechanisms of enrichment of natural radioactivity along the......

Xinwei Lu; Xiaoxue Li; Pujun Yun; Dacheng Luo; Lijun Wang; Chunhui Ren; Cancan Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Assessment of natural and anthropogenic radioactivity levels in soils, rocks and water in the vicinity of Chirano Gold Mine in Ghana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......gamma-ray exposure from natural radioactivity concentrations...drinking water containing natural radioactivity due to...inhalation of airborne radon gas for the area where both...concentrations in surface soils in Cyprus. J. Environ. Radioact...UNSCEAR. Exposures from natural sources of radiation......

A. Faanu; H. Lawluvi; D. O. Kpeglo; E. O. Darko; G. Emi-Reynolds; A. R. Awudu; O. K. Adukpo; C. Kansaana; I. D. Ali; B. Agyeman; L. Agyeman; R. Kpodzro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Measurements of activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil samples from Punjab province of Pakistan and assessment of radiological hazards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......G. Natural radioactivity of some Mongolian building materials. Nuclear Research Center, National University of Mongolia, INIS Electronic form No. E16-20002-46 (2000). 13. Sam, A. K., Ahmed, M. M. O., El-Khangi, F. A., El-nigumi......

S. N. A. Tahir; K. Jamil; J. H. Zaidi; M. Arif; Nasir Ahmed; Syed Arif Ahmad

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Comment on 'Existence of long-lived isomeric states in naturally-occurring neutron-deficient Th isotopes'  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In their article ''Existence of Long-Lived Isomeric States in Naturally-Occuring Neutron-Deficient Th Isotopes''[Phys. Rev. C 76, 021303 (2007)], Marinov et al. fail to demonstrate that basic mass spectrometric protocols, such as abundance sensitivity, linearity, and freedom from possible interferences, have been met. In particular, the claim that four isomeric states of Th have been discovered, using an inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometer (ICP-SFMS), with abundances from (1-10)x10{sup -11} relative to {sup 232}Th, cannot be accepted, given the known abundance sensitivities of other sector field mass spectrometers. Accelerator mass spectrometry is the only mass spectrometric methodology capable of measuring relative abundances of the magnitude claimed by Marinov et al.

Barber, R. C.; De Laeter, J. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Department of Applied Physics, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM V): proceedings of an international symposium, Seville, Spain, 1922 March 2007  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......their decay chain members in rare earth minerals is often enough...occupational exposure during rare earth production gives rise...variety of monazite mining and rare earth recovery industries...environmental weathering of stacked phosphogypsum waste materials, with observed......

William E. Kennedy; Jr.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Thermoluminescence (TL) Analysis and Fading Studies of Naturally Occurring Salt Irradiated by 500 mGy Gamma Rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of the naturally occurring salt for the dosimetry purposes, using TL. The fine powder samples (20 mg) were irradiated by {gamma}- rays from 500 mGy to 2500 mGy by using Theratron-780C Cobalt-60 source, however, this paper discusses about 500 mGy only. The TL glow curve peak parameters were studied by using Chen's peak shape equation. TL glow curves were compared with fitted curves using glow curve deconvolution (GCD) method by using Kitis expression. The kinetic parameter values (E, b and s) so calculated, are in good agreement with those available in literature. The calculated energy values were also verified by using various heating rate (VHR) method. {chi}{sup 2} test and figure of merit (FOM) calculation was done to accept the goodness of fit between the curves. Fading studies of the sample showed a good fitting between the curves. The analysis suggests that natural salt should be considered for dosimetry purposes.

Tiwari, Ramesh Chandra; Pau, Kham Suan [Department of Physics, Mizoram University: Tanhril Campus, Aizawl-796004, Mizoram (India)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

65

Natural radioactivity in various water samples and radiation dose estimations in Bolu province, Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The level of natural radioactivity for Bolu province of north-western Turkey was assessed in this study. There is no information about radioactivity measurement reported in water samples in the Bolu province so far. For this reason, gross ? and ? activities of 55 different water samples collected from tap, spring, mineral, river and lake waters in Bolu were determined. The mean activity concentrations were 68.11mBqL?1, 169.44mBqL?1 for gross ? and ? in tap water. For all samples the gross ? activity is always higher than the gross ? activity. All value of the gross ? were lower than the limit value of 500mBqL?1 while two spring and one mineral water samples were found to have gross ? activity concentrations of greater than 1000mBqL?1. The associated age-dependent dose from all water ingestion in Bolu was estimated. The total dose for adults had an average value exceeds the WHO recommended limit value. The risk levels from the direct ingestion of the natural radionuclides in tap and mineral water in Bolu were determinated. The mean 210Po and 228Ra risk the value of tap and mineral waters slightly exceeds what some consider on acceptable risk of 10?4 or less.

F. Korkmaz Gorur; H. Camgoz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Natural radioactive nuclides and chemical components in the groundwater of Beni Suef  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of natural radioactivity in drinking water have been performed in many parts of the world, mostly for assessment of the doses and risk resulting from consuming water. A study of the radionuclide and chemical components in groundwater from Beni Suef Governate, Egypt has been carried out. Fifty water samples were analysed by ?-ray spectroscopy to determine the 226Ra, 232Th and 40K concentrations; major elements, pH, alkalinity and conductivity were also measured. The activity concentration values ranged from 0.008 to 0.040Bql?1 for 226Ra, from 0.003 to 0.019Bql?1 for 232Th and from 0.025 to 0.344Bql?1 for 40K. The annual ingestion of these radionuclides, using local consumption rates (averaged over the whole population) of 1.5ld?1, was estimated to be 8.59, 4.86 and 83.47Bqy?1 for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. The estimated effective doses from drinking water were found to be 2.4Svy?1 (226Ra), 1.1Svy?1 (232Th) and 0.5Svy?1 (40K). The contribution of these radionuclides to the committed effective dose from a year's consumption of drinking water is therefore estimated to be only 4% of the WHO value (0.1mSvy?1). The moderate pH value is the most important parameter, and there was no observed correlation between natural radioactivity and electrical conductivity or concentrations of major ions.

F A Khalil; Rafat M Amin; M A K El Fayoumi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

CHAPTER 4: CONCEPTS OF RADIOACTIVITY 1998 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT4-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a range in air of only an inch or so. Naturally occurring radioactive elements such as radon emit alpha by materials such as aluminum foil. They have a range in air of a few inches. Naturally occurring radioactive-rays are essen- tially a form of gamma radiation. Figure 4-1. Typical Annual Radiation Doses from Natural and Man

68

New Colchicinoids from a Native Jordanian Meadow Saffron, Colchicum brachyphyllum: Isolation of the First Naturally Occurring Dextrorotatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of their toxic nature, and in Arabian writings of the tenth century, they were recommended for use in gout

Falkinham, Joseph

69

(Revised May 25, 2012) Radioactivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Revised May 25, 2012) Radioactivity GOALS (1) To gain a better understanding of naturally-occurring. (3) To measure the amount of "background radiation" from natural sources. (4) To test whether and man-made radiation sources. (2) To use a Geiger-Mueller tube to detect both beta and gamma radiation

Collins, Gary S.

70

Internal and External Radioactive Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.6 Table 3.1: Naturally occurring radioactive isotopes [89]. The elemental abundance is the total amount words the signal to noise ratio should be greater than one, S/N > 1. Naturally, the larger S/N is to be distinguished from beta particles or gamma radiation. The big challenge for the Borexino experiment is to deal

71

Metrological Determination of Natural Radioactive Isotopes {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb by Means of Ge Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A metrological method to determine the activity per mass unity (activity concentration) of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb ({sup 238}U decay series) and {sup 228}Ra ({sup 232}Th series) by gamma-ray spectrometers based on hyper-pure coaxial germanium detector was developed. In the soil the {sup 22}Ra (half-life = 1600 years) exhibits the same level of radioactivity as {sup 238}U (half-life 4.5x10{sup 9} years) because of a natural phenomenon called secular equilibrium. {sup 226}Ra decays into {sup 222}Rn (half-life = 3.8 days), a radioactive inert gas. After several days, the {sup 222}Rn naturally decays to {sup 218}Po (half-life = 3 minutes), where finally {sup 210}Pb (half-life = 22 years) is produced. The metrological capability of high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry for naturally occurring radionuclides at environmental levels is showed, with emphasis on the use of 2 mL standard sources volume in a glass ampoule. Source preparation and calibration procedures are described. Radionuclide standards in an activity range of 10 to 250 Bq/g were produced which can be applied in a variety of environmental sample analysis (water, plant material, sediment, etc.). Uncertainties for {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb around 3% (k = 1) were obtained.

Almeida, Maria Candida M. de; Delgado, Jose U.; Poledna, Roberto; Oliveira, Estela Maria de; Silva, Ronaldo L. da [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear(SEMRA/LNMRI/IRD/CNEN) Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio, Rio de Janeiro, CEP 22780-160, RJ (Brazil)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

72

IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary accomplishment of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter was the preparation of tools and measurement systems for deployment, testing and use on ODP Leg 204, which will study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon. Additional accomplishments were related to the postcruise evaluation of tools and measurements systems used on ODP Leg 201 along the Peru margin from January through March, 2002. The operational results from the use of the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) tool and the PCS Gas Manifold on ODP Leg 201 are evaluated in this progress report in order to prepare for the upcoming deployments on ODP Leg 204 in July, 2002. The PCS was deployed 17 times during ODP Leg 201 and successfully retrieved cores from a broad range of lithologies and sediment depths along the Peru margin. Eleven deployments were entirely successful, collecting between 0.5 and 1.0 meters of sediment at greater than 75% of hydrostatic pressure. The PCS gas manifold was used in conjunction with the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) throughout ODP Leg 201 to measure the total volume and composition of gases recovered in sediment cores associated with methane gas hydrates. The FUGRO Pressure Corer (FPC), one of the HYACE/HYACINTH pressure coring tools, was also deployed on the D/V JOIDES Resolution during ODP Legs 201 to field-test this coring system at three shallow-water sites located offshore Peru. The field-testing of these tools provides a corollary benefit to DOE/NETL at no cost to this project. The testing of these tools on the D/V JOIDES Resolution was negotiated as part of a cooperative agreement between JOI/ODP and the HYACINTH partners. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively during ODP Leg 201. The data obtained from the successful deployments of these tools is still being evaluated by the scientists and engineers involved in this testing; however, preliminary results are presented in this report. An infrared-thermal imaging system (IR-TIS) was deployed for the first time on ODP Leg 201. This system was used to identify methane hydrate intervals in the recovered cores. Initial discussions of these experiments are provided in this report. This report is an overview of the field measurements made on recovered sediment cores and the downhole measurements made during ODP Leg 201. These results are currently being used to incorporate the ''lessons learned'' from these deployments to prepare for a dedicated ODP leg to study the characteristics of naturally-occurring hydrates in the subsurface environment of Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon during ODP Leg 204, which will take place from July through September, 2002.

Dr. Frank R. Rack; Dr. Gerald Dickens; Kathryn Ford; Derryl Schroeder; Michael Storms; ODP Leg 201 Shipboard Scientific Party

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Susceptibility to different tick genera in Gambian N'Dama and Gobra zebu cattle exposed to naturally occurring tick infestations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tick collection on one side of the body and whole tail was performed weekly over one year on 11 Gambian N'Dama(Bos taurus) and 11 Gobra zebu(Bos indicus) cattle to assess breed susceptibility to naturally occurri...

R. C. Mattioli; M. Bah; S. Kora; M. Cassama

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Determination of the natural radioactivity levels in north west of Dukhan, Qatar using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study is aimed at the determination of the activity concentrations of naturally occuring and technologically enhanced levels of radiation in 34 representative soil samples that have been collected from an inshore oil field area which was found to have, in a previous study, the highest observed value of 226Ra concentration among 129 soil samples. The activity concentrations of 238U and 226Ra have been inferred from gamma-ray transitions associated with their decay progenies and measured using a hyper-pure germanium detector. Details of the sample preparation and the gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis techniques are presented, together with the values of the activity concentrations associated with the naturally occuring radionuclide chains for all the samples collected from NW Dukhan. Discrete-line, gamma-ray energy transitions from spectral lines ranging in energy from ?100keV up to 2.6MeV have been associated with characteristic decays of the various decay products within the 235.8U and 232Th radioactive decay chains. These data have been analyzed, under the assumption of secular equilibrium for the U and Th decay chains. Details of the sample preparation and the gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis techniques are presented. The weighted mean value of the activity concentrations of 226Ra in one of the samples was found to be around a factor of 2 higher than the values obtained in the previous study and approximately a factor of 10 higher than the accepted worldwide average value of 35Bq/kg. The weighted mean values of the activity concentrations of 232Th and 40K were also deduced and found to be within the worldwide average values of 30 and 400Bq/kg, respectively. Our previous study reported a value of 201.91.5Stat.13Syst.Bq/kg for 226Ra in one sample and further investigation in the current work determined a measured value for 226Ra of 342.001.9Stat.25Syst.Bq/kg in a sample taken from the same locality. This is significantly higher than all the other investigated soil samples in the current and previous works. Notably, the Th levels in the same sample are within the worldwide average expectations, implying that the increased 226Ra concentration arises from TENORM processes.

Huda Al-Sulaiti; Tabassum Nasir; K.S. Al Mugren; N. Alkhomashi; N. Al-Dahan; M. Al-Dosari; D.A. Bradley; S. Bukhari; M. Matthews; P.H. Regan; T. Santawamaitre; D. Malain; A. Habib

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

C-1 1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT APPENDIX C: CONCEPTS OF RADIOACTIVITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occurring radioactive elements such as radon emit alpha radiation. BETA Beta radiation is composed and Lucite panels. They have a range in air of several feet. Naturally occur- ring radioactive elements and radiation are part of the earth's natural environment. Human beings are exposed to radiation from a variety

76

Measurement of natural radioactivity and dose rate assessment of terrestrial gamma radiation in the soil of southern Punjab, Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......terrestrial background radiation mainly due to these...assess the population radiation doses(4-9). However...data are available on naturally occuring and artificial radionulides...order to assess the radiation doses for the general......

I. Fatima; J. H. Zaidi; M. Arif; M. Daud; S. A. Ahmad; S. N. A. Tahir

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Influence of heavy natural radioactive nuclides introduced in soil with labelled fertilizers and ameliorants on cytogenetic effects in plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of heavy natural radioactive nuclides (STYU, STSTh, SSWRa, S Po, and S Pb) in labeled fertilizers and ameliorants on the number of meiotic chromosome aberrations was studied in field experiments on the major crop plants, wheat, barley and corn. The mining and use of coal and oil and the processing of raw materials in the production of rare and nonferrous metals produce high quantities of wastes with an elevated content of natural radionuclides. One possible way for technogenically altering the natural radiation background of soil is the active utilization of phosphorus fertilizers in agriculture, and also the use, as fertilizers and ameliorants of wastes from nonferrous metallurgy, of the ash from heat and power plants and various intermediates from the chemical industry. The authors conclude that the introduction of labeled ammophos, nitrophos and phosphogypsum, which raised the soil background concentration of the specified elements, produced an increase in the number of cells with meiotic chromosome aberrations.

Arkhipov, N.P.; Bazylev, V.V.; Bobrikova, E.T.; Fevraleva, L.T.; Kal'chenko, VA.; Shevchenko, V.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Public exposure to hazards associated with natural radioactivity in open-pit mining in Ghana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and Waste Safety in Mining and Mineral Procession...on the Kubi Forest Mining Project. Environmental...Anglogold Ashanti. Review of Operations. Annual...Community Development Plan, Iduapriem and Teberebe...International Basic Safety Standards (BSS) for protection...radioactivity in open-pit mining in Ghana. | The......

E. O. Darko; A. Faanu; A. R. Awudu; G. Emi-Reynolds; J. Yeboah; O. C. Oppon; E. H. K. Akaho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Naturally Occurring Auxin Transport Regulators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Isorhamnetin >==Fisetin >=fisetin) again included widely distributed flavone and flavonol aglycones...

MARK JACOBS; PHILIP H. RUBERY

1988-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Interactions between radioactively labeled colloids and natural particles: Evidence for colloidal pumping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been hypothesized that colloidal forms of trace metals can be reactive intermediaries in the scavenging processes leading to the removal of their particulate forms. A series of radiotracer experiments using natural colloidal organic matter from Galveston Bay, USA were carried out in order to test this hypothesis. Suspended particle uptake of originally colloidally bound trace metals occurred in a matter of hours to days in estuarine waters. After ten days, the majority ( >50%) of the colloidal trace metals had been transferred into the particulate phase ({ge} 0.45{mu}m), except for {sup 65}Zn. Two distinctively different temporal regions of removal of colloidal trace metals were identified: a faster reaction during the first four hours, followed by a slower reaction after approximately one day. In a separate river water-seawater mixing experiment, the solid/solution partitioning of the radiotracers was investigated in the absence of suspended matter. About 30% of most of the elements, except Ag and Fe ({approximately}60%), were associated with a newly formed particulate phase after eight days. There were two major trends: (1) the particulate fraction of {sup 59}Fe and {sup 110}Ag increased while the colloidal fraction decreased, suggesting a colloidal pumping mechanism. (2) The particulate fraction of {sup 54}Mn, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 65}Zn, {sup 109}Cd, {sup 113}Sn, and {sup 60}Co increased while the LMW({le}1 kDa) fraction decreased, suggesting a direct uptake into the particulate fraction with less involvement of a transitory colloidal phase. The results from these experiments suggested two different pathways for colloidal tracer uptake by particles: (1) colloidal pumping of a major component (e.g., biopolymer) of the colloidal pool and (2) coagulation of trace components (e.g., phytochelatins) with varying affinities for different trace metals. 39 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Wen, L.S.; Santschi, P.H.; Tang, D. [Texas A & M Univ., Galveston, TX (United States)] [Texas A & M Univ., Galveston, TX (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Radioactive Dust from Nuclear Detonations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...than the dose received from natural radioactivity in a period of...radioactive particles. The natural radioactivity of the atmosphere...curies/liter. This radioactive gas is present in equilibrium with...With an approximation of the natural radiation dose to the lung as...

Merril Eisenbud; John H. Harley

1953-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

82

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

83

B-1 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT APPENDIX B: CONCEPTS OF RADIOACTIVITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as aluminum foil and Lucite panels. They have a range in air of several feet. Naturally occurring radioactive OF RADIATION Radioactivity and radiation are part of the earths natural environment. Human beings are exposed in the environment, and how they contribute to an individuals radiation dose are provided. Some gen- eral statistical

Homes, Christopher C.

84

Natural radioactivity of 226Ra and 228Ra in thermal and mineral waters in Croatia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and Occupational Health, Radiation Protection...the elements of the uranium and thorium natural...Croatia, with many health resorts based on...detector (partially depleted PIPS detector: active...other elements of the uranium and thorium natural...ingested U and Ra. Health Phys (1985) 48......

Tomislav Bituh; Gordana Marovic; Branko Petrinec; Jasminka Sencar; Iva Franulovic

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Natural radioactivity measurements and dose calculations to the public: Case of the uranium-bearing region of Poli in Cameroon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to carry out a baseline study of the uranium-bearing region of Poli in which lies the uranium deposit of Kitongo, prior to its impending exploitation. This study required sampling soil, water and foodstuffs representative of the radioactivity exposure and food consumption patterns of the population of Poli. After sampling and radioactivity measurements were taken, our results indicated that the activities of natural series in soil and water samples are low. However, high levels of 210Po and 210Pb in foodstuffs (vegetables) were discovered and elevated activities of 40K were observed in some soil samples. All components of the total dose were assessed and lead to an average value of 5.2mSv/year, slightly higher than the average worldwide value of 2.4mSv/year. Most of this dose is attributable to the ingestion dose caused by the high levels of 210Po and 210Pb contained in vegetables, food items which constitute an important part of the diet in Northern Cameroon. Consequently, bringing uranium ore from underground to the surface might lead to an increased dose for the population of Poli through a higher deposition of 222Rn decay products on leafy vegetables.

Sadou; Franois O. Bochud; Sbastien Baechler; Kwato Njock Mose; Ngachin Merlin; Pascal Froidevaux

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha radioactivity measurement Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT4-1 Summary: a range in air of only an inch or so. Naturally occurring radioactive elements such as radon emit alpha... . This is a measure of the rate at...

87

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sources of Radiation Biological Responses Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Radiation is all around us, occurring naturally in the environment. We are always exposed to radiation from: radon in the air uranium, radium and thorium in the earth cosmic rays from outer space and the sun radioactive potassium in our food and water naturally occuring radioactive material within our own bodies. This is commonly called "naturally-occurring background radiation." TYPES OF IONIZING RADIATION Alpha Alpha particles can be shielded by a sheet of paper or by human skin. If alpha emitters are inhaled, ingested, or enter the body through a cut, they can cause cancer. Beta Beta radiation can be stopped by a shield like aluminum foil or wood. If beta emitters are inhaled, ingested, or enter the body through a cut, they can cause cancer.

88

The importance of transport parameter cross correlations in natural systems radioactive transport models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transport parameter cross correlations are rarely considered in models used to predict radionuclide transport in natural systems. In this paper, it is shown that parameter cross correlations could have a significant impact on radionuclide transport predictions in saturated media. In fractured rock, the positive correlation between fracture apertures and groundwater residence times is shown to result in significantly less retardation due to matrix diffusion than is predicted without the correlation. The suppression of matrix diffusion is further amplified by a tendency toward larger apertures, smaller matrix diffusion coefficients, and less sorption capacity in rocks of lower matrix porosity. In a hypothetical example, strong cross correlations between these parameters result in a decrease in predicted radionuclide travel times of an order of magnitude or more relative to travel times calculated with uncorrelated parameters. In porous media, expected correlations between permeability, porosity, and sorption capacity also result in shorter predicted travel times than when the parameters are assumed to be uncorrelated. Individual parameter standard deviations can also have a significant influence on predicted radionuclide travel times, particularly when cross correlations are considered.

Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

89

Natural radioactivity and radiation exposure at the Minjingu phosphate mine in Tanzania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the results of studies on activity and ambient radiation background around the Minjingu phosphate mine in Tanzania are presented. The outdoor dose rate in air and the activity levels of samples from and outside the mine were determined by thermoluminiscent dosimeters and a gamma spectrometer system with a Hyper Pure germanium detector system respectively. The determination of activity was made for the 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K radionuclides. High concentrations of radium-226 were observed in phosphate rock (5760107 Bq kg-1 ), waste rock (425098 Bq kg-1 ), wild leaf vegetation (65011 Bq kg-1 ), edible leaf vegetation (3939 Bq kg-1 ), surface water (4.70.4 mBq l-1 ) and chicken feed (40.1 Bq kg-1 ) relative to selected control sites. These findings suggest a radiation health risk particularly when the samples are ingested, because the internal exposure may give rise to an effective dose exceeding 20 mSv which is the annual limit of intake of natural radionuclides recommended by the ICRP. On the other hand, the radiation dose from ambient air over five years at the phosphate mine ranges from 1375 to 1475 nGy h-1 with an average of 1415 nGy h-1 . The average is about 28 times that of the global average background radiation from terrestrial sources, and about 12 times the allowed average dose limit for public exposure over five consecutive years. Future investigations on the occupancy factor, external dose rate and radon and radon progeny exposure in drinking water, buildings and activity content in the locally grown foodstuffs are proposed, for the realistic quantification of the overall exposure of workers and public at Minjingu, and remedial measures for future radiation safety.

Firmi P Banzi; Leonard D Kifanga; Felician M Bundala

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California, as a near-field natural analog of a radioactive waste repository in salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since high concentrations of radionuclides and high temperatures are not normally encountered in salt domes or beds, finding an exact geologic analog of expected near-field conditions in a mined nuclear waste repository in salt will be difficult. The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, however, provides an opportunity to investigate the migration and retardation of naturally occurring U, Th, Ra, Cs, Sr and other elements in hot brines which have been moving through clay-rich sedimentary rocks for up to 100,000 years. The more than thirty deep wells drilled in this field to produce steam for electrical generation penetrate sedimentary rocks containing concentrated brines where temperatures reach 365/sup 0/C at only 2 km depth. The brines are primarily Na, K, Ca chlorides with up to 25% of total dissolved solids; they also contain high concentrations of metals such as Fe, Mn, Li, Zn, and Pb. This report describes the geology, geophysics and geochemistry of this system as a prelude to a study of the mobility of naturally occurring radionuclides and radionuclide analogs within it. The aim of this study is to provide data to assist in validating quantitative models of repository behavior and to use in designing and evaluating waste packages and engineered barriers. 128 references, 33 figures, 13 tables.

Elders, W.A.; Cohen, L.H.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Estimation of radiation doses associated with natural radioactivity in sand samples of the north western areas of Pakistan using Monte Carlo simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides, i.e., 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, were measured in sand samples of north western areas of Pakistan using gamma-spectrometry. The measured ranges of activity...

Khalid Khan; P. Akhter; S. D. Orfi

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Water quality in the vicinity of Mosquito Creek Lake, Trumbull County, Ohio, in relation of the chemistry of locally occurring oil, natural gas, and brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe current water quality and the chemistry of oil, natural gas, and brine in the Mosquito Creek Lake area. Additionally, these data are used to characterize water quality in the Mosquito Creek Lake area in relation to past oil and natural gas well drilling and production. To meet the overall objective, several goals for this investigation were established. These include (1) collect water-quality and subsurface-gas data from shallow sediments and rock that can be used for future evaluation of possible effects of oil and natural gas well drilling and production on water supplies, (2) characterize current surface-water and ground-water quality as it relates to the natural occurrence and (or) release of oil, gas, and brine (3) sample and chemically characterize the oil in the shallow Mecca Oil Pool, gas from the Berea and Cussewago Sandstone aquifers, and the oil, gas, and brine from the Clinton sandstone, and (4) identify areas where aquifers are vulnerable to contamination from surface spills at oil and natural gas drilling and production sites.

