Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock  

SciTech Connect

As repositories for CO? and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air–water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Experimentally determined rock-fluid interactions applicable to a natural hot-dry-rock geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The field program cnsists of experiments in which hot rock of low permeability is hydraulically fractured between two wellbores. Water is circulated from one well to the other through the fractured hot rock. Our field experiments are designed to test reservoir engineering parameters such as heat-extraction rates, water-loss rates, flow characteristics including impedance and buoyancy, seismic activity, and fluid chemistry. Laboratory experiments were designed to provide information on the mineral-water reactivity encountered during the field program. Two experimental circulation systems tested the rates of dissolution and alteration during dynamic flow. Solubility of rock in agitated systems was studied. Moreover, pure minerals, samples of the granodiorite from the actual reservoir, and Tijeras Canyon granite have been reacted with distilled water and various solutions of NaCl, NaOH, and Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. The results of these experimental systems are compared to the observations made in field experiments done within the hot dry rock reservoir at a depth of approximately 3 km where the initial rock temperature was 150 to 200/sup 0/C.

Charles, R.W.; Grigsby, C.O.; Holley, C.E. Jr.; Tester, J.W.; Blatz, L.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Life on the Bottom of a Stream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on the Bottom of a Stream on the Bottom of a Stream Nature Bulletin No. 690 October 20, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist LIFE ON THE BOTTOM OF A STREAM A stream conceals a teeming world of bottom-dwelling animals that are the food supply for all stream fish and a source of live bait for catching them. Raccoons, mink, muskrats, ducks, shore birds, turtles and frogs hunt here for mussels, snails, crayfish and aquatic insects. These insects, after passing their young stages on the stream bottom, emerge as swarms of flying adults devoured by dozens of kinds of song birds. These, too, are the insects that fly fishermen imitate in making their artificial lures. Streams of all sizes have about the same kinds of bottom animals, whether a brook small enough to be stepped across or the mile-wide Mississippi. The greatest differences are found when the populations from different types of bottom are compared -- rock, gravel, sand and mud. These main types result from the sorting action of the water, especially during floods. Rock bottom is found in the fastest water because all smaller materials are swept downstream. As the current becomes slower the gravel, then the sand, and finally the mud, settle out.

4

Production of 239 Pu from a natural Uranium disk and "hot" rock using a neutron howitzer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A neutron howitzer was used to produce 239Np from the targets of natural U and a hot rock. An intrinsic Germanium detector enabled the observations of the gamma rays in the decay of 239Np and a determination of its half life of 2.3 days. This shows that 239Pu had been produced in both targets

Steiner, Joseph; De Marco, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Production of 239 Pu from a natural Uranium disk and "hot" rock using a neutron howitzer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A neutron howitzer was used to produce 239Np from the targets of natural U and a hot rock. An intrinsic Germanium detector enabled the observations of the gamma rays in the decay of 239Np and a determination of its half life of 2.3 days. This shows that 239Pu had been produced in both targets

Joseph Steiner; Aaron Anderson; Michael De Marco

2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

6

Commercial potential of natural gas storage in lined rock caverns (LRC)  

SciTech Connect

The geologic conditions in many regions of the United States will not permit the development of economical high-deliverability gas storage in salt caverns. These regions include the entire Eastern Seaboard; several northern states, notably Minnesota and Wisconsin; many of the Rocky Mountain States; and most of the Pacific Northwest. In late 1997, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Federal Energy Technology Center engaged Sofregaz US to investigate the commercialization potential of natural gas storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC). Sofregaz US teamed with Gaz de France and Sydkraft, who had formed a consortium, called LRC, to perform the study for the USDOE. Underground storage of natural gas is generally achieved in depleted oil and gas fields, aquifers, and solution-mined salt caverns. These storage technologies require specific geologic conditions. Unlined rock caverns have been used for decades to store hydrocarbons - mostly liquids such as crude oil, butane, and propane. The maximum operating pressure in unlined rock caverns is limited, since the host rock is never entirely impervious. The LRC technology allows a significant increase in the maximum operating pressure over the unlined storage cavern concept, since the gas in storage is completely contained with an impervious liner. The LRC technology has been under development in Sweden by Sydkraft since 1987. The development process has included extensive technical studies, laboratory testing, field tests, and most recently includes a storage facility being constructed in southern Sweden (Skallen). The LRC development effort has shown that the concept is technically and economically viable. The Skallen storage facility will have a rock cover of 115 meters (375 feet), a storage volume of 40,000 cubic meters (250,000 petroleum barrels), and a maximum operating pressure of 20 MPa (2,900 psi). There is a potential for commercialization of the LRC technology in the United States. Two regions were studied in some detail - the Northeast and the Southeast. The investment cost for an LRC facility in the Northeast is approximately $182 million and $343 million for a 2.6-billion cubic foot (bcf) working gas facility and a 5.2-bcf working gas storage facility, respectively. The relatively high investment cost is a strong function of the cost of labor in the Northeast. The labor union-related rules and requirements in the Northeast result in much higher underground construction costs than might result in Sweden, for example. The LRC technology gas storage service is compared to other alternative technologies. The LRC technology gas storage service was found to be competitive with other alternative technologies for a variety of market scenarios.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

A New Natural Gamma Radiation Measurement System for Marine Sediment and Rock Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new high-efficiency and low-background system for the measurement of natural gamma radioactivity in marine sediment and rock cores retrieved from beneath the seabed was designed, built, and installed on the JOIDES Resolution research vessel. The system includes eight large NaI(Tl) detectors that measure adjacent intervals of the core simultaneously, maximizing counting times and minimizing statistical error for the limited measurement times available during drilling expeditions. Effect to background ratio is maximized with passive lead shielding, including both ordinary and low-activity lead. Large-area plastic scintillator active shielding filters background associated with the high-energy part of cosmic radiation. The new system has at least an order of magnitude higher statistical reliability and significantly enhances data quality compared to other offshore natural gamma radiation (NGR) systems designed to measure geological core samples. Reliable correlations and interpretations of cored intervals are ...

Vasiliev, M A; Chubarian, G; Olsen, R; Bennight, C; Cobine, T; Fackler, D; Hastedt, M; Houpt, D; Mateo, Z; Vasilieva, Y B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Sea bottom coring apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A marine bottom coring apparatus for drilling into and obtaining core samples from subsea formations is described. It is particularly useful for obtaining core samples from hard rock formations. The apparatus includes a frame having buoyancy, which has sufficient capacity to float the apparatus in the unballast condition. Ballasting means are also connected to the frame and having ballast capacity sufficient to overcome a buoyancy of the buoyancy means. Release means are provided for releasing the ballast at a predetermined time. The frame has the core drilling means attached to it and is supported on the sea bottom, whereby the apparatus may be sunk to the sea bottom by the ballast, a core sample drilled from the subsea formation, and the apparatus floated to the surface upon release of the ballast. (11 claims)

Williamson, T.N.

1969-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

9

Rock deformation in hydrothermal systems: the nature of fractures in plutons and their host rocks. Technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this program is to accumulate the types of field data which are important for the analysis of magma-hydrothermal systems. The structural effects of thermal processes were identified in order to distinguish the thermally induced deformations from the deformations that occurred subsequent to complete cooling of the system. Mapping techniques were developed to record the structural data on the ground from local domains characteristic of larger areas in the magma chamber, and in the air from low-angle oblique aerial photography of the entire region. The ground system is complete and preliminary testing is currently being carried out to verify the method. The results indicate that granitic crystalline rocks have no structural resistance to thermal perturbations. If nuclear wastes are to be stored in granite, precautionary buffers would have to be incorporated into the system. A total of 30 fossil magma chambers have been studied over the past 2 years. An extensive set of fracture imagery has been collected, together with information related to the geological history of the plutons. Fossil magma chambers in Arizona, Utah, California, Washington, Montana, and British Columbia have been studied.

Norton, D.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

A Coupled Model for Natural Convection and Condensation in Heated Subsurface Enclosures Embedded in Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Mass Transfer in Yucca Mountain Drifts,” Proceedings ofMD- 000001 REV 00, Yucca Mountain Project Report, Bechtelthe fractured rock at Yucca Mountain have been investigated

Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

The nature of fire-cracked rock: new insights from ethnoarchaeological and laboratory experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire-cracked rock (FCR) is the archaeological by-product of the systemic use of hot rocks for cooking and heating purposes. As a record of various cooking and heating facilities, FCR has substantial potential for addressing research questions on past settlement and subsistence systems. To be able to address these questions requires reliable methods that can identify or infer how a given FCR was used. A series of ethnoarchaeological replication experiments are conducted in order to improve the understanding of the geothennodynamics of FCR production. FCR from two experimental data sets are cut to expose flat surfaces that are inspected for thermal-weathering characteristics under low-power magnification. Analytical results indicate that rock structure and the length of heat application have the most control over thermal weathering. The five most important rock structure characteristics are (1) strength of the bond between grains/crystals, (2) degree of porosity, (3) grain/crystal mineralogy, (4) presence of discontinuities, and (5) grain size; thin section analysis can identify these characteristics for any rock sample. The length of heat application varies dependent on the type of cooking or heating facility, for instance, a typical earth oven remains hot for a longer duration than a typical stone-boil facility; multiple uses of a rock in a facility also increases the sum total of heat application. In broad terms, experimental tests indicate igneous rock types withstand thermal weathering better than metamorphic or sedimentary rock types. Ethnoarchaeological results are applied to six archaeological FCR features, and provide new insights on the use-history of five of the features. Microscopic observations of archaeological FCR also all for the re-evaluation of the current model which explains the occurrence of various FCR shape types within features.

Jackson, Michael A

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

DOE/EA-1371; Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan, Environmental Assessment, and Finding of No Significant Impacts for Rock Creek Reserve (5/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan and Environmental Assessment for Rock Creek Reserve Summary: The Department of Energy (DOE) with the assistance and cooperation of the US. Fish and Wildlife Service, prepared an Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan and Environmental Assessment (Plan)(DOE/EA-1371) for the Rock Creek Reserve at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) located north of Golden, Colorado. The Rock Creek Reserve was established in May 1999 in recognition of the area's biological significance. Although still under the ownership of the DOE, the Rock Creek Reserve will be co- managed with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service as part of an interagency agreement signed by these two

13

DOE/EA-1371; Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan, Environmental Assessment, and Finding of No Significant Impacts for Rock Creek Reserve (5/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTEGRATED NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PLAN, ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT and Finding Of No Significant Impacts for ROCK CREEK RESERVE 2001-Closure DOE/EA - 1371 Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service May, 2001 Dear Stakeholder: Enclosed is the Final Rock Creek Reserve Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (Plan), Environmental Assessment (EA), and Finding Of No Significant Impacts (FONSI). The Rock Creek Reserve was dedicated on May 17, 1999, to be jointly managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and US Department of Energy. This Plan/EA was developed in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. Through cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for joint

14

ASSEMBLAGES ON WASTE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Natural regeneration on waste rock was investigated at the old Wangaloa coal mine, south-east Otago. A 450-m long waste rock stack had been created 40–50 years ago, and has had little anthropogenic intervention since. The stack is made up of a gradient of three main waste rock types, defined as ‘silt-rich’, ‘mixed’, and ‘quartz-rich’, which reflect different proportions of loess siltstone and quartz gravel conglomerate. Plant species assemblages were quantified in four 5-m 2 quadrats in each waste rock type. Invertebrates were heat extracted from substrate cores (7 cm diameter; depth 5 cm) collected from quadrats over an eight-week period in spring 2003. Ordination analysis showed statistically distinct plant and invertebrate assemblages had arisen on each waste rock type. Revegetation patterns were dominated by native, woody individuals on all waste rock types, particularly manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides). Plant cover on ‘silt-rich ’ waste rock was four-fold that on ‘quartz-rich ’ waste rock. Total numbers of invertebrates were highest on ‘quartz-rich’ waste rock, but richness greatest on ‘silt-rich ’ waste rock. Collembola dominated the fauna but their numbers were proportionally greatest in poorly vegetated areas. Further work is required to explain the absence of plants and invertebrates from local areas of waste rock. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

C. G. Rufaut; S. Hammit; D. Craw; S. G. Clearwater

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Ocean bottom seisometer  

SciTech Connect

An improved ocean bottom seismometer is described comprising: a spherical-shaped main housing having a seismic acquisition portion and a ballast portion below the acquisition portion. The ballast portion controls the ascent and descent of the ocean bottom seismometer; a conical skirt fixed to the main housing elevating the main housing above a horizontal plane coincident with a base of the skirt. The skirt is capable of confining fluid under the main housing when the base rests on an ocean bottom; spherical compartments mounted inside the skirt; and a lifting hook mounted on the outside of the main housing.

Neeley, W.P.

1987-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

16

SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

Eugene A. Fritzler

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Pipeline bottoming cycle study. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of applying bottoming cycles to the prime movers that drive the compressors of natural gas pipelines was studied. These bottoming cycles convert some of the waste heat from the exhaust gas of the prime movers into shaft power and conserve gas. Three typical compressor station sites were selected, each on a different pipeline. Although the prime movers were different, they were similar enough in exhaust gas flow rate and temperature that a single bottoming cycle system could be designed, with some modifications, for all three sites. Preliminary design included selection of the bottoming cycle working fluid, optimization of the cycle, and design of the components, such as turbine, vapor generator and condensers. Installation drawings were made and hardware and installation costs were estimated. The results of the economic assessment of retrofitting bottoming cycle systems on the three selected sites indicated that profitability was strongly dependent upon the site-specific installation costs, how the energy was used and the yearly utilization of the apparatus. The study indicated that the bottoming cycles are a competitive investment alternative for certain applications for the pipeline industry. Bottoming cycles are technically feasible. It was concluded that proper design and operating practices would reduce the environmental and safety hazards to acceptable levels. The amount of gas that could be saved through the year 2000 by the adoption of bottoming cycles for two different supply projections was estimated as from 0.296 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a low supply projection to 0.734 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a high supply projection. The potential market for bottoming cycle equipment for the two supply projections varied from 170 to 500 units of varying size. Finally, a demonstration program plan was developed.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Preferential flow paths and heat pipes: Results from laboratory experiments on heat-driven flow in natural and artificial rock fractures  

SciTech Connect

Water flow in fractures under the conditions of partial saturation and thermal drive may lead to fast flow along preferential localized pathways and heat pipe conditions. Water flowing in fast pathways may ultimately contact waste packages at Yucca Mountain and transport radionuclides to the accessible environment. Sixteen experiments were conducted to visualize liquid flow in glass fracture models, a transparent epoxy fracture replica, and a rock/replica fracture assembly. Spatially resolved thermal monitoring was performed in seven of these experiments to evaluate heat-pipe formation. Depending on the fracture apertures and flow conditions, various flow regimes were observed including continuous rivulet flow for high flow rates, intermittent rivulet flow and drop flow for intermediate flow rates, and film flow for low flow rates and wide apertures. These flow regimes were present in both fracture models and in the replica of a natural fracture. Heat-pipe conditions indicated by low thermal gradients were observed in five experiments. Conditions conducive to heat-pipe formation include an evaporation zone, condensation zone, adequate space for vapor and liquid to travel, and appropriate fluid driving forces. In one of the two experiments where heat pipe conditions were not observed, adequate space for liquid-vapor counterflow was not provided. Heat pipe conditions were not established in the other, because liquid flow was inadequate to compensate for imbibition and the quantity of heat contained within the rock.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The arena of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. This has led to a great deal of theoretical effort being put forth in the calculation of mass spectra in this sector. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of experiments for some time, it is interesting to compare results between lattice QCD computations and continuum theoretical models. Several recent lattice QCD calculations exist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. In this work we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of the mass spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. The wide range of quark masses in these systems require that the various flavors of quarks be treated with different lattice actions. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. The calculation of the ground state spectrum is presented and compared to recent models.

Zachary Brown, William Detmold, Stefan Meinel, Konstantinos Orginos

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Bell-Bottoms and Energy Efficient Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bell-Bottoms and Energy Efficient Buildings Bell-Bottoms and Energy Efficient Buildings Bell-Bottoms and Energy Efficient Buildings January 18, 2011 - 5:19pm Addthis Roland Risser Roland Risser Program Director, Building Technologies Office This is hard to admit via blog, but I must come clean. I have fallen victim to some now seemingly ridiculous trends during my life. A few of them include wearing bell-bottoms in the 70s, sporting a "Members Only" jacket in the 80s, and rocking Ray-Bans and Maui Jims in the 90s (well, technically I still wear Maui Jims). What was I thinking? This tri-fecta of bad fashion and wrong choices makes me wonder... What characteristic makes an idea or product so exceptional that people value it? What causes the popularity explosion of a YouTube video or the national obsession with a bed bug outbreak?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hot rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four kilometers down below the orange earth of Australia¿s Cooper Basin lies some of the hottest nonvolcanic rock in the world¿rock that the geothermal industry had never seriously considered using to make electricity. But next month Geodynamics, an ...

S. Upson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Antarctic Bottom Water Variability in a Coupled Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural variability of the Weddell Sea variety of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) is examined in a long-term integration of a coupled climate model. Examination of passive tracer concentrations suggests that the model AABW is predominantly ...

Agus Santoso; Matthew H. England

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Evaluating the Moisture Conditions in the Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain: The Impact of Natural Convection Processes in Heated Emplacement Drifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE FRACTURED ROCK AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN: THE IMPACT OF NATURALgeologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, will stronglyWaste Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Nuclear

Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Halecky, N.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Peach Bottom  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Peach Bottom" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

25

Bottom-up Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On its way to its current form this report has received significant input from a considerable number of experts. In particular, a panel of experts in Brussels discussed a draft version of the report on March 29, 2000 (see Annex 5 for a list of names), and made a number of specific and more general comments and suggestions. The authors would like to thank these people for their valuable inputs into this study. It was attempted to consider their suggestions wherever possible. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The fossil fuel extraction, transport and distribution sector comprises the exploration, transport and distribution of oil, natural gas and coal. Within the EU, the fossil fuel extraction, transport and distribution sector is an important source of methane, accounting for 20 % of total methane emissions in 1990. This equals to about 2.3 % of total greenhouse emissions in the EU in 1990. Between 1990 and 1995 (the latest year for which emissions data was available at the time of writing), emission from the fossil fuel extraction, transport and distribution sector fell by about 20%, due principally to decrease in production

Fuels In The Eu; Chris Hendriks; David De Jager; Contact Chris Hendriks

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

,"Texas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

27

,"Iowa Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Iowa Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

28

,"Alabama Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Alabama Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

29

,"Georgia Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Georgia Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

30

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

31

,"Colorado Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Colorado Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

32

,"California Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"California Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

33

,"Florida Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Florida Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

34

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

35

,"Arizona Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Arizona Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

36

,"Alaska Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Alaska Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

37

,"Delaware Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Delaware Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

38

,"Hawaii Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Hawaii Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

39

Bottom Ash System Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides information to personnel involved in the bottom ash system and its components, including good maintenance practices, condition monitoring, predictive and preventive maintenance techniques, probable failure modes, and troubleshooting guidance. The guide was developed primarily to provide detailed maintenance and troubleshooting information but also includes basic system information.

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Mechanical and transport properties of rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Task I. The physical nature of fracturing at depth. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The deformational behavior of granitic rocks is important to a wide variety of national and academic concerns. Both transient and steady state behavior at elevated temperature and pressure, in the presence and absence of excess H2O, have been investigated recently in solid pressure medium equipment and deformation mechanisms and empirical steady state flow laws have been determined. Efforts in the more precise gas and fluid pressure media apparatus have generally been concentrated on low pressure transient creep in order to evaluate effects of stress, temperature, pore pressure and, most recently, strain rate on failure times and static fatigue processes. Additional research is required and the stage is now set for a thorough physical understanding of the evolution from elastic-brittle, through transient (work-hardening)-semibrittle to steady-state-semibrittle to ductile flow of granitic rocks under both dry and wet (saline fluid pore pressure) conditions. 31 refs., 9 figs.

Carter, N.L.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Antarctic Bottom Water Flow through the Hunter Channel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rio Grande Rise acts as a natural barrier for the equatorward flow of Antarctic Bottom Water in the subtropical South Atlantic. In addition to the Vema Channel, the Hunter Channel cuts through this obstacle and offers a separate route for ...

Walter Zenk; Gerold Siedler; Bernd Lenz; Nelson G. Hogg

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Shotgun cartridge rock breaker  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1980-August 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following: interpretation of seismic data from hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Site, interpretation of 3-D velocity anomalies in the western US with special attention to geothermal areas, theoretical and observational studies of scattering and attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves, theoretical and observational studies of volcanic tremors in relation to magma transport mechanisms, and deployment and maintenance of 9 event-recorders around Mt. St. Helens. Abstracts of papers submitted for publication are included. (MHR)

Aki, K.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1979-August 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the following research areas: a synthesis of seismic experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot-Dry-Rock System; attenuation of high-frequency shear waves in the lithosphere; a new kinematic source model for deep volcanic tremors; ground motion in the near-field of a fluid-driven crack and its interpretation in the study of shallow volcanic tremor; low-velocity bodies under geothermal areas; and operation of event recorders in Mt. St. Helens and Newberry Peak with preliminary results from them. (MHR)

Aki, K.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The bottom of the ocean food chain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The bottom of the ocean food chain 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:July 2013 All Issues submit The bottom of the ocean food chain Global ocean...

46

Bottom Topography Mapping via Nonlinear Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variational data assimilation method is described for bottom topography mapping in rivers and estuaries using remotely sensed observations of water surface currents. The velocity field and bottom topography are related by the vertically ...

Edward D. Zaron; Marie-Aude Pradal; Patrick D. Miller; Alan F. Blumberg; Nickitas Georgas; Wei Li; Julia Muccino Cornuelle

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1978-August 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An interpretation theory based on the fluid-filled crack model of geothermal systems is being developed and tested against a variety of data from various geothermal areas. Progress is reported on the following subjects: (1) analysis and interpretation of seismic data obtained from the bore holes at the LASL Hot Dry Rock geothermal site. (2) Collection, analysis and interpretation of data on deep volcanic tremors at the USGS Hawaii Volcano Observatory. (3) Development of a new method for determining seismic attenuation at frequencies higher than 1HZ, and initiation of a cooperative work with Mexican seismologists on the attenuation measurements at various geothermal areas in Baja, California using the method. (4) Installation of 3-component digital event-recorders at four stations in the Newberry Peak volcano, Oregon. (5) Developing a computer program for calculating seismic motion generated by the vibration of fluid-filled crack in a layered medium.

