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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Thermal stress on bottom hole rock of gas drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas drilling has higher penetration than mud drilling. The greatest reason for this phenomenon with gas is that the gas is greatly cooled by expansion as it passes through the bit and thereby cools the bottom of the hole. The thermal stress at bottom-hole occurs during this process. The concept of thermal crushing of rocks is analysed in this study. The theoretical methods are developed to analyse thermal stresses and fragmentation induced by cooling of rock. Then, the numerical computation is conducted for the thermal stress equations with the numerical result simulated for the temperature field at the bottom hole to explain the reason of high drilling rates in gas drilling. Furthermore, an experiment was conducted to verify the theory. Therefore, the theories and simulated results in this paper have a guiding signification for best understand the technique and possibly to extend its economic advantage still further. [Received: September 23, 2011; Accepted: November 20, 2011

Shunji Yang; Gonghui Liu; Jun Li

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Natural Convection Heat Transfer in a Rectangular Liquid Metal Pool With Bottom Heating and Top Cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study is performed to investigate the natural convection heat transfer characteristics with subcooled coolant to create engineering database for basic applications in a lead alloy cooled reactor. Tests are performed in the ALTOS (Applied Liquid-metal Thermal Operation Study) apparatus as part of MITHOS (Metal Integrated Thermo Hydrodynamic Operation System). A relationship is determined between the Nusselt number Nu and the Rayleigh number Ra in the liquid metal rectangular pool. Results are compared with correlations and experimental data in the literature. Given the similar Ra condition, the present test results for Nu of the liquid metal pool with top subcooling are found to be similar to those predicted by the existing correlations or experiments. The current test results are utilized to develop natural convection heat transfer correlations applicable to low Prandtl number Pr fluids that are heated from below and cooled by the external coolant above. Results from this study are slated to be used in designing BORIS (Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System), a small lead cooled modular fast reactor for deployment at remote sites cycled with MOBIS (Modular Optimized Brayton Integral System) for electricity generation, tied with NAVIS (Naval Application Vessel Integral System) for ship propulsion, joined with THAIS (Thermochemical Hydrogen Acquisition Integral System) for hydrogen production, and coupled with DORIS (Desalination Optimized Reactor Integral System) for seawater desalination. Tests are performed with Wood's metal (Pb-Bi-Sn-Cd) filling a rectangular pool whose lower surface is heated and upper surface cooled by forced convection of water. The test section is 20 cm long, 11.3 cm high and 15 cm wide. The simulant has a melting temperature of 78 deg. C. The constant temperature and heat flux condition was realized for the bottom heating once the steady state had been met. The test parameters include the heated bottom surface temperature of the liquid metal pool, the input power to the bottom surface of the section, and the coolant temperature. (authors)

Lee, Il S.; Yu, Yong H.; Son, Hyoung M.; Hwang, Jin S.; Suh, Kune Y. [Seoul National University, 599 Gwanangno, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Bottom-up and top-down effects on insects herbivores along a natural salinity gradient in a florida salt marsh.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??I compared the strength of bottom- up and top-down effects on insect herbivores along a natural salinity gradient in salt marsh communities in West -… (more)

Albarracin, Maria Teresa

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Detection of Nosema apis and N. ceranae in honeybee bottom scraps and frass in naturally infected hives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detection of Nosema apis and N. ceranae in honeybee bottom scraps and frass in naturally infected Abstract ­ Current sampling methods for identification of honeybee microsporidians (Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae) involve killing adult honeybees. The current study monitored the presence of N. apis and N

5

Life on the Bottom of a Stream  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on the Bottom of a Stream on the Bottom of a Stream Nature Bulletin No. 690 October 20, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist LIFE ON THE BOTTOM OF A STREAM A stream conceals a teeming world of bottom-dwelling animals that are the food supply for all stream fish and a source of live bait for catching them. Raccoons, mink, muskrats, ducks, shore birds, turtles and frogs hunt here for mussels, snails, crayfish and aquatic insects. These insects, after passing their young stages on the stream bottom, emerge as swarms of flying adults devoured by dozens of kinds of song birds. These, too, are the insects that fly fishermen imitate in making their artificial lures. Streams of all sizes have about the same kinds of bottom animals, whether a brook small enough to be stepped across or the mile-wide Mississippi. The greatest differences are found when the populations from different types of bottom are compared -- rock, gravel, sand and mud. These main types result from the sorting action of the water, especially during floods. Rock bottom is found in the fastest water because all smaller materials are swept downstream. As the current becomes slower the gravel, then the sand, and finally the mud, settle out.

6

NATURE AND EXTENT OF FOULING OF SHIPS' BOTTOMS By J. PAUL VISSCHER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;194 BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF FISHERIES the effect of marine borers recently has been studied extensively additional. 4. Increase in wear and tear on machinery. 5. Necessity for dry docking, cleaning, and painting this the bottoms are exposed to view, either by the use of dry docks or marine railways. The former are of two

7

Effects of a sulfide system produced by a natural brine seep on sandy-bottom community structure at the East Flower Garden Bank, northwest Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF A SULFIDE SYSTEM PRODUCED BY A NATURAL BRINE SEEP ON SANDY-BOTTOM COI'1MUNITY STRUCTURE AT THE EAST FLOWER GARDEN BANK, NORTHWEST GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by EDWARD ANDREW WOODS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM... University in partia 1 fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subject: Oceanography EFFECTS OF A SULFIDE SYSTEM PRODUCED BY A NATURAL BRINE SEEP ON SANDY-BOTTOM COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AT THE EAST FLOWER...

Woods, Edward Andrew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

8

Radiation defects and energy storage in natural polycrystalline rock salt. Results of an in-situ test in the Permian rock salt of the Asse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation damage development and the corresponding energy storage in pure undeformed single crystals have frequently been studied in laboratory experiments, however little is known of irradiation experiments on natural rock salt (polycrystalline, deformed and impure) under geological conditions. The relevance of these parameters to the defect formation was revealed by a joint United States/Federal Republic of Germany in-situ test in the Asse Mine. Natural rock salt was heated and irradiated using Co-60 sources. Calculations of the amount of halite expected to be decomposed by radiolysis during the experiment were performed using the 1985 version of the Jain-Lidiard model. Qualitative agreement between theory and analyses was found for all the performed analyses. Quantitative and qualitative deviations of the natural samples behaviour from that of single undeformed crystals were observed and attributed to the influence of sulfatic admixtures, polycrystallinity and strain on radiation damage development and anneal. Special chemical methods, such as iodometric titration and uv-visible spectroscopy were applied in order to measure the hypochlorite ion, which forms in irradiated salt. Composite samples located closet to the Co-60 source averaged 0,4 micromoles neutral chlorine atoms per gram salt, a factor of two more than from other positions. Uv-vis analyses revealed more than a factor of ten greater neutral chlorine concentrations in coloured halite. Similarly, optical absorption measurements indicated a factor of ten difference in sodium metal colloid concentrations.

Gies, H.; Rothfuchs, T. [Institut fuer Tieflagerung, Braunschweig (Germany); Celma, A.G.; Haas, J.B.M. de [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands); Pederson, L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Bottoms Up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Broadcast Transcript: "Bottoms up!" Or, "gan bei," as they say here in China. But what are you drinking? It could either be the authentic 144-proof sorghum-based liquor Moutai, or a clever counterfeit. Moutai has been ...

Hacker, Randi; Boyd, David

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

A Coupled Model for Natural Convection and Condensation in Heated Subsurface Enclosures Embedded in Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Mass Transfer in Yucca Mountain Drifts,” Proceedings ofMD- 000001 REV 00, Yucca Mountain Project Report, Bechtelthe fractured rock at Yucca Mountain have been investigated

Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

The nature of fire-cracked rock: new insights from ethnoarchaeological and laboratory experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the understanding of the geothennodynamics of FCR production. FCR from two experimental data sets are cut to expose flat surfaces that are inspected for thermal-weathering characteristics under low-power magnification. Analytical results indicate that rock...

Jackson, Michael A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

Natural radionuclides in the rocks of the Valle del Cervo Pluton in Piedmont  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......experimental tool in studying natural radioactivity and determining...accurately determine the natural radioactivity in quarries...exhalation rate of radon gas has been determined to...G. and Vecchi, R. Natural Radioactivity and Radon...radioactive samples from Cyprus characteristic geological......

Lucia Sesana; Marco Fumagalli; Mauro Carnevale; Giancarla Polla; Ugo Facchini; Annita Colombo; Annalisa Tunesi; Luisa De Capitani; Rosella Rusconi

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Natural radioactivity measurements in rock samples of Cuihua Mountain National Geological Park, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......samples were stored in gas-tight, radon impermeable...concentrations of the natural radionuclides 226Ra...radiation hazard indices from natural radioactivity of some...radioactive samples from Cyprus characteristic geological...Matiullah, Kenawy M. A. Natural radioactivity in marble......

Xinwei Lu; Xiaolan Zhang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

DOE/EA-1371; Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan, Environmental Assessment, and Finding of No Significant Impacts for Rock Creek Reserve (5/2001)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan and Environmental Assessment for Rock Creek Reserve Summary: The Department of Energy (DOE) with the assistance and cooperation of the US. Fish and Wildlife Service, prepared an Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan and Environmental Assessment (Plan)(DOE/EA-1371) for the Rock Creek Reserve at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) located north of Golden, Colorado. The Rock Creek Reserve was established in May 1999 in recognition of the area's biological significance. Although still under the ownership of the DOE, the Rock Creek Reserve will be co- managed with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service as part of an interagency agreement signed by these two

15

Natural radioactivity measurements in rock samples of Cuihua Mountain National Geological Park, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Holm E. The natural radioactivity in phosphate deposits from Sudan. Sci. Total Environ (1995) 162:173-178. 17 Sesana L...24 El-Arabi A. M . Natural radioactivity in sand used in thermal therapy at the Red Sea Coast. J. Environ. Radioact (2005......

Xinwei Lu; Xiaolan Zhang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

An integrated quantitative hazard analysis method for natural gas jet release from underground gas storage caverns in salt rock. II: A sample computation and parametric study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is of great importance and necessity to perform quantitative hazard analysis on possible accidental leakage from gas storage cavern in salt rock. To improve the working safety in the cavern, an integrated quantitative method for hazard analysis on natural gas jet release from caverns in salt rock was presented. In this paper, a sample of gas storage cavern in salt rock was analyzed to demonstrate the presented method. Furthermore, the factors that influence the hazard range of leakage accidents from gas storage cavern in salt rock were discussed. The results indicated that the release rate diminishes with increased pipe length due to friction in steady-state. Meanwhile, the hazard distance from production casing also diminishes with increased pipe length. As the pipeline gets as long as several kilometers, the predicted hazard distance will be constant. However, the hazard distance increases with increasing the operating pressure and pipeline diameter.

Shigang Yang; Qin Fang; Hao Wu; Yadong Zhang; Hengbo Xiang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

DOE/EA-1371; Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan, Environmental Assessment, and Finding of No Significant Impacts for Rock Creek Reserve (5/2001)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INTEGRATED NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PLAN, ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT and Finding Of No Significant Impacts for ROCK CREEK RESERVE 2001-Closure DOE/EA - 1371 Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service May, 2001 Dear Stakeholder: Enclosed is the Final Rock Creek Reserve Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (Plan), Environmental Assessment (EA), and Finding Of No Significant Impacts (FONSI). The Rock Creek Reserve was dedicated on May 17, 1999, to be jointly managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and US Department of Energy. This Plan/EA was developed in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. Through cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for joint

18

Bottom head assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs.

Fife, A.B.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey's Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey`s Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

Eugene A. Fritzler

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Pipeline bottoming cycle study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of applying bottoming cycles to the prime movers that drive the compressors of natural gas pipelines was studied. These bottoming cycles convert some of the waste heat from the exhaust gas of the prime movers into shaft power and conserve gas. Three typical compressor station sites were selected, each on a different pipeline. Although the prime movers were different, they were similar enough in exhaust gas flow rate and temperature that a single bottoming cycle system could be designed, with some modifications, for all three sites. Preliminary design included selection of the bottoming cycle working fluid, optimization of the cycle, and design of the components, such as turbine, vapor generator and condensers. Installation drawings were made and hardware and installation costs were estimated. The results of the economic assessment of retrofitting bottoming cycle systems on the three selected sites indicated that profitability was strongly dependent upon the site-specific installation costs, how the energy was used and the yearly utilization of the apparatus. The study indicated that the bottoming cycles are a competitive investment alternative for certain applications for the pipeline industry. Bottoming cycles are technically feasible. It was concluded that proper design and operating practices would reduce the environmental and safety hazards to acceptable levels. The amount of gas that could be saved through the year 2000 by the adoption of bottoming cycles for two different supply projections was estimated as from 0.296 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a low supply projection to 0.734 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a high supply projection. The potential market for bottoming cycle equipment for the two supply projections varied from 170 to 500 units of varying size. Finally, a demonstration program plan was developed.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

An integrated quantitative hazard analysis method for natural gas jet release from underground gas storage caverns in salt rock. I: Models and validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is very important and necessary to perform quantitative hazard analysis for possible accidental leakage from an underground gas storage cavern in salt rock. An integrated quantitative hazard analysis method for natural gas jet release from salt caverns is presented in this paper, which was constituted by a revised model for gas leakage rate calculation, a consequence analysis and a model of probability assessment for harm. The presented method was validated by comparing the analytical results with the data collected from the real accidents (including the leakage, jet fire, fireball and vapor cloud explosion). It is indicated that the proposed method was more accurate than the TNT equivalence method for vapor cloud explosion and gave more reasonable results when applied to the consequence analysis for the thermal radiation from jet fire and fireball.

Shigang Yang; Qin Fang; Yadong Zhang; Hao Wu; Linjian Ma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Permeability of natural rock salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during damage evolution and healing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has developed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the bedded salt of southeastern New Mexico to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive transuranic wastes. Four vertical shafts provide access to the underground workings located at a depth of about 660 meters. These shafts connect the underground facility to the surface and potentially provide communication between lithologic units, so they will be sealed to limit both the release of hazardous waste from and fluid flow into the repository. The seal design must consider the potential for fluid flow through a disturbed rock zone (DRZ) that develops in the salt near the shafts. The DRZ, which forms initially during excavation and then evolves with time, is expected to have higher permeability than the native salt. The closure of the shaft openings (i.e., through salt creep) will compress the seals, thereby inducing a compressive back-stress on the DRZ. This back-stress is expected to arrest the evolution of the DRZ, and with time will promote healing of damage. This paper presents laboratory data from tertiary creep and hydrostatic compression tests designed to characterize damage evolution and healing in WIPP salt. Healing is quantified in terms of permanent reduction in permeability, and the data are used to estimate healing times based on considerations of first-order kinetics.

Pfeifle, T.W. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Hurtado, L.D. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Laser bottom hole assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

26

Bell-Bottoms and Energy Efficient Buildings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bell-Bottoms and Energy Efficient Buildings Bell-Bottoms and Energy Efficient Buildings Bell-Bottoms and Energy Efficient Buildings January 18, 2011 - 5:19pm Addthis Roland Risser Roland Risser Program Director, Building Technologies Office This is hard to admit via blog, but I must come clean. I have fallen victim to some now seemingly ridiculous trends during my life. A few of them include wearing bell-bottoms in the 70s, sporting a "Members Only" jacket in the 80s, and rocking Ray-Bans and Maui Jims in the 90s (well, technically I still wear Maui Jims). What was I thinking? This tri-fecta of bad fashion and wrong choices makes me wonder... What characteristic makes an idea or product so exceptional that people value it? What causes the popularity explosion of a YouTube video or the national obsession with a bed bug outbreak?

27

White Rock  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Furnished house for rent in rural White Rock Bright and sunny Ideal for a young family Safe neighborhood 10 min drive to LANL 1300 per month, basic utilities included 1180 sq ft....

28

Rock magnetism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The past three decades have witnessed a new paradigm, the plate tectonics paradigm, in Earth sciences. The record of the Earth's magnetic field stored in rocks played a major role in the establishment of this par...

Ronald T. Merrill

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Evaluating the Moisture Conditions in the Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain: The Impact of Natural Convection Processes in Heated Emplacement Drifts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE FRACTURED ROCK AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN: THE IMPACT OF NATURALgeologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, will stronglyWaste Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Nuclear

Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Halecky, N.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Detonation: From the Bottom Up  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Latest Issue:December 2014 All Issues submit Detonation: From the Bottom Up In the nuclear testing era, scientists never thoroughly characterized the properties of the...

31

Modeling of crack initiation, propagation and coalescence in rocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural or artificial fracturing of rock plays a very important role in geologic processes and for engineered structures in and on rock. Fracturing is associated with crack initiation, propagation and coalescence, which ...

Gonçalves da Silva, Bruno Miguel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Assessment of natural and anthropogenic radioactivity levels in soils, rocks and water in the vicinity of Chirano Gold Mine in Ghana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......gamma-ray exposure from natural radioactivity concentrations...drinking water containing natural radioactivity due to...inhalation of airborne radon gas for the area where both...concentrations in surface soils in Cyprus. J. Environ. Radioact...UNSCEAR. Exposures from natural sources of radiation......

A. Faanu; H. Lawluvi; D. O. Kpeglo; E. O. Darko; G. Emi-Reynolds; A. R. Awudu; O. K. Adukpo; C. Kansaana; I. D. Ali; B. Agyeman; L. Agyeman; R. Kpodzro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Shotgun cartridge rock breaker  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

1 -SUBTIDAL 2 -INTERTIDAL RB ROCK UB UNCONSOLIDATED AB AQUATIC BED RF -REEF OW -OPEN WATER/ AB AQUATIC BED RF REEF RS ROCKY SHORE US -UNCONSOLIDATED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M - MARINE 1 - SUBTIDAL 2 - INTERTIDAL RB ­ ROCK UB ­ UNCONSOLIDATED AB ­ AQUATIC BED RF - REEF OW - OPEN WATER/ AB ­ AQUATIC BED RF­ REEF RS ­ ROCKY SHORE US - UNCONSOLIDATED BOTTOM BOTTOM Unknown Bottom ­ UNCONSOLIDATED AB ­ AQUATIC RF ­ REEF OW - OPEN WATER/ AB ­ AQUATIC RF­ REEF SB ­ STREAMBED RS - ROCKY US

Gray, Matthew

35

NETL: Natural Gas Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources Significant volumes of natural gas can also be produced from tight (low permeability) sandstone reservoirs and coal seams, both unconventional reservoir rocks. NETL...

36

Composite attachment: the Trek bottom bracket  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bottom bracket failures have been one of the most common failures in the composite bicycle frames produced by the Trek Bicycle Corporation. The bottom bracket is the portion of the frame that supports the crank and pedals. An aluminum insert...

Mallard, David

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

37

Dense Bottom Currents in Rotating Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A dense bottom current is the flow created by a source of mass, momentum, and buoyancy flowing into an ambient fluid in such a way that the flow is bounded by the fixed wall and the interface. The dense bottom...

Flemming Bo Pedersen

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and significance of magnetism in sedimentary rocks. Journal1997. Rock Magnetism. ¨ zdemir, O Dunlop, D. J. & Oon July 30, 2013 ROCK MAGNETISM: REMAGNETIZED CARBONATES

Jackson, M.; Swanson-Hysell, N. L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Does roughening of rock-fluid-rock interfaces emerge from a stress-induced instability?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-planar solid-fluid-solid interfaces under stress are very common in many industrial and natural materials. For example, in the Earth’s crust, many rough and wavy interfaces can be observed in rocks in a wi...

E. Bonnetier; C. Misbah; F. Renard; R. Toussaint…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Definition: Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rock Sampling Systematic rock sampling can be used to characterize a geothermal reservoir. The physical and chemical properties of rock samples provide important information for determining whether a power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed. Some general rock properties can be measured by visual inspection, but detailed properties require laboratory techniques. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is called the "core hole". A variety of core samplers exist to sample

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Representation of common equipment at a natural gas hydraulic fracturing drill pad. Representation of common equipment at a natural gas hydraulic fracturing drill pad. How is Shale Gas Produced? Shale gas formations are "unconventional" reservoirs - i.e., reservoirs of low "permeability." Permeability refers to the capacity of a porous, sediment, soil - or rock in this case - to transmit a fluid. This contrasts with a "conventional" gas reservoir produced from sands and carbonates (such as limestone). The bottom line is that in a conventional reservoir, the gas is in interconnected pore spaces, much like a kitchen sponge, that allow easier flow to a well; but in an unconventional reservoir, like shale, the reservoir must be mechanically "stimulated" to

42

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

is shale gas? is shale gas? Basically, it is natural gas - primarily methane - found in shale formations, some of which were formed 300-million-to-400-million years ago during the Devonian period of Earth's history. The shales were deposited as fine silt and clay particles at the bottom of relatively enclosed bodies of water. At roughly the same time, primitive plants were forming forests on land and the first amphibians were making an appearance. Some of the methane that formed from the organic matter buried with the sediments escaped into sandy rock layers adjacent to the shales, forming conventional accumulations of natural gas which are relatively easy to extract. But some of it remained locked in the tight, low permeability shale layers, becoming shale gas.

43

Hot rocks could help meet US energy needs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... -4 Hot rocks could help meet US energy needs LucyOdling-Smee Get more out of geothermal, experts advise. ... , experts advise.Geothermal energy takes advantage of heat naturally generated within the earth. Punchstock Nature energy focus ...

Lucy Odling-Smee

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

44

Natural  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 2,094,387 2,266,751 2,566,049 2,816,408 2,883,277 Mexico .............................. 0 1,678 7,013 6,722 13,862 Total Pipeline Imports....... 2,094,387 2,268,429 2,573,061 2,823,130 2,897,138 LNG Algeria .............................. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 35,325 United Arab Emirates ....... 0 0 0 0 4,949 Total LNG Imports............. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 40,274 Total Imports......................... 2,137,504 2,350,115 2,623,839 2,841,048 2,937,413 Average Price (dollars per thousand cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 1.84 2.02 1.86 1.48 1.96 Mexico .............................. - 1.94 1.99 1.53 2.25 Total Pipeline Imports.......

45

Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS P532 Zhiyue Xu, Yuichiro Yamashita 1 , and Claude B. Reed Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA 1 Now with Kyushu University, Japan Abstract High power lasers can weaken, spall, melt and vaporize natural earth materials with thermal spallation being the most energy efficient rock removal mechanism. Laser rock spallation is a very complex phenomenon that depends on many factors. Computer numerical modeling would provides great tool to understand the fundamental of this complex phenomenon, which is crucial to the success of its applications. Complexity of modeling laser rock spallation is due to: 1) rock is a porous media, to which traditional theories of heat transfer and rock mechanics can not be directly

47

Rock Magnetism To-Day  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ROCK magnetism is that branch of geophysics that deals with the origin of magnetization in rocks and ... that deals with the origin of magnetization in rocks and its stability. Workers in rock magnetism are also interested in the phenomenon of self-reversal, that is, a rock acquiring ...

SUBIR K. BANERJEE

1966-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

48

Session: Hard Rock Penetration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Triple bottom line assessment of transport options for the UBC farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Triple bottom line and analyzes viable vehicle options to be used at the UBC Farm using Triple bottom line assessment. These options include powering the vehicle with the traditional fossil fuels, natural gas, biodiesel, or use

50

Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

51

,"Texas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural...