Barton, G.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Ryder, R.T.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Specific Activity Specific Activity Low Specific Activity (LSA) material means Class 7 (radioactive) material with limited specific activity which satisfies the descriptions and limits set forth below. Shielding materials surrounding the LSA material may not be considered in determining the estimated average specific activity of the package contents. LSA material must be in one of three groups: LSA-I (i) Ores containing only naturally occurring radionuclides (e.g., uranium, thorium) and uranium or thorium concentrates of such ores; or (ii) Solid unirradiated natural uranium or depleted uranium or natural thorium or their solid or liquid compounds or mixtures; or (iii) Class 7 (radioactive) material, other than fissile material, for which the A2 value is unlimited; or

94

Radiation and Radon from Natural Stone May 7, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation and Radon from Natural Stone May 7, 2008 W.J. Llope Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 is "radiation" and the other is "radon." Radioactive elements, by their very nature, seek stability by decaying the outside and cause damage to cells and DNA, potentially causing cancer. Also, naturally occurring Uranium

Llope, William J.

95

Naturally Occurring Mutations in the WTI Gene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dominant oncogenes, like myc or ras, confer a gain of func-tion to transformed cells.1,2 Gain-of-function mutations result in abnormal, positive signals for cell proliferation. In general, however, genetic altera...

Max J. Coppes M.D.; Ph.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Geochemical aspects of radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The book addresses various topics related to the geochemistry of waste disposal: natural radioactivity, kinds of radioactive waste, details of possible disposal sites, low-level waste, uranium mill tailing, natural analogs, waste forms, and engineered barriers. Emphasis throughout is on the importance of natural analogs, the behavior of elements resembling those to be put in a waste repository as they occur in natural situations where the temperature, pressure, and movement of ground water are similar to those expected near a repository. The author is convinced that conclusions drawn from the study of analog elements are directly applicable to predictions about radionuclide behavior, and that the observed near-immobility of most of these elements in comparable geologic environments is good evidence that radioactive waste can be disposed of underground with negligible effects on the biosphere. Much of his own research has been in this area, and the best parts of the book are the descriptions of his work on trace elements in the salt minerals at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico, on the movement of radionuclides and their daughter elements from the famous Precambrian reactor at Oklahoma in Gabon, and on the distribution of analog elements in rocks near the contacts of igneous intrusions.

Brookins, D.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Researchers at Montana State University and Idaho National Lab have developed a process to effectively and efficiently clean natural and man-made porous material of radioactive contamination. The system eliminates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to effectively and efficiently clean natural and man-made porous material of radioactive contamination. The system eliminates the practice of full demolition and removal of contaminated objects and can address contaminated substrate. Thus, building walls (interior or exterior), floors and ceilings can be remediated

Maxwell, Bruce D.

98

A preliminary report on the determination of natural radioactivity levels of the State of Qatar using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study is aimed at the determination of the activity concentrations of naturally occuring and technically enhanced levels of radiation in soil samples collected across the landscape of Qatar. Representative soil samples from various locations across the Qatarian peninsula have been collected and analyzed in order to establish activity concentrations associated with the 235,8U and 232Th natural decay chains and also the long-lived naturally occurring radionuclide 40K. The activity concentrations have been measured using a hyper-pure germanium detector. Details of the sample preparation and the gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis techniques are presented, together with the preliminary values of the activity concentrations associated with the naturally occuring radionuclide chains for six soil samples collected from the Qatarian peninsula. Sample 228, which has been collected from an inshore oil-field area, was observed to have the highest observed value of 226Ra concentration among the six samples. The weighted mean values of the activity concentrations of the radionuclides 238U, 232Th and 40K in one particular sample (sample 228) were, respectively, found to be 213.91.4, 4.550.11 and 111.43.6Bq/kg, which compare with the worldwide weighted mean values in soil samples, 33, 45 and 420Bq/kg, respectively. The deduced activity concentration of 238U in sample 228 in the current work was found to be significantly higher than the worldwide average value and was also significantly higher than the values determined for the five other initial samples discussed here. The mean values of the activity concentration of the 232Th series, 40K and 137Cs in Bq/kg from the six investigated soil samples were found to be 9.41.3, 20422 and 5.85.6, respectively, with the quoted uncertainty referring to the standard deviation among these measurements.

H. Al-Sulaiti; P.H. Regan; D.A. Bradley; D. Malain; T. Santawamaitre; A. Habib; M. Matthews; S. Bukhari; M. Al-Dosari

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Organic fluorine in human serum: natural versus industrial sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...highly inadvisable to locate a chemical waste disposal site adjacent to a radioac-tive waste disposal site. Naturally occur-ring organic substances...EPA-52015-761020 (1977). 3. The hydrology of the Maxey Flats site has been described in H. H. Zehner...

J Belisle

1981-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

100

Measurement of natural radioactivity and radon exhalation rate in fly ash samples from a thermal power plant and estimation of radiation doses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fly ash produced by coal-burning in thermal power station has become a subject of world wide interest in recent years because of its diverse uses in construction activities and considerable economic and environmental importance. Fly ash is used in the production of bricks, sheets, cement and also in land filling etc. Indian coals used in thermal power plants are found to have high ash contents, resulting in the production of large amount of fly ash. Coal contains radionuclides including uranium (the source of inert gas radon), Th and K. Thus coal combustion results in enhanced concentration of natural radionuclides 226Ra, 232Th and 40K. Since these radionuclides concentration in fly ash plays an important role in health physics it is important to measure radionuclides concentration in fly ash. In the present work enhanced radioactivity and radon exhalation rate from fly ash samples collected from a thermal power plant of NTPC (National Thermal Power Corporation), Dadri (U.P.) India, have been measured. A high resolution gamma ray spectroscopic system has been used for the measurement of natural radioactivity (226Ra, 232Th and 40K). Gamma spectrometric measurements were carried out at Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi using a coaxial n-type \\{HPGe\\} detector (EG&G, ORTEC, Oak Ridge, USA). Activity concentration of 226Ra varies from 81.82.2 to 177.310.0Bqkg?1 with an average value of 118.67.4Bqkg?1 and of 232Th from 111.63.2 to 178.53.9Bqkg?1 with an average value of 147.03.4Bqkg?1. 40K activity was found to be below detection limit in some samples while other samples have shown potassium activity to vary from 365.94.8 to 495.96.2Bqkg?1 with an average value of 352.04.5Bqkg?1. Surface radon exhalation rates (EA) and Mass exhalation rates (EM) in these samples were measured by Sealed can technique using LR-115 type II track detectors. EA is found to vary from 80.19.3 to 242.716.3mBqm?2h?1 with an average value 155.512.8mBqm?2h?1, while EM varies from 3.10.4 to 9.30.6mBqkg?1h?1 with an average value of 6.00.5mBqkg?1h?1. Radium equivalent activity (Raeq), related to the external gamma dose and internal dose due to radon and its daughters range from 283.2 to 422.4Bqkg?1 with an average value of 353.9Bqkg?1. The calculated values of external hazard index (Hex) vary from 0.77 to 1.87 with an average value of 1.03. Most of the samples show the value of Raeq close to the allowed upper limit of 370Bqkg?1 and Hex close to unity respectively except in two samples. Annual effective dose varies from 0.15 to 0.23mSvy?1 with an average value 0.19mSvy?1.

Mamta Gupta; Ajay Kumar Mahur; Rati Varshney; R.G. Sonkawade; K.D. Verma; Rajendra Prasad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Airborne Observations of Natural Radioactivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... al. on cosmic rays; (2) the results of the direct determination of the radon content of free atmosphere at different altitudes made as early as 1928 by Wigand and ... in a series of airplane measurements:

F. B?HOUNEK

1966-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

102

Summary of Natural Resources that Potentially Influence Human Intrusion at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993, Raytheon Services Nevada completed a review of natural resource literature and other sources to identify potentially exploitable resources and potential future land uses near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, that could lead to future inadvertent human intrusion and subsequent release of radionuclides to the accessible environment. National Security Technologies, LLC, revised the original limited-distribution document to conform to current editorial standards and U.S. Department of Energy requirements for public release. The researchers examined the potential for future development of sand, gravel, mineral, petroleum, water resources, and rural land uses, such as agriculture, grazing, and hunting. The study was part of the performance assessment for Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes. Sand and gravel are not considered exploitable site resources because the materials are common throughout the area and the quality at the Area 5 RWMS is not ideal for typical commercial uses. Site information also indicates a very low mineral potential for the area. None of the 23 mining districts in southern Nye County report occurrences of economic mineral deposits in unconsolidated alluvium. The potential for oil and natural gas is low for southern Nye County. No occurrences of coal, tar sand, or oil shale on the NTS are reported in available literature. Several potential future uses of water were considered. Agricultural irrigation is impractical due to poor soils and existing water supply regulations. Use of water for geothermal energy development is unlikely because temperatures are too low for typical commercial applications using current technology. Human consumption of water has the most potential for cause of intrusion. The economics of future water needs may create a demand for the development of deep carbonate aquifers in the region. However, the Area 5 RWMS is not an optimal location for extraction of groundwater from the deep carbonate aquifer. Grazing and hunting are unlikely to be potential causes for inadvertent human intrusion into waste areas because of vegetation characteristics and lack of significant game animal populations.

NSTec Environmental Management

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

FAQ 5-Is uranium radioactive?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? All isotopes of uranium are radioactive, with most having extremely long half-lives. Half-life is a measure of the time it takes for one half of the atoms of a particular radionuclide to disintegrate (or decay) into another nuclear form. Each radionuclide has a characteristic half-life. Half-lives vary from millionths of a second to billions of years. Because radioactivity is a measure of the rate at which a radionuclide decays (for example, decays per second), the longer the half-life of a radionuclide, the less radioactive it is for a given mass. The half-life of uranium-238 is about 4.5 billion years, uranium-235 about 700 million years, and uranium-234 about 25 thousand years. Uranium atoms decay into other atoms, or radionuclides, that are also radioactive and commonly called "decay products." Uranium and its decay products primarily emit alpha radiation, however, lower levels of both beta and gamma radiation are also emitted. The total activity level of uranium depends on the isotopic composition and processing history. A sample of natural uranium (as mined) is composed of 99.3% uranium-238, 0.7% uranium-235, and a negligible amount of uranium-234 (by weight), as well as a number of radioactive decay products.

104

Radioactive Fallout in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...radiopotassium, radium, and other natural sources of radioactivity...Tex. Amarillo, Tex. *Corpus Christi, Tex. *Dallas, Tex...Kr90, which is an inert gas having a half-life of...dispersion of the radioactive gas radon and its daughter...

Merril Eisenbud; John H. Harley

1955-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

105

Natural  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 2,094,387 2,266,751 2,566,049 2,816,408 2,883,277 Mexico .............................. 0 1,678 7,013 6,722 13,862 Total Pipeline Imports....... 2,094,387 2,268,429 2,573,061 2,823,130 2,897,138 LNG Algeria .............................. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 35,325 United Arab Emirates ....... 0 0 0 0 4,949 Total LNG Imports............. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 40,274 Total Imports......................... 2,137,504 2,350,115 2,623,839 2,841,048 2,937,413 Average Price (dollars per thousand cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 1.84 2.02 1.86 1.48 1.96 Mexico .............................. - 1.94 1.99 1.53 2.25 Total Pipeline Imports.......

106

Photosynthesis: Why Does It Occur?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photosynthesis: Why Does It Occur? ... The text explains why photosynthesis is the opposite of respiration only at the reversible boundary between them. ... Contrary to popular belief, photosynthesis is exothermic at all times. ...

J. J. MacDonald

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

108

Radioactive Material Transportation Practices  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

109

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

external radiation from naturally occurring radioactivity ininternal radiation from naturally occurring radioactiveRemediation Radiation emitted by naturally occurring

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Integrated data base report--1996: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes. Inventories of most of these materials are reported as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1996, which is September 30, 1996. Commercial SNF and commercial uranium mill tailings inventories are reported on an end-of-calendar year (CY) basis. All SNF and radioactive waste data reported are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are SNF, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program contaminated environmental media, naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive material, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through FY 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...being based on firmer information. It also attempts to weigh fusion and fission as they have actually occurred. About 9.4 X...the stratosphere for years, the tritium from high-yield thermonuclear detonations does not, but descends in a matter of 1 or 2...

W. F. Libby

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Measurement of low radioactivity background in a high voltage cable by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The measurement of naturally occurring low level radioactivity background in a high voltage (HV) cable by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR ICP MS) is presented in this work. The measurements were performed at the Chemistry Service of the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. The contributions to the radioactive background coming from the different components of the heterogeneous material were separated. Based on the mass fraction of the cable, the whole contamination was calculated. The HR ICP MS results were cross-checked by gamma ray spectroscopy analysis that was performed at the low background facility STELLA (Sub Terranean Low Level Assay) of the LNGS underground lab using HPGe detectors.

Vacri, M. L. di; Nisi, S.; Balata, M. [Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Chemistry Service, SS 17bis km 18.910, 67100 Assergi (Aq) (Italy)] [Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Chemistry Service, SS 17bis km 18.910, 67100 Assergi (Aq) (Italy)

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

113

Bacteria eats radioactive waste  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bacteria eats radioactive waste Bacteria eats radioactive waste Name: deenaharper Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: In my studies, I have found that everything in this world is balanced. When something dies it is converted into life. Is there anything out there that could convert radioactive material into a harmless substance? Some sort of bacteria that consumes radiation? Replies: The reason why radiation is so harmful is that is produces free radicals in living tissue, that is, it de-stabilizes molecules by tearing off electrons due to intense energies. These free radicals start a chain reaction of destruction, de-stabilizing neighboring molecules. If this continues unchecked, cells die, genetic material are mutated, and tissue aging accelerates. It is somewhat like being burned. Fire oxidizes by a similar free radical reaction. (Hence the term "sun burn.") The natural defenses against free radical reactions in biological systems are antioxidants, which are enzymes, nutrients, and other chemicals, which quench free radical reactions. Without them, life would very quickly cease. To my knowledge, no microorganism has an antioxidant capacity great enough to withstand even minimal exposure to any type of radiation. Microorganisms are actually very susceptible to radiation, which is why heat and gamma irradiation are used to sterilize food, instruments, etc. However, you raise an interesting possibility in that perhaps one can be genetically engineered to have super- antioxidant capacity, but that may be beyond current technology. Plus, if any got loose, given the exponential rate of reproduction, they may become an uncontrollable health hazard, as it would be very difficult to destroy them!

114

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation...

115

GammaSense: Infrastructureless Positioning Using Background Radioactivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce the harvesting of natural background radioactivity for positioning. Using a standard Geiger-Mller counter as sensor, we fingerprint the natural levels of gamma radiation with the aim of then roughly pinpointing the position of a client ...

Doina Bucur; Mikkel Baun Kjrgaard

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Identification of a Naturally Occurring Peroxidase-Lipoxygenase Fusion Protein  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2 M. Hamberg, J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 66, 1445 (1989...sequence was cloned with the Marathon cDNA Amplification...M. Hamberg, J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 66, 1445...sequence was cloned with the Marathon cDNA Amplification kit...

Reet Koljak; Olivier Boutaud; Bih-Hwa Shieh; Nigulas Samel; Alan R. Brash

1997-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

117

Protoporphyrin IX Occurs Naturally in Colorectal Cancers and Their Metastases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...performed using a Spectra Physics solvent delivery system...next 30 min. The flow rate was 1.5 ml/min; injection...GCR 230-50; Spectra-Physics), provided pulsed laser radiation at a rate of 50 pulses per s, tunable...corresponding short wave pass filter. The energy of...

K. Thomas Moesta; Bernd Ebert; Tim Handke; Dirk Nolte; Christian Nowak; Wolfgang E. Haensch; Ravindra K. Pandey; Thomas J. Dougherty; Herbert Rinneberg; and Peter M. Schlag

2001-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

118

Naturally Occurring Melanin Synthesis Regulators and Their Modes of Action  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

St. Louis, MO). Luteolin and fisetin were purchased fromof L-DOPA. In addition, fisetin (3) behaves the same as

Satooka, Hiroki

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Synthetic and Naturally Occurring Hydrazines as Possible Cancer Causative Agents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...brain, lungs, blood vessels, liver, breasts...components of rocket fuels (26); carbamyl hydrazine...Lungs Mice Lungs, blood vessels Mice Lungs Rats Lymphoreticular...Intestine Lungs, blood vessels MiceLungsp.o.39MiceLungs...States A . bisporus consumption (production plus imports...

Bela Toth

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Going Wild: Lessons from Naturally Occurring T-Lymphotropic Lentiviruses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...epidemiologic and clinical studies performed thus...develop experimental systems to evaluate mechanisms...this experimental system, the profile of...while limited studies have been conducted...the human immune system. Furthermore, studies of the cytokine...

Sue VandeWoude; Cristian Apetrei

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Naturally Occurring Alpha-Activity of Drinking Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... whether the observed values applied to radium-226 or also included gaseous products such as radon-222, known to exist in certain waters at considerably higher levels of activity than ... of 71 drinking waters available in Britain, and in addition we report the values for radon-222 and radium-224 (thorium X) when present.

R. C. TURNER; J. M. RADLEY; W. V. MAYNEORD

1961-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

122

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

123

Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2008. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2007. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

125

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid frequently and change them if contaminated. 5. Use radioactive waste container to collect the waste. 6. Check

Jia, Songtao

126

Natural radionuclides in the rocks of the Valle del Cervo Pluton in Piedmont  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......experimental tool in studying natural radioactivity and determining...accurately determine the natural radioactivity in quarries...exhalation rate of radon gas has been determined to...G. and Vecchi, R. Natural Radioactivity and Radon...radioactive samples from Cyprus characteristic geological......

Lucia Sesana; Marco Fumagalli; Mauro Carnevale; Giancarla Polla; Ugo Facchini; Annita Colombo; Annalisa Tunesi; Luisa De Capitani; Rosella Rusconi

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Radioactivity in Products Derived from Gypsum in Tanzania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Dosimetry Article Radioactivity in Products Derived from Gypsum in Tanzania P. Msaki F.P. Banzi Scientific investigations have long...products suspected to have natural radioactivity radiation risk in Tanzania. In response to the concern expressed by the users of chalk......

P. Msaki; F.P. Banzi

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

When are they used? How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record A radioactive material (RAM) packaging is a container that is used to safely transport radioactive material from one location to another. In RAM transportation the container alone is called the Packaging. The packaging together with its contents is called the Package. Basic types of radioactive material packagings are: Excepted Packaging Industrial Packaging Type A Packaging Type B Packaging [EXCEPTED] Click to view picture [IP] Click to view picture [TYPE A] Click to view picture [TYPE B] Click to view picture Excepted Packagings are designed to survive normal conditions of transport. Excepted packagings are used for transportation of materials that are either Low Specific Activity (LSA) or Surface Contaminated Objects (SCO) and that are limited quantity shipments, instruments or articles, articles manufactured from natural or depleted uranium or natural thorium; empty packagings are also excepted (49CFR 173.421-428).

129

Distribution of Radioactive Materials in the Absheron Peninsula, Azerbaijan - 13567  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Absheron Peninsula forms the extreme Eastern part of Azerbaijan and juts into the Caspian Sea. The region has a long history of oil and gas exploration, transport, and processing and includes a number of abandoned chemical plants that were used in the separation of iodine from formation waters. As a result of lax environmental standards during the Soviet era, the industrial activity has led to serious contamination from oils residues, heavy metals and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). Radiometric surveys performed over a wide range of the Absheron Peninsula showed generally low NORM concentrations. However, radiation levels two to three orders of magnitude above background levels were detected at two abandoned iodine separation plants near the capital city, Baku. These elevated radiation levels are mainly due to Ra-226 and U-238 with lower contributions from Ra-228 and U-235. (authors)

Vandergraaf, Tjalle T. [Consultant, Pinawa, MB, R0E 1L0 (Canada)] [Consultant, Pinawa, MB, R0E 1L0 (Canada); Mamedov, Gudrat G.; Ramazanov, Mahammadali A.; Badalov, Vatan H. [Baku State University, Baku (Azerbaijan)] [Baku State University, Baku (Azerbaijan); Naghiyev, Jalal A. [Institute of Radiation Problems of ANAS, Baku (Azerbaijan)] [Institute of Radiation Problems of ANAS, Baku (Azerbaijan); Mehdiyeva, Afat A. [National Aerospace Agency of Ministry of Defense Industry, Baku (Azerbaijan)] [National Aerospace Agency of Ministry of Defense Industry, Baku (Azerbaijan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Determination of Dose from the Disposal of Radioactive Waste Related with TENORM using Residual Radioactivity (RESRAD) Monte Carlo Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The working procedures in the RESRAD for specific evaluations of environmental pollutants are briefly mentioned. The risk of human health associated with Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) who are working in the Malaysian oil and gas industry are analyzed. The sources of NORM and Technologically Enhanced NORM (TENORM) in the oil and gas industry are described. Some measurements for the external and internal effective dose equivalent on the workers will be described. These data are entered into the RESRAD software program and the output reports are taken. Long-term effects of TENORM to the industrial workers are also discussed with graphical illustrations. These results are compared with previous research work within the same field to validate and verify.

Lwin, Maung Tin Moe; Kassim, Hassan Abu; Amin, Yusoff Mohd. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lampur (Malaysia)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Progress in Iraq - 13216  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management of Iraq's radioactive wastes and decommissioning of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are the responsibility of Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST). The majority of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are in the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located a few kilometers from the edge of Baghdad. These facilities include bombed and partially destroyed research reactors, a fuel fabrication facility and radioisotope production facilities. Within these facilities are large numbers of silos, approximately 30 process or waste storage tanks and thousands of drums of uncharacterised radioactive waste. There are also former nuclear facilities/sites that are outside of Al-Tuwaitha and these include the former uranium processing and waste storage facility at Jesira, the dump site near Adaya, the former centrifuge facility at Rashdiya and the former enrichment plant at Tarmiya. In 2005, Iraq lacked the infrastructure needed to decommission its nuclear facilities and manage its radioactive wastes. The lack of infrastructure included: (1) the lack of an organization responsible for decommissioning and radioactive waste management, (2) the lack of a storage facility for radioactive wastes, (3) the lack of professionals with experience in decommissioning and modern waste management practices, (4) the lack of laws and regulations governing decommissioning or radioactive waste management, (5) ongoing security concerns, and (6) limited availability of electricity and internet. Since its creation eight years ago, the MoST has worked with the international community and developed an organizational structure, trained staff, and made great progress in managing radioactive wastes and decommissioning Iraq's former nuclear facilities. This progress has been made, despite the very difficult implementing conditions in Iraq. Within MoST, the Radioactive Waste Treatment and Management Directorate (RWTMD) is responsible for waste management and the Iraqi Decommissioning Directorate (IDD) is responsible for decommissioning activities. The IDD and the RWTMD work together on decommissioning projects. The IDD has developed plans and has completed decommissioning of the GeoPilot Facility in Baghdad and the Active Metallurgical Testing Laboratory (LAMA) in Al-Tuwaitha. Given this experience, the IDD has initiated work on more dangerous facilities. Plans are being developed to characterize, decontaminate and decommission the Tamuz II Research Reactor. The Tammuz Reactor was destroyed by an Israeli air-strike in 1981 and the Tammuz II Reactor was destroyed during the First Gulf War in 1991. In addition to being responsible for managing the decommissioning wastes, the RWTMD is responsible for more than 950 disused sealed radioactive sources, contaminated debris from the first Gulf War and (approximately 900 tons) of naturally-occurring radioactive materials wastes from oil production in Iraq. The RWTMD has trained staff, rehabilitated the Building 39 Radioactive Waste Storage building, rehabilitated portions of the French-built Radioactive Waste Treatment Station, organized and secured thousands of drums of radioactive waste organized and secured the stores of disused sealed radioactive sources. Currently, the IDD and the RWTMD are finalizing plans for the decommissioning of the Tammuz II Research Reactor. (authors)

Al-Musawi, Fouad; Shamsaldin, Emad S.; Jasim, Hadi [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq)] [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq); Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Radioactive residues associated with water treatment, use and disposal in Australia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Water resources are known to contain radioactive materials, either from natural or anthropogenic sources. Treatment, including wastewater treatment, of water for drinking, domestic, agricultural and (more)

Kleinschmidt, Ross Ivan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Indirect Estimation of Radioactivity in Containerized Cargo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detecting illicit nuclear and radiological material in containerized cargo challenges the state of the art in detection systems. Current systems are being evaluated and new systems envisioned to address the need for the high probability of detection and extremely low false alarm rates necessary to thwart potential threats and extremely low nuisance and false alarm rates while maintaining necessary to maintain the flow of commerce impacted by the enormous volume of commodities imported in shipping containers. Maintaining flow of commerce also means that primary inspection must be rapid, requiring relatively indirect measurements of cargo from outside the containers. With increasing information content in such indirect measurements, it is natural to ask how the information might be combined to improved detection. Toward this end, we present an approach to estimating isotopic activity of naturally occurring radioactive material in cargo grouped by commodity type, combining container manifest data with radiography and gamma spectroscopy aligned to location along the container. The heart of this approach is our statistical model of gamma counts within peak regions of interest, which captures the effects of background suppression, counting noise, convolution of neighboring cargo contributions, and down-scattered photons to provide physically constrained estimates of counts due to decay of specific radioisotopes in cargo alone. Coupled to that model, we use a mechanistic model of self-attenuated radiation flux to estimate the isotopic activity within cargo, segmented by location within each container, that produces those counts. We demonstrate our approach by applying it to a set of measurements taken at the Port of Seattle in 2006. This approach to synthesizing disparate available data streams and extraction of cargo characteristics holds the potential to improve primary inspection using current detection capabilities and to enable simulation-based evaluation of new candidate detection systems.

Jarman, Kenneth D.; Scherrer, Chad; Smith, Eric L.; Chilton, Lawrence; Anderson, K. K.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Trease, Lynn L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

136

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - annually occurring aerosol Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Radiative Transfer Encyclopedia of Atmospheric Science Summary: system. Naturally occurring aerosols reflect some of the incident solar radiation back to space before... in...