Aki, K.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Seismological investigation of crack formation in hydraulic rock fracturing experiments and in natural geothermal environments. Progress report, September 1, 1977--August 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New seismological methods were developed for determining the structure of a geothermal energy source region by the use of data from both active and passive experiments. Technical papers were published on four topics, namely: a field experiment at Kilauea Iki, source models of volcanic tremors, microearthquake source spectra, and a numerical study of elastic wave diffraction by fluid-filled cracks. In addition, papers were submitted for publication on a statistical synthesis of source mechanism of seismic events in Kilauea Iki and the observation of a temporal variation in the attenuation of earthquake coda in central California. The following subjects were worked on: (1) interpretation of seismic data from the LASL Hot Dry Rock system; (2) analyisis of volcanic tremor data from the U.S.G.S. Hawaiian seismic network; (3) frequency dependence and three-dimensional distribution of seismic attenuation in central Japan; (4) experimental study of seismic scattering by a penny-shaped crack; (5) development of a microprocessor system for the treatment of the data from digital event recorders.

Aki, K.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Summary" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

50

Coal liquefaction with subsequent bottoms pyrolysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal liquefaction process wherein heavy bottoms produced in a liquefaction zone are upgraded by coking or a similar pyrolysis step, pyrolysis liquids boiling in excess of about 1000.degree. F. are further reacted with molecular hydrogen in a reaction zone external of the liquefaction zone, the resulting effluent is fractionated to produce one or more distillate fractions and a bottoms fraction, a portion of this bottoms fraction is recycled to the reaction zone, and the remaining portion of the bottoms fraction is recycled to the pyrolysis step.

Walchuk, George P. (Queens, NY)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Natural  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 2,094,387 2,266,751 2,566,049 2,816,408 2,883,277 Mexico .............................. 0 1,678 7,013 6,722 13,862 Total Pipeline Imports....... 2,094,387 2,268,429 2,573,061 2,823,130 2,897,138 LNG Algeria .............................. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 35,325 United Arab Emirates ....... 0 0 0 0 4,949 Total LNG Imports............. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 40,274 Total Imports......................... 2,137,504 2,350,115 2,623,839 2,841,048 2,937,413 Average Price (dollars per thousand cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 1.84 2.02 1.86 1.48 1.96 Mexico .............................. - 1.94 1.99 1.53 2.25 Total Pipeline Imports.......

52

Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock  

SciTech Connect

The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

Rowley, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Definition: Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rock Sampling Systematic rock sampling can be used to characterize a geothermal reservoir. The physical and chemical properties of rock samples provide important information for determining whether a power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed. Some general rock properties can be measured by visual inspection, but detailed properties require laboratory techniques. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is called the "core hole". A variety of core samplers exist to sample

54

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representation of common equipment at a natural gas hydraulic fracturing drill pad. Representation of common equipment at a natural gas hydraulic fracturing drill pad. How is Shale Gas Produced? Shale gas formations are "unconventional" reservoirs - i.e., reservoirs of low "permeability." Permeability refers to the capacity of a porous, sediment, soil - or rock in this case - to transmit a fluid. This contrasts with a "conventional" gas reservoir produced from sands and carbonates (such as limestone). The bottom line is that in a conventional reservoir, the gas is in interconnected pore spaces, much like a kitchen sponge, that allow easier flow to a well; but in an unconventional reservoir, like shale, the reservoir must be mechanically "stimulated" to

55

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is shale gas? is shale gas? Basically, it is natural gas - primarily methane - found in shale formations, some of which were formed 300-million-to-400-million years ago during the Devonian period of Earth's history. The shales were deposited as fine silt and clay particles at the bottom of relatively enclosed bodies of water. At roughly the same time, primitive plants were forming forests on land and the first amphibians were making an appearance. Some of the methane that formed from the organic matter buried with the sediments escaped into sandy rock layers adjacent to the shales, forming conventional accumulations of natural gas which are relatively easy to extract. But some of it remained locked in the tight, low permeability shale layers, becoming shale gas.

56

Water waves over strongly undulating bottom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two-dimensional free-surface potential flows of an ideal fluid over a strongly inhomogeneous bottom are investigated with the help of conformal mappings. Weakly-nonlinear and exact nonlinear equations of motion are derived by the variational method for arbitrary seabed shape parameterized by an analytical function. The band structure of linear waves over periodic bottoms is calculated.

Ruban, V P

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Hot dry rock energy project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proof-of-concept experimental project by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory endeavors to establish the feasibility of exploitation of the thermal energy contained in the earth's crust where such energy and a transporting fluid have not been juxtaposed in nature. A region of high heat flow and apparently unfaulted basement rock formation was selected. Two boreholes, drilled to a total depth of about 3 km (10,000 ft) and penetrating about 2.5 km (7500 ft) into the Precambrian formation, to a rock temperature of 200/sup 0/C, have been connected at depth by a hydraulically fractured zone to form the heat extraction surface. Energy was extracted at a rate of 3.2 MW(t) with water temperature of 132/sup 0/C during a 96-h preliminary circulating test run performed late in September 1977. This paper traces the progress of the project, summarizes procedures and salient events, and references detailed reports and specialized topics.

Hendron, R.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District, Teller County, Colorado," U.S. Geol. Survey Bull.Jamestown District, Colorado," Econ. Geol. , v. 68, pp 1247-Rocks at Powderhorn, Colorado; Economic Geology, Vol. 60,

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Stratification Effects in a Bottom Ekman Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stratified bottom Ekman layer over a nonsloping, rough surface is studied using a three-dimensional unsteady large eddy simulation to examine the effects of an outer layer stratification on the boundary layer structure. When the flow field is ...

John R. Taylor; Sutanu Sarkar

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS P532 Zhiyue Xu, Yuichiro Yamashita 1 , and Claude B. Reed Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA 1 Now with Kyushu University, Japan Abstract High power lasers can weaken, spall, melt and vaporize natural earth materials with thermal spallation being the most energy efficient rock removal mechanism. Laser rock spallation is a very complex phenomenon that depends on many factors. Computer numerical modeling would provides great tool to understand the fundamental of this complex phenomenon, which is crucial to the success of its applications. Complexity of modeling laser rock spallation is due to: 1) rock is a porous media, to which traditional theories of heat transfer and rock mechanics can not be directly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Session: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Double Bottom Line Project Report:Assessing Social Impact In Double Bottom Line Ventures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Key Characteristics Glossary Method Summaries Theories ofin double bottom line ventures methods catalog glossary ofterms glossary of terms This glossary defines the variables

Rosenzweig, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Rock-ravintolatoiminta : elävää rock-musiikkia ravintolaympäristössä; Rock venue activity : live rock music in the restaurant setting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Työn tavoitteena oli tutkia rock-ravintolatoimintaa ja elävää rock-musiikkia ravintolaympäristössä ravintolan, artistin ja asiakkaan näkökulmasta. Tutkimuksessa pyrittiin selvittämään rock-ravintolayrittämisen toimintatapoja ja kartoittamaan alan tämän hetkistä tilaa.… (more)

Väyliö, Jari

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

Mark D. Habana

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

66

Distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters in fissured volcanogenic bed rocks of the Lake Karachai Area, Chelyabinsk, Southern Urals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present investigation is devoted to the study of the distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters, beneath the site of temporary storage of liquid radioactive waste known as Lake Karachai. For this purpose a method of hydrogeochemical logging (HGCL) together with standard hydrogeochemical and geophysical methods of uncased hole logging were used. The distribution of sodium nitrate brine plumes in the subsurface was determined by the physical and physico-chemical properties of these brines and by the petrochemical composition of enclosing rocks and the structural setting of the flow paths. The latter is represented by fractures and large faults in the bedrock of volcanogenic and volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks of intermediate-to-basic composition. The volcanogenic rocks are overlain in some places by a thin cover of unconsolidated sediments, i.e., by loams and relatively impermeable silts. Contaminated waters flow-in accordance with the eluvium bottom relief towards local areas of natural (Mishelyak and Techa rivers) and artificial (Novogomenskii water intake) discharge of subsurface waters. The large Mishelyak fault, southwest of Lake Karachai and under fluvial sediments of the Mishelyak, is assumed to significantly influence the flow pattern of contaminated waters, diverting them from an intake of drinking water.

Solodov, I.N.; Belichkin, V.I.; Zotov, A.V.; Kochkin, B.T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Drozhko, E.G. [Atomic Energy of Russia (Russian Federation); Glagolev, A.V.; Skokov, A.N. [Russian Federation Committee on Geological and Subsurface Usage (Russian Federation)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

,"Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

68

,"Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

69

,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

70

,"California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural...

71

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural...

72

,"Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural...

73

,"Washington Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural...

74

,"Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural...

75

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural...

76

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural...

77

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural...

78

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural...

79

,"Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural...

80

,"Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Natural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

,"Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural...

82

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural...

83

,"Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Natural...

84

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural...

85

,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire Natural...

86

,"Nebraska Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Underground Natural Gas...

87

,"Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Underground Natural Gas...

88

,"Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Underground Natural Gas...

89

,"Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Underground Natural Gas...

90

,"Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Underground Natural Gas...

91

,"Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Underground Natural Gas...

92

,"West Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Underground Natural...

93

,"Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Underground Natural Gas...

94

,"California Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Underground Natural...

95

,"Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage Capacity "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Storage Capacity " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural...

96

,"Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Underground Natural...

97

,"Arkansas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Underground Natural Gas...

98

,"Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Underground Natural Gas...

99

,"Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Underground Natural Gas...

100

,"New York Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Underground Natural Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

,"Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Underground Natural Gas...

102

,"Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas...

103

,"Washington Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Underground Natural...

104

,"Kansas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Underground Natural Gas...

105

,"Natural Gas Salt Caverns Storage Capacity "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural Gas...

106

,"New Mexico Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Underground Natural...

107

,"Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Underground Natural Gas...

108

,"Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Underground Natural Gas...

109

,"Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Underground Natural Gas...

110

,"Utah Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Underground Natural Gas...

111

,"Tennessee Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Underground Natural Gas...

112

,"Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Underground Natural Gas...

113

,"Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Underground Natural Gas...

114

,"Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Underground Natural...

115

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

116

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

117

Configuration and performance of the indirect-fired fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas, indirect-fired fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFFC) is introduced as a novel power plant system for the distributed power and on-site markets in the 20--200 megawatt (MW) size range. The novel indirect-fired carbonate fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFCFC) power plant system configures the ambient pressure carbonate fuel cell with a gas turbine, air compressor, combustor, and ceramic heat exchanger. Performance calculations from ASPEN simulations present material and energy balances with expected power output. The results indicate efficiencies and heat rates for the NG-IFCFC are comparable to conventionally bottomed carbonate fuel cell steam bottomed cycles, but with smaller and less expensive components.

Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect

The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Oldest Rock on Earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Canada." and "Some of the oldest surface rock can be found in the Canadian Shield, Australia, Africa and in other more specific places around the world. The ages of...

120

Development of hot dry rock resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LASL Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project is the only U.S. field test of this geothermal resource. In the LASL concept, a man-made geothermal reservoir would be formed by drilling a deep hole into relatively impermeable hot rock, creating a large surface area for heat transfer by fracturing the rock hydraulically, then drilling a second hole to intersect the fracture to complete the circulation loop. In 1974, the first hole was drilled to a depth of 2929 m (9610 ft) and a hydraulic fracture was produced near the bottom. In 1975, a second hole was directionally drilled to intersect the fracture. Although the desired intersection was not achieved, a connection was made through which water was circulated. After a year's study of the fracture system, drilling began again in April 1977 and an improved connection was achieved. In September of 1977 a 5 MW (thermal) heat extraction and circulation experiment was conducted for 100 h as a preliminary test of the concept. An 1800-h circulation experiment was concluded on April 13, 1978 to determine temperature-drawdown, permeation water loss and flow characteristics of the pressurized reservoir, to examine chemistry changes in the circulating fluid, and to monitor for induced seismic effects.

Pettitt, R.A.; Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Spindown of Bottom-Trapped Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note considers the decay of a bottom-trapped freshwater plume after the causative freshwater inflow has ceased. It is shown that shortly after the low-density inflow stops, the barotropic pressure field that it created radiates away and the ...

Ricardo P. Matano; Elbio D. Palma

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- CO2-Rock Interactions in EGS...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

CO2-Rock Interactions in EGS-CO2: New Zealand TVZ Geothermal Systems as a Natural Analog Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On...

123

Bottom: The PNNL-developed Grid Friendly  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bottom: The PNNL-developed Grid Bottom: The PNNL-developed Grid Friendly (tm) Appliance Controller was successfully tested in clothes dryers and water heaters in Washington and Oregon during a 2007 demonstration project. The controller senses stress on the electric grid and automatically and instantaneously responds to reduce the demand for electricity from appliances, such as turning off the heating element in a dryer for a few minutes. When applied in concert across multiple appliances in multiple households, this temporary drop in energy demand could give grid operators the cushion they need to balance the system. The Grid-Friendly Appliance Controller won a prestigious R&D 100 Award in 2008. Top: Researchers draw upon historic expertise and use modern instrumen- tation to develop new methods for

124

DOE hot dry rock program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing has been used to create and subsequently to enlarge the first hot dry rock heat-extraction loop at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Encouraging results prompted the DOE to expand this project into a program of national scope. The elements of that Program and their present status are discussed. Emphasis is given the ongoing Fenton Hill Project where techniques and information developed in the existing research system will soon be used to produce a multiply-fractured engineering system in hotter rock at the same site. Recent results from research loop operation and progress in constructing the engineering system are reported. Although acoustic mapping and system geometry indicate that the primary hydraulic fractures are essentially vertical, relatively low fracturing pressure and absence of a sharp breakdown suggest that at Fenton Hill fracture initiation occurs by reopening of old natural fractures rather than by initiation of new ones. Flow patterns and temperature behavior suggest opening of additional old fractures as the loop is operated. Except where the hot fluid leaves the crack system to enter the production well, flow impedances are very low without either artificial propping or inflation by pressurization.

Nunz, G.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Hot Dry Rock - Summary  

SciTech Connect

Hot Dry Rock adds a new flexibility to the utilization of geothermal energy. Almost always the approach has been to limit that utilization to places where there is a natural source of water associated with a source of heat. Actually, the result was that steam was mined. Clearly there are much larger heat resources available which lack natural water to transport that energy to the surface. Also, as is found in hydrothermal fields being mined for steam, the water supply finally gets used up. There is a strong motive in the existing capital investment to revitalize those resources. Techniques for introducing, recovering and utilizing the water necessary to recover the heat from below the surface of the earth is the subject of this session. Implicit in that utilization is the ability to forecast with reasonable accuracy the busbar cost of that energy to the utility industry. The added element of supplying the water introduces costs which must be recovered while still supplying energy which is competitive. Hot Dry Rock technology can supply energy. That has been proved long since. The basic barrier to its use by the utility industry has been and remains proof to the financial interests that the long term cost is competitive enough to warrant investment in a technology that is new to utility on-grid operations. As the opening speaker for this session states, the test that is underway will ''simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings''. Further, the Fenton Hill system is a research facility not designed for commercial production purposes, but it can give indications of how the system must be changed to provide economic HDR operations. And so it is that we must look beyond the long term flow test, at the opportunities and challenges. Proving that the huge HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale must involve the construction of additional sites, preferably to the specifications of the now Federal geothermal community. These facilities will have to be engineered to produce and market energy at competitive prices. At the same time, we must not rest on our technological laurels, though they be many. Design and operational techniques have been conceived which could lead to improved economics and operations for HDR. These must be pursued and where merit is found, vigorously pursued. Accelerated research and development ought to include revolutionary drilling techniques, reservoir interrogation, and system modeling to assure the competitiveness and geographical diversity of applications of HDR. Much of this work will be applicable to the geothermal industry in general. More advanced research ought to include such innovations as the utilization of other operating fluids. Supercritical carbon dioxide and the ammonia/water (Kalina) cycle have been mentioned. But even as the near and more distant outlook is examined, today's work was reported in the HDR session. The start-up operations for the current test series at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant were described. The surface plant is complete and initial operations have begun. While some minor modifications to the system have been required, nothing of consequence has been found to impede operations. Reliability, together with the flexibility and control required for a research system were shown in the system design, and demonstrated by the preliminary results of the plant operations and equipment performance. Fundamental to the overall success of the HDR energy resource utilization is the ability to optimize the pressure/flow impedance/time relationships as the reservoir is worked. Significant new insights are still being developed out of the data which will substantially affect the operational techniques applied to new systems. However, again, these will have to be proved to be general and not solely specific to the Fenton Hill site. Nevertheless, high efficiency use of the reservoir without unintended reservoir grow

Tennyson, George P. Jr.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

126

Rim Rock Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rim Rock Wind Farm Rim Rock Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rim Rock Wind Farm Facility Rim Rock Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer NaturEner Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location Glacier and Toole Counties MT Coordinates 48.779564°, -112.061291° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.779564,"lon":-112.061291,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

127

Rock Harbor UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passage Conglomerate Bay Five Finger Bay Lane Cove Stockly Bay Lake Ojibway Siskiwit River Creek Little River Washington Moskey M cCargoe Cove Robinson Bay Amygdaloid Channel Pickerel Cove Chippewa Harbor Crystal Cove Belle Isle Canoe Rocks Caribou Island Saginaw Point Tookers Island The Palisades Raspberry

128

Part 1: The Bottom Line | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: The Bottom Line Part 1: The Bottom Line Question: What is different about decommissioning under CERCLA from the way DOE has decommissioned facilities in the past? Answer: DOE...

129

Bottom Ekman Pumping with Stress-Dependent Eddy Viscosity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reconsiders the classic problem of bottom Ekman pumping below a steady geostrophic flow by relaxing the assumption of a constant eddy viscosity. It is assumed instead that the eddy viscosity depends on the magnitude of the bottom ...

Benoit Cushman-Roisin; Vlado Mala?i?

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Lines: Ethnographic Sources and Rock Art Interpretationwhen applying these sources toward rock art interpretation.information source for developing rock art interpretations.

David, Robert James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Hot Bottom Burning in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hot Bottom Burning in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars By J OHN C. LATTANZ I O 1 , CHERYL A. FROST 1 state of knowledge about the phenomenon of Hot Bottom Burning as seen in Asymptotic Giant Branch stars. This is illustrated with some results from new 6M fi stellar models. 1. Introduction and Motivation Hot Bottom Burning

Lattanzio, John

132

Microwave assisted hard rock cutting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Rankine bottoming cycle safety analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Vector Engineering Inc. conducted a safety and hazards analysis of three Rankine Bottoming Cycle Systems in public utility applications: a Thermo Electron system using Fluorinal-85 (a mixture of 85 mole % trifluoroethanol and 15 mole % water) as the working fluid; a Sundstrand system using toluene as the working fluid; and a Mechanical Technology system using steam and Freon-II as the working fluids. The properties of the working fluids considered are flammability, toxicity, and degradation, and the risks to both plant workers and the community at large are analyzed.

Lewandowski, G.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Richard Parker,. Parker Geoscience Consulting, LLC, Arvada, Colorado, USA; Zhiyue Xu and Claude Reed, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA; Ramona Graves, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado, USA; Brian Gahan and Samih Batarseh, Gas Technology Institute, Des Plaines, Illinois, USA ABSTRACT Studies on drilling petroleum reservoir rocks with lasers show that modern infrared lasers have the capability to spall (thermally fragment), melt and vaporize natural earth materials with the thermal spallation being the most efficient rock removal mechanism. Although laser irradiance as low as 1000 W/cm 2 is sufficient to spall rock, firing the

135

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Definition: Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in crustal rocks. Rock density is a physical characteristic that is governed by the chemical composition (in situ minerals) and pore spaces of a specific rock or rock type.1...

137

Transfer of hot dry rock technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

Smith, M.C.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

,"Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

139

,"Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Offshore Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

140

,"U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

,"Other States Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Other States Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

142

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

143

,"U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

144

,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

145

,"Texas Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

146

,"Texas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

147

,"Tennessee Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

148

,"Arizona Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

149

,"Missouri Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

150

,"Nevada Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

151

,"Nebraska Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

152

,"Maryland Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

153

,"Illinois Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

154

,"Oregon Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

155

,"Indiana Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

156

,"North Troy, VT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Troy, VT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

157

,"Portal, ND Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Portal, ND Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

158

,"Rio Bravo, Texas Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rio Bravo, Texas Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

159

,"International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

160

,"Eagle Pass, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Eagle Pass, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

,"Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

162

,"Champlain, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Champlain, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

163

,"Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","L...

164

,"Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

165

,"Roma, Texas Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Roma, Texas Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

166

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

167

,"Estimated Production of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Lates...

168

,"North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

169

,"Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas...

170

,"Michigan U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

171

,"Massachusetts U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

172

,"California U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

173

,"Maryland U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

174

,"Mississippi U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

175

,"Washington U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

176

,"Louisiana U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

177

,"Minnesota U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

178

,"Texas State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

179

,"Alabama State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

180

,"LA, State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

LA, State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

,"California State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

182

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

183

,"California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

184

,"Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","...

185

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

186

,"Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","...

187

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

188

,"West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

189

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

190

,"Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","...

191

,"Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","...

192

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

193

,"Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

194

,"Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

195

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

196

,"Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

197

,"Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

198

,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

199

,"Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","...

200

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

,"Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

202

,"Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

203

,"Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

204

,"Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

205

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

206

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

207

,"Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

208

,"Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

209

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

210

,"Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

211

,"Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","...

212

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","...

