National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for naturally occurring element

  1. Chapter 5. Conclusion Uranium, a naturally occurring element, contributes to low levels of natural background radiation in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5-1 Chapter 5. Conclusion Uranium, a naturally occurring element, contributes to low levels into uranium oxide or other chemical forms usable in industry. Uranium undergoes radioactive decay into a long are extracted from the earth. Protore is mined uranium ore that is not rich enough to meet the market demand

  2. Naturally occurring radionuclides in agricultural products: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanlon, E.A.

    1994-07-01

    Low levels of naturally occurring radionuclides exist in phosphatic clays, a by-product of phosphatic mining and beneficiation processes. Concerns about these radionuclides entering the human food chain were an immediate research priority before the phosphate clays could be reclaimed for intensive agricultural purposes. Efforts included the assembly of a large body of data from both sons and plants, part of which were produced by the Polk County (Florida) Mined Lands Agricultural Research/Demonstration Project MLAR/DP. Additional detailed studies involving dairy and beef cattle (Bos taurus) were conducted by researchers working with the MLAR/DP. A national symposium was conducted in which data concerning the MLAR/DP work and other research projects also dealing with naturally occurring radionuclides in agriculture could be discussed. The symposium included invited review papers dealing with the identification of radionuclide geological origins, the geochemistry and movement of radionuclides within the environment, mechanisms of plant uptake, entry points into the food chain, and evaluation of dose and risk assessment to the consumer of low levels of radionuclides. The risk to human health of an individual obtaining 0.1 of his or her dietary intake from crops produced on phosphatic clays increased by 1 in 5 x 10{sup 6}/yr above a control individual consuming no food grown on phosphatic clays. Leaf tissues were found to be generally higher than fruit, grain, or root tissues. The natural range in radionuclide content among various food types was greater than the difference in radionuclides content between the same food produced on phosphatic clays vs. natural soils. 19 refs.

  3. Manufactured Home Testing in Simulated and Naturally Occurring High Winds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. D. Richins; T. K. Larson

    2006-08-01

    A typical double-wide manufactured home was tested in simulated and naturally occurring high winds to understand structural behavior and improve performance during severe windstorms. Seven (7) lateral load tests were conducted on a double-wide manufactured home at a remote field test site in Wyoming. An extensive instrumentation package monitored the overall behavior of the home and collected data vital to validating computational software for the manufactured housing industry. The tests were designed to approach the design load of the home without causing structural damage, thus allowing the behavior of the home to be accessed when the home was later exposed to high winds (to 80-mph). The data generally show near-linear initial system response with significant non-linear behavior as the applied loads increase. Load transfer across the marriage line is primarily compression. Racking, while present, is very small. Interface slip and shear displacement along the marriage line are nearly insignificant. Horizontal global displacements reached 0.6 inch. These tests were designed primarily to collect data necessary to calibrate a desktop analysis and design software tool, MHTool, under development at the Idaho National Laboratory specifically for manufactured housing. Currently available analysis tools are, for the most part, based on methods developed for “stick built” structures and are inappropriate for manufactured homes. The special materials utilized in manufactured homes, such as rigid adhesives used in the connection of the sheathing materials to the studs, significantly alter the behavior of manufactured homes under lateral loads. Previous full scale tests of laterally loaded manufactured homes confirm the contention that conventional analysis methods are not applicable. System behavior dominates the structural action of manufactured homes and its prediction requires a three dimensional analysis of the complete unit, including tiedowns. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Manufactured Housing Institute. The results of this research can lead to savings in annual losses of life and property by providing validated information to enable the advancement of code requirements and by developing engineering software that can predict and optimize wind resistance.

  4. Lab 2: Mineral Lab notes. Minerals are inorganic, solid, naturally occurring substances that have a characteristic chemical compositions,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    Lab 2: Mineral Lab notes. Minerals are inorganic, solid, naturally occurring substances that have composition is the chemical elements that make up any given mineral. For instance, the mineral quartz is silicon dioxide SiO2; the mineral galena is an ore of lead, and its chemical formula is PbS, a lead

  5. USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE COSO EGS PROJECT Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  6. Systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans; , Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

    2012-08-07

    Some or all of the needs above can be addressed by embodiments of the invention. According to embodiments of the invention, systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies can be implemented. In one embodiment, a method for storing hydrogen can be provided. The method can include providing diatoms comprising diatomaceous earth or diatoms from a predefined culture. In addition, the method can include heating the diatoms in a sealed environment in the presence of at least one of titanium, a transition metal, or a noble metal to provide a porous hydrogen storage medium. Furthermore, the method can include exposing the porous hydrogen storage medium to hydrogen. In addition, the method can include storing at least a portion of the hydrogen in the porous hydrogen storage medium.

  7. A century of oil and gas exploration in Albania: assessment of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORMs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xhixha, Gerti; Callegari, Ivan; Colonna, Tommaso; Hasani, Fadil; Mantovani, Fabio; Shala, Ferat; Strati, Virginia; Kaçeli, Merita Xhixha

    2015-01-01

    Because potential Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORMs) generated from oil and gas extractions in Albania have been disposed without regulatory criteria in many decades, an extensive survey in one of the most productive regions (Vlora-Elbasan) has been performed. Among 52 gamma-ray spectrometry measurements of soil, oil-sand, sludge, produced water and crude oil samples, we discover that relatively low activity concentrations of 226Ra, 228Ra, 228Th and 40K, which are 23 +/- 2 Bq/kg, 23 +/- 2 Bq/kg, 24 +/- 3 Bq/kg and 549 +/- 12 Bq/kg, respectively, come from oil-sand produced by hydrocarbon extraction from molasses formations. The mineralogical characterization together with the 228Ra/40K and 226Ra/40K ratios of these Neogene deposits confirm the geological and geodynamic model that predicts a dismantling of Mesozoic source rocks. The average activity concentrations (+/- standard deviations) of the radium isotopes (226Ra, 228Ra) and of the 228Th and 40K radionuclides in soil samples are determined...

  8. An overview of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the petroleum industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.P.

    1992-12-01

    Oil and gas extraction and processing operations sometimes accumulate naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) at concentrations above normal in by-product waste streams. Results from NORM surveys indicate that radionuclide concentrations can be quite variable, ranging from undetectable to extremely high levels. To date, efforts to characterize the geographic distribution of NORM have been limited by poor statistical representation. In addition, the fate of NORM in the environment has not been fully defined, and few human health risk assessment have been conducted. Both the petroleum industry and regulators are becoming increasingly concerned about the presence of NORM. At present, most existing federal environmental regulations do not address oil and gas NORM, and only a few states have developed regulatory programs. Available data suggest that the occurrence of NORM (and associated health risks) is significant enough to warrant increased regulatory control. However, before these regulations can be developed, additional research is needed to (1) better characterize the occurrence and distribution of NORM throughout the industry, (2) quantify hazards posed by NORM to industry workers and the general public, and (3) develop effective waste treatment and minimization technologies that will lower the risk associated with NORM and reduce disposal costs.

  9. Manufactured Home Testing in Simulated and Naturally Occurring High Winds for WCTE Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William D. Richins; Thomas K. Larson; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Ryan G. Kobbe

    2006-08-01

    A typical double-wide manufactured home was tested in simulated and naturally occurring high winds to understand structural behavior and improve performance during severe windstorms. Seven (7) lateral load tests were conducted on a double-wide manufactured home at a remote field test site in Wyoming. An extensive instrumentation package monitored the overall behavior of the home and collected data vital to validating computational software for the manufactured housing industry. The tests were designed to approach the design load of the home without causing structural damage, thus allowing the behavior of the home to be accessed when the home was later exposed to high winds (to 80-mph). The data generally show near-linear initial system response with significant non-linear behavior as the applied loads increase. Load transfer across the marriage line is primarily compression. Racking, while present, is very small. Interface slip and shear displacement along the marriage line are nearly insignificant. Horizontal global displacements reached 0.6 inch. These tests were designed primarily to collect data necessary to calibrate a desktop analysis and design software tool, MHTool, under development at the Idaho National Laboratory specifically for manufactured housing. Currently available analysis tools are, for the most part, based on methods developed for "stick built" structures and are inappropriate for manufactured homes. The special materials utilized in manufactured homes, such as rigid adhesives used in the connection of the sheathing materials to the studs, significantly alter the behavior of manufactured homes under lateral loads. Previous full scale tests of laterally loaded manufactured homes confirm the contention that conventional analysis methods are not applicable. System behavior dominates the structural action of manufactured homes and its prediction requires a three dimensional analysis of the complete unit, including tie-downs. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Manufactured Housing Institute. The results of this research can lead to savings in annual losses of life and property by providing validated information to enable the advancement of code requirements and by developing engineering software that can predict and optimize wind resistance.

  10. Investigation of Naturally Occurring Radio Nuclides in Shir-kuh Granites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazarei, Mohammad Mehdi; Zarei, Mojtaba

    2011-12-26

    One of the principle natural radiation resources is Granite which can be dangerous for human because of its radiations. Based on this fact, in this research we attempt to specify the activity amount of these natural radio nuclides, existing in Shir-kuh Granite of Yazd state. To specify the activity amount of this natural radio nuclides, it has been applied the measurement method of Gamma spectroscopy using high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector.

  11. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) generated from lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    Available online 16 September 2014 Keywords: Lignite Coal fired power plant Fly ash Bottom ash Naturally depends primarily on lignite-fired power plants. During coal com- bustion, huge amounts of fly ash exposure of workers and the local population. Lignite samples and NORMs of fly ash and bottom ash generated

  12. Naturally occurring, optically driven, cellular rotor J. A. Dharmadhikari, S. Roy, A. K. Dharmadhikari, S. Sharma, and D. Mathura)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Shobhona

    005, India (Received 10 June 2004; accepted 20 October 2004) We report the conversion of optical energy into mechanical energy by naturally occurring red blood cells (RBCs) placed in an optical trap material, biconcave disk-shaped red blood cells (RBCs), which convert optical energy into mechanical energy

  13. Sulphoraphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells by targeting heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Ruma; Mukherjee, Sutapa [Department of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Toxicology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India)] [Department of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Toxicology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India); Biswas, Jaydip [Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India)] [Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India); Roy, Madhumita, E-mail: mitacnci@yahoo.co.in [Department of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Toxicology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India)] [Department of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Toxicology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, SP Mukherjee Road, Kolkata 700 026 (India)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HSPs (27, 70 and 90) and HSF1 are overexpressed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate inhibited HSPs and HSF1 expressions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of HSPs and HSF1 lead to regulation of apoptotic proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins activate of caspases particularly caspase 3 and 9 leading to induction of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins induce caspases leading to induction of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are involved in protein folding, aggregation, transport and/or stabilization by acting as a molecular chaperone, leading to inhibition of apoptosis by both caspase dependent and/or independent pathways. HSPs are overexpressed in a wide range of human cancers and are implicated in tumor cell proliferation, differentiation, invasion and metastasis. HSPs particularly 27, 70, 90 and the transcription factor heat shock factor1 (HSF1) play key roles in the etiology of breast cancer and can be considered as potential therapeutic target. The present study was designed to investigate the role of sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate on HSPs (27, 70, 90) and HSF1 in two different breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells expressing wild type and mutated p53 respectively, vis-a-vis in normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-12F. It was furthermore investigated whether modulation of HSPs and HSF1 could induce apoptosis in these cells by altering the expressions of p53, p21 and some apoptotic proteins like Bcl-2, Bax, Bid, Bad, Apaf-1 and AIF. Sulphoraphane was found to down-regulate the expressions of HSP70, 90 and HSF1, though the effect on HSP27 was not pronounced. Consequences of HSP inhibition was upregulation of p21 irrespective of p53 status. Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, AIF were upregulated followed by down-regulation of Bcl-2 and this effect was prominent in MCF-7 than in MDA-MB-231. However, very little change in the expression of Bid was observed. Alteration in Bcl-2 Bax ratio resulted in the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and activation of caspases 3 and 9 which are in agreement with apoptotic index values. Sulphoraphane therefore can be regarded as a potent inducer of apoptosis due to HSP modulation in breast cancer cells.

  14. Using naturally occurring radionuclides to determine drinking water age in a community water system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Waples, James T.; Bordewyk, Jason K.; Knesting, Kristina M.; Orlandini, Kent A.

    2015-07-22

    Drinking water quality in a community water system is closely linked to the age of water from initial treatment to time of delivery. However, water age is difficult to measure with conventional chemical tracers; particularly in stagnant water, where the relationship between disinfectant decay, microbial growth, and water age is poorly understood. Using radionuclides that were naturally present in source water, we found that measured activity ratios of 90Y/90Sr and 234Th/238U in discrete drinking water samples of known age accurately estimated water age up to 9 days old (?est: ± 3.8 h, P 2 = 0.998, n =more »11) and 25 days old (?est: ± 13.3 h, P 2 = 0.996, n = 12), respectively. Moreover, 90Y-derived water ages in a community water system (6.8 × 104 m3 d–1 capacity) were generally consistent with water ages derived from an extended period simulation model. Radionuclides differ from conventional chemical tracers in that they are ubiquitous in distribution mains and connected premise plumbing. The ability to measure both water age and an analyte (e.g., chemical or microbe) in any water sample at any time allows for new insight into factors that control drinking water quality.« less

  15. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number

  16. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural GasYearElements) Gas and

  17. Prediction of rodent carcinogenic potential of naturally occurring chemicals in the human diet using high-throughput QSAR predictive modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerio, Luis G. . E-mail: luis.valerio@FDA.HHS.gov; Arvidson, Kirk B.; Chanderbhan, Ronald F.; Contrera, Joseph F.

    2007-07-01

    Consistent with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Critical Path Initiative, predictive toxicology software programs employing quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models are currently under evaluation for regulatory risk assessment and scientific decision support for highly sensitive endpoints such as carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and reproductive toxicity. At the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Office of Food Additive Safety and the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research's Informatics and Computational Safety Analysis Staff (ICSAS), the use of computational SAR tools for both qualitative and quantitative risk assessment applications are being developed and evaluated. One tool of current interest is MDL-QSAR predictive discriminant analysis modeling of rodent carcinogenicity, which has been previously evaluated for pharmaceutical applications by the FDA ICSAS. The study described in this paper aims to evaluate the utility of this software to estimate the carcinogenic potential of small, organic, naturally occurring chemicals found in the human diet. In addition, a group of 19 known synthetic dietary constituents that were positive in rodent carcinogenicity studies served as a control group. In the test group of naturally occurring chemicals, 101 were found to be suitable for predictive modeling using this software's discriminant analysis modeling approach. Predictions performed on these compounds were compared to published experimental evidence of each compound's carcinogenic potential. Experimental evidence included relevant toxicological studies such as rodent cancer bioassays, rodent anti-carcinogenicity studies, genotoxic studies, and the presence of chemical structural alerts. Statistical indices of predictive performance were calculated to assess the utility of the predictive modeling method. Results revealed good predictive performance using this software's rodent carcinogenicity module of over 1200 chemicals, comprised primarily of pharmaceutical, industrial and some natural products developed under an FDA-MDL cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA). The predictive performance for this group of dietary natural products and the control group was 97% sensitivity and 80% concordance. Specificity was marginal at 53%. This study finds that the in silico QSAR analysis employing this software's rodent carcinogenicity database is capable of identifying the rodent carcinogenic potential of naturally occurring organic molecules found in the human diet with a high degree of sensitivity. It is the first study to demonstrate successful QSAR predictive modeling of naturally occurring carcinogens found in the human diet using an external validation test. Further test validation of this software and expansion of the training data set for dietary chemicals will help to support the future use of such QSAR methods for screening and prioritizing the risk of dietary chemicals when actual animal data are inadequate, equivocal, or absent.

  18. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969CentralWellsMillion CubicOctober 2015Elements) Gas and

  19. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers4.32Elements) Gas and Gas

  20. California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 ArizonaResidential Consumers (Number of Elements)

  1. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014Proved ReservesFoot) DecadeNetElements)

  2. Radiological Impact Associated to Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) from Coal-Fired Power Plants Emissions - 13436

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinis, Maria de Lurdes; Fiuza, Antonio; Soeiro de Carvalho, Jose; Gois, Joaquim [Geo-Environment and Resources Research Centre (CIGAR), Porto University, Faculty of Engineering - FEUP, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)] [Geo-Environment and Resources Research Centre (CIGAR), Porto University, Faculty of Engineering - FEUP, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Meira Castro, Ana Cristina [School of Engineering Polytechnic of Porto - ISEP, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 431, 4200-072, Porto (Portugal)] [School of Engineering Polytechnic of Porto - ISEP, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 431, 4200-072, Porto (Portugal)

    2013-07-01

    Certain materials used and produced in a wide range of non-nuclear industries contain enhanced activity concentrations of natural radionuclides. In particular, electricity production from coal is one of the major sources of increased human exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials. A methodology was developed to assess the radiological impact due to natural radiation background. The developed research was applied to a specific case study, the Sines coal-fired power plant, located in the southwest coastline of Portugal. Gamma radiation measurements were carried out with two different instruments: a sodium iodide scintillation detector counter (SPP2 NF, Saphymo) and a gamma ray spectrometer with energy discrimination (Falcon 5000, Canberra). Two circular survey areas were defined within 20 km of the power plant. Forty relevant measurements points were established within the sampling area: 15 urban and 25 suburban locations. Additionally, ten more measurements points were defined, mostly at the 20-km area. The registered gamma radiation varies from 20 to 98.33 counts per seconds (c.p.s.) corresponding to an external gamma exposure rate variable between 87.70 and 431.19 nGy/h. The highest values were measured at locations near the power plant and those located in an area within the 6 and 20 km from the stacks. In situ gamma radiation measurements with energy discrimination identified natural emitting nuclides as well as their decay products (Pb-212, Pb-2142, Ra-226, Th-232, Ac-228, Th-234, Pa-234, U- 235, etc.). According to the results, an influence from the stacks emissions has been identified both qualitatively and quantitatively. The developed methodology accomplished the lack of data in what concerns to radiation rate in the vicinity of Sines coal-fired power plant and consequently the resulting exposure to the nearby population. (authors)

  3. Thermoluminescence (TL) Analysis and Fading Studies of Naturally Occurring Salt Irradiated by 500 mGy Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiwari, Ramesh Chandra; Pau, Kham Suan [Department of Physics, Mizoram University: Tanhril Campus, Aizawl-796004, Mizoram (India)

    2011-10-20

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of the naturally occurring salt for the dosimetry purposes, using TL. The fine powder samples (20 mg) were irradiated by {gamma}- rays from 500 mGy to 2500 mGy by using Theratron-780C Cobalt-60 source, however, this paper discusses about 500 mGy only. The TL glow curve peak parameters were studied by using Chen's peak shape equation. TL glow curves were compared with fitted curves using glow curve deconvolution (GCD) method by using Kitis expression. The kinetic parameter values (E, b and s) so calculated, are in good agreement with those available in literature. The calculated energy values were also verified by using various heating rate (VHR) method. {chi}{sup 2} test and figure of merit (FOM) calculation was done to accept the goodness of fit between the curves. Fading studies of the sample showed a good fitting between the curves. The analysis suggests that natural salt should be considered for dosimetry purposes.

  4. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank R. Rack

    2006-09-20

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41329 between Joint Oceanographic Institutions and DOE-NETL was divided into two phases based on successive proposals and negotiated statements of work pertaining to activities to sample and characterize methane hydrates on ODP Leg 204 (Phase 1) and on IODP Expedition 311 (Phase 2). The Phase 1 Final Report was submitted to DOE-NETL in April 2004. This report is the Phase 2 Final Report to DOE-NETL. The primary objectives of Phase 2 were to sample and characterize methane hydrates using the systems and capabilities of the D/V JOIDES Resolution during IODP Expedition 311, to enable scientists the opportunity to establish the mass and distribution of naturally occurring gas and gas hydrate at all relevant spatial and temporal scales, and to contribute to the DOE methane hydrate research and development effort. The goal of the work was to provide expanded measurement capabilities on the JOIDES Resolution for a dedicated hydrate cruise to the Cascadia continental margin off Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada (IODP Expedition 311) so that hydrate deposits in this region would be well characterized and technology development continued for hydrate research. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. The statement of work for this project included three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd.; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). Additional small tasks that arose during the course of the research were included under these three primary tasks in consultation with the DOE-NETL Program Manager. All tasks outlined in the original statement of work were accomplished except for the deployment and use of the X-ray CT system under Subtask 2-2. This reduction in scope provided resources that were applied to other activities to support the overall project. Post-expedition analysis of results and report writing will continue beyond this reporting period, however, all field deployments associated with this project have been successfully concluded as of this writing.

  5. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rack, Frank R.; Dickens, Gerald; Ford, Kathryn; Schroeder, Derryl; Storms, Michael

    2002-08-01

    The primary accomplishment of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter was the preparation of tools and measurement systems for deployment, testing and use on ODP Leg 204, which will study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon. Additional accomplishments were related to the postcruise evaluation of tools and measurements systems used on ODP Leg 201 along the Peru margin from January through March, 2002. The operational results from the use of the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) tool and the PCS Gas Manifold on ODP Leg 201 are evaluated in this progress report in order to prepare for the upcoming deployments on ODP Leg 204 in July, 2002. The PCS was deployed 17 times during ODP Leg 201 and successfully retrieved cores from a broad range of lithologies and sediment depths along the Peru margin. Eleven deployments were entirely successful, collecting between 0.5 and 1.0 meters of sediment at greater than 75% of hydrostatic pressure. The PCS gas manifold was used in conjunction with the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) throughout ODP Leg 201 to measure the total volume and composition of gases recovered in sediment cores associated with methane gas hydrates. The FUGRO Pressure Corer (FPC), one of the HYACE/HYACINTH pressure coring tools, was also deployed on the D/V JOIDES Resolution during ODP Legs 201 to field-test this coring system at three shallow-water sites located offshore Peru. The field-testing of these tools provides a corollary benefit to DOE/NETL at no cost to this project. The testing of these tools on the D/V JOIDES Resolution was negotiated as part of a cooperative agreement between JOI/ODP and the HYACINTH partners. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively during ODP Leg 201. The data obtained from the successful deployments of these tools is still being evaluated by the scientists and engineers involved in this testing; however, preliminary results are presented in this report. An infrared-thermal imaging system (IR-TIS) was deployed for the first time on ODP Leg 201. This system was used to identify methane hydrate intervals in the recovered cores. Initial discussions of these experiments are provided in this report. This report is an overview of the field measurements made on recovered sediment cores and the downhole measurements made during ODP Leg 201. These results are currently being used to incorporate the ''lessons learned'' from these deployments to prepare for a dedicated ODP leg to study the characteristics of naturally-occurring hydrates in the subsurface environment of Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon during ODP Leg 204, which will take place from July through September, 2002.

  6. Blimp-1{delta}exon7: A naturally occurring Blimp-1 deletion mutant with auto-regulatory potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Doris; Nayak, Arnab; Schumann, Julia E.; Schimpl, Anneliese; Berberich, Ingolf Berberich-Siebelt, Friederike

    2008-12-10

    Blimp-1 is a master regulator of terminal B cell differentiation and plays a pivotal role in various developmental processes. In addition to full length Blimp-1, a Blimp-1 mRNA lacking exon 7 (Blimp-1{delta}7) has been described to occur in murine B cells. The activity and function of the mutant mRNA-encoded protein (Blimp-1{delta}7), lacking three crucial zinc fingers necessary for DNA interaction, is completely unknown. Since isoforms of other prdm family proteins affect each other's functions, we wondered whether Blimp-1{delta}7 still plays a role in B cells, independent of direct DNA binding. In this study, we found that Blimp-1{delta}7 is preferentially expressed in naive CD19{sup +} B cells. A fraction of Blimp-1{delta}7 migrates to the nucleus, colocalizes with HDAC2 and is found at sites of repressed chromatin, although it does not bind to the Blimp-1 DNA consensus site. Unexpectedly, Blimp-1 and Blimp-1{delta}7 homodimerize as well as heterodimerize with each other. Ectopic expression of Blimp-1{delta}7 in WEHI 231 cells, a Blimp-1-negative murine lymphoma line, leads to cessation of proliferation and enhancement of apoptosis. Importantly, LPS-induced differentiation is suppressed in the presence of Blimp-1{delta}7. This is in agreement with our finding that Blimp-1{delta}7 interferes with endogenous Blimp-1 expression. Thus, our data suggest an auto-regulatory mechanism of Blimp-1 activation.

  7. No-go Theorem for One-way Quantum Computing on Naturally Occurring Two-level Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianxin Chen; Xie Chen; Runyao Duan; Zhengfeng Ji; Bei Zeng

    2010-04-21

    One-way quantum computing achieves the full power of quantum computation by performing single particle measurements on some many-body entangled state, known as the resource state. As single particle measurements are relatively easy to implement, the preparation of the resource state becomes a crucial task. An appealing approach is simply to cool a strongly correlated quantum many-body system to its ground state. In addition to requiring the ground state of the system to be universal for one-way quantum computing, we also want the Hamiltonian to have non-degenerate ground state protected by a fixed energy gap, to involve only two-body interactions, and to be frustration-free so that measurements in the course of the computation leave the remaining particles in the ground space. Recently, significant efforts have been made to the search of resource states that appear naturally as ground states in spin lattice systems. The approach is proved to be successful in spin-5/2 and spin-3/2 systems. Yet, it remains an open question whether there could be such a natural resource state in a spin-1/2, i.e., qubit system. Here, we give a negative answer to this question by proving that it is impossible for a genuinely entangled qubit states to be a non-degenerate ground state of any two-body frustration-free Hamiltonian. What is more, we prove that every spin-1/2 frustration-free Hamiltonian with two-body interaction always has a ground state that is a product of single- or two-qubit states, a stronger result that is interesting independent of the context of one-way quantum computing.