138

Public involvement in radioactive waste management decisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current repository siting efforts focus on Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is conducting exploratory studies to determine if the site is suitable. The state of Nevada has resisted these efforts: it has denied permits, brought suit against DOE, and publicly denounced the federal government`s decision to study Yucca Mountain. The state`s opposition reflects public opinion in Nevada, and has considerably slowed DOE`s progress in studying the site. The Yucca Mountain controversy demonstrates the importance of understanding public attitudes and their potential influence as DOE develops a program to manage radioactive waste. The strength and nature of Nevada`s opposition -- its ability to thwart if not outright derail DOE`s activities -- indicate a need to develop alternative methods for making decisions that affect the public. This report analyzes public participation as a key component of this openness, one that provides a means of garnering acceptance of, or reducing public opposition to, DOE`s radioactive waste management activities, including facility siting and transportation. The first section, Public Perceptions: Attitudes, Trust, and Theory, reviews the risk-perception literature to identify how the public perceives the risks associated with radioactivity. DOE and the Public discusses DOE`s low level of credibility among the general public as the product, in part, of the department`s past actions. This section looks at the three components of the radioactive waste management program -- disposal, storage, and transportation -- and the different ways DOE has approached the problem of public confidence in each case. Midwestern Radioactive Waste Management Histories focuses on selected Midwestern facility-siting and transportation activities involving radioactive materials.

NONE

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Radioactivity in food crops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Container for radioactive materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

Fields, S.R.

1984-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

external radiation from naturally occurring radioactivity ininternal radiation from naturally occurring radioactiveradiation Radiation emitted by naturally occurring

Lackner, Regina E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Notice extends DOE N 5400.9, Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability, of 12-24-91, until 12-24-95, unless sooner superseded or rescinded. The contents of DOE N 5400.9 will be updated and incorporated in the revised DOE O 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers.

1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

144

Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) interim policy and to provide guidance for sealed radioactive source accountability. The directive does not cancel any directives. Extended by DOE N 5400.10 to 12-24-93 & Extended by DOE N 5400.12 to 12-24-94.

1991-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

145

Vacuuming radioactive sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vacuuming an estimated 55 cubic yards of radioactive sludge from the floor of Hanford's K East Basin was a complicated process. Workers stood on grates suspended above the 20-foot deep basin and manipulated vacuuming equipment at the end of long poles--using underwater cameras to guide their work.

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

146

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The objective of this Order is to ensure that all Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste is managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety and the environment. Cancels DOE O 5820.2A

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

147

Distinguishing Between Site Waste, Natural, and Other Sources of Contamination at Uranium and Thorium Contaminated Sites - 12274  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium and thorium processing and milling sites generate wastes (source, byproduct, or technically enhanced naturally occurring material), that contain contaminants that are similar to naturally occurring radioactive material deposits and other industry wastes. This can lead to mis-identification of other materials as Site wastes. A review of methods used by the US Army Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Protection Agency to distinguish Site wastes from potential other sources, enhanced materials, and natural deposits, at three different thorium mills was conducted. Real case examples demonstrate the importance of understanding the methods of distinguishing wastes. Distinguishing between Site wastes and enhanced Background material can be facilitated by establishing and applying a formal process. Significant project cost avoidance may be realized by distinguishing Site wastes from enhanced NORM. Collection of information on other potential sources of radioactive material and physical information related to the potential for other radioactive material sources should be gathered and reported in the Historical Site Assessment. At a minimum, locations of other such information should be recorded. Site decision makers should approach each Site area with the expectation that non site related radioactive material may be present and have a process in place to distinguish from Site and non Site related materials. (authors)

Hays, David C. [United States Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City, Missouri, 64106 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Finding Aids: Radioactive Fallout  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Guide to Archival Collections Relating to Radioactive Fallout from Nuclear Weapon Testing A Guide to Archival Collections Relating to Radioactive Fallout from Nuclear Weapon Testing Table of Contents INTRODUCTION Argonne National Laboratory Bancroft Library, University of California Boeing Aircraft Company Brookhaven National Laboratory Coordination and Information Center (CIC) Eastman Kodak EG&G, Energy Measurements Holmes and Narver Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Manuscript Division, Library of Congress National Academy of Sciences Archives Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest Laboratory Sandia National Laboratories Scripps Institution of Oceanography Archives Smithsonian Institution Archives U.S. Air Force Brooks Air Force Base Kirtland Air Force Base USAF Historical Research Center U.S. Army Chemical Corps (Aberdeen Proving Ground)

149

Radioactive ion detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity. 2 figs.

Bower, K.E.; Weeks, D.R.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

150

Radioactive ion detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity.

Bower, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM); Weeks, Donald R. (Saratoga, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

22 - Radioactive waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the disposal of radioactive wastes that arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, beneficial uses of isotopes, and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. The spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. It is anticipated that a multi-barrier system involving packaging and geologic media will provide protection of the public over the centuries. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In some countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is done by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Developing a Methodology for Characterizing the Effects of Building Materials Natural Radiation Background on a Radiation Portal Monitoring System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the sponsors of this research, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). vi NOMENCLATURE EW Energy Windowing FWHM Full-Width at Half Maximum HEU Highly Enriched Uranium HPGe High-Purity Germanium ISOCS In-Situ Object Counting System MCA Multichannel... Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material ? Diameter ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory PMT Photomultiplier Tube PNNL Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PVT Polyvinyl Toluene RDD Radiological Dispersal Device vii RPM Radiation Portal Monitor...

Fitzmaurice, Matthew Blake 1988-

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

154

EXPLOSIONS CAUSED BY COMMONLY OCCURRING SUBSTANCES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the nature of the operations is such that these explosions...that the limit of a safe oil as fixed by the 'flashing...ignition was found in the boiler fires, which were 60...in this report to the fundamental dis-tinctions between...a fire under a steam boiler, and that this vapor...

Charles E. Munroe

1899-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

Radioactive ''hot spots'' from nuclear weapons test fallout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a paper presented on January 8, 1985, at the Health Physics Society Midyear Symposium, Franke and Alvarez claimed that radioactivity observed on the Savannah River Plant site on March 14, 1955, was the result of a reactor accident. The source of the observed radioactivity was, in fact, rainwater containing radioactive products from a nuclear weapon test made two days earlier in Nevada. The weapon test TEAPOT HORNET was shown to be the source of the contamination at the time, and this has been corroborated in two recent papers. The aim of this review is to show that the highly-localized radioactive fallout on the Savannah River Plant site was not unique but part of a widespread phenomenon occurring all over the United States in the 1950s and early 1960s. 18 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

Sanders, S.M.

1985-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

156

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT Annual Financial Report Years Ended September 30, 2009 and 2008 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT Annual Financial Report Years Ended September 30, 2009 and 2008 As required by Section 304(c) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, as amended, Public Law 97-425, the following document is the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Annual Financial Report for the years ended September 30, 2009 and 2008 as required by Section 302(c)(l) ofNWPA. The information in this report is current only as of September 30, 2009, and does not reflect actions or changes that have occurred since then.

157

Questions and Answers - How does the radioactivity of an atom affect the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How is radioactivity measured? How is radioactivity measured? Previous Question (How is radioactivity measured?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Why do we use radioactivity to destroy cancers?) Why do we use radioactivityto destroy cancers? How does the radioactivity of an atom affect the body? You've asked a very broad question, so we'll have to split it up into smaller chunks in order to give you a reasonable answer. This is a topic that is very much misunderstood by most people and it's hard to give a short answer. You may know that all of us have radioactive material in our bodies naturally. There has always been radioactive material on earth (in fact, a million years ago, there was more present than there is today), and people have therefore always been exposed to it. There has also always been cosmic

158

The Uncertainty of Dosimetry of Radioactive and Non-Radiactive Aerosols  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Uncertainty of Dosimetry of Radioactive and Non-Radiactive Aerosols The Uncertainty of Dosimetry of Radioactive and Non-Radiactive Aerosols Speaker(s): Lev Ruzer Date: September 27, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Faulkner Radioactive aerosols are a substantial risk factor in radiation safety in the atomic industry, mining industry, nuclear warhead depository and nuclear waste storage, as well as the natural radioactivity in houses. Assessment of the exposure, dose and health effect is very important for workers and the general population. In the last 5-10 years the problem of dosimetry of non-radioactive aerosols has become a "hot" topic in environmental health science with emphasis on submicron and even nanometer-sized particles. Both radioactive and non-radioactive aerosols

159

Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

1999-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

160

Nipah virus entry can occur by macropinocytosis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nipah virus (NiV) is a zoonotic biosafety level 4 paramyxovirus that emerged recently in Asia with high mortality in man. NiV is a member, with Hendra virus (HeV), of the Henipavirus genus in the Paramyxoviridae family. Although NiV entry, like that of other paramyxoviruses, is believed to occur via pH-independent fusion with the host cell's plasma membrane we present evidence that entry can occur by an endocytic pathway. The NiV receptor ephrinB2 has receptor kinase activity and we find that ephrinB2's cytoplasmic domain is required for entry but is dispensable for post-entry viral spread. The mutation of a single tyrosine residue (Y304F) in ephrinB2's cytoplasmic tail abrogates NiV entry. Moreover, our results show that NiV entry is inhibited by constructions and drugs specific for the endocytic pathway of macropinocytosis. Our findings could potentially permit the rapid development of novel low-cost antiviral treatments not only for NiV but also HeV.

Pernet, Olivier; Pohl, Christine; Ainouze, Michelle; Kweder, Hasan [Molecular Basis of Paramyxovirus Entry, INSERM U758 Virologie Humaine IFR 128 BioSciences Gerland-Lyon Sud, 21 Avenue Tony Garnier, 69365 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); Buckland, Robin, E-mail: robin.buckland@inserm.f [Molecular Basis of Paramyxovirus Entry, INSERM U758 Virologie Humaine IFR 128 BioSciences Gerland-Lyon Sud, 21 Avenue Tony Garnier, 69365 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

162

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS SENSORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Providing technical means to detect, prevent, and reverse the threat of potential illicit use of radiological or nuclear materials is among the greatest challenges facing contemporary science and technology. In this short article, we provide brief description and overview of the state-of-the-art in sensor development for the detection of radioactive materials, as well as an identification of the technical needs and challenges faced by the detection community. We begin with a discussion of gamma-ray and neutron detectors and spectrometers, followed by a description of imaging sensors, active interrogation, and materials development, before closing with a brief discussion of the unique challenges posed in fielding sensor systems.

Mayo, Robert M.; Stephens, Daniel L.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Radioactivity levels in some sediment samples from Red Sea and Baltic Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Natural radioactivity in sand used in thermal therapy at the Red Sea coast. Environ...and surface sediments of the Red Sea, Sudan. Environ. Radioact. (2008) 99:1825-1828...in the Red Sea coastal Environment of Sudan. Marine Pollut. Bull. (1998b) 36......

K. Salahel Din; P. Vesterbacka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Radiation Awareness TrainingRadiation Awareness Training Radioactive Material &Radioactive Material &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quarterly · Radioactive waste retrieval, storage, disposal · Dosimetry exchange · Leak tests of sealedRadiation Awareness TrainingRadiation Awareness Training Radioactive Material &Radioactive Material, Chemistry, Physics, Applied Physiology · Radioactive Material ­ Sealed Sources, Unsealed Sources (liquid

Sherrill, David

166

RSSC RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL 08/2011 7-1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RSSC RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL 08/2011 7-1 CHAPTER 7 RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL PAGE I. Radioactive Waste Disposal ............................................................................................ 7-2 II. Radiation Control Technique #2 Instructions for Preparation of Radioactive Waste

Slatton, Clint

167

Natural radiation environment III. [Lead Abstract  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. (KRM)

Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M. (eds.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

How low-energy fusion can occur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fusion of two deuterons of room temperature energy is discussed. The nuclei are in vacuum with no connection to any external source (electric or magnetic field, illumination, surrounding matter, traps, etc.) which may accelerate them. The energy of two nuclei is conserved and remains small during the motion through the Coulomb barrier. The penetration through this barrier, which is the main obstacle for low-energy fusion, strongly depends on a form of the incident flux on the Coulomb center at large distances from it. In contrast to the usual scattering, the incident wave is not a single plane wave but the certain superposition of plane waves of the same energy and various directions, for example, a convergent conical wave. The wave function close to the Coulomb center is determined by a cusp caustic which is probed by de Broglie waves. The particle flux gets away from the cusp and moves to the Coulomb center providing a not small probability of fusion (cusp driven tunneling). Getting away from a caustic cusp also occurs in optics and acoustics.

B. Ivlev

2012-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

169

Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual establishes standard transportation practices for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials and waste. The revision reflects ongoing collaboration of DOE and outside organizations on the transportation of radioactive material and waste. Cancels DOE M 460.2-1.

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

170

Radioactive waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

1985-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document This document specifies the top-level...

173

Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review The main goal of this complex-wide review was to obtain feedback from DOE sites...

174

United States Office of Radiation & EPA 402-R-99-002 Environmental Protection Indoor Air (6602J) October 1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) October 1999 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive NATURALLY OCCURRING RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS #12;#12;TECHNICAL REPORT ON TECHNOLOGICALLY ENHANCED NATURALLY as a compilation of existing data on technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM

175

5 - Fukushima Radioactivity Impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Huge amounts of radioactivity have been released to the environment because of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident. In order to implement adequate protective actions and to assess the impact of the Fukushima radioactivity on the environment, an environmental monitoring has been conducted by national and local governments, research institutes and universities in Japan and over the world. The environmental monitoring revealed that heavy radioactivity-contaminated areas appeared within about 50 km of the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP, controlled by land topography as do meteorological factors. The Fukushima-derived radionuclides, in which dominant nuclides were 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs, contaminated food stuffs. The radionuclide levels exceeded the regulation values in a part of food stuffs produced within about 500 km off Fukushima. Based on the comprehensive monitoring data, we describe here levels of the Fukushima-derived radionuclides in terrestrial and marine environments and in food products in Japan and over the globe. Temporal and spatial distributions of Fukushima-derived radionuclides in aerosols revealed the presence of two dominant radionuclide maxima which were observed throughout the Europe with decreasing amplitudes from the North to the South, which were associated with different air masses present in the European air. Modeled forward and backward trajectories indicated a preferential transport of air masses between Fukushima and Europe at 500 hPa (5000 m a. s. l.) air heights. The Lagrangian dispersion modeling showed that the horizontal dispersion in the Europe reached about 4000-km-wide belt, however, the entire world has been labeled with the Fukushima radionuclides, although at very low levels. A typical travel time between Fukushima and Europe has been estimated to be of 1015 days, with an average speed of the plume of 5070 km/h. An average 131I concentration, which was measured over the Europe (?1 mBq/m3), would result in the total amount of dispersed 131I of about 1 PBq. Although this represents a high release rate (almost 1% of the total amount of 131I released from the Fukushima NPP), as it was distributed over a huge area, it has not been of any radiological significance for European citizens. 134Cs and 137Cs were released to the North Pacific Ocean by two major likely pathways, direct discharge from the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP site and atmospheric deposition off Honshu Islands of Japan, east and northeast of the site. High-density observations of 134Cs and 137Cs in the surface water were carried out by 17 cruises of cargo ships and several research-vessel cruises since March 2011 till March 2012. Main body of radioactive surface plume whose activity exceeded 10 Bq/m3 had been traveling along 40 N, and reached International Date Line on March 2012, 1 year after the accident. A zonal speed of the radioactive plume was estimated to be about 8 cm/s which was consistent with the zonal speed derived by Argo floats and satellite observations at the region. The dispersion of Fukushima-derived 137Cs in surface seawater of the North Pacific Ocean was carried out using an ocean global circulation model. The traveling time from the Fukushima coast to the US west coast was estimated to be 45 years, and the predicted 137Cs levels will reach ?3 Bq/m3, which are by about a factor of three higher than the present global fallout background levels. After 10 years, the 137Cs in the North Pacific Ocean will not be distinguishable over the global fallout background of 1 Bq/m3. The maximum predicted 137Cs activity concentrations in 2012 in the open western North Pacific Ocean will be around 20 Bq/m3, which will be comparable to that observed during the early 1960s after atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. However, after 10 years this concentration will be similar to that from global fallout. The open Pacific Ocean radionuclide concentrations will not pose therefore any radiation risk to the world population from consumption of seafood collected in this region.

Pavel P. Povinec; Katsumi Hirose; Michio Aoyama

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Radioactive Kr Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A radioactive isotope of 1.1-hour half-life has been produced in krypton by alpha-particle bombardment of Se74, enriched electromagnetically from 0.9 percent to 14.1 percent. Assignment of the isotope is made to Kr77. Aluminum absorption measurements indicate a positron end point of 1.7 Mev. In addition to annihilation radiation, gamma-rays and K-capture have been observed. The ratio of K-capture to positron emission from the Se74(?,n) reaction is computed as 2.6. The krypton 1.42-day isotope has been produced by an ?,n reaction on electromagnetically enriched Se76. The isotope is located as Kr79 and its half-life confirmed. A positron end point of 1.0 Mev is determined by aluminum absorption measurements. In addition to annihilation radiation, gamma-rays and K-capture have been observed. The ratio of K-capture to positron emission from the Se76(?,n) reaction is computed to be 50. The cross-section ratio for formation of Kr77 compared to Kr79 by alpha-particle bombardment of selenium is computed as 1.4. The 4.6-hour Kr85 isotope has been produced by a Se(?,n) reaction.

L. L. Woodward; D. A. Mccown; M. L. Pool

1948-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Risk Due to Radiological Terror Attacks With Natural Radionuclides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The naturally occurring radionuclides radium (Ra?226) and polonium (Po?210) have the potential to be used for criminal acts. Analysis of international incident data contained in the Database on Nuclear Smuggling Theft and Orphan Radiation Sources (CSTO) operated at the University of Salzburg shows that several acts of murder and terrorism with natural radionuclides have already been carried out in Europe and Russia. Five different modes of attack (T) are possible: (1) Covert irradiation of an individual in order to deliver a high individual dose; (2) Covert irradiation of a group of persons delivering a large collective dose; (3) Contamination of food or drink; (4) Generation of radioactive aerosols or solutions; (5) Combination of Ra?226 with conventional explosives (Dirty Bomb).

Steinhusler Friedrich; Rydell Stan; Zaitseva Lyudmila

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The largest radioactive waste glassification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

largest radioactive waste glassification largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the nation, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for treating liquid nuclear waste. By immobilizing the radioactivity in glass, the DWPF reduces the risks associated with the continued storage of liquid nuclear waste at SRS and prepares the waste for final disposal in a federal repository. About 38 million gallons of liquid nuclear wastes are now stored in 49 underground carbon-steel tanks at SRS. This waste has about 300 million curies of radioactivity, of which the vast majority

179

Radioactive waste material melter apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another.

Newman, Darrell F. (Richland, WA); Ross, Wayne A. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Radioactivity of the Cooling Water  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

The most important source of radioactivity at the exit manifold of the pile will be due to O{sup 19}, formed by neutron absorption of O{sup 18}. A recent measurement of Fermi and Weil permits to estimate that it will be safe to stay about 80 minutes daily close to the exit manifolds without any shield. Estimates are given for the radioactivities from other sources both in the neighborhood and farther away from the pile.

Wigner, E. P.

1943-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Radioactivity concentrations and dose assessment for soil samples from Kestanbol granite area, Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......digital environmental radiation dosemeter which contains...measured in Kestanbol from naturally occurring radioisotopes...study. The decay of naturally occuring radionuclides in soil produces a gamma-beta radiation fields in soil that......

B. Merdanoglu; N. Altinsoy

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Storage depot for radioactive material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Vertical drilling of cylindrical holes in the soil, and the lining of such holes, provides storage vaults called caissons. A guarded depot is provided with a plurality of such caissons covered by shielded closures preventing radiation from penetrating through any linear gap to the atmosphere. The heat generated by the radioactive material is dissipated through the vertical liner of the well into the adjacent soil and thus to the ground surface so that most of the heat from the radioactive material is dissipated into the atmosphere in a manner involving no significant amount of biologically harmful radiation. The passive cooling of the radioactive material without reliance upon pumps, personnel, or other factor which might fail, constitutes one of the most advantageous features of this system. Moreover this system is resistant to damage from tornadoes or earthquakes. Hermetically sealed containers of radioactive material may be positioned in the caissons. Loading vehicles can travel throughout the depot to permit great flexibility of loading and unloading radioactive materials. Radioactive material can be shifted to a more closely spaced caisson after ageing sufficiently to generate much less heat. The quantity of material stored in a caisson is restricted by the average capacity for heat dissipation of the soil adjacent such caisson.

Szulinski, Milton J. (Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Discharges in 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents radioactive discharges from the TA50 Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facilities (RLWTF) during calendar 2011. During 2011, three pathways were available for the discharge of treated water to the environment: discharge as water through NPDES Outfall 051 into Mortandad Canyon, evaporation via the TA50 cooling towers, and evaporation using the newly-installed natural-gas effluent evaporator at TA50. Only one of these pathways was used; all treated water (3,352,890 liters) was fed to the effluent evaporator. The quality of treated water was established by collecting a weekly grab sample of water being fed to the effluent evaporator. Forty weekly samples were collected; each was analyzed for gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Weekly samples were also composited at the end of each month. These flow-weighted composite samples were then analyzed for 37 radioisotopes: nine alpha-emitting isotopes, 27 beta emitters, and tritium. These monthly analyses were used to estimate the radioactive content of treated water fed to the effluent evaporator. Table 1 summarizes this information. The concentrations and quantities of radioactivity in Table 1 are for treated water fed to the evaporator. Amounts of radioactivity discharged to the environment through the evaporator stack were likely smaller since only entrained materials would exit via the evaporator stack.

Del Signore, John C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

Natural Toxicants in Foods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of exploring the potential naturally occurring toxic hazards of food plants is not to suggest an irrational avoidance of these common foods. However, it is important to identify, define, and invest...

Ross C. Beier; Herbert N. Nigg

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

1994 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report for calendar year 1994 summarizes the progress that states and compact regions made during the year in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Although events that have occurred in 1995 greatly alter the perspective in terms of storage versus disposal, the purpose of this report is to convey the concerns as evidenced during calendar year 1994. Significant developments occurring in 1995 are briefly outlined in the transmittal letter and will be detailed in the report for calendar year 1995. The report also provides summary information on the volume of low-level radioactive waste received for disposal in 1994 by commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities, and is prepared is in response to Section 7(b) of Title I of Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Descriptions of selected accidents that have occurred at nuclear reactor facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared at the request of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island to provide the members of the Commission with some insight into the nature and significance of accidents that have occurred at nuclear reactor facilities in the past. Toward that end, this report presents a brief description of 44 accidents which have occurred throughout the world and which meet at least one of the severity criteria that were established.

Bertini, H.W.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Radioactive Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The radioactive material must then be placed in inner packages that will prevent radioactive contamination during transportation. Dispersible radioactive material must be...

188

DOE Comments on Radioactive Waste | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on Radioactive Waste DOE Comments on Radioactive Waste 1. Summary Comments on Draft Branch Technical Position on a Performance Assessment Methodology for Low-Level Radioactive...

189

Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda Northeast High-Level Radioactive...

190

Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish U.S. Department of Energy requirements for inventory reporting, transaction reporting, verification of reporting, and assign responsibilities for reporting of radioactive sealed sources. DOE N 251.86 extends this notice until 5-6-11. No cancellations. Canceled by DOE O 231.1B

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

191

Chapter 22 - Radioactive Waste Disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses safe disposal of radioactive waste in order to provide safety to workers and the public. Radioactive wastes arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, and from beneficial uses of isotopes and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. In the United States spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. A multi-barrier system involving packaging and geological media will provide protection of the public over the centuries the waste must be isolated. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In other countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes (LLWs) come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Establishment of regional disposal sites by interstate compacts has generally been unsuccessful in the United States. Decontamination of defense sites will be long and costly. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Radioactive waste at Ward Valley  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Data Base for 1992: U.S. Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Inventories, Projections and Characteristics, publi. DOE/RW-0006, Rev. 8 (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC, 1989), p. 113. 2. T. Taylor, quoted by S. Salesky...

Earl Budin

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

193

Nanomechanical properties of bird feather rachises: exploring naturally occurring fibre reinforced laminar composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rachis) must resist these stresses and is fundamental to this mode of locomotion. Relatively...Avian anatomy: integument (Agricultural handbook 362). Lansing, MI: United States...1999 Polymeric matrix composites. In Handbook of materials selection for engineering...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

NMR SPECTROSCOPY OF NATURALLY OCCURRING SURFACE-ADSORBED FLUORIDE ON GEORGIA KAOLINITE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reaction vessel and N2 atmosphere to exclude CO2. The...determined by direct-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry...operating at 470.18 MHz for 19F and 130.23 MHz for 27Al. Samples were...Data acquired at 470 MHz, 20 kHz spinning rate...

Stacey G. Cochiara; Brian L. Phillips

195

NMR SPECTROSCOPY OF NATURALLY OCCURRING SURFACE-ADSORBED FLUORIDE ON GEORGIA KAOLINITE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...high concentration, large fluoride concentrations...measured surface area of the 2 mum fraction...reaction vessel and N2 atmosphere to exclude CO2...direct-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry...BET-measured surface area of the particles...operating at 470.18 MHz for 19F and 130...

Stacey G. Cochiara; Brian L. Phillips

196

Occupational exposure due to naturally occurring radionuclide material in granite quarry industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......resolution of about 8 % at the energy of 0.662 MeV of 137Cs. The equipment was calibrated against reference source from Rocketdyne Laboratories (CA). The following gamma transitions were used: 40K, 1.461 MeV; 226Ra, 1.760 MeV (214Bi) and 232Th......

J. A. Ademola

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The Cognitive Effects of Naturally Occurring Domoic Acid Toxicosis in Wild California Sea Lions (Zalophus Californianus)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

allocentric combine. TRENDS in Cognitive Sciences, 10, 551in the motivational and cognitive control of behavior.deficits but normal cognitive behavior despite widespread

Cook, Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

. Liquid or solid particles suspended in the air . Some occur naturally, originating from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling may partially offset global warming due to CO2, etc. #12;. Alter warm, ice and mixed-phase cloud) . Aerosols produce more vivid sunsets . We are not sure whether aerosols are overall warming or cooling by underlying Earth surface albedo . Although reduction in sunlight reaching ground produces net cooling

McCready, Mark J.