213

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

214

Peach Bottom test element program. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirty-three test elements were irradiated in the Peach Bottom high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of the testing program for advanced HTGRs. Extensive postirradiation examinations and evaluations of 21 of these irradiation experiments were performed. The test element irradiations were simulated using HTGR design codes and data. Calculated fuel burnups, power profiles, fast neutron fluences, and temperatures were verified via destructive burnup measurements, gamma scanning, and in-pile thermocouple readings corrected for decalibration effects. Analytical techniques were developed to improve the quality of temperature predictions through feedback of nuclear measurements into thermal calculations. Dimensional measurements, pressure burst tests, diametral compression tests, ring-cutting tests, strip-cutting tests, and four-point bend tests were performed to measure residual stress, strain, and strength distributions in H-327 graphite structures irradiated in the test elements.

Saurwein, J.J.; Holzgraf, J.F.; MIller, C.M.; Myers, B.F.; Wallroth, C.F.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

217

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Overview - Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, James C.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

219

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Energy from hot dry rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Program is described. The system, operation, results, development program, environmental implications, resource, economics, and future plans are discussed. (MHR)

Hendron, R.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up Print Many pathogenic bacteria use a specialized secretion system to inject virulence proteins directly into the cells they...

222

Mineralization of Synthetic Polymer Scaffolds: A Bottom-Up ...  

Mineralization of Synthetic Polymer Scaffolds: A Bottom-Up Approach for the Development of Artificial Bone Jie Song,*,†,‡ Viengkham Malathong,† and Carolyn R ...

223

Rock Art in the Public Trust: Managing Prehistoric Rock Art on Federal Land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Archaic North America. ? In Handbook of Rock Art Research,Rock Art Analysis. ? In Handbook of Archaeological Methods,Rock Art Analysis,? in Handbook of Archaeological Methods,

Hale, John Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09 Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL ( IL.09 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Rock Island , Illinois IL.09-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.09-2 Site Operations: Site located on a DOD facility and operated under AEC control. Exact nature or time period of operations not clear. No indication that radioactive materials were involved. Contract work with Albuquerque Operations office performed. IL.09-1 IL.09-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Referred to DOD IL.09-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated IL.09-2 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

225

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

226

Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

Davis, S.N. (comp.)

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Energy of tsunami waves generated by bottom motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation models. Theoretical and Computational Fluid Dynamics, 21:245­269, 2007. Z. Kowalik, W. Knight, TEnergy of tsunami waves generated by bottom motion By Denys Dutykh, Fr´ed´eric Dias CMLA, ENS investigation on the energy of waves generated by bottom motion is performed here. We start with the full

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

228

Wind Waves and Moveable-Bed Bottom Friction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of moveable-bed bottom friction for wave observations and wave modeling are investigated using a state-of-the-art bottom friction model. This model combines the hydrodynamic friction model of Madsen et al. with a moveable-bed roughness ...

Hendrik L. Tolman

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Integrating health impact assessment into the triple bottom line concept  

SciTech Connect

This theoretical study explores the links between the Triple Bottom Line (TBL) concept and the principles of HIA and considers the potential role of HIA to provide a mechanism for integrating health concerns within a broader agenda of government and business. TBL is a framework linked to the broader sustainability agenda that underpins and reviews environmental, economic and social performance of organizations. In its simplest form, TBL acts as a tool for reporting to stakeholders/shareholders organizational performance and the nature of the impacts on the community. The links to HIA are clear as both seek to determine the impact (potential and actual) on the health and well-being of the population. The study found that TBL can operate at four levels within organizations ranging from reporting through to full integration with the organization's goals and practices. Health is narrowly defined and there are tensions about how to undertake the social accountability functions. The study shows the potential role for HIA within the broader policy and accountability agenda. As health is one of the main outcomes of an organization's activities it needs to be taken into account at all levels of activity.

Mahoney, Mary; Potter, Jenny-Lynn

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

,"Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas...

231

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas...

232

,"Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas...

233

,"Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas...

234

,"Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas...

235

,"Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas...

236

,"Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arizona Natural Gas...

237

,"Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas...

238

,"Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas...

239

,"Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Natural Gas...

240

,"Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

,"Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas...

242

,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas...

243

,"Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas...

244

New project for Hot Wet Rock geothermal reservoir design concept  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the outlines of a new Hot Wet Rock (HWR) geothermal project. The goal of the project is to develop a design methodology for combined artificial and natural crack geothermal reservoir systems with the objective of enhancing the thermal output of existing geothermal power plants. The proposed concept of HWR and the research tasks of the project are described.

Takahashi, Hideaki; Hashida, Toshiyuki

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Post Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Rock Jump to: navigation, search Name Post Rock Facility Post Rock Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Capital Group Developer Wind Capital Group Energy Purchaser Westar Energy Location Ellsworth KS Coordinates 38.87269233°, -98.33059788° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.87269233,"lon":-98.33059788,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

246

Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Density Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Density Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Density of different lithologic units. Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 10.001,000 centUSD 0.01 kUSD 1.0e-5 MUSD 1.0e-8 TUSD / sample

247

Energy extraction characteristics of hot dry rock geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LASL Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project is investigating methods to extract energy at useful temperatures and rates from naturally heated crustal rock in locations where the rock does not spontaneously yield natural steam or hot water at a rate sufficient to support commercial utilization. Several concepts are discussed for application to low and high permeability formations. The method being investigated first is intended for use in formations of low initial permeability. It involves producing a circulation system within the hot rock by hydraulic fracturing to create a large crack connecting two drilled holes, then operating the system as a closed pressurized-water heat-extration loop. With the best input assumptions that present knowledge provides, the fluid-flow and heat-exchange calculations indicate that unpumped (buoyant) circulation through a large hydraulic fracture can maintain a commercially useful rate of heat extraction throughout a usefully long system life. With a power cycle designed for the temperature of the fluid produced, total capital investment and generating costs are estimated to be at least competitive with those of fossil-fuel-fired and nuclear electric plants. This paper discusses the potential of the hot dry rock resource, various heat extraction concepts, prediction of reservoir performance, and economic factors, and summarizes recent progress in the LASL field program.

Tester, J.W.; Smith, M.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Bottom-up generative modeling of tree-structured data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a compositional probabilistic model for treestructured data that defines a bottom-up generative process from the leaves to the root of a tree. Contextual state transitions are introduced from the joint configuration of the children to the ...

Davide Bacciu; Alessio Micheli; Alessandro Sperduti

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Bottom Boundary Layer Over the Northern California Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moored temperature and shipboard CTD observations from a northern California coastal upwelling region reveal variable bottom mixed-layer heights that are typically 5–15 m, but occasionally exceed 50 m. Observations from Oregon, northern ...

Steven J. Lentz; John H. Trowbridge

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Corrections to Bottom Pressure Records for Dynamic Temperature Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Factory calibration of Digiquartz™ transducers allows for static temperature corrections, assuming that the temperature changes slowly enough during deployment that the gauge is always in thermal equilibrium. Deep ocean bottom pressure recorders ...

Edward F. Boss; Frank I. González

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Surges of Antarctic Bottom Water into the North Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current meter records show that Antarctic Bottom Water surges into the western North Atlantic with roughly a sixty-day period. A time-dependent mass budget which incorporates estimated volume fluxes from geostrophic calculations, surges with a ...

John A. Whitehead

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Propagation of Barotropic Continental Shelf Waves over Irregular Bottom Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a geometry which roughly approximates that of a typical continental shelf and slope, the effects of a random bottom topography on free barotropic shelf waves are found. The bathymetric irregularity induces damping of the coherent wave due ...

K. H. Brink

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Effects of Instrumented Bottom Tripods on Process Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The measurement and assessment of ocean bottom processes are important sources of information for understanding bedform evolution and sediment entrainment and for improving numerical models. Instrumented tripods have been used to investigate ...

Rodolfo Bolaños; Laurent O. Amoudry; Ken Doyle

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Interaction of Ocean Waves with a Soft Bottom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soft muddy bottoms have significant effects on properties of water waves which propagate over them. The wave dispersion equation is modified and wave energy is dissipated by the coupling between the waves in water and those induced in the mud ...

S. V. Hsiao; O. H. Shemdin

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Convectively Driven Mixing in the Bottom Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Closely spaced vertical profiles through the bottom boundary layer over a sloping continental shelf during relaxation from coastal upwelling reveal structure that is consistent with convectively driven mixing. Parcels of fluid were observed ...

J. N. Moum; A. Perlin; J. M. Klymak; M. D. Levine; T. Boyd; P. M. Kosro

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Charm and bottom hadronic form factors with QCD sum rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a brief review of some calculations of form factors and coupling constants in vertices with charm and bottom mesons in the framework of QCD sum rules. We first discuss the motivation for this work, describing possible applications of these form factors to charm and bottom decays processes. We first make a summarize of the QCD sum rules method. We give special attention to the uncertainties of the method introducing by the intrinsic variation of the parameters. Finally we conclude.

Bracco, M. E. [Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rod. Presidente Dutra Km 298, Polo Industrial, 27537-000, Resende, RJ (Brazil); Rodrigues, B. O.; Cerqueira, A. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier 524, 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

257

Rock physics at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock physics refers to the study of static and dynamic chemical and physical properties of rocks and to phenomenological investigations of rocks reacting to man-made forces such as stress waves and fluid injection. A bibliography of rock physics references written by LASL staff members is given. Listing is by surname of first author. (RWR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Rock Details Activities (13) Areas (11) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.

259

Engineering a 70-percent efficient, indirect-fired fuel-cell bottomed turbine cycle  

SciTech Connect

The authors introduce the natural gas, indirect-fired fuel-cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFFC) as a novel power plant system for the distributed power and on-site markets in the 20 to 200 megawatt (MW) size range. The NG-IFFC system is a new METC-patented system. This power-plant system links the ambient pressure, carbonate fuel cell in tandem with a gas turbine, air compressor, combustor, and ceramic heat exchanger. Performance calculations based on Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN) simulations show material and energy balances with expected power output. Early results indicated efficiencies and heat rates for the NG-IFFC are comparable to conventionally bottomed, carbonate fuel-cell steam-bottomed cycles. More recent calculations extended the in-tandem concept to produce near-stoichiometric usage of the oxygen. This is made possible by reforming the anode stream to completion and using all hydrogen fuel in what will need to be a special combustor. The performance increases dramatically to 70%.

Williams, M.C.; Micheli, P.L.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash: Characterization and kinetic studies of organic matter  

SciTech Connect

Bottom ash is the main solid residue which is produced by municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) facilities. To be reused in public works, it has to be stored previously a few months. This material is composed primarily of a mineral matrix but also contains unburnt organic matter. The mineral content and its change in the course of aging are relatively well-known, in contrast with the organic content. So in order to detect the phenomena responsible for changes in organic matter and their effects during aging, the concentrations of the main organic compounds previously characterized, the number of microorganisms, and the release of carbon dioxide were followed kinetically in model laboratory conditions. The results showed that the aging process led to the natural biodegradation of the organic matter available in bottom ash, composed essentially of carboxylic acids and n-alkanes (steroids and PAH`s to a lesser extent), and consequently that it would improve the bottom ash quality. Furthermore these results were confirmed by the study of aging conducted in conditions used in the industrial scale.

Dugenest, S.; Casabianca, H.; Grenier-Loustalot, M.F. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Vernaison (France). Service central d`Analyse; Combrisson, J. [Univ. Claude Bernard-Lyon I, Villeurbanne (France). Lab. d`Ecologie Microbienne du Sol

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

,"U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

262

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

263

,"U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","...

264

,"U.S. Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

265

Microhole Coiled Tubing Bottom Hole Assemblies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original objective of the project, to deliver an integrated 3 1/8-inch diameter Measurement While Drilling (MWD) and Logging While Drilling (LWD) system for drilling small boreholes using coiled tubing drilling, has been achieved. Two prototype systems have been assembled and tested in the lab. One of the systems has been successfully tested downhole in a conventional rotary drilling environment. Development of the 3 1/8-inch system has also lead to development and commercialization of a slightly larger 3.5-inch diameter system. We are presently filling customer orders for the 3.5-inch system while continuing with commercialization of the 3 1/8-inch system. The equipment developed by this project will be offered for sale to multiple service providers around the world, enabling the more rapid expansion of both coiled tubing drilling and conventional small diameter drilling. The project was based on the reuse of existing technology whenever possible in order to minimize development costs, time, and risks. The project was begun initially by Ultima Labs, at the time a small company ({approx}12 employees) which had successfully developed a number of products for larger oil well service companies. In September, 2006, approximately 20 months after inception of the project, Ultima Labs was acquired by Sondex plc, a worldwide manufacturer of downhole instrumentation for cased hole and drilling applications. The acquisition provided access to proven technology for mud pulse telemetry, downhole directional and natural gamma ray measurements, and surface data acquisition and processing, as well as a global sales and support network. The acquisition accelerated commercialization through existing Sondex customers. Customer demand resulted in changes to the product specification to support hotter (150 C) and deeper drilling (20,000 psi pressure) than originally proposed. The Sondex acquisition resulted in some project delays as the resistivity collar was interfaced to a different MWD system and also as the mechanical design was revised for the new pressure requirements. However, the Sondex acquisition has resulted in a more robust system, secure funding for completion of the project, and more rapid commercialization.

Don Macune

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

Developing hot dry rock reservoirs with inflatable open hole packers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An open hole packer system was designed for high pressure injection operations in high temperature wells at the Fenton Hill, Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Site. The packer runs were required to verify that the HDR reservoir fractures had been penetrated during the drilling of well EE-3A. They were also used to stimulate fractures connecting EE-3A to the reservoir and to conduct two massive hydraulic fracture treatments at the bottom of EE-3A. An attempt to use a modified packer design as a temporary well completion system was not successful but with modification the system may prove to be an important HDR completion technique. The eleven packer runs have demonstrated that formation testing, stimulation and HDR reservoir development can now be conducted with an open hole inflatable packer operating over large temperature ranges and high differential pressures.

Dreesen, D.S.; Miller, J.R.; Nicholson, R.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ...

268

Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Lab Analysis Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Lab Analysis Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Core and cuttings analysis is done to define lithology. Water rock interaction. Can determine detailed information about rock composition and morphology. Density of different lithologic units. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Core analysis can locate faults or fracture networks. Oriented core can give additional important information on anisotropy. Historic structure and deformation of land.

269

Petrography and geochemistry of precambrian rocks from GT-2 and EE-1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the drilling of GT-2 and EE-1, 27 cores totaling about 35 m were collected from the Precambrian section. Samples of each different lithology in each core were taken for petrographic and whole-rock major- and trace-element analyses. Whole-rock analyses are now completed on 37 samples. From these data four major Precambrian units were identified at the Fenton Hill site. Geophysical logs and cuttings were used to extrapolate between cores. The most abundant rock type is an extremely variable gneissic unit comprising about 75% of the rock penetrated. This rock is strongly foliated and may range compositionally from syenogranitic to tonalitic over a few centimeters. The bulk of the unit falls within the monzogranite field. Interlayered with the gneiss is a ferrohastingsite-biotite schist which compositionally resembles a basaltic andesite. A fault contact between the schist and gneiss was observed in one core. Intrusive into this metamorphic complex are two igneous rocks. A leucocratic monzogranite occurs as at least two 15-m-thick dikes, and a biotite-granodiorite body was intercepted by 338 m of drill hole. Both rocks are unfoliated and equigranular. The biotite granodiorite is very homogeneous and is characterized by high modal contents of biotite and sphene and by high K/sub 2/O, TiO/sub 2/, and P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ contents. Although all of the cores examined show fractures, most of these are tightly sealed or healed. Calcite is the most abundant fracture filling mineral, but epidote, quartz, chlorite, clays or sulfides have also been observed. The degree of alteration of the essential minerals normally increases as these fractures are approached. The homogeneity of the biotite granodiorite at the bottom of GT-2 and the high degree of fracture filling ensure an ideal setting for the Hot Dry Rock Experiment.

Laughlin, A.W.; Eddy, A.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Geothermal Project Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Low Temperature Resources Project Description The proposed two-year project supports the DOE GTP's goal of promoting the development and commercial application of energy production from low-temperature geothermal fluids, i.e., between 150°F and 300°F. State Nevada Objectives Demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of electricity generation from nonconventional geothermal resources of 205°F using the first commercial use of a cycle at a geothermal power plant inlet temperature of less than 300°F.

271

MHK Technologies/Under Bottom Wave Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Under Bottom Wave Generator Under Bottom Wave Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Under Bottom Wave Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Glen Edward Cook Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description Water will flow up into the pipe from the down stroke and out of the pipe back into the ocean on the up stroke Waves rolling by will push water into the pipe This will mock the ocean swell A propellar is mounted inside the lower portion of the pipe the upward and downward flow of water will spin the propellar in both direcitons The propellar is connected to a generator

272

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: BUENAS Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Baseline projection, - Macroeconomic, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.superefficient.org/Resource%20Library/BUENAS%20-%20Bottom-Up%20Ene References: BUENAS Homepage[1] BUENAS for SEAD[2] Logo: BUENAS BUENAS stands for "Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System". It is used to project

273

Three-dimensional, transient natural convection in inclined wellbores  

SciTech Connect

The occurrence of natural conduction in a wellbore can affect geothermal gradient measurements and heat flow estimates. In the Hot Dry Rock geothermal concept, the wellbores are purposely inclined in the deep regions to enhance heat production. To simulate natural convection flow patterns in directionally drilled wellbores, experiments and analyses were conducted for a circular tube with length to diameter (L/D) ratio of 36 at angles of 0{degrees}, 20{degrees}, and 35{degrees} from the vertical. The tube was heated at the bottom and cooled at the top, and the insulation was adjusted so that approximately one- to two-thirds of the power dissipated was transferred through the tube wall to the surroundings. An aqueous solution of polyvinyl alcohol was employed as the working fluid in order to obtain low Rayleigh numbers corresponding to conditions in geothermal wellbores. Temperature distributions were measured for the three orientations and for several heating rates to demonstrate the effects of tube angle and Rayleigh number. Comparison with measurements showed good agreement of the predicted temperature levels for the maximum inclination and slightly poorer agreement for the other limit, a vertical tube. 50 refs., 9 figs.

McEligot, D.M. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Middletown, RI (USA). Oceanic Div.); Denbow, D.A. (Software AG of North America, Inc., Lakewood, CO (USA)); Murphy, H.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A top-injection bottom-production cyclic steam stimulation method for enhanced heavy oil recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel method to enhance oil production during cyclic steam injection has been developed. In the Top-Injection and Bottom-Production (TINBOP) method, the well contains two strings separated by two packers (a dual and a single packer): the short string (SS) is completed in the top quarter of the reservoir, while the long string (LS) is completed in the bottom quarter of the reservoir. The method requires an initial warm-up stage where steam is injected into both strings for 21 days; then the LS is opened to production while the SS continues to inject steam for 14 days. After the initial warm-up, the following schedule is repeated: the LS is closed and steam is injected in the SS for 21 days; then steam injection is stopped and the LS is opened to production for 180 days. There is no soak period. Simulations to compare the performance of the TINBOP method against that of a conventional cyclic steam injector (perforated across the whole reservoir) have been made. Three reservoir types were simulated using 2-D radial, black oil models: Hamaca (9�°API), San Ardo (12�°API) and the SPE fourth comparative solution project (14�°API). For the first two types, a 20x1x20 10-acre model was used that incorporated typical rock and fluid properties for these fields. Simulation results indicate oil recovery after 10 years was 5.7-27% OIIP with TINBOP, that is 57-93% higher than conventional cyclic steam injection (3.3-14% OIIP). Steam-oil ratios were also decreased with TINBOP (0.8-3.1%) compared to conventional (1.2-5.3%), resulting from the improved reservoir heating efficiency.

Matus, Eric Robert

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat so as to insulate the reactor vessel bottom end wall from the containment structure base mat and allow the reactor vessel bottom end wall to freely expand as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof. Further, a deck is supported upon the side wall of the containment structure above the top open end of the reactor vessel, and a plurality of serially connected extendible and retractable annular bellows extend between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnect the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck. An annular guide ring is disposed on the containment structure and extends between its side wall and the top open end of the reactor vessel for providing lateral support of the reactor vessel top open end by limiting imposition of lateral loads on the annular bellows by the occurrence of a lateral seismic event.

Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Laser Rock Perforation Demo - The NE Multimedia Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rock perforation demo High power laser beam can be used in oil well completion application for perforating oil reservoir rock and increasing rock's permeability for high oil...

277

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 1. Project Location Project Location j PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK &...

278

Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Over the past 13,500 years, human populations have lived in and productively utilized the natural resources offered by the cold desert environment of the northeastern Snake River Plain in eastern Idaho. Within an overall framework of hunting and gathering, groups relied on an intimate familiarity with the natural world and developed a variety of technologies to extract the resources that they needed to survive. Useful items were abundant and found everywhere on the landscape. Even the basaltic terrain and the rocks, themselves, were put to productive use. This paper presents a preliminary classification scheme for rock structures built on the Idaho National Laboratory landscape by prehistoric aboriginal populations, including discussions of the overall architecture of the structures, associated artifact assemblages, and topographic placement. Adopting an ecological perspective, the paper concludes with a discussion of the possible functions of these unique resources for the desert populations that once called the INL home.

Brenda R Pace

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Simulation of water-rock interaction in the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to simulate the chemical and hydrological effects of water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to simulate the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

280

Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to accurately simulate water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to determine if TOUGHREACT could accurately predict the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Analytic Results for Higgs Production in Bottom Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate analytically the cross section for Higgs production plus one jet through bottom quark fusion. By considering the small pT limit we derive expressions for the resummation coefficients governing the structure of large logarithms, and compare these expressions with those available in the literature.

Kemal J. Ozeren

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

282

Antarctic Bottom Water Flux in the Equatorial Western Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A moored array at the equator in the western basin of the Atlantic provides a 604-day time series of abyssal currents and temperatures spanning the full breadth of the Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) flowing from the Brazil Basin to the Guiana ...

Melinda M. Hall; Michael McCartney; J. A. Whitehead

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The Influence of Bottom Topography on Baroclinic Transports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new and reduced set of governing equations is proposed for the modeling of baroclinic motions in a two-layer system with variable bottom topography. The reduction of the equations, which eliminates all barotropic is based on the assumption of ...