52

A Computational Strategy to Analyze Label-Free Temporal Bottom...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computational Strategy to Analyze Label-Free Temporal Bottom-up Proteomics Data. A Computational Strategy to Analyze Label-Free Temporal Bottom-up Proteomics Data. Abstract:...

53

Magnetic Anisotropy as an Aid to Identifying CRM and DRM in Red Sedimentary Rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To further evaluate the potential of magnetic anisotropy techniques for determining the origin of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) in sedimentary rocks, several new remanence anisotropy measurement tec...

K.P. Kodama; M.J. Dekkers

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Direct CP Violating Asymmetries in Charmless Decays of Strange Bottom Mesons and Bottom Baryons with 9.3 fb-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

note 10726 Direct CP Violating Asymmetries in Charmless Decays of Strange Bottom Mesons and Bottom measurements of direct CP­violating asymmetries in charmless decays of neutral bottom hadrons to pairs corresponding to 9.3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, we measure the direct CP violation in bottom strange mesons

Fermilab

55

Rim Rock Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rim Rock Wind Farm Rim Rock Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rim Rock Wind Farm Facility Rim Rock Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer NaturEner Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location Glacier and Toole Counties MT Coordinates 48.779564°, -112.061291° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.779564,"lon":-112.061291,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

56

Spectroscopy and decays of charm and bottom  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After a brief review of the quark model, we discuss our present knowledge of the spectroscopy of charm and bottom mesons and baryons. We go on to review the lifetimes, semileptonic, and purely leptonic decays of these particles. We conclude with a brief discussion B and D mixing and rare decays.

Butler, J.N.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The Bottom Line Space@Penn Upgrade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Bottom Line Space@Penn Upgrade Coming Soon! A project is underway to upgrade the current that allows designated users in the field to update certain elements of their space. This project, whose: Grants & Projects ­ Used for invoice generation, overhead and revenue recognition, and award and project

Sharp, Kim

58

Programmable Self-Assembly Control of Concurrent Systems From the Bottom Up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Programmable Self-Assembly Control of Concurrent Systems From the Bottom Up Eric Klavins Self-assembly. Self-assembly is ubiquitous in nature. For example, virus capsids, cell membranes, and tissues are all self-assembled from smaller com- ponents in a completely distributed fashion. Self-assembly

59

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Richard Parker,. Parker Geoscience Consulting, LLC, Arvada, Colorado, USA; Zhiyue Xu and Claude Reed, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA; Ramona Graves, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado, USA; Brian Gahan and Samih Batarseh, Gas Technology Institute, Des Plaines, Illinois, USA ABSTRACT Studies on drilling petroleum reservoir rocks with lasers show that modern infrared lasers have the capability to spall (thermally fragment), melt and vaporize natural earth materials with the thermal spallation being the most efficient rock removal mechanism. Although laser irradiance as low as 1000 W/cm 2 is sufficient to spall rock, firing the

60

Microwave assisted hard rock cutting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Bottom: The PNNL-developed Grid Friendly  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bottom: The PNNL-developed Grid Bottom: The PNNL-developed Grid Friendly (tm) Appliance Controller was successfully tested in clothes dryers and water heaters in Washington and Oregon during a 2007 demonstration project. The controller senses stress on the electric grid and automatically and instantaneously responds to reduce the demand for electricity from appliances, such as turning off the heating element in a dryer for a few minutes. When applied in concert across multiple appliances in multiple households, this temporary drop in energy demand could give grid operators the cushion they need to balance the system. The Grid-Friendly Appliance Controller won a prestigious R&D 100 Award in 2008. Top: Researchers draw upon historic expertise and use modern instrumen- tation to develop new methods for

62

On the generation of bottom-trapped internal tides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction of the barotropic tide with the bottom topography when the tidal frequency ? is smaller than the Coriolis frequency f is examined. The resulting waves are called bottom-trapped internal tides. The energy density associated with ...

Saeed Falahat; Jonas Nycander

63

Updated Web Tool Focuses on Bottom Line for Distributed Wind...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Updated Web Tool Focuses on Bottom Line for Distributed Wind Turbines Updated Web Tool Focuses on Bottom Line for Distributed Wind Turbines January 10, 2013 - 2:43pm Addthis This...

64

,"US--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

65

,"California Onshore Natural Gas Processed in California (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Onshore Natural Gas Processed in California (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Lates...

66

Rankine bottoming cycle safety analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vector Engineering Inc. conducted a safety and hazards analysis of three Rankine Bottoming Cycle Systems in public utility applications: a Thermo Electron system using Fluorinal-85 (a mixture of 85 mole % trifluoroethanol and 15 mole % water) as the working fluid; a Sundstrand system using toluene as the working fluid; and a Mechanical Technology system using steam and Freon-II as the working fluids. The properties of the working fluids considered are flammability, toxicity, and degradation, and the risks to both plant workers and the community at large are analyzed.

Lewandowski, G.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

68

Overview - Hard Rock Penetration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, James C.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

69

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Rock Properties Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

C. Lum

2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

71

Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.

Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

73

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09 Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL ( IL.09 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Rock Island , Illinois IL.09-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.09-2 Site Operations: Site located on a DOD facility and operated under AEC control. Exact nature or time period of operations not clear. No indication that radioactive materials were involved. Contract work with Albuquerque Operations office performed. IL.09-1 IL.09-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Referred to DOD IL.09-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated IL.09-2 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

74

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parts of Eastern Ontario and Western Quebec. Field Guide toof the Oka Area, Quebec." Geol. Assn. Can. Guidebook, ppField Guide to the Oka Area," Quebec Department of Natural

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Rock around the planets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From a strictly dynamical point of view the difference between a natural and an artificial celestial body relies on the possibility that the latter has to follow trajectories chosen not only by gravitation but...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Evidence for natural gas hydrate occurrences in Colombia Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multichannel and selected single-channel seismic lines of the continental margin sediments of the Colombia basin display compelling evidence for large accumulations of natural gas hydrate. Seismic bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs), interpreted to mark the base of the hydrate stability zone, are pronounced and very widespread along the entire Panama-Colombia lower continental slope. BSRs have also been identified at two locations on the abyssal plain. Water depths for these suspected hydrate occurrences range from 900 to 4000 m. Although no gas hydrate samples have been recovered from this area, biogenic methane is abundant in Pliocene turbidites underlying the abyssal plain. More deeply buried rocks beneath the abyssal plain are thermally mature. Thermogenic gas from these rocks may migrate upward along structural pathways into the hydrate stability zone and form hydrate. Impermeable hydrate layers may form caps over large accumulations of free gas, accounting for the very well-defined BSRs in the area. The abyssal plain and the deformed continental margin hold the highest potential for major economic accumulations of gas hydrate in the basin. The extensive continuity of BSRs, relatively shallow water depths, and promixity to onshore production facilities render the marginal deformed belt sediments the most favorable target for future economic development of the gas hydrate resource within the Colombia basin. The widespread evidence of gas hydrates in the Colombia basin suggests a high potential for conventional hydrocarbon deposits offshore of Panama and Colombia.

Finley, P.D.; Krason, J.; Dominic, K.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Technological features and operating modes of bottom turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technological features and the startup and operation modes of a power unit consisting of an R-type turbine and a bottom turbine connected to it are considered.

L. S. Ioffe

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2004............................................................................................................... 13 2.3. Test fishing.................................................................................................................................. 17 3.1. Fish observed

79

The Bottom-Up Approach forThermoelectric Nanocomposites, plus?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Contains an overview of the synthetic strategies for preparing bulk nanocomposite TE materials using a two-step bottom-up approach and associated experimental and theoretical results.

80

The Palaeomagnetism of Late Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks from Kenya and Tanzania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks from Kenya and Tanzania T. A. Reilly P. K. S. Raja A. E...from the volcanic province of northern Tanzania, Nature Phys. Sci., 229, 19-20...Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks from Kenya and Tanzania T .A. Reilly Geological Survey of Ireland......

T. A. Reilly; P. K. S. Raja; A. E. Mussett; A. Brock

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Palaeomagnetism of Late Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks from Kenya and Tanzania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks from Kenya and Tanzania T. A. Reilly P. K. S. Raja A. E...from the volcanic province of northern Tanzania, Nature Phys. Sci., 229, 19-20...Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks from Kenya and Tanzania T. A. Reilly Geological Survey of Ireland......

T. A. Reilly; P. K. S. Raja; A. E. Mussett; A. Brock

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

BENEFITS OF LIVING IN A BUILDING: BIG BROWN BATS (EPTESICUS FUSCUS) IN ROCKS VERSUS BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BENEFITS OF LIVING IN A BUILDING: BIG BROWN BATS (EPTESICUS FUSCUS) IN ROCKS VERSUS BUILDINGS CORI) roosting in natural and building roosts in the prairies of southeastern Alberta. During pregnancy, bats roosting in buildings used torpor less frequently than did rock- roosting bats, but achieved lower body

Barclay, Robert

83

Life Under Rocks Grade Level: First  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Procedure: Find a small and large rock (rock should be on a solid surface and not sunk in sand or muck

84

Measurement of the masses and widths of the bottom baryons ?b[superscript ±] and ?b*[superscript ±  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using data from pp? collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV recorded by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, we present improved measurements of the masses and first measurements of natural widths of the four bottom baryon ...

Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

85

Energy of tsunami waves generated by bottom motion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy of tsunami waves generated by bottom motion By Denys Dutykh, Fr´ed´eric Dias CMLA, ENS investigation on the energy of waves generated by bottom motion is performed here. We start with the full for the linearized water wave equations. Exchanges between potential and kinetic energies are clearly revealed

Boyer, Edmond

86

Nanowires As Building Blocks for Bottom-Up Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Nanowires As Building Blocks for Bottom-Up Nanotechnology The field of nanotechnology/or combinations of function in an integrated nanosystem. To enable this bottom-up approach for nanotechnology-dimensional (1D) nanostruc- tures at the forefront of nanoscience and nanotechnology. NWs and NBs are typi- cally

Wang, Zhong L.

87

Post Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Rock Jump to: navigation, search Name Post Rock Facility Post Rock Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Capital Group Developer Wind Capital Group Energy Purchaser Westar Energy Location Ellsworth KS Coordinates 38.87269233°, -98.33059788° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.87269233,"lon":-98.33059788,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

88

Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Density Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Density Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Density of different lithologic units. Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 10.001,000 centUSD 0.01 kUSD 1.0e-5 MUSD 1.0e-8 TUSD / sample

89

GEOL 103 Writing Assignment 3. Sedimentary Rocks Name _______________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., kaolinite), halite (rock salt), gypsum, occasionally micas (muscovite, biotite). Sed rocks can also contain

Kirby, Carl S.

90

Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Rock Details Activities (13) Areas (11) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.

91

A-type granites and related rocks: Petrogenesis and classification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The problems of identification of A-type granitoids are analyzed. These rocks occur in different geodynamic settings. Owing to their mantle nature, they show distinct REE specialization. These are acid intrusive rocks, whose volcanic products are of crucial scientific and practical significance. However, neither the great number of proposed classification schemes and diagrams, including those based on expensive analytical data, nor hot scientific discussions of their identification and the ambiguity of the term A-granitoids helped to determine their classification features in full measure. A principally new discriminant diagram is proposed for the classification of igneous A-type rocks, based on the analysis of earlier obtained results and the petrochemical composition of these rocks. A comparative analysis of subdivision of granites and related felsic volcanic rocks (SiO2 > 67 wt.%), based on the ternary (Na2O + K2O)–Fe2O3* × 5–(CaO + MgO) × 5 and other widely applied diagrams, has shown the advantage of the proposed discriminant diagram for the classification of A-type granitoids from different geodynamic settings.

A.V. Grebennikov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Bottom steam turbines of the Ural Turbine Works  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Basic design features, thermal schemes, and economic indicators of some bottom turbines that have been developed, as well as ... that have partially been manufactured at the Ural Turbine Works, are presented.

G. D. Barinberg; A. E. Valamin; Yu. A. Sakhnin

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Hygienic rating of hydrocarbons in bottom deposits of water ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors of this article draw the reader’s attention to the topical problem of the contamination of bottom deposits of water ecosystems by hydrocarbons, such as oil and gas condensate,...

Rauf Valievich Galiulin…

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Charm and bottom hadronic form factors with QCD sum rules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a brief review of some calculations of form factors and coupling constants in vertices with charm and bottom mesons in the framework of QCD sum rules. We first discuss the motivation for this work, describing possible applications of these form factors to charm and bottom decays processes. We first make a summarize of the QCD sum rules method. We give special attention to the uncertainties of the method introducing by the intrinsic variation of the parameters. Finally we conclude.

Bracco, M. E. [Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rod. Presidente Dutra Km 298, Polo Industrial, 27537-000, Resende, RJ (Brazil); Rodrigues, B. O.; Cerqueira, A. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier 524, 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

95

Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and findings from a field experiment devised to estimate the rates and mechanisms of transport of carbon across the continental shelves. The specific site chosen for the experiment was the mid-Atlantic Bight, a region off the North Carolina coast. The experiment involved a large contingent of scientists from many institutions. The specific component of the program was the transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer. The postulate mechanisms of transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer are: resuspension and advection, downward deposition, and accumulation. The high turbulence levels in the bottom boundary layer require the understanding of the coupling between turbulence and bottom sediments. The specific issues addressed in the work reported here were: (a) What is the sediment response to forcing by currents and waves? (b) What is the turbulence climate in the bottom boundary layer at this site? and (c) What is the rate at which settling leads to carbon sequestering in bottom sediments at offshore sites?

Agrawal, Y.C.

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

96

Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Lab Analysis Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Lab Analysis Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Core and cuttings analysis is done to define lithology. Water rock interaction. Can determine detailed information about rock composition and morphology. Density of different lithologic units. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Core analysis can locate faults or fracture networks. Oriented core can give additional important information on anisotropy. Historic structure and deformation of land.

97

Nanomaterial processing using self-assembly-bottom-up chemical and biological approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanotechnology is touted as the next logical sequence in technological evolution. This has led to a substantial surge in research activities pertaining to the development and fundamental understanding of processes and assembly at the nanoscale. Both top-down and bottom-up fabrication approaches may be used to realize a range of well-defined nanostructured materials with desirable physical and chemical attributes. Among these, the bottom-up self-assembly process offers the most realistic solution toward the fabrication of next-generation functional materials and devices. Here, we present a comprehensive review on the physical basis behind self-assembly and the processes reported in recent years to direct the assembly of nanoscale functional blocks into hierarchically ordered structures. This paper emphasizes assembly in the synthetic domain as well in the biological domain, underscoring the importance of biomimetic approaches toward novel materials. In particular, two important classes of directed self-assembly, namely, (i) self-assembly among nanoparticle–polymer systems and (ii) external field-guided assembly are highlighted. The spontaneous self-assembling behavior observed in nature that leads to complex, multifunctional, hierarchical structures within biological systems is also discussed in this review. Recent research undertaken to synthesize hierarchically assembled functional materials have underscored the need as well as the benefits harvested in synergistically combining top-down fabrication methods with bottom-up self-assembly.

Rajagopalan Thiruvengadathan; Venumadhav Korampally; Arkasubhra Ghosh; Nripen Chanda; Keshab Gangopadhyay; Shubhra Gangopadhyay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 1. Project Location Project Location j PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK &...

99

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Introduction into Induction and Natural Gas Stoves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into Induction and Natural Gas Stoves: A Triple Bottom Line Analysis for the new Student Union Building Jordan Ho of a project/report". #12;APSC 262 An Introduction Into Induction and Natural Gas Stoves A triple-bottom line, 2011 #12;Page 2 of 21 ABSTRACT This report compares the attributes of induction and natural gas stoves

100

Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look MIKE JACKSON* & NICHOLAS L. SWANSON-HYSELL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look MIKE JACKSON* & NICHOLAS L. SWANSON-HYSELL Institute for Rock Magnetism, Winchell School of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, US, dominantly in the super- paramagnetic and stable single-domain size range, also give rise to distinctive rock-magnetic

Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Microhole Coiled Tubing Bottom Hole Assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The original objective of the project, to deliver an integrated 3 1/8-inch diameter Measurement While Drilling (MWD) and Logging While Drilling (LWD) system for drilling small boreholes using coiled tubing drilling, has been achieved. Two prototype systems have been assembled and tested in the lab. One of the systems has been successfully tested downhole in a conventional rotary drilling environment. Development of the 3 1/8-inch system has also lead to development and commercialization of a slightly larger 3.5-inch diameter system. We are presently filling customer orders for the 3.5-inch system while continuing with commercialization of the 3 1/8-inch system. The equipment developed by this project will be offered for sale to multiple service providers around the world, enabling the more rapid expansion of both coiled tubing drilling and conventional small diameter drilling. The project was based on the reuse of existing technology whenever possible in order to minimize development costs, time, and risks. The project was begun initially by Ultima Labs, at the time a small company ({approx}12 employees) which had successfully developed a number of products for larger oil well service companies. In September, 2006, approximately 20 months after inception of the project, Ultima Labs was acquired by Sondex plc, a worldwide manufacturer of downhole instrumentation for cased hole and drilling applications. The acquisition provided access to proven technology for mud pulse telemetry, downhole directional and natural gamma ray measurements, and surface data acquisition and processing, as well as a global sales and support network. The acquisition accelerated commercialization through existing Sondex customers. Customer demand resulted in changes to the product specification to support hotter (150 C) and deeper drilling (20,000 psi pressure) than originally proposed. The Sondex acquisition resulted in some project delays as the resistivity collar was interfaced to a different MWD system and also as the mechanical design was revised for the new pressure requirements. However, the Sondex acquisition has resulted in a more robust system, secure funding for completion of the project, and more rapid commercialization.

Don Macune

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Geothermal Project Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Low Temperature Resources Project Description The proposed two-year project supports the DOE GTP's goal of promoting the development and commercial application of energy production from low-temperature geothermal fluids, i.e., between 150°F and 300°F. State Nevada Objectives Demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of electricity generation from nonconventional geothermal resources of 205°F using the first commercial use of a cycle at a geothermal power plant inlet temperature of less than 300°F.

103

MHK Technologies/Under Bottom Wave Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Under Bottom Wave Generator Under Bottom Wave Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Under Bottom Wave Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Glen Edward Cook Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description Water will flow up into the pipe from the down stroke and out of the pipe back into the ocean on the up stroke Waves rolling by will push water into the pipe This will mock the ocean swell A propellar is mounted inside the lower portion of the pipe the upward and downward flow of water will spin the propellar in both direcitons The propellar is connected to a generator

104

Light Higgses and Dark Matter at Bottom and Charm Factories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neither Dark Matter nor scalar particles in the Higgs sector are ruled out at energies accessible to bottom and charm factories. In Dark Matter searches, the error on the mass of Dark Matter is $\\sim 4$ GeV in the best LHC studies. For light Dark Matter this could represent a 100% (or more) error. In Higgs searches, the presence of a light singlet Higgs can make the LHC Higgs search difficult, if not impossible. If Dark Matter or a Higgs scalar is light, it will {\\it require} a low-energy machine to precisely determine the couplings. We review the models, modes of discovery and rate expectations for these new particle searches at bottom and charm factories. We also discuss the options for new runs at bottom and charm factories relevant for these searches.

Bob McElrath

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

105

Guided Wave Inspection for Bottom Edge of Rails  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Defects in a railhead and web can be detected with rail inspection cars and rail inspection tools equipped with special transducers such as wheel probes. However bottom edges of rails easily damaged regions due to contact to soil and fastening are blind zones for the conventional ultrasonic inspection technique in which signals are input from a railhead. In this paper inspection technique for defects in bottom edges of rails using guided waves were described. Dispersion curves for a rail obtained by a semi analytical finite element calculation show that a lot of propagating modes exist in a frequency region used for guided wave inspection eg. 10kHz – 200kHz. Guided wave modes mainly vibrating a bottom edge of a rail were selected among the many modes in dispersion curves and then defect detection tests were done using the selected modes. Good reflections from an artificial defect and a rail end were obtained with a vertically vibrating mode.

T. Hayashi; Y. Miyazaki; M. Murase; T. Abe

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: BUENAS Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Baseline projection, - Macroeconomic, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.superefficient.org/Resource%20Library/BUENAS%20-%20Bottom-Up%20Ene References: BUENAS Homepage[1] BUENAS for SEAD[2] Logo: BUENAS BUENAS stands for "Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System". It is used to project

107

Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry: Chapter 9: Limestone and Crushed Rock  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 Limestone and Crushed Rock Crushed rock is one of the most accessible natural resources and a major basic raw material. It is used in construction, agriculture, and other industries using complex chemical and metallurgical processes. Despite the low value of its basic products, the crushed rock industry is a major contributor to and an indicator of the economic well being of the nation. Forms Of Crushed Rock About three-quarters of the crushed stone production is limestone and dolomite, followed by, in descending order of tonnage: granite, traprock, sandstone and quartzite, miscellaneous stone, marble, slate, calcareous marl, shell, volcanic cinder and scoria. Limestone, one of the largest produced crushed rock, is a sedimentary rock composed

109

Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat so as to insulate the reactor vessel bottom end wall from the containment structure base mat and allow the reactor vessel bottom end wall to freely expand as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof. Further, a deck is supported upon the side wall of the containment structure above the top open end of the reactor vessel, and a plurality of serially connected extendible and retractable annular bellows extend between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnect the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck. An annular guide ring is disposed on the containment structure and extends between its side wall and the top open end of the reactor vessel for providing lateral support of the reactor vessel top open end by limiting imposition of lateral loads on the annular bellows by the occurrence of a lateral seismic event.

Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Influence of rock mass fracturing on the net penetration rates of hard rock \\{TBMs\\}  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Penetration rates during excavation using hard rock tunnel boring machines (TBMs) are significantly influenced by the degree of fracturing of the rock mass. In the NTNU prediction model for hard rock TBM performance and costs, the rock mass fracturing factor (ks) is used to include the influence of rock mass fractures. The rock mass fracturing factor depends on the degree of fracturing, fracture type, fracture spacing, and the angle between fracture systems and the tunnel axis. In order to validate the relationship between the degree of fracturing and the net penetration rate of hard rock TBMs, field work has been carried out, consisting of geological back-mapping and analysis of performance data from a TBM tunnel. The rock mass influence on hard rock TBM performance prediction is taken into account in the NTNU model. Different correlations between net penetration rate and the fracturing factor (ks) have been identified for a variety of ks values.

F.J. Macias; P.D. Jakobsen; Y. Seo; A. Bruland

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Complex dynamics in a short annular container with rotating bottom ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We believe that these phenomena are novel in fluid dynamics, as is a ... outer radius Ro and length L, driven by the constant rotation of the inner cylinder and bottom .... Poisson-like equations are solved using the spectral–Galerkin method presented in ... is a multiplicity of states over a small range of ? ? (2.8635, 2.