199

DISTRIBUTION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING RADIONUCLIDES (U, Th) IN TIMAHDIT'S BLACK SHALE (MOROCCO)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focused on the use of Moroccan's black oil shales as the raw materials for production of a new type, 1991). These adsorbents were produced from oil shale, which is abundant in Morocco. The choice

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

200

Vitamin B12 Production and Depletion in a Naturally Occurring Eutrophic Lake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cultures isolated from Upper Klamath Lake water and sediments...vary among the different groups of algae, may be a significant...successions of algal groups could like- wise be...eutrophic system (Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon). To...cold weather in early fall. During the peak of...

Paul A. Gillespie; Richard Y. Morita

1972-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The counting of naturally occuring radiocarbon in the form of benzene in a liquid scintillation counter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A counting system is described for C14 dating with a benzene scintillator solution. The single photomultiplier counter used is relatively simple and reliable. Different sizes and forms of the counting solution containers were investigated. A 6 ml cell with a background of 4?0 counts/min and a 45 per cent detection efficiency is recommended for routine C14 dating. A 60 ml cell with a background of 14?6 counts/min and a 45 per cent detection efficiency is capable of dating samples as old as 57,500 years (4 ? statistics, 48 hr counting). The calibration and operation of the counter is discussed. On comparison with standard gas counter methods, it is suggested that routine C14 dating by the benzene method is preferable in those cases where the laboratory personnel are more skilled in chemical manipulations than electronic technique.

C. Leger; M.A. Tamers

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Recent Developments in the Field of Naturally-Occurring Aroma Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nutritious foods have to contain trace constituents such as minerals, vitamins and flavors. The role of flavors is critical; they are partially responsible for the digestion of food in man and control food rec...

G. Ohloff

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

NMR SPECTROSCOPY OF NATURALLY OCCURRING SURFACE-ADSORBED FLUORIDE ON GEORGIA KAOLINITE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reaction vessel and N2 atmosphere to exclude CO2...direct-coupled plasma atomic emission...operating at 470.18 MHz for 19F and 130.23 MHz for 27Al. Samples...were either 17 kHz or 20 kHz. All...acquired at 470 MHz, 20 kHz spinning rate...

Stacey G. Cochiara; Brian L. Phillips

204

Sequestering carbon dioxide into complex structures of naturally occurring gas hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...deposited worldwide as a new energy source. For recovering...found that CO 2 hydrates reform at both the surface and...sites such as the Gulf of Mexico outside the Caspian Sea (17, 18...Ratcliffe C. I. ( 1988 ) Energy Fuels 12 : 197 200 . 15 Seo Y...Commerce, Industry, and Energy of Korea, also partially...

Youngjune Park; Do-Youn Kim; Jong-Won Lee; Dae-Gee Huh; Keun-Pil Park; Jaehyoung Lee; Huen Lee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Communities of Practice in Workplaces: Learning as a Naturally Occurring Event  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in consideration of social and cultural aspects of learning as a way to foster organizational learning and human performance. Despite strong interest among practitioners and scholars, the study of organizational learning that there are six attributes of communities of practice (CoPs) that serve as scaffolding for organizational learning

Hara, Noriko

206

Photodynamic therapy of naturally occurring tumors in animals using a novel benzophenothiazine photosensitizer.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that developed elevated body temperatures during the treatment. The...definitively determined, but the temperature returned to normal in 1 day...tu-mom strongly support the development of EtNBS-PDT for use in...cancers in felines, canines and snakes with chboro-aluminum subfonated...

A E Frimberger; A S Moore; L Cincotta; S M Cotter; and J W Foley

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Investigation of the activity level and radiological impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides in blast furnace slag  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......material such as iron ore, coal and limestone in steel production...road construction can bring economic and environmental advantages...properties of concrete incorporating coal bottom ash and granulated blast...fly ashes produced in Turkish coal-burning thermal power plants......

F. A. Ugur; S. Turhan; H. Sahan; M. Sahan; E. Gren; F. Gezer; Z. Yegingil

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The Radioactive Beam Program at Argonne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk I will present selected topics of the ongoing radioactive beam program at Argonne and discuss the capabilities of the CARIBU radioactive ion production facility as well as plans for construction of a novel superconducting solenoid spectrometer.

B. B. Back

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

209

Fusion Reactions Involving Radioactive Beams at GANIL  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......February 2004 research-article Articles Fusion Reactions Involving Radioactive Beams...been used to produce exotic nuclei via fusion evaporation or to study reaction mechanisms...Physics Supplement No. 154, 2004 113 Fusion Reactions Involving Radioactive Beams......

Gilles de France

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

A Study on Natural Radioactivity in Khewra Salt Mines, Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......The excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR) was calculated...salt mines (Excluding Uranium) of some other countries...and Excess Life Time Cancer Risk (%) in the Khewra...than the other non-uranium mines.5) The average...and Excess Life Time Cancer Risk (100%) are calculated......

Muzahir Ali Baloch; Aziz Ahmed Qureshi; Abdul Waheed; Muhammad Ali; Nawab Ali; Muhammad Tufail; Saima Batool; Muhammad Akram; Poonam Iftikhar; Hamza Qayyum; Shahid Manzoor; Hameed Ahmed Khan

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Natural radioactivity of Zambian coal and coal ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

226Ra and232Th specific activities in coal from Maamba Collieries in Zambia have been...?1..., respectively. These values are nearly two and a half times larger than the world average for coal an...

P. Hayumbu; M. B. Zaman; S. S. Munsanje

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Review of {sup 222}Rn in natural gas produced from unconventional sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the literature on trace radioactivity in natural gas and natural gas products has been performed and the consequent radioactivity concentrations and dose rates due to natural radioactive elements in natural gas produced from Devonian shale wells, western tight gas sands, geo-pressurized aquifiers and coal beds have been studied. Preliminary data on {sup 222}Rn concentrations from these energy sources fall within the range observed for more conventional sources. Gas produced from reservoirs with higher than average natural /sup 238/U higher than average levels of {sup 222}Rn. Massive fracturing techniques do not appear to raise the relative concentration of radon in natural gas.

Gogolak, C.V.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Radioactive Waste Incineration: Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incineration is generally accepted as a method of reducing the volume of radioactive waste. In some cases, the resulting ash may have high concentrations of materials such as Plutonium or Uranium that are valuable materials for recycling. Incineration can also be effective in treating waste that contains hazardous chemicals as well as radioactive contamination. Despite these advantages, the number of operating incinerators currently in the US currently appears to be small and potentially declining. This paper describes technical, regulatory, economic and political factors that affect the selection of incineration as a preferred method of treating radioactive waste. The history of incinerator use at commercial and DOE facilities is summarized, along with the factors that have affected each of the sectors, thus leading to the current set of active incinerator facilities. In summary: Incineration has had a long history of use in radioactive waste processing due to their ability to reduce the volume of the waste while destroying hazardous chemicals and biological material. However, combinations of technical, regulatory, economic and political factors have constrained the overall use of incineration. In both the Government and Private sectors, the trend is to have a limited number of larger incineration facilities that treat wastes from a multiple sites. Each of these sector is now served by only one or two incinerators. Increased use of incineration is not likely unless there is a change in the factors involved, such as a significant increase in the cost of disposal. Medical wastes with low levels of radioactive contamination are being treated effectively at small, local incineration facilities. No trend is expected in this group. (authors)

Diederich, A.R.; Akins, M.J. [WorleyParsons, Reading, PA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Jet-like circulations occur in the `simple' geometries of gas planets and Earth's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Jet-like circulations occur in the `simple' geometries of gas planets and Earth's liquid The Jet Stream Conundrum Baldwin, Rhines, Huang & McIntyre, Nature 2007 #12;For Earth's oceans, density reverses upscale cascade of 2DT breaks momentum conservation by exchange with solid earth via pressure drag

215

Radioactive isotopes in Danish drinking water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactive isotopes in Danish drinking water Sven P. Nielsen Risø National Laboratory Working OF INVESTIGATION 11 3 DESCRIPTION OF INVESTIGATION 12 4 RADIOACTIVITY IN DRINKING WATER 13 5 SAMPLING 15 6 27 #12;4 #12;5 Preface This project for investigation of radioactivity in drinking water shall

216

Spills of Radioactive Materials -Emergency Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to radioactive waste container. For surface decontamination, use soap and water and cleansers appropriateSpills of Radioactive Materials - Emergency Procedures Procedure: 7.53 Created: 1/16/2014 Version for injured personnel. B. Applicability/scope This policy applies to all facilities where radioactive

Jia, Songtao

217

Laboratory Surveys when Working with Radioactive Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radioactive materials (RAM) are used or stored, including waste areas. Negative results should be clearlyLaboratory Surveys when Working with Radioactive Materials Procedure: 7.546 Created: 9/25/14 Version: 1.0 Revised: Environmental Health & Safety Page 1 of 6 A. Purpose Radioactive contamination and

Jia, Songtao

218

Spontaneous Muon Emission during Fission, a New Nuclear Radioactivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper the essential theoretical predictions for the nuclear muonic radioactivity are presented by using a special fission-like model similar with that used in description of the pionic emission during fission. Hence, a fission-like model for the muonic radioactivity takes into account the essential degree of freedom of the system: muon-fissility, muon-fission barrier height, etc. Using this model it was shown that most of the SHE-nuclei lie in the region where the muonic fissility parameters attain their limiting value X=1. Hence, the SHE-region is characterized by the absence of a classical barrier toward spontaneous muon and pion emissions. Numerical estimations on the yields for the natural muonic radioactivities of the transuranium elements as well numerical values for barrier heights are given only for even-even parent nuclei. Some experimental results from LCP-identification emission spectrum are reviewed. Also, the experimental results obtained by Khryachkov et al, using new spectrometer for investigation of ternary nuclear fission, are presented. The OPERA-experiment proposed to perform search for muonic radioactivity from lead nuclei, in the low background conditions offered by the Gran Sasso underground Laboratory (LNGS), is discussed.

D. B. Ion; M. L. D. Ion; Reveica Ion-Mihai

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

219

Low-level radioactive waste disposal facility closure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part I of this report describes and evaluates potential impacts associated with changes in environmental conditions on a low-level radioactive waste disposal site over a long period of time. Ecological processes are discussed and baselines are established consistent with their potential for causing a significant impact to low-level radioactive waste facility. A variety of factors that might disrupt or act on long-term predictions are evaluated including biological, chemical, and physical phenomena of both natural and anthropogenic origin. These factors are then applied to six existing, yet very different, low-level radioactive waste sites. A summary and recommendations for future site characterization and monitoring activities is given for application to potential and existing sites. Part II of this report contains guidance on the design and implementation of a performance monitoring program for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A monitoring programs is described that will assess whether engineered barriers surrounding the waste are effectively isolating the waste and will continue to isolate the waste by remaining structurally stable. Monitoring techniques and instruments are discussed relative to their ability to measure (a) parameters directly related to water movement though engineered barriers, (b) parameters directly related to the structural stability of engineered barriers, and (c) parameters that characterize external or internal conditions that may cause physical changes leading to enhanced water movement or compromises in stability. Data interpretation leading to decisions concerning facility closure is discussed. 120 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

White, G.J.; Ferns, T.W.; Otis, M.D.; Marts, S.T.; DeHaan, M.S.; Schwaller, R.G.; White, G.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Chapter 5. Conclusion Uranium, a naturally occurring element, contributes to low levels of natural background radiation in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are extracted from the earth. Protore is mined uranium ore that is not rich enough to meet the market demand conventional open-pit and underground uranium mining include overburden (although most overburden is not necessarily enriched in uranium as is protore), unreclaimed protore, waste rock, evaporites from mine water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Radioactive waste treatment technologies and environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radioactive waste treatment and conditioning are the most important steps in radioactive waste management. At the Slovak Electric, plc, a range of technologies are used for the processing of radioactive waste into a form suitable for disposal in near surface repository. These technologies operated by JAVYS, PLc. Nuclear and Decommissioning Company, PLc. Jaslovske Bohunice are described. Main accent is given to the Bohunice Radwaste Treatment and Conditioning Centre, Bituminization plant, Vitrification plant, and Near surface repository of radioactive waste in Mochovce and their operation. Conclusions to safe and effective management of radioactive waste in the Slovak Republic are presented. (authors)

HORVATH, Jan; KRASNY, Dusan [JAVYS, PLc. - Nuclear and Decommisioning Company, PLc. (Slovakia)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Determining Planes Along Which Earthquakes Occur- Method of Applicatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Planes Along Which Earthquakes Occur- Method of Application to Earthquakes Accompanying Hydraulic Fracturing Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

223

Key changes in proteins occur in cyanobacteria | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

proteins occur in cyanobacteria Identification of redox-sensitive enzymes can enrich biofuel production research Overview of the chemical biology technique used by PNNL...

224

RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE - 25 YEARS SINCE THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities of the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, and in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program. The brief overview of the radioactive waste issues in the ChEZ presented in this article demonstrates that management of radioactive waste resulting from a beyond-designbasis accident at a nuclear power plant becomes the most challenging and the costliest effort during the mitigation and remediation activities. The costs of these activities are so high that the provision of radioactive waste final disposal facilities compliant with existing radiation safety requirements becomes an intolerable burden for the current generation of a single country, Ukraine. The nuclear accident at the Fukushima-1 NPP strongly indicates that accidents at nuclear sites may occur in any, even in a most technologically advanced country, and the Chernobyl experience shows that the scope of the radioactive waste management activities associated with the mitigation of such accidents may exceed the capabilities of a single country. Development of a special international program for broad international cooperation in accident related radioactive waste management activities is required to handle these issues. It would also be reasonable to consider establishment of a dedicated international fund for mitigation of accidents at nuclear sites, specifically, for handling radioactive waste problems in the ChEZ. The experience of handling Chernobyl radioactive waste management issues, including large volumes of radioactive soils and complex structures of fuel containing materials can be fairly useful for the entire world's nuclear community and can help make nuclear energy safer.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Radioactive Waste Management BasisSept 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this RWMB is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Goodwin, S S

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

TYPE B RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGE FAILURE MODES AND CONTENTS COMPLIANCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Type B radioactive material package failures can occur due to any one of the following: inadequate design, manufacture, and maintenance of packages, load conditions beyond those anticipated in the regulations, and improper package loading and operation. The rigorous package design evaluations performed in the certification process, robust package manufacture quality assurance programs, and demanding load conditions prescribed in the regulations are all well established. This paper focuses on the operational aspects of Type B package loading with respect to an overbatch which may cause a package failure.

Watkins, R; Steve Hensel, S; Allen Smith, A

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Responses Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions [RAD Pie Chart] Exposure Source Average annual dose to an individual in the United States (millirem) Natural sources (including radon) - Ground, cosmic, and terrestrial - Internal radiation 200 mrem 100 mrem Occupational 0.9 mrem Nuclear Fuel Cycle 0.05 mrem Consumer Products - Tobacco - Other (i.e., smoke detectors, exit signs, luminous watch dials) Dose to lungs ~16,000 mrem 5 - 13 mrem Environmental Sources 0.06 mrem Medical - Diagnostic X-rays - Nuclear Medicine 39 mrem 14 mrem Approximate Annual Total 360 mrem [Radiation] Everyone in the world is continuously exposed to naturally-occuring background radiation. The average radiation dose received by the United

228

Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Civilian Radioactive Waste Management February 2006 Evaluation of technical impact on the Yucca Mountain Project technical basis resulting from issues raised by emails of former...

229

Radioactive Material or Multiple Hazardous Materials Decontamination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for performing decontamination ofindividuals who have entered a hot zone during transportation incidents involving radioactive.

230

Annual Transportation Report for Radioactive Waste Shipments...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

ANNUAL TRANSPORTATION REPORT FY 2008 Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) February 2009 United States Department of Energy National Nuclear Security...

231

Science with Beams of Radioactive Isotopes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2015 The International Chemical Congress of Pacific Basin Societies Science with Beams of Radioactive Isotopes ( 340) Honolulu, Hawaii, USA December 15-20, 2015 Science...

232

Radiation Sources and Radioactive Materials (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations apply to persons who receive, transfer, possess, manufacture, use, store, handle, transport or dispose of radioactive materials and/or sources of ionizing radiation. Some...

233

Radiation Machines and Radioactive Materials (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These chapters describe general provisions and regulatory requirements; registration, licensure, and transportation of radioactive materials; and exposure standards for radiation protection.

234

INTRODUCTION Aggression and conflict occur ubiquitously throughout the animal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2007), and are considered costly (Castro et al., 2006; Hack, 1997). As a result, they occur at frequencies inversely related to their cost (Hack, 1997), although game theory can be used to assess whether

Tattersall, Glenn

235

Radioactive Material Declaration Form Exhibit to the Radioactive Waste Manual (RWM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactive Material Declaration Form Exhibit to the Radioactive Waste Manual (RWM) 12/5/2013 (form Declaration Form Exhibit to the Radioactive Waste Manual (RWM) 12/5/2013 (form date) SLAC-I-760-2A08Z-001 (RWM date) SLAC-I-760-2A08Z-001 (RWM number) Page 1 of 2 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL DECLARATION FORM For RP use

Wechsler, Risa H.

236

Hydrogen production during processing of radioactive sludge containing noble metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen was produced when radioactive sludge from Savannah River Site radioactive waste containing noble metals was reacted with formic acid. This will occur in a process tank in the Defense Waste Facility at SRS when waste is vitrified. Radioactive sludges from four tanks were tested in a lab-scale apparatus. Maximum hydrogen generation rates varied from 5 {times}10{sup {minus}7} g H{sub 2}/hr/g of sludge from the least reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 51) to 2 {times}10{sup {minus}4} g H{sub 2}/hr/g of sludge from the most reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 11). The time required for the hydrogen generation to reach a maximum varied from 4.1 to 25 hours. In addition to hydrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were produced and the pH of the reaction slurry increased. In all cases, the carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were generated before the hydrogen. The results are in agreement with large-scale studies using simulated sludges.

Ha, B.C.; Ferrara, D.M.; Bibler, N.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Hydrogen production during processing of radioactive sludge containing noble metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen was produced when radioactive sludge from Savannah River Site radioactive waste containing noble metals was reacted with formic acid. This will occur in a process tank in the Defense Waste Facility at SRS when waste is vitrified. Radioactive sludges from four tanks were tested in a lab-scale apparatus. Maximum hydrogen generation rates varied from 5 {times}10{sup {minus}7} g H{sub 2}/hr/g of sludge from the least reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 51) to 2 {times}10{sup {minus}4} g H{sub 2}/hr/g of sludge from the most reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 11). The time required for the hydrogen generation to reach a maximum varied from 4.1 to 25 hours. In addition to hydrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were produced and the pH of the reaction slurry increased. In all cases, the carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were generated before the hydrogen. The results are in agreement with large-scale studies using simulated sludges.

Ha, B.C.; Ferrara, D.M.; Bibler, N.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Radioactive material package seal tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General design or test performance requirements for radioactive materials (RAM) packages are specified in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1983). The requirements for Type B packages provide a broad range of environments under which the system must contain the RAM without posing a threat to health or property. Seals that provide the containment system interface between the packaging body and the closure must function in both high- and low-temperature environments under dynamic and static conditions. A seal technology program, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories. Experiments were performed in this program to characterize the behavior of several static seal materials at low temperatures. Helium leak tests on face seals were used to compare the materials. Materials tested include butyl, neoprene, ethylene propylene, fluorosilicone, silicone, Eypel, Kalrez, Teflon, fluorocarbon, and Teflon/silicone composites. Because most elastomer O-ring applications are for hydraulic systems, manufacturer low-temperature ratings are based on methods that simulate this use. The seal materials tested in this program with a fixture similar to a RAM cask closure, with the exception of silicone S613-60, are not leak tight (1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} std cm{sup 3}/s) at manufacturer low-temperature ratings. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Madsen, M.M.; Humphreys, D.L.; Edwards, K.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Some mismatches occurred when simulating fractured reservoirs as homogeneous porous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The understanding of transport processes that occur in naturally fractured geothermal systems is far from being complete. Often, evaluation and numerical simulations of fractured geothermal reservoirs, are carried out by assuming equivalent porous media and homogeneous petrophysical properties within big matrix blocks. The purpose of this paper, is to present a comparison between results obtained from numerical studies of a naturally fractured reservoir treated as a simple porous medium and the simulation of some real aspects of the fractured reservoir. A general conclusion outlines the great practical importance of considering even approximately, the true nature of such systems. Our results show that the homogeneous simplified evaluation of the energy resource in a fractured system, could result in unrealistic estimates of the reservoir capacity to generate electricity.

Mario Cesar Suarez Arriaga; Fernando Samaniego V.; Fernando Rodriguez

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

242

Homeowners: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Because natural gas is distributed through underground pipelines, delivery disruptions occur less often than electrical outages. Severe storms, flooding, and earthquakes can expose and break pipes,...

243

Local Leaders: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Because natural gas is distributed through underground pipelines, delivery disruptions occur less often than electrical outages. Severe storms, flooding, and earthquakes can expose and break pipes,...

244

Some radioactive-elements in the coastal sediments of the Mediterranean Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......igneous rocks from the mountainous ranges in Sudan and Abyssinia carried down the course...in the Red Sea coastal environment of Sudan. Mar. Pollut. Bull (1998) 36(1...Natural radioactivity in sand used in thermal therapy at the Red Sea Coast. J. Environ......

Mahmoud A. Radi Dar; Abeer A. El-Saharty

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Radioactive Thulium for X-Rays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radioactive power from thulium makes Argonne x-ray unit a potential for medical and industrial use ... Active component of the instrument is a tiny particle (one-fifth gram) of thulium-170 which has been made radioactive in a heavy water nuclear reactor at Arco, Idaho. ...

1954-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

246

Cyclotrons for the production of radioactive beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the characteristics and design choices for modern cyclotrons. Cyclotrons can be used in 3 areas in the radioactive beam field: the production of high energy heavy ion beams for use in fragmentation, the spallation of targets with high energy protons, and the acceleration of radioactive beams from low energy to the MeV/u range. 16 refs., 6 figs.

Clark, D.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... CHOOSING an awkward moment, Phillips Petroleum Exploration have announced a new find of natural ...naturalgas ...

1967-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

248

Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS Using Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS The use of radioactive samples requires additional information for review and approval. All proposed experiments involving radioactive samples will be reviewed by the APS Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee (RSSRC). The review will be on a graded basis. Hence, the experimenters are strongly advised to send in the experiment proposal in detail at least 2 months before the expected scheduled date of the experiment. Previously approved containment, isotopes and weights can be submitted as late as 2 weeks in advance. If your ESAF was submitted less than seven (7) days in advance of its scheduled start date you may be delayed to allow time for a safety review. The following guidelines are to be followed for all experiments with

249

APS Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee March 6, 2012 1. Purpose The APS Safety Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee (RSSRC) advises the AES Division Director on the radioactive samples to be used at the APS and the adequacy of controls in place for the duration of their use. The RSSRC reviews the radioactive material samples proposed to be run at the APS to ensure that they fall within established safety envelopes of the APS. 2. Membership The RSSRC members are appointed by the AES Division Director. The current members of the RSRC are: B. Glagola AES - Chair S. Davey AES G. Pile AES L. Soderholm CHM J. Vacca RSO W. VanWingeren AES M. Beno XSD E. Alp XSD M. Rivers PUC 3. Method The AES User Safety Coordinator will notify the RSSRC of any samples

250

Apparatus and method for radioactive waste screening  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus and method relating to screening radioactive waste are disclosed for ensuring that at least one calculated parameter for the measurement data of a sample falls within a range between an upper limit and a lower limit prior to the sample being packaged for disposal. The apparatus includes a radiation detector configured for detecting radioactivity and radionuclide content of the of the sample of radioactive waste and generating measurement data in response thereto, and a collimator including at least one aperture to direct a field of view of the radiation detector. The method includes measuring a radioactive content of a sample, and calculating one or more parameters from the radioactive content of the sample.

Akers, Douglas W.; Roybal, Lyle G.; Salomon, Hopi; Williams, Charles Leroy

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

251

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SAFE are radioactive material transportations packages? SAFE are radioactive material transportations packages? RAM PACKAGES TESTING & CERTIFICATION REGULATIONS & GUIDANCE SITE MAP This graphic was generated from a computer analysis and shows the results from a regulatory puncture test of a stainless steel packaging dropping 40 inches (10 MPH) onto a 6 inch diameter steel spike. U.S. DOE | Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Sandia National Laboratories | Nuclear Energy & Fuel Cucle Programs © Sandia Corporation | Site Contact | Sandia Site Map | Privacy and Security An internationally recognized web-site from PATRAM 2001 - the 13th International Symposium on the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material. Recipient of the AOKI AWARD. PATRAM, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency brings government and industry leaders together to share information on innovations, developments, and lessons learned about radioactive materials packaging and transportation.

252

Diverter assembly for radioactive material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A diverter assembly for diverting a pneumatically conveyed holder for a radioactive material between a central conveying tube and one of a plurality of radially offset conveying tubes includes an airtight container. A diverter tube having an offset end is suitably mounted in the container for rotation. A rotary seal seals one end of the diverter tube during and after rotation of the diverter tube while a spring biased seal seals the other end of the diverter tube which moves between various offset conveying tubes. An indexing device rotatably indexes the diverter tube and this indexing device is driven by a suitable drive. The indexing mechanism is preferably a geneva-type mechanism to provide a locking of the diverter tube in place. 3 figs.

Andrews, K.M.; Starenchak, R.W.

1988-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

253

Neutron-deficient nuclei studied with stable and radioactive beams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...radioactive nuclei compiled by W. Gelletly Neutron-deficient nuclei studied with stable and radioactive beams Neutron-deficient nuclei close to the proton...proton drip-line|radioactive beams| Neutron-deficient nuclei studied with stable...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Rev August 2006 Radiation Safety Manual Section 14 Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rev August 2006 Radiation Safety Manual Section 14 ­ Radioactive Waste Page 14-1 Section 14 Radioactive Waste Contents A. Proper Collection, Disposal, and Packaging and Putrescible Animal Waste.........................14-8 a. Non-Radioactive Animal Waste

Wilcock, William

255

Characterization of Plutonium in Maxey Flats Radioactive Trench Leachates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...leachates at the Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site exists as dissolved...leachates at the Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site exists as dissolved...leachates at the Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site exists as dissolved...