  8. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew Field DiscoveriesElements) Gas and

  9. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew Field DiscoveriesElements) Gas

  10. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew FieldDecadeYear JanElements) Gas and

  11. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew FieldDecadeYear JanElements) Gas

  12. Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,2060Year0YearElements)

  13. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969CentralWellsMillion Cubic Feet) Havre, MT NaturalYear

  14. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014Residential Consumers

  15. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (BillionYear Jan FebFueland

  16. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (BillionYear JanIndustrial

  17. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (BillionYear

  18. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rack, Frank; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Trehu, Anne; Storms, Michael; Schroeder, Derryl

    2002-09-30

    The primary accomplishment of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter was the deployment of tools and measurement systems on ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September, 2002. During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to map estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which the process of gas hydrate formation is occurring. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: (1) the discovery that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally consistent results; (2) evidence for the importance of sediment properties for controlling the migration of fluids in the accretionary complex; (3) geochemical indications that the gas hydrate system at Hydrate Ridge contains significant concentrations of higher order hydrocarbons and that fractionation and mixing signals will provide important constraints on gas hydrate dynamics; and (4) the discovery of very high chlorinity values that extend for at least 10 mbsf near the summit, indicating that hydrate formation here must be very rapid.

  19. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rack, Frank

    2003-06-30

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) Frank Rack, Anne Trehu, and Tim Collett presented preliminary results and operational outcomes of ODP Leg 204 at the American Association of Petroleum Geologists annual meeting in Salt Lake City, UT; (2) several Leg 204 scientists participated in special hydrate sessions at the international EGS/AGU/EUG meeting in Nice, France and presented initial science results from the cruise, which included outcomes arising from this cooperative agreement; and, (3) postcruise evaluation of the data, tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 continued in the preparation of deliverables under this agreement. At the EGS/EUG/AGU meeting in Nice, France in April, Leg 204 Co-chiefs Anne Trehu and Gerhard Bohrmann, as well as ODP scientists Charlie Paull, Erwin Suess, and Jim Kennett, participated in a press conference on hydrates. The well-attended press conference entitled ''Gas Hydrates: Free methane found and controversy over the 'hydrate gun''' led to stories in Nature on-line and BBC radio, among others. There were six (6) oral and fifteen (15) poster presentations on ODP Leg 204 hydrate science at the EGS/AGU/EUG Meeting in Nice, France on April 6-11, 2003. This was a very strong showing at a meeting just over six month following the completion of the drilling cruise and highlighted many of the results of the leg, including the results obtained with instruments and equipment funded under this cooperative agreement. At the AAPG annual meeting in Salt Lake City, UT on May 11-14, 2003, Anne Trehu gave an oral presentation about the scientific results of Leg 204, and Frank Rack presented a poster outlining the operational and technical accomplishments. Work continued on analyzing data collected during ODP Leg 204 and preparing reports on the outcomes of Phase 1 projects as well as developing plans for Phase 2.

  20. Florida Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969CentralWells (MillionProved ReservesYear Jan FebYear Jan Feb

  1. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969CentralWells (MillionProved% of TotalInput Supplemental

  2. Idaho Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969CentralWellsMillion Cubic Feet) Havre,1BureauImports

  3. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969CentralWellsMillion Cubic Feet)ThousandYear Jan Feb

  4. Iowa Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969CentralWellsMillion CubicOctoberperFeet) Year

  5. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969CentralWellsMillionReserves (BillionYear Jan FebResidential

  6. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential Consumers (Number of33Cubic Foot)Year Jan

  7. Maine Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN

  8. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR:Decade Year-0 Year-1NetYear

  9. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014 MEMORANDUMProved ReservesDecadeYear Jan Feb

  10. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers THURSDAY,ProvedFeet)

  11. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic Feet) Gas WellsFoot)YearYear

  12. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic Feet)Cubic1992Thousand9)% ofYearResidential

  13. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014 MEMORANDUMProvedFeet) U.S.2ImportsResidential

  14. Montana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014ProvedYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug

  15. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade Year-0Cubic(MillionDecade Year-0Fuel

  16. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade Year-0Cubic(MillionDecade Year-0FuelIndustrial

  17. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570 2,304Exports (NoYear Jan FebCommercial

  18. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570 2,304Exports (NoYear Jan

  19. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570Month PreviousDry4,645Decade0

  20. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570Month PreviousDry4,645Decade0Industrial

  1. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570MonthThousand8 2 2

  2. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570MonthThousand8 2 2Industrial Consumers

  3. California Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724perSalesFuel Consumption (Million

  4. California Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724perSalesFuel Consumption (MillionIndustrial

  5. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

  6. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov DecIndustrial Consumers

  7. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions (Million CubicCommercial

  8. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions (Million

  9. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1 0 0Commercial Consumers

  10. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1 0 0Commercial

  11. Florida Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Augand Plant

  12. Florida Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Augand

  13. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar87.1 81.2

  14. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar87.1 81.2Industrial Consumers

  15. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan FebMississippi119,4562009

  16. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan FebMississippi119,4562009Industrial

  17. Idaho Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear JanThousandThousand

  18. Idaho Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear JanThousandThousandIndustrial Consumers

  19. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearYear Jan Feb Mar AprCommercial Consumers

  20. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearYear Jan Feb Mar AprCommercial

  1. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearYear Jan FebperDecade

  2. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearYear Jan FebperDecadeIndustrial Consumers

  3. Iowa Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearYear JanDecadeperInjections

  4. Iowa Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearYear JanDecadeperInjectionsIndustrial Consumers

  5. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearYearDecade Year-0163DecadeFuel

  6. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearYearDecade Year-0163DecadeFuelIndustrial

  7. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012 2013 2014 ViewSalesFeet) Decade

  8. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012 2013 2014 ViewSalesFeet) DecadeIndustrial

  9. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012 2013(MillionYear Jan Feb MarFuel

  10. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012 2013(MillionYear Jan Feb MarFuelIndustrial

  11. Maine Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Commercial Consumers

  12. Maine Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Commercial

  13. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012Decade Year-0Year Jan Feb MarCommercial Consumers

  14. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012Decade Year-0Year Jan Feb MarCommercial

  15. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19 15 15 15 3

  16. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19 15 15 15 3Industrial Consumers

  17. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19 15 15May-15DecadeAdditionsCommercial

  18. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19 15

  19. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19 1522 35Feet) Year JanCommercial

  20. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19 1522 35Feet) Year

  1. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19Fuel Consumption (Million

  2. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19Fuel Consumption (MillionIndustrial

  3. Montana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19FuelYear5)Year JanFuel

  4. Montana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19FuelYear5)Year JanFuelIndustrial

  5. Measurement and modeling of uranium and strategic element sorption by amidoxime resins in natural seawater 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pina-Jordan, Jose Gregorio

    1985-01-01

    -JORDAN Approved as to style and content by: F, A. Best (Chairman of Committee) C. A. Erdman (Head of Department) S. sun aram (Member) Mar R. Scott (Member) Dec. 1985 ABSTRACT Measur ement and modeling of Uranium and Strategic Element Sor ption... by Amidoxime Resins in Natural Seawater . (Dec. 1985) Jose Gregor io Pica-Jordan, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr . F. R. Best The international effort to economically recover ur anium and strategic elements from seawater has...

  6. Introduction Uranium is a common element in nature, and has been used for centuries as a coloring agent in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction Uranium is a common element in nature, and has been used for centuries as a coloring agent in decorative glass and ceramics. Today, uranium has uses that range from metal alloys to aircraft counterweights. The most significant modern uses of uranium, however, have been for national defense and electric

  7. Hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    Diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated hydrocarbons are produced as reactor gases in a fast quench reactor. During the fast quench, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  8. Fast-quench reactor for hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Detering, Brent A.; Kong, Peter C.

    2006-08-29

    A fast-quench reactor for production of diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated carbons is provided. During the fast quench in the downstream diverging section of the nozzle, such as in a free expansion chamber, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  9. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172YearDecadeElements) Gas and

  10. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172YearDecadeElements) Gas andResidential

  11. New York Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunPriceElements) Gas and

  12. New York Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunPriceElements) Gas

  13. U.S. Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProved Reserves (Billion CubicBarrels) Increases (Million Barrels) U.S. NaturalDecadeYear

  14. Nature of matrix elements in the quantum chaotic domain of interacting particle systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. K. B. Kota; R. Sahu

    2000-06-02

    There is a newly emerging understanding that in the chaotic domain of isolated finite interacting many particle systems smoothed densities define the statistical description of these systems and these densities follow from embedded (two-body) random matrix ensembles and their various deformations. These ensembles predict that the smoothed form of matrix elements of a transition operator between the chaotic eigenstates weighted by the densities at the two ends (i.e. the bivariate strength density) will be a bivariate Gaussian with the bivariate correlation coefficient arising out of the non-commutability of the hamiltonian and the transition operator involved. The ensemble theory extends to systems with a mean-field and a chaos generating two-body interaction (as in nuclei, atoms and diffusive quantum dots). These developments in many-body quantum chaos are described with special reference to one-body transition operators.

  15. U.S. Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)EstimatedWells (ThousandYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul

  16. U.S. Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)EstimatedWells (ThousandYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

  17. U.S. Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProved ReservesCubicper ThousandFeet) and10-2015 Liquefied49,797.6BalancingDecade Year-0

  18. U.S. Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProved ReservesCubicper ThousandFeet) and10-2015 Liquefied49,797.6BalancingDecade

  19. U.S. Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProved ReservesCubicper ThousandFeet) and10-2015700,596Barrels)Decade

  20. U.S. Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan3 November18.5 385.5DryMay-15Decade(Percent)Year Jan Feb Mar

  1. Half-lives of $\\alpha$ decay from natural nuclides and from superheavy elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Yibin

    2014-01-01

    Recently, experimental researches on the $\\alpha$ decay with long lifetime are one of hot topics in the contemporary nuclear physics [e.g. N. Kinoshita {\\sl et al.} (2012) and J. W. Beeman {\\sl et al.} (2012) ]. In this study, we have systematically investigated the extremely long-lived $\\alpha$-decaying nuclei within a generalized density-dependent cluster model involving the experimental nuclear charge radii. In detail, the important density distribution of daughter nuclei is deduced from the corresponding experimental charge radii, leading to an improved $\\alpha$-core potential in the quantum tunneling calculation of $\\alpha$-decay width. Besides the excellent agreement between theory and experiment, predictions on half-lives of possible candidates for natural $\\alpha$ emitters are made for future experimental detections. In addition, the recently confirmed $\\alpha$-decay chain from $^{294}$117 is well described, including the attractive long-lived $\\alpha$-decaying $^{270}$Db, i.e., a positive step toward...

  2. Chapter 1. Introduction Uranium is a common element in nature that has for centuries been used as a coloring agent in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1-1 Chapter 1. Introduction Uranium is a common element in nature that has for centuries been used as a coloring agent in decorative glass and ceramics. Uranium and its radioactive decay products are ubiquitous that many of the natural occurrences of uranium present radiation hazards without any disturbance from

  3. Half-lives of $?$ decay from natural nuclides and from superheavy elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yibin Qian; Zhongzhou Ren

    2014-10-10

    Recently, experimental researches on the $\\alpha$ decay with long lifetime are one of hot topics in the contemporary nuclear physics [e.g. N. Kinoshita {\\sl et al.} (2012) and J. W. Beeman {\\sl et al.} (2012) ]. In this study, we have systematically investigated the extremely long-lived $\\alpha$-decaying nuclei within a generalized density-dependent cluster model involving the experimental nuclear charge radii. In detail, the important density distribution of daughter nuclei is deduced from the corresponding experimental charge radii, leading to an improved $\\alpha$-core potential in the quantum tunneling calculation of $\\alpha$-decay width. Besides the excellent agreement between theory and experiment, predictions on half-lives of possible candidates for natural $\\alpha$ emitters are made for future experimental detections. In addition, the recently confirmed $\\alpha$-decay chain from $^{294}$117 is well described, including the attractive long-lived $\\alpha$-decaying $^{270}$Db, i.e., a positive step towards the "island of stability" in the superheavy mass region.

  4. A Case where a Paradox Like Braess's Occurs in the Nash Equilibrium but Does Not Occur in the Wardrop Equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Case where a Paradox Like Braess's Occurs in the Nash Equilibrium but Does Not Occur of the other individuals. Another framework in which such a paradox may occur is that of the Nash equilibrium­ negligible eoeect on the other players. It is natural to expect the same type of paradox in the Nash equilib

  5. Elements of naturality in dynamical simulation frameworks for Hamiltonian, thermostatic, and Lindbladian flows on classical and quantum state-spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John A. Sidles; Joseph L. Garbini; Jonathan P. Jacky; Rico A. R. Picone; Scott A. Harsila

    2010-07-12

    The practical focus of this work is the dynamical simulation of polarization transport processes in quantum spin microscopy and spectroscopy. The simulation framework is built-up progressively, beginning with state-spaces (configuration manifolds) that are geometrically natural, introducing coordinates that are algebraically natural; and finally specifying dynamical potentials that are physically natural; in each respect explicit criteria are given for "naturality." The resulting framework encompasses Hamiltonian flow (both classical and quantum), quantum Lindbladian processes, and classical thermostatic processes. Constructive validation and verification criteria are given for metric and symplectic flows on classical, quantum, and hybrid state-spaces, with particular emphasis to tensor network state-spaces. Both classical and quantum examples are presented, including dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). A broad span of applications and challenges is discussed, ranging from the design and simulation of quantum spin microscopes to the design and simulation of quantum oracles.

  6. Elements of naturality in dynamical simulation frameworks for Hamiltonian, thermostatic, and Lindbladian flows on classical and quantum state-spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidles, John A; Jacky, Jonathan P; Picone, Rico A R; Harsila, Scott A

    2010-01-01

    The practical focus of this work is the dynamical simulation of polarization transport processes in quantum spin microscopy and spectroscopy. The simulation framework is built-up progressively, beginning with state-spaces (configuration manifolds) that are geometrically natural, introducing coordinates that are algebraically natural; and finally specifying dynamical potentials that are physically natural; in each respect explicit criteria are given for "naturality." The resulting framework encompasses Hamiltonian flow (both classical and quantum), quantum Lindbladian processes, and classical thermostatic processes. Constructive validation and verification criteria are given for metric and symplectic flows on classical, quantum, and hybrid state-spaces, with particular emphasis to tensor network state-spaces. Both classical and quantum examples are presented, including dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). A broad span of applications and challenges is discussed, ranging from the design and simulation of quantum...

  7. Naturally Occurring Melanin Synthesis Regulators and Their Modes of Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satooka, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    vivo hepatotoxicity caused by green tea phenolic acids andvivo hepatotoxicity caused by green tea phenolic acids andvivo hepatotoxicity caused by green tea phenolic acids and

  8. Naturally Occurring Melanin Synthesis Regulators and Their Modes of Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satooka, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    activity and mechanism of resveratrol- oriented analogues:trans- stilbene derivatives: resveratrol, pinosylvin and 4-Multiple molecular targets of resveratrol: Anti-carcinogenic

  9. The Geochemistry of Technetium: A Summary of the Behavior of an Artificial Element in the Natural Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Martin, Wayne J.; Zachara, John M.

    2008-12-01

    Interest in the chemistry of technetium has only increased since its discovery in 1937, mainly because of the large and growing inventory of 99Tc generated during fission of 235U, its environmental mobility in oxidizing conditions, and its potential radiotoxicity. For every ton of enriched uranium fuel (3% 235U) that is consumed at a typical burn-up rate, nearly 1 kg of 99Tc is generated. Thus, the mass of 99Tc produced since 1993 has nearly quadrupled, and will likely to continue to increase if more emphasis is placed on nuclear power to slow the accumulation of atmospheric greenhouse gases. In order to gain a comprehensive understanding of the interaction of 99Tc and the natural environment, we review the sources of 99Tc in the nuclear fuel cycle, its chemical properties, radiochemistry, and biogeochemical behavior. We include an evaluation of the use of Re as a chemical analog of Tc, as well as a summary of the redox potential, thermodynamics, sorption, colloidal behavior, and interaction of humic substances with Tc, and the potential for re-oxidation and remobilization of Tc(IV). What emerges is a more complicated picture of Tc behavior than that of an easily tractable transition of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV) with consequent immobilization. Reducing conditions (+200 to +100 mV Eh) are generally thought necessary to cause reduction of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), but far more important are the presence of reducing agents, such as Fe(II) sorbed onto mineral grains. Catalysis of Tc(VII) by surface-mediated Fe(II) will bring the mobile Tc(VII) species to a lower oxidation state and will form the relatively insoluble Tc(IV)O2?nH2O, but even as a solid, equilibrium concentrations of aqueous Tc are nearly a factor of 20× above the EPA set drinking water standards. However, sequestration of Tc(IV) into Fe(III)-bearing phases, such as goethite or other hydrous oxyhydroxides of iron, may ameliorate concerns over the mobility of Tc. Further, the outcome of many studies on terrestrial and marine sediments that are oxidizing overall indicate that Tc is relatively immobile, due to formation of oxygen-depleted microenvironments that develop in response to bacteriological activities. The rate of re-mobilization of Tc from these microenvironments is just beginning to be assessed, but with no firm consensus. Reassessment of the simple models in which Tc is mobilized and immobilized is therefore urged.

  10. Radioactive Elements in the Standard Atomic Weights Table.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden,N.E.

    2007-08-04

    In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (or longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular element has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of 'these constants' for use in various chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was the most stable, i.e., the one with the longest known half-life. In their 1973 Report, the Commission noted that the users of the main Table of Atomic Weights were dissatisfied with the omission of values for some elements in that Table and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for the radioactive elements into the main Table. In their 1983 Report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, from which an atomic weight value could be calculated to five or more figure accuracy, without prior knowledge of the sample involved. These elements were again listed in the Atomic Weights Table with no further information, i.e., with no mass number or atomic weight value.

  11. How low-energy fusion can occur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Ivlev

    2012-12-04

    Fusion of two deuterons of room temperature energy is discussed. The nuclei are in vacuum with no connection to any external source (electric or magnetic field, illumination, surrounding matter, traps, etc.) which may accelerate them. The energy of two nuclei is conserved and remains small during the motion through the Coulomb barrier. The penetration through this barrier, which is the main obstacle for low-energy fusion, strongly depends on a form of the incident flux on the Coulomb center at large distances from it. In contrast to the usual scattering, the incident wave is not a single plane wave but the certain superposition of plane waves of the same energy and various directions, for example, a convergent conical wave. The wave function close to the Coulomb center is determined by a cusp caustic which is probed by de Broglie waves. The particle flux gets away from the cusp and moves to the Coulomb center providing a not small probability of fusion (cusp driven tunneling). Getting away from a caustic cusp also occurs in optics and acoustics.

  12. Programmatic Elements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11

    The Guide provides acceptable methods of meeting the requirements of DOE O 151.1C for programmatic elements that sustain the emergency management program and maintain the readiness of the program to respond to an emergency. Supersedes DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-1, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-3.

  13. Response Elements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11

    The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Supersedes DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

  14. Descriptions of selected accidents that have occurred at nuclear reactor facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertini, H.W.

    1980-04-01

    This report was prepared at the request of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island to provide the members of the Commission with some insight into the nature and significance of accidents that have occurred at nuclear reactor facilities in the past. Toward that end, this report presents a brief description of 44 accidents which have occurred throughout the world and which meet at least one of the severity criteria that were established.

  15. Nature Elements Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,MeregNIFESpinningLtd Jump to: navigation,Pvt Ltd

  16. Nature Elements Holding AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,MeregNIFESpinningLtd Jump to: navigation,Pvt LtdHolding AG

  17. Determining Planes Along Which Earthquakes Occur- Method of Applicatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of earthquake locations is often so smeared that the underlying fault or joint structures along which the earthquakes occur cannot be inferred from visual inspection of...

  18. Jet-like circulations occur in the `simple' geometries of gas planets and Earth's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Jet-like circulations occur in the `simple' geometries of gas planets and Earth's liquid to barotropize jets => life cycles of BC instability. large-scale PV gradients act as source of eddy entrophy The Jet Stream Conundrum Baldwin, Rhines, Huang & McIntyre, Nature 2007 #12;For Earth's oceans, density

  19. Notes 04. Elements of analytical dynamics. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Elements of Analytical Mechanics ? 2008 Luis San Andr?s 1 MEEN 617 - Handout 4a ELEMENTS OF ANALYTICAL MECHANICS Newton's laws (Euler's fundamental principles of motion) are formulated for a single particle and easily extended to systems of particles.... This method is also valid for continuous systems, and in which case not only the equations of motion are obtained but also the associated (natural) boundary conditions. MEEN 617 - Handout 4 Elements of Analytical Mechanics ? 2008 Luis San Andr?s 2...

  20. In-situ remediation of naturally occurring radioactive materials with high-permeability hydraulic fracturing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demarchos, Andronikos Stavros

    1998-01-01

    in the petroleum industry, is the recommended technique. NORM are found throughout subterranean formations. Whenever fluids from petroleum or water reservoirs are produced NORM are present in varying quantities. NORM can only be sensed with radiation detectors...

  1. Roles of Naturally Occurring Bacteria in Controlling Iodine-129 Mobility in Subsurface Soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hsiu-Ping

    2012-10-19

    (IO3-) and is the predominant species in the terrestrial environment due to prevailing pH and Eh conditions. In order to transform I- to less mobile organo-iodine (OI), strong oxidants are necessary to activate the first electron transfer step from I...

  2. The role of naturally occurring waterholes in determining the distribution of Florida Key Deer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ji Yeon

    2009-05-15

    (Big Pine Key Inn Station, 1953) Data on Big Pine Key and the Volume of Daily Fresh Water Shortage on Big Pine Key (From the Result of 1-Year Base Line Simulation)................................................................................ 26...). I used two precipitation data sets to parameterize dv1, one consisting of daily precipitation (inches) from January 1 to December 31, 1953 from the Big Pine Key Inn weather station and one from January 1 to December 31, 2001 from the Key West...

  3. USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown(LECBP)BioGen LLC JumpForestryForm12 JumpCOSO EGS

  4. Discrete Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, J; Johnson, S

    2007-12-03

    The Distinct Element Method (also frequently referred to as the Discrete Element Method) (DEM) is a Lagrangian numerical technique where the computational domain consists of discrete solid elements which interact via compliant contacts. This can be contrasted with Finite Element Methods where the computational domain is assumed to represent a continuum (although many modern implementations of the FEM can accommodate some Distinct Element capabilities). Often the terms Discrete Element Method and Distinct Element Method are used interchangeably in the literature, although Cundall and Hart (1992) suggested that Discrete Element Methods should be a more inclusive term covering Distinct Element Methods, Displacement Discontinuity Analysis and Modal Methods. In this work, DEM specifically refers to the Distinct Element Method, where the discrete elements interact via compliant contacts, in contrast with Displacement Discontinuity Analysis where the contacts are rigid and all compliance is taken up by the adjacent intact material.

  5. The Uranium Processing Facility Finite Element Meshing Discussion

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion ...Need picture of Building... October 25, 2011 Department of Energy - Natural Phenomenon Hazard Workshop 1...

  6. Natural lighting and skylights 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Benjamin Hampton

    1961-01-01

    There are many physiological and psychological factors which enter into the proper design of space for human occupancy. One of these elements is light. Both natural light and manufactured light are basic tools with which any designer must work...

  7. Regular unipotent elements Elements unipotents reguliers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnafé, Cédric

    GF . Alors il existe un ´el´ement unipotent r´egulier v dans LF tel que RG LPG u = L v o`u G u est un ´el´ement unipotent r´egulier de GF et soit uL = resG L u. Alors RG LPG u = L uL . L

  8. If a fire should occur... CLOSE the doors to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    If a fire should occur... · CLOSE the doors to stop the spread of the fire · SOUND the alarm, alert others to the danger · GET OUT of the building · NOTIFY the fire department DO NOT go back into the building or try to save your stuff. Clothes, books and papers can be replaced- YOU CAN'T! Living With Fire

  9. Improving Home Automation by Discovering Regularly Occurring Device Usage Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holder, Lawrence B.

    Improving Home Automation by Discovering Regularly Occurring Device Usage Patterns Edwin O in an environment can be mined to discover significant patterns, which an intelligent agent could use to automate of two prediction algorithms, thus demonstrating multiple uses for a home automation system. Finally, we

  10. Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/NevadaaToolsRadioactive Mineral Occurences in

  11. RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS IN THE STANDARD ATOMIC WEIGHTS TABLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.; Holden, N.; Holden,N.E.