2004-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

112

Steam bottoming cycle for an adiabatic diesel engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of steam bottoming cycles using adiabatic diesel engine exhaust heat projected substantial performance and economic benefits for long haul trucks. A parametric analysis of steam cycle and system component variables, system cost, size and performance was conducted. An 811 K/6.90 MPa state-of-the-art reciprocating expander steam system with a monotube boiler and radiator core condenser was selected for preliminary design. When applied to a NASA specified turbo-charged adiabatic diesel the bottoming system increased the diesel output by almost 18%. In a comparison of the costs of the diesel with bottoming system (TC/B) and a NASA specified turbocompound adiabatic diesel with after-cooling with the same total output, the annual fuel savings less the added maintenance cost was determined to cover the increased initial cost of the TC/B system in a payback period of 2.3 years. Also during this program steam bottoming system freeze protection strategies were developed, technological advances required for improved system reliability were considered and the cost and performance of advanced systems were evaluated.

Poulin, E.; Demler, R.; Krepchin, I.; Walker, D.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Effect of Natural Gas Composition on the Design of Natural Gas Liquid Demethanizers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Natural Gas Composition on the Design of Natural Gas Liquid Demethanizers ... The hydrocarbon composition of natural gas varies fairly significantly from location to location. ... The relative amounts of methane (C1) and ethane (C2) have a profound effect on the cryogenic high-pressure distillation column used to recover the C2 and heavier components as a bottoms product called “natural gas liquid” (NGL). ...

William L. Luyben

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

114

A study to improve the engineering properties of limestone rock asphalt paving mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

asphalt is a naturally occuring calcareous material with its interstices filled with natural bitumen. Deposits of this material exist in various locations throughout the United States. The 1 imestone rock asphalt materials used for thi s study... streets, parking lots, etc . Since the aggregate contains natural bitumen, the amount of additional asp baltic binder required to produce a quality paving mixture is reduced. Consequently, the cost of building a road with this material is reduced...

Goodwin, Philip Wayne

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Rock mass response ahead of an advancing face in faulted shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, the rock mass response ahead of an advancing test tunnel in the Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory (Switzerland) was investigated. Characterisation of the excavation-induced damage zone at Mont Terri is a challenging task due to the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of the shale: pronounced bedding leads to intact rock anisotropy and prevalent small-scale tectonic shears lead to rock mass heterogeneity. Rock mass damage ahead of an experimental tunnel or niche was characterised through single-hole seismic wave velocity logging, borehole digital optical televiewer imaging, and geological drillcore mapping. Three-dimensional elastic stress analyses were completed and showed that rock mass degradation can be correlated to changes in the maximum to minimum principal stress ratio (i.e., spalling limit). Numerical results showed that close to the niche boundary, unloading lowers stress ratios, which correspond with decreasing seismic wave amplitudes and velocities; thus, indicating that strength degradation resulted from increasing crack-induced damage. Considerations of tectonic shears and distance from a previously stressed volume of rock were necessary in understanding both the damage state and extent ahead of the face. By integrating field and numerical data, the investigation showed that geological structures (i.e., bedding and bedding-parallel tectonic shears) were most influential near the entrance but played a lesser role as the niche deepened. Additionally, a portion of the niche is located in the perturbed zone of the intersecting Gallery04.

Salina Yong; Peter K. Kaiser; Simon Loew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Deformation in ramp regions of thrust faults: experiments with rock models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and justification. Furthermore, they can be tested only in the field, because t. he experimental and natural systems are only analogous, not identical The approach +aken h re, the d formation of a rock specimen in exper. iments designed to favor the simulation... and justification. Furthermore, they can be tested only in the field, because t. he experimental and natural systems are only analogous, not identical The approach +aken h re, the d formation of a rock specimen in exper. iments designed to favor the simulation...

Morse, James Donald

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

117

Rock Energy Cooperative (Illinois) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Cooperative (Illinois) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rock Energy Cooperative Place: Illinois References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA...

118

Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Phase I prototype hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal system was developed in Precambrian basement rocks at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Core and cuttings samples from the four deep wells indicate that the reservoir of this Phase I HDR system lies within a homogeneous biotite granodiorite body of very low permeability. Natural fractures, although present, are

119

Oxidation and stabilization of hydrocarbon fuels in contact with rock salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground storage is the most ecologically clean and economical method for extended storage of natural gas, crude oil, and petroleum products. Such storage reservoirs are created in stable rock (granites, gneisses, limestone, etc.), rock salt deposits, clays, abandoned mines, and permafrost formations. In this investigation of the influence of rock salt deposits on the oxidation of hydrocarbons (summer-grade straight-run diesel fuel L and automotive gasoline A-76 [unleaded, low-octane]), the authors carried out a kinetic study of hydroperoxide accumulation during the oxidation of these fuels after contact with a saturated solution of rock salt (brine). The experiments were performed in a bubbler-type unit with various ratios of brine to fuel.

Klinaeva, E.V.; Golubeva, I.A.; Tolstykh, L.I. [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Burlington Bottoms, Technical Report 1993-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burlington Bottoms, consisting of approximately 417 acres of riparian and wetland habitat, was purchased by the Bonneville Power Administration in November 1991. The site is located approximately 1/2 mile north of the Sauvie Island Bridge (T2N R1W Sections 20, 21), and is bound on the east side by Multnomah Channel and on the west side by the Burlington Northern Railroad right-of-way and U.S. Highway 30 (Figures 1 and 2). Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Columbia and Willamette River Basin's Fish and Wildlife Program and Amendments. Under this Program, mitigation goals were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the development and operation of Federal hydro-electric facilities in the Columbia and Willamette River Basins. In 1993, an interdisciplinary team was formed to develop and implement quantitative Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) to document the value of various habitats at Burlington Bottoms. Results of the HEP will be used to: (1) determine the current status and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area. HEP participants included; Charlie Craig, BPA; Pat Wright, Larry Rasmussen, and Ron Garst, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service; John Christy, The Nature Conservancy; and Doug Cottam, Sue Beilke, and Brad Rawls, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Beilke, Susan

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Ship Bottom, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ship Bottom, New Jersey: Energy Resources Ship Bottom, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.642897°, -74.1804159° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.642897,"lon":-74.1804159,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

122

Landforms of the Flathead Subbasin1 Valley Bottoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

valleys with wide flood plains bordered by abandoned terraces of alluvial soils (rounded rocks and sand materials typically range from fine sand to small boulder in size, with gravel to cobble size materials sediment, even during large flood events due to the well vegetated floodplains and streambanks. Sensitive

123

Integrated Rankine bottoming cycle for diesel truck engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study assessed the feasibility of incorporating a Rankine bottoming cycle into a diesel truck engine. An organic Rankine bottoming cycle (ORBC) previously demonstrated by the US Department of Energy in a heavy-duty, long-haul truck reduced the truck's fuel consumption by about 12%. However, that system was considered too complex and costly to be commercialized. The integrated Rankine bottoming cycle (IRBC) described here is expected to be simpler and less costly than the ORBC. In the IRBC, one cylinder of a six-cylinder diesel truck engine will be used for power recovery, instead of the turbine and reduction gears of the ORBC; engine coolant will serve as the working fluid; and the engine radiator will also serve as the condenser. Toluene and steam were considered as working fluids in this assessment, and we concluded that steam (at 1000 psi, partially vaporized to about 33% saturation in the cylinder head, and superheated in an evaporator) would be the more practical of the two. Both heat exchangers are smaller than those of the ORBC system, but may pose a challenge in an under-the-hood installation. Overall, the concept appears feasible. 13 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

Sekar, R.; Cole, R.L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer drilling tests, as well as single impact tests, have been designed and executed. Both Berea sandstone and Mancos shale samples are used. In single impact tests, three impacts are sequentially loaded at the same rock location to investigate rock response to repetitive loadings. The crater depth and width are measured as well as the displacement and force in the rod and the force in the rock. Various pressure differences across the rock-indentor interface (i.e. bore pressure minus pore pressure) are used to investigate the pressure effect on rock penetration. For hammer drilling tests, an industrial fluid hammer is used to drill under both underbalanced and overbalanced conditions. Besides calibrating the modeling tool, the data and cuttings collected from the tests indicate several other important applications. For example, different rock penetrations during single impact tests may reveal why a fluid hammer behaves differently with diverse rock types and under various pressure conditions at the hole bottom. On the other hand, the shape of the cuttings from fluid hammer tests, comparing to those from traditional rotary drilling methods, may help to identify the dominant failure mechanism that percussion drilling relies on. If so, encouraging such a failure mechanism may improve hammer performance. The project is summarized in this report. Instead of compiling the information contained in the previous quarterly or other technical reports, this report focuses on the descriptions of tasks, findings, and conclusions, as well as the efforts on promoting percussion drilling technologies to industries including site visits, presentations, and publications. As a part of the final deliveries, the 3D numerical model for rock mechanics is also attached.

Michael S. Bruno

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

DE-AI26-06NT42878 - Bottom Source Task | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Deep Sea Sediments DE-AI26-06NT42878 - Bottom Source Task Last Reviewed 1172011 Project Goal The objective of this project is to develop and test a bottom-mounted seismic...

126

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility General Information Name Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Facility Eagle Rock Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location The Geysers, California Coordinates 38.826770222484°, -122.80002593994° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.826770222484,"lon":-122.80002593994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

128

Strength and static elastic moduli of Mesaverde rocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the mechanical properties of Mesaverde rocks (shale and sandstone) from various depths in five wells in Colorado and Wyoming. The properties studied were tensile strength, compressive strength, hydrostatic compressibility, shear stress under strain-controlled compression, and static elastic moduli. With respect to these properties, the sandstones are virtually isotropic. The shales, on the other hand, are definitely anisotropic. The nature and degree of anisotropy of the shales vary with the depth of sample origin. The relative values of mechanical properties between the shale and the sandstone also vary with depth. 7 references, 17 figures, 8 tables.

Lin, W.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A pore-scale model of two-phase flow in water-wet rock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A finite-difference discretization of Stokes equations is used to simulate flow in the pore space of natural rocks. Numerical solutions are obtained using the method of artificial compressibility. In conjunction with Maximal Inscribed Spheres method, these computations produce relative permeability curves. The results of computations are in agreement with laboratory measurements.

Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Slick Rock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Slick Rock - Old North Continent Slick Rock - Union Carbide More Documents & Publications South Valley Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

131

Open bottom mesons in hot asymmetric hadronic medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The in-medium masses and optical potentials of $B$ and ${\\bar B}$ mesons are studied in an isospin asymmetric, strange, hot and dense hadronic environment using a chiral effective model. The chiral $SU(3)$ model originally designed for the light quark sector, is generalized to include the heavy quark sector ($c$ and $b$) to derive the interactions of the $B$ and $\\bar B$ mesons with the light hadrons. Due to large mass of bottom quark, we use only the empirical form of these interactions for the desired purpose, while treating the bottom degrees of freedom to be frozen in the medium. Hence, all medium effects are due to the in-medium interaction of the light quark content of these open-bottom mesons. Both $B$ and $\\bar B$ mesons are found to experience net attractive interactions in the medium, leading to lowering of their masses in the medium. The mass degeneracy of particles and antiparticles, ($B^+$, $B^-$) as well as ($B^0$, ${\\bar B}^0$), is observed to be broken in the medium, due to equal and opposite contributions from a vectorial Weinberg-Tomozawa interaction term. Addition of hyperons to the medium lowers further the in-medium mass for each of these four mesons, while a non-zero isospin asymmetry is observed to break the approximate mass degeneracy of each pair of isospin doublets. These medium effects are found to be strongly density dependent, and bear a considerably weaker temperature dependence. The results obtained in the present investigation are compared to predictions from the quark-meson coupling model, heavy meson effective theory, and the QCD Sum Rule approach.

Divakar Pathak; Amruta Mishra

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

132

Bottom-Fill Method for Stopping Leaking Oil Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hardware failure at the top of a deep underwater oil well can result in a catastrophic oil leak. The enormous pressure lifting the column of oil in that well makes it nearly impossible to stop from the top with seals or pressurization. We propose to fill the bottom of the well with dense and possibly streamlined objects that can descend through the rising oil. As they accumulate, those objects couple to the oil via viscous and drag forces and increase the oil's effective density. When its effective density exceeds that of the earth's crust, the oil will have essentially stopped flowing.

Bloomfield, Louis A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock between two wells on the west flank of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat is extracted by injecting water into one well,

134

Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assembly of a Molecular Needle, Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up Print Wednesday, 21 December 2005 00:00 Many pathogenic bacteria use a specialized secretion system to inject virulence proteins directly into the cells they infect. The injected proteins, by mimicking host-cell mechanisms, can then subvert normal cellular function. The type III secretion system (TTSS) is a sophisticated protein complex with an overall shape similar to a hypodermic needle. More than twenty unique types of proteins are required for its assembly, most of which are found among a wide variety of animal as well as plant pathogens. Electron microscopy has sketched the broad outlines of TTSS structure, but it does not have sufficient resolution to reveal the details required to understand, and eventually inhibit, the needle's function. At the ALS, researchers from Canada and the U.S. performed crystallographic studies of EscJ, the protein that makes up the needle's ring-shaped base. Their analysis of the EscJ ring not only presents a snapshot of one of the earliest structures generated in the TTSS assembly process, but also reveals features indicative of its role as the molecular platform for subsequent construction of the secretion apparatus.

135

Glass Development for Treatment of LANL Evaporator Bottoms Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vitrification is an attractive treatment option for meeting the stabilization and final disposal requirements of many plutonium (Pu) bearing materials and wastes at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) TA-55 facility, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Hanford, and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared that vitrification is the "best demonstrated available technology" for high- level radioactive wastes (HLW) (Federal Register 1990) and has produced a handbook of vitriilcation technologies for treatment of hazardous and radioactive waste (US EPA, 1992). This technology has been demonstrated to convert Pu-containing materials (Kormanos, 1997) into durable (Lutze, 1988) and accountable (Forsberg, 1995) waste. forms with reduced need for safeguarding (McCulhun, 1996). The composition of the Evaporator Bottoms Waste (EVB) at LANL, like that of many other I%-bearing materials, varies widely and is generally unpredictable. The goal of this study is to optimize the composition of glass for EVB waste at LANL, and present the basic techniques and tools for developing optimized glass compositions for other Pu-bearing materials in the complex. This report outlines an approach for glass formulation with fixed property restrictions, using glass property-composition databases. This approach is applicable to waste glass formulation for many variable waste streams and vitrification technologies.. Also reported are the preliminary property data for simulated evaporator bottom glasses, including glass viscosity and glass leach resistance using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

DE Smith; GF Piepel; GW Veazey; JD Vienna; ML Elliott; RK Nakaoka; RP Thimpke

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

136

Rock of Ages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Ages of Ages Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock of Ages Facility Rock of Ages Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Rock of Ages Energy Purchaser Rock of Ages Location Graniteville VT Coordinates 44.14668574°, -72.48180896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.14668574,"lon":-72.48180896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

137

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/isopubs/itchch2.html Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Isotopic_Analysis-_Rock&oldid=687702" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

138

Thermophysical properties of the Po Basin rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......7 per cent. 4.2.2 Anisotropic rocks Anisotropy of shales, silty shales and siltstones...dolomites). Horizons of shales, silty shales and siltstones are present...the presence of thermally anisotropic sheet silicates, note that......

V. Pasquale; G. Gola; P. Chiozzi; M. Verdoya

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Winner: Hot Rocks | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

a catch. Only a couple of EGS projects have ever produced power, and those are in Germany and France, where the rock is considerably more pliant than Australia's granite...

140

Measurements of water vapor adsorption on the Geysers rocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ORNL high temperature isopiestic apparatus was adapted for adsorption measurements. The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three different wells of The Geysers was measured at 150 °C and at 200 °C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 ? p/p0 ? 0.98, where p0 is the saturated water vapor pressure. The rocks were crushed and sieved into three fractions of different grain sizes (with different specific surface areas). Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, BET surface area analyses were performed by Porous Materials Inc. on the same rock samples using nitrogen or krypton adsorption measurements at 77 K. Specific surface areas and pore volumes were determined. These parameters are important in estimating water retention capability of a porous material. The same laboratory also determined the densities of the samples by helium pycnometry. Their results were then compared with our own density values obtained by measuring the effect of buoyancy in compressed argon. One of the goals of this project is to determine the dependence of the water retention capacity of the rocks as a function of temperature. The results show a significant dependence of the adsorption and desorption isotherms on the grain size of the sample. The increase in the amount of water retained with temperature observed previously (Shang et al., 1994a, 1994b, 1995) between 90 and 130°C for various reservoir rocks from The Geysers may be due to the contribution of slow chemical adsorption and may be dependent on the time allowed for equilibration. In contrast with the results of Shang et al. (1994a, 1994b, 1995), some closed and nearly closed hysteresis loops on the water adsorption/desorption isotherms (with closing points at p/p0 ? 0.6) were obtained in this study. In these cases the effects of activated processes were not present, and no increase in water adsorption with temperature was observed

Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw S.; Horita, Juske; Simonson, John M.; Mesmer, Robert E.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Integrating hospital information systems: a bottom-up approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The growing complexity of hospital information systems has prompted information systems managers to seek applicable solutions for integrating their systems. While many successful applications of information systems have been introduced and implemented in the hospital environment, the integration of heterogeneous applications in existing, multi-vendor, computing environments into a cohesive hospital-wide information system has proved to be complicated and difficult to accomplish. This paper discusses systems integration in hospitals and presents a conceptual framework for bottom-up integration of hospital information systems. The scope of the proposed framework is the integration of stand-alone clinical, administrative and financial information elements of a hospital into a unified system environment with a central medical data warehouse.

Moshe Zviran; Aviad Armoni

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Reach the Bottom Line of the Sbottom Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a new search strategy for directly-produced sbottoms at the LHC with a small mass splitting between the sbottom and its decayed stable neutralino. Our search strategy is based on boosting sbottoms through an energetic initial state radiation jet. In the final state, we require a large missing transverse energy and one or two b-jets besides the initial state radiation jet. We also define a few kinematic variables to further increase the discovery reach. For the case that the sbottom mainly decays into the bottom quark and the stable neutralino, we have found that even for a mass splitting as small as 10 GeV sbottoms with masses up to around 400 GeV can be excluded at the 95% confidence level with 20 inverse femtobarn data at the 8 TeV LHC.

Alvarez, Ezequiel; Bai, Yang

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

143

Anisotropic yielding of rocks at high temperatures and pressures; Annual Progress Report, 1988-1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental results we have obtained on Four-Mile gneiss have demonstrated that the yield behavior of quartzo-feldspathic rocks containing only a small percentage (10%) of mica can be markedly anisotropic, provided the mica minerals exhibit a strong crystallographic preferred orientation. Samples of gneiss oriented such that resolved shear stresses on the foliation plane are large are considerably weaker than granites of similar grain size and composition, and this weakness is attributed to enhanced nucleation of microcracks in quartz and feldspar adjacent to mica grains that are suitably oriented for slip. We expect the yield behavior of rocks containing a higher proportion of phyllosilicates to be influenced by the strongly anisotropic nature of these minerals as well, although the strengths, temperature and pressure dependencies, and flow-controlling mechanisms in such rocks may be significantly different.

Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Carter, N.L.

1989-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

A Statistical Analysis Of Bottom-Hole Temperature Data In The...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Considerable differences in the spread of bottom-hole temperature values from petroleum exploration well logs plotted as a function of depth are observed over a region of...

146

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctic bottom fauna Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a It is clear from both cladistic Summary: ) A general review of the Antarctic bottom fish fauna, in Fifth Congressof European Ichthyologists Proceedings... The recent...

147

A note on the stability theory of buoyancy-driven ocean currents over a sloping bottom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a previous paper, a new model was derived describing the baroclinic dynamics of buoyancy-driven ocean currents over a sloping bottom. In particular,...

Richard H. Karsten; Gordon E. Swaters

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Performance Comparison of Bottom and Top Emitting LWIR (8 ?m) LED Devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For similar substrate thickness, flip-chip mount bottom emitting LWIR LED device has higher light intensity than top emitting device. Enhanced emission is attributed to better cooling...

Das, Naresh C; Chang, Wayne

149

Rock-brine chemical interactions. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of experimental interaction of powdered volcanic rock with aqueous solutions are presented at temperatures from 200 to 400/sup 0/C, 500 to 1000 bars fluid pressure, with reaction durations of approximately 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this research is to develop data on the kinetics and equilibria of rock solution interactions that will provide insight into the complex geochemical processes attending geothermal reservoir development, stimulation, and reinjection. The research was done in the Stanford Hydrothermal Lab using gold cell equipment of the Dickson design. This equipment inverts the solution rock mixture several times a minute to ensure thorough mixing. Solution samples were periodically withdrawn without interruption of the experimental conditions. The data from these experiments suggests a path dependent series of reactions by which geothermal fluids might evolve from meteoric or magmatic sources.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

151

Category:Little Rock, AR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AR AR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Little Rock, AR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVHospital Little Rock... 69 KB SVLargeHotel Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeHotel Little Ro... 70 KB SVLargeOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeOffice Little R... 71 KB SVMediumOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMediumOffice Little ... 68 KB SVMidriseApartment Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMidriseApartment Lit... 70 KB SVOutPatient Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVOutPatient Little Ro...

152

,"Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids " Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids ",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_gp_a_epl0_fpf_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_gp_a_epl0_fpf_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

153

Subsalt source rock maturity in the Sudanese Red Sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal modeling can demonstrate that stratal salt deposits may provide a significant heat conduit and conceptually provide a basis for hypothermal fairways of hydrocarbon aspiration in regions of dominant thermal overmaturity. However, accurate evaluation of thermal maturity suppression by modeling must be geologically constrained. With respect to the Tertiary Tokar Delta of offshore Sudan, ID tectonic subsidence analysis of boreholes in the region reveals at least two major pu1ses of crustal extension and associated heating (24-20 m.a. and 5.4-2.7 m.a.). Integrating the borehole geochemical information with a Tokar Delta seismic stratigraphic interpretation allows the construction of constrained 2D thermal basin models through time using Procom BMT. The best match between the observed and modelled vitrinite reflectance values is achieved by using a two phase tectonic stretching model with pulses at 22{+-}2 m.a. and 4{+-}1.5 m.a. and incremental subcrustal stretching factors which vary between 2.65-2.75. Utilizing these parameters suggests the top of the oil window to occur within the Zeit Formation and bottom of the oil window to exist at the base of the Dungunab Salt. As only subsalt source rocks are observed, this model would tend to negate the possibility of the occurrence of liquid hydrocarbons. For the Tokar Delta the presently observed general high heat flow is so high that it leads in all cases to overcooked organics for a subsalt source. However, that hydrocarbons in the post-salt Zeit Formation of the Tokar Delta have been discovered suggests significant secondary hydrocarbon migration to have occurred within the late Miocene (15.4 - 5.4 m.a.). Potential migration pathways would be a1ong basement-induced fault conduits. If true, similar secondary migration play concepts may be applicable elsewhere in the Red Sea.

Geiger, C. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)]|[Preussag Energie, Lingen (Germany); Pigott, J.; Forgotson, J.M. Jr. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

,"Selected National Average Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected National Average Natural Gas Prices" Selected National Average Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Average Natural Gas Prices",11,"Monthly","11/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Data 2","Annual Average Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1922" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm03vmall.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/oil_gas/natural_gas/data_publications/natural_gas_monthly/ngm.html"

155

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... CHOOSING an awkward moment, Phillips Petroleum Exploration have announced a new find of natural ...naturalgas ...