JESS M. CLEVELAND; TERRY F. REES

1981-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

256

772 NATURE NANOTECHNOLOGY | VOL 7 | DECEMBER 2012 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology research highlights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with laser radiation is an optoelectronic process that occurs in most semiconductors. The laser excitation fraction of naturally occurring hydrogen and is used in a variety of applications from nuclear fusion772 NATURE NANOTECHNOLOGY | VOL 7 | DECEMBER 2012 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology research

Wu, Junqiao

257

Natural radionuclide content and radiological hazard associated with usage of quartzite sand samples from OvacikSilifkeMersin open pit as building material in Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......building materials such as gas concrete and concrete...respectively. CONCLUSIONS The natural radioactivity due to...Xiaolan Z. Measurement of natural radioactivity in sand...concentrations in surface soils in Cyprus samples. J. Environ...Karahan G., Karack Z. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides......

S. Turhan; A. S. Aykamis; A. M. Kili

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Environmental Security and Radioactive Contaminantion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of environmental security is connected to changes in the natural environment as a result of increased stress and the incidence and consequences of extreme events. One of the major problems of envir...

Kazimir A. Karimov; R. D. Gainutdinova

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

MAGNETIC TOPOLOGIES: WHERE WILL RECONNECTION OCCUR ? Pascal Demoulin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MAGNETIC TOPOLOGIES: WHERE WILL RECONNECTION OCCUR ? Pascal D´emoulin Observatoire de Paris to power flares is thought to come from the coronal magnetic field. However, such energy release is efficient only at very small scales. Magnetic configurations with a complex topology, i.e. with sepa

Demoulin, Pascal

260

Improving Home Automation by Discovering Regularly Occurring Device Usage Patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving Home Automation by Discovering Regularly Occurring Device Usage Patterns Edwin O of two prediction algorithms, thus demonstrating multiple uses for a home automation system. Finally, we Several research efforts are focused on home automation. The Intelligent Room [2] uses an array of sensors

Cook, Diane J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas...

262

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 41300 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 41300 The objective of this surveillance is to...

263

Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials Participants should expect to...

264

2010 Annual Planning Summary for Civilian Radioactive Waste Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of...

265

Lab obtains approval to begin design on new radioactive waste...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New radioactive waste staging facility Lab obtains approval to begin design on new radioactive waste staging facility The 4-acre complex will include multiple staging buildings...

266

Letter to Congress RE: Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Congress RE: Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Annual Financial Report Letter to Congress RE: Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Annual Financial...

267

RESRAD Computer Code- Evaluation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The evaluation of sites with radioactive contamination was a problem until the RESidual RADioactivity (RESRAD) Computer Code was first released in 1989.

268

Safety and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Safety and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments Safety and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments Safety and Security Technologies for...

269

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

00: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste SUMMARY This...

270

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview Net additions to storage during the fourth week of April were estimated to have been over 100 Bcf-a record high level for the first month of the refill season. Compared to last year when only 36 Bcf or 1.2 Bcf per day were added to stocks in April, this year the industry appears to be taking advantage of the reduction in demand that typically occurs in April, the first shoulder month of the year, and the recent price declines. After beginning the week down, spot prices at the Henry Hub trended down most days last week to end trading on Friday at $4.49 per MMBtu-the lowest price since early November. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (June) contract also moved down most days and ended last week at $4.490-down $0.377 from the previous Friday. Some-early summer high temperatures last week in the Northeast and winter-like weather in the Rockies (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) appear to have had little impact on the natural gas markets as prices declined most days at most major locations.

271

Operational Strategies for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site in Egypt - 13513  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate aims of treatment and conditioning is to prepare waste for disposal by ensuring that the waste will meet the waste acceptance criteria of a disposal facility. Hence the purpose of low-level waste disposal is to isolate the waste from both people and the environment. The radioactive particles in low-level waste emit the same types of radiation that everyone receives from nature. Most low-level waste fades away to natural background levels of radioactivity in months or years. Virtually all of it diminishes to natural levels in less than 300 years. In Egypt, The Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center has been established since 1983, as a waste management facility for LLW and ILW and the disposal site licensed for preoperational in 2005. The site accepts the low level waste generated on site and off site and unwanted radioactive sealed sources with half-life less than 30 years for disposal and all types of sources for interim storage prior to the final disposal. Operational requirements at the low-level (LLRW) disposal site are listed in the National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control NCNSRC guidelines. Additional procedures are listed in the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Standards Manual. The following describes the current operations at the LLRW disposal site. (authors)

Mohamed, Yasser T. [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 3 Ahmed El-Zomor St., El-Zohour District, Naser City, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)] [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 3 Ahmed El-Zomor St., El-Zohour District, Naser City, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: July 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 24, 2009) Natural gas spot prices generally declined this report week (June 17-24), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.19 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.80. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for natural gas decreased as prices for most energy products fell amid concerns over the economy. The natural gas futures contract for July delivery decreased by 49 cents per MMBtu on the week to $3.761. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday, June 19, is

273

Radioactivity evaluation for the KSTAR tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Articles Radioactivity evaluation for the KSTAR tokamak Hyunduk Kim 1 Hee-Seock Lee 1 Sukmo Hong 1 Minho...reaction in the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak generates neutrons with a peak yield of 2.51016......

Hyunduk Kim; Hee-Seock Lee; Sukmo Hong; Minho Kim; Chinwha Chung; Changsuk Kim

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

274

Argonne In-Flight Radioactive Ion Separator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In-Flight Radioactive Ion Separator www.phy.anl.govairis B. B. Back, C. Dickerson, C. R. Hoffman, B. P. Kay, B. Mustapha, J. A. Nolen, P. Ostroumov, R. C. Pardo, K. E. Rehm, G....

275

Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

Glissmeyer, John A.

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

276

Accelerated Radioactive Nuclear Beams (Low Energy)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility of producing and accelerating intense beams of short-lived radioactive heavy ions, both for studies of nuclides themselves and for use as projectiles in reactions of considerable interest to the f...

John M. DAuria

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Radioactivity in man: levels, effects and unknowns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report discusses the potential for significant human exposure to internal radiation. Sources of radiation considered include background radiation, fallout, reactor accidents, radioactive waste, and occupational exposure to various radioisotopes. (ACR)

Rundo, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Radioactive materials shipping cask anticontamination enclosure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An anticontamination device for use in storing shipping casks for radioactive materials comprising (1) a seal plate assembly; (2) a double-layer plastic bag; and (3) a water management system or means for water management.

Belmonte, Mark S. (Irwin, PA); Davis, James H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Williams, David A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Radioactive materials are carried by road, rail, water, and air. There are strict regulations that originate from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) which cover the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. Road Rail Water Air [Road transport] Click to view picture [Rail transport] Click to view picture [Sea transport] Click to view picture [Air transport] Click to view picture 1998 DOE Radioactive Shipments in the United States Out of the 3 million hazardous material shipments are made each year, DOE accounts for less than 1% of all radioactive materials shipments and 75% of the total curies shipped in the United States Ship 0 Train 308

280

Radioactivity and X-rays Applications and health effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the release of radioactivity from reactor accidents and fallout from nuclear explosions in the atmosphereRadioactivity and X-rays Applications and health effects by Thormod Henriksen #12;Preface ­ 7 Chapter 2. What is radioactivity page 8 ­ 27 Chapter 3. Radioactive decay laws page 28 ­ 35

Sahay, Sundeep

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Sorting and disposal of hazardous laboratory Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorting and disposal of hazardous laboratory waste Radioactive waste Solid radioactive waste or in a Perspex box. Liquid radioactive waste collect in a screw-cap plastic bottle, ½ or 1 L size. Place bottles in a tray to avoid spill Final disposal of both solid and radioactive waste into the yellow barrel

Maoz, Shahar

282

Migration and retention of elements at the Oklo natural reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oklo natural reactor, Gabon, permits study of fission-produced elemental behavior in a natural geologic environment. The uranium ore that sustained fission reactions formed about 2 billion years before present (BYBP), and the reactor was operative for about 5 x 10/sup 5/ yrs between about 1.95 to 2 BYBP. The many tons of fission products can, for the most part, be studied for their abundance and distribution today. Since reactor shutdown, many fissiogenic elements have not migrated from host pitchblende, and several others have migrated only a few tens of meters from the reactor ore. Only Xe and Kr have apparently been largely removed from the reactor zones. An element by element assessment of the Oklo rocks' ability to retain the fission products, and actinides and radiogenic Pb and Bi as well, leads to the conclusion that no widespread migration of the elements occurred. This suggests that rocks with more favorable geologic characteristics are indeed well suited for consideration for the storage of radioactive waste.

Brookins, D.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE RELEASES S  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

. . . . . . -- SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE RELEASES S t a r t u p t h r o u g h 1 9 5 9 September 1 9 6 0 _- R E C O R D - W O R K S T E C H N I C A L D E P A R T M E N T 1 J. E. C o l e , W i l n i 1 4 W. P. 3ebbii 3 H. Worthington, Wilm 16 C. $?. P~.t-Lei-s~:; - 5 J. D. E l l e t t - 17 E. C. Morris 6 F. H. Endorf 19 3 . L. &tier 7 K. W. F r e n c h 20 bi. C . 3 e i n i g 8 J. K. Lower 2 1 2. 3 . 3 G : - x r 9 K. W. M i l l e t t 22 R . FJ . V 2 x 7 : W ~ ~ C k 1 c - 2 J. B. Tinker, W i h L-, i . c . E?-ens 4 W F i l e P. 3 . K t B U ? & J. A. Monier, Jr. 13. : . A. KcClesrer. 1 0 M. 2 . Wahl . - 23 C. Ashley C. W. J. Wende 24 T I S F i l e 11 J. W. Morris - 2s T'pC File D. E. Waters 26 P3D F i l e , 736-C R. B. Fenninger 33 V l ~ a l Records F i l e 12 W. P. Overbeck - 27 -23 P3D % x : r a Czpies P33 2e:ol.d C ~ p l *iB+ ' / - - & OF THIS DQCUMENT I S UNuMITEI) E. 1. ciu /'(I,\ 7' d

284

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 21, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 13, 2010) Significant price increases occurred through Friday, January 8, apparently as a result of extreme temperatures and continued wellhead freeze-offs in some parts of the country during the first half of the report week. However, with temperatures across much of the lower 48 States returning to normal, spot prices receded significantly between Monday, January 11, and Wednesday, January 13. On the week, natural gas spot prices registered significant net decreases at all locations in the lower 48 States since January 6. The largest weekly price drops occurred in Florida and the

285

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2008 9, 2008 Next Release: June 5, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, May 21-28), with price decreases generally occurring in markets west of the Mississippi River and price increases dominant in trading locations in the eastern parts of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.20 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $11.60. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased for the report week, continuing a trend of rising prices that has occurred in futures markets for many commodities this spring, including futures prices for crude oil. The futures contract for June delivery, for

286

33. Radioactivity and radiation protection 1 33. RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIATION PROTECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a conservative estimate for the value of the protection quantity. · Ambient dose equivalent, H(10) (unit: sievert): The dose equivalent at a point in a radiation field that would be produced by the corresponding expanded33. Radioactivity and radiation protection 1 33. RADIOACTIVITY AND RADIATION PROTECTION Revised

287

CHAPTER 5-RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ore pitchblende was discovered in the 1750's near Joachimstal in what is now the Czech Republic. Used as a colorant in glazes, uranium was identified in 1789 as the active ingredient by chemist Martin Klaproth. In 1896, French physicist Henri Becquerel studied uranium minerals as part of his investigations into the phenomenon of fluorescence. He discovered a strange energy emanating from the material which he dubbed 'rayons uranique.' Unable to explain the origins of this energy, he set the problem aside. About two years later, a young Polish graduate student was looking for a project for her dissertation. Marie Sklodowska Curie, working with her husband Pierre, picked up on Becquerel's work and, in the course of seeking out more information on uranium, discovered two new elements (polonium and radium) which exhibited the same phenomenon, but were even more powerful. The Curies recognized the energy, which they now called 'radioactivity,' as something very new, requiring a new interpretation, new science. This discovery led to what some view as the 'golden age of nuclear science' (1895-1945) when countries throughout Europe devoted large resources to understand the properties and potential of this material. By World War II, the potential to harness this energy for a destructive device had been recognized and by 1939, Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman showed that fission not only released a lot of energy but that it also released additional neutrons which could cause fission in other uranium nuclei leading to a self-sustaining chain reaction and an enormous release of energy. This suggestion was soon confirmed experimentally by other scientists and the race to develop an atomic bomb was on. The rest of the development history which lead to the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 is well chronicled. After World War II, development of more powerful weapons systems by the United States and the Soviet Union continued to advance nuclear science. It was this defense application that formed the basis for the commercial nuclear power industry.

Marra, J.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

Evaluation of Incident Risks in a Repository for Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A probabilistic safety assessment of the operation phase of a repository for radioactive waste requires the knowledge of incident risks. These are evaluated from generic observations. The present method accounts for the uncertainty (1) of whether an incident occurs, (2) of the incident rate, (3) of the duration of generic observation, and (4) of the duration of operation phase of the repository. It yields a mean risk and its standard deviation from a minimum of generic data, comprising only the number of observed incidents and the duration of the observation, as more comprehensive generic data are seldom available. It was shown that incidents sharing a common generic observation must be either merged together to a total incident or the generic observation must be split up in sub-observations, one for each such incident. The method was tested on the example of the German Konrad repository for low-level waste in a deep geological formation. (authors)

Grundler, D.; Mariae, D.; Muller, W.; Boetsch, W. [Institut fur Sicherheitstechnologie (ISTec), Koln (Germany); Thiel, J. [Bundesamt fur Strahlenschutz (BfS), Salzgitter (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: July 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 15, 2009) Natural gas spot prices rose during the week in all trading locations. Price increases ranged between 6 cents and 48 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), with the biggest increases occurring in the Rocky Mountain region. During the report week, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased 15 cents or 5 percent to $3.37 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas near-month contract (August 2009) decreased 7 cents to $3.283 per MMBtu from $3.353 the previous week. During its tenure as the near-month contract, the August 2009 contract has lost 66 cents. As of Friday, July 10, 2009, working gas in storage rose to 2,886

290

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 25, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 17, 2010) Natural gas prices continued their decline across much of the country for the week ended February 17. Even prices in the Northeast, which registered large increases during the previous week, fell as of yesterday. On the week, natural gas spot prices registered net decreases at almost all locations in the lower 48 States. The significant price increases for the week ended February 10 in the Northeast occurred in response to the two major snow storms that slammed the Mid-Atlantic and parts of the Northeast. However, with average temperatures this report week resembling historical normals, prices in the

291

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 2, 2009) Natural gas spot prices soared this week, following significant, albeit smaller decreases in trading the prior week. Spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States by more than a dollar per million Btu (MMBtu). The only exception occurred at the Leidy location in the Northeast, which rose by 84 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week at $4.67 per MMBtu, $1.35 per MMBtu higher than last Wednesday. Trading at the Henry Hub ended yesterday’s session 14 cents higher than the January 2010 contract. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

292

Directions in low-level radioactive waste management. Low-level radioactive waste disposal: commercial facilities no longer operating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication discusses three commercial facilities-no longer operating-that have received and now contain low-level radioactive waste. The facilities are located at West Valley, New York; Maxey Flats, Kentucky; and Sheffield, Illinois. All three of the facilities were selected and developed in the 1960s. The onset of water management problems caused the closure of the sites at West Valley and Maxey Flats in 1975 and 1977, respectively. Closure of the Sheffield site occurred in 1978, after the operator experienced site problems and consequent lengthy delays in its license renewal procedures. The document provides detailed explanation of the history, basis for closure, and current status of each facility. This information is intended, primarily, to assist state officials-executive, legislative, and agency-in planning for, establishing, and managing low-level waste disposal facilities.

Berlin, R.E.; Tuite, P.T.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Source term characterization for the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of source term characterization studies for the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site show that because of the long residence time of water accumulations in the trenches, prolonged leaching and microbial degradation of waste materials occur continuously, leading to leachate formation. As a result of such interactions for extended time periods, the resultant trench leachates exhibit significant modifications in terms of inorganic, organic, and radionuclide constituents and acquire geochemical properties that are unique, compared to ambient groundwater. The leachates generally exhibit varying degrees of anoxia characterized by negative redox potentials, low dissolved oxygen and sulfate concentrations, high alkalinity, and high ammonia concentrations. The enrichments, to varying degrees, of inorganic, organic, and radionuclide constituents associated with fuel cycle and non-fuel cycle low-level wastes reflect the nature of the leaching process itself and of the waste materials. Elevated concentrations of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/, Fe/sub TOTAL/, Mn/sub TOTAL/, Cl/sup -/, dissolved organic and inorganic carbon, and several organic compounds as well as radionuclides, such as /sup 3/H, /sup 241/Am, /sup 60/Co, /sup 134/Cs, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 238/Pu, and /sup 239//sup,/sup 240/Pu are a consequence of waste leaching. Some of the waste-derived organic compounds present in the trenches, such as chelating agents and several carboxylic acids, are strong complexing agents and have the potential to form stable radionuclide complexes and thus enhance nuclide mobility. The consequences of past disposal practices as reflected in the problems associated with the burial of unsegregated, poorly packaged, and unstabilized wastes at the Maxey Flats disposal site indicate the significance of waste segregation, improved stabilization, and proper packaging.

Dayal, R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Clinton, J.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

EVALUATION OF THE FAILURE OF A RADIOACTIVE WASTE TRANSFER LINE JACKET  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive wastes are confined in 49 underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The waste is transported between tanks primarily via an underground transfer piping system. Due to the hazardous nature of the waste, the inner core stainless steel pipe is typically surrounded by a carbon steel pipe jacket, which provides secondary containment. Recently several through-wall penetrations were discovered on a segment of one of the jackets. An evaluation was performed to verify the failure mechanism and to estimate the degree of damage that occurred to the pipe segment. Failure analysis of a section of the jacket confirmed that pitting corrosion on the exterior of the pipe led to the through-wall penetration. Ultrasonic measurements on sections of the pipe were utilized to determine the remaining wall thickness in adjacent areas of the pipe. Based on these measurements, the degree of pitting and general corrosion was determined. Pit growth rate models were then developed to estimate the life expectancy of sections of the pipe that had not been excavated. The calculations estimated that the occurrence of through-wall failures in this jacket will begin to increase substantially in 12 years. Given that this pipe segment will be utilized beyond this time, short-term and long-term solutions to this failure were proposed. The short-term solutions focused on the repair or replace decisions that must be made to return the jacket to service as soon as practical. The long-term solutions focused on a broader strategy to address jacket integrity issues in the entire tank farm facility. These solutions included the evaluation of innovative remote inspection and repair techniques.

Wiersma, B; Alan03 Plummer, A; Karthik Subramanian, K; Charles Jenkins, C; William Hinz, W; A Fellinger, A

2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

295

Radioactive Nickel-63 - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Making Radioactive Nickel-63 Making Radioactive Nickel-63 ORNL-Supplied Nickel-63 Enables High-Sensitivity Explosives, Chemical Weapons, and Narcotics Detectors at Airports Explosives and narcotics detector. Detectors based on ion mobility spectrometry using ORNL 63Ni can now satisfy enhanced Homeland Security requirements at airports and other sensitive locations. When Transportation Security Administration (TSA) inspectors swipe a cloth over your luggage and then place it in an analyzer to check for explosives residue, they are using a device containing 63Ni, a radioactive isotope of nickel, made at ORNL. ORNL is the exclusive producer for 63Ni in North America and perhaps worldwide. "Our only competition would probably be Russia. They have high-flux research reactors and may well be supplying the material also,"

296

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What are the requirements? Safety Record The Agencies that Generate Rules that Promulgate the Transport of Radioactive Materials: Regulations to control the transport of radioactive material were initiated about 1935 by the Postal Service. Over the years, the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) became involved and in 1948 promulgated regulations as Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations. In 1966, DOT received hazardous materials regulatory authority that had been exercised by the ICC, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and United States Costal Guard (USCG). Currently, five groups generate rules governing the transport of radioactive material -- the DOT, NRC, USPS, DOE, and various State agencies. Among these, DOT and NRC are the primary agencies issuing regulations based on the model regulations developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

297

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What are the requirements? What are the requirements? Safety Record Radioactive material has been shipped in the U. S. for more than 50 years with no occurrences of death or serious injury from exposure of the contents of these shipments. Hazardous Material Shipments for 1 Year Internationally 300 million United States 3 million DOE <1% or 5,000 (out of 3 million) [U.S. DOE NTP, 1999, Transporting Radioactive Materials] All radioactive shipments are regulated by the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Since transport accidents cannot be prevented, the regulations are primarily designed to: Insure safety in routine handling situations for minimally hazardous material Insure integrity under all circumstances for highly dangerous materials

298

Completion of the Radioactive Materials Packaging Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radioactive Materials Packaging Handbook: Design, Operation and Maintenance, which will serve as a replacement for the Cask Designers Guide (Shappert, 1970), has now been completed and submitted to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) electronics publishing group for layout and printing; it is scheduled to be printed in late spring 1998. The Handbook, written by experts in their particular fields, is a compilation of technical chapters that address the design aspects of a package intended for transporting radioactive material in normal commerce; it was prepared under the direction of M. E. Wangler of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is intended to provide a wealth of technical guidance that will give designers a better understanding of the regulatory approval process, preferences of regulators on specific aspects of package design, and the types of analyses that should be considered when designing a package to carry radioactive materials.

Shappert, L.B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Enhancement factors for resuspended aerosol radioactivity: Effects of topsoil disturbance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enhancement factor for airborne radionuclides resuspended by wind is defined as the ratio of the activity density (Bq g{sup {minus}1}) in the aerosol to the activity density in the underlying surface of contaminated soil. Enhancement factors are useful for assessment of worst-case exposure scenarios and transport conditions, and are one of the criteria for setting environmental standards for radioactivity in soil. This paper presents results of experimental studies where resuspension of {sup 239}Pu was measured when air concentrations were equilibrated to the soil surface. Enhancement factors were observed for several types of man-made disturbances (bulldozer-blading, soil raking, vacuum-cleaning) and natural disturbances (springtime thaw, soil-drying, wildfire). For some cases, enhancement factors are compared over range of geographical locations (Bikini Atoll, California, Nevada, and South Carolina). The particle-size distributions of aerosol activity are compared to particle-size distributions of the underlying soil.

Shinn, J.H.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

CRAD, Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 CRAD, Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 June 22, 2009 Radioactive Waste Management, Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-33, Rev. 0) The following provides an overview of the typical activities that will be performed to collect information to evaluate the management of radioactive wastes and implementation of integrated safety management. The following Inspection Activities apply to all Inspection Criteria listed below: Review radioactive waste management and control processes and implementing procedures. Interview personnel including waste management supervision, staff, and subject matter experts. Review project policies, procedures, and corresponding documentation related to ISM core function

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emer Emer Emer Emer Emer Emergency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a Transportation ransportation ransportation ransportation ransportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional

302

ORISE: University Radioactive Ion Beam Consortium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

UNIRIB UNIRIB Research Overview Physics Topics Equipment Development Education and Training People Publications Overview 2009 Bibliography 2008 Bibliography 2007 Bibliography 2006 Bibliography How to Work With Us Contact Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education University Radioactive Ion Beam Consortium The University Radioactive Ion Beam (UNIRIB) consortium is a division of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) focused on cutting-edge nuclear physics research. UNIRIB is a collaborative partnership involving Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and nine member universities that leverages national laboratory and university resources to effectively accomplish the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) strategic goals in the fundamental structure of nuclei.

303

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emergency Response Effects of Radiation History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Agencies U. S. Department of Transportation (DOT), U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Postal Services (USPS) U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Conference of State Legislatures - Environment, Energy and Transportation Program, Hazardous and Radioactive Materials International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulations Code of Federal Regulations: Title 10 - Energy Code of Federal Regulations: Title 10, PART 71 - Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material Code of Federal Regulations: Title 49 - Transportation Code of Federal Regulations: Title 49, PART 173 - Shippers - General

304

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid liquid radioactive Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 Summary: radioactive wastes in liquid or solid forms. Oil and gas production, as an example, also results... a radioactive source, plus radioactive...

305

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sources » Fossil » Natural Gas Sources » Fossil » Natural Gas Natural Gas July 30, 2009 DOE Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates The U.S. Department of Energy today told Congress the agency is leading a nationwide program in search of naturally occurring natural gas hydrates - a potentially significant storehouse of methane--with far reaching implications for the environment and the nation's future energy supplies. May 18, 2009 DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum Operators A comprehensive publication detailing the oil-rich fields of Utah and nearby states, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, can now provide petroleum companies and related service providers with the geologic, geographic, and engineering data needed to tap into these resources.

306

natural gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

natural gasoline, condensate, distillate [Liquid hydrocarbons, generally clear or pale straw-coloured and of high API gravity (above 6o), that are produced with wet gas] ? Gasbenzin n, Gasolin n ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Physics with energetic radioactive ion beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beams of short-lived, unstable nuclei have opened new dimensions in studies of nuclear structure and reactions. Such beams also provide key information on reactions that take place in our sun and other stars. Status and prospects of the physics with energetic radioactive beams are summarized.

Henning, W.F.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

High-level radioactive wastes. Supplement 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains information on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from August 1982 through December 1983. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 1452 citations.

McLaren, L.H. (ed.)

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Radioactivity: Olympic Games: dirty and decaying?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radioactivity: Olympic Games: dirty and decaying? Awards: SciCast rewards the best in scientific short films Conference: Teachers conference is big in Boston Workshop: Experts and teachers mingle in Mexico Awards: Olympiad holds lavish ceremony Cinema: Indiana Jones has a skull full of physics Conference: ESERA announces Turkish delight for 2009 Forthcoming Events

310

Canister arrangement for storing radioactive waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The subject invention relates to a canister arrangement for jointly storing high level radioactive chemical waste and metallic waste resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel elements. A cylindrical steel canister is provided with an elongated centrally disposed billet of the metallic waste and the chemical waste in vitreous form is disposed in the annulus surrounding the billet.