    2011-07-27

    In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (or longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular element has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of 'these constants' for use in various chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was the most stable, i.e., the one with the longest known half-life. In their 1973 Report, the Commission noted that the users of the main Table of Atomic Weights were dissatisfied with the omission of values for some elements in that Table and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for the radioactive elements into the main Table. In their 1983 Report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, from which an atomic weight value could be calculated to five or more figure accuracy, without prior knowledge of the sample involved. These elements were again listed in the Atomic Weights Table with no further information, i.e., with no mass number or atomic weight value. For the elements, which have no stable characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, the data on the half-lives and the relative atomic masses for the nuclides of interest for those elements have been evaluated. The values of the half-lives with their uncertainties are listed in the table. The uncertainties are given for the last digit quoted of the half-life and are given in parentheses. A half-life entry for the Table having a value and an uncertainty of 7 {+-} 3 is listed in the half-life column as 7 (3). The criteria to include data in this Table, is to be the same as it has been for over sixty years. It is the same criteria, which are used for all data that are evaluated for inclusion in the Standard Table of Atomic Weights. If a report of data is published in a peer-reviewed journal, that data is evaluated and considered for inclusion in the appropriate table of the biennial report of the Atomic Weights Commission. As better data becomes available in the future, the information that is contained in either of the Tables of Standard Atomic Weights or in the Table of Radioactive Elements may be modified. It should be noted that the appearance of any datum in the Table of the Radioactive Elements is merely for the purposes of calculating an atomic mass value for any sample of a radioactive material, which might have a variety of isotopic compositions and it has no implication as to the priority for claiming discovery of a given element and is not intended to. The atomic mass values have been taken primarily from the 2003 Atomic Mass Table. Mass values for those radioisotopes that do not appear in the 2003 Atomic mass Table have been taken from preliminary data of the Atomic Mass Data Center. Most of the quoted half-lives.

  12. Do naked singularities generically occur in generalized theories of gravity?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kengo Maeda; Takashi Torii; Makoto Narita

    1998-10-27

    A new mechanism for causing naked singularities is found in an effective superstring theory. We investigate the gravitational collapse in a spherically symmetric Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton system in the presence of a pure cosmological constant "potential", where the system has no static black hole solution. We show that once gravitational collapse occurs in the system, naked singularities necessarily appear in the sense that the field equations break down in the domain of outer communications. This suggests that in generalized theories of gravity, the non-minimally coupled fields generically cause naked singularities in the process of gravitational collapse if the system has no static or stationary black hole solution.

  13. Sorption of redox-sensitive elements: critical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickert, R.G.

    1980-12-01

    The redox-sensitive elements (Tc, U, Np, Pu) discussed in this report are of interest to nuclear waste management due to their long-lived isotopes which have a potential radiotoxic effect on man. In their lower oxidation states these elements have been shown to be highly adsorbed by geologic materials occurring under reducing conditions. Experimental research conducted in recent years, especially through the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) and Waste/Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) program, has provided extensive information on the mechanisms of retardation. In general, ion-exchange probably plays a minor role in the sorption behavior of cations of the above three actinide elements. Formation of anionic complexes of the oxidized states with common ligands (OH/sup -/, CO/sup - -//sub 3/) is expected to reduce adsorption by ion exchange further. Pertechnetate also exhibits little ion-exchange sorption by geologic media. In the reduced (IV) state, all of the elements are highly charged and it appears that they form a very insoluble compound (oxide, hydroxide, etc.) or undergo coprecipitation or are incorporated into minerals. The exact nature of the insoluble compounds and the effect of temperature, pH, pe, other chemical species, and other parameters are currently being investigated. Oxidation states other than Tc (IV,VII), U(IV,VI), Np(IV,V), and Pu(IV,V) are probably not important for the geologic repository environment expected, but should be considered especially when extreme conditions exist (radiation, temperature, etc.). Various experimental techniques such as oxidation-state analysis of tracer-level isotopes, redox potential measurement and control, pH measurement, and solid phase identification have been used to categorize the behavior of the various valence states.

  14. The synthetic elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1990-05-01

    Prior to 1940, the heaviest element known was uranium, discovered in 1789. Since that time the elements 93 through 109 have been synthesized and identified and the elements 43, 61, 85, and 87 which were missing form the periodic tables of the 1930's have been discovered. The techniques and problems involved in these discoveries and the placement of the transuranium elements in the periodic table will be discussed. The production and positive identification of elements heavier than Md (Z=101), which have very short half-lives and can only be produced an atom-at-a-time, are very difficult and there have been controversies concerning their discovery. Some of the new methods which have been developed and used in these studies will be described. The prospects for production of still heavier elements will be considered.

  15. A topology-motivated mixed finite element method for dynamic response of porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotfian, Zahrasadat

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a numerical method for computing solutions to Biot's fully dynamic model of incompressible saturated porous media [Biot;1956]. Our spatial discretization scheme is based on the three-field formulation (u-w-p) and the coupling of a lowest order Raviart-Thomas mixed element [Raviart,Thomas;1977] for fluid variable fields (w, p ) and a nodal Galerkin finite element for skeleton variable field (u). These mixed spaces are constructed based on the natural topology of the variables; hence, are physically compatible and able to exactly model the kind of continuity which is expected. The method automatically satisfies the well known LBB (inf-sup) stability condition and avoids locking that usually occurs in the numerical computations in the incompressible limit and very low hydraulic conductivity. In contrast to the majority of approaches, our three-field formulation can fully capture dynamic behavior of porous media even in high frequency loading phenomena with considerable fluid acceleratio...

  16. RHESSI observation of flare elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo C. Grigis; Arnold O. Benz

    2006-02-14

    RHESSI observations of elementary flare bursts are presented. These solar flare elements are distinct emission peaks of a duration of some tens of seconds present in the hard X-ray light curves. They are characterized by consistent soft-hard-soft spectral behavior, which can be described in a quantitative way and compared which predictions from acceleration models. A detailed analysis of hard X-ray images for an M5 class flare shows that elementary flare bursts do not occur at distinct locations, but as twin X-ray sources move smoothly along an arcade of magnetic loops. This observation apparently contradicts the predictions of standard translation invariant 2.5-dimensional reconnection models.

  17. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korton, George (Cincinnati, OH)

    2004-02-24

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure by encompassing the sides of the fuel element between the header plates.

  18. Modeling a bender element test using Abaqus Finite Element Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Sean (Sean Michael)

    2011-01-01

    Finite Element Methods hold promise for modeling the behavior of an unsaturated soil specimen subjected to bender element agitation. The immediate objective of this research project is to reproduce a bender element test ...

  19. Book Reviews Elements of Mathematical Linguistics ELEMENTS OF MATHEMATICALLINGUISTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Book Reviews Elements of Mathematical Linguistics ELEMENTS OF MATHEMATICALLINGUISTICS (Janus and Phonetics University of Leeds LEEDS LS2-9JT AUTOMATIC SEMANTICINTERPRETATION: k COMPUTER MODEL

  20. Traces of natural radionuclides in animal food

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merli, Isabella Desan; Guazzelli da Silveira, Marcilei A.; Medina, Nilberto H.

    2014-11-11

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials are present everywhere, e.g., in soil, air, housing materials, food, etc. Therefore, human beings and animals receive internal exposure from radioactive elements inside their bodies through breathing and alimentation. Gamma radiation has enough energy to remove an electron from the atom and compromise the rearrangement of electrons in the search for a more stable configuration which can disturb molecule chemical bonding. Food ingestion is one of the most common forms of radioisotopes absorption. The goal of this work is the measurement of natural gamma radiation rates from natural radioisotopes present in animal food. To determine the concentration of natural radionuclides present in animal food gamma-ray spectrometry was applied. We have prepared animal food samples for poultry, fish, dogs, cats and cattle. The two highest total ingestion effective doses observed refers to a sample of mineral salt cattle, 95.3(15) ?Sv/year, rabbit chow, with a value of 48(5) ?Sv/year, and cattle mineral salt, with a value of 69(7) ?Sv/year, while the annual total dose value from terrestrial intake radionuclide is of the order of 290 ?Sv/year.

  1. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  2. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria (Winchester, MA); Hu, Zhicheng (Somerville, MA)

    1993-01-01

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO.sub.2 in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst.

  3. Nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zocher, Roy W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element and a method of manufacturing the element. The fuel element is comprised of a metal primary container and a fuel pellet which is located inside it and which is often fragmented. The primary container is subjected to elevated pressure and temperature to deform the container such that the container conforms to the fuel pellet, that is, such that the container is in substantial contact with the surface of the pellet. This conformance eliminates clearances which permit rubbing together of fuel pellet fragments and rubbing of fuel pellet fragments against the container, thus reducing the amount of dust inside the fuel container and the amount of dust which may escape in the event of container breach. Also, as a result of the inventive method, fuel pellet fragments tend to adhere to one another to form a coherent non-fragmented mass; this reduces the tendency of a fragment to pierce the container in the event of impact.

  4. Element Abundances at High Redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Pettini

    1999-02-11

    I review measurements of element abundances in different components of the high redshift universe, including the Lyman alpha forest, damped Lyman alpha systems, and Lyman break galaxies. Although progress is being made in all three areas, recent work has also produced some surprises and shown that established ideas about the nature of the damped Lyman alpha systems in particular may be too simplistic. Overall, our knowledge of metal abundances at high z is still very sketchy. Most significantly, there seems to be an order of magnitude shortfall in the comoving density of metals which have been measured up to now compared with those produced by the star formation activity seen in Lyman break galaxies. At least some of the missing metals are likely to be in hot gas in galactic halos and proto-clusters.

  5. DOLFIN: Automated Finite Element Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logg, Anders; Wells, G N

    2009-01-01

    ´de´lec 1980]. (4) L2-conforming finite elements: (a) DGq, arbitrary degree discontinuous Lagrange elements; and (b) CR1, first degree Crouzeix–Raviart5 elements [Crouzeix and Raviart 1973]. Arbitrary combinations of the above elements may be used to define...

  6. Finite Element Analysis Skateboard Truck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De, Suvranu

    Finite Element Analysis Of a Skateboard Truck #12;2 Executive Summary: Engineering is and always is an element of the `truck,' which holds the wheels. Finite Element analysis will be conducted on this piece a combination of SolidWorks (for modeling) and ABAQUS (for finite element analysis). It is evident from

  7. Damping element for reducing the vibration of an airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Christian X; Marra, John J

    2013-11-12

    An airfoil (10) is provided with a tip (12) having an opening (14) to a center channel (24). A damping element (16) is inserted within the opening of the center channel, to reduce an induced vibration of the airfoil. The mass of the damping element, a spring constant of the damping element within the center channel, and/or a mounting location (58) of the damping element within the center channel may be adjustably varied, to shift a resonance frequency of the airfoil outside a natural operating frequency of the airfoil.

  8. The transuranium elements: From neptunium and plutonium to element 112

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, D.C. |

    1996-07-26

    Beginning in the 1930`s, both chemists and physicists became interested in synthesizing new artificial elements. The first transuranium element, Np, was synthesized in 1940. Over the past six decades, 20 transuranium elements have been produced. A review of the synthesis is given. The procedure of naming the heavy elements is also discussed. It appears feasible to produce elements 113 and 114. With the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator, it should be possible to reach the superheavy elements in the region of the spherical Z=114 shell, but with fewer neutrons than the N=184 spherical shell. 57 refs, 6 figs.

  9. Immunology of naturally transmissible tumours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddle, Hannah V.; Kaufman, Jim

    2014-09-04

    understanding of the vertebrate immune response to allografts. Two naturally occurring contagious cancers are currently active in the animal kingdom, Canine Transmissible Venereal Tumour (CTVT) that spreads among dogs and Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) among...

  10. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2014-04-29

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  11. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  12. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occuring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rack, Frank; Guerin, Gilles; Goldberg, David

    2003-12-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) Leg 204 scientific party members presented preliminary results and operational outcomes of ODP Leg 204 at the American Geophysical Union Fall meeting, which was held in San Francisco, CA; and, (2) a report was prepared by Dr. Gilles Guerin and David Goldberg from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University on their postcruise evaluation of the data, tools and measurement systems that were used for vertical seismic profiling (VSP) experiments during ODP Leg 204. The VSP report is provided herein. Intermediate in scale and resolution between the borehole data and the 3-D seismic surveys, the Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP) carried during Leg 204 were aimed at defining the gas hydrate distribution on hydrate ridge, and refining the signature of gas hydrate in the seismic data. VSP surveys were attempted at five sites, following completion of the conventional logging operations. Bad hole conditions and operational difficulties did not allow to record any data in hole 1245E, but vertical and constant offset VSP were successful in holes 1244E, 1247B and 1250F, and walk-away VSP were successfully completed in holes 1244E, 1250F and 1251H. Three different tools were used for these surveys. The vertical VSP provided the opportunity to calculate interval velocity that could be compared and validated with the sonic logs in the same wells. The interval velocity profiles in Holes 1244E and 1247B are in very good agreement with the sonic logs. Information about the Leg 204 presentations at the AGU meeting are included in a separate Topical Report, which has been provided to DOE/NETL in addition to this Quarterly Report. Work continued on analyzing data collected during ODP Leg 204 and preparing reports on the outcomes of Phase 1 projects as well as developing plans for Phase 2.

  13. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Rack

    2001-12-31

    The primary accomplishments during the first quarter were to mobilize materials and supplies to meet the deployment schedule for equipment and activities, as proposed under the DOE/NETL cooperative agreement with JOI, with initial testing and use of specialized tools and equipment on Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 201. As a requirement of the award, two copies of a technical feasibility report entitled ''Preliminary Evaluation of Existing Pressure/Temperature Coring Systems'' were delivered to DOE/NETL on October 22, 2001. The report was written to provide a discussion of the availability and compatibility of the four existing pressure coring devices in existence. Most of these systems are available for use by JOI/ODP aboard the D/V JOIDES Resolution, via purchase, lease, modification, etc. and the proposed capabilities to upgrade existing devices or systems for use on other platforms. In addition, the report provided a discussion of the compatibility of each existing coring device in conjunction with the use of the other coring devices, such as the advanced piston coring (APC) system used by ODP. Based on an evaluation of the JOI report, the DOE/NETL Program Manager William Gwilliam provided a ''Go'' decision to JOI for the further development of the ODP Pressure Coring System (PCS) and PCS Gas Manifold. During the reporting period negotiations were conducted with various potential subcontractors and vendors to establish the specific cost-sharing arrangements and work breakdown necessary to definitize the terms of the DOE/NETL cooperative agreement with JOI. The discussions were communicated with the DOE/NETL Program Manager, William Gwilliam, to keep NETL closely informed about events as this project evolved. A series of meetings were also held with ODP engineers, technical staff, and to plan for the implementation of the various tasks outlined in the JOI proposal to DOE for deployment during ODP Legs 201 and 204. These meetings helped to answer numerous unresolved questions and establish a firm timetable of remaining activities that needed to be accomplished by January 28, 2002, when ODP Leg 201 will begin.

  14. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank R. Rack; Tim Francis; Peter Schultheiss; Philip E. Long; Barry M. Freifeld

    2005-04-01

    The primary activities accomplished during this quarter were continued efforts to develop plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the evolving operational planning for IODP Expedition 311, which will use the JOIDES Resolution to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, offshore Vancouver Island. IODP Expedition 311 has been designed to further constrain the models for the formation of marine gas hydrate in subduction zone accretionary prisms. The objectives include characterizing the deep origin of the methane, its upward transport, its incorporation in gas hydrate, and its subsequent loss to the seafloor. The main attention of this expedition is on the widespread seafloor-parallel layer of dispersed gas hydrate located just above the base of the predicted stability field. In a gas hydrate formation model, methane is carried upward through regional sediment or small-scale fracture permeability, driven by the tectonic consolidation of the accretionary prism. The upward moving methane is incorporated into the gas hydrate clathrate as it enters the methane hydrate stability zone. Also important is the focusing of a portion of the upward methane flux into localized plumes or channels to form concentrations of near-seafloor gas hydrate. The amount of gas hydrate in local concentrations near the seafloor is especially important for understanding the response of marine gas hydrate to climate change. The expedition includes coring and downhole measurements at five sites across the Northern Cascadia accretionary prism. The sites will track the history of methane in an accretionary prism from (1) its production by mainly microbiological processes over a thick sediment vertical extent, (2) its upward transport through regional or locally focused fluid flow, (3) its incorporation in the regional hydrate layer above the BSR or in local concentrations at or near the seafloor, (4) methane loss from the hydrate by upward diffusion, and (5) methane oxidation and incorporation in seafloor carbonate, or expulsion to the ocean. This expedition builds on the previous Cascadia gas hydrate drilling of ODP Leg 146 and on more recent ODP Leg 204 off Oregon. Important experiments being considered for DOE/NETL funding as part of the JOI cooperative agreement include, (1) Logging-While-Drilling/Measurements-While-Drilling (LWD/MWD), (2) Pressure Core Sampling (PCS/HYACINTH) of gas hydrate, and fluid recovery under in situ conditions, (3) X-ray CT logging of whole cores under in situ conditions, and (4) Infrared thermal imaging of whole round cores to map temperature variations resulting from the presence of hydrate. Preliminary budget estimates have been made for each of these tasks and discussions are ongoing with DOE/NETL program managers to develop a final plan that can be implemented within the constraints of the available funding and logistical considerations.

  15. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rack, Frank; Storms, Michael; Schroeder, Derryl; Dugan, Brandon; Schultheiss, Peter

    2002-12-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were (1) the preliminary postcruise evaluation of the tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September 2002; and (2) the preliminary study of the hydrate-bearing core samples preserved in pressure vessels and in liquid nitrogen cryofreezers, which are now stored at the ODP Gulf Coast Repository in College Station, TX. During ODP Leg 204, several newly modified downhole tools were deployed to better characterize the subsurface lithologies and environments hosting microbial populations and gas hydrates. A preliminary review of the use of these tools is provided herein. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively and successfully during ODP Leg 204 aboard the D/V JOIDES Resolution. These systems provided a strong operational capability for characterizing the in situ properties of methane hydrates in subsurface environments on Hydrate Ridge during ODP Leg 204. Pressure was also measured during a trial run of the Fugro piezoprobe, which operates on similar principles as the DVTP-P. The final report describing the deployments of the Fugro Piezoprobe is provided in Appendix A of this report. A preliminary analysis and comparison between the piezoprobe and DVTP-P tools is provided in Appendix B of this report. Finally, a series of additional holes were cored at the crest of Hydrate Ridge (Site 1249) specifically geared toward the rapid recovery and preservation of hydrate samples as part of a hydrate geriatric study partially funded by the Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, the preliminary results from gamma density non-invasive imaging of the cores preserved in pressure vessels are provided in Appendix C of this report. An initial visual inspection of the samples stored in liquid nitrogen is provided in Appendix D of this report.

  16. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rack, Frank; Schroeder, Derryl; Storms, Michael

    2001-03-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were the deployment of tools and measurement systems for testing on ODP Leg 201, which is intended to study hydrate deposits on the Peru margin as part of other scientific investigations. Additional accomplishments were related to the continuing evolution of tools and measurements systems in preparation for deployment on ODP Leg 204, Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon in July 2002. The design for PCS Gas Manifold was finalized and parts were procured to assemble the gas manifold and deploy this system with the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) tool on ODP Leg 201. The PCS was deployed 17 times during ODP Leg 201 and successfully retrieved cores from a broad range of lithologies and sediment depths along the Peru margin. Eleven deployments were entirely successful, collecting between 0.5 and 1.0 meters of sediment at greater than 75% of hydrostatic pressure. The PCS gas manifold was used in conjunction with the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) throughout ODP Leg 201 to measure the total volume and composition of gases recovered in sediment cores associated with methane hydrates. The results of these deployments will be the subject of a future progress report. The FUGRO Pressure Corer (FPC), one of the HYACE/HYACINTH pressure coring tools, and two FUGRO engineers were deployed on the D/V JOIDES Resolution during ODP Legs 201 to field-test this coring system at sites located offshore Peru. The HYACINTH project is a European Union (EU) funded effort to develop tools to characterize methane hydrate and measure physical properties under in-situ conditions. The field-testing of these tools provides a corollary benefit to DOE/NETL at no cost to this project. The opportunity to test these tools on the D/V JOIDES Resolution was negotiated as part of a cooperative agreement between JOI/ODP and the HYACINTH partners. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were deployed onboard the R/V JOIDES Resolution and used extensively during ODP Leg 201. Preliminary results indicate successful deployments of these tools. An infrared-thermal imaging system (IR-TIS) was delivered to JOI/ODP for testing and use on ODP Leg 201 to identify methane hydrate intervals in the recovered cores. The results of these experiments will be the subject of a future progress report. This report presents an overview of the primary methods used for deploying the ODP memory tools and PCS on ODP Leg 201 and the preliminary operational results of this leg. Discussions regarding the laboratory analysis of the recovered cores and downhole measurements made during these deployments will be covered in a future progress report.

  17. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rack, Frank; Schultheiss, Peter

    2005-12-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were the implementation of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 using the R/V JOIDES Resolution and the deployment of all required equipment and personnel to provide the required services during this expedition. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. New ODP Pressure Coring System (PCS) aluminum autoclave chambers were fabricated prior to the expedition. During the expedition, 16 PCS autoclaves containing pressure cores were X-rayed before and after depressurization using a modified Geotek MSCL-P (multi-sensor core logger-pressure) system. These PCS cores were density scanned using the MSCL-V (multi-sensor core logger-vertical) during depressurization to monitor gas evolution. The MSCL-V was set up in a 20-foot-long refrigerated container provided by Texas A&M University through the JOI contract with TAMRF. IODP Expedition 311 was the first time that PCS cores were examined before (using X-ray), during (using MSCL-V gamma density) and after (using X-ray) degassing to determine the actual volume and distribution of sediment and gas hydrate in the pressurized core, which will be important for more accurate determination of mass balances between sediment, gas, gas hydrate, and fluids in the samples collected. Geotek, Ltd was awarded a contract by JOI to provide equipment and personnel to perform pressure coring and related work on IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrates). Geotek, Ltd. provided an automated track for use with JOI's infrared camera systems. Four auxiliary monitors showed infrared core images in real time to aid hydrate identification and sampling. Images were collected from 185 cores during the expedition and processed to provide continuous core temperature data. The HYACINTH pressure coring tools, subsystems, and core logging systems were mobilized to Astoria, Oregon. Both HYACINTH pressure coring tools, the HRC (HYACE Rotary Corer) and the FPC (Fugro Pressure Corer) were mobilized and used during the expedition. Two HYACINTH engineers supervised the use of the tools and five good pressure cores were obtained. Velocity, density and X-ray linear scanning data were collected from these cores at near in situ pressure using the MSCL-P system. Dr. Barry Freifeld from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory provided an X-ray source and detector for X-ray imaging of pressure cores and helped Geotek with the design and mobilization of the MSCL-P system. Pressure core handling, transfer, and logging was performed in a refrigerated 20-foot container supplied by Geotek, Ltd. After scanning, the pressure cores were stored for on-shore analysis in aluminum barrels. Additional studies were conducted at the Pacific Geoscience Center (PGC), where a shore based laboratory was established after Expedition 311.

  18. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Rack

    2005-06-30

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were to refine budgets and operational plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the scheduling of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) using the R/V JOIDES Resolution. The proposed statement of work for Phase 2 will include three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd., who will work with Fugro and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to accomplish some of the subtasks; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). More details about these tasks are provided in the following sections of this report. The appendices to this report contain a copy of the scientific prospectus for the upcoming IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Hydrates), which provides details of operational and scientific planning for this expedition.

  19. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank R. Rack; Peter Schultheiss; Melanie Holland

    2005-01-01

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) follow-up logging of pressure cores containing hydrate-bearing sediment; and (2) opening of some of these cores to establish ground-truth understanding. The follow-up measurements made on pressure cores in storage are part of a hydrate geriatric study related to ODP Leg 204. These activities are described in detail in Appendices A and B of this report. Work also continued on developing plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on evolving plans to schedule a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) using the R/V JOIDES Resolution.

  20. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rack, Frank R

    2004-09-30

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) postcruise evaluation of the data, tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 continued in the preparation of deliverables under this agreement. Work continued on analyzing data collected during ODP Leg 204 and preparing reports on the outcomes of Phase 1 projects as well as developing plans for Phase 2.

  1. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank R. Rack

    2004-05-01

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) Frank Rack presented preliminary results and operational outcomes of ODP Leg 204 at the DOE/NETL project review and two made two presentations at the ChevronTexaco Gulf of Mexico Hydrate JIP meeting, which were both held in Westminster, CO; and, (2) postcruise evaluation of the data, tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 continued in the preparation of deliverables under this agreement. Work continued on analyzing data collected during ODP Leg 204 and preparing reports on the outcomes of Phase 1 projects as well as developing plans for Phase 2.

  2. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rack, Frank

    2004-06-30

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) post-cruise evaluation of the data, tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 continued in the preparation of deliverables under this agreement. Work continued on analyzing data collected during ODP Leg 204 and preparing reports on the outcomes of Phase 1 projects as well as developing plans for Phase 2.

  3. responses to environmental changes that are significantly more abrupt than those that would occur in nature. A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaspari, Mike

    to a different growth chamber after every five weeks, and the appropriate [CO2] was re-set. Plants were watered weeks. At harvest, soil was collected using a 10-cm diameter corer. This soil core was then used to trap colonization26 . The total length of fungal hyphae was determined after extraction from a subsample of soil

  4. Structure and mechanical properties of naturally occurring lightweight foam-filled cylinder The peacock's tail coverts shaft and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Marc A.

    ­ The peacock's tail coverts shaft and its components Z.Q. Liu a, , D. Jiao a , M.A. Meyers b , Z.F. Zhang a Available online 4 February 2015 Keywords: Biological materials Feather shaft Hierarchical structure Buckling Mechanical properties a b s t r a c t Feather shaft, which is primarily featured by a cylinder

  5. Simple Quantitative PCR Approach to Reveal Naturally Occurring and Mutation-Induced Repetitive Sequence Variation on the Drosophila Y Chromosome 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldrich, John C.; Maggert, Keith A.

    2014-10-06

    pair product of qPCR. The absence of unique primer binding sites in blocks of short (e.g., pentameric or heptameric) satellites makes avoidance of primer-primer annealing the chief difficulty. An assay that circumvented this problem and allowed... to quantify their relative copy number. The reaction used primers with designed self-incompat- ibilities to disfavor primer-dimer formation and instead heavily- favor template-dependent and product-dependent priming. The products of template...