Benoit Cushman-Roisin; James J. O'Brien

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Deep-Ocean Bottom Pressure Measurements in the Northeast Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure transducers with quartz-crystal resonators are being used to measure deep-ocean bottom pressure in the northeast Pacific as part of a long-term monitoring program. In principal, instrument sensitivity is less than 1 mm for sea-level ...

M. C. Eble; F. I. Gonzalez

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Deep-Ocean Bottom Pressure Measurement: Drift Removal and Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sixteen records from seven Digiquartz deep-ocean bottom pressure sensors have been in deployments of 3–12 month duration under the Gulf Stream in depths of 3300 to 4400 m. Particular attention is given (i) to characterizing any observed drift in ...

D. Randolph Watts; Harilaos Kontoyiannis

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Bottom Boundary Layer in the Eastern Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical and horizontal structure of near-bottom currents at two locations in the eastern tropical Pacific (9°26?N, 151°17?W; 14°38?N, 125°29?W) have been studied. Low-frequency currents at these sites, located in a region of abyssal hills, ...

S. P. Hayes

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

288

Simulation of blasting induced rock motion using spherical element models  

SciTech Connect

Control of the rock motion associated with blasting can have significant economic benefits. For example, surface coal mining can be made more efficient if the overburden material can be cast further with explosives, leaving less work for mechanical equipment. The final muck pile shape in very type of surface and underground blasting is controlled by the blasting induced motion of the rock. A theoretically sound method of predicting rock motion will be beneficial to understanding the blasting process. Discrete element methods have been used for some time to predict rock motion resulting from blasting. What all of these approaches had in common was the use of polygonal elements with corners and sides as well as aspect ratio. Reasonably good results were obtained but treatment of the interactions of the corners and sides of elements was a computationally intensive process that made long simulations with many elements expensive to perform. The use of spherical elements showed increased efficiency but lacked the mechanisms for treating the bulking of the rock mass. The computer program developed was converted from an explicit code to an event-driven code and some bulking mechanisms were added that allowed spherical elements to exert a torque on other spherical elements with which contact was made. The architecture of this program and its event-driven nature made it difficult to vectorize for efficient execution on vector processing machines. A new code called DMC (Distinct Motion Code) has been developed this past year. DMC was designed and written especially to take advantage of super computer vector processing capabilities. This paper will discuss the use of DMC to perform accurate rock motion calculations with very reasonable computation times. 9 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Taylor, L.M.; Preece, D.S. (Hibbitt, Karlsson and Sorensen, Providence, RI (USA); Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Introduction into Induction and Natural Gas Stoves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into Induction and Natural Gas Stoves: A Triple Bottom Line Analysis for the new Student Union Building Jordan Ho of a project/report". #12;APSC 262 An Introduction Into Induction and Natural Gas Stoves A triple-bottom line, 2011 #12;Page 2 of 21 ABSTRACT This report compares the attributes of induction and natural gas stoves

290

Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Future of hot dry rock geothermal energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Where natural groundwater circulation does not exist, the obvious method of extracting heat from the earth's crust is to imitate nature by creating it. A means of doing so by hydraulic fracturing has been demonstrated. Alternatively, explosives or mechanical or chemical methods might be used to open circulation paths. However, where permeabilities are sufficient so that fluid loss is excessive, other approaches are also possible. The magnitude and distribution of hot dry rock and the variety of possible heat-extraction techniques make it appear inevitable that this energy supply will eventually be used on a large scale.

Smith, M.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas...

293

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas...

294

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports To Brazil "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

To Brazil " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas...

295

,"Texas U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas...

296

,"Idaho U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho...

297

,"New York U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New...

298

,"Alaska U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska...

299

,"Arizona U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arizona...

300

,"North Dakota U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

,"Vermont U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Vermont...

302

,"Georgia U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Georgia...

303

,"New Hampshire U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New...

304

,"Maine U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine...

305

,"Montana U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana...

306

,"U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline...

307

,"Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Summary" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Dry...

308

Ship Bottom, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ship Bottom, New Jersey: Energy Resources Ship Bottom, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.642897°, -74.1804159° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.642897,"lon":-74.1804159,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

309

Donor solvent coal liquefaction with bottoms recycle at elevated pressure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein increased naphtha yields are achieved by effecting the liquefaction at a pressure within the range from about 1750 to about 2800 psig in the presence of recycled bottoms and a hydrogen-donor solvent containing at least 0.8 wt % donatable hydrogen. The liquefaction is accomplished at a temperature within the range from about 700.degree. to about 950.degree. F. The coal:bottoms ratio in the feed to liquefaction will be within the range from about 1:1 to about 5:1 and the solvent or diluent to total solids ratio will be at least 1.5:1 and preferably within the range from about 1.6:1 to about 3:1. The yield of naphtha boiling range materials increases as the pressure increases but generally reaches a maximum at a pressure within the range from about 2000 to about 2500 psig.

Bauman, Richard F. (Houston, TX); Taunton, John W. (Seabrook, TX); Anderson, George H. (Houston, TX); Trachte, Ken L. (Baytown, TX); Hsia, Steve J. (Friendswood, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Biphase turbine bottoming cycle for a diesel engine  

SciTech Connect

Application of a two-phase turbine system to waste heat recovery was examined. Bottoming cycle efficiencies ranging from 15 to 30% were calculated for a 720/sup 0/F diesel exhaust temperature. A single stage demonstration unit, designed for non-toxic fluids (water and DowTherm A) and for atmospheric seals and bearings, had a cycle efficiency of 23%. The net output power was 276 hp at 8,100 rpm, increasing the total shaft power from 1,800 hp for the diesel alone, to 2,076 hp for the combined system. A four stage organic turbine, for the same application, had a rotational speed of 14,700 rpm while a four stage steam turbine had 26,000 rpm. Fabrication drawings were prepared for the turbine and nozzle. The major improvement leading to higher cycle efficiency and lower turbine rpm was found to be the use of a liquid component with lower sensible heat. A reduction in capital cost was found to result from the use of a contact heat exchanger instead of tube-fin construction. The cost for a contact heat exchanger was only $35-52/kWe compared to $98/kWe for a tube-fin heat exchanger. Design drawings and materials list were prepared. A program resulting in the demonstration of a two-phase bottoming system was planned and the required cost estimated. The program would result in a feasibility test of the nozzle and turbine at the end of the first year, a laboratory performance test of the bottoming system by the end of the second year and a field demonstration test and laboratory endurance test of the bottoming system during the third year. The blowdown test rig for the first year's program and test turbine were designed.

Ahmad, S.; Hays, L.

1977-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Higgs Boson Resummation via Bottom-Quark Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The region of small transverse momentum in q-qbar- and gg-initiated processes must be studied in the framework of resummation to account for the large, logarithmically-enhanced contributions to physical observables. In this letter, we study resummed differential cross-sections for Higgs production via bottom-quark fusion. We find that the differential distribution peaks at approximately 15 GeV, a number of great experimental importance to measuring this production channel.

B. Field

2004-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Underwater-cable power-transmission system: bottom segment design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

After a survey of the state of the art for bottom cables, some possible configurations are considered for candidate OTEC sites. General considerations on laying and embedding are discussed, and solutions are considered. Optimization of cable dimensions and the problem of flexible joints are covered. The state of the art of cable installation and repair is reviewed and discussed with reference to the representative OTEC sites. Costs for shore terminal stations are evaluated. (LEW)

Not Available

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry: Chapter 9: Limestone and Crushed Rock  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Limestone and Crushed Rock Crushed rock is one of the most accessible natural resources and a major basic raw material. It is used in construction, agriculture, and other industries using complex chemical and metallurgical processes. Despite the low value of its basic products, the crushed rock industry is a major contributor to and an indicator of the economic well being of the nation. Forms Of Crushed Rock About three-quarters of the crushed stone production is limestone and dolomite, followed by, in descending order of tonnage: granite, traprock, sandstone and quartzite, miscellaneous stone, marble, slate, calcareous marl, shell, volcanic cinder and scoria. Limestone, one of the largest produced crushed rock, is a sedimentary rock composed

314

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Burlington Bottoms, Technical Report 1993-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Burlington Bottoms, consisting of approximately 417 acres of riparian and wetland habitat, was purchased by the Bonneville Power Administration in November 1991. The site is located approximately 1/2 mile north of the Sauvie Island Bridge (T2N R1W Sections 20, 21), and is bound on the east side by Multnomah Channel and on the west side by the Burlington Northern Railroad right-of-way and U.S. Highway 30 (Figures 1 and 2). Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Columbia and Willamette River Basin's Fish and Wildlife Program and Amendments. Under this Program, mitigation goals were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the development and operation of Federal hydro-electric facilities in the Columbia and Willamette River Basins. In 1993, an interdisciplinary team was formed to develop and implement quantitative Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) to document the value of various habitats at Burlington Bottoms. Results of the HEP will be used to: (1) determine the current status and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area. HEP participants included; Charlie Craig, BPA; Pat Wright, Larry Rasmussen, and Ron Garst, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service; John Christy, The Nature Conservancy; and Doug Cottam, Sue Beilke, and Brad Rawls, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Beilke, Susan

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Project. Annual report, fiscal year 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of extracting geothermal energy from hot dry rock in the earth's crust was investigated. The concept being investigated involves drilling a deep hole, creating an artificial geothermal reservoir at the bottom of the hole by hydraulic fracturing, and then intersecting the fracture with a second borehole. At the beginning of FY77, the downhole system was complete, but the impedance to the flow of fluid was too high to proceed confidently with the planned energy extraction demonstration. Therefore, in FY77 work focused on an intensive investigation of the characteristics of the downhole system and on the development of the necessary tools and techniques for understanding and improving it. Research results are presented under the following section headings: introduction and history; hot dry rock resource assessment and site selection; instrumentation and equipment development; drilling and fracturing; reservoir engineering; energy extraction system; environmental studies; project management and liaison; and, looking back and ahead. (JGB)

Not Available

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Fluid-rock interaction: A reactive transport approach  

SciTech Connect

Fluid-rock interaction (or water-rock interaction, as it was more commonly known) is a subject that has evolved considerably in its scope over the years. Initially its focus was primarily on interactions between subsurface fluids of various temperatures and mostly crystalline rocks, but the scope has broadened now to include fluid interaction with all forms of subsurface materials, whether they are unconsolidated or crystalline ('fluid-solid interaction' is perhaps less euphonious). Disciplines that previously carried their own distinct names, for example, basin diagenesis, early diagenesis, metamorphic petrology, reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, are now considered to fall under the broader rubric of fluid-rock interaction, although certainly some of the key research questions differ depending on the environment considered. Beyond the broadening of the environments considered in the study of fluid-rock interaction, the discipline has evolved in perhaps an even more important way. The study of water-rock interaction began by focusing on geochemical interactions in the absence of transport processes, although a few notable exceptions exist (Thompson 1959; Weare et al. 1976). Moreover, these analyses began by adopting a primarily thermodynamic approach, with the implicit or explicit assumption of equilibrium between the fluid and rock. As a result, these early models were fundamentally static rather than dynamic in nature. This all changed with the seminal papers by Helgeson and his co-workers (Helgeson 1968; Helgeson et al. 1969) wherein the concept of an irreversible reaction path was formally introduced into the geochemical literature. In addition to treating the reaction network as a dynamically evolving system, the Helgeson studies introduced an approach that allowed for the consideration of a multicomponent geochemical system, with multiple minerals and species appearing as both reactants and products, at least one of which could be irreversible. Helgeson's pioneering approach was given a more formal kinetic basis (including the introduction of real time rather than reaction progress as the independent variable) in subsequent studies (Lasaga 1981; Aagaard and Helgeson 1982; Lasaga 1984). The reaction path approach can be used to describe chemical processes in a batch or closed system (e.g., a laboratory beaker), but such systems are of limited interest in the Earth sciences where the driving force for most reactions is transport. Lichtner (1988) clarified the application of the reaction path models to water-rock interaction involving transport by demonstrating that they could be used to describe pure advective transport through porous media. By adopting a reference frame which followed the fluid packet as it moved through the medium, the reaction progress variable could be thought of as travel time instead. Multi-component reactive transport models that could treat any combination of transport and biogeochemical processes date back to the early 1980s. Berner and his students applied continuum reactive transport models to describe processes taking place during the early diagenesis of marine sediments (Berner 1980). Lichtner (1985) outlined much of the basic theory for a continuum model for multicomponent reactive transport. Yeh and Tripathi (1989) also presented the theoretical and numerical basis for the treatment of reactive contaminant transport. Steefel and Lasaga (1994) presented a reactive flow and transport model for nonisothermal, kinetically-controlled water-rock interaction and fracture sealing in hydrothermal systems based on simultaneous numerical solution of both reaction and transport This chapter begins with a review of the important transport processes that affect or even control fluid-rock interaction. This is followed by a general introduction to the governing equations for reactive transport, which are broadly applicable to both qualitative and quantitative interpretations of fluid-rock interactions. This framework is expanded through a discussion of specific topics that are the f

Steefel, C.; Maher, K.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

2008 Rock Deformation GRC - Conference August 3-8, 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GRC on Rock Deformation highlights the latest research in brittle and ductile rock mechanics from experimental, field and theoretical perspectives. The conference promotes a multi-disciplinary forum for assessing our understanding of rock strength and related physical properties in the Earth. The theme for the 2008 conference is 'Real-time Rheology'. Using ever-improving geophysical techniques, our ability to constrain the rheological behavior during earthquakes and post-seismic creep has improved significantly. Such data are used to investigate the frictional behavior of faults, processes responsible for strain localization, the viscosity of the lower crust, and viscous coupling between the crust and mantle. Seismological data also provide information on the rheology of the lower crust and mantle through analysis of seismic attenuation and anisotropy. Geologists are improving our understanding of rheology by combining novel analyses of microstructures in naturally deformed rocks with petrologic data. This conference will bring together experts and students in these research areas with experimentalists and theoreticians studying the same processes. We will discuss and assess where agreement exists on rheological constraints derived at different length/time scales using different techniques - and where new insight is required. To encompass the elements of these topics, speakers and discussion leaders with backgrounds in geodesy, experimental rock deformation, structural geology, earthquake seismology, geodynamics, glaciology, materials science, and mineral physics will be invited to the conference. Thematic sessions will be organized on the dynamics of earthquake rupture, the rheology of the lower crust and coupling with the upper mantle, the measurement and interpretation of seismic attenuation and anisotropy, the dynamics of ice sheets and the coupling of reactive porous flow and brittle deformation for understanding geothermal and chemical properties of the shallow crust that are important for developing ideas in CO2 sequestration, geothermal and petrochemical research and the mechanics of shallow faults.

James G. Hirth

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

Boundary Layer under Near-Inertial Internal Waves over a Critically Sloping Bottom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internal waves reflecting off sloping bottoms have been shown to have boundary-layer scales proportional to ?½ (? is viscosity). As the characteristic slope of the wave approaches the slope of the bottom, the boundary-layer scale increases ...

R. Lee Gordon

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Top-Down, Bottom-Up Diffusion Experiments in a Water Convection Tank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-eddy simulation (LES) results indicate that turbulent scalar diffusion in the convective atmospheric boundary layer (CBL) has interesting properties. A scalar introduced into the bottom of the CBL with no flux through the top (bottom-up ...

M. Piper; J. C. Wyngaard; W. H. Snyder; R. E. Lawson Jr.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

An Embedded Bottom Boundary Layer Formulation for Z-Coordinate Ocean Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An embedded bottom boundary layer (EBBL) scheme is developed to improve the bottom topographic representation in z-coordinate ocean general circulation models. The EBBL scheme is based on the combined techniques of an embedded topography-...

Y. Tony Song; Yi Chao

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Asymmetric Behavior of an Oceanic Boundary Layer above a Sloping Bottom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of stratification, planetary rotation and a sloping bottom combine to produce an asymmetric response in which the characteristics of an oceanic bottom boundary layer depend on the direction, in addition to the magnitude, of the along-...

J. H. Trowbridge; S. J. Lentz

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Bottom Stress Estimates from Vertical Dissipation Rate Profiles on the Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the near-bottom distribution of the turbulent dissipation rate on the continental shelf west of Vancouver Island are used to calculate bottom stress. A free-failing vertical profiler with microstructure shear probes was used to ...

Richard K. Dewey; William R. Crawford

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Bottom Temperatures Related to Gulf Stream Displacement off the Southeast United States Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bottom temperature time series recorded beneath the Gulf Stream at 265 and 589 m depth off the Georgia coast are compared with simultaneous time series of main thermocline depth determined from inverted echo sounder and bottom pressure gauge ...

Li Li; Mark Wimbush

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Global Contraction of Antarctic Bottom Water between the 1980s and 2000s  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistically significant reduction in Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) volume is quantified between the 1980s and 2000s within the Southern Ocean and along the bottom-most, southern branches of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). AABW ...

Sarah G. Purkey; Gregory C. Johnson

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Subterrene rock-melting concept applied to the production of deep geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of wells comprises a large fraction of the costs of geothermal energy-extraction plants, and billions of dollars for wells will be needed before geothermal energy is nationally significant. Technical and cost studies were made of the application of the Subterrene concept, i.e., excavating and penetrating rocks or soils by melting, to deep wells such as may be used for dry-hot-rock or geopressure geothermal energy extraction systems. Technically, it was found that Subterrene requirements are compatible with those of current rotary drilling practices. Certain features of the rock-melting concept such as the glass lining on the borehole wall, and nonrotation, provide opportunities for the development of better well production techniques in hot wells. A typical optimum-cost well would be rotary-drilled in the upper regions and then rock-melted to total depth. Indicated cost-savings are significant: a 33 percent or 4.5 million dollars reduction from rotary drilled well costs are estimated for a 10 km depth well with bottom hole temperatures of 673 K. Even for normal geothermal gradient conditions, the savings for the 10 km depth is estimated as 23 percent or 2 million dollars.

Altseimer, J.H.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Technical and cost analysis of rock-melting systems for producing geothermal wells. [GEOWELL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of wells makes up a large fraction of the costs of geothermal energy-extraction plants, and billions of dollars for wells will be needed before geothermal energy is nationally significant. Technical and economic systems studies are summarized regarding the application of the Subterrene concept, i.e., excavating and penetrating rocks or soils by melting, to the production of deep wells such as may be used for dry hot rock or geopressurized geothermal energy-extraction systems. Technically, it was found that Subterrene features are compatible with those of current rotary drilling practices. In fact, some special features could lead to improved well production techniques. These include the buildup of a glass lining along the borehole wall which provides structural resistance to collapse; close control of hole geometry; the existence of a barrier between the drilling fluids and the formations being penetrated; nonrotation; potentially better bit life; and faster rates of penetration in deep, hard rock. A typical optimum-cost well would be rotary-drilled in the upper regions and then rock-melted to total depth. Indicated cost savings are significant: a 30 percent or 3.9 million dollar (1975 $) reduction from rotary-drilled well costs are estimated for a 10-km depth well with a bottom hole temperature of 673 K. Even for relatively cool normal geothermal gradient conditions, the savings for the 1..pi..-km well are estimated as 23 percent of 2.1 million dollars.

Altseimer, J.H.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Hot dry rock geothermal potential of Roosevelt Hot Springs area: review of data and recommendations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Roosevelt Hot Springs area in west-central Utah possesses several features indicating potential for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development. The area is characterized by extensional tectonics and a high regional heat flow of greater than 105 mW/m/sup 2/. The presence of silicic volcanic rocks as young as 0.5 to 0.8 Myr and totaling 14 km/sup 3/ in volume indicates underlying magma reservoirs may be the heat source for the thermal anomaly. Several hot dry wells have been drilled on the periphery of the geothermal field. Information obtained on three of these deep wells shows that they have thermal gradients of 55 to 60/sup 0/C/km and bottom in impermeable Tertiary granitic and Precambrian gneissic units. The Tertiary granite is the preferred HDR reservoir rock because Precambrian gneissic rocks possess a well-developed banded foliation, making fracture control over the reservoir more difficult. Based on a fairly conservative estimate of 160 km/sup 2/ for the thermal anomaly present at Roosevelt Hot Springs, the area designated favorable for HDR geothermal exploration may be on the order of seven times or more than the hydrogeothermal area currently under development.

East, J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Definition: Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to core recovered from boreholes. They typically involve measuring the physical and chemical properties of the rock. Physical properties include density, elastic modulus, seismic...

330

Rock Energy Cooperative (Illinois) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperative (Illinois) Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock Energy Cooperative Place Illinois Utility Id 16196 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

331

A Bottom-Up Approach to SUSY Analyses  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes a new way to do event generation and analysis in searches for new physics at the LHC. An abstract notation is used to describe the new particles on a level which better corresponds to detector resolution of LHC experiments. In this way the SUSY discovery space can be decomposed into a small number of eigenmodes each with only a few parameters, which allows to investigate the SUSY parameter space in a model-independent way. By focusing on the experimental observables for each process investigated the Bottom-Up Approach allows to systematically study the boarders of the experimental efficiencies and thus to extend the sensitivity for new physics.

Horn, Claus; /SLAC

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

332

Bottom-Fill Method for Stopping Leaking Oil Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hardware failure at the top of a deep underwater oil well can result in a catastrophic oil leak. The enormous pressure lifting the column of oil in that well makes it nearly impossible to stop from the top with seals or pressurization. We propose to fill the bottom of the well with dense and possibly streamlined objects that can descend through the rising oil. As they accumulate, those objects couple to the oil via viscous and drag forces and increase the oil's effective density. When its effective density exceeds that of the earth's crust, the oil will have essentially stopped flowing.

Bloomfield, Louis A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Gas turbine bottoming cycles: Triple-pressure steam versus Kalina  

SciTech Connect

The performance of a triple-pressure steam cycle has been compared with a single-stage Kalina cycle and an optimized three-stage Kalina cycle as the bottoming sections of a gas turbine combined cycle power plant. A Monte Carlo direct search was used to find the optimum separator temperature and ammonia mass fraction for the three-stage Kalina cycle for a specific plant configuration. Both Kalina cycles were more efficient than the triple pressure steam cycle. Optimization of the three-stage Kalina cycle resulted in almost a two percentage point improvement.