1967-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

156

Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

Amos Nur

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

157

Method for using fast fluidized bed dry bottom coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbonaceous solid material such as coal is gasified in a fast fluidized bed gasification system utilizing dual fluidized beds of hot char. The coal in particulate form is introduced along with oxygen-containing gas and steam into the fast fluidized bed gasification zone of a gasifier assembly wherein the upward superficial gas velocity exceeds about 5.0 ft/sec and temperature is 1500.degree.-1850.degree. F. The resulting effluent gas and substantial char are passed through a primary cyclone separator, from which char solids are returned to the fluidized bed. Gas from the primary cyclone separator is passed to a secondary cyclone separator, from which remaining fine char solids are returned through an injection nozzle together with additional steam and oxygen-containing gas to an oxidation zone located at the bottom of the gasifier, wherein the upward gas velocity ranges from about 3-15 ft/sec and is maintained at 1600.degree.-200.degree. F. temperature. This gasification arrangement provides for increased utilization of the secondary char material to produce higher overall carbon conversion and product yields in the process.

Snell, George J. (Fords, NJ); Kydd, Paul H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes.

Micheli, Paul L. (Morgantown, WV); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Parsons, Edward L. (Morgantown, WV)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Solution of 2D Boussinesq systems with FreeFem++: the flat bottom case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solution of 2D Boussinesq systems with FreeFem++: the flat bottom case Georges Sadaka May 14, 2012-parameter family of Boussinesq type systems in two space dimensions which approx- imate the three-dimensional Euler and Mitsotakis have developed a code in finite volumes for the Boussinesq system with variable bottom in 1D ([Dut

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

160

Looking for Dark Matter through the Bottom of a Wine Glass!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and detect the imprint of dark energy on the web of dark matter that winds across the cosmos. Café Email listLooking for Dark Matter through the Bottom of a Wine Glass! (IYA Strange Telescope Series://cfcpwork.uchicago.edu/mailman/listinfo/cafe! #12;Looking for Dark Matter through the Bottom of a Wine Glass! (IYA Strange Telescope Series

Collar, Juan I.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Bottom-up, social innovation for addressing climate change Noam Bergman, University of Oxford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Bottom-up, social innovation for addressing climate change Noam Bergman, University of Oxford and practice in the area of bottom-up, social innovation could yield benefits if integrated into wider considerations of research and policy development concerning climate change. Taking social innovation to include

162

Sediment Quality Triad Assessment in Kachemak Bay: Characterization of Soft Bottom Benthic Habitats and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment Quality Triad Assessment in Kachemak Bay: Characterization of Soft Bottom Benthic Habitats. Sediment Quality Triad Assessment in Kachemak Bay: Characterization of Soft Bottom Benthic Habitats and Contaminant Bioeffects Assessment. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS 104. 170pp. #12;iii Sediment Quality

163

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Thermophysical properties of the Po Basin rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......W.E., AAPG, Memoir 1. Hadgu T. , Clinton C.L., Bean J.E., 2007. Determination of heat capacity of Yucca Mountain stratigraphic layer, Int. J. Rock Mech. Min. Sci., 44, 1022-1034. Hamilton E. , 1976. Variations of density......

V. Pasquale; G. Gola; P. Chiozzi; M. Verdoya

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

E-Print Network 3.0 - archean metavolcanic rocks Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(Krner, 1985). However, the tectonic setting and age of metavolcanic rocks in Egypt are poorly... metavolcanic rocks. Metavolcanic rocks in Egypt were described by...

167

Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action Agency/Company /Organization: Booz and Company Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications Website: www.booz.com/global/home/what_we_think/reports_and_white_papers/ic-dis Cost: Free Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action Screenshot References: Bottom Up and Country Led: A New Framework for Climate Action[1] "As delegates gather for the Climate Change Conference in Cancun in late 2010, they can benefit from familiarizing themselves with the set of tools available for mitigation and adaptation, as well as how these tools can fit

168

Effect of fuel properties on the bottom ash generation rate by a laboratory fluidized bed combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The range of fuels that can be accommodated by an FBC boiler system is affected by the ability of the fuel, sorbent, and ash-handling equipment to move the required solids through the boiler. Of specific interest is the bottom ash handling equipment, which must have sufficient capacity to remove ash from the system in order to maintain a constant bed inventory level, and must have sufficient capability to cool the ash well below the bed temperature. Quantification of a fuel's bottom ash removal requirements can be useful for plant design. The effect of fuel properties on the rate of bottom ash production in a laboratory FBC test system was examined. The work used coal products ranging in ash content from 20 to 40+ wt. %. The system's classification of solids by particle size into flyash and bottom ash was characterized using a partition curve. Fuel fractions in the size range characteristic of bottom ash were further analyzed for distributions of ash content with respect to specific gravity, using float sink tests. The fuel fractions were then ashed in a fixed bed. In each case, the highest ash content fraction produced ash with the coarsest size consist (characteristic of bottom ash). The lower ash content fractions were found to produce ash in the size range characteristic of flyash, suggesting that the high ash content fractions were largely responsible for the production of bottom ash. The contributions of the specific gravity fractions to the composite ash in the fuels were quantified. The fuels were fired in the laboratory test system. Fuels with higher amounts of high specific gravity particles, in the size ranges characteristic of bottom ash, were found to produce more bottom ash, indicating the potential utility of float sink methods in the prediction of bottom ash removal requirements.

Rozelle, P.L.; Pisupati, S.V.; Scaroni, A.W. [Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Energy & Geoenvironmental Engineering

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

A summary of SNCR applications to two coal-fired wet bottom boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to NO{sub x} reductions mandated under Title I of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), Public Service Electric & Gas and Atlantic Electric of New Jersey evaluated Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for NO{sub x} control under separate programs at Mercer Station and B.L. England Station, respectively. Mercer Station is comprised of twin 321 MW Foster Wheeler coal-fired wet bottom boilers, with natural gas capability up to 100% load. B.L. England Station has three units, two of which are cyclone boilers of 136 MW and 163 MW. These furnace designs are of particular interest in that nominally 23,000 MW of cyclone boiler capacity and 6,900 MW of wall- or turbo-fired wet bottom boiler capacity will be faced with NO{sub x} reductions to be mandated under Title IV - Phase II for Group II boilers. Both stations evaluated Nalco Fuel Tech`s SNCR system using a portable test skid, with urea as the reducing chemical. The Mercer Unit 2 demonstration was performed with a low sulfur coal (nominally 0.8%), while the B.L. England Unit 1 demonstration utilized a medium sulfur coal (nominally 2.4%), and also re-injects fly ash back into the cyclones for ultimate collection and removal as slag. To address concerns over potential Ljungstrom air heater fouling, due to reactions between ammonia and SO{sub 3} in the air heater, and fly ash salability at Mercer Station, both sites targeted no greater than 5-10 ppmv ammonia emissions at the economizer exit. At Mercer Unit 2, air heater fouling was only experienced during system start-up when the ammonia emissions at the economizer exit were estimated at levels approaching 60 ppmv. B.L. England Unit 1, however, experienced frequent fouling of the air heater. NO{sub x} reductions achieved at both sites ranged between 30%-40% from nominal baseline NO{sub x} levels of 1.1-1.6 lb/MMBtu. Each site is currently undergoing installation of commercial SNCR systems.

Himes, R.; Hubbard, D.; West, Z. [Carnot, Tustin, CA (United States)] [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Peach Bottom and Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dramatic and extraordinary instance of state and local government control of nuclear power, the purchase by New York of the Shoreham plant is nonetheless indicative of the political demands that some states confront for additional involvement in the regulation of the radiological hazards associated with commercial nuclear power plants. Although the Supreme Court has appeared to expand, in the eight years since PG&E and Silkwood, the acceptable extent of state regulation, some states, in addition to New York, have acquired, with the acquiescence of the NRC, a degree of involvement that exceeds the role for state and local governments provided by the Court. For example, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania concluded with the Philadelphia Electric Company (PECO) in June 1989 an agreement that commits PECO to various initiatives, not otherwise required under NRC regulations, for the safe operation of the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant in Pennsylvania. In July 1991 the State of Vermont and Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corporation (Vermont Yankee) concluded an agreement similar to that concluded between Pennsylvania and PECO. The agreement also commits Vermont Yankee to certain initiatives, not otherwise required under NRC regulations, related to its operation of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant in Vermont. The agreement was precipitated by a challenge to an application, submitted to the NRC by Vermont Yankee in April 1989, to amend the Vermont Yankee plant license to extend its expiration date from December 11, 2007 to March 21, 2012. The amendment would allow the Vermont Yankee plant to operate for forty full years.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

VancouverParksville White RockNew Westminster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Courtenay VancouverParksville Abbotsford White RockNew Westminster Squamish Chilliwack Port McNeill Powell

172

MULTI-ATTRIBUTE SEISMIC/ROCK PHYSICS APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING FRACTURED RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project consists of three key interrelated Phases, each focusing on the central issue of imaging and quantifying fractured reservoirs, through improved integration of the principles of rock physics, geology, and seismic wave propagation. This report summarizes the results of Phase I of the project. The key to successful development of low permeability reservoirs lies in reliably characterizing fractures. Fractures play a crucial role in controlling almost all of the fluid transport in tight reservoirs. Current seismic methods to characterize fractures depend on various anisotropic wave propagation signatures that can arise from aligned fractures. We are pursuing an integrated study that relates to high-resolution seismic images of natural fractures to the rock parameters that control the storage and mobility of fluids. Our goal is to go beyond the current state-of-the art to develop and demonstrate next generation methodologies for detecting and quantitatively characterizing fracture zones using seismic measurements. Our study incorporates 3 key elements: (1) Theoretical rock physics studies of the anisotropic viscoelastic signatures of fractured rocks, including up scaling analysis and rock-fluid interactions to define the factors relating fractures in the lab and in the field. (2) Modeling of optimal seismic attributes, including offset and azimuth dependence of travel time, amplitude, impedance and spectral signatures of anisotropic fractured rocks. We will quantify the information content of combinations of seismic attributes, and the impact of multi-attribute analyses in reducing uncertainty in fracture interpretations. (3) Integration and interpretation of seismic, well log, and laboratory data, incorporating field geologic fracture characterization and the theoretical results of items 1 and 2 above. The focal point for this project is the demonstration of these methodologies in the Marathon Oil Company Yates Field in West Texas.

Gary Mavko

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Rock mechanics activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of rock mechanics at nuclear waste repositories is a true multidisciplinary effort. A description and historical summary of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is presented. Rock mechanics programs at the WIPP are outlined, and the current rock mechanics modeling philosophy of the Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division is discussed.

Francke, C. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States); Saeb, S. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Understanding Through-Composition in Post-Rock, Math-Metal, and other Post-Millennial Rock Genres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the dawn of experimental rock’s second coming in the new millennium, experimental artists have begun distancing themselves from Top-40 artists through formal structures that eschew recapitulatory verse/chorus ...

Osborn, Brad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Comparative Studies on Deterministic and RVT-based SASSI Analyses of Nuclear Structures for Soil and Rock Sites  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Comparative Studies on Deterministic and RVT-based SASSI Analyses of Nuclear Structures for Soil and Rock Sites Dr. Dan M. Ghiocel Ghiocel Predictive Technologies Inc. http://www.ghiocel-tech.com 2014 DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting Germantown, MD, October 21-22, 2014

176

Analysis Of 2H-Evaporator Scale Pot Bottom Sample [HTF-13-11-28H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is planning to remove a buildup of sodium aluminosilicate scale from the 2H-evaporator pot by loading and soaking the pot with heated 1.5 M nitric acid solution. Sampling and analysis of the scale material from the 2H evaporator has been performed so that the evaporator can be chemically cleaned beginning July of 2013. Historically, since the operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), silicon in the DWPF recycle stream combines with aluminum in the typical tank farm supernate to form sodium aluminosilicate scale mineral deposits in the 2H-evaporator pot and gravity drain line. The 2H-evaporator scale samples analyzed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) came from the bottom cone sections of the 2H-evaporator pot. The sample holder from the 2H-evaporator wall was virtually empty and was not included in the analysis. It is worth noting that after the delivery of these 2H-evaporator scale samples to SRNL for the analyses, the plant customer determined that the 2H evaporator could be operated for additional period prior to requiring cleaning. Therefore, there was no need for expedited sample analysis as was presented in the Technical Task Request. However, a second set of 2H evaporator scale samples were expected in May of 2013, which would need expedited sample analysis. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) confirmed the bottom cone section sample from the 2H-evaporator pot consisted of nitrated cancrinite, (a crystalline sodium aluminosilicate solid), clarkeite and uranium oxide. There were also mercury compound XRD peaks which could not be matched and further X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of the sample confirmed the existence of elemental mercury or mercuric oxide. On ''as received'' basis, the scale contained an average of 7.09E+00 wt % total uranium (n = 3; st.dev. = 8.31E-01 wt %) with a U-235 enrichment of 5.80E-01 % (n = 3; st.dev. = 3.96E-02 %). The measured U-238 concentration was 7.05E+00 wt % (n=3, st. dev. = 8.25E-01 wt %). Analyses results for Pu-238 and Pu-239, and Pu-241 are 7.06E-05 {+-} 7.63E-06 wt %, 9.45E-04 {+-} 3.52E-05 wt %, and <2.24E-06 wt %, respectively. These results are provided so that SRR can calculate the equivalent uranium-235 concentrations for the NCSA. Because this 2H evaporator pot bottom scale sample contained a significant amount of elemental mercury (11.7 wt % average), it is recommended that analysis for mercury be included in future Technical Task Requests on 2H evaporator sample analysis at SRNL. Results confirm that the uranium contained in the scale remains depleted with respect to natural uranium. SRNL did not calculate an equivalent U-235 enrichment, which takes into account other fissionable isotopes U-233, Pu-239 and Pu-241.

Oji, L. N.

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Hydrothermal treatment of MSWI bottom ash forming acid-resistant material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To recycle municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash, synthesis of hydrothermal minerals from bottom ash was performed to stabilize heavy metals. MSWI bottom ash was mixed with SiO{sub 2}, Al(OH){sub 3}, and Mg(OH){sub 2} so its chemical composition was similar to that of hydrothermal clay minerals. These solid specimens were mixed with water at a liquid/solid ratio of 5. The reaction temperature was 200 deg. C, and reactions were performed for 24-240 h. Generation of kaolinite/smectite mixed-layer clay mineral was found in the samples after the reaction of the mixture of bottom ash, SiO{sub 2}, and Mg(OH){sub 2}. Calcium silicate hydrate minerals such as tobermorite and xonotlite were also generated. X-ray powder diffraction suggested the presence of amorphous materials. Leaching tests at various pHs revealed that the concentration of heavy metals in the leachates from MSWI bottom ash hydrothermally treated with SiO{sub 2} and Mg(OH){sub 2} was lower than that in leachates from non-treated bottom ash, especially under acid conditions. Hydrothermal treatment with modification of chemical composition may have potential for the recycling of MSWI bottom ash.

Etoh, Jiro [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Motooka 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)], E-mail: etoh@doc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Kawagoe, Takeshi [Department of Earth System Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Motooka 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Shimaoka, Takayuki [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Motooka 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Watanabe, Koichiro [Department of Earth System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Motooka 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Rock River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock River Wind Farm Facility Rock River Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Shell Wind Energy Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Arlington and Carbon Counties WY Coordinates 41.6996°, -107.003° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6996,"lon":-107.003,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

179

A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The bottom currents in the area of abyssal hills in the north-east tropical Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of simultaneous measurements of the bottom (6.25 and 35 m above the bottom) currents, deep currents, and surface currents made at three points in the north-east tropical Pacific Ocean are given. The b...

T. A. Demidova; E. A. Kontar'; A. V. Sokov; A. M. Belyaev

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

Holcomb, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); McNamee, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system that runs a steam turbine system (bottom cycle).This report focuses on the steam turbine system since these

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Category:Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Rock Lab Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Rock Lab Analysis Add.png Add a new Rock Lab Analysis Technique Pages in category "Rock Lab Analysis" The following 9 pages are in this category, out of 9 total. C Core Analysis Cuttings Analysis I Isotopic Analysis- Rock O Over Core Stress P Paleomagnetic Measurements Petrography Analysis R Rock Density X X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF)

184

ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4) Generation of derivative property models via linear coregionalization with porosity; (5) Post-processing of the simulated models to impart desired secondary geologic attributes and to create summary and uncertainty models; and (6) Conversion of the models into real-world coordinates. The conversion to real world coordinates is performed as part of the integration of the RPM into the Integrated Site Model (ISM) 3.1; this activity is not part of the current analysis. The ISM provides a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site and consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) RPM, which is the subject of this AMR; and (3) Mineralogic Model. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows the geographic boundaries of the RPM and other component models of the ISM.

Clinton Lum

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

185

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

adequate engineering review or operator supervision. In fact, a negative pressure test, conducted to evaluate the cement seal at the bottom of the well, identified problems...

186

A Statistical Analysis Of Bottom-Hole Temperature Data In The Hinton Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Statistical Analysis Of Bottom-Hole Temperature Data In The Hinton Area A Statistical Analysis Of Bottom-Hole Temperature Data In The Hinton Area Of West-Central Alberta Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Statistical Analysis Of Bottom-Hole Temperature Data In The Hinton Area Of West-Central Alberta Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Considerable differences in the spread of bottom-hole temperature values from petroleum exploration well logs plotted as a function of depth are observed over a region of west-central Alberta. The spatial variation of the spread is investigated, and it is found to be greater toward the Rocky Mountain disturbed belt in the west. The spatial variation there does not seem to correspond directly to local topography, and may be partly due

187

Energy-Saving Bottom-Lit LED Backlight with Angle-Control Freeform Lens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, relation of transmittance of prism sheets used in bottom-lit LED backlight on the direction of incident light was studied. Freeform lens was utilized to enhance the...

Qin, Zong; Wang, Kai; Wang, Shang; Liu, Sheng

188

Radiological characterization of main cooling reservoir bottom sediments at The South Texas Project Electrical Generating Station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The purpose of this study was to accurately profile the radionuclide distribution of important gamma emitting nuclides and their concentrations in the bottom sediment of the STPEGS main cooling reservoir (MCR). A Loran-C navigation system was used...

Blankinship, David Randle

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

Best practices for the sustainable scaleup of lighting technologies in bottom of the pyramid communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis deduces a set of best practices for sustainably scaling up lighting technologies in developing countries with a focus on Bottom-of-the-Pyramid (BOP) communities, whose annual incomes are US $3000 or less (in ...

Alekal, Pragnya Y. (Pragnya Yogesh), 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Numerical Investigation of Formation and Variability of Antarctic Bottom Water off Cape Darnley, East Antarctica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At several locations around Antarctica, dense water is formed as a result of intense sea ice formation. When this dense water becomes sufficiently denser than the surrounding water, it descends the continental slope and forms Antarctic Bottom ...

Yoshihiro Nakayama; Kay I. Ohshima; Yoshimasa Matsumura; Yasushi Fukamachi; Hiroyasu Hasumi

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Identification of Bottom Contribution in Non-photonic Electron Spectra and $v_2$ at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a study on the spectra for heavy flavor (charm and bottom) decayed electrons in 200 GeV $p+p$ collisions and provide the relative contributions of charm and bottom hadrons from the PYTHIA calculations. The results suggest that the crossing point of the electron spectra from charm and bottom decays is above 7 GeV/$c$ and bottom contribution is not dominant for electron $p_{T}<3$ GeV/$c$. The upper limit of the relative cross section ratio is reported as $\\sigma_{b\\bar{b}}/\\sigma_{c\\bar{c}}\\leq(0.49\\pm0.09\\pm0.09)%$. We also compare the $v_2$ distribution from simulation to the experimental data in 200 GeV $Au+Au$ collisions and estimate the possible charm $v_2$.

Yifei Zhang

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Oblique sub- and super-harmonic Bragg resonance of surface waves by bottom ripples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a class of higher order (quartet) Bragg resonance involving two incident wave components and a bottom ripple component (so called class III Bragg resonance). In this case, unlike class I/II Bragg resonance ...

Alam, Mohammad-Reza

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash bottom ash Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of bottom ash, 3 million tons of boiler slag, and 28 million tons of clean-coal ash materials) were produced... CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By...

194

The Impact of Finite-Amplitude Bottom Topography on Internal Wave Generation in the Southern Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Direct observations in the Southern Ocean report enhanced internal wave activity and turbulence in a kilometer-thick layer above rough bottom topography collocated with the deep-reaching fronts of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Linear theory, ...

Maxim Nikurashin; Raffaele Ferrari; Nicolas Grisouard; Kurt Polzin

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Use of ammonia to reduce the viscosity of bottoms streams produced in hydroconversion processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal, petroleum residuum and similar carbonaceous feed materials are subjected to hydroconversion in the presence of molecular hydrogen to produce a hydroconversion effluent which is then subjected to one or more separation steps to remove lower molecular weight liquids and produce a heavy bottoms stream containing high molecular weight liquids and unconverted carbonaceous material. The viscosity of the bottoms streams produced in the separation step or steps is prevented from increasing rapidly by treating the feed to the separation step or steps with ammonia gas prior to or during the separation step or steps. The viscosity of the heavy bottoms stream produced in the final separation step is also controlled by treating these bottoms with ammonia gas. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the effluent from the hydroconversion reactor is subjected to an atmospheric distillation followed by a vacuum distillation and the feeds to these distillations are contacted with ammonia during the distillations.

Zaczepinski, Sioma (Houston, TX); Billimoria, Rustom M. (Houston, TX); Tao, Frank (Baytown, TX); Lington, Christopher G. (Houston, TX); Plumlee, Karl W. (Baytown, TX)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Drilling Vibration Monitoring and Control System Drilling Vibration Monitoring and Control System DE-FC26-02NT41664 Goal Improve the rate of penetration and reduce the incidence of premature equipment failures in deep hard rock drilling environments by reducing harmful drillstring vibration. Performer APS Technology, Inc., Cromwell, CT 06492 Results To date, this project has produced the following results: Carried out a review of the major sources of vibration likely to influence the bottom hole assembly (BHA) and in particular the bit, and characterized them by their anticipated frequency and amplitude; Developed a software model to analyze drillstring axial vibration and determine optimal damping action; Developed a method to directly quantify the various vibration modes using a system of four accelerometers and a magnetometer mounted in a sensor sub of the damper component;

197

Variability of bottom water domes and geostrophic currents in the eastern Gulf of Maine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VARIABILITY OF BOTTOM WATER DOMES AND GEOSTROPHIC CURRENTS IN THE EASTERN GULF OF MAINE A Thesis by ERIK SAUL GQTTLIEB Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Oceanography VARIABILITY OF BOTTOM WATER DOMES AND GEOSTROPHIC CURRENTS IN THE EASTERN GULF OF ~ A Thesis by ERIK SAUL GOTTLIEB Approved as to style and content by: Davi A. rooks (Chairman...