  6. Received 20 Feb 2014 | Accepted 27 May 2014 | Published 24 Jun 2014 Naturally occurring tumours in the basal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cesta 54, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia. 3 Catholic University of Croatia, Ilica 242, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia. 4 Zoological Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Universitetskaya emb. 1, 199034 St

  7. RADIOACTIVE ELEMENT REMOVAL FROM WATER USING GRAPHENE OXIDE (GO) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Concklin, Joshua Paul

    2013-12-19

    and uranium. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are abundant throughout the earth's crust. Human manipulation of NORM for economic ends, such as mining, ore processing, fossil fuel extraction, and commercial aviation, may lead to what is known...

  8. Adaptive contact elements for three-dimensional fluid-structure interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulak, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element method is developed for treating the mechanics of contact between two deformable bodies which occurs, for example, at fluid-structure interfaces. The method uses a family of adaptive contact elements, which are based upon the penalty method, to handle all of the possible contact configurations that can occur between the discretized contacting bodies. The contact element's nodal connectivity is allowed to change during the computations in order to accommodate finite sliding. The infusion of these elements in the interface results in satisfying the force equilibrium condition during contact. The methodology has been implemented into the NEPTUNE code. Results are presented for an illustrative problem.

  9. Rate Case Elements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2RateCaseElements Sign In About | Careers |

  10. State-of-the-Art 3-D Assessment of Elements Degrading TBR of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) degrade breeding? · Could required TBR be achieved in presence of several design elements (such design elements on TBR ­ Vary Li enrichment from natural to 90% to determine operating enrichmentState-of-the-Art 3-D Assessment of Elements Degrading TBR of ARIES-ACT SiC/LiPb Blanket L. El

  11. Elemental and isotopic analysis of inorganic salts by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayasekharan, T.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-05

    Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry is applied for the analysis of elements as well as their isotopic composition in different inorganic salts. At very low laser energies the inorganic ions are desorbed and ionized from the thin layer of the sample surface. The naturally occurring isotopes of alkali and silver ions are resolved using time of flight mass spectrometer. Further increase in laser energy shows the appearance of Al, Cr, and Fe ions in the mass spectra. This indicates the penetration laser beam beyond the sample surface leading to the ablation of sample target at higher energies. The simultaneous appearance of atomic ions from the sample target at relatively higher laser energies hampers the unambiguous identification of amino acid residues from the biomolecular ions in MALDI-MS.

  12. Laboratory and numerical investigation of transport processes occurring above and within a saltwater wedge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Laboratory and numerical investigation of transport processes occurring above and within knowledge, so far no one has completed laboratory experiments to study contaminant transport processes occurring within a saltwater wedge. In this study, we completed laboratory experiments to understand

  13. Utilizing rare earth elements as tracers in high TDS reservoir brines in CCS applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McLing, Travis; Smith, William; Smith, Robert

    2014-12-31

    In this paper we report the result of research associated with the testing of a procedures necessary for utilizing natural occurring trace elements, specifically the Rare Earth Elements (REE) as geochemical tracers in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) applications. Trace elements, particularly REE may be well suited to serve as in situ tracers for monitoring geochemical conditions and the migration of CO?-charged waters within CCS storage systems. We have been conducting studies to determine the efficacy of using REE as a tracer and characterization tool in the laboratory, at a CCS analogue site in Soda Springs, Idaho, and at amore »proposed CCS reservoir at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming. Results from field and laboratory studies have been encouraging and show that REE may be an effective tracer in CCS systems and overlying aquifers. In recent years, a series of studies using REE as a natural groundwater tracer have been conducted successfully at various locations around the globe. Additionally, REE and other trace elements have been successfully used as in situ tracers to describe the evolution of deep sedimentary Basins. Our goal has been to establish naturally occurring REE as a useful monitoring measuring and verification (MMV) tool in CCS research because formation brine chemistry will be particularly sensitive to changes in local equilibrium caused by the addition of large volumes of CO?. Because brine within CCS target formations will have been in chemical equilibrium with the host rocks for millions of years, the addition of large volumes of CO? will cause reactions in the formation that will drive changes to the brine chemistry due to the pH change caused by the formation of carbonic acid. This CO? driven change in formation fluid chemistry will have a major impact on water rock reaction equilibrium in the formation, which will impart a change in the REE fingerprint of the brine that can measured and be used to monitor in situ reservoir conditions. Our research has shown that the REE signature imparted to the formation fluid by the introduction of CO? to the formation, can be measured and tracked as part of an MMV program. Additionally, this REE fingerprint may serve as an ideal tracer for fluid migration, both within the CCS target formation, and should formation fluids migrate into overlying aquifers. However application of REE and other trace elements to CCS system is complicated by the high salt content of the brines contained within the target formations. In the United States by regulation, in order for a geologic reservoir to be considered suitable for carbon storage, it must contain formation brine with total dissolved solids (TDS) > 10,000 ppm, and in most cases formation brines have TDS well in excess of that threshold. The high salinity of these brines creates analytical problems for elemental analysis, including element interference with trace metals in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) (i.e. element mass overlap due to oxide or plasma phenomenon). Additionally, instruments like the ICP-MS that are sensitive enough to measure trace elements down to the parts per trillion level are quickly oversaturated when water TDS exceeds much more than 1,000 ppm. Normally this problem is dealt with through dilution of the sample, bringing the water chemistry into the instruments working range. However, dilution is not an option when analyzing these formation brines for trace metals, because trace elements, specifically the REE, which occur in aqueous solutions at the parts per trillion levels. Any dilution of the sample would make REE detection impossible. Therefore, the ability to use trace metals as in situ natural tracers in high TDS brines environments requires the development of methods for pre-concentrating trace elements, while reducing the salinity and associated elemental interference such that the brines can be routinely analyzed by standard ICP-MS methods. As part of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Project the INL-CAES has developed a rapid, easy to use proces

  14. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172 3,009165,360 165,928Feet)Fueland

  15. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172 3,009165,360Industrial Consumers (Number of

  16. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172 3,009165,360Industrial Consumers (Number

  17. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172Year Jan Feb MarDecadeCommercial Consumers

  18. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172Year Jan Feb MarDecadeCommercialIndustrial

  19. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172Year Jan Feb

  20. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew Field Discoveries

  1. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew FieldDecade Year-0YearYear Jan Feband Plant

  2. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew FieldDecade Year-0YearYear Jan FebandIndustrial

  3. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew FieldDecade Year-0YearYear Jan

  4. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew FieldDecadeYear Jan

  5. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,2060 0Feet)and Plant

  6. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,2060 0Feet)andIndustrial

  7. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,2060

  8. Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,2060Year0Year

  9. Texas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672

  10. Utah Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation ResultsYear Jan Feb Mar Apr

  11. Utah Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation ResultsYear Jan Feb MarIndustrial

  12. Utah Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation ResultsYear Jan Feb

  13. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation ResultsYear JanYearDay)Year

  14. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation ResultsYear JanYearDay)YearIndustrial

  15. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation ResultsYear

  16. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation ResultsYearYearYearCommercial Consumers

  17. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation ResultsYearYearYearCommercialIndustrial

  18. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation

  19. Washington Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation10,428 285,726Withdrawals

  20. Washington Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation10,428 285,726WithdrawalsIndustrial

  1. Washington Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation10,428

  2. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of6,090 7,163 10,532 14,881Withdrawals (Million Cubic

  3. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of6,090 7,163 10,532 14,881Withdrawals (Million

  4. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of6,090 7,163 10,532 14,881Withdrawals (MillionResidential

  5. Nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armijo, Joseph S. (Saratoga, CA); Coffin, Jr., Louis F. (Schenectady, NY)

    1980-04-29

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has an improved composite cladding comprised of a moderate purity metal barrier of zirconium metallurgically bonded on the inside surface of a zirconium alloy tube. The metal barrier forms a shield between the alloy tube and a core of nuclear fuel material enclosed in the composite cladding. There is a gap between the cladding and the core. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 30 percent of the thickness of the composite cladding and has low neutron absorption characteristics. The metal barrier serves as a preferential reaction site for gaseous impurities and fission products and protects the alloy tube from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. Methods of manufacturing the composite cladding are also disclosed.

  6. Nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armijo, Joseph S. (Saratoga, CA); Coffin, Jr., Louis F. (Schenectady, NY)

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has a composite cladding having a substrate and a metal barrier metallurgically bonded on the inside surface of the substrate so that the metal barrier forms a shield between the substrate and the nuclear fuel material held within the cladding. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 30 percent of the thickness of the cladding and is comprised of a low neutron absorption metal of substantially pure zirconium. The metal barrier serves as a preferential reaction site for gaseous impurities and fission products and protects the substrate from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. The substrate of the composite cladding is selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably is a zirconium alloy. Methods of manufacturing the composite cladding are also disclosed.

  7. Photoconductive circuit element reflectometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauscher, Christen (Alexandria, VA)

    1990-01-01

    A photoconductive reflectometer for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a first photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short first laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test. Second PCEs are connected along the transmission line to sample the signals on the transmission line when excited into conductance by short second laser light pulses, spaced apart in time a variable period from the first laser light pulses. Electronic filters connected to each of the second PCEs act as low-pass filters and remove parasitic interference from the sampled signals and output the sampled signals in the form of slowed-motion images of the signals on the transmission line.

  8. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Natural convection can provide adequate heat distribution in many situtations that arise in buildings. This is appropriate, for example, in passive solar buildings where some rooms tend to be more strongly solar heated than others or to reduce the number of heating units required in a building. Natural airflow and heat transport through doorways and other internal building apertures is predictable and can be accounted for in the design. The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Natural convective loops that can occur in buildings are described and a few design guidelines are presented.

  9. Fuel elements of research reactor CM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlov, A.V.; Morozov, A.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Ershov, S.A.

    2013-07-01

    In 1961 the CM research reactor was commissioned at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Dimitrovgrad, Russia), it was intended to carry on investigations and the production of transuranium nuclides. The reactor is of a tank type. Original fuel assembly contained plate fuels that were spaced with vanes and corrugated bands. Nickel was used as a cladding material, fuel meat was produced from UO{sub 2} + electrolytic nickel composition. Fuel plates have been replaced by self-spacing cross-shaped dispersion fuels clad in stainless steel. In 2005 the reactor was updated. The purpose of this updating was to increase the quantity of irradiation channels in the reactor core and to improve the neutron balance. The updating was implemented at the expense of 20 % reduction in the quantity of fuel elements in the core which released a space for extra channels and decreased the mass of structural materials in the core. The updated reactor is loaded with modified standard fuel elements with 20 % higher uranium masses. At the same time stainless steel in fuel assembly shrouds was substituted by zirconium alloy. Today in progress are investigations and work to promote the second stage of reactor updating that involve developments of cross-shaped fuel elements having low neutron absorption matrix materials. This article gives an historical account of the design and main technical changes that occurred for the CM reactor since its commissioning.

  10. Optimization Problems in Natural Gas Transportation Systems: A ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-09-15

    While short term factors can significantly affect the demand for natural gas, ...... rithm to search for global solutions to the pooling problem. ... v entering element.

  11. Neuromorphic, Digital and Quantum Computation with Memory Circuit Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuriy V. Pershin; Massimiliano Di Ventra

    2011-09-28

    Memory effects are ubiquitous in nature and the class of memory circuit elements - which includes memristors, memcapacitors and meminductors - shows great potential to understand and simulate the associated fundamental physical processes. Here, we show that such elements can also be used in electronic schemes mimicking biologically-inspired computer architectures, performing digital logic and arithmetic operations, and can expand the capabilities of certain quantum computation schemes. In particular, we will discuss few examples where the concept of memory elements is relevant to the realization of associative memory in neuronal circuits, spike-timing-dependent plasticity of synapses, digital and field-programmable quantum computing.

  12. Trace element patterns in lichens following uranium mine closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahselt, D.; Wu, T.W.; Mott, B. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    1995-09-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to determine trace elements in Cladina mitis (Sandst). Hale & Culb. along transects extending from uranium mines at Elliot Lake and Agnew Lake in central Ontario, Canada. Levels of 11 elements were reported and the presence of uranium (U) was confirmed, although U concentrations were much less than in Cladina rangiferina 10 years earlier. Among the elements identified in lichen thalli was Th, which occurred in higher concentrations than U. All trace elements, including the two radionuclides, were found in deteriorating thallus parts as well as living podetia, and five of these seem to have originated as airborne particulates from minesites. In spite of mine closures, levels of Th and U remained higher near sources of ore dust and there was little relationship between radionuclide concentrations in thallus and substrate. 24 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Resistive hydrogen sensing element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for providing a hydrogen sensing element with a more robust exposed metallization by application of a discontinuous or porous overlay to hold the metallization firmly on the substrate. An apparatus includes: a substantially inert, electrically-insulating substrate; a first Pd containing metallization deposited upon the substrate and completely covered by a substantially hydrogen-impermeable layer so as to form a reference resistor on the substrate; a second Pd containing metallization deposited upon the substrate and at least a partially accessible to a gas to be tested, so as to form a hydrogen-sensing resistor; a protective structure disposed upon at least a portion of the second Pd containing metallization and at least a portion of the substrate to improve the attachment of the second Pd containing metallization to the substrate while allowing the gas to contact said the second Pd containing metallization; and a resistance bridge circuit coupled to both the first and second Pd containing metallizations. The circuit determines the difference in electrical resistance between the first and second Pd containing metallizations. The hydrogen concentration in the gas may be determined. The systems and methods provide advantages because adhesion is improved without adversely effecting measurement speed or sensitivity.

  14. ME 872 -Finite Element Methods Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Alejandro

    Element Method: Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element Analysis (Dover Civil and Mechanical Engineering problems Special topics: Lagrange multipliers, adaptive finite elements, sensitivity analysis, nonlinearME 872 - Finite Element Methods Spring 2014 Catalog Description: Theory and application

  15. Natural ventilation : design for suburban houses in Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tantasavasdi, Chalermwat, 1971-

    1998-01-01

    Natural Ventilation is the most effective passive cooling design strategy for architecture in hot and humid climates. In Thailand, natural ventilation has been the most essential element in the vernacular architecture such ...

  16. Thesis and Dissertation Required Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Thesis and Dissertation Required Elements 2012 version UT Arlington Graduate Students Required Elements for Theses/Dissertations Thesis/dissertation documents must be written in the proper format in order to be accepted by the Office of Graduate Studies. These requirements ensure that all thesis

  17. The Search for Heavy Elements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    The 1994 documentary "The Search for Heavy Elements" chronicles the expansion of the periodic table through the creation at Berkeley Lab of elements heavier than uranium. The documentary features a mix of rarely-seen archival footage, historical photos, and interviews with scientists who made history, such as Glenn Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso.

  18. Multi-Dimensional Astrophysical Structural and Dynamical Analysis I. Development of a Nonlinear Finite Element Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David L. Meier

    1998-11-10

    A new field of numerical astrophysics is introduced which addresses the solution of large, multidimensional structural or slowly-evolving problems (rotating stars, interacting binaries, thick advective accretion disks, four dimensional spacetimes, etc.). The technique employed is the Finite Element Method (FEM), commonly used to solve engineering structural problems. The approach developed herein has the following key features: 1. The computational mesh can extend into the time dimension, as well as space, perhaps only a few cells, or throughout spacetime. 2. Virtually all equations describing the astrophysics of continuous media, including the field equations, can be written in a compact form similar to that routinely solved by most engineering finite element codes. 3. The transformations that occur naturally in the four-dimensional FEM possess both coordinate and boost features, such that (a) although the computational mesh may have a complex, non-analytic, curvilinear structure, the physical equations still can be written in a simple coordinate system independent of the mesh geometry. (b) if the mesh has a complex flow velocity with respect to coordinate space, the transformations will form the proper arbitrary Lagrangian- Eulerian advective derivatives automatically. 4. The complex difference equations on the arbitrary curvilinear grid are generated automatically from encoded differential equations. This first paper concentrates on developing a robust and widely-applicable set of techniques using the nonlinear FEM and presents some examples.

  19. Natural air motion in passive buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Jones, G.F.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Natural convective loops that can occur in buildings are described and a few experimental results are presented. Observations of stratification are discussed, similitude experiments are described, and the beginnings of a complete-system mathematical model are presented.

  20. Experimental and finite element analysis of high pressure packer elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Stephanie, 1981-

    2004-01-01

    Packer elements are traditionally rubber seals that can operate under specified downhole conditions and provide a seal for either a short-term, retrievable, or a long-term, permanent, completion. In this case a retrievable ...

  1. Method for detecting an element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackwood, Larry G.; Reber, Edward L.; Rohde, Kenneth W.

    2007-02-06

    A method for detecting an element is disclosed and which includes the steps of providing a gamma-ray spectrum which depicts, at least in part, a test region having boundaries, and which has a small amount of the element to be detected; providing a calculation which detects the small amount of the element to be detected; and providing a moving window and performing the calculation within the moving window, and over a range of possible window boundaries within the test region to determine the location of the optimal test region within the gamma-ray spectrum.

  2. Indiana Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969CentralWellsMillion CubicOctober 2015Elements) GasYear

  3. Kentucky Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) KentuckyKentuckyYear JanNA

  4. Alaska Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers4.32Elements) Gas andYear Jan Feb

  5. Oregon Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3+Elements) Gas and Gas4.00 4.92 1979-2010

  6. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3+Elements)Barrels)PennsylvaniaYear

  7. Massachusetts Natural Gas Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012Decade Year-0YearDecadeElements)ThousandNA

  8. FIRE /SMOKE The most effective method of fighting fires is to prevent them from occurring. All

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    FIRE /SMOKE The most effective method of fighting fires is to prevent them from occurring. All-305-7979 (CUMC) after evacuating. Procedures for UNCONTROLLABLE FIRES DO NOT stay to fight a large or rapidly

  9. Microbial Biogeochemistry Chemical reactions occurring in the environment mediated by microbial communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Microbial Biogeochemistry Chemical reactions occurring in the environment mediated by microbial communities Outline · Metabolic Classifications. · Winogradsky columns, Microenvironments. · Redox Reactions Chemical (Chemotrophs) Inorganic (Chemolithotrophs) Aerobic (majority) Anaerobic (few) Organic

  10. Importance of the Equlibrium Node in Preventing the Voltage Collapse Occurs in the Wind Power System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavaei, Javad

    or insufficient reactive power supplies may also contribute to voltage collapse and blackouts. In recent years, the voltage collapse or blackouts have occurred worldwide, such as the blackout in France at 1978 and blackout

  11. Environmental research on actinide elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  12. Elemental ABAREX -- a user's manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.B.

    1999-05-26

    ELEMENTAL ABAREX is an extended version of the spherical optical-statistical model code ABAREX, designed for the interpretation of neutron interactions with elemental targets consisting of up to ten isotopes. The contributions from each of the isotopes of the element are explicitly dealt with, and combined for comparison with the elemental observables. Calculations and statistical fitting of experimental data are considered. The code is written in FORTRAN-77 and arranged for use on the IBM-compatible personal computer (PC), but it should operate effectively on a number of other systems, particularly VAX/VMS and IBM work stations. Effort is taken to make the code user friendly. With this document a reasonably skilled individual should become fluent with the use of the code in a brief period of time.

  13. Identify key design elements of desired function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nawroth, Janna C.

    DESIGN Identify key design elements of desired function Identify functionally equivalent implementation of key design elements (e.g. structure, physiology, kinematics etc.) Quantify functional and standardize fabrication for repeatability . Test phase: Quantify implementation of key design elements

  14. Secretary Moniz on Natural Gas and Renewables | Department of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secretary Moniz on Natural Gas and Renewables Secretary Moniz on Natural Gas and Renewables Addthis An error occurred. Try watching this video on www.youtube.com, or enable...

  15. Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) researchers have...

  16. Supplement: Thousands of human mobile element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Supplement: Thousands of human mobile element fragments undergo strong purifying selection near Supplemental material Supplemental text, tables, and figures. S1 pan-boreoeutherian mobile elements Mobile

  17. AN ADAPTIVE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR THE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-06-30

    Scattering theory in periodic structures, which is crucial in application .... is used to design the adaptive finite element algorithm to choose elements for refine-.

  18. Nature's software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Canarutto

    2014-04-20

    I bring forward some arguments to support the thesis that nature is fundamentally discrete, and present my own thoughts about the direction in which one could look for a possible, consistent "theory of everything" describing gravitation and quantum particles.

  19. QCD Matrix Elements + Parton Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Catani; F. Krauss; R. Kuhn; B. R. Webber

    2001-09-25

    We propose a method for combining QCD matrix elements and parton showers in Monte Carlo simulations of hadronic final states in $e^+e^-$ annihilation. The matrix element and parton shower domains are separated at some value $y_{ini}$ of the jet resolution, defined according to the $k_T$-clustering algorithm. The matrix elements are modified by Sudakov form factors and the parton showers are subjected to a veto procedure to cancel dependence on $y_{ini}$ to next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The method provides a leading-order description of hard multi-jet configurations together with jet fragmentation, while avoiding the most serious problems of double counting. We present first results of an approximate implementation using the event generator APACIC++.

  20. Finite element analysis of multilayer coextrusion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Schunk, Peter Randall; Baer, Thomas A.; Mrozek, Randy A.; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Collins, Robert; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2011-09-01

    Multilayer coextrusion has become a popular commercial process for producing complex polymeric products from soda bottles to reflective coatings. A numerical model of a multilayer coextrusion process is developed based on a finite element discretization and two different free-surface methods, an arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) moving mesh implementation and an Eulerian level set method, to understand the moving boundary problem associated with the polymer-polymer interface. The goal of this work is to have a numerical capability suitable for optimizing and troubleshooting the coextrusion process, circumventing flow instabilities such as ribbing and barring, and reducing variability in layer thickness. Though these instabilities can be both viscous and elastic in nature, for this work a generalized Newtonian description of the fluid is used. Models of varying degrees of complexity are investigated including stability analysis and direct three-dimensional finite element free surface approaches. The results of this work show how critical modeling can be to reduce build test cycles, improve material choices, and guide mold design.

  1. Spent graphite fuel element processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holder, N.D.; Olsen, C.W.

    1981-07-01

    The Department of Energy currently sponsors two programs to demonstrate the processing of spent graphite fuel elements. General Atomic in San Diego operates a cold pilot plant to demonstrate the processing of both US and German high-temperature reactor fuel. Exxon Nuclear Idaho Company is demonstrating the processing of spent graphite fuel elements from Rover reactors operated for the Nuclear Rocket Propulsion Program. This work is done at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, where a hot facility is being constructed to complete processing of the Rover fuel. This paper focuses on the graphite combustion process common to both programs.

  2. Molecular modeling of slip supposed to occur in the shock initiation of crystalline PETN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, J.P.

    1992-12-01

    Some molecular modeling of slip using both rigid and flexible molecules of PETN in perfect, but finite, lattices has been performed. Results show that it is likely that molecular deformations occur and have an important effect in determining the shear strength.

  3. The blue shark (Prionace glauca) is an oceanic species that occurs in tem-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    720 The blue shark (Prionace glauca) is an oceanic species that occurs in tem- perate and tropical); numerically, the blue shark is the top nontarget species captured by the U.S. longline pelagic Atlantic fleet) on the catch rate of several target and bycatch species, including the blue shark. However, they did

  4. Mdm10 is an ancient eukaryotic porin co-occurring with the ERMES complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Just, Armin

    Mdm10 is an ancient eukaryotic porin co-occurring with the ERMES complex Nadine Flinner a , Lars -barrel protein Multiple sequence alignment Homology modeling Phylogenetic analysis ERMES SAM mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES), which tethers the ER to mitochondria and associates with the SAM

  5. Planetary and Space Science 56 (2008) 17781784 Predictions and observations of events and configurations occurring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sicardy, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    and configurations occurring during the Uranian equinox Jean-Eudes ArlotÃ, Bruno Sicardy Paris Observatory of difficulties due to the faintness of the Uranian satellites and this proximity to the planet. 2. The equinox, 1990; Arlot, 2002; Arlot et al., 2006a, b). The equinox on Jupiter takes place every 6 years allowing

  6. Xylem cavitation caused by drought and freezing stress in four co-occurring Juniperus species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Xylem cavitation caused by drought and freezing stress in four co-occurring Juniperus species induced by drought but in many cases, not by freezing. Rarely have vulnerability to drought and freezing and distribution of plants in many regions of the world. We studied vulnerability to drought- and freezing- induced

  7. New species of Mycosphaerella occurring on Eucalyptus leaves in Indonesia and Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    781 New species of Mycosphaerella occurring on Eucalyptus leaves in Indonesia and Africa P.W. Crous and M.J. Wingfield Ahstract:Although Africa and Indonesia have not been particularly well surveyed Eucalyptus leaves from Indonesia. The former species is of particular interest, because its anamorph

  8. Enhanced Longevity by Ibuprofen, Conserved in Multiple Species, Occurs in Yeast through Inhibition of Tryptophan Import 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chong; Tsuchiyama, Scott K.; Nguyen, Quynh T.; Plyusnina, Ekaterina N.; Terrill, Samuel R.; Sahibzada, Sarah; Patel, Bhumil; Faulkner, Alena R.; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail V.; Tian, Ruilin; Tsuchiya, Mitsuhiro; Kaeberlein, Matt; Moskalev, Alexey A.; Kennedy, Brian K.; Polymenis, Michael

    2014-12-18

    by Ibuprofen, Conserved in Multiple Species, Occurs in Yeast through Inhibition of Tryptophan Import Chong He1, Scott K. Tsuchiyama1, Quynh T. Nguyen2, Ekaterina N. Plyusnina3,4, Samuel R. Terrill2, Sarah Sahibzada2, Bhumil Patel1, Alena R. Faulkner1, Mikhail V...