Marston, C.H. [Villanova Univ., PA (United States); Hyre, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Dani Podladchikov, PGP, University of Oslo, Norway Intro 1 #12;Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Motivation 2 The single most useful thing to understand! #12;Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming

Cesare, Bernardo

335

Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Phase I prototype hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal system was developed in Precambrian basement rocks at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Core and cuttings samples from the four deep wells indicate that the reservoir of this Phase I HDR system lies within a homogeneous biotite granodiorite body of very low permeability. Natural fractures, although present, are

336

The hot dry rock geothermal energy program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paper presents a simplified description of the Department of Energy's Hot-Dry-Rock program conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. What a hot-dry-rock resource is and what the magnitude of the resource is are also described.

Smith, M.C.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Proceedings of hot dry rock geothermal workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abstracts of 38 papers are included on the following subjects: rock mechanics, part 1: hydraulic fracturing; fracture imaging and borehole surveying; fluid flow-pressure analyses; rock mechanics, part 2: hydraulic fracturing and thermal cracking; geochemistry; heat extraction modeling; and economics and energy conversion. (MHR)

Elsner, D.B. (comp.)

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assembly of a Molecular Needle, Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up Print Wednesday, 21 December 2005 00:00 Many pathogenic bacteria use a specialized secretion system to inject virulence proteins directly into the cells they infect. The injected proteins, by mimicking host-cell mechanisms, can then subvert normal cellular function. The type III secretion system (TTSS) is a sophisticated protein complex with an overall shape similar to a hypodermic needle. More than twenty unique types of proteins are required for its assembly, most of which are found among a wide variety of animal as well as plant pathogens. Electron microscopy has sketched the broad outlines of TTSS structure, but it does not have sufficient resolution to reveal the details required to understand, and eventually inhibit, the needle's function. At the ALS, researchers from Canada and the U.S. performed crystallographic studies of EscJ, the protein that makes up the needle's ring-shaped base. Their analysis of the EscJ ring not only presents a snapshot of one of the earliest structures generated in the TTSS assembly process, but also reveals features indicative of its role as the molecular platform for subsequent construction of the secretion apparatus.

339

Impacts of Bottom Trawling on Underwater Cultural Heritage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fishing method of trawling, or dragging, has long been shown to be harmful to a plethora of sea life inhabiting the world?s oceans and inland waterways. Fishing nets scour the seabed, disturbing everything in their path, while usually in search of only one type of bottom-dwelling species. Impacts to the seafloor include a removal of topographic features, disturbance of the upper sediment layers, including deep furrows, as well as physical and chemical changes to sediment morphology. While biological organisms and communities can potentially recover from this destruction, archaeological data cannot. Fishermen have been raising important artifacts in their nets for over a century. These finds have helped archaeologists locate significant sites, but they also have the adverse effect of irreparably damaging these sites. This thesis explores the impacts of bottom trawling on underwater cultural heritage. The methods and gear used by trawlers and their documented effects upon the sea floor are identified. Examples of the types of damage shipwreck sites receive after being impacted by trawling are presented. Instances where fishermen have raised prehistoric artifacts from inundated land sites are also introduced. The fishing and archaeological communities must cooperate to limit further damage to underwater cultural heritage around the globe.

Atkinson, Christopher

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Proteomics by FTICR Mass Spectrometry: Top Down and Bottom Up  

SciTech Connect

This review offers a broad overview of recent FTICR applications and technological developments in the field of proteomics, directed to a variety of people with different expertise and interests. Both the ''bottom-up'' (peptide level) and ''top-down'' (intact protein level) approaches will be covered and various related aspects will be discussed and illustrated with examples that are among the best available references in the literature. ''Bottom-up topics include peptide fragmentation, the AMT approach and DREAMS technology, quantitative proteomics, post-translational modifications, and special FTICR software focused on peptide and protein identification. Topics in the ''top-down'' part include various aspects of high-mass measurements, protein tandem mass spectrometry, protein confirmations, protein-protein complexes, as well as some esoteric applications that may become more practical in the coming years. Finally, examples of integrating both approaches and medical proteomics applications using FTICR will be provided, closing with an outlook of what may be coming our way sooner than later.

Bogdanov, Bogdan; Smith, Richard D.

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility General Information Name Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Facility Eagle Rock Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location The Geysers, California Coordinates 38.826770222484°, -122.80002593994° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.826770222484,"lon":-122.80002593994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

342

Modeling Explosive/Rock Interaction During Presplitting Using ALE Computational Methods  

SciTech Connect

Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) computational techniques allow treatment of gases, liq- uids, and solids in the same simulation. ALE methods include the ability to treat shockwaves in gases, liquids, and solids and the interaction of shockwaves with each other and with media from one of the other categories. ALE codes can also treat explosive detonation and the expansion of the explosive gases and their interaction with air and solids. ALEGRA is a 3-DALE code that has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the past few years. ALEGRA has been applied to a 2-D simulation of presplitting using decoupled explosives in rock blasting with very interesting results. The detonation of the explosive at the bottom of the hole sends a shock wave up the borehole driven by the explosive gas expanding into air. The explosive gas compresses the air against the stemming column where it rebounds and recompresses at the bottom of the borehole. This type of ringing takes several cycles to damp out. The explosively induced expansion of the borehole is also treated by ALEGRA as well as the shock wave imparted to the rock. The presentation of this paper will include sev- eral computer animations to aid in understanding this complex phenomenon.

Jensen, Richard P.; Preece, Dale S.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

343

Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer drilling tests, as well as single impact tests, have been designed and executed. Both Berea sandstone and Mancos shale samples are used. In single impact tests, three impacts are sequentially loaded at the same rock location to investigate rock response to repetitive loadings. The crater depth and width are measured as well as the displacement and force in the rod and the force in the rock. Various pressure differences across the rock-indentor interface (i.e. bore pressure minus pore pressure) are used to investigate the pressure effect on rock penetration. For hammer drilling tests, an industrial fluid hammer is used to drill under both underbalanced and overbalanced conditions. Besides calibrating the modeling tool, the data and cuttings collected from the tests indicate several other important applications. For example, different rock penetrations during single impact tests may reveal why a fluid hammer behaves differently with diverse rock types and under various pressure conditions at the hole bottom. On the other hand, the shape of the cuttings from fluid hammer tests, comparing to those from traditional rotary drilling methods, may help to identify the dominant failure mechanism that percussion drilling relies on. If so, encouraging such a failure mechanism may improve hammer performance. The project is summarized in this report. Instead of compiling the information contained in the previous quarterly or other technical reports, this report focuses on the descriptions of tasks, findings, and conclusions, as well as the efforts on promoting percussion drilling technologies to industries including site visits, presentations, and publications. As a part of the final deliveries, the 3D numerical model for rock mechanics is also attached.

Michael S. Bruno

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Thin Film Si Bottom Cells for Tandem Device Structures: Final Technical Report, 15 December 2003 - 15 October 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GIT and IEC developed thin-film Si bottom cell and showed that deposition of top cell in tandem device did not reduce bottom cell performance.

Yelundur, V.; Hegedus, S.; Rohatgi, A.; Birkmire, R.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Flow dynamics and solute transport in unsaturated rock fractures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock fractures play an important role in flow and contaminant transport in fractured aquifers, production of oil from petroleum reservoirs, and steam generation from geothermal reservoirs. In this dissertation, phenomenological aspects of flow in unsaturated fractures were studied in visualization experiments conducted on a transparent replica of a natural, rough-walled rock fracture for inlet conditions of constant pressure and flow rate over a range of angles of inclination. The experiments demonstrated that infiltrating liquid proceeds through unsaturated rock fractures along non-uniform, localized preferential flow paths. Even in the presence of constant boundary conditions, intermittent flow was a persistent flow feature observed, where portions of the flow channel underwent cycles of snapping and reforming. Two modes of intermittent flow were observed, the pulsating blob mode and the rivulet snapping mode. A conceptual model for the rivulet snapping mode was proposed and examined using idealized, variable-aperture fractures. The frequency of intermittent flow events was measured in several experiments and related to the capillary and Bond numbers to characterize this flow behavior.

Su, G. W.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

High temperature water adsorption on The Geysers rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to measure water retention by geothermal reservoir rocks at the actual reservoir temperature, the ORNL high temperature isopiestic apparatus was adapted for adsorption measurements. The quality of water retained by rock samples taken from three different wells of The Geysers geothermal reservoir was measured at 150{sup degree}C, 200{sup degree}C, and 250{sup degree}C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {<=}p/p{sub degree} {<=} 0.98, where p{sub degree} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A correlation is sought between water adsorption, the surface properties, and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

FRACTURE DETECTION IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK USING ULTRASONIC SHEAR WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the piezoelectric source plate and the rock surface. With aThe S^j sources were bonded to the rock surface with a fast-^ source plate was epoxied in position on the rock specimen.

Waters, K.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Bottom/Side Lift Gantry Conceptual Design Rev. 01  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this task is to update the existing bottom/side lift gantry analysis so that the design is consistent with Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II) design constraints listed in the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (CRWMS M and O 1999a, Section 2.2.1.1, p. 9a). This update is consistent with the requirements of the Technical Guidance Document for License Application Preparation (YMP 1999, Section 6.2.5.1). This update will also take into account the latest available equipment classification and Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System Description Document (SDD) (CRWMS M and O 2000c) requirements. The principal objective of this analysis is to verify that the newly developed bottom/side lift gantry concept continues to be a suitable design concept for the current Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) design. This analysis includes an examination of the waste package (WP) transfer operation at the emplacement drift transfer dock. In addition, this analysis verifies that the gantry is compatible with the WP transporter, which has been redesigned to handle WPs sitting on pallets (CRWMS M and O 2000a). The scope of this work is to examine the existing analysis and to determine what, if any, modifications to the analysis may be required as a result of additional requirements imposed by the EDA II concept. Then, a revision will be made to the conceptual design accordingly. The analysis will also be revised to show the approximate sizes and locations of the electrical equipment and control cabinets, and to take into account the weight of that equipment in the total gantry weight. The analytical portions of the analysis are revised, as required, to address changes resulting from modifications to the conceptual design or from changes in classification and/or SDD requirements. Finally, the revised conceptual design is evaluated to verify that it continues to be a suitable method for handling the WPs within the emplacement drift. Except as noted, the scope of this work does not include any new analytical investigations or any detailed studies regarding the mechanical or electrical subsystems of the gantry beyond those in Revision 00 of this analysis. This analysis has been prepared in accordance with the requirements set forth in Bottom/Side Lift Gantry Analysis (CRWMS M and O 1999b). This analysis supports the MGR design that will be presented as part of the Site Recommendation.

Bair, P.S.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

349

Reach the Bottom Line of the Sbottom Search  

SciTech Connect

We propose a new search strategy for directly-produced sbottoms at the LHC with a small mass splitting between the sbottom and its decayed stable neutralino. Our search strategy is based on boosting sbottoms through an energetic initial state radiation jet. In the final state, we require a large missing transverse energy and one or two b-jets besides the initial state radiation jet. We also define a few kinematic variables to further increase the discovery reach. For the case that the sbottom mainly decays into the bottom quark and the stable neutralino, we have found that even for a mass splitting as small as 10 GeV sbottoms with masses up to around 400 GeV can be excluded at the 95% confidence level with 20 inverse femtobarn data at the 8 TeV LHC.

Alvarez, Ezequiel; Bai, Yang

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

350

Some approaches to rock mass hydrofracture theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new engineering method has been developed at the Leningrad Mining Institute for defining hot dry rock hydrofracturing parameters. It reflects the structural features of a real jointed rock mass, its gravity-tectonic components of the stress tensor and volume character of deformations, taking into account the inertial effects of hydrodynamics in the non-Darcy zone of radial fluid flow near the injection well, and conversion of the heat energy extracted from hot rock by circulating water partly into filtration-flow additional pressure. Results of calculations are compared to field experiments at Fenton Hill, NM, and are used for the first HDR circulation systems in the USSR.

Dyadkin, Yuri, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Industrial applications of hot dry rock geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the form of naturally occurring hot water or steam have been utilized for many years. While these hydrothermal resources are found in many places, the general case is that the rock at depth is hot, but does not contain significant amounts of mobile fluid. An extremely large amount of geothermal energy is found around the world in this hot dry rock (HDR). Technology has been under development for more than twenty years at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and elsewhere to develop the technology to extract the geothermal energy from HDR in a form useful for electricity generation, space heating, or industrial processing. HDR technology is especially attractive for industrial applications because of the ubiquitous distribution of the HDR resource and the unique aspects of the process developed to recover it. In the HDR process, as developed at Los Alamos, water is pumped down a well under high pressure to open up natural joints in hot rock and create an artificial geothermal reservoir. Energy is extracted by circulating water through the reservoir. Pressurized hot water is returned to the surface through the production well, and its thermal energy is extracted for practical use. The same water is then recirculated through the system to mine more geothermal heat. Construction of a pilot HDR facility at Fenton Hill, NM, USA, has recently been completed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists of a large underground reservoir, a surface plant, and the connecting wellbores. This paper describes HDR technology and the current status of the development program. Novel industrial applications of geothermal energy based on the unique characteristics of the HDR energy extraction process are discussed.

Duchane, D.V.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Industrial applications of hot dry rock geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the form of naturally occurring hot water or steam have been utilized for many years. While these hydrothermal resources are found in many places, the general case is that the rock at depth is hot, but does not contain significant amounts of mobile fluid. An extremely large amount of geothermal energy is found around the world in this hot dry rock (HDR). Technology has been under development for more than twenty years at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and elsewhere to develop the technology to extract the geothermal energy from HDR in a form useful for electricity generation, space heating, or industrial processing. HDR technology is especially attractive for industrial applications because of the ubiquitous distribution of the HDR resource and the unique aspects of the process developed to recover it. In the HDR process, as developed at Los Alamos, water is pumped down a well under high pressure to open up natural joints in hot rock and create an artificial geothermal reservoir. Energy is extracted by circulating water through the reservoir. Pressurized hot water is returned to the surface through the production well, and its thermal energy is extracted for practical use. The same water is then recirculated through the system to mine more geothermal heat. Construction of a pilot HDR facility at Fenton Hill, NM, USA, has recently been completed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists of a large underground reservoir, a surface plant, and the connecting wellbores. This paper describes HDR technology and the current status of the development program. Novel industrial applications of geothermal energy based on the unique characteristics of the HDR energy extraction process are discussed.

Duchane, D.V.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Rock of Ages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Ages of Ages Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock of Ages Facility Rock of Ages Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Rock of Ages Energy Purchaser Rock of Ages Location Graniteville VT Coordinates 44.14668574°, -72.48180896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.14668574,"lon":-72.48180896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

354

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/isopubs/itchch2.html Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Isotopic_Analysis-_Rock&oldid=687702" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

355

Rock bed heat accumulators. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the research program on rock bed heat accumulators (or RBHA) are: (1) to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of storing large amounts of thermal energy (in the tens of MWt range) at high temperature (up to 500/sup 0/C) over extended periods of time (up to 6 months) using native earth or rock materials; (2) to conduct studies to establish the performance characteristics of large rock bed heat accumulators at various power and temperature levels compatible with thermal conversion systems; and (3) to assess the materials and environmental problems associated with the operation of such large heat accumulators. Results of the study indicate that rock bed heat accumulators for seasonal storage are both technically and economically feasible, and hence could be exploited in various applications in which storage plays an essential role such as solar power and total energy systems, district and cogeneration heating systems.

Riaz, M.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock between two wells on the west flank of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat is extracted by injecting water into one well,

357

Summary - Hot Dry Rock R&D Strategies and Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In geothermal energy technology, the hydrothermal systems rely on volcanic hot rocks being fortuitously co-located with an adequate supply of natural ground water, usually at some considerable depth within the earth. This represents essentially two accidents in the same place, and the occurrence is relatively rare. Yellowstone Park and the desert valley of southern California are the most noteworthy US. examples. Since the heat is the energy needed, if we could just get the water down to it and back. Well, that's what is being done with the hot dry rock program. A well is drilled down to where there is adequate heat in the rocks. The well is then pressurized until the rock fractures creating what amounts to a reservoir full of hot, shattered rock. Finally, a well is drilled into the reservoir and water is pumped in one well, heated by the rock, and taken out through the other well at useful temperatures and pressures. We are getting ready to run significant long-term flow tests at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site west of Los Alamos, New Mexico. We expect the operational information to provide the data to forecast the energy life of the wells as a production facility. This kind of resource is much more common than regular geothermal resources. Robert H. Hendron described the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies for which the project is preparing. A shortfall of available funding has slowed preparations, delaying the start of that test. The test is planning to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other interests include geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to the pumping power required. Progress has been made in modeling studies, chemically reactive tracer techniques, and in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis. Donald W. Brown discussed reservoir modeling as it relates to production management of the HDR well. For wells which are fracture dominated rather than matrix-permeability controlled, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (or pre-existing fractures is critical to long-term power production from the wells) through optimized pressure management. It was mentioned that a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs, or reinjection I procedures of geothermal reservoirs. Dr. Bruce A. Robinson discussed the development of fluid flow and transport models for simulation of HDR geothermal reservoirs. These models are also expected to provide accurate predictions of long-term behavior and help in the development of strategies for reservoir improvement and operation. Two approaches were discussed. The discrete fracture approach is based on a random fracture network subject to prescribed statistical properties of the fracture set. It is used to simulate steady state fluid flow and solute transport. The other approach used the continuum approximation. This type of model is appropriate when the reservoir consists of many interconnected fractures, as is the case at Fenton Hill.

Tennyson, George P..

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

358

Results of fluid-circulation experiments: LASL hot dry rock geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first large-scale field experiment to investigate the extraction of heat from hot dry rock is now in progress on the Jemez Plateau in northern New Mexico. The experimental system consists of two holes about 3 km deep, from each of which hydraulic fractures have been made. The two major fractures appear to be approximately vertical and parallel, and separated by about 9 m of granodiorite through which fluid is transmitted probably along a distributed set of secondary fractures. Experiments to this point have demonstrated that the surface area of each hydraulic fracture is sufficient to accomplish effective heat transfer from the rock, at about 200/sup 0/C, to water circulated through the system; that there is no significant short-circuiting of the water within the fractures; but that the impedance to fluid flow through the rock between the fractures is too high to permit the rate of heat extraction (initially about 10 MWt) desired of the experimental system. An attempt to reduce impedance by leaching with dilute sodium carbonate solution was unsuccessful. Therefore an attempt is now being made to reduce it by re-drilling from near the bottom of one hole in order to produce a simple system geometry in which the two holes are connected directly through a single hydraulic fracture.

Smith, M.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Mining earth's heat: development of hot-dry-rock geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy-extraction concept of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Program, as initially developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is to mine this heat by creating a man-made reservoir in low-permeability, hot basement rock. This concept has been successfully proven at Fenton Hill in northern New Mexico by drilling two holes to a depth of approximately 3 km (10,000 ft) and a bottom temperature of 200/sup 0/C (392/sup 0/F), then connecting the boreholes with a large-diametervertical hydraulic fracture. Water is circulated down one borehole, heated by the hot rock, and rises up the second borehole to the surface where the heat is extracted and the cooled water is reinjected into the underground circulation loop. This system has operated for a cumulative 416 days during engineering and reservoir testing. An energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t) was produced without adverse environmental problems. During one test, a generator was installed in the circulation loop and produced 60 kW of electricity. A second-generation system, recently drilled to 4.5 km (15,000 ft) and temperatures of 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F), entails creating multiple, parallel fractures between a pair of inclined boreholes. This system should produce 5 to 10 MW(e) for 20 years. Significant contributions to underground technology have been made through the development of the program.

Pettitt, R.A.; Becker, N.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Acord 1-26 hot, dry well, Roosevelt Hot Springs hot dry rock prospect, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Acord 1-26 well is a hot, dry well peripheral to the Roosevelt Hot Springs known geothermal resource area (KGRA) in southwestern Utah. The bottom-hole temperature in this 3854-m-deep well is 230/sup 0/C, and the thermal gradient is 54/sup 0/C/km. The basal 685 m, comprised of biotite monzonite and quartz schist and gneiss, is a likely hot, dry rock (HDR) prospect. The hole was drilled in a structural low within the Milford Valley graben and is separated from the Roosevelt KGRA to the east by the Opal Mound Fault and other basin faults. An interpretation of seismic data approximates the subsurface structure around the well using the lithology in the Acord 1-26 well. The hole was drilled with a minimum of difficulty, and casing was set to 2411 m. From drilling and geophysical logs, it is deduced that the subsurface blocks of crystalline rock in the vicinity of the Acord 1-26 well are tight, dry, shallow, impermeable, and very hot. A hydraulic fracture test of the crystalline rocks below 3170 m is recommended. Various downhole tools and techniques could be tested in promising HDR regimes within the Acord 1-26 well.

Shannon, S.S. Jr.; Pettitt, R.; Rowley, J.; Goff, F.; Mathews, M.; Jacobson, J.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals in MSWI Bottom Ash ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... The Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals in MSWI Bottom Ash by Carbonation Reaction with Diffeent Water Content by Nam-Il Um, Kwang-Suk ...

362

A Statistical Analysis Of Bottom-Hole Temperature Data In The...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Considerable differences in the spread of bottom-hole temperature values from petroleum exploration well logs plotted as a function of depth are observed over a region of...

363

A Bottom-Up Model to Estimate the Energy Efficiency Improvement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Chinese Iron and Steel Industry Title A Bottom-Up Model to Estimate the Energy Efficiency Improvement and...