Lorenzo, Donald K. (Knoxville, TN); Van Cleve, Jr., John E. (Kingston, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program: 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1995 to evaluate these vessels and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections performed since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report

McNatt, F.G. Sr.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

International Standards and Units of Radioactivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... latter could be measured and their radium contents expressed in grams. For the measurement of radon, grams (or cubic centimetres) of this gas are impracticable as units, and it ... gas are impracticable as units, and it was therefore decided to use as unit of radon the quantity which is in radioactive equilibrium with 1 gm. of radium; it was ...

1947-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

313

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Radioactive Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radioactive Materials Radioactive Materials Refer to transportation guidelines in the applicable Radioactive Work Authorization (RWA). Contact the Radiation Protection Group (x7652) if transportation assistance is needed or if radioactive materials need to be shipped. Refer to RPG's Zone sheet to identifying the RCT or HP for your building: https://ehswprod.lbl.gov/rpg/who_to_call.shtml Need radioactive material shipped from LBNL? Please complete the request for shipment form online, print, sign, and forward to your building assigned RPG support person: RPG Transportation - Request for Shipment Form: http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/rpg/assets/docs/Transportation4.pdf Receiving radioactive material at LBNL? If receiving radioactive material at LBNL; radioactive material should be sent to the following address:

314

Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes April 18, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Danielle Miller, DOE-Idaho...

315

Radioactive waste management and decommissioning of accelerator facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Austria). EPAC. 2 International Atomic Energy Agency. Management of radioactive waste...Association, October 2008: Buenos Aires, Argentina. Argentina: SAR editor. 5 International Atomic Energy Agency. Classification of radioactive......

Luisa Ulrici; Matteo Magistris

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Depleted uranium: a contemporary controversy for the teaching of radioactivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium has been used in recent military conflicts and the media have reported the danger from radioactivity. This context provides a good way to keep students' attention when introducing the subject of radioactivity at GCSE or advanced level.

Mark Whalley

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Application of Field-Flow Fractionation to Radioactive Waste Disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Argonne National Laboratory Specialists Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Nuclear Waste Management / Radioactive Waste

Marcus N. Myers; Kathy A. Graff; J. Calvin Giddings

318

A naturally occurring nucleotide polymorphism in the orf2/folc promoter is associated with Streptococcus suis virulence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Streptococcus suis is a major problem in the swine industry causing meningitis, arthritis and pericarditis in piglets. Pathogenesis of S. suis is poorly understood. We previously showed that in...

Astrid de Greeff; Herma Buys; Jerry M Wells; Hilde E Smith

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were the implementation of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 using the R/V JOIDES Resolution and the deployment of all required equipment and personnel to provide the required services during this expedition. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. New ODP Pressure Coring System (PCS) aluminum autoclave chambers were fabricated prior to the expedition. During the expedition, 16 PCS autoclaves containing pressure cores were X-rayed before and after depressurization using a modified Geotek MSCL-P (multi-sensor core logger-pressure) system. These PCS cores were density scanned using the MSCL-V (multi-sensor core logger-vertical) during depressurization to monitor gas evolution. The MSCL-V was set up in a 20-foot-long refrigerated container provided by Texas A&M University through the JOI contract with TAMRF. IODP Expedition 311 was the first time that PCS cores were examined before (using X-ray), during (using MSCL-V gamma density) and after (using X-ray) degassing to determine the actual volume and distribution of sediment and gas hydrate in the pressurized core, which will be important for more accurate determination of mass balances between sediment, gas, gas hydrate, and fluids in the samples collected. Geotek, Ltd was awarded a contract by JOI to provide equipment and personnel to perform pressure coring and related work on IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrates). Geotek, Ltd. provided an automated track for use with JOI's infrared camera systems. Four auxiliary monitors showed infrared core images in real time to aid hydrate identification and sampling. Images were collected from 185 cores during the expedition and processed to provide continuous core temperature data. The HYACINTH pressure coring tools, subsystems, and core logging systems were mobilized to Astoria, Oregon. Both HYACINTH pressure coring tools, the HRC (HYACE Rotary Corer) and the FPC (Fugro Pressure Corer) were mobilized and used during the expedition. Two HYACINTH engineers supervised the use of the tools and five good pressure cores were obtained. Velocity, density and X-ray linear scanning data were collected from these cores at near in situ pressure using the MSCL-P system. Dr. Barry Freifeld from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory provided an X-ray source and detector for X-ray imaging of pressure cores and helped Geotek with the design and mobilization of the MSCL-P system. Pressure core handling, transfer, and logging was performed in a refrigerated 20-foot container supplied by Geotek, Ltd. After scanning, the pressure cores were stored for on-shore analysis in aluminum barrels. Additional studies were conducted at the Pacific Geoscience Center (PGC), where a shore based laboratory was established after Expedition 311.

Frank Rack; Peter Schultheiss; IODP Expedition 311 Scientific Party

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

A soluble class II cytokine receptor, IL-22RA2, is a naturally occurring IL-22 antagonist  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Radiation Hybrid Mapping Panel (Research Genetics, Huntsville, AL) in conjunction with publicly available servers (http://shgc-www.stanford.edu/, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/, and http://genome.UCSC.edu). The PCRs were carried...

Wenfeng Xu; Scott R. Presnell; Julia Parrish-Novak; Wayne Kindsvogel; Steve Jaspers; Zhi Chen; Stacey R. Dillon; Zeren Gao; Teresa Gilbert; Karen Madden; Stacy Schlutsmeyer; Lena Yao; Theodore E. Whitmore; Yasmin Chandrasekher; Francis J. Grant; Mark Maurer; Laura Jelinek; Harold Storey; Ty Brender; Angie Hammond; Stavros Topouzis; Christopher H. Clegg; Donald C. Foster

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were the deployment of tools and measurement systems for testing on ODP Leg 201, which is intended to study hydrate deposits on the Peru margin as part of other scientific investigations. Additional accomplishments were related to the continuing evolution of tools and measurements systems in preparation for deployment on ODP Leg 204, Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon in July 2002. The design for PCS Gas Manifold was finalized and parts were procured to assemble the gas manifold and deploy this system with the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) tool on ODP Leg 201. The PCS was deployed 17 times during ODP Leg 201 and successfully retrieved cores from a broad range of lithologies and sediment depths along the Peru margin. Eleven deployments were entirely successful, collecting between 0.5 and 1.0 meters of sediment at greater than 75% of hydrostatic pressure. The PCS gas manifold was used in conjunction with the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) throughout ODP Leg 201 to measure the total volume and composition of gases recovered in sediment cores associated with methane hydrates. The results of these deployments will be the subject of a future progress report. The FUGRO Pressure Corer (FPC), one of the HYACE/HYACINTH pressure coring tools, and two FUGRO engineers were deployed on the D/V JOIDES Resolution during ODP Legs 201 to field-test this coring system at sites located offshore Peru. The HYACINTH project is a European Union (EU) funded effort to develop tools to characterize methane hydrate and measure physical properties under in-situ conditions. The field-testing of these tools provides a corollary benefit to DOE/NETL at no cost to this project. The opportunity to test these tools on the D/V JOIDES Resolution was negotiated as part of a cooperative agreement between JOI/ODP and the HYACINTH partners. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were deployed onboard the R/V JOIDES Resolution and used extensively during ODP Leg 201. Preliminary results indicate successful deployments of these tools. An infrared-thermal imaging system (IR-TIS) was delivered to JOI/ODP for testing and use on ODP Leg 201 to identify methane hydrate intervals in the recovered cores. The results of these experiments will be the subject of a future progress report. This report presents an overview of the primary methods used for deploying the ODP memory tools and PCS on ODP Leg 201 and the preliminary operational results of this leg. Discussions regarding the laboratory analysis of the recovered cores and downhole measurements made during these deployments will be covered in a future progress report.

Frank Rack; Derryl Schroeder; Michael Storms; ODP Leg 201 Shipboard Scientific Party

2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Tissue-Specific Gene Silencing Mediated by a Naturally Occurring Chalcone Synthase Gene Cluster in Glycine max  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...3.5 mM MgCl2, and 0.025 units/muL of AmpliTaq Gold DNA polymerase...deoxynucleotide triphosphate, 2.5 units of Taq polymerase (Invitrogen...to another gene for a house-keeping isoform. Plant J. 13, 267-273...transmitted by grafting from silenced stocks to non-silenced scions. EMBO...

Jigyasa H. Tuteja; Steven J. Clough; Wan-Ching Chan; Lila O. Vodkin

323

Natural System  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural System Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development - FY11 Progress Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Program Yifeng Wang (SNL) Michael Simpson (INL) Scott Painter (LANL) Hui-Hai Liu (LBNL) Annie B. Kersting (LLNL) July 15, 2011 FCRD-USED-2011-000223 UFD Natural System Evaluation - FY11 Year-End Report July 15, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

324

Film Badge Application Radioactive Material Package Receipt Log  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGE RECEIPT LOG DATE: DELIVERED BY: AUTHORIZED BY: Contamination Check DPM/100 cm2APPENDIX A Film Badge Application Radioactive Material Package Receipt Log Radioactive Material Package Receipt Form (Off-Campus Locations) Radiation / Contamination Survey Form #12;PERSONNEL MONITORING

Slatton, Clint

325

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal, argillite is being of the radioactive waste disposal, the host rock will be subjected to various thermo-hydro-mechanical loadings, thermal solicitation comes from the heat emitting from the radioactive waste packages. On one hand

Boyer, Edmond

326

Survey of National Programs for Managing High-Level Radioactive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of National Programs for Managing High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel A Report to Congress and the Secretary of Energy October 2009 #12 Safety (Germany) Peter De Preter: National Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials

327

Study of gel materials as radioactive 222Rn gas detectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......studied as radioactive radon gas detectors. The detection...diffusion of the radioactive gas in the gel material...easy handling and low cost of the gel material...and other radioactive gases. INTRODUCTION The objective...homogeneity of the device production, dimensions, almost......

G. Espinosa; J. I. Golzarri; J. Rickards; R. B. Gammage

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 9 | JUNE 2013 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 325 news & views  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of emission can be envisaged, and have even been observed to occur naturally in outer space and in planetaryNATURE PHYSICS | VOL 9 | JUNE 2013 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 325 news & views LASERS Amplified atmospheres1,2 . For instance, stellar gases are known to emit surprisingly strong radiation on certain

Loss, Daniel

329

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: July 3, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, June 18-25), with price decreases generally occurring in producing areas in the Gulf of Mexico region and price increases at trading locations in the Rockies, the Midcontinent, and the Northeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.17 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $12.76. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of rising prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. After trading at $13.20 per MMBtu on Monday, the futures contract for July delivery decreased by 45 cents in value over the next 2 days and ended the

330

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2008 30, 2008 Next Release: November 6, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 29) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States decreased from Wednesday to Wednesday, October 22-29, with relatively large declines of more than 10 percent occurring in markets west of the Mississippi River and more modest price movements in the eastern half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.36 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.58. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased for the report week. The futures contract for November delivery, for which the final day of trading was yesterday (October 29), decreased by

331

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 8, 2009 Next Release: June 4, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 27, 2009) Natural gas spot prices declined this report week (May 20-27), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.49. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as moderate temperatures in most of the country limited demand. The futures contract for June delivery expired yesterday, May 27, at a price of $3.538 per MMBtu, which is the second-lowest monthly closing price for a NYMEX near-month contract in more than 6 years. Meanwhile, the price

332

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 0, 2009 Next Release: August 27, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 19, 2009) Natural gas spot prices declined this report week (August 12-19), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. The Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.34 to $3.02 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as supplies continued to be viewed as more than adequate to address near-term demand, including heating-related demand increases this winter. The futures contract for September delivery decreased by $0.36 on the week to $3.12 per MMBtu. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday is estimated to

333

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: November 20, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, November 5, to Thursday, November 13) Natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday (November 5), failing to respond to the increase in heating load that occurred across much of the country, particularly in the Midwest and the Rocky Mountains. Since last Wednesday, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.31 after the intraweek run-up to more than $7 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for the near-month contract decreased in five of the six trading sessions covered by this report, resulting in a weekly net decrease of $0.931 per MMBtu. The

334

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2008 3, 2008 Next Release: October 30, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 22) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States this report week increased as a result of cold weather in some major gas consuming areas of the country, several ongoing pipeline maintenance projects, and the continuing production shut-ins in the Gulf of Mexico region. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month contract (November 2008) increased on the week to $6.777 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) as of yesterday (October 22). The net weekly increase occurred during a week in which the price increased in three trading sessions. As of Friday, October 17, working gas in underground storage totaled

335

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2008 0, 2008 Next Release: July 17, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot prices declined sharply this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, July 2-9), with the largest decreases generally occurring in consuming regions in the Northeast and Midwest. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.22 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $12.09. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of rising prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. After the August 2008 contract reached a daily settlement price of $13.578 per MMBtu (a record high for this contract) on July 3, the price decreased by $1.57 per MMBtu over the next three trading sessions and ended the week

336

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2009 26, 2009 Next Release: April 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 25, 2009) Spot prices increased at all trading locations this week, with the biggest increases occurring in the Northeast. Many market locations ended the week with spot prices above $4 per million British thermal units (MMBtu). During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.38 to $4.13 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased, climbing by $0.65 to $4.329 for the April 2009 contract. Prices for the April 2009 contract reached their highest levels since February 13, 2009, on March 24. Natural gas in storage was 1,654 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

337

NATURE STUDY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...last two numbers of SCIENCE have appeared articles by Drs. Wheeler and Chapman on the abuses of nature writing as exemplified...imprint of Rand, IeNally and Co., 1903, and its author is Katherine E. Dopp, of the Extension Division of the Chicago University...

E. C. CASE

1904-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Marketing Mother Natures Molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marketing Mother Natures Molecules ... Yet molecules made by Mother Nature, or derivatives thereof, still account for nearly half of the drugs on the market. ...

LISA JARVIS

2012-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

339

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of about 40 percent from the beginning of the year, when a level of 1,267 natural gas rotary rigs were reported on January 2. The decline in natural gas rigs has occurred in...

340

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Packagings are used to safely transport radioactive materials across the United States in over 1.6 million shipments per year. [Weiner et. al., 1991, Risk Analysis, Vol. 11, No. 4, p. 663] Most shipments are destined for hospitals and medical facilities. Other destinations include industrial, research and manufacturing plants, nuclear power plants and national defense facilities. The last comprehensive survey showed that less than 1 percent of these shipments involve high-level radioactive material. [Javitz et. al., 1985, SAND84-7174, Tables 4 and 8] The types of materials transported include: Surface Contaminated Object (SCO) Low Specific Activity (LSA) materials, Low-Level Waste (LLW),

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

1969 AUDIT OF SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

969 AUDIT OF SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE 969 AUDIT OF SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE bY C . Ashley A p r i l 1970 Radiological Sciences Division Savannah River Laboratory E. 1. du Pont de Nemours & Co. Aiken, South Carolina 29801 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best avaiiable original document. . . . CONTENTS Page I n t r o d u c t i o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Releases t o t h e Atmosphere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 S e p a r a t i o n s Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 TNX and Building 773-A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Reactor Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Releases t o E f f l u e n t Streams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 S e p a r a t i o n s Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 DArea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 R e a c t o r A r e a s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

342

Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18, 2012 18, 2012 Media Contact: Danielle Miller, DOE-Idaho Operations, 208-526-5709, millerdc@id.doe.gov Rick Dale, Idaho Treatment Group, 208-557-6552, rick.dale@amwtp.inl.gov Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes IDAHO FALLS, ID- Operations to retrieve the estimated 6,900 cubic meters of stored transuranic waste remaining at the Idaho site began this week at the U.S. Department of Energy�s Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. Waste retrieval resumes at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. The resumption of work comes after a nearly two-year stoppage of retrieval operations �A significant investment has been made in terms of time and dollars that will allow employees to safely retrieve the final radioactive waste that has been stored aboveground at the Idaho site for more than four

343

ScienceDirect JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ontine at wtYw.sciencedlrect.com ontine at wtYw.sciencedlrect.com ^-- 9 e* + - . , * * ScienceDirect JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY Journal o f Environmental Radioactivity 91 (2006) 27-40 www.elsevier.co~nAocate/jenvrad Radionuclides in marine macroalgae from Amchitka and Kiska Islands in the Aleutians: establishing a baseline for future biomonitoring Joanna Burger Michael Gochfeld C-d, David S . Kosson b7e, Charles W. Powers b-d*e7 Stephen Jewett b*f, Barry Friedlander b7d, Heloise Chenelot b=f7 Conrad D. Volz b-8, Christian Jeitner a-b Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 6 0 4 Allison R o a d . Piscataway, N.I 0 8 8 5 4 - 8 0 8 2 , USA Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Piscataway. N.I 0 8 8 5 4 . USA Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSZ), Piscataway, NJ 0

344

Solar Powered Radioactive Air Monitoring Stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring of ambient air for radioactive material is required as stipulated in the PNNL Site radioactive air license. Sampling ambient air at identified preferred locations could not be initially accomplished because utilities were not readily available. Therefore, solar powered environmental monitoring systems were considered as a possible option. PNNL purchased two 24-V DC solar powered environmental monitoring systems which consisted of solar panels, battery banks, and sampling units. During an approximate four month performance evaluation period, the solar stations operated satisfactorily at an on-site test location. They were subsequently relocated to their preferred locations in June 2012 where they continue to function adequately under the conditions found in Richland, Washington.

Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Gervais, Todd L.

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

345

Standard Model tests with trapped radioactive atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the use of laser cooling and trapping for Standard Model tests, focusing on trapping of radioactive isotopes. Experiments with neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques are testing several basic predictions of electroweak unification. For nuclear $\\beta$ decay, demonstrated trap techniques include neutrino momentum measurements from beta-recoil coincidences, along with methods to produce highly polarized samples. These techniques have set the best general constraints on non-Standard Model scalar interactions in the first generation of particles. They also have the promise to test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, to search for tensor interactions, and to search for new sources of time reversal violation. There are also possibilites for exotic particle searches. Measurements of the strength of the weak neutral current can be assisted by precision atomic experiments using traps of small numbers of radioactive atoms, and sensitivity to possible time-reversal violating electric dipole moments can be improved.

J. A. Behr; G. Gwinner

2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

346

Qualifying radioactive waste forms for geologic disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a phased strategy that defines specific program-management activities and critical documentation for producing radioactive waste forms, from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, that will be acceptable for geologic disposal by the US Department of Energy. The documentation of these waste forms begins with the decision to develop the pyroprocessing technology for spent fuel conditioning and ends with production of the last waste form for disposal. The need for this strategy is underscored by the fact that existing written guidance for establishing the acceptability for disposal of radioactive waste is largely limited to borosilicate glass forms generated from the treatment of aqueous reprocessing wastes. The existing guidance documents do not provide specific requirements and criteria for nonstandard waste forms such as those generated from pyrochemical processing operations.

Jardine, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Experiment Hazard Class 8.1 - Radioactive Materials/Samples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 - Radioactive Materials 1 - Radioactive Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving radioactive materials as samples. The requirements of this hazard class also apply to sealed radioactive sources that are used as a sample (i.e. a target for x-ray radiation). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. The current requirements can be found in the APS Policy for Conducting Radioactive Sample Experiments in APS Experiment Enclosures. NOTE: The APS must be notified of shipment of any radioactive materials to the site well in advance of the proposed experiment. All radioactive materials must arrive through Argonne Receiving in Building 46 and the Argonne Materials Control & Accountability group (MC&A). Please contact

348

Radioactive Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex The EMSL Radiochemistry Annex, located in the 3410 Material Science and Technology Building, is authorized to work with small to moderate amounts of radioactive material. In order to work within 3410 facility radiological limits, potential users must provide detailed information about the type and quantity of radioactive material, the form and packaging of the material and the type of work that will be performed at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex. Radioactive material includes both purchased radioactive material and samples that contain concentrations of radioactive material in excess of normal background levels. Please realize that some samples that may not be considered to be radioactive material at your institution will be managed as radioactive material at

349

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection This act provides a comprehensive strategy for the siting of commercial low-level waste compactors and other waste management facilities, and to ensure the proper transportation, disposal and storage of low-level radioactive waste. Commercial incineration of radioactive wastes is prohibited. Licenses are required for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities not licensed to accept low-level radioactive waste. Disposal at

350

Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota) Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Fuel Distributor Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact, which provides for the cooperative management of low-level radioactive waste. The Compact is administered by a commission, which can regulate and impose fees on in-state radioactive waste generators. The states of Arizona, California,

351

Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RW-0583 RW-0583 QA:N/A Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management EVALUATION OF TECHNICAL IMPACT ON THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT TECHNICAL BASIS RESULTING FROM ISSUES RAISED BY EMAILS OF FORMER PROJECT PARTICIPANTS February 2006 This page intentionally left blank. Table of Contents Executive Summary .............................................................................................................v 1. Introduction..............................................................................................................1 1.1 Background ....................................................................................................1 1.2 Role of the USGS in Yucca Mountain Work.................................................2

352

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FEMA 358, 05/10 FEMA 358, 05/10 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q Q Law Enforcement ____________________________________ Fire ___________________________________________ Medical ____________________________________________ State Radiological Assistance ___________________________ Local Government Official ______________________________ Local Emergency Management Agency ___________________ State Emergency Management Agency ___________________ HAZMAT Team ______________________________________ Water Pollution Control ________________________________ CHEMTEL (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-255-3924 _________ CHEMTREC (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-424-9300 _______

353

Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research project was to develop an improved understanding of how electriexecy driven processes, including electrocoalescence, acoustic agglomeration, and electric filtration, may be employed to efficiently treat problems caused by the formation of aerosols during DOE waste treatment operations. The production of aerosols during treatment and retrieval operations in radioactive waste tanks and during thermal treatment operations such as calcination presents a significant problem of cost, worker exposure, potential for release, and increased waste volume.

David W. DePaoli; Ofodike A. Ezekoye; Costas Tsouris; Valmor F. de Almeida

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

354

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

355

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

356

Radioactive waste management in the former USSR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste materials--and the methods being used to treat, process, store, transport, and dispose of them--have come under increased scrutiny over last decade, both nationally and internationally. Nuclear waste practices in the former Soviet Union, arguably the world's largest nuclear waste management system, are of obvious interest and may affect practices in other countries. In addition, poor waste management practices are causing increasing technical, political, and economic problems for the Soviet Union, and this will undoubtedly influence future strategies. this report was prepared as part of a continuing effort to gain a better understanding of the radioactive waste management program in the former Soviet Union. the scope of this study covers all publicly known radioactive waste management activities in the former Soviet Union as of April 1992, and is based on a review of a wide variety of literature sources, including documents, meeting presentations, and data base searches of worldwide press releases. The study focuses primarily on nuclear waste management activities in the former Soviet Union, but relevant background information on nuclear reactors is also provided in appendixes.

Bradley, D.J.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Natural ventilation of the Paintings Room in the Altamira cave  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Radon-222 is a noble gas of the radioactive series of 238U, an element that ... per 106). Because of its gaseous nature and its greater concentration within the Earth, radon escapes through the interstices of the soil to the atmosphere, with an exhalation rate ...

P. L. Fernndez; I. Gutierrez; L. S. Quinds; J. Soto; E. Villar

1986-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

359

Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature.

Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L. (Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature.

Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 26, 2007) 9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 26, 2007) Since Wednesday, July 11, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub declined 41 cents per MMBtu, or 6 percent, since Wednesday, July 11, to $6.24 per MMBtu. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (July 18) at $6.528 per MMBtu, falling 7 cents per MMBtu, or 1 percent since last Wednesday, July 11. Natural gas in storage was 2,692 Bcf as of July 13, which is 15.7 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $2.45 per barrel on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $75.03 per barrel or $12.94 per MMBtu. Prices: Natural gas prices fell at virtually all market locations since last Wednesday, July 11, with declines of 25 to 50 cents per MMBtu or about 4 to 12 percent. Moderating temperatures in most areas of the Lower 48 States likely accounted for the widespread declines, as cooler temperatures mitigated cooling demand for natural gas. On a regional basis, price declines averaged between 18 and 58 cents per MMBtu, or 3 and 13 percent, since last Wednesday, July 11. The largest price decreases since last Wednesday, July 11, occurred principally in the Rocky Mountain region, where prices fell by more than 57 cents per MMBtu, or 13 percent on average. By far, the smallest decreases occurred in the Arizona/Nevada and Florida regions, where prices fell by 18 and 24 cents per MMBtu on average, respectively, with the Florida citygate posting the highest price in the Lower 48 States at $8.00 per MMBtu. Elsewhere, average price decreases by region ranged between 30 and 43 cents per MMBtu. Despite these declines and lower electric generation demand relative to last year, prices generally exceeded levels reported last year at this time, with prices at the Henry Hub $0.22 per MMBtu or 4 percent above last year's level. The principal exception to the year-over-year price increases occurred in the Rocky Mountain region, where prices at selected markets were between $1.87 and $2.28 per MMBtu or about 35 and 43 percent below last year's level.

362

Comprehensive low-level radioactive waste management plan for the Commonwealth of Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part I of the Comprehensive Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Plan for the Commonwealth of Kentucky discusses the alternatives that have been examined to manage the low-level radioactive waste currently generated in the state. Part II includes a history of the commercial operation of the Maxey Flats Nuclear Waste Disposal Site in Fleming County, Kentucky. The reasons for closure of the facility by the Human Resources Cabinet, the licensing agency, are identified. The site stabilization program managed by the Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet is described in Chapter VI. Future activities to be conducted at the Maxey Flats Disposal Site will include site stabilization activities, routine operations and maintenance, and environmental monitoring programs as described in Chapter VII.

Carr, R.M.; Mills, D.; Perkins, C.; Riddle, R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha contaminated material Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

possible. Radioactively Contaminated... consumption by removing levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials found in raw water supplies... . As large quantities of water...

364

Gonyaulux polyedra  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

single, naturally occurring phytoplankton cells after the test expIosion and measure their radioactivity, and also to measure the activity taken LIP from radioactive...