  9. Endophytic and canker-associated Botryosphaeriaceae occurring on non-native Eucalyptus and native Myrtaceae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endophytic and canker-associated Botryosphaeriaceae occurring on non-native Eucalyptus and native associated with stem cankers on plantation-grown Eucalyptus globulus. Howev- er, very little is known their relationship is to those species infecting Eucalyptus in plantations. The objectives of this study were

  10. A multi-gene phylogeny for species of Mycosphaerella occurring on Eucalyptus leaves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    147 A multi-gene phylogeny for species of Mycosphaerella occurring on Eucalyptus leaves Gavin C Eucalyptus spp. where they cause leaf diseases collectively known as Mycosphaerella Leaf Disease (MLD Eucalyptus. A further aim was to study the anamorph concepts and resolve the deeper nodes of Mycosphaerella

  11. "Climate change is sure to occur in some form." The study of climate impacts notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Climate change is sure to occur in some form." 1 #12;The study of climate impacts notes how scientists generally agree that humans are changing the climate, and that if we continue pumping carbon we learn from past climate variations? How can we best adapt to climate change? This report attempts

  12. Introduction Neutral grasslands occur throughout the UK on soils where the pH is within

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction Neutral grasslands occur throughout the UK on soils where the pH is within the range 5 by grasses and herbs (Figure 1). The term `neutral', although indicative of soil pH, is more correctly descriptive of the species assemblage being neither markedly `calcifuge' (thriving in acid soils) nor

  13. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES Many types of emergencies can occur on campus; instructions for specific emergencies such as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    EMERGENCY PROCEDURES Many types of emergencies can occur on campus; instructions for specific emergencies such as severe weather, active shooter, or fire can be found at emergency.uark.edu. Severe Weather (Tornado Warning): · Follow the directions of the instructor or emergency personnel · Seek shelter

  14. between the nucleus and cytoplasm occurs through large macromolecular structures, the nuclear pores. Quantitative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbes, Douglass

    363 between the nucleus and cytoplasm occurs through large macromolecular structures, the nuclear pores. Quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy has estimated the mass of a nuclear pore noteworthy in that they saw: 1) the purification of both the yeast and vertebrate nuclear pores, 2

  15. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR RE: ``HOW MANY FOODBORNE OUTBREAKS OF SALMONELLA INFECTION OCCURRED IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boehning, Dankmar

    LETTERS TO THE EDITOR RE: ``HOW MANY FOODBORNE OUTBREAKS OF SALMONELLA INFECTION OCCURRED IN FRANCE outbreaks of Salmonella infection that had oc- curred in France during the year 1995. The data provided), the Ministry of Agriculture (MA), and the National Salmonella and Shigella Reference Center (NRC). A complete

  16. Element

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:IAboutReubenPressElectrical

  17. Fast acting multiple element valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Jefferson Y. S. (Orange, CA); Wada, James M. (Torrance, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A plurality of slide valve elements having plural axial-spaced annular parts and an internal slide are inserted into a bulkhead in a fluid conduit from a downstream side of the bulkhead, locked in place by a bayonet coupling and set screw, and project through the bulkhead into the upstream conduit. Pneumatic lines connecting the slide valve element actuator to pilot valves are brought out the throat of the valve element to the downstream side. Pilot valves are radially spaced around the exterior of the valve to permit the pneumatic lines to be made identical, thereby to minimize adverse timing tolerances in operation due to pressure variations. Ring manifolds surround the valve adjacent respective pilot valve arrangements to further reduce adverse timing tolerances due to pressure variations, the manifolds being directly connected to the respective pilot valves. Position sensors are provided the valve element slides to signal the precise time at which a slide reaches or passes through a particular point in its stroke to initiate a calibrated timing function.

  18. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

    2005-09-13

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  19. Scrambled Elements Literate Software Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Robert D.

    14 E C R U 37 A L E 57 I C E 77 R E N T © Literate Software Systems ACROSS 1. Relaxation locale 4. Fat-cleaving enzyme 67. "No man is an island" poet 69. Yearn 70. Scrambled element #44 74. Kind

  20. Massively Parallel Computing: Unstructured Finite Element Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnsson, S. Lennart

    of NAFEM 4th International Conference on Quality Assurance and Standards in Finite Element and Associated

  1. Sinks of Light Elements in Stars - Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc H. Pinsonneault; Corinne Charbonnel; Constantine P. Deliyannis

    2000-06-20

    The fragile light elements lithium, beryllium, and boron are easily destroyed in stellar interiors, and are thus superb probes of physical processes occuring in the outer stellar layers. The light elements are also excellent tracers of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, and can test big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). These inter-related topics are reviewed with an emphasis on stellar physics. In Part I (presented by CPD), an overview is given of the physical processes which can modify the surface abundances of the light elements, with emphasis on Population I dwarfs - convection; gravitational settling, thermal diffusion, and radiative levitation; slow mixing induced by gravity waves or rotation. We will discuss the increasingly large body of data which begin to enable us to discern the relative importance of these mechanisms in Population I main sequence stars. In Part II (presented by MHP), discussion is extended to the issue of whether or not the halo Li plateau is depleted, and includes the following topics: Li dispersion in field and globular cluster stars, Li production vs. destruction in Li-rich halo stars, and constraints from 6Li. Also discussed are trends with metal abundance and Teff and implications for chemical evolution and BBN. In Part III (presented by CC), evidence is reviewed that suggests that in situ mixing occurs in evolved low mass Population I and Population II stars. Theoretical mechanisms that can create such mixing are discussed, as well as their implications in stellar yields.

  2. Sinks of Light Elements in Stars - Part III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corinne Charbonnel; Constantine P. Deliyannis; Marc H. Pinsonneault

    2000-06-20

    The fragile light elements lithium, beryllium, and boron are easily destroyed in stellar interiors, and are thus superb probes of physical processes occuring in the outer stellar layers. The light elements are also excellent tracers of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, and can test big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). These inter-related topics are reviewed with an emphasis on stellar physics. In Part I (presented by CPD), an overview is given of the physical processes which can modify the surface abundances of the light elements, with emphasis on Population I dwarfs - convection; gravitational settling, thermal diffusion, and radiative levitation; slow mixing induced by gravity waves or rotation. We will discuss the increasingly large body of data which begin to enable us to discern the relative importance of these mechanisms in Population I main sequence stars. In Part II (presented by MHP), discussion is extended to the issue of whether or not the halo Li plateau is depleted, and includes the following topics: Li dispersion in field and globular cluster stars, Li production vs. destruction in Li-rich halo stars, and constraints from 6Li. Also discussed are trends with metal abundance and Teff and implications for chemical evolution and BBN. In Part III (presented by CC), evidence is reviewed that suggests that in situ mixing occurs in evolved low mass Population I and Population II stars. Theoretical mechanisms that can create such mixing are discussed, as well as their implications in stellar yields.

  3. Proton magnetic resonance studies of the chemical shifts occurring in propionic acid-dioxane solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldham, William J. Bryan

    1958-01-01

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 ~ ~ ~ 35 LIET OF TABES TAEIR6 l, Chemical shiftsoccurring in aqueous solutions of propionic PAGE ac id ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 21 2, Chemical shifts occurring in propionic ac1d-dioxane solut1ons 22 3. C... is added. , the dimers break up to form monomers. There i, s formed alternately a hydrogen bond between the monomer ac1d and the water, forming a complex. If the correlation times of the diner state aud oomplex water state ere sufficiently smallv...

  4. The Origin of the Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Edward

    2012-11-20

    The world around us is made of atoms. Did you ever wonder where these atoms came from? How was the gold in our jewelry, the carbon in our bodies, and the iron in our cars made? In this lecture, we will trace the origin of a gold atom from the Big Bang to the present day, and beyond. You will learn how the elements were forged in the nuclear furnaces inside stars, and how, when they die, these massive stars spread the elements into space. You will learn about the origin of the building blocks of matter in the Big Bang, and we will speculate on the future of the atoms around us today.

  5. The Origin of the Elements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Murphy, Edward

    2014-08-06

    The world around us is made of atoms. Did you ever wonder where these atoms came from? How was the gold in our jewelry, the carbon in our bodies, and the iron in our cars made? In this lecture, we will trace the origin of a gold atom from the Big Bang to the present day, and beyond. You will learn how the elements were forged in the nuclear furnaces inside stars, and how, when they die, these massive stars spread the elements into space. You will learn about the origin of the building blocks of matter in the Big Bang, and we will speculate on the future of the atoms around us today.

  6. Self supporting heat transfer element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Story, Grosvenor Cook (Livermore, CA); Baldonado, Ray Orico (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides an improved internal heat exchange element arranged so as to traverse the inside diameter of a container vessel such that it makes good mechanical contact with the interior wall of that vessel. The mechanical element is fabricated from a material having a coefficient of thermal conductivity above about 0.8 W cm.sup.-1.degree. K.sup.-1 and is designed to function as a simple spring member when that member has been cooled to reduce its diameter to just below that of a cylindrical container or vessel into which it is placed and then allowed to warm to room temperature. A particularly important application of this invention is directed to a providing a simple compartmented storage container for accommodating a hydrogen absorbing alloy.

  7. Photoconductive circuit element pulse generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauscher, Christen (Alexandria, VA)

    1989-01-01

    A pulse generator for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test.

  8. Submitted to: Finite Elements in Analysis and Design Finite Element Analysis over Tangled Simplicial Meshes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suresh, Krishnan

    Submitted to: Finite Elements in Analysis and Design 1 Finite Element Analysis over Tangled element theory and commercial FEA packages are not designed to handle tangled meshes, i.e., they can lead element). Modern finite element theory and commercial FEA packages are not designed to handle tangled

  9. Merging parton showers and matrix elements -- back to basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavesson, Nils

    2008-01-01

    We make a thorough comparison between different schemes of merging fixed-order tree-level matrix element generators with parton-shower models. We use the most basic benchmark of the O(alpha_S) correction to e+e- -> jets, where the simple kinematics allows us to study in detail the transition between the matrix-element and parton-shower regions. We find that the CKKW-based schemes give a reasonably smooth transition between these regions, although problems may occur if the parton shower used is not ordered in transverse momentum. However, the so-called Pseudo-Shower and MLM schemes turn out to have potentially serious problems due to different scale definitions in different regions of phase space, and due to sensitivity to the details in the initial conditions of the parton shower programs used.

  10. Merging parton showers and matrix elements -- back to basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nils Lavesson; Leif Lonnblad

    2008-04-23

    We make a thorough comparison between different schemes of merging fixed-order tree-level matrix element generators with parton-shower models. We use the most basic benchmark of the O(alpha_S) correction to e+e- -> jets, where the simple kinematics allows us to study in detail the transition between the matrix-element and parton-shower regions. We find that the CKKW-based schemes give a reasonably smooth transition between these regions, although problems may occur if the parton shower used is not ordered in transverse momentum. However, the so-called Pseudo-Shower and MLM schemes turn out to have potentially serious problems due to different scale definitions in different regions of phase space, and due to sensitivity to the details in the initial conditions of the parton shower programs used.

  11. Design and Testing of Prototypic Elements Containing Monolithic Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; M.K. Meyer; D.M. Wachs

    2011-10-01

    The US fuel development team has performed numerous irradiation tests on small to medium sized specimens containing low enriched uranium fuel designs. The team is now focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum Base Monolithic Design and has entered the next generation of testing with the design and irradiation of prototypic elements which contain this fuel. The designs of fuel elements containing monolithic fuel, such as AFIP-7 (which is currently under irradiation) and RERTR-FE (which is currently under fabrication), are appropriate progressions relative to the technology life cycle. The culmination of this testing program will occur with the design, fabrication, and irradiation of demonstration products to include the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiments. Future plans show that design, fabrication, and testing activities will apply the rigor needed for a demonstration campaign.

  12. Monitoring arrangement for vented nuclear fuel elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campana, Robert J. (Solana Beach, CA)

    1981-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel reactor core, fuel elements are arranged in a closely packed hexagonal configuration, each fuel element having diametrically opposed vents permitting 180.degree. rotation of the fuel elements to counteract bowing. A grid plate engages the fuel elements and forms passages for communicating sets of three, four or six individual vents with respective monitor lines in order to communicate vented radioactive gases from the fuel elements to suitable monitor means in a manner readily permitting detection of leakage in individual fuel elements.

  13. Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014ProvedYear Jan Feb MarNGPL Production,Energy Office

  14. DOLFIN: Automated finite element computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logg, Anders; Wells, G N

    2009-02-25

    , and in particular the C++ Technical Report 1 (TR1) std::tr1::shared ptr and Boost boost:shared ptr (DOLFIN currently uses boost:shared ptr since this is better supported by SWIG than is std::tr1::shared ptr). In managing data sharing, this solution has reduced... . DOLFIN: Automated Finite Element Computing · 7 3. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS The successful development of DOLFIN has been driven by two keys factors. The first is striving for technical innovation. Examples of this include the use of a form compiler...

  15. Element Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of theClimate FinanceElektrizitatswerk GoldbachElement

  16. Nuclear matrix elements for double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadim Rodin

    2009-10-30

    The present status of calculations of the nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double beta decay is reviewed. A proposal which allows in principle to measure the neutrinoless double beta decay Fermi matrix element is briefly described.

  17. Programing the Finite Element Method with Matlab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-10-03

    Oct 3, 2002 ... in the writing of finite element code using Matlab. It is assumed .... Ultimately for all finite element programs we solve a linear algebraic system of the form .... equations is the enforcement of the essential boundary conditions.

  18. Stacked switchable element and diode combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, Howard M.; Wang, Qi

    2006-06-27

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  19. Stacked Switchable Element and Diode Combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, H. M.; Wang, Q.

    2006-06-27

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  20. Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) Program Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walkowicz, K.

    2002-05-01

    Fact sheet describing U. S. DOE and NREL's development of next generation natural gas vehicles (NGVs) as a key element in its strategy to reduce oil import and vehicle pollutants.

  1. Metaphysics and Natural Kinds: Slingshots, Fundamentality, and Causal Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Andrew

    2014-08-31

    come from theoretical categories given to us by the natural sciences, which include things like the chemical elements – hydrogen, gold, and plutonium – biological taxa – species like tiger, Panthera tigris, porcini mushroom, Boletus edulis, and the main...

  2. Thermoacoustic natural gas liquefier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W.

    1997-05-01

    Cryenco and Los Alamos are collaborating to develop a natural-gas-powered natural-gas liquefier that will have no moving parts and require no electrical power. It will have useful efficiency, remarkable reliability, and low cost. The liquefaction of natural gas, which occurs at only 115 Kelvin at atmospheric pressure, has previously required rather sophisticated refrigeration machinery. The 1990 invention of the thermoacoustically driven orifice pulse-tube refrigerator (TA-DOPTR) provides cryogenic refrigeration with no moving parts for the first time. In short, this invention uses acoustic phenomena to produce refrigeration from heat. The required apparatus consists of nothing more than helium-filled heat exchangers and pipes, made of common materials, without exacting tolerances. In the Cryenco-Los Alamos collaboration, the authors are developing a version of this invention suitable for use in the natural-gas industry. The project is known as acoustic liquefier for short. The present program plans call for a two-phase development. Phase 1, with capacity of 500 gallon per day (i.e., approximately 40,000 scfd, requiring a refrigeration power of about 7 kW), is large enough to illuminate all the issues of large-scale acoustic liquefaction without undue cost, and to demonstrate the liquefaction of 60--70% of input gas, while burning 30--40%. Phase 2 will target versions of approximately 10{sup 6} scfd = 10,000 gallon per day capacity. In parallel with both, they continue fundamental research on the technology, directed toward increased efficiency, to build scientific foundations and a patent portfolio for future acoustic liquefiers.

  3. Diffractive optical elements for spectroscopy Hallvard Angelskar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    Diffractive optical elements for spectroscopy by Hallvard Angelsk°ar Submitted in partial;Abstract Diffractive optical elements can be used in spectroscopy instruments to fulfill several tasks to precisely fabricate complex diffractive optical elements with feature sizes below the micrometer scale

  4. Medial Techniques for Automating Finite Element Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitton, Mary C.

    Medial Techniques for Automating Finite Element Analysis by Jessica Renee Crawford Crouch Analysis. (Under the direction of Stephen M. Pizer.) Finite element analysis provides a principled method the simulation of tissue deformation. The drawback to using finite element analysis for imaging problems

  5. Finite Element Analysis in Vertebrate Biomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finite Element Analysis in Vertebrate Biomechanics CALLUM F. ROSS* Department of Organismal Biology presents a series of papers that apply the method of finite element analysis (FEA) to questions ontogenetic or phylogenetic transformations. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: finite-element analysis

  6. Construction of Higher Order Finite Element with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kern, Michel

    ' & $ % Construction of Higher Order Finite Element with Mass Lumping Using Computer Algebra. (3D, combinatorial analysis, new third order element) 2 #12; ' & $ % Guidelines for the construction of nodes must be ~ P k unisolvent. 2. Finite element must be continuous. 3. Quadrature formula must satisfy

  7. Deformation Expression for Elements of Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Omori; Y. Maeda; N. Miyazaki; A. Yoshioka

    2011-04-09

    The purpose of this paper is to give a notion of deformation of expressions for elements of algebra. Deformation quantization (cf.[BF]) deforms the commutative world to a non-commutative world. However, this involves deformation of expression of elements of algebras even from a commutative world to another commutative world. This is indeed a deformation of expressions for elements of algebra.

  8. HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN OF THE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND THEIR DISCOVERIES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29

    The origin of the chemical elements show a wide diversity with some of these elements having their origin in antiquity. Still other elements have been synthesized within the past fifty years via nuclear reactions on heavy elements, because these other elements are unstable and radioactive and do not exist in nature. The names of the elements come from many sources including mythological concepts or characters; places, areas or countries; properties of the element or its compounds, such as color, smell or its inability to combine; and the names of scientists. There are also some miscellaneous names as well as some obscure names for particular elements. The claim of discovery of an element has varied over the centuries. Many claims, e.g., the discovery of certain rare earth elements of the lanthanide series, involved the discovery of a mineral ore from which an element was later extracted. The honor of discovery has often been accorded not to the person who first isolated the element but to the person who discovered the original mineral itself, even when the ore was impure and contained many elements. The reason for this is that in the case of these rare earth elements, the ''earth'' now refers to oxides of a metal not to the metal itself. This fact was not realized at the time of their discovery, until the English chemist Humphry Davy showed that earths were compounds of oxygen and metals in 1808. In the early discoveries, the atomic weight of an element and spectral analysis of the element were not available. Later both of these elemental properties would be required before discovery of the element would be accepted. In general, the requirements for discovery claims have tightened through the years and claims that were previously accepted would no longer meet the minimum constraints now imposed. There are cases where the honor of discovery is not given to the first person to actually discover the element but to the first person to claim the discovery in print. If a publication was delayed, the discoverer has often historically been ''scooped'' by another scientist.

  9. NEWS & VIEWS nature physics | VOL 2 | JULY 2006 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 445

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    . In tokamak-based fusion plasmas, reconnection occurs as a result of plasma instabilities and hampers magnetic confinement. It influences the dayside dynamics of the Earth's magnetosphere and the magnetic substormsNEWS & VIEWS nature physics | VOL 2 | JULY 2006 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 445 MAGNETIC

  10. Natural gas monthly, February 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration. Estimates extend through February 1998 for many data series, and through November 1997 for most natural gas prices. Highlights of the natural gas data contained in this issue are: Preliminary estimates for January and February 1998 show that dry natural gas production, net imports, and consumption are all within 1 percent of their levels in 1997. Warmer-than-normal weather in recent months has resulted in lower consumption of natural gas by the residential sector and lower net withdrawals of gas from under round storage facilities compared with a year ago. This has resulted in an estimate of the amount of working gas in storage at the end of February 1998 that is 18 percent higher than in February 1997. The national average natural gas wellhead price is estimated to be $3.05 per thousand cubic feet in November 1997, 7 percent higher than in October. The cumulative average wellhead price for January through November 1997 is estimated to be $2.42 per thousand cubic feet, 17 percent above that of the same period in 1996. This price increase is far less than 36-percent rise that occurred between 1995 and 1996. 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  11. Elucidation of the Local and Long-Range Structural Changes that Occur in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article)at theReport) |in QCD: Thethe Utilization

  12. Data transmission element for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

    2006-01-31

    A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

  13. Ecotoxicity of rare earth elements Rare earth elements (REEs) or rare earth metals is the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Ecotoxicity of rare earth elements Info Sheet Rare earth elements (REEs) or rare earth metals isolated. Actually, most rare earth elements exist in the Earth's crust in higher concentrations than though most people have never heard of rare earth elements, sev- eral of them govern mankind's modern

  14. Retention of elemental mercury in fly ashes in different atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Lopez-Anton; M. Diaz-Somoano; M.R. Martinez-Tarazona

    2007-01-15

    Mercury is an extremely volatile element, which is emitted from coal combustion to the environment mostly in the vapor phase. To avoid the environmental problems that the toxic species of this element may cause, control technologies for the removal of mercury are necessary. Recent research has shown that certain fly ash materials have an affinity for mercury. Moreover, it has been observed that fly ashes may catalyze the oxidation of elemental mercury and facilitate its capture. However, the exact nature of Hg-fly ash interactions is still unknown, and mercury oxidation through fly ash needs to be investigated more thoroughly. In this work, the influence of a gas atmosphere on the retention of elemental mercury on fly ashes of different characteristics was evaluated. The retention capacity was estimated comparatively in inert and two gas atmospheres containing species present in coal gasification and coal combustion. Fly ashes produced in two pulverized coal combustion (PCC) plants, produced from coals of different rank (CTA and CTSR), and a fly ash (CTP) produced in a fluidized bed combustion (FBC) plant were used as raw materials. The mercury retention capacity of these fly ashes was compared to the retention obtained in different activated carbons. Although the capture of mercury is very similar in the gasification atmosphere and N{sub 2}, it is much more efficient in a coal combustion retention, being greater in fly ashes from PCC than those from FBC plants. 22 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Apparatus for inspecting fuel elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaiser, B.J.; Oakley, D.J.; Groves, O.J.

    1984-12-21

    This disclosure describes an alpha monitor usable in an automated nuclear fuel pin loading and processing unit. Fuel pins or other elongated pins are fed laterally into the alpha monitor in a singular fashion and are translated by a first roller assembly into a weld flare machining and decontamination substation not forming a part of the invention. Pins return and are lifted upwardly and transferred across to a combined pin lifting and electrode operating means which lifts the pins upwardly into a clamshell electrode assembly which is spread open by a combined pin lifting and electrode operating means. Once inserted the clamshell type electrode arrangement closes around the fuel pins so that inspection can occur. Fuel pins are inspected by charging electrodes to a negative potential and measuring the change in charge occurring when positively charged alpha particles strike the negatively charged electrodes. After inspection, the fuel pins are lowered by the pin lifting and electrode operating means into a second roller assembly which longitudinally conveys approved pins from the airtight enclosure in which the alpha monitor is mounted. If the fuel pins are rejected then they are moved laterally by a second transfer means and onto another system for further processing.

  16. Natural Dynamics for Combinatorial Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovchinnikov, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic and or natural dynamical systems (DSs) are dominated by sudden nonlinear processes such as neuroavalanches, gamma-ray bursts, solar flares, earthquakes etc. that exhibit scale-free statistics. These behaviors also occur in many nanosystems. On phase diagrams, these DSs belong to a finite-width phase that separates the phases of thermodynamic equilibrium and ordinary chaotic dynamics, and that is known under such names as intermittency, noise-induced chaos, and self-organized criticality. Within the recently formulated approximation-free cohomological theory of stochastic differential equations, the noise-induced chaos can be roughly interpreted as a noise-induced overlap between regular (integrable) and chaotic (non-integrable) deterministic dynamics so that DSs in this phase inherit the properties of the both. Here, we analyze this unique set of properties and conclude that such DSs must be the most efficient natural optimizers. Based on this understanding, we propose the method of the natural dyn...