Gottlieb, Erik S

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

198

Year 2014 | Volume 12 | Health | Natural Science | Technology | Social Science | Humanities | Business Year 2014 | Volume 12 | upenn.edu/research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ Anthropology / pgs 14­15 Eduardo Fernandez-Duque Natural Science / Astronomy / pg 16 Dark Energy Survey Natural 17 Dark Energy Survey Natural Science / Astronomy / bottom right / pg 17 Reidar Hahn of energy in the farthest reaches of space to liquid crystals at the nanoscale, researchers across

Sharp, Kim

199

Size distribution functions for rock fragments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The capacity of 17 functions to represent the size distribution of fragmented rock is assessed on 1234 data sets of screened fragments from blasted and crushed rock of different origins, of sizes ranging from 0.002 to 2000 mm. The functions evaluated are Weibull, Grady, log-normal, log-logistic and Gilvarry, in their plain, re-scaled and bi-component forms, and also the Swebrec distribution and its bi-component extension. In terms of determination coefficient, the Weibull is the best two-parameter function for describing rock fragments, with a median R2 of 0.9886. Among re-scaled, three-parameter distributions, Swebrec and Weibull lead with median R2 values of 0.9976 and 0.9975, respectively. Weibull and Swebrec distributions tie again as best bi-component, with median R2 of 0.9993. Re-scaling generally reduces the unexplained variance by a factor of about four with respect to the plain function; bi-components further reduce this unexplained variance by a factor of about two to three. Size-prediction errors are calculated in four zones: coarse, central, fines and very fines. Expected and maximum errors in the different ranges are discussed. The extended Swebrec is the best fitting function across the whole passing range for most types of data. Bimodal Weibull and Grady distributions follow, except for the coarse range, where re-scaled forms are preferable. Considering the extra difficulty in fitting a five-parameter function with respect to a three-parameter one, re-scaled functions are the best choice if data do not extend far below 20% passing. If the focus is on the fine range, some re-scaled distributions may still do (Weibull, Swebrec and Grady, with maximum errors of 15–20% at 8% passing), but serious consideration should be given to bi-component distributions, especially extended Swebrec, bimodal Weibull and bimodal Grady.

José A. Sanchidrián; Finn Ouchterlony; Pablo Segarra; Peter Moser

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

GPC behavior of metalloporphyrins from rock extract  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel and vanadyl porphyrins present in rock extract from the vicinity of petroleum deposit in the Persian Gulf area were isolated by the combination of adsurption chromatography on silica gel and GPC on styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer. In order to study the GPC behavior of these metalloporphyrins, chromatographic fractions were collected and analyzed by UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The number of carbon atoms present in the porphine substituents and the different geometry of nickel and vanadyl ions in the molecule of metalloporphyrins were found to be the main factors influencing the GPC separation of these complexes. This chromatographic technique provided an effective separation of nickel from vanadylporphyrins.

Sebor, G.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A History Of Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Systems | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A History Of Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A History Of Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Systems Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This is a short history, so far as it can now be assembled, of early speculations and observations concerning the existence and origin of natural heat in the earth's crust; of some of the many methods proposed to extract and use it; and of recent investigations designed to develop and demonstrate such methods. It is probably only the preface to a much longer

202

Study of Acid Response of Qatar Carbonate Rocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDY OF ACID RESPONSE OF QATAR CARBONATE ROCKS A Thesis by ZHAOHONG WANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 2011 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering Study of Acid Response of Qatar Carbonate Rocks Copyright 2011 Zhaohong Wang STUDY OF ACID RESPONSE OF QATAR CARBONATE ROCKS A Thesis...

Wang, Zhaohong

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

203

United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock.

Brunton, G.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth`s interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges.

Heuze, F.E.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Rock types, pore types, and hydrocarbon exploration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposed exploration-oriented method of classifying porosity in sedimentary rocks is based on microscopic examination cores or cuttings. Factors include geometry, size, abundance, and connectivity of the pores. The porosity classification is predictive of key petrophysical characteristics: porosity-permeability relationships, capillary pressures, and (less certainly) relative permeabilities. For instance, intercrystalline macroporosity typically is associated with high permeability for a given porosity, low capillarity, and favorable relative permeabilities. This is found to be true whether this porosity type occurs in a sucrosic dolomite or in a sandstone with pervasive quartz overgrowths. This predictive method was applied in three Rocky Mountain oil plays. Subtle pore throat traps could be recognized in the J sandstone (Cretaceous) in the Denver basin of Colorado by means of porosity permeability plotting. Variations in hydrocarbon productivity from a Teapot Formation (Cretaceous) field in the Powder River basin of Wyoming were related to porosity types and microfacies; the relationships were applied to exploration. Rock and porosity typing in the Red River Formation (Ordovician) reconciled apparent inconsistencies between drill-stem test, log, and mud-log data from a Williston basin wildcat. The well was reevaluated and completed successfully, resulting in a new field discovery. In each of these three examples, petrophysics was fundamental for proper evaluation of wildcat wells and exploration plays.

Coalson, E.B.; Hartmann, D.J.; Thomas, J.B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractured Rock at Yucca Mountain Jens Birkholzer, Guomin Lrepository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as it is locatedclimate conditions at Yucca Mountain. The numerical study is

Birkholzer, Jens; Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Tsang, Yvonne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Active control of underground stresses through rock pressurization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To significantly increase the stability of underground excavations while exploiting the full advantages of confined rock strength, methods must be developed to actively control the distribution of stresses near the excavation. This US Bureau of Mines study examines theoretical and practical aspects of rock pressurization, an active stress control concept that induces compressive stress in the wall rock through repeated hydraulic fracturing with a settable fluid. Numerical analyses performed by incorporating the rock pressurization concept into a variety of boundary-element models indicate that rock pressurization has the potential to improve underground excavation stability in three ways: (1) by relocating stress concentrations away from the weak opening surface to stronger, confined wall rock; (2) by inducing additional stresses in a biaxial stress field to reduce the difference between the principal stress components near the surface of the opening, and (3) by counteracting the tensile stresses induced in the rock around internally loaded openings. Practical aspects of the rock pressurization concept were investigated through a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments. The use of sulfur as a settable fluid for hydraulic fracturing was demonstrated, although problems related to sulfur viscosity suggest that other molten materials, such as wax, may be better suited to practical field application of the rock pressurization concept.

Vandergrift, T.L.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and...

209

Scientists Pass Solid Particles Through Rock in DOE-Sponsored...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

rock fractures in the laboratory. This technology has the potential for mapping fracture systems in detail and aid in determining reservoir characteristics. This research was...

210

Reconstruction of Sedimentary Rock Based on Mechanical Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diagenesis transforms an unconsolidated loose sed- imentOur emphasis is on unconsolidated sand and sandstone. Thesedi- mentary rock: unconsolidated sand and sandstone. The

Jin, Guodong; Patzek, Tad W.; Silin, Dmitry B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

212

Evaluation Of Used Fuel Disposition In Clay-Bearing Rock  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties, e.g., low permeability, potential geochemically reduced conditions...

213

ANALYSIS OF 2H-EVAPORATOR SCALE WALL [HTF-13-82] AND POT BOTTOM [HTF-13-77] SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is planning to remove a buildup of sodium aluminosilicate scale from the 2H-evaporator pot by loading and soaking the pot with heated 1.5 M nitric acid solution. Sampling and analysis of the scale material has been performed so that uranium and plutonium isotopic analysis can be input into a Nuclear Criticality Safety Assessment (NCSA) for scale removal by chemical cleaning. Historically, since the operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), silicon in the DWPF recycle stream combines with aluminum in the typical tank farm supernate to form sodium aluminosilicate scale mineral deposits in the 2Hevaporator pot and gravity drain line. The 2H-evaporator scale samples analyzed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) came from the bottom cone sections of the 2H-evaporator pot [Sample HTF-13-77] and the wall 2H-evaporator [sample HTF-13-82]. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) confirmed that both the 2H-evaporator pot scale and the wall samples consist of nitrated cancrinite (a crystalline sodium aluminosilicate solid) and clarkeite (a uranium oxy-hydroxide mineral). On “as received” basis, the bottom pot section scale sample contained an average of 2.59E+00 ± 1.40E-01 wt % total uranium with a U-235 enrichment of 6.12E-01 ± 1.48E-02 %, while the wall sample contained an average of 4.03E+00 ± 9.79E-01 wt % total uranium with a U-235 enrichment of 6.03E-01% ± 1.66E-02 wt %. The bottom pot section scale sample analyses results for Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-241 are 3.16E- 05 ± 5.40E-06 wt %, 3.28E-04 ± 1.45E-05 wt %, and <8.80E-07 wt %, respectively. The evaporator wall scale samples analysis values for Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-241 averages 3.74E-05 ± 6.01E-06 wt %, 4.38E-04 ± 5.08E-05 wt %, and <1.38E-06 wt %, respectively. The Pu-241 analyses results, as presented, are upper limit values. These results are provided so that SRR can calculate the equivalent uranium-235 concentrations for the NCSA. Results confirm that the uranium contained in the scale remains depleted with respect to natural uranium. SRNL did not calculate an equivalent U-235 enrichment, which takes into account other fissionable isotopes U-233, Pu-239 and Pu-241. The applicable method for calculation of equivalent U-235 will be determined in the NCSA.

Oji, L.

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

214

natural gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

natural gasoline, condensate, distillate [Liquid hydrocarbons, generally clear or pale straw-coloured and of high API gravity (above 6o°), that are produced with wet gas] ? Gasbenzin n, Gasolin n ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

WIPP Safety Is Paramount Top to Bottom, Literally | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WIPP Safety Is Paramount Top to Bottom, Literally WIPP Safety Is Paramount Top to Bottom, Literally WIPP Safety Is Paramount Top to Bottom, Literally March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WIPP surface maintenance employees tail a new steel head rope over the hoist drum. The hoist is used to transport TRU waste 2,150 underground for final disposal. WIPP surface maintenance employees tail a new steel head rope over the hoist drum. The hoist is used to transport TRU waste 2,150 underground for final disposal. The WIPP shaft crew installs rigging onto a new 2,300-foot-long head rope on the first floor. The WIPP shaft crew installs rigging onto a new 2,300-foot-long head rope on the first floor. WIPP surface maintenance employees tail a new steel head rope over the hoist drum. The hoist is used to transport TRU waste 2,150 underground for final disposal.

216

Rock Rapids Municipal Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rapids Municipal Utility Rapids Municipal Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock Rapids Municipal Utility Place Iowa Utility Id 16206 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Power (Single-Phase) Commercial Commercial Power (Three-Phase) Commercial Residential Power Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0807/kWh Commercial: $0.0633/kWh Industrial: $0.0899/kWh

217

Natural System  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural System Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development - FY11 Progress Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Program Yifeng Wang (SNL) Michael Simpson (INL) Scott Painter (LANL) Hui-Hai Liu (LBNL) Annie B. Kersting (LLNL) July 15, 2011 FCRD-USED-2011-000223 UFD Natural System Evaluation - FY11 Year-End Report July 15, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

218

international journal of rock mechanics and mining sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original Research, New Developments and Case Studies in Rock Mechanics and Rock .... Prior to submitting your paper, please follow the instructions given below. ... Permission of the Publisher is required for resale or distribution ..... The Digital Object Identifier (DOI) may be used to cite and link to electronic documents.

219

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project Objectives: Elucidate comprehensively the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments at temperatures of up to 250ºC, and to develop chemical modeling of CO2-reservior rock interactions.

220

SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Effects of pore texture on porosity, permeability, and sonic velocity. We show how a relation can be found between porosity, permeability, and velocity by separating the formations of rocks with similar pore textures.

Gary Mavko

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

GEOS898 History on the Rocks Assignment 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can be broken down into four major rock groups (i.e. Clastic, biogenic, organic, chemical Flow chart for identifying sedimentary rocks (most text books have this or can be found on line) Acid, distribution of layers and chemistry. It is worthwhile for the teacher to spend about 10 minutes reviewing

Frank, Tracy D.

222

Determining inert content in coal dust/rock dust mixture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for determining the inert content of a coal dust and rock dust mixture uses a transparent window pressed against the mixture. An infrared light beam is directed through the window such that a portion of the infrared light beam is reflected from the mixture. The concentration of the reflected light is detected and a signal indicative of the reflected light is generated. A normalized value for the generated signal is determined according to the relationship .phi.=(log i.sub.c `log i.sub.co) / (log i.sub.c100 -log i.sub.co) where i.sub.co =measured signal at 0% rock dust i.sub.c100 =measured signal at 100% rock dust i.sub.c =measured signal of the mixture. This normalized value is then correlated to a predetermined relationship of .phi. to rock dust percentage to determine the rock dust content of the mixture. The rock dust content is displayed where the percentage is between 30 and 100%, and an indication of out-of-range is displayed where the rock dust percent is less than 30%. Preferably, the rock dust percentage (RD%) is calculated from the predetermined relationship RD%=100+30 log .phi.. where the dust mixture initially includes moisture, the dust mixture is dried before measuring by use of 8 to 12 mesh molecular-sieves which are shaken with the dust mixture and subsequently screened from the dust mixture.

Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Ward, Jr., Jack A. (Oakmont, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/water reaction, which will depend on the rate at which water can be segregated from a melting ice/rock core. For the liquid water phase to migrate toward the surface, the denser rock phase must compact. The primary question that this thesis will answer is how...

Raney, Robert 1987-

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

224

Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in cavern sealing and operation. The MDCF model is used in three simulations of field experiments in which indirect measures were obtained of the generation of damage. The results of the simulations help to verify the model and suggest that the model captures the correct fracture behavior of rock salt. The model is used in this work to estimate the generation and location of damage around a cylindrical storage cavern. The results are interesting because stress conditions around the cylindrical cavern do not lead to large amounts of damage. Moreover, the damage is such that general failure can not readily occur, nor does the extent of the damage suggest possible increased permeation when the surrounding salt is impermeable.

Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The performance of a simulated fractured matrix reservoir subject to a bottom-water drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is thought that the flooding of a fractured matr ix reservoir may not, recover much of the oil because the water would move through the fracture and there would, be an early breakthrough of the water . Yet this has not been demonstrated for a bottom...-water dr ive, A model to represent one element of a frac- tured matrix reservoir was constructed. , The model was positioned vertically and. water was injected at a constant rate in the bottom and. oil was produced from the top of the model...

Yazdi, Mojtaba

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Slick Rock sites, Slick Rock, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah, Inc., has reevaluated the Slick Rock sites in order to revise the October 1977 engineering radioactive uranium mill tailings at Slick Rock, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 387,000 tons of tailings at the Slick Rock sites constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The five alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment include millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, consolidation of the piles, and removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings sites. Cost estimates for the five options range from about $6,800,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $11,000,000 for disposal at a distance of about 6.5 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Slick Rock tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be over $800/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by conventional or heap leach plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present, nor for the foreseeable future.

none,

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Property:HostRockLithology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HostRockLithology HostRockLithology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name HostRockLithology Property Type String Description Condensed description of the lithology of the reservoir rock. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 14 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area S cont. Stillwater Geothermal Area V Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area W Wabuska Hot Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "HostRockLithology"

228

Property:HostRockAge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HostRockAge HostRockAge Jump to: navigation, search Property Name HostRockAge Property Type String Description Describes the age of the reservoir rock by epoch, era, or period per available data. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 10 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area W Wabuska Hot Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "HostRockAge" Showing 11 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + Mesozoic + B Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + Triassic + C Coso Geothermal Area + Mesozoic +

229

Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks Author J.D. McNeill Organization Geonics Limited Published Geonics Limited, 1980 Report Number TN-5 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks Citation J.D. McNeill (Geonics Limited). 1980. Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks. TN-5 Edition. ?: Geonics Limited. Report No.: TN-5. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Electrical_Conductivity_of_Soils_and_Rocks&oldid=695344"

230

Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Density At Alum Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Alum Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Rock Density Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Rock_Density_At_Alum_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402985" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

231

Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Coso Geothermal Area (1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date 1995 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material. References Lutz, S.J.; Moore, J.N. ; Copp, J.F. (1 June 1995) Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area,

232

Property:CapRockLithology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapRockLithology CapRockLithology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name CapRockLithology Property Type String Description Condensed description of the lithology of the cap rock. Subproperties This property has the following 6 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Pages using the property "CapRockLithology" Showing 6 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + volcanic; lacustrine sediments + B Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + Hydrothermal alteration layer + G Geysers Geothermal Area + Hydrothermal alteration layer + K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area + Overlapping a'a' and pahoehoe flows + L Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area + Metasedimentary Landslide Block; Hydrothermal Alteration Layer +

233

Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: up to $275 Heat Pump Replacement: $400 Provider Rock Hill Utilities Through the SmartChoice program, Rock Hill Utilities offers rebates for water heater and heat pump replacements. Information on financing for heat pumps can also be found on the web site listed above. If both the water heater and heat pump are purchased then the customer may qualify for the Great Rate program. The Great Rate program will add a 25% discount to a

234

Longwave thermal infrared spectral variability in individual rocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hyperspectral imaging spectrometer measuring in the longwave thermal infrared (7.6-11.6 {micro}m) with a spatial resolution less than 4 mm was used in the field to observe the variability of emissivity spectra within individual rocks. The rocks were obtained commercially, were on the order of 20 cm in size and were selected to have distinct spectral features: they include alabaster (gypsum), soapstone (steatite with talc), obsidian (volcanic glass), norite (plagioclase and orthopyroxene), and 'jasper' (silica with iron oxides). The advantages of using an imaging spectrometer to spectrally characterize these rocks are apparent. Large spectral variations were observed within individual rocks that may be attributed to roughness, surface geometry, and compositional variation. Non-imaging spectrometers would normally miss these variations as would small samples used in laboratory measurements, spatially averaged spectra can miss the optimum spectra for identification materials and spatially localized components of the rock can be obscured.

Balick, Lee K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gillespie, Alan [UN. WASHINGTON; French, Andrew [USDA-ARS; Danilina, Iryna [UN. WASHINGTON

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To analyze evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field Notes The isotopic compositions of Pb and Sr in Pleistocene basalt, high-silica rhyolite, and andesitic inclusions in rhyolite of the Coso volcanic field indicate that these rocks were derived from different levels of compositionally zoned magmatic systems. The two earliest rhyolites probably

236

Age of Goose Rock Conglomerate, Wheele and Grant Counties, north-central Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reconstruction of the geologic history and synthesis of the tectonic history of the Blue Mountains and Columbia Basin require that they know the age of key outcrops. The geological record in this entire area has been largely hidden by a thick blanket of Tertiary volcanic rocks. Only a few erosional inliers are available from which to interpret the pre-volcanic tectonic and sedimentation history. The Goose Rock Inlier, exposed along the John Day River in the Butler basin and Turtle Cove, is one such important outcrop. These exposures, consisting of a few hundred feet of fluvial sandstones and conglomerates, informally called the Goose Rock Conglomerate have received only limited attention from previous workers. Estimates of this unit's age range from Early Cretaceous to early Tertiary, on the basis of lithologic similarities with other named and unnamed formations in the area. The terrestrial nature of these strata and the apparent lack of fossils cause considerable difficulty in correlation with other Cretaceous sequences, which are largely marine. In the absence of scarcity of other fossils, palynology offers a unique alternative for making biochronological and paleoenvironmental interpretations.

Aguirre, M.R.; Fisk, L.H.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock: Data Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geological repositories have been considered a feasible option worldwide for storing high-level nuclear waste. Clay rock is one of the rock types under consideration for such purposes, because of its favorable features to prevent radionuclide transport from the repository. Coupled hydromechanical processes have an important impact on the performance of a clay repository, and establishing constitutive relationships for modeling such processes are essential. In this study, we propose several constitutive relationships for elastic deformation in indurated clay rocks based on three recently developed concepts. First, when applying Hooke's law in clay rocks, true strain (rock volume change divided by the current rock volume), rather than engineering strain (rock volume change divided by unstressed rock volume), should be used, except when the degree of deformation is very small. In the latter case, the two strains will be practically identical. Second, because of its inherent heterogeneity, clay rock can be divided into two parts, a hard part and a soft part, with the hard part subject to a relatively small degree of deformation compared with the soft part. Third, for swelling rock like clay, effective stress needs to be generalized to include an additional term resulting from the swelling process. To evaluate our theoretical development, we analyze uniaxial test data for core samples of Opalinus clay and laboratory measurements of single fractures within macro-cracked Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples subject to both confinement and water reduced swelling. The results from this evaluation indicate that our constitutive relationships can adequately represent the data and explain the related observations.

Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Analysis Of 2H-Evaporator Scale Wall [HTF-13-82] And Pot Bottom [HTF-13-77] Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is planning to remove a buildup of sodium aluminosilicate scale from the 2H-evaporator pot by loading and soaking the pot with heated 1.5 M nitric acid solution. Sampling and analysis of the scale material has been performed so that uranium and plutonium isotopic analysis can be input into a Nuclear Criticality Safety Assessment (NCSA) for scale removal by chemical cleaning. Historically, since the operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), silicon in the DWPF recycle stream combines with aluminum in the typical tank farm supernate to form sodium aluminosilicate scale mineral deposits in the 2H-evaporator pot and gravity drain line. The 2H-evaporator scale samples analyzed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) came from two different locations within the evaporator pot; the bottom cone sections of the 2H-evaporator pot [Sample HTF-13-77] and the wall 2H-evaporator [sample HTF-13-82]. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) confirmed that both the 2H-evaporator pot scale and the wall samples consist of nitrated cancrinite (a crystalline sodium aluminosilicate solid) and clarkeite (a uranium oxyhydroxide mineral). On ''as received'' basis, the bottom pot section scale sample contained an average of 2.59E+00 {+-} 1.40E-01 wt % total uranium with a U-235 enrichment of 6.12E-01 {+-} 1.48E-02 %, while the wall sample contained an average of 4.03E+00 {+-} 9.79E-01 wt % total uranium with a U-235 enrichment of 6.03E-01% {+-} 1.66E-02 wt %. The bottom pot section scale sample analyses results for Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-241 are 3.16E-05 {+-} 5.40E-06 wt %, 3.28E-04 {+-} 1.45E-05 wt %, and <8.80E-07 wt %, respectively. The evaporator wall scale samples analysis values for Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-241 averages 3.74E-05 {+-} 6.01E-06 wt %, 4.38E-04 {+-} 5.08E-05 wt %, and <1.38E-06 wt %, respectively. The Pu-241 analyses results, as presented, are upper limit values. For these two evaporator scale samples obtained at two different locations within the evaporator pot the major radioactive components (on a mass basis) in the additional radionuclide analyses were Sr-90, Cs-137 Np-237, Pu-239/240 and Th-232. Small quantities of americium and curium were detected in the blanks used for Am/Cm method for these radionuclides. These trace radionuclide amounts are assumed to come from airborne contamination in the shielded cells drying or digestion oven, which has been replaced. Therefore, the Am/Cm results, as presented, may be higher than the true Am/Cm values for these samples. These results are provided so that SRR can calculate the equivalent uranium-235 concentrations for the NCSA. Results confirm that the uranium contained in the scale remains depleted with respect to natural uranium. SRNL did not calculate an equivalent U-235 enrichment, which takes into account other fissionable isotopes U-233, Pu-239 and Pu-241. The applicable method for calculation of equivalent U-235 will be determined in the NCSA. With a few exceptions, a comparison of select radionuclides measurements from this 2013 2H evaporator scale characterization (pot bottom and wall scale samples) with those measurements for the same radionuclides in the 2010 2H evaporator scale analysis shows that the radionuclide analysis for both years are fairly comparable; the analyses results are about the same order of magnitude.