1999-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

365

Radioactivity In Marine Organisms From Northeast Atlantic Ocean  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naturally-occurring radionuclides such as {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Po, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 232}Th, and artificial radionuclides such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am, were measured in a large number of marine species. In common fish species, typical concentrations of {sup 210}Po ranged from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 4} mBq kg{sup -1} (wet weight), {sup 226}Ra concentrations ranged from 1x10{sup 2} to 5xl0{sup 2} mBq kg{sup -1}, {sup 238}U was at about 10 mBq kg{sup -1} and {sup 232}Th at about 0.5 mBq kg{sup -1}. Radiation doses to marine organisms originated by naturally-occurring and artificial radionuclides accumulated in tissues and by external radiation sources were computed and compared. Internal sources generally give higher contribution to the absorbed radiation dose than external sources. Amongst radionuclides accumulated in fish muscle and acting as internal radiation sources, natural {sup 210}Po and {sup 40}K give the largest contribution to the absorbed radiation dose, while artificial radionuclides such as {sup 137}Cs and {sup 239+240}Pu contribute with less than 0.5% to the absorbed radiation dose from all internal sources.

Carvalho, Fernando P.; Oliveira, Joao M. [Nuclear and Technological Institute (ITN) Department of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

366

CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48 RADIOACTIVE WASTE SAMPLE USING FBSR TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC DESTRUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble fractions of the product solids. Radioanalytical measurements were performed on the Tank 48H feed material and on the dissolved products in order to estimate retention of Cs-137 in the process. All aspects of prior crucible scale testing with simulant Tank 48H slurry were demonstrated to be repeatable with the actual radioactive feed. Tetraphenylborate destruction was shown to be >99% and the final solid product is sodium carbonate crystalline material. Less than 10 wt% of the final solid products are insoluble components comprised of Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn containing sludge components and Ti from monosodium titanate present in Tank 48H. REDOX measurements on the radioactive solid products indicate a reducing atmosphere with extremely low oxygen fugacity--evidence that the sealed crucible tests performed in the presence of a reductant (sugar) under constant argon purge were successful in duplicating the pyrolysis reactions occurring with the Tank 48H feed. Soluble anion measurements confirm that using sugar as reductant at 1X stoichiometry was successful in destroying nitrate/nitrite in the Tank 48H feed. Radioanalytical measurements indicate that {approx}75% of the starting Cs-137 is retained in the solid product. No attempts were made to analyze/measure other potential Cs-137 in the process, i.e., as possible volatile components on the inner surface of the alumina crucible/lid or as offgas escaping the sealed crucible. The collective results from these crucible scale tests on radioactive material are in good agreement with simulant testing. Crucible scale processing has been shown to duplicate the complex reactions of an actual fluidized bed steam reformer. Thus this current testing should provide a high degree of confidence that upcoming bench-scale steam reforming with radioactive Tank 48H slurry will be successful in tetraphenylborate destruction and production of sodium carbonate product.

Hammond, C; William Pepper, W

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

367

Environmental consequences of postulated radionuclide releases from the Battelle Memorial Institute Columbus Laboratories JN-1b Building at the West Jefferson site as a result of severe natural phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated radionuclide releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Battelle Memorial Institute Columbus Laboratories JN-1b Building at the West Jefferson site. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Maximum radioactive material deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum radioactive material deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the events are well below the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The likely maximum residual contamination from beta and gamma emitters are far below the background produced by fallout from nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere.

Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 29, 2007) 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 29, 2007) As the bitter cold has evolved to more moderate temperatures, natural gas spot prices have eased through most of the country. During the report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 14-21), the Henry Hub spot price declined 4 cents per MMBtu to $6.82. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts were slightly higher, as increases Tuesday and yesterday (March 20 and 21) more than offset decreases that occurred in the 3 previous trading days. The futures contract for April delivery, which is the first contract following the current heating season, increased 7.7 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.160. Relatively high levels of natural gas in working storage and decreasing prices for competing fuels likely contributed to falling natural gas spot prices this week. Working gas in storage as of Friday, March 16, was 1,533 Bcf, which is 18.5 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.17 per barrel on the week to $56.98, or $9.82 per MMBtu.

369

CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2008 FEE ADEQUACY ASSESSMENT LETTER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2008 FEE ADEQUACY ASSESSMENT CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2008 FEE ADEQUACY ASSESSMENT LETTER REPORT CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2008 FEE ADEQUACY ASSESSMENT LETTER REPORT This Fiscal Year 2008 Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Letter Report presents an evaluation of the adequacy of the one mill per kilowatt-hour fee paid by commercial nuclear power generators for the permanent disposal of their spent nuclear fuel by the Government. This evaluation recommends no fee change. CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 2008 FEE ADEQUACY ASSESSMENT LETTER REPORT More Documents & Publications FY 2007 Fee Adequacy, Pub 2008 Fiscal Year 2007 Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Fee Adequacy Assessment Report January 16, 2013 Secretarial Determination of the Adequacy of the Nuclear

370

Upgrading the Radioactive Waste Management Infrastructure in Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radionuclide uses in Azerbaijan are limited to peaceful applications in the industry, medicine, agriculture and research. The Baku Radioactive Waste Site (BRWS) 'IZOTOP' is the State agency for radioactive waste management and radioactive materials transport. The radioactive waste processing, storage and disposal facility is operated by IZOTOP since 1963 being significantly upgraded from 1998 to be brought into line with international requirements. The BRWS 'IZOTOP' is currently equipped with state-of-art devices and equipment contributing to the upgrade the radioactive waste management infrastructure in Azerbaijan in line with current internationally accepted practices. The IAEA supports Azerbaijan specialists in preparing syllabus and methodological materials for the Training Centre that is currently being organized on the base of the Azerbaijan BRWS 'IZOTOPE' for education of specialists in the area of safety management of radioactive waste: collection, sorting, processing, conditioning, storage and transportation. (authors)

Huseynov, A. [Baku Radioactive Waste Site IZOTOP, Baku (Azerbaijan); Batyukhnova, O. [State Unitary Enterprise Scientific and Industrial Association Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ojovan, M. [Sheffield Univ., Immobilisation Science Lab. (United Kingdom); Rowat, J. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Dept. of Nuclear Safety and Security, Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Low Level Radioactive Waste Authority (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low Level Radioactive Waste Authority (Michigan) Low Level Radioactive Waste Authority (Michigan) Low Level Radioactive Waste Authority (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Program Info State Michigan Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Department of Environmental Quality Federal laws passed in 1980 and 1985 made each state responsible for the low-level radioactive waste produced within its borders. Act 204 of 1987 created the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Authority (LLRWA) to fulfill state responsibilities under federal law for managing and assuring disposal capacity for the low-level radioactive waste produced in Michigan. The LLRWA began a facility siting process in 1989 under the statutory limits of Act 204. The LLRWA eventually determined that it was impossible to find a

372

Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management annual report to Congress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fifth Annual Report to Congress by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report covers the activities and expenditures of OCRWM during fiscal year 1987, which ended on September 30, 1987. The activities and accomplishments of OCRWM during fiscal year 1987 are discussed in chapters 1 through 9 of this report. The audited financial statements of the Nuclear Waste Fund are provided in chapter 10. Since the close of the fiscal year, a number of significant events have occurred. Foremost among them was the passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 (Amendments Act) on December 21, 1987, nearly 3 months after the end of the fiscal year covered by this report. As a result, some of the plans and activities discussed in chapters 1 through 9 are currently undergoing significant change or are being discontinued. Most prominent among the provisions of the Amendments Act is the designation of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the only candidate first repository site to be characterized. Therefore, the site characterization plans for Deaf Smith, Texas, and Hanford, Washington, discussed in chapter 3, will not be issued. The refocusing of the waste management program under the Amendments Act is highlighted in the epilogue, chapter 11. 68 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

NONE

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

RW - Radioactive Waste - Energy Conservation Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Unconsciously Unconsciously Negative Behaviors Consciously Negative Behaviors Consciously Positive Behaviors Unconsciously Positive Behaviors Education Motivation Repetition Permanent Change Figure 1 - The Phases of Behavior Change Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Energy Conservation Plan Summary: Development and implementation of this plan is being treated as a project. This serves two purposes. First, it increases familiarity with the precepts of project management and DOE Order 413. Secondly, project management provides a great structure for organizing and implementing the activities that will facilitate energy savings through behavioral changes. A project structure also helps define how the effort will begin and what constitutes success at the

374

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Council of State Governments Council of State Governments Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee May 15, 2012 Knoxville, Tennessee Revised Agenda 9 - 9:45 am Welcome, Introductions, and Committee Reports Report from co-chairs Tim Runyon (Illinois) Project update Lisa Janairo, CSG Midwest Work group reports Integrated Spent Fuel Management Work Group Teri Engelhart (Wisconsin) NTSF-related reports Planning Committee Tim Runyon (Illinois) Communications Ad Hoc Working Group Jane Beetem (Missouri) WIPP Security Communications Protocol Major Lance Evans (Iowa) Ad Hoc Working Group Information and Communications Work Group Lisa Janairo 9:45 - 10:45 am Committee Discussion Blue Ribbon Commission final report: state reactions, next steps

375

System for handling and storing radioactive waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for handling and storing spent reactor fuel and other solid radioactive waste, including canisters to contain the elements of solid waste, storage racks to hold a plurality of such canisters, storage bays to store these racks in isolation by means of shielded doors in the bays. This system also includes means for remotely positioning the racks in the bays and an access tunnel within which the remotely operated means is located to position a rack in a selected bay. The modular type of these bays will facilitate the construction of additional bays and access tunnel extension.

Anderson, John K. (San Diego, CA); Lindemann, Paul E. (Escondido, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

McCarthy, T.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

2p radioactivity studies with a TPC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After the discovery of two-proton radioactivity in 2002, an important effort has been made in order to observe each emitted particle individually. Energy and angular correlations between the protons should reveal details about the mechanism of this exotic decay mode. In this framework, an experiment has been performed at LISE/GANIL, where the two protons emitted in the decay of {sup 54}Zn have been individually observed for the first time. Angular and energy correlations were determined and allowed a first comparison with theoretical predictions.

Ascher, P.; Audirac, L.; Blank, B.; Delalee, F.; Demonchy, C. E.; Giovinazzo, J.; Leblanc, S.; Pedroza, J.-L.; Pibernat, J.; Serani, L. [Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan-Universite Bordeaux 1-UMR 5797 CNRS/IN2P3, Chemin du Solarium, BP120, 33175 Gradignan (France); Adimi, N. [Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan-Universite Bordeaux 1-UMR 5797 CNRS/IN2P3, Chemin du Solarium, BP120, 33175 Gradignan (France); Faculte de Physique, USTHB, B.P.32, El Alia, 16111 Bab Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria); Borcea, C.; Companis, I. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG6, Bucharest-Margurele (Romania); Brown, B. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); Oliveira Santos, F. de; Grevy, S.; Thomas, J.-C. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Caen Cedex05 (France); Grigorenko, L. V.; Perrot, L. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Srivastava, P. [Nuclear Physics Group, Department of Physics, University of Allahabad (India); and others

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability and Control Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

For use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating a sealed radioactive source accountability and control program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. In particular, this Guide provides guidance for achieving compliance with subpart M of 10 CFR 835. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

RECLAMATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive material packages are withdrawn from use for various reasons; loss of mission, decertification, damage, replacement, etc. While the packages themselves may be decertified, various components may still be able to perform to their required standards and find useful service. The Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems group of the Savannah River National Laboratory has been reducing the cost of producing new Type B Packagings by reclaiming, refurbishing, and returning to service the containment vessels from older decertified packagings. The program and its benefits are presented.

Abramczyk, G.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Bellamy, S.

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

380

Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating high-level radioactive waste material in a repository is claimed. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between juxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

Schweitzer, D.G.; Davis, M.S.

1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating radioactive waste material in a repository. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between judxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

Schweitzer, Donald G. (Bayport, NY); Davis, Mary S. (Wading River, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Fusion Induced by Radioactive Ion Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of radioactive beams opens a new frontier for fusion studies. The coupling to the continuum can be explored with very loosely bound nuclei. Experiments were performed with beams of nuclei at or near the proton and neutron drip-lines to measure fusion and associated reactions in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In addition, the fusion yield is predicted to be enhanced in reactions involving very neutron-rich unstable nuclei. Experimental measurements were carried out to investigate if it is feasible to use such beams to produce new heavy elements. The current status of these experimental activities is given in this review.

J. F. Liang; C. Signorini

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

383

Current Regulations and Guidance - New Approaches for Risk-Informed Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the historical foundations and future challenges for commercial low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) management in the United States. LLRW has been managed at government facilities since the beginning of the nuclear age and in the commercial sector since the early 1960's. Over the intervening years many technical, management and regulatory changes have occurred. Significant progress has been made in waste form, waste packaging and in recognizing radionuclides important to performance of disposal technologies and disposal facilities. This presentation will examine approaches using existing regulations and risk-informed approaches to improve guidance, licensing and management of LLRW. (authors)

Ryan, M.T. Ph.D.; CHP [Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste and Materials, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C. (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

385

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

386

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

387

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

388

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

389

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

390

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

391

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

392

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

393

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

394

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

395

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

396

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

397

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

398

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

399

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

400

South Carolina Radioactive Waste Transportation and Disposal Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health and Environmental Control is responsible for regulating the transportation of radioactive waste, with some exceptions, into or within the state for storage, disposal, or...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

now track shipments of radioactive materials and access transportation information on mobile devices. Transportation Tracking and Communication System users can now track...

402

EIS-0286: Hanford Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement (HSW EIS) analyzes the proposed waste management practices at the Hanford Site.

403

Geopolymeric Agent for Immobilization of Radioactive Ashes after Biomass Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solidification of low-level radioactive wastes obtained after biomass burning was studied. Two solidification modes using Portland...- 6 g cm- 2 day- 1.... Thus, su...

A. D. Chervonnyi; N. A. Chervonnaya

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes Maryland's entrance into the Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact, which seeks to promote interstate cooperation for the proper management and disposal...

405

Photo of the Week: What Do Airborne Radioactive Particles Taste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of scientific research experiments at Oak Ridge National Lab. By accelerating intense beams of light ions to strike a target, the facility creates short-lived, radioactive nuclei...

406

Fire hazard analysis of the radioactive mixed waste trenchs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) is intended to assess comprehensively the risk from fire associated with the disposal of low level radioactive mixed waste in trenches within the lined landfills, provided by Project W-025, designated Trench 31 and 34 of the Burial Ground 218-W-5. Elements within the FHA make recommendations for minimizing risk to workers, the public, and the environment from fire during the course of the operation`s activity. Transient flammables and combustibles present that support the operation`s activity are considered and included in the analysis. The graded FHA contains the following elements: description of construction, protection of essential safety class equipment, fire protection features, description of fire hazards, life safety considerations, critical process equipment, high value property, damage potential--maximum credible fire loss (MCFL) and maximum possible fire loss (MPFL), fire department/brigade response, recovery potential, potential for a toxic, biological and/or radiation incident due to a fire, emergency planning, security considerations related to fire protection, natural hazards (earthquake, flood, wind) impact on fire safety, and exposure fire potential, including the potential for fire spread between fire areas. Recommendations for limiting risk are made in the text of this report and printed in bold type. All recommendations are repeated in a list in Section 18.0.

McDonald, K.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

407

DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

NA

2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

408

Testing atomic mass models with radioactive beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significantly increased yields of new or poorly characterized exotic isotopes that lie far from beta-decay stability can be expected when radioactive beams are used to produce these nuclides. Measurements of the masses of these new species are very important. Such measurements are motivated by the general tendency of mass models to diverge from one another upon excursions from the line of beta-stability. Therefore in these regions (where atomic mass data are presently nonexistent or sparse) the models can be tested rigorously to highlight the features that affect the quality of their short-range and long-range extrapolation properties. Selection of systems to study can be guided, in part, by a desire to probe those mass regions where distinctions among mass models are most apparent and where yields of exotic isotopes, produced via radioactive beams, can be optimized. Identification of models in such regions that have good predictive properties will aid materially in guiding the selection of additional experiments which ultimately will provide expansion of the atomic mass database for further refinement of the mass models. 6 refs., 5 figs.

Haustein, P.E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the last decade to ensure the safe disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of comprehensive State and Federal regulations governing the disposal of low-level radioactive waste, and the enactment of Federal laws making States responsible for the disposal of such waste generated within their borders.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2008 7, 2008 Next Release: July 24, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview The report week ended July 16 registered significant price declines at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with the largest decreases occurring in the Arizona/Nevada, California, and Louisiana trading regions. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased 94 cents per million British thermal units (MMBtu) to $11.15 as of yesterday. Similarly, at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for all futures contracts in the 12-month strip declined between 44.6 and 69.7 cents per MMBtu. The near-month contract on Monday settled below $12-per MMBtu for the first time in 6 weeks, dropping to $11.398 per MMBtu as of

411

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 2, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 25, 2011) Warmer weather moved into major population centers this report week, increasing demand at electric power plants in order to meet air-conditioning needs. Prices moved higher at most trading locations in the lower 48 States, with the biggest increases occurring in the Southeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.21 to $4.36 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased as the weather outlook suggested higher weather-related consumption for the remaining days of May. The futures contract for June

412

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2008 8, 2008 Next Release: January 8, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, December 10, to Wednesday, December 17, 2008) The coldest temperatures of the season to date covered much of the northern half of the country this report week, boosting demand related to space heating on both coasts and across the Northern Plains and Midwest population centers. Prices increased throughout the country outside the Northeast, with the biggest increases occurring for supplies from the Rocky Mountains (particularly for delivery into the Northwest). During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.11 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $5.79. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices

413

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 11, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 3, 2010) Warmer weather moved into major population centers this report week, limiting demand related to space heating for much of the country. Prices declined, with the biggest decreases occurring at markets in the Rocky Mountains and the Midcontinent. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.15 to $4.76 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for April delivery decreased by $0.10 on the week to $4.76 per MMBtu. As of Friday, February 26, working gas in underground storage was

414

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 28, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 20, 2010) A reprieve from the extreme cold in much of the country during this report week limited space-heating demand, resulting in price declines. The biggest decreases occurred in the Northeast. During the report week (January 13-20), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.07 to $5.54 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for February delivery decreased by $0.24 on the week to $5.496 per MMBtu. As of Friday, January 15, working gas in underground storage was 2,607 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 0.2 percent below the 5-year

415

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 24, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 16, 2011) A reprieve from extreme cold in much of the country this week limited space-heating demand, contributing to price declines. The biggest price decreases occurred in the Northeast. During the report week (February 9-16), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.29 to $3.93 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for March delivery decreased by $0.12 on the week to $3.92 per MMBtu. As of Friday, February 11, working gas in underground storage was 1,911 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 6.3 percent below the 5-year

416

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 31, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 23, 2011) Colder weather moved into major population centers this report week, increasing demand related to space heating for much of the country. Prices moved higher at all trading locations in the lower 48 States, with the biggest increases occurring in the Northeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.33 to $4.18 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased significantly as the weather outlook suggested higher consumption for the remaining days of March. The futures contract for April delivery

417

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

418

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

419

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

420

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

422

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

423

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

424

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

425

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

426

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

427

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

428

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

429

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

430

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

431

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

432

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

433

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

434

The Nature of Glass Leaching  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Argonne National Laboratory Specialists Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Nuclear Waste Management / Radioactive Waste

G. L. McVay; C. Q. Buckwalter

435

Fault tree analysis of commonly occurring medication errors and methods to reduce them  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Medication errors occur in health care settings and they continue to Pose significant challenges to hospital administrators, Physicians, Pharmacists and nurses. These medication errors may occur due to a lack of knowledge, substandard performance...

Cherian, Sandhya Mary

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

436

Have sudden large releases of methane from geological reservoirs occurred since the Last Glacial Maximum, and could such releases occur again?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...source. Should marked warming occur, resulting...dioxide (reducing the global warming potential), but...fossil fuels such as coal and oil that have higher warming impact per unit of...destabilization with global warming. Clathrate...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Severe or serious infusion reactions occurred in 18 treatment-failure gout patients who received pegloticase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Severe or serious infusion reactions occurred in 18 treatment-failure gout patients who received pegloticase [Puricase] while...

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

DECONTAMINATION DRESSDOWN AT A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Video User' s Guide Video User' s Guide DECONTAMINATION DRESSDOWN AT A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond

439

Combustible radioactive waste treatment by incineration and chemical digestion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review is given of present and planned combustible radioactive waste treatment systems in the US. Advantages and disadvantages of various systems are considered. Design waste streams are discussed in relation to waste composition, radioactive contaminants by amount and type, and special operating problems caused by the waste.

Stretz, L.A.; Crippen, M.D.; Allen, C.R.

1980-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

440

A model approach to radioactive waste disposal at Sellafield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model approach to radioactive waste disposal at Sellafield R. 5. Haszeldine* and C. Mc of the great environmentalproblems of our age is the safe disposal of radioactive waste for geological time periods. Britain is currently investigating a potential site for underground burial of waste, near

Haszeldine, Stuart

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Radiation issues in a radioactive ion decay ring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......disposed of as radioactive waste. Table 3. Specific activity...effective dose per unit release for long-term water releases for two critical...et al. The acceleration and storage of radioactive ions for Neutrino...and 18Ne) circulating in a storage ring. Since the beam is not......

M. Magistris; M. Silari

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

442

Characterization of plutonium in Maxey Flats radioactive trench leachates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium in trench leachates at the Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site exists as dissolved species, primarily complexes of the tetravalent ion with strong organic ligands such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The complexes are not sorbed well by sediment and are only partly precipitated by ferric hydroxide. These results indicate the importance of isolating radioactive waste from organic matter. 3 tables.

Cleveland, J.M.; Rees, T.F.

1981-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

443

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 21) 14, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 21) Natural gas spot prices climbed 25 to 55 cents across the Lower 48 States this week (Wednesday, August 6-Wednesday, August 13). Increases were highest in sun-drenched California, but also significant in the Northeast and Midwest as this summer's hottest weather to date occurred in parts of the two regions. At the Henry Hub, the spot price increased 43 cents or roughly 9 percent to $5.17 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub similarly increased, gaining just over 43 cents per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $5.179 per MMBtu yesterday (August 13). Natural gas in storage increased to 2,188 Bcf as of Friday, August 8, which is about 8.5 percent below the 5-year average inventory level for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.92 per barrel or 2.9 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $30.85 per barrel, or $5.32 per MMBtu.

444

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 10, 2007) 3, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 10, 2007) Since Wednesday, April 25, natural gas spot price movements were mixed in the Lower 48 States, with decreases principally occurring west of the Rocky Mountains and increases predominant to the east of the Rockies. Prices at the Henry Hub increased a nickel since Wednesday, April 25, to $7.64 per MMBtu. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub declined about 5 cents per MMBtu, or less than 1 percent since Wednesday, April 25, to settle at $7.730 per MMBtu yesterday (Wednesday, May 2). Natural gas in storage was 1,651 Bcf as of April 27, which is 19 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.55 per barrel on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $63.78 per barrel or $11.00 per MMBtu.

445

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 6) December 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 6) Since Wednesday, December 22, natural gas spot prices have decreased sharply at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 87 cents per MMBtu or about 12 percent to $6.18. Prices declined in each of the last three days of trading (December 27-29) as temperatures moderated following the coldest weather to date of the 2004-2005 heating season, which occurred during the holiday weekend. On Tuesday, December 28, the January futures contract at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) ended its tenure as the near-month contract, settling at $6.213 per MMBtu. On its first day of trading as the near-month contract, the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery closed yesterday (Wednesday, December 29) at $6.402 per MMBtu, which was down roughly 45 cents or 6.5 percent lower than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage decreased to 2,849 Bcf as of December 24, which is 14.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $0.55 per barrel or about 1.2 percent since last Wednesday, falling to $43.69 per barrel or $7.53 per MMBtu.

446

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 8) 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 8) Natural gas spot and futures prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, August 24-31), as Hurricane Katrina's movement through the Gulf of Mexico region brought widespread evacuations of production facilities and an unknown amount of infrastructure damage. For the week, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased $2.70 per MMBtu to $12.70. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), final settlement for the September delivery contract occurred on Monday as Katrina hammered the Gulf Coast, causing a one-day increase of $1.055 per MMBtu to a final expiration price of $10.847. On the week, the price of the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub moved approximately $1.45 per MMBtu higher to settle yesterday (Wednesday, August 31) at $11.472. Natural gas in storage was 2,633 Bcf as of Friday, August 26, which is 5.2 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.53 per barrel or about 2 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $68.63 per barrel or $11.83 per MMBtu.

447

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 9, 2011) The Henry Hub spot price fell during the week from $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, February 2, to $4.22 per MMBtu on Wednesday, February 9. The price decline occurred in spite of very cold weather across the United States. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price fell from $89.78 per barrel, or $15.48 per MMBtu, on Thursday to $85.59 per barrel, or $14.76 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near month futures contract (March 2011) fell by 39 cents from $4.429 per MMBtu to $4.044 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell below the 5-year average for the

448

THE IMPACT OF REDUCED VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation to which the general population is exposed. Radon- 222 is an inert, radioactive, naturally-occurring

Berk, James V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit Multiple Users Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit Multiple Users January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Transportation Tracking and Communication System users can now track shipments of radioactive materials and access transportation information on mobile devices. Transportation Tracking and Communication System users can now track shipments of radioactive materials and access transportation information on mobile devices. CARLSBAD, N.M. - EM's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) recently deployed a new version of the Transportation Tracking and Communication System (TRANSCOM) that is compatible with mobile devices, including smartphones. The recent enhancement, TRANSCOM version 3.0, improves the user interface

450

Security for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Security for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Security for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet Mar 23, 2012 Radioactive materials are a critical and beneficial component of global

451

Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina) Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info Start Date 1986 State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Atlantic Compact Commission The Atlantic (Northeast) Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact is a cooperative effort to plan, regulate, and administer the disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the region. The states of Connecticut, New Jersey, and South Carolina are party to this compact

452

First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from River |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from River First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from River July 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Dee_Millikin@rl.doe.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers have started moving highly radioactive material, called sludge, away from the Columbia River, marking a significant milestone in the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s cleanup of the Hanford Site in Washington State. Today, DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) safely transferred the first large container of highly radioactive sludge from a basin next to a former plutonium production reactor to dry storage in the center of the site. Today's transfer is the first of six shipments

453

Radioactive Materials at SSRL | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radioactive Materials at SSRL Radioactive Materials at SSRL Contact Information SSRL Safety Officer (650) 926-3861 SSRL Radiation Protection Group (650) 926-4299 SSRLRadMat@SLAC.STANFORD.EDU Throughout the course of an SSRL Experimental Run, there are requests from users to transport and use small amounts of radioactive material in their experiments, either as stand alone samples or in a matrix of other materials. There is no minimum quantity for declaring the use of radioactive samples at SSRL. The purpose of this procedure is to enable Users, SSRL and SLAC staff to know what radiological controls will be implemented for these materials, based on the isotope, its toxicity risk and radiological controls. Radioactive materials at SSRL are classified into 4 classification Groups based on the radiotoxicity tables, see below.