364

HDR (Hot Dry Rock) technology transfer activities in the Clear Lake Area, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large Hot Dry Rock resource has been recognized in northern California. It underlies the region extending NE of The Geysers to N of the City of Clearlake. The long-range productive potential is thousands of megawatts. The geothermal resource is heterogeneous. There are two mechanisms of heat flow occurring together. One is fluid transport, up natural zones of permeability, to outflows as surface springs. The other is conductive heat flow through impermeable rock. The temperature isotherms are thought to be nearly level surfaces, for example, the 300{degree}C isotherm is at about 8000 ft depth, with spikes'' or ridges'' occurring around narrow zones of fluid flow. While there is accessible heat at shallow depth in the naturally permeable rocks, the really substantial resource is in the impermeable rock. This is the HDR resource. The potential reservoir rocks are Franciscan greywackes and greenstones. Recorded drilling problems appear to be mainly due to intersection with serpentinites or to the effects of stimulation, so are potentially avoidable. Greywacke is favoured as a reservoir rock, and is expected to fail by brittle fracture. The water shortages in Northern California appear to be surmountable. Leakoff rates are expected to be low. Sewerage water may be available for fill and makeup. There is a possibility of combining HDR heat power production with sewerage disposal. To establish the first HDR producer in Northern California offers challenges in technology transfer. Two significant challenges will be creation of dispersed permeability in a greywacke reservoir, and pressure management in the vicinity of naturally permeable zones. A successful demonstration of HDR production technology will improve the long-term prospects for the geothermal power industry in California. 29 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

Burns, K.; Potter, R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes.

Micheli, Paul L. (Morgantown, WV); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Parsons, Edward L. (Morgantown, WV)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes.

Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Bulk heating cleans paraffinic bottoms from crude tanks  

SciTech Connect

It is often challenging to remove from service crude oil tanks that have been in use for many years. Bulk heating, as opposed to localized heating, has been used to successfully liquefy heavy paraffinic or asphaltic bases in crude oil tanks. The process provides economical product recovery, while minimizing waste production and reducing human exposure to hazardous working conditions. Statia Terminals Point Tupper Inc., Point Tupper, N.S., used bulk heating to remove 2 ft of weathered, paraffinic tank bottoms from six 450,000 bbl tanks that held Cabinda crude from West Africa. Immersion tube heaters were installed through the tank manholes and a diluent was added. Two 10-million BTU/hr propane burners supplied heat, and tank mixers operated continuously to aid in heat transfer. The tank contents were heated to 135 F and the temperature was held constant for 3 days. The resulting hot liquid was a pumpable and recoverable product. About 10 days were required to clean each tank. The paper describes the heating and cleaning operation as well as the economics of the Statia project.

Badrock, J. (Cooperheat Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Coutu, R. (Cooperheat Inc., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)); Johnson, N. (Statia Terminals N.V. St. Eustatius (Netherlands)); Martin, A. (Chicago Bridge and Iron Co., Oak Brook, IL (United States))

1995-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

368

Method for using fast fluidized bed dry bottom coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbonaceous solid material such as coal is gasified in a fast fluidized bed gasification system utilizing dual fluidized beds of hot char. The coal in particulate form is introduced along with oxygen-containing gas and steam into the fast fluidized bed gasification zone of a gasifier assembly wherein the upward superficial gas velocity exceeds about 5.0 ft/sec and temperature is 1500.degree.-1850.degree. F. The resulting effluent gas and substantial char are passed through a primary cyclone separator, from which char solids are returned to the fluidized bed. Gas from the primary cyclone separator is passed to a secondary cyclone separator, from which remaining fine char solids are returned through an injection nozzle together with additional steam and oxygen-containing gas to an oxidation zone located at the bottom of the gasifier, wherein the upward gas velocity ranges from about 3-15 ft/sec and is maintained at 1600.degree.-200.degree. F. temperature. This gasification arrangement provides for increased utilization of the secondary char material to produce higher overall carbon conversion and product yields in the process.

Snell, George J. (Fords, NJ); Kydd, Paul H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes. 1 fig.

Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L.

1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

370

Flow dynamics and potential for Biodegradation of Organic Contaminants in Fractured Rock Vadose Zones  

SciTech Connect

We present an experimental approach for investigating the potential for bioremediation of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in fractured-rock vadose zones. This approach is based on the coupling of fluid flow dynamics and biotransformation processes. Fluid flow and distribution within fracture networks may be a significant factor in the ability of microorganisms to degrade VOCs, as they affect the availability of substrate, moisture and nutrients. Biological activity can change liquid surface tension and generate biofilms that may change the nettability of solid surfaces, locally alter fracture permeability and redirect infiltrating liquids. Our approach has four components: (1) establishing a conceptual model for fluid and contaminant distribution in the geologic matrix of interest; (2) physical and numerical experiments of liquid seepage in the fracture plane; (3) non-destructive monitoring of biotransformations on rock surfaces at the micron-scale; and, (4) integration of flow and biological activity in natural rock ''geocosms''. Geocosms are core-scale flow cells that incorporate some aspects of natural conditions, such as liquid seepage in the fracture plane and moisture content. The experimental work was performed with rock samples and indigenous microorganisms from the site of the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), located in a basalt flow basin where VOC contamination threatens the Snake River Aquifer. The insights gained from this approach should contribute to the design of techniques to monitor and stimulate naturally occurring biological activity and control the spread of organic contaminants.

Geller, J.T.; Holman, H.-Y.; Su, T.-S.; Liou, M.S.; Conrad, M.S.; Pruess, K.; Hunter-Devera, J.C.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Trapping of a Coastal Density Front by the Bottom Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of a surface-to-bottom density front on a uniformly sloping continental shelf and the role of density advection in the bottom boundary layer are examined using a three-dimensional, primitive equation numerical model. The front is ...

David C. Chapman; Steven J. Lentz

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Technology assessments of advanced power generation systems 2: Kalina bottoming cycle: Final report  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary assessment of the Kalina cycle as the bottoming system of a small, combined-cycle power plant found that the cost of electricity for this plant was calculated to be somewhat less than that of competing steam-bottoming systems. This new system requires further analysis, however, particularly of the trade-off between heat exchanger cost and cycle performance.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Technology Assessments of Advanced Power Generation Systems II--Kalina Bottoming Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary assessment of the Kalina cycle as the bottoming system of a small, combined-cycle power plant found that the cost of electricity for this plant was calculated to be somewhat less than that of competing steam-bottoming systems. This new system requires further analysis, however, particularly of the trade-off between heat exchanger cost and cycle performance.

1986-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

374

Anisotropic yielding of rocks at high temperatures and pressures; Annual Progress Report, 1988-1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The experimental results we have obtained on Four-Mile gneiss have demonstrated that the yield behavior of quartzo-feldspathic rocks containing only a small percentage (10%) of mica can be markedly anisotropic, provided the mica minerals exhibit a strong crystallographic preferred orientation. Samples of gneiss oriented such that resolved shear stresses on the foliation plane are large are considerably weaker than granites of similar grain size and composition, and this weakness is attributed to enhanced nucleation of microcracks in quartz and feldspar adjacent to mica grains that are suitably oriented for slip. We expect the yield behavior of rocks containing a higher proportion of phyllosilicates to be influenced by the strongly anisotropic nature of these minerals as well, although the strengths, temperature and pressure dependencies, and flow-controlling mechanisms in such rocks may be significantly different.

Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Carter, N.L.

1989-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action Agency/Company /Organization: Booz and Company Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications Website: www.booz.com/global/home/what_we_think/reports_and_white_papers/ic-dis Cost: Free Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action Screenshot References: Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action[1] "As delegates gather for the Climate Change Conference in Cancun in late 2010, they can benefit from familiarizing themselves with the set of tools available for mitigation and adaptation, as well as how these tools can fit

376

Peach Bottom and Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dramatic and extraordinary instance of state and local government control of nuclear power, the purchase by New York of the Shoreham plant is nonetheless indicative of the political demands that some states confront for additional involvement in the regulation of the radiological hazards associated with commercial nuclear power plants. Although the Supreme Court has appeared to expand, in the eight years since PG&E and Silkwood, the acceptable extent of state regulation, some states, in addition to New York, have acquired, with the acquiescence of the NRC, a degree of involvement that exceeds the role for state and local governments provided by the Court. For example, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania concluded with the Philadelphia Electric Company (PECO) in June 1989 an agreement that commits PECO to various initiatives, not otherwise required under NRC regulations, for the safe operation of the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant in Pennsylvania. In July 1991 the State of Vermont and Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corporation (Vermont Yankee) concluded an agreement similar to that concluded between Pennsylvania and PECO. The agreement also commits Vermont Yankee to certain initiatives, not otherwise required under NRC regulations, related to its operation of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant in Vermont. The agreement was precipitated by a challenge to an application, submitted to the NRC by Vermont Yankee in April 1989, to amend the Vermont Yankee plant license to extend its expiration date from December 11, 2007 to March 21, 2012. The amendment would allow the Vermont Yankee plant to operate for forty full years.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Rock-brine chemical interactions. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of experimental interaction of powdered volcanic rock with aqueous solutions are presented at temperatures from 200 to 400/sup 0/C, 500 to 1000 bars fluid pressure, with reaction durations of approximately 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this research is to develop data on the kinetics and equilibria of rock solution interactions that will provide insight into the complex geochemical processes attending geothermal reservoir development, stimulation, and reinjection. The research was done in the Stanford Hydrothermal Lab using gold cell equipment of the Dickson design. This equipment inverts the solution rock mixture several times a minute to ensure thorough mixing. Solution samples were periodically withdrawn without interruption of the experimental conditions. The data from these experiments suggests a path dependent series of reactions by which geothermal fluids might evolve from meteoric or magmatic sources.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Searching, naturally  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: artificial intelligence, computational linguistics, information retrieval, knowledge representation, natural language processing, text processing

Eileen E. Allen

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Rock melting tool with annealer section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Some characteristics of the Hardhat chimney and surrounding wall rock  

SciTech Connect

The Hardhat event was a 4.9 + 1.5 kt nuclear explosion at a depth of 286.2 m in granodiorite. Data from 3 underground drill holes have been analyzed in an effort to further define chimney characteristics. The chimney radius was determined to be 20.3 m near shot point level and 17.7 m near the apical void. The earlier determined cavity radius of 19.2 m was confirmed. Total chimney volume is calculated to be 113,860 cu m consisting of 30,800 cu m of void space and 222 million kg of rock. Of the total chimney volume, 27% is void space. In the rubble column itself, exclusive of the apical void, 22% is void space. The nature of the radioactive melt and its distribution in the puddle suggest that the cavity did not collapse until H + 11 hr when an audible rumble was heard. The zone of highly crushed rock outside the chimney is calculated to have a void column of about 2,500 cu m, roughly 8% of the void volume inside the chimney.

Boardman, C.R.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Category:Little Rock, AR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AR AR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Little Rock, AR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVHospital Little Rock... 69 KB SVLargeHotel Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeHotel Little Ro... 70 KB SVLargeOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeOffice Little R... 71 KB SVMediumOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMediumOffice Little ... 68 KB SVMidriseApartment Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMidriseApartment Lit... 70 KB SVOutPatient Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVOutPatient Little Ro...

383

,"Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids " Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids ",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_gp_a_epl0_fpf_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_gp_a_epl0_fpf_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

384

,"Selected National Average Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected National Average Natural Gas Prices" Selected National Average Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Average Natural Gas Prices",11,"Monthly","11/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Data 2","Annual Average Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1922" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm03vmall.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/oil_gas/natural_gas/data_publications/natural_gas_monthly/ngm.html"

385

ANALYSIS OF 2H-EVAPORATOR SCALE POT BOTTOM SAMPLE [HTF-13-11-28H  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is planning to remove a buildup of sodium aluminosilicate scale from the 2H-evaporator pot by loading and soaking the pot with heated 1.5 M nitric acid solution. Sampling and analysis of the scale material from the 2H evaporator has been performed so that the evaporator can be chemically cleaned beginning July of 2013. Historically, since the operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), silicon in the DWPF recycle stream combines with aluminum in the typical tank farm supernate to form sodium aluminosilicate scale mineral deposits in the 2H-evaporator pot and gravity drain line. The 2H-evaporator scale samples analyzed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) came from the bottom cone sections of the 2H-evaporator pot. The sample holder from the 2Hevaporator wall was virtually empty and was not included in the analysis. It is worth noting that after the delivery of these 2H-evaporator scale samples to SRNL for the analyses, the plant customer determined that the 2H evaporator could be operated for additional period prior to requiring cleaning. Therefore, there was no need for expedited sample analysis as was presented in the Technical Task Request. However, a second set of 2H evaporator scale samples were expected in May of 2013, which would need expedited sample analysis. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) confirmed the bottom cone section sample from the 2Hevaporator pot consisted of nitrated cancrinite, (a crystalline sodium aluminosilicate solid), clarkeite and uranium oxide. There were also mercury compound XRD peaks which could not be matched and further X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of the sample confirmed the existence of elemental mercury or mercuric oxide. On ?as received? basis, the scale contained an average of 7.09E+00 wt % total uranium (n = 3; st.dev. = 8.31E-01 wt %) with a U-235 enrichment of 5.80E-01 % (n = 3; st.dev. = 3.96E-02 %). The measured U-238 concentration was 7.05E+00 wt % (n=3, st. dev. = 8.25E-01 wt %). Analyses results for Pu-238 and Pu-239, and Pu-241 are 7.06E-05 ? 7.63E-06 wt %, 9.45E-04 ? 3.52E-05 wt %, and <2.24E-06 wt %, respectively. These results are provided so that SRR can calculate the equivalent uranium-235 concentrations for the NCSA. Because this 2H evaporator pot bottom scale sample contained a significant amount of elemental mercury (11.7 wt % average), it is recommended that analysis for mercury be included in future Technical Task Requests on 2H evaporator sample analysis at SRNL. Results confirm that the uranium contained in the scale remains depleted with respect to natural uranium. SRNL did not calculate an equivalent U-235 enrichment, which takes into account other fissionable isotopes U-233, Pu-239 and Pu-241.

Oji, L.

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate  

SciTech Connect

We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

Amos Nur

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

387

Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

Brown, D.W.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

389

Segmentation of cracks in shale rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the use of morphological connected filters are studied for segmenting sheet- and thread-like cracks in images of shale rock. A volume formed from a stack of 2-D X-ray images is processed using 3-D attributes. The shape-preserving property ...

Erik R. Urbach; Marina Pervukhina; Leanne Bischof

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

STANFORD ROCK PHYSICS BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TABLE OF CONTENTS A: Rock Physics and Geology. Pressure-solution models and the velocity......................................................... A3 Pressure trends of compressional-and shear-wave velocities measured measured in sands to 20 MPA.....................................................C3 Properties of pore fluids at very high pressures from equations of state. Walls & Dvorkin

Nur, Amos

391

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Hot dry rock geothermal energy development program. Annual report, fiscal year 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Program was on development of methods to produce the hydraulic fractures required to connect the deep, inclined wells of the Phase II system at Fenton Hill. Environmental surveillance, instrument development, laboratory and modeling studies, and other supporting activities were continued. After two unsuccessful attempts to fracture hydraulically through inflatable packers, formation breakdown was produced in an uncased section near the bottom of well EE-2 by pumping water through a cemented-in steel liner. Breakdon occurred at a wellhead pressure of 33.1 MPa and a total of 8539 m/sup 3/ of water was injected. Mapping of source locations of microseismic events indicated opening of an extensive set of planar features dipping about 40/sup 0/W, striking about N20/sup 0/W, and apparently passing beneath the bottom of well EE-3. An attempt was then made to fracture at a higher level where the relative positions of the two wells increased the probability that an inclined fracture would connect them. Repeated failures of drill pipe, tubing, couplings, and packers terminated most pumping experiments prematurely. Important advances were made in thermal protection of downhole instruments, real-time mapping source locations of microseismic signals, modeling of heat and mass transport, and the mechanics of hydraulic fracturing.

Smith, M.C.; Nunz, G.J.; Ponder, G.M. (eds.)

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Impact #309 Potassium-Argon and Argon-Argon Dating of Crustal Rocks and the Problem of Excess Argon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the assumptions foundational to potassium-argon (K-Ar) and argon-argon (Ar-Ar) dating of rocks, there should not be any daughter radiogenic argon ( 40 Ar * ) in rocks when they form. When measured, all 40 Ar * in a rock is assumed to have been produced by in situ radioactive decay of 40 K within the rock since it formed. However, it is well established that volcanic rocks (e.g. basalt) contain excess 40 Ar * , that is, 40 Ar which cannot be attributed to either atmospheric contamination or in situ radioactive decay of 40 K. 1 This excess 40 Ar * represents primordial Ar carried from source areas in the earth’s mantle by the parent magmas, is inherited by the resultant volcanic rocks, and thus has no age significance. However, are all other rocks in the earth’s crust also susceptible to “contamination” by excess 40 Ar * emanating from the mantle? If so, then the K-Ar and Ar-Ar “dating ” of crustal rocks would be similarly questionable. When muscovite (a common mineral in crustal rocks) is heated to 740°– 860°C under high Ar pressures for periods of 3 to 10.5 hours it absorbs significant quantities of Ar, producing K-Ar “ages ” of up to 5 billion years, and the absorbed Ar is indistinguishable from radiogenic argon ( 40 Ar *). 2 In other experiments muscovite was synthesized from a colloidal gel under similar temperatures and Ar pressures, the resultant muscovite retaining up to 0.5 wt % Ar at 640°C and a vapor pressure of 4,000 atmospheres. 3 This is approximately 2,500 times as much Ar as is found in natural muscovite. Thus under certain conditions Ar can be incorporated into minerals which are supposed to exclude Ar when they crystallize. Patterson et al. envisage noble gases from the mantle (and the atmosphere) migrating and circulating through the crust, so there should be evidence of excess

Andrew A. Snelling T

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Materials Reliability Program: Safety Evaluation for Boric Acid Wastage of PWR Reactor Vessel Bottom Heads Due to Bottom-Mounted Noz zle Leakage (MRP-167)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This safety assessment addresses one of the potential safety issues associated with aging degradation of reactor vessel bottom head penetrations: bottom mounted nozzles (BMNs). Specifically, this report evaluates the concern that BMN leakage due to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of the Alloy 600 nozzle and/or Alloy 82/182 J-groove attachment weld could lead to significant wastage of the low-alloy steel head shell material due to concentration of the boric acid present in the leaking prim...

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

Evaluation of the Accuracy of a Ship-Mounted, Bottom-Tracking ADCP in a Near-Shore Coastal Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy of an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) used with an internal bottom-tracking system is considered. The boat speed measured using bottom tracking is extremely accurate, comparable to the speeds measured by a high-resolution, ...

Derek A. Fong; Stephen G. Monismith

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A Self-Contained Sector-Scanning Sonar for Bottom Roughness Observations as Part of Sediment Transport Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies and models of sediment transport in the bottom boundary layer require knowledge of the bottom roughness as a parameter affecting the suspension and transport of sediment. Knowledge of this has often been quite imprecise since measurements ...

J. D. Irish; J. F. Lynch; P. A. Traykovski; A. E. Newhall; K. Prada; A. E. Hay

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Esimation of field-scale thermal conductivities of unsaturated rocks from in-situ temperature data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vicinity of the heat source, and rock temperature exceededand the dry rock near the heat source. The other differencesources, heat transfer takes place through the wet rock (see

Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Index Appendix 1. Sources of Information Rock properties -various sources, and list of mines in crystalline rock whichoz SOURCE EOLOGY INFORMATION MINERALOGY OF HOST ROCKS GULF

Wallenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

toward the heat source, or into the rock underlying the heatcharacterizing DNAPL source zones in fractured rock at theby a point source injection in fractured rock with multiple

Faybishenko, Boris; Witherspoon, Paul A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems  and  rock  fall  source  and  impact  areas,  it  possible  to  a   rock   fall   source   area   in   the  possible  to  a  rock   fall  source  area.    There  are  

Zimmer, Valerie Louise

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system that runs a steam turbine system (bottom cycle).This report focuses on the steam turbine system since these

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Little Rock, Arkansas Small Business IT Security Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Twitter, Facebook & Blogs Free Workshop helps Small Business Owners Reduce Cyber Threats LITTLE ROCK--The US ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

403

CRC handbook of physical properties of rocks. Volume III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book presents topics on: Density of rocks and minerals, includes histograms of density ranges; elastic constants of minerals, elastic moduli, thermal properties; inelastic properties, strength and rheology for rocks and minerals, rock mechanics and friction, and stress-strain relations; radioactivity, decay constants and heat production of isotope systems in geology; seismic attenuation, in rocks, minerals, and the earth, with application to oil exploration and terrestrial studies; and index.

Carmichael, R.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A Statistical Analysis Of Bottom-Hole Temperature Data In The Hinton Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Statistical Analysis Of Bottom-Hole Temperature Data In The Hinton Area A Statistical Analysis Of Bottom-Hole Temperature Data In The Hinton Area Of West-Central Alberta Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Statistical Analysis Of Bottom-Hole Temperature Data In The Hinton Area Of West-Central Alberta Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Considerable differences in the spread of bottom-hole temperature values from petroleum exploration well logs plotted as a function of depth are observed over a region of west-central Alberta. The spatial variation of the spread is investigated, and it is found to be greater toward the Rocky Mountain disturbed belt in the west. The spatial variation there does not seem to correspond directly to local topography, and may be partly due

405

Evolution of the Deep Western Boundary Current of Antarctic Bottom Water in the Brazil Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A synthesis of WOCE (and other) hydrographic data shows that the deep western boundary current of Antarctic Bottom Water has a double-core structure, and that it is differentially modified during its northward transit through the Brazil Basin. At ...

Francisco J. Sandoval; Georges L. Weatherly

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Subpolar ocean bottom pressure oscillation and its links to the tropical ENSO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent analysis of ocean bottom pressure (OBP) data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites reveals strong El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-like oscillating phenomena in the subpolar gyre of the North Pacific. The oscillation ...

Y. T. Song; V. Zlotnicki

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Mass transport in the Stokes edge wave for constant arbitrary bottom slope in a rotating ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lagrangian mass transport in the Stokes surface edge wave is obtained from the vertically integrated equations of momentum and mass in a viscous rotating ocean, correct to second order in wave steepness. The analysis is valid for bottom slope ...