Oji, L. N.

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

239

Analysis of fish bycatch and observer effect within the New Zealand ling bottom long-lining commercial fishery.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research aims to make a contribution to management of the ling bottom long-line (BLL) fishery by: - providing improved understanding of fish bycatch in… (more)

Burns, R. J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

NATURE STUDY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...last two numbers of SCIENCE have appeared articles by Drs. Wheeler and Chapman on the abuses of nature writing as exemplified...imprint of Rand, IeNally and Co., 1903, and its author is Katherine E. Dopp, of the Extension Division of the Chicago University...

E. C. CASE

1904-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

GEOL 104 Dinosaurs: A Natural History Geology Assignment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rocks is the energy of the environment: that is, how fast the water (or wind) was moving. EssentiallyName: 1 GEOL 104 Dinosaurs: A Natural History Geology Assignment DUE: Mon. Sept. 18 Part I, the higher the energy, the larger the size of the particles of sediment. Slow moving water can only move

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

242

Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, anomalous groundwater pressures, and widespread geologic occurrence. Clay/shale rock formations are characterized by their high content of clay minerals such as smectites and illites where diffusive transport and chemisorption phenomena predominate. These, in addition to low permeability, are key attributes of shale to impede radionuclide mobility. Shale host-media has been comprehensively studied in international nuclear waste repository programs as part of underground research laboratories (URLs) programs in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. These investigations, in some cases a decade or more long, have produced a large but fundamental body of information spanning from site characterization data (geological, hydrogeological, geochemical, geomechanical) to controlled experiments on the engineered barrier system (EBS) (barrier clay and seals materials). Evaluation of nuclear waste disposal in shale formations in the USA was conducted in the late 70’s and mid 80’s. Most of these studies evaluated the potential for shale to host a nuclear waste repository but not at the programmatic level of URLs in international repository programs. This report covers various R&D work and capabilities relevant to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in shale/argillite media. Integration and cross-fertilization of these capabilities will be utilized in the development and implementation of the shale/argillite reference case planned for FY15. Disposal R&D activities under the UFDC in the past few years have produced state-of-the-art modeling capabilities for coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development to evaluate generic disposal concepts. The THMC models have been developed for shale repository leveraging in large part on the information garnered in URLs and laboratory data to test and demonstrate model prediction capability and to accurately represent behavior of the EBS and the natural (barrier) system (NS). In addition, experimental work to improve our understanding of clay barrier interactions and TM couplings at high temperatures are key to evaluate thermal effects as a result of relatively high heat loads from waste and the extent of sacrificial zones in the EBS. To assess the latter, experiments and modeling approaches have provided important information on the stability and fate of barrier materials under high heat loads. This information is central to the assessment of thermal limits and the implementation of the reference case when constraining EBS properties and the repository layout (e.g., waste package and drift spacing). This report is comprised of various parts, each one describing various R&D activities applicable to shale/argillite media. For example, progress made on modeling and experimental approaches to analyze physical and chemical interactions affecting clay in the EBS, NS, and used nuclear fuel (source term) in support of R&D objectives. It also describes the development of a reference case for shale/argillite media. The accomplishments of these activities are summarized as follows: ? Development of a reference case for shale/argillite; ? Investigation of Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in EBS: FY14; ? Update on Experimental Activities on Buffer/Backfill Interactions at elevated Pressure and Temperature; ? Thermodynamic Database Development: Evaluation Strategy, Modeling Tools, First-Principles Modeling of Clay, and Sorption Database Assessment; ? ANL Mixed Potential Model For Used Fuel Degradation: Application to Argillite and Crystalline Rock Environments.

Carlos F. Jové Colón; Philippe F. Weck; David H. Sassani; Liange Zheng; Jonny Rutqvist; Carl I. Steefel; Kunhwi Kim; Seiji Nakagawa; James Houseworth; Jens Birkholzer; Florie A. Caporuscio; Michael Cheshire; Michael S. Rearick; Mary K. McCarney; Mavrik Zavarin; Ana Benedicto; Annie B. Kersting; Mark Sutton; James Jerden; Kurt E. Frey; Jacqueline M. Copple; William Ebert

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

243

Marketing Mother Nature’s Molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marketing Mother Nature’s Molecules ... Yet molecules made by Mother Nature, or derivatives thereof, still account for nearly half of the drugs on the market. ...

LISA JARVIS

2012-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

244

Natural Marine Oil Seepage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...be anticipated in rocks of the same age...in place in the reservoir. If one-third...breached petroleumn reservoirs or froin the subaerial...asphalts, and source rocks containing imiintitely...fracttures and isolated porosity is probably, in...sccpagc driive from reservoirs is the "reset-voir...

R. D. Wilson; P. H. Monaghan; A. Osanik; L. C. Price; M. A. Rogers

1974-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

245

TOP-DOWN/BOTTOM-UP APPROACH FOR DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT INDICATORS FOR MINING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: APPLICATION TO THE ARLIT URANIUM MINES (NIGER) A. Chamareta)b) , M. O'Connor a) and G. Récoché b) a, undertaken at the Arlit uranium mines in Niger. Our objective was to define indicators that are understood1 TOP-DOWN/BOTTOM-UP APPROACH FOR DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT INDICATORS FOR MINING

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

246

ORIGINAL PAPER Tomato fruit weight 11.3 maps close to fasciated on the bottom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Tomato fruit weight 11.3 maps close to fasciated on the bottom of chromosome 11 online: 4 May 2011 Ã? Springer-Verlag 2011 Abstract Fruit weight is an important character in many crops. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), fruit weight is controlled by many loci, some of which have a major effect

van der Knaap, Esther

247

OVERLAP OF PREDICTED COLD-WATER CORAL HABITAT AND BOTTOM-CONTACT FISHERIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Environmental Management Project No. 476 © Jessica L. Finney 2009 SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY Fall 2009 All rights of Resource Management Title of Thesis: Overlap of predicted cold-water coral habitat and bottom- contact School of Resource and Environmental Management Simon Fraser University

248

Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill By Ed Killer Saturday, June 12 like if touched by an underwater plume of oil. No doubt, much of it would be gone forever. Reed inhabiting the reefs, Reed hoped the oil would not be swept around the tip of Florida and onto the fragile

Belogay, Eugene A.

249

Hydrodynamics of high speed planing hulls with partially ventilated bottom and hydrofoils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The influence of a cambered shaped bottom step on the performance of sea going V-stepped planing hulls is investigated using numerical methods. The shape of the step was designed to decrease the Drag/Lift ratio of the hull ...

Sheingart, Zvi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Sonar imaging of bay bottom sediments and anthropogenic impacts in Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Knowledge of surface sediment distribution in Galveston Bay is important because it allows us to better understand how the bay works and how human activities impact the bay and its ecosystems. In this project, six areas of bay bottom were surveyed...

Maddox, Donald Shea

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

251

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top National Laboratory (LBNL) Edgar Villaseñor Franco, Promoting an Energy-efficient Public Sector (PEPS (Promoting an Energy-efficient Public Sector) program, demonstrates the need for flexibility in designing

252

Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events: Peach Bottom, Unit 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the internal event initiated accident sequence analyses for Peach Bottom, Unit 2; one of the reference plants being examined as part of the NUREG-1150 effort by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-1150 will document the risk of a selected group of nuclear power plants. As part of that work, this report contains the overall core damage frequency estimate for Peach Bottom, Unit 2, and the accompanying plant damage state frequencies. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses provided additional insights regarding the dominant contributors to the Peach Bottom core damage frequency estimate. The mean core damage frequency at Peach Bottom was calculated to be 8.2E-6. Station blackout type accidents (loss of all ac power) were found to dominate the overall results. Anticipated Transient Without Scram accidents were also found to be non-negligible contributors. The numerical results are largely driven by common mode failure probability estimates and to some extent, human error. Because of significant data and analysis uncertainties in these two areas (important, for instance, to the most dominant scenario in this study), it is recommended that the results of the uncertainty and sensitivity analyses be considered before any actions are taken based on this analysis.

Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Lambright, J.A.; Ferrell, W.L.; Cathey, N.G.; Najafi, B.; Harper, F.T.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF A SAMPLER FOR MEASURING THE NEAR-BOTTOM VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF A SAMPLER FOR MEASURING THE NEAR-BOTTOM VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF PINK distribution of shrimp was considered essential to the design of an effective shrimp trawl since the vertical. Subsequently a multipurpose shrimp sampler was designed to facilitate investigation of shrimp distributions

254

Using MAS Technologies for Intelligent Organizations: A Report of Bottom-Up Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using MAS Technologies for Intelligent Organizations: A Report of Bottom-Up Results Armando Robles1 Organizations us- ing MAS Technology. We discuss our experience of implementing different types of server agents institutional prescription, and having that prescription control the information system that handles the day

Luck, Michael

255

Recent Bottom Water Warming in the Pacific Ocean* GREGORY C. JOHNSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent Bottom Water Warming in the Pacific Ocean* GREGORY C. JOHNSON NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Contribution Number 3037. Corresponding author address: Gregory C. Johnson, NOAA-mail: gregory.c.johnson@noaa.gov 1 NOVEMBER 2007 J O H N S O N E T A L . 5365 DOI: 10.1175/2007JCLI1879.1 © 2007

Johnson, Gregory C.

256

Abstract--Three aspects of a survey bottom trawl performance--1) trawl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ronmental conditions. Variables such as surface and bottom currents, sea state, wind direction, varying sub- strate types and inclinations, and depth of tow may all contribute to dif- ferences in gear efficiency. Other than by controlling towing speed and direction, these surveys are unable to compensate

257

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

258

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspo hard rock Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

60 Merguerian, Charles; and Ozdemir, Levent, 2003, Rock Mass Properties and Hard Rock TBM Penetration Rate Investigations, Queens Tunnel Complex, NYC Water Tunnel 3, Stage 2: p....

260

A STATISTICAL FRACTURE MECHANICS APPROACH TO THE STRENGTH OF BRITTLE ROCK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to evaluate subcritical crack growth, many of the rubberoccurred indicating negligible subcritical crack growth.Subcritical crack growth can occur in many rocks and rock-

Ratigan, J.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Excavation Damaged Zones In Rock Salt Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt formations have long been proposed as potential host rocks for nuclear waste disposal. After the operational phase of a repository the openings, e.g., boreholes, galleries, and chambers, have to be sealed in order to avoid the release of radionuclides into the biosphere. For optimising the sealing techniques knowledge about the excavation damaged zones (EDZ) around these openings is essential. In the frame of a project performed between 2004 and 2007, investigations of the EDZ evolution were performed in the Stassfurt halite of the Asse salt mine in northern Germany. Three test locations were prepared in the floor of an almost 20 year old gallery on the 800-m level of the Asse mine: (1) the drift floor as existing, (2) the new drift floor shortly after removing of a layer of about 1 m thickness of the floor with a continuous miner, (3) the new drift floor 2 years after cutting off the 1-m layer. Subject of investigation were the diffusive and advective gas transport and the advective brine transport very close to the opening. Spreading of the brine was tracked by geo-electric monitoring in order to gain information about permeability anisotropy. Results obtained showed that EDZ cut-off is a useful method to improve sealing effectiveness when constructing technical barriers. (authors)

Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Hydrogeologic factors affecting cavern morphology within rocks of Mississippian age in northwestern Arkansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cavern development within rocks of Mississippian age in northwestern Arkansas is associated with two Pleistocene erosional features, the Boston Mountains Plateau and the Springfield Plateau. Each plateau is characterized by a distinct stratigraphic sequence with unique lithologies. Cavern morphology (both cross-sectional and planimetric) in each plateau is the result of the complex interaction of numerous hydrogeologic factors. Four of the most dominant factors which affect cavern morphology appear to be: (1) composition and continuity of the confining units; (2) percentage of noncarbonate components in rocks of the cavern-forming interval; (3) nature and distribution of ground-water recharge to the cavern-forming interval; and (4) nature and distribution of fractures within the cavern-forming interval. Network maze patterns typically develop in the Pitkin Limestone, the formation in which most caverns form beneath the Boston Mountains Plateau. The Pitkin, a bioclastic limestone, is confined above by siltstones of the Cane Hill member of the Hale Formation and below by shales of the Fayetteville Formation. The maze pattern indicates that these caverns probably were formed by dissolution of the rock matrix by diffuse recharge moving vertically through leaky confining units. Single rooms are the dominant cavern morphology in the chert-dominated Boone Formation of the Springfield Plateau. Where the concentration of chert is greater than 50 percent, the Boone lacks structural integrity and fails to develop well-integrated conduit networks. Point recharge features in outcrop areas of the Boone Formation are not visible in most of the Springfield Plateau because the insoluble residuum masks the upper bedrock surface. Where the Boone Formation is less than 7 meters thick, surface karst features are more prevalent.

Fanning, B.J. (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Geology); Brahana, J.V. (Univ. of Arkansas , Fayetteville, AR (United States). Geological Survey)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Discrete element modeling of rock deformation, fracture network development and permeability evolution under hydraulic stimulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Key challenges associated with the EGS reservoir development include the ability to reliably predict hydraulic fracturing and the deformation of natural fractures as well as estimating permeability evolution of the fracture network with time. We have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a network flow model. In DEM model, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external and internal load is applied. The natural fractures are represented by a series of connected line segments. Mechanical bonds that intersect with such line segments are removed from the DEM model. A network flow model using conjugate lattice to the DEM network is developed and coupled with the DEM. The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms the mechanical bonds and breaks them if the deformation reaches a prescribed threshold value. Such deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability of the flow network, which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, intimately coupling the two processes. The intimate coupling between fracturing/deformation of fracture networks and fluid flow makes the meso-scale DEM- network flow simulations necessary in order to accurately evaluate the permeability evolution, as these methods have substantial advantages over conventional continuum mechanical models of elastic rock deformation. The challenges that must be overcome to simulate EGS reservoir stimulation, preliminary results, progress to date and near future research directions and opportunities will be discussed. Methodology for coupling the DEM model with continuum flow and heat transport models will also be discussed.

Shouchun Deng; Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Geology of the hydrothermal field at 26 [degrees] N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge: interpretations from ocean-bottom photography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, seismics, magnetics, gravity, bottom sampling, and bottom photography. Studies of the MAR between 47'-51'N (Johnson and Vogt, 1973), at 45'N (Aumento and others, 1971), and between 22'- 23'N (van Andel and. Bowin, 1968) have determined the gross...

Temple, Darcy Merideth Goode

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Boussinesq systems in two space dimensions over a variable bottom for the generation and propagation of tsunami waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boussinesq systems in two space dimensions over a variable bottom for the generation.R.T.H., P.O. Box 1527, 71110 Heraklion, Greece Abstract Considered here are Boussinesq systems of equations of surface water wave theory over a variable bottom. A simplified such Boussinesq system is derived

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

268

ADCP backscatter measurements in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico: comparison of near-surface with near-bottom biological backscatter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Also investigated is ABI from near-bottom scatterers during the Deep Gulf of Mexico Benthic Ecology study (DGoMB). Four near-bottom deployments of a 300kHz ADCP in depths ranging from 755 to 2740 m were made in June 2001 each for 1-2 days. A fifth...

Sindlinger, Laurie R

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

269

Coupled In-Rock and In-Drift Hydrothermal Model Stuudy For Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermal-hydrologic-natural-ventilation model is configured for simulating temperature, humidity, and condensate distributions in the coupled domains of the in-drift airspace and the near-field rockmass in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. The multi-physics problem is solved with MULTIFLUX in which a lumped-parameter computational fluid dynamics model is iterated with TOUGH2. The solution includes natural convection, conduction, and radiation for heat as well as moisture convection and diffusion for moisture transport with half waste package scale details in the drift, and mountain-scale heat and moisture transport in the porous and fractured rock-mass. The method provides fast convergence on a personal computer computational platform. Numerical examples and comparison with a TOUGH2 based, integrated model are presented.

G. Danko; J. Birkholzer; D. Bahrami

2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

270

Use of Long-Lived Natural Radioactivity as an Atmospheric Tracer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... group of radioactive isotopes for this purpose would be the longer-lived, daughter products of radon radium-D, -E and -F which are naturally present in the atmosphere as ... -F which are naturally present in the atmosphere as a result of the leakage of radon from soils and rocks on the Earth's surface.

W. M. BURTON; N. G. STEWART

1960-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

271

Evidence for residual elastic strain in deformed natural quartz  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual elastic strain in naturally deformed, quartz-containing rocks can be measured quantitatively in a petrographic thin section with high spatial resolution using Laue microdiffraction with white synchrotron x-rays. The measurements with a resolution of one micrometer allow the quantitative determination of the deviatoric strain tensor as a function of position within the crystal investigated. The observed equivalent strain values of 800-1200 microstrains represent a lower bound of the actual preserved residual strain in the rock, since the stress component perpendicular to the cut sample surface plane is released. The measured equivalent strain translates into an equivalent stress in the order of {approx} 50 MPa.

Kunz, Martin; Chen, Kai; Tamura,Nobumichi; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

Bottom Frame  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at SSRL X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at SSRL Welcome to the home page of the Structural Molecular Biology/X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Group at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. The SMB/XAS group develops methodology and instrumentation, and provides a wide array of equipment, software and services/support for x-ray absorption spectroscopy users at SSRL. Scientific focus is on dilute metalloprotein XAS, microbeam imaging/XAS, low-Z XAS (S and Cl etc.), and polarized single crystal XAS studies, for which specialized facilities are made available. Equipment ranges from advanced solid-state array x-ray fluorescence detector systems, liquid-He cryostats and capillary/ K-B optic micro-XAS instrumentation to wet-laboratory facilities. Software provided by the

273

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- WNI Split Rock Site - 043  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Split Rock Site - 043 Split Rock Site - 043 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WNI Split Rock Site (043) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Western Nuclear, Inc. (WNI) Split Rock site is a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Title II site located in Jeffrey City, Wyoming. UMTRA Title II sites are privately owned and operated sites that were active when the Uranium Mill Tailings Control Act was passed in 1978. The majority of the milling conducted at these sites was for private sale, but a portion was sold to the U.S. Government. After the owner completes U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission license termination, the Department of

274

Photo of the Week: Laser Beats Rock | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Laser Beats Rock Laser Beats Rock Photo of the Week: Laser Beats Rock April 8, 2013 - 5:28pm Addthis On August 5, 2012, the Curiosity rover touched down on the surface of Mars. The ChemCam instrument package, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is a device mounted on the Mars Curiosity rover that uses two remote sensing instruments: the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) and a Remote Micro-Imager (RMI). The LIBS fires a powerful laser that determines chemical compositions of rock and soil samples, while the RMI takes photos of the samples within the rover's vicinity. In this photo, the ChemCam is being prepared in the clean room prior to the launch of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission. Learn more about the ChemCam. | Photo courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

275

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1997 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine a major lithospheric boundary Notes Sr and Nd isotope ratios of Miocene-Recent basalts in eastern California, when screened for crustal contamination, vary dramatically and indicate the presence of a major lithospheric boundary that is not obvious from surface geology. Isotope ratios from the Coso field form a bull's-eye pattern with very low 87Sr/86Sr (0.7033) centered just south of the geothermal area. The

276

Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Florida Mountains Area (Brookins, 1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Florida Mountains Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Radiogenic heat production analysis from U,Th,K concentrations. References D. G. Brookins (1982) Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In The Precambrian And Younger Silicic Rocks Of The Zuni And Florida Mountains, New Mexico (Usa)

277

On the energy range relation for fast muons in rock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A discussion is given of the best estimate of various types of energy loss; the energy-range relation for muons in rock and water is then evaluated....?6 g?1 cm2 fractional «nuclear» energy losses respectively; w...

M. Mandò; L. Ronchi

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Upscaling of elastic properties of anisotropic sedimentary rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Data 2.1 Physical model of shale Shales are anisotropic rocks whose anisotropy is generally...Hudson J.A., 1994. Anisotropic effective-medium modeling of the elastic properties of shales, Geophysics, 59, 1570-1583......

Irina O. Bayuk; Mike Ammerman; Evgeni M. Chesnokov

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Mimbres rock art: a graphic legacy of cultural expression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rock art abounds along the Mimbres River banks and drainage tributaries reflecting the rich cultural remains of the ancient Mimbres people. The Mimbres are a well established cultural group who lived in southwest New Mexico and northern Mexico from...

Tidemann, Kathryn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

280

Experimental Study on Rock Deformation and Permeability Variation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of a petroleum reservoir would inevitably induce a rearrangement of the in-situ stress field. The rearrangement of the stress field would then bring about a deformation of the reservoir rock and a change of the permeability...

Ding, Jihui

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Acid Fracture and Fracture Conductivity Study of Field Rock Samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acid fracturing is a well stimulation strategy designed to increase the productivity of a producing well. The parameters of acid fracturing and the effects of acid interaction on specific rock samples can be studied experimentally. Acid injection...

Underwood, Jarrod

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Modeling of Seismic Signatures of Carbonate Rock Types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbonate reservoirs of different rock types have wide ranges of porosity and permeability, creating zones with different reservoir quality and flow properties. This research addresses how seismic technology can be used to identify different...

Jan, Badr H.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

283

Rock Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Goff, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pre-intrusive metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks can have considerably higher Sr-isotope ratios (0.7061-0.7246 and 0.7090-0.7250, respectively). Hydrothermally altered...

284

Microsoft Word - CX_HatRockEquipmentDisposition.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

station taps PacifiCorp's McNary-Wallula 230-kilovolt (kV) line to serve BPA's Hat Rock Substation. PacifiCorp is in the process of rebuilding the switching station, including...

285

Mathematical model of a Hot Dry Rock system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......efficiency calculations, geothermal energy, Hot Dry Rock, multiple crack...is to estimate the amount of energy which may be produced by a geothermic power station. Heat capacity...provides a large resource of energy. To obtain the energy cold......

Norbert Heuer; Tassilo Küpper; Dirk Windelberg

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Asphaltene Deposition in Carbonate Rocks: Experimental Investigation and Numerical Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Asphaltene Deposition in Carbonate Rocks: Experimental Investigation and Numerical Simulation ... Interfacial tension (IFT) as one of the main properties for efficient CO2 flooding planning in oil reservoirs depends strongly on pressure, temperature, and composition of the reservoir fluids. ...

Shahin Kord; Rohaldin Miri; Shahab Ayatollahi; Mehdi Escrochi

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

287

Reservoir Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System, Fenton Hill, New Mexico- Tracer Test Results Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

288

Fluid-Rock Interaction in Geothermal Energy Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reaction of aqueous fluids with minerals of geothermal energy reservoir rocks produces both secondary solid phases ... for these effects. Heat production from chemical energy is possible in relevant amounts, but ...

E. Althaus

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hot Dry Rock Reservoir Engineering | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hydraulically connect the wells. Water pumped down the injection well and through the fracture system is heated by contact with the hot rock and rises to the production well. This...

290

FREQUENCY DEPENDENT ELASTIC AND ANELASTIC PROPERTIES OF CLASTIC ROCKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was sequestered in a shallow saline aquifer where the vertical migration of the CO2 is controlled by shale changes in the compressibility of rocks. A large difference between the seismic and ultrasonic frequencies

291

The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore pressure and fracture...