  17. Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranski, Micahel J

    2009-11-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Oak Ridge Reservation, encompassing 33,639 acres in the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province of East Tennessee, has long been known for its unfragmented forests and high biodiversity. Many areas on the Reservation have been recognized as important natural areas, but no comprehensive treatment has been performed to evaluate the relative significance and importance of these areas compared to each other. The present study was conducted to develop a set of guidelines for evaluating the natural value of specific areas, to evaluate all the terrestrial areas that are currently delineated, and to rank all areas according to their relative biodiversity importance. All available data, reports and site-specific information relevant to Reservation lands, including Tennessee Division of Natural Areas database information, were evaluated and field work was conducted. Methodologies and criteria for assessment and evaluation of areas were developed; categories of criteria were devised; and a ranking system for evaluation of natural areas was produced. There were 70 areas evaluated during the study. The system is flexible, dynamic and easily revised to reflect updated and new information and interpretations. Eight categories of evaluation factors were established and used to characterize each site. These were the following: size of area, number or status taxa present, number of Endangered and Threatened taxa present, rarity of the Endangered and Threatened taxa on the Reservation, community diversity, site integrity and quality, disturbance and threat levels, and other significant features and factors. Each category generally consisted of a 5-point ranking scale from 0-4, allowing for a possible composite score of 32, with higher ranked, more important, sites attaining higher scores. Highly ranked sites are representative of regional natural diversity; contain outstanding natural features, communities or geology and/or very rare taxa or other elements; are relatively large in size with mature or old-growth community composition; lack current disturbance factors or potential threats and disturbances; are in excellent condition with good buffers; are places where ecological and evolutionary processes can occur relatively unaffected by humans; and can be reasonably defended and maintained as natural areas in an undeveloped condition. Highly ranked sites are the most significant and should receive the greatest protections. Composite scores of the ranked areas ranged from 1-25.5, with a mean score of 12. The ranked areas were divided into three Priority Groups. Group I, the most highly ranked group, included 20 sites and covered 5189 acres or 15.4% of Reservation lands; Group II included 31 sites and covered 4108 acres; Group III included 19 sites covering 400 acres of Reservation lands. All sites together comprise 9697 acres or 28.8% of Reservation lands. Six sites emerged as clearly the most significant natural areas on the Reservation. The study developed a number of recommendations that should be implemented in order to enhance and refine the natural areas data for the Reservation. There is a clear need for better and standardized ecological community classification and identification. Several areas are proposed for merger into larger units, and some new areas are proposed for inclusion and recognition in a natural areas system. Various gaps and discrepancies in the existing data are described and should be corrected. Other recommendations are made, including the development of a corollary system that can accommodate aquatic natural areas. The study relied primarily on the synthesis of information from many sources and from limited reconnaissance and direct observation during field work to produce a methodology for assessing natural area importance and assigning priorities for protection. Many instances of incomplete, missing or conflicting information made it difficult to complete thorough analysis. Further review and discussion among natural resources personnel will likely reveal possibilities for refinement and

  18. Method and apparatus for sensing the natural frequency of a cantilevered body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Michael G. (Clinton, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the natural resonant frequency of a spring element by monitoring a phase difference between an output signal from the spring element and an input signal to the spring element and by adjusting frequency of the input signal until a detected phase difference signals that the natural resonant frequency has been reached. The method and apparatus are applied to a micro-cantilevered elements used to measure gas compositions and concentrations. Such elements are provided with coatings that absorb gas to cause deflections and changes in the mass or spring constant of the cantilevered element. These changes correspond to changes in the natural resonant frequency of the cantilevered element which are measured using the method and apparatus described herein.

  19. 3-D Finite Element Analyses of the Egan Cavern Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klamerus, E.W.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1999-02-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed for the two gas-filled storage caverns at the Egan field, Jennings dome, Louisiana. The effects of cavern enlargement on surface subsidence, storage loss, and cavern stability were investigated. The finite element model simulated the leaching of caverns to 6 and 8 billion cubic feet (BCF) and examined their performance at various operating conditions. Operating pressures varied from 0.15 psi/ft to 0.9 psi/ft at the bottom of the lowest cemented casing. The analysis also examined the stability of the web or pillar of salt between the caverns under differential pressure loadings. The 50-year simulations were performed using JAC3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasistatic solids. A damage criterion based on onset of dilatancy was used to evaluate cavern instability. Dilation results from the development of microfractures in salt and, hence, potential increases in permeability onset occurs well before large scale failure. The analyses predicted stable caverns throughout the 50-year period for the range of pressures investigated. Some localized salt damage was predicted near the bottom walls of the caverns if the caverns are operated at minimum pressure for long periods of time. Volumetric cavern closures over time due to creep were moderate to excessive depending on the salt creep properties and operating pressures. However, subsidence above the cavern field was small and should pose no problem, to surface facilities.

  20. Matrix Elements of Lorentzian Hamiltonian Constraint in LQG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuele Alesci; Klaus Liegener; Antonia Zipfel

    2013-07-18

    The Hamiltonian constraint is the key element of the canonical formulation of LQG coding its dynamics. In Ashtekar-Barbero variables it naturally splits into the so called Euclidean and Lorentzian parts. However, due to the high complexity of this operator, only the matrix elements of the Euclidean part have been considered so far. Here we evaluate the action of the full constraint, including the Lorentzian part. The computation requires an heavy use of SU(2) recoupling theory and several tricky identities among n-j symbols are used to find the final result: these identities, together with the graphical calculus used to derive them, also simplify the Euclidean constraint and are of general interest in LQG computations.

  1. Formation of super-heavy elements in astrophysical nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Karpov, A. V.; Mishustin, I. N.; Greiner, Walter

    2012-10-20

    The unexplored area of heavy neutron-rich nuclides is extremely important for the understanding of the r process of astrophysical nucleogenesis. For elements with Z>100 only neutron deficient isotopes (located to the left of the stability line) have been synthesized so far. The 'north-east' area of the nuclear map can be reached neither in fusion reactions nor in fragmentation processes. Low energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions are quite promising for the production and study of neutron-rich heavy nuclei including those located at the superheavy (SH) island of stability [1]. The neutron capture process is considered here as an alternative method for the production of SH nuclei. Requirements for the pulsed reactors of the next generation that could be used for the synthesis of long-living neutron rich SH nuclei are formulated. Formation of SH nuclei in supernova explosions is also discussed and the abundance of SH elements in nature is estimated.

  2. ,"Natural Gas Consumption",,,"Natural Gas Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Census Division, 1999" ,"Natural Gas Consumption",,,"Natural Gas Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand cubic feet)","per Square Foot (cubic feet)","per Worker (thousand cubic...

  3. A Naturally Occurring Mutation in ropB Suppresses SpeB Expression and Reduces M1T1 Group A Streptococcal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizet, Victor

    University, Cairo, Egypt, 3 The VA Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, United States of America, 4 The Department Epidemiological studies of group A streptococcus (GAS) have noted an inverse relationship between SpeB expression show that an intact RopB and efficient SpeB production are necessary for systemic infection with GAS

  4. A selective survey to determine the frequency of naturally occurring Hepatozoon canis infections in the Coastal Bend area of South Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espitia, Noberto Francisco

    1985-01-01

    data applicable to the determination of prevalence rates of the disease and to construct patient profiles of the affected population. The investigation centered on the results of blood sample evaluations of seventy-five dogs collected among five... veterinary clinics during a sixty day period. Only client-owned animals visiting one of the five veterinary clinics on a scheduled working day were sampled. Clinical evaluations of blood samples included complete blood counts, differential white cell...

  5. NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

  6. Worldwide, accelerating glacier loss provides independent and startling evidence that global warming is occurring1 It is now clear that the Earth is warming rapidly due to man-made emissions of carbon dioxide and other heat-trap-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combes, Stacey A.

    such as coal, oil and natural gas are burned for trans- portation, heating, or the production of electricity! Climate Change And Global Glacier Decline Global Warming is melting glaciers in every region of the world that global warming is occurring1 . It is now clear that the Earth is warming rapidly due to man

  7. Trace element partitioning in Texas lignite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acevedo, Lillian Esther

    1989-01-01

    to their enrichment factors and the relationship between their concentrations and particle size. Class I elements show no enrichment in fly ash and no tendency to be more concentrated in the smallest fly ash particles (Au, K, Rb, Ba, Si, Sr, Cs, Na, Fe, Mg, La, Ce... Neutron Activation Analysis. Gamma Rays Used for Neutron Activation Analysis Elements Studied That Present Possible Interferences in NAA . 33 43 VI VII Elemental Average Concentrations of Samples Collected at the Gibbons Creek SES. Comparison...

  8. Kidney cancer is one of the most common cancers occurring in 1-2% of individuals in their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    Kidney cancer is one of the most common cancers occurring in 1-2% of individuals in their lifetime. The current incidence in the United States is approximately 60,000-cases/ year. While many cancers were believed to occur sporadically, it's now understood approximately 5-8% of kidney cancers have a genetic

  9. It has been demonstrated that pictures whose names occur more frequently (e.g., dog) are named faster than

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caramazza, Alfonso

    It has been demonstrated that pictures whose names occur more frequently (e.g., dog) are named faster than pictures whose names occur less frequently (e.g., deer; Oldfield & Wingfield, 1965 with variables like structural similarity in picture naming experiments (Humphreys, Riddoch, & Quinlan, 1988

  10. Method of lightening radiation darkened optical elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reich, Frederich R. (Richland, WA); Schwankoff, Albert R. (W. Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01

    A method of lightening a radiation-darkened optical element in wich visible optical energy or electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength in the range of from about 2000 to about 20,000 angstroms is directed into the radiation-darkened optical element; the method may be used to lighten radiation-darkened optical element in-situ during the use of the optical element to transmit data by electronically separating the optical energy from the optical output by frequency filtering, data cooling, or interlacing the optic energy between data intervals.

  11. Spectral analysis method for detecting an element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackwood, Larry G [Idaho Falls, ID; Edwards, Andrew J [Idaho Falls, ID; Jewell, James K [Idaho Falls, ID; Reber, Edward L [Idaho Falls, ID; Seabury, Edward H [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-02-12

    A method for detecting an element is described and which includes the steps of providing a gamma-ray spectrum which has a region of interest which corresponds with a small amount of an element to be detected; providing nonparametric assumptions about a shape of the gamma-ray spectrum in the region of interest, and which would indicate the presence of the element to be detected; and applying a statistical test to the shape of the gamma-ray spectrum based upon the nonparametric assumptions to detect the small amount of the element to be detected.

  12. Bi-stable optical element actuator device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holdener, Fred R. (Tracy, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a bistable optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to move an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, between two stable positions. A non-powered means holds the actuation arm in either of the two stable positions. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm between the two stable positions.

  13. AN ADAPTIVE EDGE ELEMENT METHOD WITH PERFECTLY ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-09-15

    May 7, 2009 ... Scattering theory in biperiodic structures has many important .... the PML error and the finite element discretization error, is used to design.

  14. Finite Element Modeling of Drilling Using DEFORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Joel D.; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01

    Vijayaraghavan, A. (2005), “Drilling of Fiber- ReinforcedFINITE ELEMENT MODELING OF DRILLING USING DEFORM J. Gardner,of Comprehensive Drilling Simulation Tool” ABSTRACT DEFORM-

  15. Two position optical element actuator device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holdener, Fred R. (Tracy, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a two position optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to hold an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, in a first position. A non-powered means drives the actuation arm to a second position, when the powered means ceases to receive power. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive, reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm from the first to second position.

  16. Low exchange element for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brogli, Rudolf H. (Aarau, CH); Shamasunder, Bangalore I. (Encinitas, CA); Seth, Shivaji S. (Encinitas, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A flow exchange element is presented which lowers temperature gradients in fuel elements and reduces maximum local temperature within high temperature gas-cooled reactors. The flow exchange element is inserted within a column of fuel elements where it serves to redirect coolant flow. Coolant which has been flowing in a hotter region of the column is redirected to a cooler region, and coolant which has been flowing in the cooler region of the column is redirected to the hotter region. The safety, efficiency, and longevity of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor is thereby enhanced.

  17. Natural Gas Basics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NREL Clean Cities

    2010-04-01

    Fact sheet answers questions about natural gas production and use in transportation. Natural gas vehicles are also described.

  18. Viscosities of natural gases at high pressures and high temperatures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, Anup

    2007-09-17

    Estimation of viscosities of naturally occurring petroleum gases provides the information needed to accurately work out reservoir-engineering problems. Existing models for viscosity prediction are limited by data, especially at high pressures...

  19. Natural ventilation possibilities for buildings in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Brian N. (Brian Nathan), 1974-

    2001-01-01

    In the United States, many of the commercial buildings built in the last few decades are completely mechanically air conditioned, without the capability to use natural ventilation. This habit has occurred in building designs ...

  20. A multiresolution finite element method based on a new locking-free rectangular Mindlin plate element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Yi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    A locking-free rectangular Mindlin plate element with a new multi-resolution analysis (MRA) is proposed and a multireolution finite element method is hence presented. The MRA framework is formulated out of a mutually nesting displacement subspace sequence. The MRA endows the proposed element with the resolution level (RL) to adjust the element node number, thus modulating structural analysis accuracy accordingly. As a result, the traditional 4-node rectangular Mindlin plate element and method is a mono-resolution one and also a special case of the proposed element and method. The meshing for the monoresolution plate element model is based on the empiricism while the RL adjusting for the multiresolution is laid on the rigorous mathematical basis. The accuracy of a structural analysis is actually determined by the RL, not by the mesh. The rational MRA enables the implementation of the multiresolution Mindlin plate element method to be more rational and efficient than that of the conventional monoresolution or o...

  1. The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

    1948-00-00

    Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

  2. Modeling and Driving Piezoelectric Resonant Blade Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling and Driving Piezoelectric Resonant Blade Elements Sam Ben-Yaakov* and Natan Krihely Power@ee.bgu.ac.il ; Website: http://www.ee.bgu.ac.il/~pel Abstract-- Piezoelectric Resonant Blade elements (PRB) are useful in applications such as light choppers, laser beam scanners, fans and others. Three methods are proposed

  3. Special fiber elements for thermal analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Qinghua

    of this paper is to present a new special element model for thermal analysis of composites. Design analysis, Hybrid FEM, Fundamental solution, Special inclusion element, Representative volume cell Paper type Research paper 1. Introduction Fiber-reinforced composites (Chung, 1994) are structural materials

  4. Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden,N.E.

    2008-08-11

    Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

  5. Elemental composition of two cumulate rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naeem, A.; Almohandis, A.A.

    1983-04-01

    Two cumulate rock samples K-185, K-250 from the Kapalagulu intrusion, W. Tanzania, were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), wet chemical and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques. Major element oxides were determined by XRF and wet chemical methods, while the concentration of trace elements were measured by NAA, using high resolution Ge(Li) detector, minicomputer-based data acquisition system and off-line computer. The percentage of major oxides and sixteen trace elements have been reported. It has been found that Cr, Ni, and Co are highly concentrated in K-250 while Sc, and most of the major elements are more concentrated in K-185. The variation of major and trace elements in these two samples have been discussed.

  6. Probabilistic finite element analysis of a craniofacial finite element model Michael A. Berthaume a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probabilistic finite element analysis of a craniofacial finite element model Michael A. Berthaume a s t r a c t We employed a probabilistic finite element analysis (FEA) method to determine how 2011 Accepted 18 January 2012 Available online 27 January 2012 Keywords: Probabilistic analysis Finite

  7. Calculations of atomic sputtering and displacement cross-sections in solid elements by electrons with energies from threshold to 1. 5 MV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, C.R.

    1988-12-01

    The kinetics of knock-on collisions of relativistic electrons with nuclei and details of the numerical evaluation of differential, recoil, and total Mott cross-sections are reviewed and discussed. The effects of electron beam induced displacement and sputtering, in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) environment, on microanalysis are analyzed with particular emphasis placed on the removal of material by knock-on sputtering. The mass loss predicted due to transmission knock-on sputtering is significant for many elements under conditions frequently encountered in microanalysis. Total Mott cross-sections are tabulated for all naturally occurring solid elements up to Z = 92 at displacement energies of one, two, four, and five times the sublimation energy and for accelerating voltages accessible in the transmission electron microscope. Fortran source code listings for the calculation of the differential Mott cross-section as a function of electron scattering angle (dMottCS), as a function of nuclear recoil angle (RECOIL), and the total Mott cross-section (TOTCS) are included. 48 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. Comparative genomics in acid mine drainage biofilm communities reveals metabolic and structural differentiation of co-occurring archaea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    co-occurring archaea. BMC Genomics 2013 14:485. Submit yourgenomes. Yelton et al. BMC Genomics 2013, 14:485 http://work was supported by DOE Genomics: GTL project Grant No.

  9. Health Hazard Chart The following is a target organ categorization of effects that may occur, including examples of signs and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Health Hazard Chart The following is a target organ categorization of effects that may occur which affect the eye or visual capacity Conjunctivitis, corneal damage Organic solvents, acids #12;

  10. Comparison of Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Cr, Mo and Sb Adsorption onto Natural Surface Coatings in a Stream Draining Natural As

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparison of Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Cr, Mo and Sb Adsorption onto Natural Surface Coatings in a Stream Science+Business Media New York 2014 Abstract Natural surface coatings (biofilms) were col- lected elements Á Distribution coefficient Á Biogenic Mn oxide Natural surface coatings are ubiquitous

  11. Neutrinos and the Supernova Origin of the Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong-Zhong Qian

    2000-08-30

    Intense fluxes of neutrinos are emitted by the hot neutron star produced in a supernova. The electron neutrino and antineutrino capture reactions on neutrons and protons, respectively, provide heating to drive a wind from the hot neutron star. The same reactions also determine the neutron-richness of the wind material. Nucleosynthesis via rapid neutron capture, the r-process, may occur in the wind material as it expands away from the neutron star. The neutron-richness of the wind material, and hence, the r-process nucleosynthesis therein, are sensitive to mixing between the muon (or tauon) neutrino/antineutrino and the electron (or sterile) neutrino/antineutrino. Indirect arguments and direct tests for the supernova origin of the r-process elements are discussed with a goal to establish supernova r-process nucleosynthesis as an important probe for neutrino mixing.

  12. NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP SITE LICENSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Biotechnology Nature Cell Biology Nature Chemical Biology Nature Chemistry Nature Climate Change Nature of Information Technology Journal of Information Technology Teaching Cases Journal of International Business

  13. Tokyo Tech International Symposium New Horizon of Electronic Materials Using Abundant Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, Sweden) In Harmony with the Environment: New Materials Harnessing Nature's Energy Flows 14Tokyo Tech International Symposium New Horizon of Electronic Materials Using Abundant Elements Date Theoretical and Computational Approach to New Materials Date: 10:00-19:00, 4th June, 2015: Lecture Session 10

  14. Carbonyl sulfide hydrolysis in natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, F.; Caribotti, P.; Garofalo, N.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide may naturally occur in high H/sub 2/S - CO/sub 2/ content sour natural gases. Furthermore part of the H/sub 2/S present in natural gases may be converted into COS if molecular sieves are used as H/sub 2/S removal substances in natural gas desulphurization plants. Carbonyl sulfide might then hydrolize to H/sub 2/S in the gas storage fields and transmission lines. This paper illustrates experimental data relevant to the kinetics and thermodynamics of the reaction between carbonyl sulfide and water both at gas and gas/liquid phases. Results may suggest whether carbonyl sulfide should be included in natural gas quality specifications.

  15. Advanced Byproduct Recovery: Direct Catalytic Reduction of Sulfur Dioxide to Elemental Sulfur. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied, to 72,000 MW of U.S., coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. In these systems, the sulfur dioxide removed from the boiler flue gas is permanently bound to a sorbent material, such as lime or limestone. The sulfated sorbent must be disposed of as a waste product or, in some cases, sold as a byproduct (e.g. gypsum). Due to the abundance and low cost of naturally occurring gypsum, and the costs associated with producing an industrial quality product, less than 7% of these scrubbers are configured to produce usable gypsum (and only 1% of all units actually sell the byproduct). The disposal of solid waste from each of these scrubbers requires a landfill area of approximately 200 to 400 acres. In the U.S., a total of 19 million tons of disposable FGD byproduct are produced, transported and disposed of in landfills annually. The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate solid waste production, transportation and disposal. In a regenerable sorbent system, the sulfur dioxide in the boiler flue gas is removed by the sorbent in an adsorber. The S0{sub 2}s subsequently released, in higher concentration, in a regenerator. All regenerable systems produce an off-gas stream from the regenerator that must be processed further in order to obtain a salable byproduct, such as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or liquid S0{sub 2}.

  16. Unipotent elements in small characteristic, IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lusztig, George

    We consider the variety of nilpotent elements in the dual of the Lie algebra of a reductive group over an algebraically closed field. We propose a definition of a partition of this variety into locally closed smooth ...

  17. Proton decay matrix elements from lattice QCD 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooney, Paul

    2010-01-01

    We present results for the matrix elements relevant for proton decay in Grand Unified Theories (GUTs), using two methods. In the indirect method, we rely on an effective field theory description of proton decay, where ...

  18. Discrete element modelling of cementitious materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Nicholas John

    2013-07-01

    This thesis presents a new bonded particle model that accurately predicts the wideranging behaviour of cementitious materials. There is an increasing use of the Discrete Element Method (DEM) to study the behaviour of ...

  19. Generalized finite element method for Helmholtz equation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hidajat, Realino Lulie

    2009-05-15

    This dissertation presents the Generalized Finite Element Method (GFEM) for the scalar Helmholtz equation, which describes the time harmonic acoustic wave propagation problem. We introduce several handbook functions for ...

  20. PARTIALLY PENALIZED IMMERSED FINITE ELEMENT METHODS ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-05

    This article presents new immersed finite element (IFE) methods for solving the ... convergence rate in an energy norm provided that the exact solution has ... An alternative approach is ...... North-Holland Publishing Co., Amsterdam-New York-.

  1. Ion processing element with composite media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mann, Nick R. (Blackfoot, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Sebesta, Ferdinand (Prague, CZ)

    2009-03-24

    An ion processing element employing composite media disposed in a porous substrate, for facilitating removal of selected chemical species from a fluid stream. The ion processing element includes a porous fibrous glass substrate impregnated by composite media having one or more active components supported by a matrix material of polyacrylonitrile. The active components are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream passing through the ion processing element. Due to the porosity and large surface area of both the composite medium and the substrate in which it is disposed, a high degree of contact is achieved between the active component and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the porosity of the matrix material and the substrate facilitates use of the ion processing element in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a high volume flows.

  2. Transition Matrix Elements for Pion Photoproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed E. Kelabi

    2007-03-20

    We have obtained the transition matrix elements for pion photoproduction by considering the number of gamma matrices involved. The approach based on the most general conditions of gauge invariance, current conservation and transversality. The approach is fairly consistent with literatures.

  3. Magnetic bearing element with adjustable stiffness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F

    2013-11-12

    A compact magnetic bearing element is provided which is made of permanent magnet discs configured to be capable of the adjustment of the bearing stiffness and levitation force over a wide range.

  4. William Fowler and Elements in the Stars

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the chemical elements inside stars; the Big Bang origin of the universe; and the current Dark Matter debate over what most of the universe is made of. "It is a remarkable fact...

  5. Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California, as a near-field natural analog of a radioactive waste repository in salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elders, W.A.; Cohen, L.H.

    1983-11-01

    Since high concentrations of radionuclides and high temperatures are not normally encountered in salt domes or beds, finding an exact geologic analog of expected near-field conditions in a mined nuclear waste repository in salt will be difficult. The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, however, provides an opportunity to investigate the migration and retardation of naturally occurring U, Th, Ra, Cs, Sr and other elements in hot brines which have been moving through clay-rich sedimentary rocks for up to 100,000 years. The more than thirty deep wells drilled in this field to produce steam for electrical generation penetrate sedimentary rocks containing concentrated brines where temperatures reach 365/sup 0/C at only 2 km depth. The brines are primarily Na, K, Ca chlorides with up to 25% of total dissolved solids; they also contain high concentrations of metals such as Fe, Mn, Li, Zn, and Pb. This report describes the geology, geophysics and geochemistry of this system as a prelude to a study of the mobility of naturally occurring radionuclides and radionuclide analogs within it. The aim of this study is to provide data to assist in validating quantitative models of repository behavior and to use in designing and evaluating waste packages and engineered barriers. 128 references, 33 figures, 13 tables.

  6. Poole-frenkel piezoconductive element and sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Habermehl, Scott D.

    2004-08-03

    A new class of highly sensitive piezoconductive strain sensor elements and sensors has been invented. The new elements function under conditions such that electrical conductivity is dominated by Poole-Frenkel transport. A substantial piezoconductive effect appears in this regime, allowing the new sensors to exhibit sensitivity to applied strain as much as two orders of magnitude in excess of prior art sensors based on doped silicon.

  7. Stretchable semiconductor elements and stretchable electrical circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL); Khang, Dahl-Young (Seoul, KR); Menard, Etienne (Durham, NC)

    2009-07-07

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  8. Finite Element Analysis of the Schroedinger Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avtar S. Sehra

    2007-04-17

    The purpose of this work is to test the application of the finite element method to quantum mechanical problems, in particular for solving the Schroedinger equation. We begin with an overview of quantum mechanics, and standard numerical techniques. We then give an introduction to finite element analysis using the diffusion equation as an example. Three numerical time evolution methods are considered: the (tried and tested) Crank-Nicolson method, the continuous space-time method, and the discontinuous space-time method.

  9. Arkansas Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural GasYearElements)Thousand

  10. Natural Gas Applications

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas Applications. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Applications...

  11. Global Natural Gas Market Trends, 2. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-07-15

    The report provides an overview of major trends occurring in the natural gas industry and includes a concise look at the drivers behind recent rapid growth in gas usage and the challenges faced in meeting that growth. Topics covered include: an overview of Natural Gas including its history, the current market environment, and its future market potential; an analysis of the overarching trends that are driving a need for change in the Natural Gas industry; a description of new technologies being developed to increase production of Natural Gas; an evaluation of the potential of unconventional Natural Gas sources to supply the market; a review of new transportation methods to get Natural Gas from producing to consuming countries; a description of new storage technologies to support the increasing demand for peak gas; an analysis of the coming changes in global Natural Gas flows; an evaluation of new applications for Natural Gas and their impact on market sectors; and, an overview of Natural Gas trading concepts and recent changes in financial markets.

  12. Fuel-element failures in Hanford single-pass reactors 1944--1971

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gydesen, S.P.