Peygham Ghaffari; Jan Erik H. Weber

408

Use of ammonia to reduce the viscosity of bottoms streams produced in hydroconversion processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal, petroleum residuum and similar carbonaceous feed materials are subjected to hydroconversion in the presence of molecular hydrogen to produce a hydroconversion effluent which is then subjected to one or more separation steps to remove lower molecular weight liquids and produce a heavy bottoms stream containing high molecular weight liquids and unconverted carbonaceous material. The viscosity of the bottoms streams produced in the separation step or steps is prevented from increasing rapidly by treating the feed to the separation step or steps with ammonia gas prior to or during the separation step or steps. The viscosity of the heavy bottoms stream produced in the final separation step is also controlled by treating these bottoms with ammonia gas. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the effluent from the hydroconversion reactor is subjected to an atmospheric distillation followed by a vacuum distillation and the feeds to these distillations are contacted with ammonia during the distillations.

Zaczepinski, Sioma (Houston, TX); Billimoria, Rustom M. (Houston, TX); Tao, Frank (Baytown, TX); Lington, Christopher G. (Houston, TX); Plumlee, Karl W. (Baytown, TX)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Simple Models of Coastal-Trapped Waves Based on the Shape of the Bottom Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solutions of barotropic coastal-trapped waves in the shallow-water context are discussed for different shapes of the bottom topography. In particular, an infinite family of topographic waves over continental shelves characterized by a shape ...

L. Zavala Sansón

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Representing energy technologies in top-down economic models using bottom-up information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper uses bottom-up engineering information as a basis for modeling new technologies within the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy. ...

McFarland, James R.; Reilly, John M.; Herzog, Howard J.

411

Deep and Bottom Waters in the Eastern Scotia Sea: Rapid Changes in Properties and Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two meridional hydrographic transects (in 1995 and 1999) across the eastern Scotia Sea are used to investigate variability in the deep and bottom waters between the South Scotia Ridge and South Georgia. There is a significant warming of the warm ...

Michael P. Meredith; Alberto C. Naveira Garabato; David P. Stevens; Karen J. Heywood; Richard J. Sanders

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Stability of Antarctic Bottom Water Formation to Freshwater Fluxes and Implications for Global Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) to freshwater (FW) perturbations is investigated in a coupled climate model of intermediate complexity. It is found that AABW is stable to surface freshwater fluxes greater in volume and rate to ...

Jessica Trevena; Willem P. Sijp; Matthew H. England

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Synthetic Subsurface Pressure Derived from Bottom Pressure and Tide Gauge Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic subsurface pressure (SSP) can be formed from tide gauge records and from bottom pressure measurements to provide a consistent and convenient basis for comparison of these two different types of observations. Common methods for this ...

Sabine Harms; Clinton D. Winant

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

On the Forcing Mechanisms Affecting the Bottom Shear Stress in Coastal Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three papers have appeared in the literature in the past four years which report current data indicating that the bottom shear stress is larger than the surface shear stress. The sites involved in the three studies had many similarities including ...

Cortis Cooper; Bryan Pearce

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Best practices for the sustainable scaleup of lighting technologies in bottom of the pyramid communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis deduces a set of best practices for sustainably scaling up lighting technologies in developing countries with a focus on Bottom-of-the-Pyramid (BOP) communities, whose annual incomes are US $3000 or less (in ...

Alekal, Pragnya Y. (Pragnya Yogesh), 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Bottom Stress in Wind-Driven Depth-Averaged Coastal Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationship between depth-averaged velocity and bottom stress for purely wind-driven flows in unstratified coastal waters is examined using a one-dimensional (vertically resolving) current model. Results indicate that conventional drag laws ...

Harry L. Jenter; Ole Secher Madsen

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Localized Coupling between Surface and Bottom-Intensified Flow over Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Substantial bottom topography in a basin with planetary vorticity gradients strongly affects the vertical structure of the linear topographic and planetary Rossby waves that spin up the ocean circulation. There is no barotropic mode with large ...

Robert Hallberg

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Influence of a Strong Bottom Slope on the Evolution of a Surface-Intensified Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors investigate the influence of steep bottom topography on the propagation of a vortex in a two-layer quasigeostrophic model. The vortex is intensified in the upper layer and the planetary beta effect is taken into account.

Virginie Thierry; Yves Morel

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The Direct Estimation of Near-Bottom Turbulent Fluxes in the Presence of Energetic Wave Motions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Velocities produced by energetic waves can contaminate direct covariance estimates of near-bottom turbulent shear stress and turbulent heat flux. A new adaptive filtering technique is introduced to minimize the contribution of wave-induced ...

W. J. Shaw; J. H. Trowbridge

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Properties of Noise Registered by Pop-Up Ocean-Bottom Seismographs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments, made by the Laboratory of Seismology, Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, have shown that the near-bottom currents excite oscillation modes specific to the body of a pop-up seismic station. These motions can affect the seismic sensor, ...

S. A. Kovachev; T. A. Demidova; A. V. Son’kin

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Turbulence Characteristics and Dissipation Estimates in the Coastal Ocean Bottom Boundary Layer from PIV Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulence characteristics in the coastal ocean bottom boundary layer are measured using a submersible Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system with a sample area of 20 × 20 cm2. Measurements are performed in the New York Bight at elevations ...

P. Doron; L. Bertuccioli; J. Katz; T. R. Osborn

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Treated bottom ash medium and method of arsenic removal from drinking water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

423

Decadal Freshening of the Antarctic Bottom Water Exported from the Weddell Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent decadal changes in Southern Hemisphere climate have driven strong responses from the cryosphere. Concurrently, there has been a marked freshening of the shelf and bottom waters across a wide sector of the Southern Ocean, hypothesized to be ...

Loïc Jullion; Alberto C. Naveira Garabato; Michael P. Meredith; Paul R. Holland; Peggy Courtois; Brian A. King

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Bottom Currents Derived from a Shipborne ADCP on WOCE Cruise A11 in the South Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is divided into two parts: the first describing an enhancement of the shipborne ADCP system and the second describing information about bottom currents that have been obtained therefrom on WOCE cruise A11 in the South Atlantic, Punta ...

Peter M. Saunders; Brian A. King

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

A Linear Equivalent Barotropic Model of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current with Realistic Coastlines and Bottom Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear equivalent barotropic (EB) model is applied to study the effects of the bottom topography H and baroclinicity on the total transport and the position of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). The model is based on the observation of ...

Alexander Krupitsky; Vladimir M. Kamenkovich; Naomi Naik; Mark A. Cane

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

A Study of Tidal Energy Dissipation and Bottom Stress in an Estuary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Method for inferring an area-averaged bottom stress and energy dissipation rate in a tidal estuarine channel is presented. The one-dimensional continuity and momentum relations are developed using simplifying assumptions appropriate for a well-...

Wendell S. Brown; Richard P. Trask

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Acceleration of a Stratified Current over a Sloping Bottom, Driven by an Alongshelf Pressure Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An idealized theoretical model is developed for the acceleration of a two-dimensional, stratified current over a uniformly sloping bottom, driven by an imposed alongshelf pressure gradient and taking into account the effects of buoyancy advection ...

David C. Chapman; Steven J. Lentz

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Adjoint Sensitivity of an Ocean General Circulation Model to Bottom Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bottom topography, or more generally the geometry of the ocean basins, is an important ingredient in numerical ocean modeling. With the help of an adjoint model, it is shown that scalar diagnostics or objective functions in a coarse-resolution ...

Martin Losch; Patrick Heimbach

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Three-Dimensional Turbulent Bottom Density Currents from a High-Order Nonhydrostatic Spectral Element Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overflows are bottom gravity currents that supply dense water masses generated in high-latitude and marginal seas into the general circulation. Oceanic observations have revealed that mixing of overflows with ambient water masses takes place over ...

Tamay M. Özgökmen; Paul F. Fischer; Jinqiao Duan; Traian Iliescu

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A Dense Current Flowing down a Sloping Bottom in a Rotating Fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A density-driven current was generated in the laboratory by releasing dense fluid over a sloping bottom in a rotating freshwater system. The behavior of the dense fluid descending the slope has been investigated by systematically varying four ...

C. Cenedese; J. A. Whitehead; T. A. Ascarelli; M. Ohiwa

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

POPUP: A Prototype Bottom-Moored Long-Term Current Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A self-contained, bottom-mounted instrument for measuring high-resolution vertical profiles of horizontal current in the deep ocean over long time periods (up to a year) has been designed, constructed and successfully tested. It employs an ...

Arthur D. Voorhis; Albert M. Bradley

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Determining Bottom Reflectance and Water Optical Properties Using Unmanned Underwater Vehicles under Clear or Cloudy Skies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) with hyperspectral optical sensors that measure downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance was deployed over sandy bottoms, sea grass patches, and coral reefs near Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas, during the ...

David C. English; Kendall L. Carder

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Simulation of measuring bottom quark flow in heavy ion collisions using the CMS detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I carried out a simulation study to characterize the measurement of bottom quark flow in relativistic Pb+Pb collisions using the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment. The Hydjet event generator is used to produce ...

Franke, Arthur James

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

A Coupled Hydrodynamic–Bottom Boundary Layer Model of Ekman Flow on Stratified Continental Shelves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a hydrodynamic model with turbulent energy closure that uses a simplified wave-current interaction model of the bottom boundary layer to compute bed drag coefficients. The coupled model is used to investigate the interaction ...

Timothy R. Keen; Scott M. Glenn

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Decadal freshening of the Antarctic Bottom Water exported from the Weddell Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent decadal changes in Southern Hemisphere climate have driven strong responses from the cryosphere. Concurrently, there has been a marked freshening of the shelf and bottom waters across a wide sector of the Southern Ocean, hypothesised to be ...

Loïc Jullion; Alberto C. Naveira Garabato; Michael P. Meredith; Paul R. Holland; Peggy Courtois; Brian A. King

436

Evidence for the existence of a stable, highly fluidized-pressurized region of deep, jointed crystalline rock from Fenton Hill hot dry rock test data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated several times at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Fenton Hill hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal test site, that large volumes of naturally jointed Precambrian crystalline rock can be stably maintained at pressures considerably above the least principal earth stress in the surrounding rock mass. In particular, for the deeper, larger, and tighter of the two HDR reservoirs tested at this site in the Jemez Mountains of north-central New Mexico, testing was carried out for a cumulative period of 11 months without evidence of fracture extension at the boundaries of the pressure-stimulated region, even though a very high reservoir inlet circulating pressure of 27.3 MPa (3960 psi) above hydrostatic was maintained throughout the testing, considerably in excess of the least principal stress in the surrounding rock mass of about 10 MPa above hydrostatic at a depth of 3500 m. The author reviews and summarizes information concerning the earth stresses at depth and the test data relative to the containment of pressurized fluid, particularly the data showing the declining rate of water loss and the absence of microseismicity--the two principal indicators of a stable, pressurized reservoir region. The author then provides a coherent and concise evaluation of this and other evidence supporting his assertion that one can indeed maintain large volumes of jointed rock at pressures considerably in excess of the least principal earth stress. In addition, a discussion is presented concerning the initial state of stress at depth beneath Fenton Hill and then possible changes to the stress state resulting from the very large volumes of injected high-pressure water and the accompanying shear displacements--and shear dilation--associated with these pressurizations.

Brown, D.W.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A digital rock density map of New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital geological maps of New Zealand (QMAP) are combined with 9256 samples with rock density measurements from the national rock catalogue PETLAB and supplementary geological sources to generate a first digital density model of New Zealand. This digital ... Keywords: Crust, Database, Density, Geological mapping, Gravimetry, Rock types

Robert Tenzer; Pascal Sirguey; Mark Rattenbury; Julia Nicolson

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

MULTI-ATTRIBUTE SEISMIC/ROCK PHYSICS APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING FRACTURED RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

This project consists of three key interrelated Phases, each focusing on the central issue of imaging and quantifying fractured reservoirs, through improved integration of the principles of rock physics, geology, and seismic wave propagation. This report summarizes the results of Phase I of the project. The key to successful development of low permeability reservoirs lies in reliably characterizing fractures. Fractures play a crucial role in controlling almost all of the fluid transport in tight reservoirs. Current seismic methods to characterize fractures depend on various anisotropic wave propagation signatures that can arise from aligned fractures. We are pursuing an integrated study that relates to high-resolution seismic images of natural fractures to the rock parameters that control the storage and mobility of fluids. Our goal is to go beyond the current state-of-the art to develop and demonstrate next generation methodologies for detecting and quantitatively characterizing fracture zones using seismic measurements. Our study incorporates 3 key elements: (1) Theoretical rock physics studies of the anisotropic viscoelastic signatures of fractured rocks, including up scaling analysis and rock-fluid interactions to define the factors relating fractures in the lab and in the field. (2) Modeling of optimal seismic attributes, including offset and azimuth dependence of travel time, amplitude, impedance and spectral signatures of anisotropic fractured rocks. We will quantify the information content of combinations of seismic attributes, and the impact of multi-attribute analyses in reducing uncertainty in fracture interpretations. (3) Integration and interpretation of seismic, well log, and laboratory data, incorporating field geologic fracture characterization and the theoretical results of items 1 and 2 above. The focal point for this project is the demonstration of these methodologies in the Marathon Oil Company Yates Field in West Texas.

Gary Mavko

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Rock River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock River Wind Farm Facility Rock River Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Shell Wind Energy Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Arlington and Carbon Counties WY Coordinates 41.6996°, -107.003° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6996,"lon":-107.003,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

440

A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting  

SciTech Connect

A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Dynamic rock fragmentation: oil shale applications  

SciTech Connect

Explosive rock fragmentation techniques used in many resource recovery operations have in the past relied heavily upon traditions of field experience for their design. As these resources, notably energy resources, become less accessible, it becomes increasingly important that fragmentation techniques be optimized and that methods be developed to effectively evaluate new or modified explosive deployment schemes. Computational procedures have significant potential in these areas, but practical applications must be preceded by a thorough understanding of the rock fracture phenomenon and the development of physically sound computational models. This paper presents some of the important features of a rock fragmentation model that was developed as part of a program directed at the preparation of subterranean beds for in situ processing of oil shale. The model, which has been implemented in a two-dimensional Lagrangian wavecode, employs a continuum damage concept to quantify the degree of fracturing and takes into account experimental observations that fracture strength and fragment dimensions depend on tensile strain rates. The basic premises of the model are considered in the paper as well as some comparisons between calculated results and observations from blasting experiments.

Boade, R. R.; Grady, D. E.; Kipp, M. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

Holcomb, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); McNamee, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Los Alamos hot dry rock geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The greatest potential for geothermal energy is the almost unlimited energy contained in the vast regions of hot, but essentially impermeable, rock within the first six or seven km of the Earth's crust. For the past five years, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory has been investigating and developing a practical, economical and environmentally acceptable method of extracting this energy. By early 1978, a 10 MW (thermal) heat extraction experiment will be in operation. In the Los Alamos concept, a man-made geothermal reservoir is formed by drilling into a region of suitably hot rock, and then creating within the rock a very large surface for heat transfer by large-scale hydraulic-fracturing techniques. After a circulation loop is formed by drilling a second hole to intersect the fractured region, the heat contained in this reservoir is brought to the surface by the buoyant closed-loop circulation of water. The water is kept liquid throughout the loop by pressurization, thereby increasing the rate of heat transport up the withdrawal hole compared to that possible with steam.

Brown, D.W.; Pettitt, R.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

Holcomb, D.J.; McNamee, M.J.

1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

Calculation of explosive rock breakage: oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Improved efficiency in explosive rock breakage becomes increasingly important as mining costs and the need to tap underground resources continue to grow. Industry has recognized this need for many years and has done a great deal in developing new products and new blasting techniques, generally by purely empirical means. One particular application that has received added attention within the past several years, and one that lends itself to a more objective theoretical study, is explosive fracture of oil shale for conventional and in situ fossil energy recovery. Numerical calculation of oil shale fracturization with commercial explosives has the potential to add to an objective understanding of the breakage process. Often, in such numerical studies, only one or two parts of the total problem are addressed with any degree of sophistication or completeness. Here an attempt is made to treat the entire problem, i.e., explosive characterization, constitutive behavior of intact rock, and a mathematical description of rock fracture. The final results are two-dimensional calculations of explosively induced fracture damage in oil shale.

Johnson, J.N.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Artificial geothermal reservoirs in hot volcanic rock  

SciTech Connect

S>Some recent results from the Los Alamos program in which hydraulic fracturing is used for the recovery of geothermal energy are discussed. The location is about 4 kilometers west and south of the ring fault of the enormous Jemez Caldera in the northcentral part of New Mexico. It is shown that geothermal energy may be extracted from hot rock that does not contain circulating hot water or steam and is relatively impermeable. A fluid is pumped at high pressure into an isolated section of a wellbore. If the well is cased the pipe in this pressurized region is perforated as it is in the petroleum industry, so that the pressure may be applied to the rock, cracking it. A second well is drilled a few hundred feet away from the first. Cold water is injected through the first pipe, circulates through the crack, and hot water returns to the surface through the second pipe. Results are described and circumstances are discussed under which artiflcial geothermal reservoirs might be created in the basaltic rock of Hawaii. (MCW)

Aamodt, R.L.

1974-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

447

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Category:Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Rock Lab Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Rock Lab Analysis Add.png Add a new Rock Lab Analysis Technique Pages in category "Rock Lab Analysis" The following 9 pages are in this category, out of 9 total. C Core Analysis Cuttings Analysis I Isotopic Analysis- Rock O Over Core Stress P Paleomagnetic Measurements Petrography Analysis R Rock Density X X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF)

449

Goa, India Permeability of Charnokite Rock at High Temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Permeability at high temperature is a very important parameter to be considered for designing underground high level nuclear waste repository (HLW) in rock mass. The surrounding rock mass is exposed to heat radiated by HLW when it is buried underground and development or extension of micro-cracks takes place in the host rock due to rise in temperature. Keeping this in view, the permeability study was conducted for Charnokite rock at high temperatures in the range from room temperature, 30 to 200 o C. The cylindrical rock samples of 36mm diameter and 150mm in length were used as per the required size for the equipment permeameter, TEMCO, USA. Total thirty rock samples were tested at various temperatures using nitrogen gas as fluid. The permeability tests were conducted at confining pressure of around 4MPa in order to simulate the horizontal in situ stress conditions in Charnokite rock at the depth of 400m for construction of HLW repository. 1

R. D. Dwivedi; R. K. Goel; A. Swarup; V. V. R. Prasad; R. K. Bajpai; P. K. Narayan; V. Arumugam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rocks  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of laboratory measurements on the mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rock. Artificial rock samples were fabricated by cementing sand and glass beads with sodium silicate binder. During uniaxial compression tests, the rock samples showed stress-strain behavior which was more similar to that of soils than competent rocks, exhibiting large permanent deformations with frictional slip. The mechanical behavior of the samples approached that of competent rocks as the amount of binder was increased. For very weak samples, acoustic waves propagating in these rocks showed very low velocities of less than 1000 m/sec for compressional waves. A borehole made within this weakly cemented rock exhibited a unique mode of failure that is called ''anti-KI mode fracture'' in this paper. The effect of cementation, grain type, and boundary conditions on this mode of failure was also examined experimentally.

Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

2001-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

451

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

452

Reflection of Ocean Surface Gravity Waves from a Natural Beach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy of seaward and shoreward propagating ocean surface gravity waves on a natural beach was estimated with data from an army of 24 bottom-mounted pressure sensors in 13-m water depth, 2 km from the North Carolina coast. Consistent with a ...

Steve Elgar; T. H. C. Herbers; R. T. Guza

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Evaluation of the second hot dry rock geothermal energy reservoir: results of Phase I, Run Segment 5  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a long-term (286 day) flow test of the second hot dry rock reservoir at the Fenton Hill field site are presented. This second reservoir was created by fracturing an interval of granitic rock located at a depth of 2.93 km (9620 ft) in the same wellbore pair used in the creation of the first, smaller reservoir. The new fracture system has a vertical extent of at least 320 m (1050 ft), suggesting that the combined heat-transfer area of the old and new fracture systems is much greater than that of the old system. The virgin rock temperature at the bottom of the deeper interval was 197/sup 0/C (386/sup 0/F). Downhole measurements of the water temperature at the reservoir outlet, as well as temperatures inferred from geothermometry, showed that the thermal drawdown of the reservoir was about 8/sup 0/C, and preliminary estimates indicate that the minimum effective heat-transfer area of the new reservoir is 45,000 m/sup 2/ (480,000 ft/sup 2/), which is six times larger than the first reservoir.

Zyvoloski, G.A.; Aamodt, R.L.; Aguilar, R.G.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4) Generation of derivative property models via linear coregionalization with porosity; (5) Post-processing of the simulated models to impart desired secondary geologic attributes and to create summary and uncertainty models; and (6) Conversion of the models into real-world coordinates. The conversion to real world coordinates is performed as part of the integration of the RPM into the Integrated Site Model (ISM) 3.1; this activity is not part of the current analysis. The ISM provides a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site and consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) RPM, which is the subject of this AMR; and (3) Mineralogic Model. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows the geographic boundaries of the RPM and other component models of the ISM.

Clinton Lum

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

455

The use of sulfer modified bottom ash (SMBA) as an aggregate in asphaltic mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of the 20 million tons of bottom ash and boiler slag generated annually in the United States less than 40 percent is used. The eastern half of Texas is served by 18 coal burning electric power generating plants which produce approximately 3.8 million tons of bottom ash each year. This is also the section of the state in which the sources of quality aggregates are either few. dwindling or nonexistent. While a small fraction of the bottom ash is utilized, the rest is delegated to landfills or on-site disposal areas. Increasing attention is being given to development of new, high-volume uses for this safe and readily available by-product. One such use is as an aggregate in road construction. The use of bottom ash as an aggregate for both roadway surfaces and base courses has been limited due to its absorbency and friability. The former tends to increase asphalt binder demand while the latter adversely affects its ability to withstand the crushing effects of traffic loads. On the other hand, bottom ash is lighter in weight and generally much cheaper than conventional quality aggregates such as limestone, sand and gavel. This research was designed to up-firade the load-bearing characteristics of bottom ash and maximize its use 'in asphaltic concrete roadway mixtures through the use of sulfur. The process essentially coats the ash with liquid sulfur which upon cooling fills the voids on the surface of the particles while increasing their crush resistance. The results of this investigation indicate that asphaltic concrete mix designs in which bottom ash represents from 5 0 to I 00 percent of the aggregate fraction can be achieved.