Keys, Ryan S.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

292

Gamma-ray absorption and chemical composition of neovolcanic rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gamma-ray absorption coefficients ? Cs 137 for a set of 49 neovolcanic rocks from the Bohemian Massif were measured; their values varied in the range from 0.2092 cm?1 to 0.2464 c...

V?ra Va?ková; Vladimír Kropá?ek; Reviewer J. Buben

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric plume of thermal water that originates from a deep reservoir to the south and then flows laterally to the north. Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material.

294

Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Usa Abstract Quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis of about 80 rhyolite and associated...

295

Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

296

Rock climbing sub-worlds: a segmentation study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ROCK CLIMBING SUB-WORLDS: A SEGMENTATION STUDY A Thesis by BRANDON WAYNE RAPELJE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 2004 Major Subject: Recreation, Park & Tourism Sciences ROCK CLIMBING SUB-WORLDS: A SEGMENTATION STUDY A Thesis by BRANDON WAYNE RAPELJE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Rapelje, Brandon Wayne

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

The effect of rock density in synthesizing seismic reflection records  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was gained on the relative significance of rock densities in determining the reflection coefficient. The error which would be expected in the reflection coefficient at an interface when computed from the velocity inforsmtion only can be estimated from... was gained on the relative significance of rock densities in determining the reflection coefficient. The error which would be expected in the reflection coefficient at an interface when computed from the velocity inforsmtion only can be estimated from...

Morris, Gerald Brooks

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Comparison of linear and nonlinear acoustic probing of rock salt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF LINEAR AND NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC PROBING OF ROCK SALT A Thesis by ALBERT MIN-HAO WANG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1980 Major Subject: Geophysics COMPARISON OF LINEAR AND NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC PROBING OF ROCK SALT A Thesis by ALBERT MIN-HAO 'RANG Approved as to style and content by: l('-/c~k~&(. Chairman o Comm ' ee Member) Member / I Member Head...

Wang, Albert Min-Hao

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

299

Rock glacier monitoring with low-cost GPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

moving stations on rock glacier Low-cost L1 GPS receivers (blox) Power source: solar panels Local data Rock glacier GPS antennaGPS antenna Solar panelSolar panel Box incl.Box incl. -GPS receiverData logger Instruments Solar panelSolar panel (24W, 12V, 50x50cm)(24W, 12V, 50x50cm) Costs per station: 2

300

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more common fluid for extracting volatile oil and fragrance compounds from various raw materials that are used in perfumery. Furthermore, its use as a heat transmission fluid is very attractive because of the greater uptake capability of heat from hot reservoir rock, compared with that of water. However, one concern was the reactivity of CO2 with clay and rock minerals in aqueous and non-aqueous environments. So if this reaction leads to the formation of water-soluble carbonates, such formation could be detrimental to the integrity of wellbore infrastructure.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Geotechnical Features of the Volcanic Rocks Related to the Arteara Rock Avalanche in Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Arteara rock avalanche is developed in the Fataga Group which is related to the first volcanic stage in the Gran Canaria Island (8.6–13.3 Ma)....

Martín Jesús Rodríguez-Peces; Jorge Yepes Temiño…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

EDS Coal Liquefaction Process Development. Phase V. Laboratory evaluation of the characteristics of EDS Illinois bottoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This interim report documents work carried out by Combustion Engineering, Inc. under a contract to Exxon Research and Engineering Company to develop a conceptual Hybrid Boiler design fueled by the vacuum distillation residue (vacuum bottoms) derived from Illinois No. 6 coal in the EDS Coal Liquefaction Process. This report was prepared by Combustion Engineering, Inc., and is the first of two reports on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler program. This report covers the results of a laboratory investigation to assess the fuel and ash properties of EDS vacuum bottoms. The results of the laboratory testing reported here were used in conjunction with Combustion Engineering's design experience to predict fuel performance and to develop appropriate boiler design parameters. These boiler design parameters were used to prepare the engineering design study reported in EDS Interim Report FE-2893-113, the second of the two reports on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler Program. 46 figures, 29 tables.

Lao, T C; Levasseur, A A

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

304

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

305

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

306

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

307

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

308

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

309

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

310

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

311

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

312

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

313

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

314

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

315

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

316

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

317

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

318

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

319

On Two-Phase Relative Permeability and Capillary Pressure of Rough-Walled Rock Fractures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Single Rock Joints", Licentiate Thesis, Lulea Universityof Technology, Lulea, Sweden. Heiba, A. A. , Sahimi, M. ,

Pruess ed, K.; Tsang, Y.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Variability of bottom nepheloid layers near the Flower Garden Banks, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1981 PHISH profiles. A) Profile 13S, B) Profile 17S. . . . . . . 36 LIST OP FIGURES (cont) 15 Transmissivity versus SpM concentration determined from samples taken at the bottom of PHZSH casts from stations near the East and West Plower Garden... contained a greater concentration of SPM in PHISH profiles collected near the East Flower Garden (particularly the east side), west of the West Flower Garden, and north of the banks. All BNLs were a variation of a basic profile structure. Models...

Cecil, Thomas Martin

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Resummed Higgs $p_T$ distribution at NNLL + NNLO in bottom-quark annihilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The resummed transverse-momentum distribution for Higgs bosons produced via bottom-quark annihilation at the LHC is presented. Our results are obtained in the five-flavor scheme to NNLO+NNLL accuracy. We present a theoretical prediction which consistently matches the cross section at small and large transverse momenta. Theoretical uncertainties are derived from a variation of the unphysical scales entering the calculation. Their size is significantly reduced with respect to lower orders.

Harlander, Robert; Wiesemann, Marius

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Resummed Higgs $p_T$ distribution at NNLL + NNLO in bottom-quark annihilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The resummed transverse-momentum distribution for Higgs bosons produced via bottom-quark annihilation at the LHC is presented. Our results are obtained in the five-flavor scheme to NNLO+NNLL accuracy. We present a theoretical prediction which consistently matches the cross section at small and large transverse momenta. Theoretical uncertainties are derived from a variation of the unphysical scales entering the calculation. Their size is significantly reduced with respect to lower orders.

Robert Harlander; Anurag Tripathi; Marius Wiesemann

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

323

Optimizing artificial lift operations through the use of wireless conveyed real time bottom hole data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of an innovative wireless bottom hole pressure/temperature telemetry acquisition system in artificial lift operations can dramatically improve efficiency and optimize fluid producing rates in those wells. The tool is installed into the producing well in the vicinity of the perforations, measuring and transmitting the producing bottom hole pressures and temperatures to the surface for instantaneous control of the surface pumping motor speed. This insures the lowest possible fluid level back pressures, thus allowing for the highest possible fluid entry into the wellbore from that reservoir`s capacity. Operating costs per barrel are lowered since the maximum oil production can now be realized from existing wells. The telemetry tool is deployed with standard slickline equipment and is installed inside a well in a manner similar to ordinary pressure recorder tools. Several unique advantages of the tool are: (1) no moving parts; (2) no wireline to the surface; (3) real time measurement of bottom hole data; and (4) slickline retrievable. Future versions of the acquisition system tool will improve operating efficiency in the following ways: (1) Temperature monitoring and control of perforation scaling, tubular waxing, and tubular hydrating plugs. (2) Provide data necessary to create diagnostically predictive IPR curves through monitoring of reservoir in-flow rates. (3) Enabling early warning of water encroachment or lensing through fluid resistivity monitoring.

Campbell, B.; MacKinnon, J.; Bandy, T.R.; Hampton, T.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Laconia, New Hampshire Bottom, Ashi Paving Project. Volume 1: Environmental testing report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bottom ash is the principal waste stream fro m the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW). It is comprised of grate ash (97%), the slag material discharged at the end of the grate system and grate sffting (3%), the material that melts or falls through the grate structure. This project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using municipal solid waste grate ash as an aggregate substitute in the construction of a pavement binder course for a portion of Rt. 3 in Laconia, New Hampshire. The research was conducted over a two year period during 1993 and 1994. This study is the culmination of an earlier two year characterization study between 1990 and 1992 that documented the physical and environmental characteristics of the bottom ash as it was produced at the Concord, N.H. waste-to-energy (WTE) facility and used in an asphaltic binder course. Together, these two studies provide a complete evaluation of the potential for using grate ash or bottom ash in asphalt binder course or as recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) in base courses in pavements.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Construction of an embankment with a fly and bottom ash mixture: field performance study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fly ash and bottom ash are coal combustion by-products (CCBPs) that are generated in large quantities throughout the world. It is often economical to dispose ash as mixtures rather than separately; that notwithstanding, only a few studies have been performed to investigate the behavior of fly and bottom ash mixtures, particularly those with high contents of fly ash. Also, there is very limited data available in the literature on the field performance of structures constructed using ash mixtures. This paper describes the construction and the instrumentation of a demonstration embankment built with an ash mixture (60:40 by weight of fly ash:bottom ash) on State Road 641, Terre Haute, Ind. Monitoring of the demonstration embankment was conducted for a period of 1 year from the start of construction of the embankment. The settlement of the embankment stabilized approximately 5 months after the end of its construction. According to horizontal inclinometer readings, the differential settlement at the top of the embankment is about 5 mm. Results from field quality control tests performed during construction of the demonstration embankment and monitoring data from vertical and horizontal inclinometers and settlement plates indicate that the ash mixture investigated can be considered an acceptable embankment construction material.

Yoon, S.; Balunaini, U.; Yildirim, I.Z.; Prezzi, M.; Siddiki, N.Z. [Louisiana Transportation Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

The Laconia, New Hampshire bottom ash paving project: Volume 3, Physical Performance Testing Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bottom ash is the principal waste stream from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW). It is comprised of grate ash (97%), the slag material discharged at the end of the grate system, and grate sifting (3%), the material that melts or falls through the grate structure. This project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using municipal solid waste grate ash as an aggregate substitute in the construction of a pavement binder course for a portion of Rt. 3 in Laconia, New Hampshire. The research was conducted over a two year period during 1993 and 1994. This study is the culmination of an earlier two year characterization study between 1990 and 1992 that documented the physical and environmental characteristics of the bottom ash as it was produced at the Concord, N.H. waste-to-energy (@) facility and used in an asphaltic binder course. Together, these two studies provide a complete evaluation of the potential for using grate ash or bottom ash in asphalt binder course or as recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) in base courses in pavements.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. 5 figs.

Fife, A.B.; Ballas, G.J.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

328

Apollo 14: Nature and origin of rock types in soil from the Fra Mauro formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Compositions of glasses in the Apollo 14 soil correspond to four types of Fra Mauro basalts, to mare basalts and soils, and, in minor amounts, to gabbroic anorthosite and potash granite. The Fra Mauro basalts can be related by simple low pressure crystal-liquid fractionation that implies a parent composition like that of Apollo 14 sample 14310.

Apollo Soil Survey

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DILUTION, COAL CREEK WATERSHED, GUNNISON COUNTY, COLORADO by Brianna Shanklin B.S., Auburn University, 2004 written by Brianna Shanklin has been approved for the Department of Civil, Environmental;iii ABSTRACT Shanklin, Brianna L. (M.S., Department of Civil Engineering) Sources and Effects

Ryan, Joe

330

Experimental and modeling results for reconsolidation of crushed natural rock salt under varying physical conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mined salt from the underground facility at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project is a candidate material for use as backfill around the waste packages and in the underground openings during and after the operational phase. We have conducted a series of hydrostatic and triaxial compression experiments on the time-dependent compaction behavior of crushed salt under nominally dry, damp,'' (0.5-3 wt % added water), and brine-saturated conditions. Though the compaction of dry crushed salt is very show in the laboratory, damp salt is likely to compact as rapidly as the mine walls can converge. Drained tests on brine-saturated crushed salt indicate that, though effects associated with saturation do retard consolidation rates slightly, high fractional densities ({ge} 0.95) can still be obtained on laboratory time scales at pressures below lithostatic at the WIPP. Triaxial compression experiments indicate that small deviatoric stresses have little impact on consolidation rates. Micromechanical models for the compaction of dry and damp crushed salt, based on isostatic hot-pressing models, are discussed.

Zeuch, D.H.; Holcomb, D.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Experimental and modeling results for reconsolidation of crushed natural rock salt under varying physical conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mined salt from the underground facility at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project is a candidate material for use as backfill around the waste packages and in the underground openings during and after the operational phase. We have conducted a series of hydrostatic and triaxial compression experiments on the time-dependent compaction behavior of crushed salt under nominally dry, ``damp,`` (0.5-3 wt % added water), and brine-saturated conditions. Though the compaction of dry crushed salt is very show in the laboratory, damp salt is likely to compact as rapidly as the mine walls can converge. Drained tests on brine-saturated crushed salt indicate that, though effects associated with saturation do retard consolidation rates slightly, high fractional densities ({ge} 0.95) can still be obtained on laboratory time scales at pressures below lithostatic at the WIPP. Triaxial compression experiments indicate that small deviatoric stresses have little impact on consolidation rates. Micromechanical models for the compaction of dry and damp crushed salt, based on isostatic hot-pressing models, are discussed.

Zeuch, D.H.; Holcomb, D.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Rock-magnetic properties of multicomponent natural remanent magnetization in alluvial red beds (NE Spain)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......palaeoenvironmental changes., Palaeogeog. Palaeoclimat. Palaeoecol., 93, 227-253. Van Hoof A.A.M. , Van Os B.J.H., Rademakers J.G., Langereis C.G., De Lange G.J., 1993. A paleomagnetic and geochemical record of the Upper Cochiti reversal......

Pauline P. Kruiver; Cor G. Langereis; Mark J. Dekkers; Wout Krijgsman

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Two-Phase Flow Simulations In a Natural Rock Fracture using the VOF Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to exhibit several shortcomings that might be partially overcome with a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles (Hassanizadeh and Gray, 1990). This alternative two-phase flow model contains a set of new and non-standard parameters, including specific interfacial area. By incorporating interfacial area production, destruction, and propagation into functional relationships that describe the capillary pressure and saturation, a more physical model has been developed. Niessner and Hassanizadeh (2008) have examined this model numerically and have shown that the model captures saturation hysteresis with drainage/imbibition cycles. Several static experimental studies have been performed to examine the validity of this new thermodynamically based approach; these allow the determination of static parameters of the model. To date, no experimental studies have obtained information about the dynamic parameters required for the model. A new experimental porous flow cell has been constructed using stereolithography to study two-phase flow phenomena (Crandall et al. 2008). A novel image analysis tool was developed for an examination of the evolution of flow patterns during displacement experiments (Crandall et al. 2009). This analysis tool enables the direct quantification of interfacial area between fluids by matching known geometrical properties of the constructed flow cell with locations identified as interfaces from images of flowing fluids. Numerous images were obtained from two-phase experiments within the flow cell. The dynamic evolution of the fluid distribution and the fluid-fluid interface locations were determined by analyzing these images. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the thermodynamically based two-phase flow model, review the properties of the stereolithography flow cell, and show how the image analysis procedure has been used to obtain dynamic parameters for the numerical model. These parameters include production/destruction of interfacial area as a function of saturation and capillary pressure. Our preliminary results for primary drainage in porous media show that the specific interfacial area increased linearly with increasing gas saturation until breakthrough of the displacing gas into the exit manifold occurred.

Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H., Bromhal, Grant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

MECHANICAL DEGRADATION OF EMPLACEMENT DRIFTS AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN - A CASE STUDY IN ROCK MECHANICS, PART 1: NONLITHOPHYSAL ROCK, PART 2: LITHOPHYSAL ROCK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for a US high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation throughout the regulatory period for repository performance.

M. Lin, D. Kicker, B. Damjanac, M. Board, and M. Karakouzian

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

335

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

336

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

337

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

338

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

339

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

340

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

342

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

343

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

344

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

345

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

346

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

347

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

348

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

349

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

350

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Where is shale gas found Where is shale gas found in the United States? Shale gas is located in many parts of the United States. These deposits occur in shale "plays" - a set of discovered, undiscovered or possible natural gas accumulations that exhibit similar geological characteristics. Shale plays are located within large-scale basins or accumulations of sedimentary rocks, often hundreds of miles across, that also may contain other oil and gas resources. 1 Shale gas production is currently occurring in 16 states. 1 U.S. Government Accountability Office, Report to Congressional Requesters, "Oil and Gas: Information on Shale Resources, Development, and

351

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

352

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

353

2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION AT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERACTION AT RESERVOIR CONDITIONS 2.1.1 Introduction In the previous section, the fluid/rock interactions in this section and expand the understanding of the interactions of the Spraberry reservoir rock, oil and brine, brine displacement and rock wettability using low permeability Spraberry cores. A schematic

Schechter, David S.

354

1.4 PETROPHYSICS: Combined Rock and Fluid Character Integration of geological and petrophysical data allows development of a rock-fluid model for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the different rock types that comprise the subject reservoirs, marginal reservoirs and non-reservoir rocks). Analytical techniques used to develop this model include porosity-permeability analysis of core plug samples.4.2.2.1 Permeability determination with Nitrogen Flow Through Rock Type: Core plug samples of 1 in. and 1.5-in

Schechter, David S.

355

Potential for tunneling based on rock and soil melting. Abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rock-melting drill was invented at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1960. Electrically heated, laboratory-scale drills were subsequently shown to penetrate igneous rocks at usefully high rates, with moderate power consumptions. The development of compact nuclear reactors and of heat pipes now makes possible the extension of this technology to much larger melting penetrators, potentially capable of producing holes up to several meters in diameter and several tens of kilometers long or deep. Development of a rapid, versatile, economical method of boring large, long shafts and tunnels offers solutions to many of man's most urgent ecological, scientific, raw-materials, and energy-supply problems. A melting method appears to be the most promising and flexible means of producing such holes. It is relatively insensitive to the composition, hardness, structure, and temperature of the rock, and offers the possibilities of producing self-supporting, glass-lined holes in almost any formation and (using a technique called lithofracturing) of eliminating the debris-removal problem by forcing molten rock into cracks created in the bore wall. Large rock-melting penetrators, called Electric Subterrenes or Nuclear Subterrenes according to the energy source used, are discussed in this report, together with problems anticipated in their development. It is concluded that this development is within the grasp of present technology.

Rowley, J.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka [RAWRA, Czech Republic

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 1. Project Location Project Location j PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 2a. Project Area (North) Staging Area #4 Structure 3/5 Structure 3/6 Structure 3/4 Structure 3/7 Structure 3/5 Structure 3/6 PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Structure 4/6 Legal Description N N 1:24000 scale 1:24000 scale Section Township Range 17 20 2 N 27 E 31 11 N 18 W 6 10 N USGS TOPO MAP: Cross Roads, Arizona-California USGS TOPO MAP: Cross Roads, Arizona-California PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas

358

Tide-Induced Sediment Resuspension and the Bottom Boundary Layer in an Idealized Estuary with a Muddy Bed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sediment transport and bottom boundary layer (BBL) in an idealized estuary with a muddy bed were studied by numerical simulations. The focus was placed on description and prediction of the dynamics of nepheloid layer (a fluid–mud layer) developed ...

X. H. Wang

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Coupled Bottom-Up/Top-Down Model for GHG Abatement Scenarios in the Swiss Housing Sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we report on the coordinated development of a regional module within a world computable general equilibrium model (CGEM) and of a bottom up energy-technology-environment model (ETEM) describing long...

Laurent Drouet; Alain Haurie; Maryse Labriet; Philippe Thalmann…

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

COMPARATIVE INSTITUTIONAL ADVANTAGES AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PYRAMID: EXPLAINING CROSS-NATIONAL DIFFERENCES IN THE GROWTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT We apply a comparative institutional perspective to extend research into the conditions of successful business innovation in Bottom-of-the-Pyramid (BOP) markets. To test the importance

Edwards, Paul N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Effect of Finite Spatial Resolution on the Turbulent Energy Spectrum Measured in the Coastal Ocean Bottom Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of finite spatial resolution on the measured energy spectrum is examined via a parametric study using in situ particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements performed in the bottom boundary layer on the Atlantic continental shelf. Two-...

Erin E. Hackett; Luksa Luznik; Joseph Katz; Thomas R. Osborn

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Effects of thermal pollution on the soft-bottoms surrounding a power station in the Canary Islands (NE Atlantic ocean)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The spatial and temporal effects of hot seawater (60–70°C) from a power station on nearby soft-bottom communities were ... coast of Tenerife, Canary Islands, NE Atlantic Ocean). The samples were taken during summ...

Rodrigo Riera; Jorge Núñez; Daniel Martín

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Influence of Bottom Friction on Sea Surface Roughness and Its Impact on Shallow Water Wind Wave Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a selected subset of the measured data obtained in shallow waters near Vindeby, Denmark, during RASEX (Risø Air–Sea Experiment), the role of bottom friction dissipation in predicting wind waves (not swell) is assessed with a third-...

Hakeem K. Johnson; Henrik Kofoed-Hansen

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Black Rock III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Rock III Geothermal Project Black Rock III Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Black Rock III Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W.The following coordinate was not recognized: 33°19'59" N, 115°50'3 W. Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

366

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Woldegabriel & Goff, 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Woldegabriel & Goff, 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Useful for age determinations - not indicated is useful for exploration. References Giday WoldeGabriel, Fraser Goff (1992) K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal

367

3rd Rock Systems and Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Systems and Technologies Rock Systems and Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name 3rd Rock Systems and Technologies Place Burlingame, California Zip 94010 Sector Renewable Energy, Services Product Provides proven renewable energy technologies and consulting services to residential, commercial, and industrial clients. Coordinates 38.753055°, -95.834619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.753055,"lon":-95.834619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

368

AltaRock Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AltaRock Energy Inc AltaRock Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name AltaRock Energy Address 7900 E Green Lake Drive N Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98103 Sector Geothermal energy Product Creates geothermal energy reservoirs, develops geothermal facilities Website http://www.altarockenergy.com/ Coordinates 47.6855466°, -122.3364827° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.6855466,"lon":-122.3364827,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

369

Chimney Rock Public Power Dist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chimney Rock Public Power Dist Chimney Rock Public Power Dist Jump to: navigation, search Name Chimney Rock Public Power Dist Place Nebraska Utility Id 3495 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png ELECTRIC THERMAL STORAGE Commercial GENERAL SEASONAL Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE Single Phase Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE Three Phase Commercial IRRIGATION STANDBY RATE, Single Phase Commercial IRRIGATION STANDBY RATE, Three Phase Commercial LARGE POWER SERVICE Commercial RESIDENTIAL SERVICE AND SEASONAL SERVICE Residential

370

City of Rock Hill, South Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Hill, South Carolina (Utility Company) Rock Hill, South Carolina (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Rock Hill Place South Carolina Utility Id 16195 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 175 Watt HPS lighting Lighting Economic Development Rate (Schedule EDR -1) Commercial Economic Development Rate (Schedule EDR -2) Industrial Flood Lighting Rate 1000 Watt HPS Lighting Flood Lighting Rate 400 Watt HPS Lighting General Service/ Non Demand (Schedule GS) Commercial General Service/Demand (Schedule GD) Industrial

371

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

372

Determination of the thermodynamic performance of a bottom outlet cyclone steam-water separator for geothermal use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DETERMINATION OF THE THERMODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF A BOTTOM OUTLET CYCLONE STEAM-WATER SEPARATOR FOR GEOTHERMAL USE A Thesis by Mark Andrew Chappell... Approved as to style and content by; Chairman o Committee Member e er em er ad epartment December 1979 ABSTRACT Determination of the Thermodynamic Performance of a Bottom Outlet Cyclone Steam-Water Separator for Geothermal Use (December 1979) Mark...