454

Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Summary In response to the the requirement of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management in the Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The Mission Plan is divided into two parts. Part I describes the overall goals, objectives, and strategy for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. It explains that, to meet the directives of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the DOE intends to site, design, construct., and start operating a mined geologic repository by January 31, 1998. The Act specifies that the costs of these

455

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees This act establishes a low-level radioactive waste disposal regional facility siting fund that requires nuclear power reactor constructors and operators to pay to the Department of Environmental Resources funds to be utilized for disposal facilities. This act ensures that nuclear facilities and the Department comply with the Low-Level Radioactive Disposal Act. The regional facility siting fund is used for reimbursement of expenses

456

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What are full-scale tests? What are scale-model tests? What is computer analysis? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. A packaging is certified when it can survive a sequence of impact, crush, puncture, fire, and immersion tests designed to replicate transport accident conditions. Type B Packages must meet the testing requirements of: Compliance Testing, as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.85 and 10 CFR Part 71.87 Normal Conditions of Transport, Ten tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.71 Hypothetical Accident Conditions, Six tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.73 The ability of radioactive material packages to withstand testing environments can be demonstrated by full-scale testing, scale-model

457

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Dose Rate Calculator Click to use calculator. This tool calculates a dose rate (DR) at 2 meters (about 6 ft) from the surface of a package containing radioactive material IF you know the dose rate at 1 meter (about 3 ft). It will also calculate the reverse; DR at 1 meter if you know the DR at 2 meters. These two distances are used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to define acceptable dose rates for packages. Dose (Rad) Biological Effect < 5 rad No immediate observable effects 5 - 50 rad Slight blood changes may be detected by medical evaluation 50 - 150 rad Slight blood changes will be noted and likely symptoms of nausea, fatigue, vomiting, etc.

458

Astronomy with Radioactivities: Chapter 9, Nuclear Reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear reaction rates determine the abundances of isotopes in stellar burning processes. A multitude of reactions determine the reaction flow pattern which is described in terms of reaction network simulations. The reaction rates are determined by laboratory experiments supplemented by nuclear reaction and structure theory. We will discuss the experimental approach as well as the theoretical tools for obtaining the stellar reaction rates. A detailed analysis of a reaction is only possible for a few selected cases which will be highlighted in this section. The bulk of nuclear reaction processes is however described in terms of a statistical model approach, which relies on global nuclear structure and reaction parameters such as level density and mass and barrier penetration, respectively. We will discuss a variety of experimental facilities and techniques used in the field, this includes low energy stable beam experiments, measurements at radioactive beam accelerators, and neutron beam facilities.

M. Wiescher; T. Rauscher

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment: Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radiological performance assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted to demonstrate compliance with appropriate radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the general public. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the general public via air, ground water, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty analyses were performed. Results of calculations made using nominal data indicate that the radiological doses will be below appropriate radiological criteria throughout operations and after closure of the facility. Recommendations were made for future performance assessment calculations.

Case, M.J.; Maheras, S.J.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Sussman, M.E.; Voilleque, P.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Submersible purification system for radioactive water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable, submersible water purification system for use in a pool of water containing radioactive contamination includes a prefilter for filtering particulates from the water. A resin bed is then provided for removal of remaining dissolved, particulate, organic, and colloidal impurities from the prefiltered water. A sterilizer then sterilizes the water. The prefilter and resin bed are suitably contained and are submerged in the pool. The sterilizer is water tight and located at the surface of the pool. The water is circulated from the pool through the prefilter, resin bed, and sterilizer by suitable pump or the like. In the preferred embodiment, the resin bed is contained within a tank which stands on the bottom of the pool and to which a base mounting the prefilter and pump is attached. An inlet for the pump is provided adjacent the bottom of the pool, while the sterilizer and outlet for the system is located adjacent the top of the pool.

Abbott, Michael L. (Fort Collins, CO); Lewis, Donald R. (Pocatello, ID)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Room air monitor for radioactive aerosols  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A housing assembly for use with a room air monitor for simultaneous collection and counting of suspended particles includes a casing containing a combination detector-preamplifier system at one end, a filter system at the other end, and an air flow system consisting of an air inlet formed in the casing between the detector-preamplifier system and the filter system and an air passageway extending from the air inlet through the casing and out the end opposite the detector-preamplifier combination. The filter system collects suspended particles transported directly through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles are detected and examined for radioactivity by the detector-preamplifier combination. 2 figs.

Balmer, D.K.; Tyree, W.H.

1987-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

462

Standard guide for sampling radioactive tank waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide addresses techniques used to obtain grab samples from tanks containing high-level radioactive waste created during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. Guidance on selecting appropriate sampling devices for waste covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is also provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (1). Vapor sampling of the head-space is not included in this guide because it does not significantly affect slurry retrieval, pipeline transport, plugging, or mixing. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

17 - Immobilisation of Radioactive Waste in Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radionuclide immobilisation mechanisms are examined for vitreous wasteforms. Both borosilicate and phosphate glasses are described in detail, including the ability of cations to enter into the glass network structure. The role of various cations is considered, including boron, intermediates, and modifiers and elements difficult to immobilise. Selection rules for designing nuclear wasteform silicate glasses are outlined. Glass composite materials to immobilise glass-immiscible waste components are discussed. Both one- and two-stage vitrification technologies are described. An overview is given of the development of vitrification technology, including current operational data on radioactive waste vitrification facilities. Calcination processes are considered in detail, including typical properties of waste calcination products. Recent developments in vitrification are given, including descriptions of cold crucible induction-heated melters and in situ vitrification. Limitations caused by radionuclide volatility are examined. Acceptance criteria are given for vitreous wasteforms.

M.I. Ojovan; W.E. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Feasibility analysis of recycling radioactive scrap steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to: (1) establish a conceptual design that integrates commercial steel mill technology with radioactive scrap metal (RSM) processing to produce carbon and stainless steel sheet and plate at a grade suitable for fabricating into radioactive waste containers; (2) determine the economic feasibility of building a micro-mill in the Western US to process 30,000 tons of RSM per year from both DOE and the nuclear utilities; and (3) provide recommendations for implementation. For purposes of defining the project, it is divided into phases: economic feasibility and conceptual design; preliminary design; detail design; construction; and operation. This study comprises the bulk of Phase 1. It is divided into four sections. Section 1 provides the reader with a complete overview extracting pertinent data, recommendations and conclusions from the remainder of the report. Section 2 defines the variables that impact the design requirements. These data form the baseline to create a preliminary conceptual design that is technically sound, economically viable, and capitalizes on economies of scale. Priorities governing the design activities are: (1) minimizing worker exposure to radionuclide hazards, (2) maximizing worker safety, (3) minimizing environmental contamination, (4) minimizing secondary wastes, and (5) establishing engineering controls to insure that the plant will be granted a license in the state selected for operation. Section 3 provides details of the preliminary conceptual design that was selected. The cost of project construction is estimated and the personnel needed to support the steel-making operation and radiological and environmental control are identified. Section 4 identifies the operational costs and supports the economic feasibility analysis. A detailed discussion of the resulting conclusions and recommendations is included in this section.

Nichols, F. [Manufacturing Sciences Corp., Woodland, WA (United States); Balhiser, B. [MSE, Inc., Butte, MT (United States); Cignetti, N. [Cignetti Associates, North Canton, OH (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Evaluation of Trenchless Installation Technology for Radioactive Wastewater Piping Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup mission at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) includes dispositioning facilities, contaminated legacy materials/waste, and contamination sources and remediation of soil under facilities, groundwater, and surface water to support final Records of Decision (RODs). The Integrated Facilities Disposition Project (IFDP) is a roughly $15B project for completion of the EM mission at Oak Ridge, with a project duration of up to 35 years. The IFDP Mission Need Statement - Critical Decision-0 (CD-0) - was approved by DOE in July 2007, and the IFDP Alternative Selection and Cost Range - Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) - was approved in November 2008. The IFDP scope includes reconfiguration of waste collection and treatment systems as needed to complete the IFDP remediation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) missions in a safe and cost-effective manner while maintaining compliance with all governing regulations and bodies and preserving the support of continuing operations at ORNL. A step in the CD-1 approval process included an external technical review (ETR) of technical approaches proposed in the CD-1 document related to the facility reconfiguration for the ORNL radioactive waste and liquid low-level waste management systems. The ETR team recommended that the IFDP team consider the use of trenchless technologies for installing pipelines underground in and around contaminated sites as part of the alternatives evaluations required in support of the CD-2 process. The team specifically recommended evaluating trenchless technologies for installing new pipes in existing underground pipelines as an alternative to conventional open trench installation methods. Potential benefits could include reduction in project costs, less costly underground piping, fewer disruptions of ongoing and surface activities, and lower risk for workers. While trenchless technologies have been used extensively in the sanitary sewer and natural gas pipeline industries, they have been used far less in contaminated environments. Although trenchless technologies have been used at ORNL in limited applications to install new potable water and gas lines, the technologies have not been used in radioactive applications. This study evaluates the technical risks, benefits, and economics for installing gravity drained and pressurized piping using trenchless technologies compared to conventional installation methods for radioactive applications under ORNL geological conditions. A range of trenchless installation technologies was reviewed for this report for general applicability for replacing existing contaminated piping and/or installing new pipelines in potentially contaminated areas. Installation methods that were determined to have potential for use in typical ORNL contaminated environments were then evaluated in more detail for three specific ORNL applications. Each feasible alternative was evaluated against the baseline conventional open trench installation method using weighted criteria in the areas of environment, safety, and health (ES&H); project cost and schedule; and technical operability. The formulation of alternatives for evaluation, the development of selection criteria, and the scoring of alternatives were performed by ORNL staff with input from vendors and consultants. A description of the evaluation methodology and the evaluation results are documented in the following sections of this report.

Robinson, Sharon M [ORNL; Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL; Patton, Bradley D [ORNL; Sullivan, Nicholas M [ORNL; Bugbee, Kathy P [ORNL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

s.haszeldine@ed.ac.uk Radioactive waste Cumbria 6, 7 Sept 2012 1 Geological disposal of radioactive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Edinburgh Professor of Geology Nuclear waste ­ exists and has to be solved Nuclear power ­ is likely_and_Copeland.html #12;Nuclear power s.haszeldine@ed.ac.uk Radioactive waste Cumbria 6, 7 Sept 2012 2 First civil nuclear waste Cumbria 6, 7 Sept 2012 15 Thus, the nuclear industry has calculated that the escape of radioactive

468

Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste management in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the 1980s to ensure the safe disposal of low-level waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61, Licensing Requirements for the Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, and steps taken by states and regional compacts to establish additional disposal sites. 42 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

E-Print Network 3.0 - adhesion molecule-5 occurs Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of natural and manmade surfaces, secreting specialized protein ... Source: Messersmith, Phillip B.- Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University...

470

E-Print Network 3.0 - administered radioactive material Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 The New Orphaned Radioactive Sources Program in the United States International Conference on the Safety of Radiation Sources and the Security of Radioactive Summary: on the...

471

1 INTRODUCTION In order to demonstrate the feasibility of a radioactive waste repository in claystone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INTRODUCTION In order to demonstrate the feasibility of a radioactive waste repository in claystone formations, the French national radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) started in 2000

Boyer, Edmond

472

Introduction to DOE Order 435.1 Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Introduction to DOE Order 435.1 Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Requirements Introduction to DOE Order 435.1 Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Requirements Christine...

473

Biological Information Document, Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is intended to act as a baseline source material for risk assessments which can be used in Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements. The current Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) does not meet current General Design Criteria for Non-reactor Nuclear Facilities and could be shut down affecting several DOE programs. This Biological Information Document summarizes various biological studies that have been conducted in the vicinity of new Proposed RLWTF site and an Alternative site. The Proposed site is located on Mesita del Buey, a mess top, and the Alternative site is located in Mortandad Canyon. The Proposed Site is devoid of overstory species due to previous disturbance and is dominated by a mixture of grasses, forbs, and scattered low-growing shrubs. Vegetation immediately adjacent to the site is a pinyon-juniper woodland. The Mortandad canyon bottom overstory is dominated by ponderosa pine, willow, and rush. The south-facing slope was dominated by ponderosa pine, mountain mahogany, oak, and muhly. The north-facing slope is dominated by Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and oak. Studies on wildlife species are limited in the vicinity of the proposed project and further studies will be necessary to accurately identify wildlife populations and to what extent they utilize the project area. Some information is provided on invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles, and small mammals. Additional species information from other nearby locations is discussed in detail. Habitat requirements exist in the project area for one federally threatened wildlife species, the peregrine falcon, and one federal candidate species, the spotted bat. However, based on surveys outside of the project area but in similar habitats, these species are not expected to occur in either the Proposed or Alternative RLWTF sites. Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate ecological functioning in the project area.

Biggs, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

Network growth for enhanced natural selection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural selection and random drift are competing phenomena for explaining the evolution of populations. Combining a highly fit mutant with a population structure that improves the odds that the mutation spreads through the whole population tips the balance in favor of natural selection. The probability that the spread occurs, known as the fixation probability, depends heavily on how the population is structured. Certain topologies, albeit highly artificially contrived, have been shown to exist that favor fixation. We present a randomized mechanism for network growth that is loosely inspired in some of these topologies key properties and demonstrate, through simulations, that it is capable of giving rise to structured populations for which the fixation probability significantly surpasses that of an unstructured population. This discovery provides important support to the notion that natural selection can be enhanced over random drift in naturally occurring population structures.

Valmir C. Barbosa; Raul Donangelo; Sergio R. Souza

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

475

Definition: Natural gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Natural gas Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Natural gas A hydrocarbon gas obtained from underground sources, often in association with petroleum and coal deposits.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Natural gas is a naturally occurring hydrocarbon gas mixture consisting primarily of methane, but commonly includes varying amounts of other higher alkanes and even a lesser percentage of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and hydrogen sulfide. Natural gas is an energy source often used for heating, cooking, and electricity generation. It is also used as fuel for vehicles and as a chemical feedstock in the manufacture of plastics and other commercially important organic chemicals. Natural gas is found in

476

Safety and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Security Technologies for and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments Safety & Security Technologies Study Started in 2005 with OCRWM Funding. OCRWM funding ended in 2009. EM gave CVSA funding to finish the report. CVSA Ad Hoc RAM/Security/ITS Committee Examined current and emerging technologies for safety and security of radioactive material shipments Site visits Product reviews HMCRP HM-04 report on emerging technologies Safety & Security Technologies Study Completed several site visits to look at current technologies being used. Technologies were broken down into five categories. 1. Inspection Technologies 2. Security Technologies 3. Radioactive Material Dose Rate Measurement and

477

Management of Disused Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt - 13512  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The future safe development of nuclear energy and progressive increasing use of sealed sources in medicine, research, industry and other fields in Egypt depends on the safe and secure management of disused radioactive sealed sources. In the past years have determined the necessity to formulate and apply the integrated management program for radioactive sealed sources to assure harmless and ecological rational management of disused sealed sources in Egypt. The waste management system in Egypt comprises operational and regulatory capabilities. Both of these activities are performed under legislations. The Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center HLWMC, is considered as a centralized radioactive waste management facility in Egypt by law 7/2010. (authors)

Mohamed, Y.T.; Hasan, M.A.; Lasheen, Y.F. [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)] [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Environmental Radioactivity Study in Surface Sediments of Guacanayabo Gulf (Cuba)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sediment samples have been collected in the Guacanayabo gulf located in the southeast Cuba, to determinate the radioactivity levels of {sup 210}Pb, {sup 234}Th, {sup 214}Pb, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K using Low-Background Gamma Spectrometry and to evaluate its impact in the habitat of important marine species for fishery industry. The obtained results show the lowest radioactivity levels determined in Cuban marine environments. The species capture declination in the last years is not originated by radioactive pollution of the zone.

Reyes, H.; Rizo, O. Diaz; Bernal, J. L.; D'Alessandro, K.; Padilla, F.; Corrales, Y.; Casanova, O. A.; Gelen, A.; Martinez, Y.; Aguilar, J.; Arado, J. O. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), Habana 10400, POB 6163 (Cuba); Lopez-Pino, N. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), Habana 10400, POB 6163 (Cuba); Instituto de Fisica da USP, LAL, Rua do Matao, Travessa R., 187, 05508-900, SP (Brazil); Maidana, N. L. [Instituto de Fisica da USP, LAL, Rua do Matao, Travessa R., 187, 05508-900, SP (Brazil)

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

479

The environmental biogeochemistry of chelating agents and recommendations for the disposal of chelated radioactive wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chelating agents are used in nuclear decontamination operations because they form very selective and strong complexes with numerous radionuclides. However, if environmentally-persistent chelated wastes are disposed of without pretreatment to eliminate the chelating agents, increased radionuclide migration rates from the disposal sites may occur. The environmental chemistry of the three most common aminopolycarboxylic acid chelating agents, NTA (nitrilotriacetic acid), EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), and DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) is reviewed. This review includes information on their persistence in the environment, as well as their tendency to form complexes with actinides. Data on the sorption of chelated actinides by geologic substrates and on the uptake of chelated actinides by plants are also presented. Increased solubility and/or migration of radionuclides by chelating agents used in decontamination operations have been observed at two different radioactive waste burial grounds. EDTA was found to be promoting the migration of 6OCo and possibly other radionuclides from liquid waste disposal sites at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (1). Recently EDTA has again been identified in radioactive wastes-this time in trench waters containing from 60016,100 pCi 238Pu per liter from solid waste burial grounds in Maxey Flats, Kentucky (2). These observations at Oak Ridge and Maxey Flats suggest that the practice of disposing chelated radioactive wastes should be reevaluated. Three different technical options for disposing chelated low-level radioactive wastes are proposed: 1. [1] Bind the solidified chelated waste in some kind of solid matrix that has a slow leach rate and bury the waste in a dry disposal site. 2. [2] Substitute biodegradable chelating agents in the decontamination reagent for the chelating agents that are persistent in the environment. 3. [3] Chemically or thermally degrade the chelating agents in the waste prior to disposal. The relative advantages and disadvantages of each of these options are discussed. We feel that surprisingly little attention has been given to an obvious procedure for the disposal of chelated radioactive wastes: chemically or thermally degrading the chelating agent prior to disposal. Any of the above three options might in fact be a satisfactory approach to the disposal of chelated wastes. However, we suggest that the burial of chelating agents such as EDTA be avoided and that option [3] be given more consideration.

Jeffrey L. Means; Carl A. Alexander

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Radiation port dermatophytosis: Tinea corporis occurring at the site of irradiated skin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation port dermatophytosis: Tinea corporis occurring atTexas Abstract Radiation port dermatophytosis is thethe area of the radiotherapy port. Including this patient, 4

Casamiquela, Kathleen M; Cohen, Philip R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naturally occurring radioactive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident excursion occurring Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University Collection: Geosciences 4 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: accidents that occur...

482

Frequently Asked Questions about Polonium 210 What is Polonium 210 (Po-210)?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is a radioactive material that occurs in nature at very low levels. Po-210 results from the natural radioactive Po-210 is a radioactive material that occurs in nature at very low levels. It is found naturally effects. Your skin or a piece of paper is enough to stop the radiation emitted by Po-210. What are common

483

Synthetic and Biosynthetic Studies of Natural Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Scholarly Communications program at the University of Kansas Libraries Center for Digital Scholarship. http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu B Y E. IfEJ.32 S Synthetic and Biosynthetic Studies of Natural Products Part I. Studies Directed Toward the Total Synthesis... of 4-Demethoxy -A-Homodaunorubicin Analogs Part II. Biosynthesis of Coloradocin. Origin of the Carbons Part III. Total Synthesis of the Naturally Occurring Prenylated Bibenzyl Amorfrutin A Eduardo Alberto Veliz Chanis B.S., University of Panama...

Ve?liz Chanis, Eduardo Alberto

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Determination of dispersivities from a natural-gradient dispersion test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and radioactive wastes. Contaminant hydrogeology is presently a focal point in the realm of hydrologic modeling. Generally, models are designed to represent simplified versions of reality and The style and format of this document was taken from the Journal... dispersivities, v ia a graphical approach, from a natural-gradient dispersion test in which artificial pollution was injected into an aquifer. The dispersion test was conducted by Sud icky et al. (1983) in order to characterize the dispersive properties...

Hoover, Caroline Marie

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

The enrichment behavior of natural radionuclides in pulverized oil shale-fired power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The oil shale industry is the largest producer of NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) waste in Estonia. Approximately 1112 million tons of oil shale containing various amounts of natural radionuclides is burned annually in the Narva oil shale-fired power plants, which accounts for approximately 90% of Estonian electricity production. The radionuclide behavior characteristics change during the fuel combustion process, which redistributes the radionuclides between different ash fractions. Out of 24 operational boilers in the power plants, four use circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology and twenty use pulverized fuel (PF) technology. Over the past decade, the PF boilers have been renovated, with the main objective to increase the efficiency of the filter systems. Between 2009 and 2012, electrostatic precipitators (ESP) in four PF energy blocks were replaced with novel integrated desulphurization technology (NID) for the efficient removal of fly ash and SO2 from flue gases. Using gamma spectrometry, activity concentrations and enrichment factors for the 238U (238U, 226Ra, 210Pb) and 232Th (232Th, 228Ra) family radionuclides as well as 40K were measured and analyzed in different PF boiler ash fractions. The radionuclide activity concentrations in the ash samples increased from the furnace toward the back end of the flue gas duct. The highest values in different PF boiler ash fractions were in the last field of the ESP and in the NID ash, where radionuclide enrichment factors were up to 4.2 and 3.3, respectively. The acquired and analyzed data on radionuclide activity concentrations in different PF boiler ashes (operating with an ESP and a NID system) compared to CFB boiler ashes provides an indication that changes in the fuel (oil shale) composition and boiler working parameters, as well as technological enhancements in Estonian oil shale fired power plants, have had a combined effect on the distribution patterns of natural radionuclides in the oil shale combustion products.

Taavi Vaasma; Madis Kiisk; Tnis Meriste; Alan Henry Tkaczyk

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Measurements of natural radioactivity and radon exhalation rates from different brands of cement used in Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......these radionuclides in large amounts of waste products used in the cement manufacturing, like phosphogypsum, coal fly ash, shale ash, some rare minerals and so on. Fly ash is obtained from coal-fired power plants and certainly contains......

S. A. Mujahid; A. Rahim; S. Hussain; M. Farooq

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Public exposure to hazards associated with natural radioactivity in open-pit mining in Ghana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......uranium and non-uranium mines(2,4...the long-lived uranium/radium and thorium...made between the standard and the sample...Anglogold Ashanti. Review of Operations...Community Development Plan, Iduapriem and...International Basic Safety Standards (BSS) for protection......

E. O. Darko; A. Faanu; A. R. Awudu; G. Emi-Reynolds; J. Yeboah; O. C. Oppon; E. H. K. Akaho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Natural radioactivity in tap waters of Eastern Black Sea region of Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and an appreciable fraction is deposited in the bone, the remaining fraction being distributed...obvious example. The release of 137Cs is estimated...Chernobyl reactor fire(3). The Chernobyl...greatest portion of airborne 222Rn from water...Chernobyl nuclear reactor fire. REFERENCES 1......

U. evik; N. Damla; G. Karahan; N. elebi; A. I. Kobya

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Public exposure to hazards associated with natural radioactivity in open-pit mining in Ghana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......addition, the wastes are in most...monitoring and control of NORMS in...monitoring and control of NORMS in...collected from the plant areas and other...tailings from the wastes dumps. The...wells and water treatment plants for...the detector system at the peak...for adults integrated over a period......

E. O. Darko; A. Faanu; A. R. Awudu; G. Emi-Reynolds; J. Yeboah; O. C. Oppon; E. H. K. Akaho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Natural gamma radioactivity in the villages of Kanyakumari District, Tamil Nadu, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate is also an important...contribution to the average dose rate received by the...population(6,7). The estimation of radiation dose distribution is important...side (Gulf of Mannar/Bay of Bengal coast). The district......

Jeni Chandar Padua; M. R. Basil Rose

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Natural radioactivity in tap waters of Eastern Black Sea region of Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......source for ionising radiation in daily life as far as normal background...Sample collection The water demand is supplied by surface water...Algeria (2.6-14 Bq l1) and Egypt (0.074-2.33 Bq l1...water in some areas of Upper Egypt. Turkish J. Eng. Environ......

U. evik; N. Damla; G. Karahan; N. elebi; A. I. Kobya

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Conditioning-specific reflex modification occurs when an unconditionedresponse(UR)ismodifiedinthe absence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not generalize from air puff to electro- dermal stimulation even though conditioning occurs to comparable levels can be obtained only at high air puff intensi- ties even though conditioning is supported by lower airConditioning-specific reflex modification occurs when an unconditionedresponse

493

Importance of the Equlibrium Node in Preventing the Voltage Collapse Occurs in the Wind Power System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Importance of the Equlibrium Node in Preventing the Voltage Collapse Occurs in the Wind Power collapse will occurs in a wind power system is discussed next. The method of power flow calculation is the specific analysis of a given simplified wind power system. Keywords--voltage collapse; Newton

Lavaei, Javad