Chimakurthy, Harshavardhan

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Organic matter characteristics of CenomanianTuronian source rocks: implications for petroleum and gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and shale source rocks . In: Petroleum Geochemistry and Source Rock Potential of Carbonate Rocks (Ed. by G of petroleum . In: Petroleum Geochemistry and Source Rock Potential of Carbonate Rocks (Ed. by G. Palacas of petroleum in Mesozoic reservoirs to carbonate source rocks of Jurassic Smackover Formation, southwestern

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

457

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling Vibration Monitoring and Control System Drilling Vibration Monitoring and Control System DE-FC26-02NT41664 Goal Improve the rate of penetration and reduce the incidence of premature equipment failures in deep hard rock drilling environments by reducing harmful drillstring vibration. Performer APS Technology, Inc., Cromwell, CT 06492 Results To date, this project has produced the following results: Carried out a review of the major sources of vibration likely to influence the bottom hole assembly (BHA) and in particular the bit, and characterized them by their anticipated frequency and amplitude; Developed a software model to analyze drillstring axial vibration and determine optimal damping action; Developed a method to directly quantify the various vibration modes using a system of four accelerometers and a magnetometer mounted in a sensor sub of the damper component;

458

Economics of producing substitute natural gas from coal. Occasional pub  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the cost levelization approach, the economics of producing substitute natural gas (SNG) are examined under different assumptions regarding conversion technologies, coal types and plant financing. A comparison of levelized constant dollar cost-of-service price estimated for Westinghouse and dry bottom Lurgi processes for 1990-2019 shows that SNG from coal produced at western sites is competitive with natural gas and fuel oils.

Rosenberg, J.I.; Ashby, A.B.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hydrothermal alteration at the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah: characterization of rock types and alteration in Getty Oil Company well Utah state 52-21  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Getty Oil Company well 52-21 in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area was drilled to 7500 feet in predominantly upper amphibolite facies metamorphic rocks. All lithologies in the drill hole are pervasively but weakly altered: the alteration assemblage is chlorite + sericite + clays with occasional traces of calcite, above 2300 feet, and chlorite + sericite + clays + calcite +- epidote below 2500 feet. A zone of increased alteration intensity from approximately 1800 feet to 2300 feet occurs within and adjacent to a dacite dike which cuts the metamorphic rocks. A second zone of stronger alteration extends from 6000 feet to the bottom of the drill hole. The drill hole which is located approximately 5000 feet south of the center of the silica apron known as the Opal Mound was apparently drilled beyond the influence of acid, high-sulfate brines such as have affected the upper portions of drill holes 72-16, 76-1 and University of Utah 1A and 1B.

Ballantyne, G.H.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

WIPP Safety Is Paramount Top to Bottom, Literally | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP Safety Is Paramount Top to Bottom, Literally WIPP Safety Is Paramount Top to Bottom, Literally WIPP Safety Is Paramount Top to Bottom, Literally March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WIPP surface maintenance employees tail a new steel head rope over the hoist drum. The hoist is used to transport TRU waste 2,150 underground for final disposal. WIPP surface maintenance employees tail a new steel head rope over the hoist drum. The hoist is used to transport TRU waste 2,150 underground for final disposal. The WIPP shaft crew installs rigging onto a new 2,300-foot-long head rope on the first floor. The WIPP shaft crew installs rigging onto a new 2,300-foot-long head rope on the first floor. WIPP surface maintenance employees tail a new steel head rope over the hoist drum. The hoist is used to transport TRU waste 2,150 underground for final disposal.

463

Hot dry rock geothermal reservoir engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two wells, GT-2 and EE-1, were originally drilled to a depth of 9600 ft (2.93 km) and 10,000 ft (3.05 km), respectively, and, after some difficulties, including redrilling of the bottom portion of GT-2, a good fracture connection was made between EE-1 and GT-2B, as the modified GT-2 was called. The circulation system was studied extensively for the purpose of establishing a number of fracture properties. Techniques were developed to determine orientation, geometry, heat exchange area, volume, flow impedance and impedance distribution. A much larger fracture system was then created from a depth of 9620 ft (2.93 km) in EE-1. The techniques used and results obtained in the study of the new and old fracture systems are discussed. (MHR)

Aamodt, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

466

Natural Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

originate? I need to give the intitial natural source of this energy. Replies: The energy source for most known organisms is the sun. Some organisms, such as deep-sea vent fauna...

467

Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs  

SciTech Connect

An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth`s interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges.

Heuze, F.E.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Hot dry rock geothermal heat extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A man-made geothermal reservoir has been created at a depth of 2.7 km in hot, dry granite by hydraulic fracturing. The system was completed by directionally drilling a second well in close proximity with the top of the vertical fracture. In early 1978 heat was extracted from this reservoir for a period of 75 days. During this period thermal power was produced at an average rate of 4 MW(t). Theoretical analysis of th measured drawdown suggests a total fracture heat transfer area of 16,000 m/sup 2/. Viscous impedance to through-flow declined continuously so that at the end of the experiment this impedance was only one-fifth its initial value. Water losses to the surrounding rock formation also decreased continuously, and eventually this loss rate was less than 1% of the circulated flow rate. Geochemical analyses suggest that, with scale up of the heat transfer area and deeper, hotter reservoirs, hot dry rock reservoirs can ultimately produce levels of power on a commercial scale.

Murphy, H.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Hot Dry Rock at Fenton Hill, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program, operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the Precambrian basement rock at Fenton Hill, outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase 1, 1978--1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/degree/C. A second (Phase 2) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/degree/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Hendron, R.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

The US Hot Dry Rock project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the precambrian basement rock outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase I, 1978-1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/sup 0/C. A second (Phase II) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/sup 0/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development.

Hendron, R.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

A History Of Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Systems | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A History Of Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A History Of Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Systems Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This is a short history, so far as it can now be assembled, of early speculations and observations concerning the existence and origin of natural heat in the earth's crust; of some of the many methods proposed to extract and use it; and of recent investigations designed to develop and demonstrate such methods. It is probably only the preface to a much longer

472

Thermal conductivity of rocks associated with energy extraction from hot dry rock geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of thermal conductivity measurements are given for 14 drill core rock samples taken from two exploratory HDR geothermal wellbores (maximum depth of 2929 m (9608 ft) drilled into Precambrian granitic rock in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. These samples have been petrographically characterized and in general represent fresh competent Precambrian material of deep origin. Thermal conductivities, modal analyses, and densities are given for all core samples studied under dry and water-saturated conditions. Additional measurements are reported for several sedimentary rocks encountered in the upper 760 m (2500 ft) of that same region. A cut-bar thermal conductivity comparator and a transient needle probe were used for the determinations with fused quartz and Pyroceram 9606 as the standards. The maximum temperature range of the measurements was from the ice point to 250/sup 0/C. The measurements on wet, water-saturated rock were limited to the temperature range below room temperature. Conductivity values of the dense core rock samples were generally within the range from 2 to 2.9 W/mK at 200/sup 0/C. Excellent agreement was achieved between these laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity and those obtained by in situ measurements used in the HDR wellbores. By using samples of sufficient thickness to provide a statistically representative heat flow path, no difference between conductivity values and their temperature coefficients for orthogonal directions (heat flow parallel or perpendicular to core axis) was observed. This isotropic behavior was even found for highly foliated gneissic specimens. Estimates of thermal conductivity based on a composite dispersion analysis utilizing pure minerallic phase conductivities and detailed modal analyses usually agreed to within 9 percent of the experimental values.

Sibbitt, W.L.; Dodson, J.G.; Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

HOT BOTTOM BURNING IN INTERMEDIATE MASS STARS JOHN LATTANZIO 1;2 , CHERYL FROST 1;2 , ROBERT CANNON 2;3 , PETER WOOD 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HOT BOTTOM BURNING IN INTERMEDIATE MASS STARS JOHN LATTANZIO 1;2 , CHERYL FROST 1;2 , ROBERT CANNON burning in the bottom of the convective envelope. We find strong CN cycling, with substantial Al include the recently discovered ``Hot Bottom Burning''. Hot Bottom Burning (hereafter HBB

Lattanzio, John

474

Seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain Jens Birkholzer, Guomin Lrepository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as it is locatedclimate conditions at Yucca Mountain. The numerical study is

Birkholzer, Jens; Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Tsang, Yvonne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling...

476

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Project Type Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more...

477

Rock Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleRockSamplingAtYel...

478

Using Ornamental Rock Waste in the Manufacture of Pressed Brick ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is a major producer of rock trimmest, with its production destined largely for export. ... Application of Electrospun Gas Diffusion Nanofibre-membranes in the ...

479

Jazz and Blues Legends Rock the Northeast, Help Save Louisiana ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Jazz and Blues Legends Rock the Northeast, Help Save Louisiana's Coastal Wetlands. 6.8.2006 Neville Brothers, Dr. John and Mavis Staples Highlight the ...

480

ROCK MASS CHARACTERIZATION FOR STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WASTE IN GRANITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effect of pressure on electrical resistivity of rocks. J..exceptionally high electrical resistivity and low waterwater content is the electrical resistivity which in igneous

Witherspoon, P.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith &...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith & Suemnicht, 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-...

482

ROCK INSTRUMENTATION PROBLEMS EXPERIENCED DURING IN-SITU HEATER TESTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R. Haught, Instrumentation evaluation, calibration, and27 - 30,1979. ROCK INSTRUMENTATION PROBLEMS EXPERIENCEDdiscussed here,l INSTRUMENTATION AND DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM

Binnall, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Paradox Basin source rock, southeastern Utah : organic geochemical characterization of Gothic and Chimney Rock units, Ismay and Desert Creek zones, within a sequence stratigraphic framework.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Chimney Rock and Gothic units of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation have long been considered source rocks for the rich hydrocarbon fields of southeastern Utah.… (more)

Tischler, Keith Louris

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

THERMO-HYDRO-MECHANICAL MODELING OF WORKING FLUID INJECTION AND THERMAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN EGS FRACTURES AND ROCK MATRIX  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) will require creation of a reservoir of sufficient volume to enable commercial-scale heat transfer from the reservoir rocks to the working fluid. A key assumption associated with reservoir creation/stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing), to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock-fracture-fluid-heat system and our ability to reliably predict how reservoirs behave under stimulation and production. Reliable performance predictions of EGS reservoirs require accurate and robust modeling for strongly coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes. Conventionally, these types of problems have been solved using operator-splitting methods, usually by coupling a subsurface flow and heat transport simulators with a solid mechanics simulator via input files. An alternative approach is to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations that govern multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, and rock mechanics simultaneously, using a fully coupled, fully implicit solution procedure, in which all solution variables (pressure, enthalpy, and rock displacement fields) are solved simultaneously. This paper describes numerical simulations used to investigate the poro- and thermal- elastic effects of working fluid injection and thermal energy extraction on the properties of the fractures and rock matrix of a hypothetical EGS reservoir, using a novel simulation software FALCON (Podgorney et al., 2011), a finite element based simulator solving fully coupled multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, rock deformation, and fracturing using a global implicit approach. Investigations are also conducted on how these poro- and thermal-elastic effects are related to fracture permeability evolution.

Robert Podgorney; Chuan Lu; Hai Huang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Nature Macmillan Publishers Ltd 1998 letters to nature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the organic phase was transferred to a new polypropylene 96-well plate (Grenier) with a flat bottom (Sigma

Doebley, John

486

Analysis of fish bycatch and observer effect within the New Zealand ling bottom long-lining commercial fishery.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research aims to make a contribution to management of the ling bottom long-line (BLL) fishery by: - providing improved understanding of fish bycatch in… (more)

Burns, R. J.

487

NATURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize the scientific work that was performed to evaluate and assess the occurrence and economic potential of natural resources within the geologic setting of the Yucca Mountain area. The extent of the regional areas of investigation for each commodity differs and those areas are described in more detail in the major subsections of this report. Natural resource assessments have focused on an area defined as the ''conceptual controlled area'' because of the requirements contained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulation, 10 CFR Part 60, to define long-term boundaries for potential radionuclide releases. New requirements (proposed 10 CFR Part 63 [Dyer 1999]) have obviated the need for defining such an area. However, for the purposes of this report, the area being discussed, in most cases, is the previously defined ''conceptual controlled area'', now renamed the ''natural resources site study area'' for this report (shown on Figure 1). Resource potential can be difficult to assess because it is dependent upon many factors, including economics (demand, supply, cost), the potential discovery of new uses for resources, or the potential discovery of synthetics to replace natural resource use. The evaluations summarized are based on present-day use and economic potential of the resources. The objective of this report is to summarize the existing reports and information for the Yucca Mountain area on: (1) Metallic mineral and mined energy resources (such as gold, silver, etc., including uranium); (2) Industrial rocks and minerals (such as sand, gravel, building stone, etc.); (3) Hydrocarbons (including oil, natural gas, tar sands, oil shales, and coal); and (4) Geothermal resources. Groundwater is present at the Yucca Mountain site at depths ranging from 500 to 750 m (about 1,600 to 2,500 ft) below the ground surface. Groundwater resources are not discussed in this report, but are planned to be included in the hydrology section of future revisions of the ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' (CRWMS M&O 2000c).

D.F. Fenster

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

488

An ultra-high-energy-neutrino detector using rock salt and ice as detection media for radar method  

SciTech Connect

We had found radio-wave-reflection effect in rock salt for detection of an ultra-high energy neutrino (UHE{nu}) which is generated in GZK processes in the universe. When an UHE{nu} interacts with rock salt or ice as a detection medium, the energy converts to a thermal energy. Consequently, a temperature gives rise along an UHE{nu} shower at the interaction location. The permittivity arises with respect to the temperature at ionization processes of the UHE{nu} shower which is composed of hadronic and electromagnetic multiplication processes. The irregularity of the refractive index in the medium for radio wave rises to a reflection. The reflection effect with a long attenuation length of radio wave in rock salt and ice would yield a new method to detect UHE{nu}. They could be used for detection media in which the UHE{nu} interacts with. We could find a huge amount of rock salt or ice over 50 Gt in a natural rock salt formation or Antarctic ice sheet. Radio wave transmitted into the medium generated by a radar system could be reflected by the irregularity of the refractive index at the shower. Receiving the reflected radio wave yields information about the UHE{nu}.

Chiba, Masami; Kamijo, Toshio; Tanikawa, Takahiro; Yabuki, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Osamu; Akiyama, Hidetoshi; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Utsumi, Michiaki; Fujii, Masatoshi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Ohsawa, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Faculty of Science and Technology, Seikei University, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan); Department of Applied Science and Energy Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); School of Medicine, Shimane University, Izumo-shi, Shimane 693-8501 (Japan)

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

489

Hot dry rock: A new energy source for clean power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volcanic eruptions provide a vivid illustration of the vast amount of thermal energy stored within the earth, while geysers, hot springs, and related geothermal features demonstrate that this energy can be brought to the surface in a more benign manner over extended time periods. These latter phenomena have, in fact, been utilized as sources of heat since ancient ones. During the second half of this century, the use of natural geothermal fluids to generate electricity has rapidly expanded. Today, in excess of 5,000 megawatts of electric power are produced from geothermal energy sources around the world. The vast majority of geothermal energy is found, not in the form of hot fluids, but rather as hot dry rock (HDR) which exists almost everywhere beneath the surface of the earth. The object of this paper is to review and summarize the current state of development of HDR technology in the United States and around the world, including preliminary results of a long-term test now underway at the HDR heat mine in Fenton Hill, NM.

Duchane, D.V.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Hot-dry-rock energy: review of environmental aspects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the production of energy contained in hot dry rock (HDR) is surveyed here. In general, careful siting and timing and routine control measures should be adequate to prevent significant environmental harm; sites of particular ecological or visual and recreational value, however, may require more extensive (and more expensive) precautions such as using multiwell pads to reduce land disturbance and dry or wet and dry cooling towers to reduce or eliminate the consumptive use of water. The most important uncertainty among the environmental concerns is the seismic response of HDR formations to short-duration fluid injections at pressures above fracture thresholds; continued monitoring at HDR development sites is necessary. The direct socioeconomic impacts of HDR development should be relatively minor, owing to its capital-intensive nature. Of greater potential importance are the indirect jobs resulting from such development, which could cause significant demographic (and thus fiscal and social) impacts in sparsely populated regions. However, such indirect growth is not expected to begin until a large, stable HDR industry is established in a region, and thus its impacts are expected to be permanent rather than transient.

O'Banion, K.

1981-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

491

Foam flow through a transparent rough-walled rock fracture  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an experimental study of nitrogen, water, and aqueous foam flow through a transparent replica of a natural rough-walled rock fracture with a hydraulic aperture of roughly 30 {mu}m. It is established that single-phase flow of both nitrogen and water is well described by analogy to flow between parallel plates. Inertial effects caused by fracture roughness become important in single-phase flow as the Reynolds number approaches 1. Foam exhibits effective control of gas mobility. Foam flow resistances are approximately 10 to 20 times greater than those of nitrogen over foam qualities spanning from 0.60 to 0.99 indicating effective gas-mobility control. Because previous studies of foam flow have focused mainly upon unfractured porous media, little information is available about foam flow mechanisms in fractured media. The transparency of the fracture allowed flow visualization and demonstrated that foam rheology in fractured media depends upon bubble shape and size. Changes in flow behavior are directly tied to transitions in bubble morphology.

Kovscek, A.; Tretheway, D.; Radke, C. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Natural System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural System Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development - FY11 Progress Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Program Yifeng Wang (SNL) Michael Simpson (INL) Scott Painter (LANL) Hui-Hai Liu (LBNL) Annie B. Kersting (LLNL) July 15, 2011 FCRD-USED-2011-000223 UFD Natural System Evaluation - FY11 Year-End Report July 15, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

493

Analytical modeling and parameter extraction of top and bottom contact structures of organic thin film transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a structure based model of an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) and analyzes its device physics. The analytical model is developed for the top contact structure by mapping the overlap region to the resistance (in the vertical direction) ... Keywords: Analytical modeling, Contact resistance, Organic thin film transistor, Overlap region, Parameter extraction, Top and bottom contact structure, Vertical resistance

Brijesh Kumar, B. K. Kaushik, Y. S. Negi, S. Saxena, G. D. Varma

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

An integrated top-down and bottom-up strategy for characterization protein isoforms and modifications  

SciTech Connect

Bottom-up and top-down strategies are two commonly used methods for mass spectrometry (MS) based protein identification; each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. In this chapter, we describe an integrated top-down and bottom-up approach facilitated by concurrent liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis and fraction collection for comprehensive high-throughput intact protein profiling. The approach employs a high resolution reversed phase (RP) LC separation coupled with LC eluent fraction collection and concurrent on-line MS with a high field (12 Tesla) Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Protein elusion profiles and tentative modified protein identification are made using detected intact protein mass in conjunction with bottom-up protein identifications from the enzymatic digestion and analysis of corresponding LC fractions. Specific proteins of biological interest are incorporated into a target ion list for subsequent off-line gas-phase fragmentation that uses an aliquot of the original collected LC fraction, an aliquot of which was also used for bottom-up analysis.

Wu, Si; Tolic, Nikola; Tian, Zhixin; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

495

The Coastal Bottom Boundary Layer: A Note on the Model of Chapman and Lentz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bottom boundary layer of a stratified flow on a coastal continental shelf is examined using the model of Chapman and Lentz. The flow is driven by a surface stress, uniform in the alongshore coordinate, in a downwelling-favorable direction. ...

Joseph Pedlosky

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events: Peach Bottom, Unit 2  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the internal event initiated accident sequence analyses for Peach Bottom, Unit 2; one of the reference plants being examined as part of the NUREG-1150 effort by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-1150 will document the risk of a selected group of nuclear power plants. As part of that work, this report contains the overall core damage frequency estimate for Peach Bottom, Unit 2, and the accompanying plant damage state frequencies. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses provided additional insights regarding the dominant contributors to the Peach Bottom core damage frequency estimate. The mean core damage frequency at Peach Bottom was calculated to be 8.2E-6. Station blackout type accidents (loss of all ac power) were found to dominate the overall results. Anticipated Transient Without Scram accidents were also found to be non-negligible contributors. The numerical results are largely driven by common mode failure probability estimates and to some extent, human error. Because of significant data and analysis uncertainties in these two areas (important, for instance, to the most dominant scenario in this study), it is recommended that the results of the uncertainty and sensitivity analyses be considered before any actions are taken based on this analysis.

Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Lambright, J.A.; Ferrell, W.L.; Cathey, N.G.; Najafi, B.; Harper, F.T.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Fission product behavior in the Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain HTGRs  

SciTech Connect

Actual operating data from Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain were compared with code predictions to assess the validity of the methods used to predict the behavior of fission products in the primary coolant circuit. For both reactors the measured circuit activities were significantly below design values, and the observations generally verify the codes used for large HTGR design.

Hanson, D.L.; Baldwin, N.L.; Strong, D.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Transport of Bottom Water in the Romanche Fracture Zone and the Chain Fracture Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two moored arrays deployed in the Romanche Fracture Zone and Chain Fracture Zone in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean provide two-year-long time series of current and temperature in the Lower North Atlantic Deep Water and the Antarctic Bottom Water. ...

Herlé Mercier; Kevin G. Speer

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Effect of Sea Ice on the Salinity of Antarctic Bottom Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brine rejection during the formation of Antarctic sea ice is known to enhance the salinity of dense shelf waters in the Weddell and Ross Seas. As these shelf waters flow off the shelves and descend to the bottom, they entrain ambient deep water ...

J. R. Toggweiler; B. Samuels

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

China's Development Could Lead to Bottom Water Formation in the Japan/East Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using hydrographic data and box models, it is shown that the presently discussed diversion of rivers such as the Yellow or the Yangtze for agricultural use is likely to cause the renewal of Bottom Water formation in the Japan/East Sea. Such ...

Doron Nof

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z