    1993-07-01

    The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. To estimate the doses, the staff of the Source Terms Task use operating information from historical documents to approximate the radioactive emissions. One source of radioactive emissions to the Columbia River came from leaks in the aluminum cladding of the uranium metal fuel elements in single-pass reactors. The purpose of this letter report is to provide photocopies of the documents that recorded these failures. The data from these documents will be used by the Source Terms Task to determine the contribution of single-pass reactor fuel-element failures to the radioactivity of the reactor effluent from 1944 through 1971. Each referenced fuel-element failure occurring in the Hanford single-pass reactors is addressed. The first recorded failure was in 1948, the last in 1970. No records of fuel-element failures were found in documents prior to 1948. Data on the approximately 2000 failures which occurred during the 28 years (1944--1971) of Hanford single-pass reactor operations are provided in this report.

  13. Stacked switchable element and diode combination with a low breakdown switchable element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qi (Littleton, CO); Ward, James Scott (Englewood, CO); Hu, Jian (Englewood, CO); Branz, Howard M. (Boulder, CO)

    2012-06-19

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship. The semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a low-density forming current and/or a low voltage.

  14. 2008NaturePublishingGrouphttp://www.nature.com/naturechemicalbiology Quantitative exploration of the catalytic landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jianzhi

    and Hyoscyamus muticus, we created a library of all possible residue combinations (29 ¼ 512) in the N. tabacum) a simplified set of naturally occurring mutations that interconvert a defined catalytic property for measur- ing the catalytic properties (recording the chemical readout) of the enzyme library. Therefore

  15. Element-based concrete design with three-dimensional finite element models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, M.; Huberty, K.; Winch, S. [Nuclear Power Technologies Div., Sargent and Lundy, 55 East Monroe, Chicago, IL 60603 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A shell element based design of a typical shear wall using analytical results from a three-dimensional finite element model subjected to a combination of vertical and lateral loads is evaluated. The axial and flexural force resultants from each element for every load combination are used to calculate the required reinforcing for each element. Strength for axial loads (P) and out-of-plane flexure (M) in structural walls is determined according to the same P-M interaction procedures used for columns. After each element has been evaluated, a required reinforcing map for each face of each element in the wall is presented along with a constructible reinforcement pattern enveloping the required reinforcing. In order to determine whether the element-based approach meets the requirements of the section cut approach to design, which is typically employed in manual calculations, the total in-plane moment (M) and total vertical axial force (P) across the entire length of the wall is calculated and the P-M points are plotted on an in-plane P-M interaction diagram. It is concluded that element-based design for a structural wall ensures that reinforcement is provided where required by the three-dimensional finite element analysis while still providing sufficient reinforcing to satisfy the section cut approach to design. (authors)

  16. 3.3 Construction of vector edge elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-10-05

    Figure 3.1: Linear tetrahedral element. 3.3 Construction of vector edge elements. Let us first consider the linear tetrahedral element, as seen in Figure 3.1. Within.

  17. In je element met een job in de chemie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goelzer, Heiko

    In je element met een job in de chemie 100 beroepen voor chemici #12;#12;Volledig in je element met een job in de chemie. Welk element ben jij? C Ben jij overal en altijd? Net als het alomtegenwoordige

  18. A baseline characterization of trace elements in Texas soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frybarger, Mary Rita

    1998-01-01

    background concentrations of elements in soils for sewage sludge application. Elements in the study soils were well below USEPA limits. When compared to the median concentration of elements on a worldwide basis, all except Co, As, and Se were found...

  19. Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos Abstract We introduce nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs, generalizing the nuclear elements Jordan pairs and show that the trace form Trintroduced in [3] may be extended to the nuclear

  20. The Valles natural analogue project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stockman, H.; Krumhansl, J.; Ho, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McConnell, V. [Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.

    1994-12-01

    The contact between an obsidian flow and a steep-walled tuff canyon was examined as an analogue for a highlevel waste repository. The analogue site is located in the Valles Caldera in New Mexico, where a massive obsidian flow filled a paleocanyon in the Battleship Rock tuff. The obsidian flow provided a heat source, analogous to waste panels or an igneous intrusion in a repository, and caused evaporation and migration of water. The tuff and obsidian samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and mineralogy by INAA, XRF, X-ray diffraction; and scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe. Samples were also analyzed for D/H and {sup 39}Ar/{sup 4O} isotopic composition. Overall,the effects of the heating event seem to have been slight and limited to the tuff nearest the contact. There is some evidence of devitrification and migration of volatiles in the tuff within 10 meters of the contact, but variations in major and trace element chemistry are small and difficult to distinguish from the natural (pre-heating) variability of the rocks.

  1. Lead in Your Drinking Water Lead (Pb) is an extremely toxic heavy metal that unfortunately occurs widely in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, J. Barry

    Lead in Your Drinking Water Lead (Pb) is an extremely toxic heavy metal that unfortunately occurs widely in our environment. The chief sources of exposure are from (1) Lead paint ­ commonly present in house interiors (2) Leaded gasoline ­ soils along major roadways are strongly enriched in lead

  2. Using Theory to Model Polymer Properties There are two general themes to this research: (1) polymer degradation that occurs when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the polymer with nanoinclusions of carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets and other structures. PolymerUsing Theory to Model Polymer Properties There are two general themes to this research: (1) polymer degradation that occurs when polymers are exposed to low earth orbit conditions, and (2) polymer mechanical

  3. Aspects of co-occurring syllables and head nods in spontaneous dialogue Simon Alexanderson, David House, Jonas Beskow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beskow, Jonas

    Aspects of co-occurring syllables and head nods in spontaneous dialogue Simon Alexanderson, David of head nods taken from motion capture data of spontaneous dialogue in Swedish. The head nods were. While the peak rotation of the nod is on average aligned with the stressed syllable, the results show

  4. Water in a Crowd In many situations, form biology to geology, water occurs not as the pure bulk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Water in a Crowd In many situations, form biology to geology, water occurs not as the pure bulk species, and interacting with large organic molecules. In such situations, water does not behave in the same manner as it does in the pure bulk liquid. Water dynamics are fundamental to many processes

  5. In 2005, an outbreak of West Nile virus (WNV) disease occurred in Sacramento County, California; 163 human cas-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    In 2005, an outbreak of West Nile virus (WNV) disease occurred in Sacramento County, California, the Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito and Vector Control District conducted an emergency aerial spray. We determined disease. WNV disease in Sacramento County cost $2.28 million for medical treatment and patients' pro

  6. Recovery systems must save state before a failure occurs to enable the system to recover from the failure. However,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Peter M.

    Abstract Recovery systems must save state before a failure occurs to enable the system to recover from the failure. However, recovery will fail if the recovery system saves any state corrupted by the fault. The frequency and comprehensive- ness of how a recovery system saves state has a major effect

  7. (LNG) production. Volitional selection occurs, for instance, in verbal fluency and verb generation, tasks widely used as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;(LNG) production. Volitional selection occurs, for instance, in verbal fluency and verb attention focusing on incorpo- rating response selection into contemporary models of LNG and speech. One-general processes has important theoretical impli- cations for modelling of spoken LNG behaviour. Contempo- rary

  8. STRESS MANAGEMENT Stress occurs in everyone's life. How stressful something is depends on how we perceive it. Stress is not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    STRESS MANAGEMENT Stress occurs in everyone's life. How stressful something is depends on how we perceive it. Stress is not necessarily a bad thing. It can help to motivate and drive us toward our goals levels of stress can have a negative impact. Medical school is demanding and can cause both prolonged

  9. Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Markus

    © 2009 APS Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology Published online: 17 July 2009 | doi:10 perfect fluid. Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 025301 (2009). | Article |1. Nature Nanotechnology ISSN 1748 : Nature Nanotechnology http://www.nature.com/nnano/reshigh/2009/0709/full/nnano.2009.222.html 1 of 1 18

  10. Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    1 Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future Penn State Natural Gas Utilization Workshop Bradley Hall sales to commercial and industrial customers ­ Natural gas, power, oil · Power generation ­ FossilMMBtuEquivalent Wellhead Gas Price, $/MMBtu Monthly US Spot Oil Price, $/MMBtu* U.S. Crude Oil vs. Natural Gas Prices, 2005

  11. 13.21 Geochemistry of the Rare-Earth Element, Nb, Ta, Hf, and Zr Deposits RL Linnen, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakhmouradian, Anton

    13.21 Geochemistry of the Rare-Earth Element, Nb, Ta, Hf, and Zr Deposits RL Linnen, University of rare metals in natural fluids 551 13.21.2.2.2 Aqueous complexation and mineral solubility 552 13 Acknowledgments 564 References 564 13.21.1 Introduction Rare-element mineral deposits, also called rare-metal

  12. The Big Bang explosion at the start of the Universe was responsible for the production of the light elements hydrogen and helium, along with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, John

    The Big Bang explosion at the start of the Universe was responsible for the production of the light elements hydrogen and helium, along with some fraction of lithium. All of the other elements in nature Galaxy and throughout the Universe were essentially composed of only hydrogen and helium -- no heavy

  13. The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics You are accessing a document...

  14. The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics Authors: Brodsky, Stanley J. ;...

  15. Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element...

  16. Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements You are accessing a document...

  17. Properties of Group Five and Group Seven transactinium elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilk, Philip A.

    2001-01-01

    of Group Five and Group Seven Transactinium Elementsof Group Five and Group Seven Transactinium Elements byof Group Five and Group Seven Transactinium Elements by

  18. Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Discusses progress...

  19. Potential trace element emissions from the gasification of Illinois...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the gasification of Illinois coals. Duplicate determinations of 34 elements in coal and ash samples Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Potential trace element emissions...

  20. Vital Elements Score Comments Introduction/Motivation: Well defined &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    Evaluator: Vital Elements Score Comments · Introduction/Motivation: Well defined & motivated: Resounding, memorable, & address objectives Vital Elements Total Presentation Mechanics · Clarity

  1. OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters; 29 CFR 1960 OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements...

  2. Determination of maximum reactor power level consistent with the requirement that flow reversal occurs without fuel damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, D.V.; Darby, J.L.; Ross, S.B.; Clark, R.A. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1990-04-19

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) operated by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) employs forced downflow for heat removal during normal operation. In the event of total loss of forced flow, the reactor will shutdown and the flow reversal valves open. When the downward core flow becomes sufficiently small then the opposing thermal buoyancy induces flow reversal leading to decay heat removal by natural convection. There is some uncertainty as to whether the natural circulation is adequate for decay heat removal after 60 MW operation. BNL- staff carried out a series of calculations to establish the adequacy of flow reversal to remove decay heat. Their calculations are based on a natural convective CHF model. The primary purpose of the present calculations is to review the accuracy and applicability of Fauske`s CHF model for the HFBR, and the assumptions and methodology employed by BNL-staff to determine the heat removal limit in the HFBR during a flow reversal and natural convection situation.

  3. Spark discharge trace element detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler-Golden, S.; Bernstein, L.S.; Bien, F.

    1988-08-23

    A spark discharge trace element detection system is provided which includes a spark chamber including a pair of electrodes for receiving a sample of gas to be analyzed at no greater than atmospheric pressure. A voltage is provided across the electrodes for generating a spark in the sample. The intensity of the emitted radiation in at least one primary selected narrow band of the radiation is detected. Each primary band corresponds to an element to be detected in the gas. The intensity of the emission in each detected primary band is integrated during the afterglow time interval of the spark emission and a signal representative of the integrated intensity of the emission in each selected primary bond is utilized to determine the concentration of the corresponding element in the gas. 12 figs.

  4. Orthotropic rotation-free thin shell elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munglani, Gautam; Wittel, Falk K; Herrmann, Hans J

    2015-01-01

    A method to simulate orthotropic behaviour in thin shell finite elements is proposed. The approach is based on the transformation of shape function derivatives, resulting in a new orthogonal basis aligned to a specified preferred direction for all elements. This transformation is carried out solely in the undeformed state leaving minimal additional impact on the computational effort expended to simulate orthotropic materials compared to isotropic, resulting in a straightforward and highly efficient implementation. This method is implemented for rotation-free triangular shells using the finite element framework built on the Kirchhoff--Love theory employing subdivision surfaces. The accuracy of this approach is demonstrated using the deformation of a pinched hemispherical shell (with a 18{\\deg} hole) standard benchmark. To showcase the efficiency of this implementation, the wrinkling of orthotropic sheets under shear displacement is analyzed. It is found that orthotropic subdivision shells are able to capture t...

  5. HTGR fuel element structural design considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alloway, R.; Gorholt, W.; Ho, F.; Vollman, R.; Yu, H.

    1986-09-01

    The structural design of the large HTGR prismatic core fuel elements involve the interaction of four engineering disciplines: nuclear physics, thermo-hydraulics, structural and material science. Fuel element stress analysis techniques and the development of structural criteria are discussed in the context of an overview of the entire design process. The core of the proposed 2240 MW(t) HTGR is described as an example where the design process was used. Probabalistic stress analysis techniques coupled with probabalistic risk analysis (PRA) to develop structural criteria to account for uncertainty are described. The PRA provides a means for ensuring that the proposed structural criteria are consistent with plant investment and safety risk goals. The evaluation of cracked fuel elements removed from the Fort St. Vrain reactor in the USA is discussed in the context of stress analysis uncertainty and structural criteria development.

  6. Neutron-capture elements in the metal-poor globular cluster M15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaori Otsuki; Satoshi Honda; Wako Aoki; Toshitaka Kajino; Grant J. Mathews

    2006-03-13

    We report on observations of six giants in the globular cluster M15 (NGC 7078) using the Subaru Telescope to measure neutron-capture elemental abundances. Our abundance analyses based on high-quality blue spectra confirm the star-to-star scatter in the abundances of heavy neutron-capture elements (e.g., Eu), and no significant s-process contribution to them, as was found in previous studies. We have found, for the first time, that there are anti-correlations between the abundance ratios of light to heavy neutron-capture elements ([Y/Eu] and [Zr/Eu]) and heavy ones (e.g., Eu). This indicates that light neutron-capture elements in these stars cannot be explained by only a single r-process. Another process that has significantly contributed to the light neutron-capture elements is required to have occurred in M15. Our results suggest a complicated enrichment history for M15 and its progenitor.

  7. Separations chemistry for f elements: Recent developments and historical perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Choppin, G.R. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-12-31

    With the end of the cold war, the principal mission in actinide separations has changed from production of plutonium to cleanup of the immense volume of moderately radioactive mixed wastes which resulted from fifty years of processing activities. In order to approach the cleanup task from a proper perspective, it is necessary to understand the nature of the problem and how the wastes were generated. In this report, the history of actinide separations, both the basic science and production aspects, is examined. Many of the separations techniques in use today were developed in the 40`s and 50`s for the identification and production of actinide elements. To respond to the modern world of actinide separations new techniques are being developed for separations ranging from analytical methods to detect ultra-trace concentrations (for bioassay and environmental monitoring) to large scale waste treatment procedures. Some of these new methods are ``improvements`` or adaptations of the historical techniques. Total actinide recovery, lanthanide/actinide separations, and selective partitioning of actinides from inert constituents are of primary concern. This report, offers a historical perspective, review the current status of f element separation processes, and suggest areas for continued research in both actinide separations and waste cleanup/environment remediation.

  8. Distributions of off-diagonal scattering matrix elements: Exact results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nock, A. Kumar, S. Sommers, H.-J. Guhr, T.

    2014-03-15

    Scattering is a ubiquitous phenomenon which is observed in a variety of physical systems which span a wide range of length scales. The scattering matrix is the key quantity which provides a complete description of the scattering process. The universal features of scattering in chaotic systems is most generally modeled by the Heidelberg approach which introduces stochasticity to the scattering matrix at the level of the Hamiltonian describing the scattering center. The statistics of the scattering matrix is obtained by averaging over the ensemble of random Hamiltonians of appropriate symmetry. We derive exact results for the distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the off-diagonal scattering matrix elements applicable to orthogonally-invariant and unitarily-invariant Hamiltonians, thereby solving a long standing problem. -- Highlights: •Scattering problem in complex or chaotic systems. •Heidelberg approach to model the chaotic nature of the scattering center. •A novel route to the nonlinear sigma model based on the characteristic function. •Exact results for the distributions of off-diagonal scattering-matrix elements. •Universal aspects of the scattering-matrix fluctuations.

  9. Electrochemical Cells with Intermediate Capacitor Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grebel, Haim

    2015-01-01

    Our goal is to electronically regulate electrochemical cells. For this, we introduced a third element, called the gate, which was placed between the cathode and the anode electrodes of the cell. Voltage applied to this element controlled the local potential of the electrolyte, thus impacting the flow of ions within the cell. The flow of ions was monitored by the electronic current in the external cell's circuit. We provide simulations and experimental data as proof to the validity of this concept. This is but the first step towards a demonstration of a two-dimensional, bi-carrier ion transistors.

  10. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, N.M.; Hawryluk, A.M.; London, R.A.; Seppala, L.G.

    1993-10-26

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed. Thin film embodiments are described. 21 figures.

  11. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

    1995-01-24

    A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

  12. Natural Organobromine in Marine Sediments: New Evidence of Biogeochemical Br Cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A Leri; J Hakala; M Marcus; A Lanzirotti; C Reddy; S Myneni

    2011-12-31

    Organobromine (Br{sub org}) compounds, commonly recognized as persistent, toxic anthropogenic pollutants, are also produced naturally in terrestrial and marine systems. Several enzymatic and abiotic bromination mechanisms have been identified, as well as an array of natural Br{sub org} molecules associated with various marine organisms. The fate of the carbon-bromine functionality in the marine environment, however, remains largely unexplored. Oceanographic studies have noted an association between bromine (Br) and organic carbon (C{sub org}) in marine sediments. Even so, there has been no direct chemical evidence that Br in the sediments exists in a stable form apart from inorganic bromide (Br{sub inorg}), which is widely presumed conservative in marine systems. To investigate the scope of natural Br{sub org} production and its fate in the environment, we probed Br distribution and speciation in estuarine and marine sediments using in situ X-ray spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy. We show that Br{sub org} is ubiquitous throughout diverse sedimentary environments, occurring in correlation with C{sub org} and metals such as Fe, Ca, and Zn. Analysis of sinking particulate carbon from the seawater column links the Br{sub org} observed in sediments to biologically produced Br{sub org} compounds that persist through humification of natural organic matter (NOM). Br speciation varies with sediment depth, revealing biogeochemical cycling of Br between organic and inorganic forms as part of the burial and degradation of NOM. These findings illuminate the chemistry behind the association of Br with Corg in marine sediments and cast doubt on the paradigmatic classification of Br as a conservative element in seawater systems.

  13. Natural Gas Regulatory Policy: Current Issues 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, G.

    1988-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-88-09-56.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 1211 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-88-09-56.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 NATURAL GAS... REGULATORY roLICY: CURRENT ISSUES G. GAIL WATKINS Railroad Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Many changes have occurred in recent months in both federal and state natural gas regulation. Those changes have increased the options of industrial...

  14. An Annotated Reference Guide to the Finite-Element Interface Specification Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan B. Williams; Ivan J. Otero; Kyran D. Mish; Lee M. Tayor; Robert L. Clay

    1999-04-01

    The Finite-Element Interface (FEI) specification provides a layered abstraction that permits finite-element analysis codes to utilize various linear-algebra solution packages with minimal concern for the internal details of the solver modules. Alternatively, this interface can be viewed as a way for solver developers to provide solution services to finite-element clients without having to embed finite-element abstractions within their solver libraries. The purpose of this document is to provide some level of documentation between the bare interface specification itself, which consists only of C/C++ header files, and the full documentation suite that supports the interface definition by providing considerable detail as to its design and implementation. This document primarily provides the ''how'' of calling the interface member functions, so that programmers can readily learn how to utilize the interface implementation without having to consider all the details contained in the interface's definition, design, and motivation. The interface specification is presented three times in this document, each time with an increasing level of detail. The first presentation provides a general overview of the calling sequence, in order to acquaint the programmer with a basic introduction to how the interface is used to ''train'' the underlying solver software on the particular finite-element problem that is to be solved. The second pass through the interface definition provides considerable detail on each method, including specific considerations as to the structure of the underlying data, and an exposition of potential pitfalls that may occur as a byproduct of either the finite-element modeling process, or of the use of the associated interface implementation. Finally, a third description of the interface is given implicitly via the discussion of sample problems that provide concrete examples of the use of the finite-element interface.

  15. The impact of co-occurring tree and grassland species on carbon sequestration and potential biofuel production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    for terrestrial carbon sequestration and potential biofuel production. For P. strobus, above- ground plant carbonThe impact of co-occurring tree and grassland species on carbon sequestration and potential biofuel production R A M E S H L A U N G A N I and J O H A N N E S M . H . K N O P S School of Biological Sciences

  16. Synthetic and Biosynthetic Studies of Natural Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ve?liz Chanis, Eduardo Alberto

    1992-05-01

    of 4-Demethoxy -A-Homodaunorubicin Analogs Part II. Biosynthesis of Coloradocin. Origin of the Carbons Part III. Total Synthesis of the Naturally Occurring Prenylated Bibenzyl Amorfrutin A Eduardo Alberto Veliz Chanis B.S., University of Panama... to the intractable behavior of some of the intermediates. Part II describes the elucidation of the biosynthesis of coloradocin by the use of stable isotopes. The major carbon chain is polyketide and derived from acetate-propionate and methionine as shown...

  17. ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature11247 An integrated encyclopedia of DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature11247 An integrated encyclopedia of DNA elements in the human genome majority of its nearly three billion bases is unknown. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project sequence provides the underlying code for human biology. Despite intensive study, especially in identifying

  18. Finite element approximation of coupled seismic and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    zyserman

    seismic and electromagnetic waves in gas hydrate-bearing sediments ..... water and natural gas, mainly methane, which form under certain conditions of low ...

  19. A NONCONFORMING MIXED FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-10-30

    Their natural sources are electric storms and solar wind fluctuations that generate electromagnetic waves in the ionosphere. These waves arrive at the earth's.

  20. The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

    1950-06-19

    Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

  1. Measuring Sparticles with the Matrix Element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johan Alwall; Ayres Freitas; Olivier Mattelaer

    2009-10-16

    We apply the Matrix Element Method (MEM) to mass determination of squark pair production with direct decay to quarks and LSP at the LHC, showing that simultaneous mass determination of squarks and LSP is possible. We furthermore propose methods for inclusion of QCD radiation effects in the MEM.

  2. Combining QCD Matrix Elements and Parton Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. Webber

    2000-05-04

    A new method for combining QCD matrix elements and parton showers in Monte Carlo simulations of hadronic final states is outlined. The aim is to provide at least a leading-order description of all hard multi-jet configurations together with jet fragmentation to next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy, while avoiding the most serious problems of double counting.

  3. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2004-11-22

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  4. Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences by Greta J. Orris1 and Richard I. Grauch2 Open Table 1. Rare earth mineral codes and associated mineral names.......................................................................................6 Table 2. Non-rare earth mineral codes and associated mineral names

  5. Plutonium-the element of surprise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Plutonium-the element of surprise G.R.ChoppinandB.E.Stout This year marked the soth annivrsary ol the original isolation o{ plutonium, making ita relativenewcomerto the PeriodicTable.Ovrthe past 50 years plutonium has become more familiar to tho generslpublic than manyothor,olderelem6nts

  6. Natural materials for carbon capture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2010-11-01

    Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, carbon dioxide. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating carbon dioxide in the interlayer of layered clays but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation.

  7. TRED: a Transcriptional Regulatory Element Database and a platform for in silico gene regulation studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    regulatory elements. They include cis-elements, such as promoters and trans-elements, such as transcription

  8. EIA - Natural Gas Publications

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    these data from 2005 to 2009 are presented for each State. (12282010) U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves: 2009 National and State...

  9. Supervisory Natural Gas Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energys Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply (FE) is responsible for regulating natural gas imports and exports...

  10. Natural gas annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

  11. A boundary element technique for incremental, non-linear elasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigoni, Davide

    structural elements, including seismic insulators and rubber bearings [9,18]. Referring to plane strain

  12. Potential trace element emissions from the gasification of Illinois...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GASIFICATION PLANTS; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; ACTIVATION ANALYSIS; AIR POLLUTION; BERYLLIUM; COAL GASIFICATION; ELEMENTS; FLOWSHEETS; FLUORESCENCE...

  13. ECI 212A: Finite Element Procedures in Applied Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    ), "The Finite Element Method: Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element Analysis," Prentice), "Concepts and Appli- cations of Finite Element Analysis," 4th Ed., John Wiley and Sons, NY. 5. M. S, Philadelphia, PA. 6. G. Strang and G. J. Fix (1973), "An Analysis of the Finite Element Method," Prentice

  14. Finite Element Analysis in Functional BRIAN G. RICHMOND,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finite Element Analysis in Functional Morphology BRIAN G. RICHMOND,1 * BARTH W. WRIGHT,1 IAN GROSSE element analysis. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: finite-element analysis; mastication; primates; biome This article reviews the fundamental principles of the finite element method and the three basic steps (model

  15. Modeling Elastic Properties in Finite-Element Analysis: How Much

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Elastic Properties in Finite- Element Analysis: How Much Precision Is Needed to Produce analysis was investigated using a finite-element model of a Macaca fascicularis skull. Four finite-element realistically using the orthotropic elastic properties employed in analysis 4. Results suggest that finite-element

  16. Techniques for Modeling Muscle-Induced Forces in Finite Element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumont, Elizabeth R.

    program was written to interface with a commercial finite element analysis tool to automatically apply: finite element analysis; muscle force; skull; muscle loading alogorithm, biting Finite element analysisTechniques for Modeling Muscle- Induced Forces in Finite Element Models of Skeletal Structures IAN

  17. Scalability Analysis of Partitioning Strategies for Finite Element Graphs. \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    Scalability Analysis of Partitioning Strategies for Finite Element Graphs. \\Lambda Grama Y. Ananth Y. Grama ananth@cs:umn:edu Abstract Issues of partitioning Finite Element Graphs are central for implementing the Finite Element Method (FEM). Parallel formulations of finite element techniques require

  18. Math/AMath 595: Finite Element Methods (Winter 2001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, William

    for Elliptic Problems by Philippe G. Ciarlet (1978). 3. An Analysis of the Finite Element Method by GilbertMath/AMath 595: Finite Element Methods (Winter 2001) Lectures: MW 3:30{4:50, room 121 RAI Professor Element Methods by Susanne C. Brenner and L. Ridgway Scott (1994). 2. The Finite Element Method

  19. Study of the vacuum matrix element of products of parafields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. W. Greenberg; A. K. Mishra

    2009-09-30

    We study the vacuum matrix elements of products of parafields using graphical and combinatorial methods.

  20. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  1. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-17

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  2. Non destructive multi elemental analysis using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis techniques: Preliminary results for concrete sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahing, Lahasen Normanshah [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia), Bangi 43000, Kajang (Malaysia); Yahya, Redzuan [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Yahya, Roslan; Hassan, Hearie [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia), Bangi 43000, Kajang (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    In this study, principle of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis has been used as a technique to determine the elements in the sample. The system consists of collimated isotopic neutron source, Cf-252 with HPGe detector and Multichannel Analysis (MCA). Concrete with size of 10×10×10 cm{sup 3} and 15×15×15 cm{sup 3} were analysed as sample. When neutrons enter and interact with elements in the concrete, the neutron capture reaction will occur and produce characteristic prompt gamma ray of the elements. The preliminary result of this study demonstrate the major element in the concrete was determined such as Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Fe and H as well as others element, such as Cl by analysis the gamma ray lines respectively. The results obtained were compared with NAA and XRF techniques as a part of reference and validation. The potential and the capability of neutron induced prompt gamma as tool for multi elemental analysis qualitatively to identify the elements present in the concrete sample discussed.

  3. Renewable Natural Gas (Biomethane)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    to Landfill Owner $6.18 Total Cost Per MMBtu #12;Index Price of Natural Gas NYMEX Natural Gas Futures PricesRenewable Natural Gas (Biomethane) #12;Critical Barriers Impeding RNG as a Transportation Fuel-developer of largest RNG production project in U.S. at McCommas Bluff Landfill in Dallas, Texas · Chairman and co

  4. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. C. Kwon

    2006-09-30

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2} in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives using a monolithic catalyst reactor, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 40-560 seconds at 120-150 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperatures, total pressure, space time, and catalyst regeneration on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,600-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,800-2,000 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 23-27 v% hydrogen, 36-41 v% CO, 10-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 30-180 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-150 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 40-210 psia. The molar ratio of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} in the monolithic catalyst reactor is mai

  5. Ferroelectric tunneling element and memory applications which utilize the tunneling element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalinin, Sergei V. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Christen, Hans M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Baddorf, Arthur P. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Meunier, Vincent (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Lee, Ho Nyung (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-20

    A tunneling element includes a thin film layer of ferroelectric material and a pair of dissimilar electrically-conductive layers disposed on opposite sides of the ferroelectric layer. Because of the dissimilarity in composition or construction between the electrically-conductive layers, the electron transport behavior of the electrically-conductive layers is polarization dependent when the tunneling element is below the Curie temperature of the layer of ferroelectric material. The element can be used as a basis of compact 1R type non-volatile random access memory (RAM). The advantages include extremely simple architecture, ultimate scalability and fast access times generic for all ferroelectric memories.

  6. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Orland Park, IL); Fischer, Donald F. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1989-01-01

    A process for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR).

  7. Analysis of delamination growth with discontinuous finite elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remmers, Joris J C; Wells, G N; De Borst, R

    of the incorporated interface elements is examined by means of a three point bending test. Conventional interface elements suffer from spurious stress oscillations for high ratios of dummy stiffnesses and the Young’s modulus of the continuum elements [2... than conventional interface elements, especially when geometrically nonlinearities are incorporated. Furthermore, the ele- ments can still be used in unstructured meshes. In the remainder of this paper, we will refer to this element type...

  8. BULLETIN OF TPHEUNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. 7 some lossbs will generally occur. Mr. Blackford, previously to this, had

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , wrote thus to me: cL WOOD'S HOLL,MASS., July 16,1886. "1am happy to report the success of the latest a special messenger along with them, and he hasjust returned, reporting their safearrival at that point propagation and the points at Which natural sources of rW3Upply need re-enforcement by artificial

  9. Nature Publishing Group Site Licenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Biotechnology Nature Cell Biology Nature Chemical Biology Nature Chemistry Nature Climate Change Nature Journal of Financial Services Marketing Journal of Information Technology Journal of Information Technology Teaching Cases Journal of International Business Studies Journal of International Relations

  10. Symposium Summary Drawn from Closing Remarks Natural Systems Are a Key Element of Climate Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    . We talked about everything from the American Pika, to grass-fed beef, to high speed rail Report. He did not shy away from controversial topics and made the case that high speed rail

  11. Material Nature Versus Structural Nurture: The Embodied Carbon of Fundamental Structural Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathre, Roger

    2013-01-01

    A. Edwards S. Life-Cycle Assessment in Building andessential step in life-cycle assessment (LCA). Purnell usesand that detailed life-cycle assessment should reveal these

  12. Material Nature Versus Structural Nurture: The Embodied Carbon of Fundamental Structural Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathre, Roger

    2013-01-01

    products in comparative LCA: A literature review. Int. J.step in life-cycle assessment (LCA). Purnell uses structuralfield of building materials LCA has progressed well beyond

  13. Analysis of thermal fields generated by natural fires on the structural elements of tall buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capote, Jorge A; Alvear, Daniel; Lazaro, Mariano; Espina, Pablo; Fletcher, Ian A; Welch, Stephen; Torero, Jose L

    The Windsor Tower in Madrid was involved in a major fire, on 12-13 February 2005, which caused extensive structural damage to the upper floors of the building. This fire has provoked intense interest amongst researchers ...

  14. New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172Year JanDecade Year-0Withdrawals

  15. New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172Year JanDecade Year-0WithdrawalsIndustrial

  16. New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172Year JanDecade

  17. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172YearDecade

  18. New York Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunPrice

  19. U.S. Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of the NationalSalesof Others (Percent) % ofDecade Year-0

  20. U.S. Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of the NationalSalesof Others (Percent) % ofDecade

  1. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of the NationalSalesof(Million Barrels)ReceiptsCommercial

  2. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of the NationalSalesof(MillionIndustrial Consumers (Number of

  3. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of the NationalSalesof(MillionIndustrial Consumers (Number

  4. ARTICLE OPEN doi:10.1038/nature13992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    ARTICLE OPEN doi:10.1038/nature13992 A comparative encyclopedia of DNA elements in the mouse genome into mammalian biology and mechanisms of human diseases. Despite the widespread use of mouse models in biomedical biological pathways show consider- able divergence from their human orthologues. . A large portion of the cis-regulato

  5. NATURE MATERIALS | VOL 12 | MARCH 2013 | www.nature.com/naturematerials 191 very technology is intimately related to a particular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    elements, and, if needed in large quanti- ties, should be made of cheap raw materials. As such, searchingNATURE MATERIALS | VOL 12 | MARCH 2013 | www.nature.com/naturematerials 191 E very technology is intimately related to a particular materials set. The steam engines that powered the industrial revolution

  6. How Powerful Are Elements? An Evaluation of the Adequacy of Element Thory in Phonological Representations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yun-Ling

    2010-08-31

    In this dissertation, I resume the discussion of privative features as a notational device in segmental representation. I argue from both theoretical and empirical perspectives that element theory is a better theory of ...

  7. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, P.P.; Smatlak, D.L.; Cohn, D.R.; Wittle, J.K.; Titus, C.H.; Surma, J.E.

    1995-12-26

    Microwave-induced plasma is described for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. 3 figs.

  8. Automation of the matrix element reweighting method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Artoisenet; V. Lemaître; F. Maltoni; O. Mattelaer

    2011-02-01

    Matrix element reweighting is a powerful experimental technique widely employed to maximize the amount of information that can be extracted from a collider data set. We present a procedure that allows to automatically evaluate the weights for any process of interest in the standard model and beyond. Given the initial, intermediate and final state particles, and the transfer functions for the final physics objects, such as leptons, jets, missing transverse energy, our algorithm creates a phase-space mapping designed to efficiently perform the integration of the squared matrix element and the transfer functions. The implementation builds up on MadGraph, it is completely automatized and publicly available. A few sample applications are presented that show the capabilities of the code and illustrate the possibilities for new studies that such an approach opens up.

  9. Electric dipole moments of superheavy elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radži?t?, Laima; Jönsson, Per; Biero?, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) method was employed to calculate atomic electric dipole moments (EDM) of the superheavy element copernicium (Cn, $Z=112$). The EDM enhancement factors of Cn, here calculated for the first time, are about one order of magnitude larger than those of Hg. The exponential dependence of enhancement factors on atomic number $Z$ along group 12 of the periodic table was derived from the EDMs of the entire homolog series, $^{69}_{30}$Zn, $^{111}_{\\phantom{1}48}$Cd, $^{199}_{\\phantom{1}80}$Hg, $^{285}_{112}$Cn, and $^{482}_{162}$Uhb. These results show that superheavy elements with sufficiently large half-lives are good candidates for EDM searches.

  10. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul P. (4 Ledgewood Dr., Bedford, MA 01730); Smatlak, Donna L. (10 Village Hill Rd., Belmont, MA 02178); Cohn, Daniel R. (26 Walnut Hill Rd., Chestnut Hill, MA 02167); Wittle, J. Kenneth (1740 Conestoga Rd., Chester Springs, PA 19425); Titus, Charles H. (323 Echo Valley La., Newton Square, PA 19072); Surma, Jeffrey E. (806 Brian La., Kennewick, WA 99337)

    1995-01-01

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury.

  11. Trace element concentrations in melanotic swine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, R.M.; Parkinson, T.F.; Veit, H.P.

    1983-10-01

    A number of investigations have been made on the role of certain trace elements in oncogenesis. In prior work, it was found that manganese and zinc concentrations in human skin cancers differed markedly from the values in normal tissue./sub 1/ The purpose of the present research was to determine trace element concentrations in skin and other tissues of normal and melanotic miniature swine. In-vivo determinations of skin tissue were carried out using x-ray fluorescence analysis (XRFA) while tissue biopsies were measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). If significant differences between normal and cancerous skin tissues can be established, the former method should prove valuable as a rapid noninvasive diagnostic method.

  12. Dual Polynomials for Collision and Element Distinctness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Bun; Justin Thaler

    2015-03-25

    The approximate degree of a Boolean function $f: \\{-1, 1\\}^n \\to \\{-1, 1\\}$ is the minimum degree of a real polynomial that approximates $f$ to within error $1/3$ in the $\\ell_\\infty$ norm. In an influential result, Aaronson and Shi (J. ACM 2004) proved tight $\\tilde{\\Omega}(n^{1/3})$ and $\\tilde{\\Omega}(n^{2/3})$ lower bounds on the approximate degree of the Collision and Element Distinctness functions, respectively. Their proof was non-constructive, using a sophisticated symmetrization argument and tools from approximation theory. More recently, several open problems in the study of approximate degree have been resolved via the construction of dual polynomials. These are explicit dual solutions to an appropriate linear program that captures the approximate degree of any function. We reprove Aaronson and Shi's results by constructing explicit dual polynomials for the Collision and Element Distinctness functions.

  13. NATURAL CONVECTION IN ROOM GEOMETRIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, A.; Bauman, Fred; Kammerud, R.; Ruberg, K.

    1980-06-01

    Computer programs have been developed to numerically simulate natural convection in room geometries in two and three dimensions. The programs have been validated using published data from the literature, results from a full-scale experiment performed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and results from a small-scale experiment reported here. One of the computer programs has been used to study the influence of natural convection on the thermal performance of a single thermal zone in a direct-gain passive solar building. The results indicate that the building heating loads calculated by standard building energy analysis methods may be in error by as much as 50% as a result of their use of common assumptions regarding the convection processes which occur in an enclosure. It is also found that the convective heat transfer coefficients between the air and the enclosure surfaces can be substantially different from the values assumed in the standard building energy analysis methods, and can exhibit significant variations across a given surface.

  14. Closed formula for the matrix elements of the volume operator in canonical quantum gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Thiemann

    1996-06-29

    We derive a closed formula for the matrix elements of the volume operator for canonical Lorentzian quantum gravity in four spacetime dimensions in the continuum in a spin-network basis. We also display a new technique of regularization which is state dependent but we are forced to it in order to maintain diffeomorphism covariance and in that sense it is natural. We arrive naturally at the expression for the volume operator as defined by Ashtekar and Lewandowski up to a state independent factor.

  15. Circuit level modeling of inductive elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muyshondt, G.P.; Portnoy, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Design and analysis of spacecraft power systems have been difficult to perform because of the lack of circuit level models for nonlinear inductive elements. This paper reviews some of the models which have been proposed, their limitations, and applications. An improved saturation dependent model will be described. The model has been implemented in SPICE and with a commercial circuit program and demonstrated to be satisfactory in both implementations. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Nuclear fuel elements made from nanophase materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heubeck, Norman B. (Schenectady, NY)

    1998-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core fuel element is composed of nanophase high temperature materials. An array of the fuel elements in rod form are joined in an open geometry fuel cell that preferably also uses such nanophase materials for the cell structures. The particular high temperature nanophase fuel element material must have the appropriate mechanical characteristics to avoid strain related failure even at high temperatures, in the order of about 3000.degree. F. Preferably, the reactor type is a pressurized or boiling water reactor and the nanophase material is a high temperature ceramic or ceramic composite. Nanophase metals, or nanophase metals with nanophase ceramics in a composite mixture, also have desirable characteristics, although their temperature capability is not as great as with all-ceramic nanophase material. Combinations of conventional or nanophase metals and conventional or nanophase ceramics can be employed as long as there is at least one nanophase material in the composite. The nuclear reactor so constructed has a number of high strength fuel particles, a nanophase structural material for supporting a fuel rod at high temperature, a configuration to allow passive cooling in the event of a primary cooling system failure, an ability to retain a coolable geometry even at high temperatures, an ability to resist generation of hydrogen gas, and a configuration having good nuclear, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics.

  17. Nuclear fuel elements having a composite cladding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Gerald M. (Fremont, CA); Cowan, II, Robert L. (Fremont, CA); Davies, John H. (San Jose, CA)

    1983-09-20

    An improved nuclear fuel element is disclosed for use in the core of nuclear reactors. The improved nuclear fuel element has a composite cladding of an outer portion forming a substrate having on the inside surface a metal layer selected from the group consisting of copper, nickel, iron and alloys of the foregoing with a gap between the composite cladding and the core of nuclear fuel. The nuclear fuel element comprises a container of the elongated composite cladding, a central core of a body of nuclear fuel material disposed in and partially filling the container and forming an internal cavity in the container, an enclosure integrally secured and sealed at each end of said container and a nuclear fuel material retaining means positioned in the cavity. The metal layer of the composite cladding prevents perforations or failures in the cladding substrate from stress corrosion cracking or from fuel pellet-cladding interaction or both. The substrate of the composite cladding is selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably is a zirconium alloy.

  18. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria (Winchester, MA); Liu, Wei (Cambridge, MA)

    1995-01-01

    A catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(OF.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1)n].sub.1-k M.sub.k, [(FO.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1.5).sub.n ].sub.1-k M.sub.k, or [Ln.sub.x Zr.sub.1-x O.sub.2-0.5x ].sub.1-k M.sub.k wherein FO.sub.2 is a fluorite-type oxide; RO represents an alkaline earth oxide; RO.sub.1.5 is a Group IIIB or rare earth oxide; Ln is a rare earth element having an atomic number from 57 to 65 or mixtures thereof; M is a transition metal or a mixture of transition metals; n is a number having a value from 0.0 to 0.35; k is a number having a value from 0.0 to about 0.5; and x is a number having a value from about 0.45 to about 0.55.

  19. Nuclear fuel elements made from nanophase materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heubeck, N.B.

    1998-09-08

    A nuclear reactor core fuel element is composed of nanophase high temperature materials. An array of the fuel elements in rod form are joined in an open geometry fuel cell that preferably also uses such nanophase materials for the cell structures. The particular high temperature nanophase fuel element material must have the appropriate mechanical characteristics to avoid strain related failure even at high temperatures, in the order of about 3000 F. Preferably, the reactor type is a pressurized or boiling water reactor and the nanophase material is a high temperature ceramic or ceramic composite. Nanophase metals, or nanophase metals with nanophase ceramics in a composite mixture, also have desirable characteristics, although their temperature capability is not as great as with all-ceramic nanophase material. Combinations of conventional or nanophase metals and conventional or nanophase ceramics can be employed as long as there is at least one nanophase material in the composite. The nuclear reactor so constructed has a number of high strength fuel particles, a nanophase structural material for supporting a fuel rod at high temperature, a configuration to allow passive cooling in the event of a primary cooling system failure, an ability to retain a coolable geometry even at high temperatures, an ability to resist generation of hydrogen gas, and a configuration having good nuclear, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics. 5 figs.

  20. Discrete Element Crowd Model for Pedestrian Evacuation Through an Exit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Peng; Lo, Siuming

    2015-01-01

    A series of accidents caused by crowd within the last decades evoked a lot of scientific interest in modeling the movement of pedestrian crowds. Based on discrete element method, a granular dynamic model, in which human body is simplified as self-driven sphere, is proposed to simulate the characteristics of crowd flow through an exit. In this model, the repulsive force among people is considered to have an anisotropic feature, and the physical contact force due to body deformation is quantified by the Hertz contact model. The movement of human body is simulated by applying the second Newton's law. The crowd flow through an exit at different desired velocities is studied and simulation results indicated that crowd flow exhibits three distinct states, i.e., smooth state, transition state and phase separation state. In the simulation, clogging phenomenon occurs more easily when the velocity of desired is high and the exit may as a result be totally blocked at a desired velocity of 1.6m/s or above, leading to fas...

  1. Kentucky Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky

  2. Alaska Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers4.32Elements) Gas and GasThousand

  3. Alaska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers4.32Elements) Gas and GasThousandDecade

  4. Alaska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers4.32Elements) Gas and

  5. Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3+Elements) Gas6 FebruaryCubic

  6. Note: Portable rare-earth element analyzer using pyroelectric crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imashuku, Susumu, E-mail: imashuku.susumu.2m@kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fuyuno, Naoto; Hanasaki, Kohei; Kawai, Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    We report a portable rare-earth element analyzer with a palm-top size chamber including the electron source of a pyroelectric crystal and the sample stage utilizing cathodoluminescence (CL) phenomenon. The portable rare-earth element analyzer utilizing CL phenomenon is the smallest reported so far. The portable rare-earth element analyzer detected the rare-earth elements Dy, Tb, Er, and Sm of ppm order in zircon, which were not detected by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. We also performed an elemental mapping of rare-earth elements by capturing a CL image using CCD camera.

  7. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  8. Natural gas annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

  9. Natural gas dehydration apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Ng, Alvin; Mairal, Anurag P

    2006-11-07

    A process and corresponding apparatus for dehydrating gas, especially natural gas. The process includes an absorption step and a membrane pervaporation step to regenerate the liquid sorbent.

  10. Natural Resources Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration, Corporate Services Office, Office of the Chief Operating Officer, Natural...

  11. Review: Manufacturing National Park Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Review: Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography,Canada Cronin, J. Keri. Manufacturing National Park Nature:J. Keri Cronin’s book Manufacturing National Park Nature

  12. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. C. Kwon

    2007-09-30

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 130-156 seconds at 120-140 C to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases, evaluate removal capabilities of hydrogen sulfide and COS from coal gases with formulated catalysts, and develop an economic regeneration method of deactivated catalysts. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,300-3,800-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-1,900 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-21 v% hydrogen, 29-34 v% CO, 8-10 v% CO{sub 2}, 5-18 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 114-132 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-140 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 116-129 psia. The molar ratio of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} in the monolithic catalyst reactor is

  13. Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.C. Kwon

    2009-09-30

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash coat, and catalytic metals, to develop a regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor. The task of developing kinetic rate equations and modeling the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants will be abandoned since formulation of catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS is being in progress. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 46-570 seconds under reaction conditions to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases and evaluate their capabilities in reducing hydrogen sulfide and COS in coal gases. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,200-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-20,000-ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-27 v% hydrogen, 29-41 v% CO, 8-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of simulated coal gas mixtures to the reactor are 30 - 180 cm{sup 3}/min at 1 atm and 25 C (SCCM). The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-155 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 40-210 psia. The molar ratio

  14. Apparatus and method for heterodyne-generated two-dimensional detector array using a single element detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strauss, C.E.

    1997-11-18

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for heterodyne-generated, two-dimensional detector array using a single detector. Synthetic-array heterodyne detection, permits a single-element optical detector to behave as though it were divided into an array of separate heterodyne detector elements. A fifteen-element synthetic array has successfully been experimentally realized on a single-element detector, permitting all of the array elements to be read out continuously and in parallel from one electrical connection. A CO{sub 2} laser and a single-element HgCdTe photodiode are employed. A different heterodyne local oscillator frequency is incident upon the spatially resolvable regions of the detector surface. Thus, different regions are mapped to different heterodyne beat frequencies. One can determine where the photons were incident on the detector surface even though a single electrical connection to the detector is used. This also prevents the destructive interference that occurs when multiple speckles are imaged (similar to spatial diversity), In coherent LIDAR this permits a larger field of view. An acoustooptic modulator generates the local oscillator frequencies and can achieve adequate spatial separation of optical frequencies of the order of a megahertz apart. 4 figs.

  15. Apparatus and method for heterodyne-generated two-dimensional detector array using a single element detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strauss, Charlie E. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus and method for heterodyne-generated, two-dimensional detector array using a single detector. Synthetic-array heterodyne detection, permits a single-element optical detector to behave as though it were divided into an array of separate heterodyne detector elements. A fifteen-element synthetic array has successfully been experimentally realized on a single-element detector, permitting all of the array elements to be read out continuously and in parallel from one electrical connection. A CO.sub.2 laser and a single-element HgCdTe photodiode are employed. A different heterodyne local oscillator frequency is incident upon the spatially resolvable regions of the detector surface. Thus, different regions are mapped to different heterodyne beat frequencies. One can determine where the photons were incident on the detector surface even though a single electrical connection to the detector is used. This also prevents the destructive interference that occurs when multiple speckles are imaged (similar to spatial diversity), In coherent LIDAR this permits a larger field of view. An acoustooptic modulator generates the local oscillator frequencies and can achieve adequate spatial separation of optical frequencies of the order of a megahertz apart.

  16. Discrete Elements Method: A New Kind of Initial Conditions - Tetrahedral Packing of Balls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark A. Tsayger

    2014-12-15

    The Paper discusses the use of the regular packing of identical balls with the coordination number 4 as a model of a medium consisting of fluid and solid particles in the conditions of fluidization. It is proposed to use the examined packing of balls as an initial condition for the calculations by the Discrete Elements Method (DEM) in technological processes in the fluidized bed in industry, as well as in the modeling of processes that occur in hydraulic and pneumatic transport of granular materials. Filtration properties of such packing required for its use as an initial condition in calculations by DEM are estimated.

  17. Discrete Elements Method: A New Kind of Initial Conditions - Tetrahedral Packing of Balls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark A. Tsayger

    2015-10-13

    The Paper discusses the use of the regular packing of identical balls with the coordination number 4 as a model of a medium consisting of fluid and solid particles in the conditions of fluidization. It is proposed to use the examined packing of balls as an initial condition for the calculations by the Discrete Elements Method (DEM) in technological processes in the fluidized bed in industry, as well as in the modeling of processes that occur in hydraulic and pneumatic transport of granular materials. Filtration properties of such packing required for its use as an initial condition in calculations by DEM are estimated.

  18. Pyrometallurgical processes for recovery of actinide elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battles, J.E.; Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C.; Miller, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    A metallic fuel alloy, nominally U-20-Pu-lOZr, is the key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Metallic fuel permits the use of an innovative, simple pyrometallurgical process, known as pyroprocessing, (the subject of this report), which features fused salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Electrorefining separates the actinide elements from fission products, without producing a separate stream of plutonium. The plutonium-bearing product is contaminated with higher actinides and with a minor amount of rare earth fission products, making it diversion resistant while still suitable as a fuel material in the fast spectrum of the IFR core. The engineering-scale demonstration of this process will be conducted in the refurbished EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility, which has entered the start-up phase. An additional pyrometallurgical process is under development for extracting transuranic (TRU) elements from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel in a form suitable for use as a feed to the IFR fuel cycle. Four candidate extraction processes have been investigated and shown to be chemically feasible. The main steps in each process are oxide reduction with calcium or lithium, regeneration of the reductant and recycle of the salt, and separation of the TRU product from the bulk uranium. Two processes, referred to as the lithium and salt transport (calcium reductant) processes, have been selected for engineering-scale demonstration, which is expected to start in late 1993. An integral part of pyroprocessing development is the treatment and packaging of high-level waste materials arising from the operations, along with the qualification of these waste forms for disposal in a geologic repository.

  19. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

  20. A Note on the Finite Element Method with Singular Basis Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaneko, Hideaki

    finite element analysis that incorporates singular element functions. A need for introducing * *some singular elements as part of basis functions in certain finite element analysis arises o* *ut A Note on the Finite Element Method with Singular Basis