Chappell, Mark Andrew

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Accelerator measurements of the Askaryan effect in rock salt: A roadmap toward teraton underground neutrino detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on further SLAC measurements of the Askaryan effect: coherent radio emission from charge asymmetry in electromagnetic cascades. We used synthetic rock salt as the dielectric medium, with cascades produced by GeV bremsstrahlung photons at the Final Focus Test Beam. We extend our prior discovery measurements to a wider range of parameter space and explore the effect in a dielectric medium of great potential interest to large-scale ultra-high-energy neutrino detectors: rock salt (halite), which occurs naturally in high purity formations containing in many cases hundreds of km{sup 3} of water-equivalent mass. We observed strong coherent pulsed radio emission over a frequency band from 0.2-15 GHz. A grid of embedded dual-polarization antennas was used to confirm the high degree of linear polarization and track the change of direction of the electric-field vector with azimuth around the shower. Coherence was observed over 4 orders of magnitude of shower energy. The frequency dependence of the radiation was tested over 2 orders of magnitude of UHF and microwave frequencies. We have also made the first observations of coherent transition radiation from the Askaryan charge excess, and the result agrees well with theoretical predictions. Based on these results we have performed a detailed and conservative simulation of a realistic GZK neutrino telescope array within a salt dome, and we find it capable of detecting 10 or more contained events per year from even the most conservative GZK neutrino models.

Gorham, P.W.; Guillian, E.; Milincic, R.; Miocinovic, P. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii (United States); Saltzberg, D.; Williams, D. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Field, R.C.; Walz, D. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Menlo Park, California (United States)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Accelerator Measurments of the Askaryan Effect in Rock Salt: A Roadmap Toward Teraton Underground Neutrino Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on further SLAC measurements of the Askaryan effect: coherent radio emission from charge asymmetry in electromagnetic cascades. We used synthetic rock salt as the dielectric medium, with cascades produced by GeV bremsstrahlung photons at the Final Focus Test Beam. We extend our prior discovery measurements to a wider range of parameter space and explore the effect in a dielectric medium of great potential interest to large scale ultra-high energy neutrino detectors: rock salt (halite), which occurs naturally in high purity formations containing in many cases hundreds of cubic km of water-equivalent mass. We observed strong coherent pulsed radio emission over a frequency band from 0.2-15 GHz. A grid of embedded dual-polarization antennas was used to confirm the high degree of linear polarization and track the change of direction of the electric-field vector with azimuth around the shower. Coherence was observed over 4 orders of magnitude of shower energy. The frequency dependence of the radiation was tested over two orders of magnitude of UHF and microwave frequencies. We have also made the first observations of coherent transition radiation from the Askaryan charge excess, and the result agrees well with theoretical predictions. Based on these results we have performed detailed and conservative simulation of a realistic GZK neutrino telescope array within a salt-dome, and we find it capable of detecting 10 or more contained events per year from even the most conservative GZK neutrino models.

Gorham, P.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Predicting the transport properties of sedimentary rocks from microstructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding transport properties of sedimentary rocks, including permeability, relative permeability, and electrical conductivity, is of great importance for petroleum engineering, waste isolation, environmental restoration, and other applications. These transport properties axe controlled to a great extent by the pore structure. How pore geometry, topology, and the physics and chemistry of mineral-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions affect the flow of fluids through consolidated/partially consolidated porous media are investigated analytically and experimentally. Hydraulic and electrical conductivity of sedimentary rocks are predicted from the microscopic geometry of the pore space. Cross-sectional areas and perimeters of individual pores are estimated from two-dimensional scanning electron microscope (SEM) photomicrographs of rock sections. Results, using Berea, Boise, Massilon, and Saint-Gilles sandstones show close agreement between the predicted and measured permeabilities. Good to fair agreement is found in the case of electrical conductivity. In particular, good agreement is found for a poorly cemented rock such as Saint-Gilles sandstone, whereas the agreement is not very good for well-cemented rocks. The possible reasons for this are investigated. The surface conductance contribution of clay minerals to the overall electrical conductivity is assessed. The effect of partial hydrocarbon saturation on overall rock conductivity, and on the Archie saturation exponent, is discussed. The region of validity of the well-known Kozeny-Carman permeability formulae for consolidated porous media and their relationship to the microscopic spatial variations of channel dimensions are established. It is found that the permeabilities predicted by the Kozeny-Carman equations are valid within a factor of three of the observed values methods.

Schlueter, E.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash Title Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Mathieu, Johanna L., Ashok J. Gadgil, Susan E. Addy, and Kristin Kowolik Journal Environmental Science and Health Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, arsenic, bangladesh, coal bottom ash, drinking water, indoor environment department, water contaminants, water treatment Abstract We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6×10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90% (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90% of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2 ≥ 0.99) increase from 2.4×105 to 7.2×105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than filtration of micron-scale particles, further contributing to the affordability of a community-scale water treatment center

378

Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have (1) Studied relationships between velocity and permeability. (2) Used independent experimental methods to measure the elastic moduli of clay minerals as functions of pressure and saturation. (3) Applied different statistical methods for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. (4) Analyzed the directional dependence of velocity and attenuation in different reservoir rocks (5) Compared Vp measured under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic stress conditions in sands. (6) Studied stratification as a source of intrinsic anisotropy in sediments using Vp and statistical methods for characterizing textures in sands.

Gary Mavko

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Ozone generation by rock fracture: Earthquake early warning?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the production of up to 10 ppm ozone during crushing and grinding of typical terrestrial crust rocks in air, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at atmospheric pressure, but not in helium or nitrogen. Ozone is formed by exoelectrons emitted by high electric fields, resulting from charge separation during fracture. The results suggest that ground level ozone produced by rock fracture, besides its potential health hazard, can be used for early warning in earthquakes and other catastrophes, such as landslides or land shifts in excavation tunnels and underground mines.

Baragiola, Raul A.; Dukes, Catherine A.; Hedges, Dawn [Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Core samples from the Dunes, California, and Raft River, Idaho, geothermal areas show diagenesis superimposed on episodic fracturing and fracture sealing. The minerals that fill fractures show significant temporal variations. Sealed fractures can act as barriers to fluid flow. Sealed fractures often mark boundaries between regions of significantly

382

Air bottoming cycle: Use of gas turbine waste heat for power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of the Air Bottoming Cycle (ABC) as well as the results of a feasibility study for using the Air Bottoming Cycle for gas turbine waste heat recovery/power generation on oil/gas platforms in the North Sea. The basis for the feasibility study was to utilize the exhaust gas heat from an LM2500PE gas turbine. Installation of the ABC on both a new and an existing platform have been considered. A design reference case is presented, and the recommended ABC is a two-shaft engine with two compressor intercoolers. The compression pressure ratio was found optimal at 8:1. The combined gas turbine and ABC shaft efficiency wa/s calculated to 46.6 percent. The LM2500PE gas turbine contributes with 36.1 percent while the ABC adds 10.5 percent points to the gas turbine efficiency. The ABC shaft power output is 6.6 MW when utilizing the waste heat of an LM2500PE gas turbine. A preliminary thermal and hydraulic design of the ABC main components (compressor, turbine, intercoolers, and recuperator) was carried out. The recuperator is the largest and heaviest component (45 tons). A weight and cost breakdown of the ABC is presented. The total weight of the ABC package was calculated to 154 metric tons, and the ABC package cost to 9.4 million US$. An economical examination for three different cases was carried out. The results show that the ABC alternative (LM2500PE + ABC) is economical, with a rather good margin, compared to the other alternatives. The conclusion is that the Air Bottoming Cycle is an economical alternative for power generation on both new platforms and on existing platforms with demand for more power.

Bolland, O.; Foerde, M. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Div. of Thermal Energy and Hydropower; Haande, B. [Oil Engineering Consultants, Sandvika (Norway)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

,"U.S. Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline Systems"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline Systems" Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline Systems" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Intratstate Natural Gas Pipelines By Region",1,"Periodic",2007 ,"Release Date:","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"Next Release Date:","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"Excel File Name:","PipeIntra.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/natural_gas/analysis_publications/ngpipeline/intrastate.html" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

384

Solution of 2D Boussinesq systems with FreeFem++: The flat bottom case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FreeFem++ is an open source platform to solve partial differential equations numerically, based on finite element methods. The FreeFem++ platform has been developed to facilitate teaching and basic research through prototyping. For the moment this platform is restricted to the numerical simulations of problems which admit a variational formulation. We will use FreeFem++ in this work to solve a three-parameter family of Boussinesq type systems in two space dimensions which approximate the three-dimensional Euler equations over an horizontal bottom.

Sadaka, Georges

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Simultaneous wave and current forces on a cylinder near the bottom boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) December 1979 1Z43363 ABSTRACT Simultaneous Wave and Current Forces on a Cylinder Near the Bottom Boundary. (December 1979) David Alex Knoll, B. S. , University of Missouri at Rolls Chai. rman of Advisory Committee: Dr. J. B. Herbich This paper is a.... ACKNOWLEDGEMENT S The author wishes to extend his appreciation to Dr. John B. Herbich of the Ocean Engineering Program for assistance and guidance in the work and preparation of this thesis. The author is also grateful to Dr. T. C. Su of the Ocean Engineer...

Knoll, David Alex

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

386

A multi-dimensional criticism of the Triple Bottom Line reporting approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While the Triple Bottom Line (TBL) approach has triggered a sense of shift in ways companies think about sustainable reporting, there are still many limitations within TBL. The fundamental roots of TBL are ingrained in a quantitative framework and have no sense of integration or a systemic approach to viewing problems. The main purpose of this paper is to provide a critical review of the TBL approach and its weaknesses. The paper provides a detailed literature review of the evolution of TBL, and then shifts towards the limitations of TBL especially in terms of measurement and the lack of systemic thinking.

Kaushik Sridhar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Construction of an ultra low temperature STM with a bottom loading mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have constructed and tested an ultra-low temperature scanning tunneling microscope that works with an atomic resolution at ultra low temperatures (T?126 mK) in magnetic fields (B?6 T) in ultra high vacuum (UHV). Clean sample surfaces can be prepared by several different methods and characterized by low energy electron diffraction in situ of UHV. A unique bottom loading mechanism enables us to cool back to the base temperature within 3 h after changing the sample and scanning tunneling microscopy tips.

T. Matsui; H. Kambara; I. Ueda; T. Shishido; Y. Miyatake; Hiroshi Fukuyama

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Geohydromechanical Processes in the Excavation Damaged Zone in Crystalline Rock, Rock Salt, and Indurated and Plastic Clays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The creation of an excavation disturbed zone or excavation damaged zone is expected around all man-made openings in geologic formations. Macro- and micro-fracturing, and in general a redistribution of in situ stresses and rearrangement of rock structures, will occur in this zone, resulting in drastic changes of permeability to flow, mainly through the fractures and cracks induced by excavation. Such an EDZ may have significant implications for the operation and long-term performance of an underground nuclear waste repository. Various issues of concern need to be evaluated, such as processes creating fractures in the excavation damaged zone, the degree of permeability increase, and the potential for sealing or healing (with permeability reduction) in the zone. In recent years, efforts along these lines have been made for a potential repository in four rock types-crystalline rock, salt, indurated clay, and plastic clay-and these efforts have involved field, laboratory, and theoretical studies. The present work involves a synthesis of the ideas and issues that emerged from presentations and discussions on EDZ in these four rock types at a CLUSTER Conference and Workshop held in Luxembourg in November, 2003. First, definitions of excavation disturbed and excavation damaged zones are proposed. Then, an approach is suggested for the synthesis and intercomparison of geohydromechanical processes in the EDZ for the four rock types (crystalline rock, salt, indurated clay, and plastic clay). Comparison tables of relevant processes, associated factors, and modeling and testing techniques are developed. A discussion of the general state-of-the-art and outstanding issues are also presented. A substantial bibliography of relevant papers on the subject is supplied at the end of the paper.

Tsang, Chin-Fu; Bernier, Frederic; Davies, Christophe

2004-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

389

Importance of Low Permeability Natural Gas Reservoirs (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40% of natural gas production and about 35% of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in darcies.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Durability and microstructure characteristics of alkali activated coal bottom ash geopolymer cement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many studies have focused on the production of mortar and concrete without cement. This is referred to as geopolymer mortar or concrete. This paper discusses the effect of alkali oxides (Na2O = 8, 12, 16 wt.% and SiO2 = 0, 4, 8, 12 wt.%) on compressive strength, microstructure and durability of circulating fluidized bed combustion coal bottom ash (CBA) geopolymer cements (GC). Durability and morphology tests were carried out through heating and freezing tests. The highest compressive strength (25.83 MPa) was achieved at Na2O wt.% = 12, SiO2 wt.% = 8. The optimum atomic ratios for a compact microstructure were obtained for Si/Al between 3.5 and 4 and Si/Na close to 0.5. Following the sintering, the main reaction products (N-A-S-H gel) became more amorphous at 800 °C, attaining Si/Al and Si/Na atomic ratios of 4.54 and 0.98. Sodium carbonate formation was observed at 800 °C. Also, the strength loss of GC was only 6.77% after 30 freeze-thaw cycles. The results show that durable geopolymer concrete without cement can be produced by using waste bottom coal ash. Therefore, the production of geopolymer concrete has a high environmental impact, decreasing waste material in addition to global warming.

?lker Bekir Topçu; Mehmet U?ur Toprak; Tayfun Uyguno?lu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Diverter/bop system and method for a bottom supported offshore drilling rig  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a system adapted for alternative use as a diverter or a blowout preventer for a bottom supported drilling rig and adapted for positioning beneath a rotary table of the drilling rig, the system comprising: a fluid flow controller having a controller housing with a lower opening and an upper opening and a vertical flow path therebetween and an outlet passage provided in its housing wall, and at least two bases. A method is described for installing a system adapted for alternative connection as a diverter or a blowout preventer for a bottom supported drilling rig positioned beneath a rotary table of the drilling rig after structural casing has been set in a borehole. The method comprises: positioning a first telescoping spool having a lower end and an upper end below the rotary table, the first spool having a first base disposed at its upper end, the first base having a port disposed in its wall; aligning a fluid flow controller having a controller housing wall outlet passage and adapted for alternative use as a diverter or a blowout preventer so that the controller is substantially vertically aligned between a bore of the rotary table above and the structural casing below; and securing the fluid flow controller beneath the drilling rig rotary table.

Roche, J.R.; Alexander, G.G.

1987-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

392

Fostering interconnectivity dimension of low-carbon cities: The triple bottom line re-interpretation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In facilitating the progress towards low-carbon cities, there is no lack of available green technologies, planning techniques, economic tools, social development strategies, etc. These technologies, strategies and techniques have, in fact, long been deployed in many cities and communities around the world. However, the outcomes have been somewhat slow and less than expected. This is also manifested in the lower-than-expectation outcomes of the formation of a meaningful global climate change treaty so far. The barriers have clearly been unveiled as disconnection among the triple bottom lines (TBL) in the approach. By linking the concept of low-carbon cities to sustainable development (informed by the TBL), the paper highlights the implication of misinterpretation of a popular TBL diagram, leading to fragmented, compromised approach to LCC. Cases in point are isolating and excluding social and economic activities that are not environmental friendly, and trading-off environmentally-friendly activities that are not profitable in economic sense. Re-interpretation the popular TBL diagram literally from a three-dimensional lens offers an alternative approach, presented in an integrated framework towards low-carbon cities. The vital factors in the framework are safeguarding the positive dynamic interconnectivities of the three bottom lines, aligning their core values (in contrast to the isolating and excluding exercise), amplifying their common interest (instead of trading-off activities), and deploying strategies from planning, renewable technologies, education and policy making to address multiple and interconnected issues reciprocally.

Wynn Chi Nguyen Cam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Roth Rock Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Wind Power Project Rock Wind Power Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Roth Rock Wind Power Project Facility Roth Rock Wind Power Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Gestamp Wind North America Developer Synergics Energy Purchaser Delmarva Power Location South of Red House MD Coordinates 39.30105°, -79.458032° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.30105,"lon":-79.458032,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

394

Lithostratigraphic Classification of Basement Rocks of the Wichita Province, Oklahoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Scale .bar = 5 nun; crossed nicols. (Sample WM-142 near Panther Creek, Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge.) 1-- t o be s...l i t i c rocks i n t h e Wichita province. f Q - The name Car.lton Rhyolite was f i r s t used by . Schoonover (19481...

Benjamin N. Powell; M. Charles Gilbert; Joseph F. Fischer

395

SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Methods for detection of stress-induced velocity anisotropy in sands. (2) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

Gary Mavko

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

Ion beam analyses of radionuclide migration in heterogeneous rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The migration of radionuclides (RN) in the environment is a topic of general interest for its implications on public health and it is an issue for the long-term safety studies of deep geological repositories (DGR) for high-level radioactive waste. The role played by colloids on RN migration is also of great concern. Diffusion and sorption are fundamental mechanisms controlling RN migration in rocks and many experimental approaches are applied to determine transport parameters for low sorbing RN in homogeneous rocks. However it is difficult to obtain relevant data for high sorbing RN or colloids for which diffusion lengths are extremely short or within heterogeneous rocks where transport might be different in different minerals. The ion beam techniques Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and micro-Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (?PIXE) rarely applied in the field were selected for their micro-analytical potential to study RN diffusion and surface retention within heterogeneous rocks. Main achievements obtained during last 12 years are highlighted.

Valentino Rigato

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A NEW MODEL FOR PERFORMANCE PREDICTION OF HARD ROCK TBMS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methods to accu- rately predict the penetration rate of a TBM in a given geology. These models are mainly, and the penetration rate. A good example of this is the Norwegian (NTH) hard rock diagnostic system and predictor penetration rate. This group of models 1.ResearchAssociakandGraduacStudentinMiningErrg.Dept. 2.Directorof

398

Dating and Context of Rock Engravings in Southern Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...we have recorded in the Orange-Vaal Basin (9.7 percent hu-man and 64 percent...andesite (or Dwyka tillites And shales of Permian age) are three distinct bodies of alluvium...Riet Lowe, The Distribution of Pre-historic Rock Engravings and Paintings in 1212...

Karl W. Butzer; Gerhai J. Fock; Louis Scott; Robert Stuckenrath

1979-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

399

Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

400

A rock engraving made by Neanderthals in Gibraltar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...u-bordeaux.fr/TIVMI/). The 3D video was created using Autodesk 3ds Max and Adobe Premiere Pro CC. A rock engraving made by...u-bordeaux.fr/TIVMI/). The 3D video was created using Autodesk 3ds Max and Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Movie S1 Other Supporting...

Joaquín Rodríguez-Vidal; Francesco d’Errico; Francisco Giles Pacheco; Ruth Blasco; Jordi Rosell; Richard P. Jennings; Alain Queffelec; Geraldine Finlayson; Darren A. Fa; José María Gutiérrez López; José S. Carrión; Juan José Negro; Stewart Finlayson; Luís M. Cáceres; Marco A. Bernal; Santiago Fernández Jiménez; Clive Finlayson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Aspects of rock physics in 4-D seismology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, time-lapse 3-13 or 4-D seismology has been used to identify bypassed oil, to monitor steam and CO[sub 2] injection processes, and even to track the movement of the injected water. However, the feasibility of applying seismic technology to monitoring oil recovery processes and the ability to interpret the seismic results depend to a large extent on the understanding of the physics or seismic properties of the reservoir rocks and fluids. We have carried out several laboratory rock physics investigations on seismic properties of reservoir rocks in relation to oil recovery processes. Particularly, we found that seismic properties were dramatically affected by he injected steam in heavy oil sands, by the injected CO[sub 2] in carbonate rocks, and in some cases, by the injected water in light oil reservoir sands. In this paper, we present laboratory results of seismic properties of oil lands from several places in the world, including Indonesia, Canada, and of West Texas carbonates undergoing CO[sub 2] injection. We discuss the effects of reservoir geology, fluid properties, and recovery process on the seismic properties and how the laboratory results can be used in the feasibility studies and seismic interpretations. We also show examples of 4-D and cross-well seismic results from the Duri field, Indonesia, and from a West Texas carbonate field undergoing CO[sub 2] flooding.

Wang, Zhijing; Langan, R. (Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States)); Jenkins, S.; Bee, M.; Waite, M. (Caltex Pacific Indonesia, Rumbai (Indonesia))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Aspects of rock physics in 4-D seismology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, time-lapse 3-13 or 4-D seismology has been used to identify bypassed oil, to monitor steam and CO{sub 2} injection processes, and even to track the movement of the injected water. However, the feasibility of applying seismic technology to monitoring oil recovery processes and the ability to interpret the seismic results depend to a large extent on the understanding of the physics or seismic properties of the reservoir rocks and fluids. We have carried out several laboratory rock physics investigations on seismic properties of reservoir rocks in relation to oil recovery processes. Particularly, we found that seismic properties were dramatically affected by he injected steam in heavy oil sands, by the injected CO{sub 2} in carbonate rocks, and in some cases, by the injected water in light oil reservoir sands. In this paper, we present laboratory results of seismic properties of oil lands from several places in the world, including Indonesia, Canada, and of West Texas carbonates undergoing CO{sub 2} injection. We discuss the effects of reservoir geology, fluid properties, and recovery process on the seismic properties and how the laboratory results can be used in the feasibility studies and seismic interpretations. We also show examples of 4-D and cross-well seismic results from the Duri field, Indonesia, and from a West Texas carbonate field undergoing CO{sub 2} flooding.

Wang, Zhijing; Langan, R. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States); Jenkins, S.; Bee, M.; Waite, M. [Caltex Pacific Indonesia, Rumbai (Indonesia)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Investigation of a hydraulic impact a technology in rock breaking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the environment such as fly rocks, air blast, noise pollution and toxic fumes. When blasting occurs close in mining industry. The impact process of a high speed piston on liquid water, previously introduced mining practice. From the technical point of view, although explosive method is powerful, it does

404

Process of breaking and rendering permeable a subterranean rock mass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The process of the present invention involves the following steps: producing, as by hydrofracing, a substantially horizontal fracture in the subterranean rock mass to be processed; emplacing an explosive charge in the mass in spaced juxtaposed position to the fracture; enlarging the fracture to create a void space thereat, an initial lifting of the overburden, and to provide a free face juxtaposed to and arranged to cooperate with the emplaced explosive charge; and exploding the charge against the free face for fragmenting the rock and to distribute the space, thus providing fractured, pervious, rubble-ized rock in an enclosed subterranean chamber. Firing of the charge provides a further lifting of the overburden, an enlargement of the chamber and a larger void space to distribute throughout the rubble-ized rock within the chamber. In some forms of the invention an explosive charge is used to produce a transitory enlargement of the fracture, and the juxtaposed emplaced charge is fired during the critical period of enlargement of the fracture.

Lekas, Mitchell A. (Concord, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Fluid-Rock Interaction: A Reactive Transport Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fluid-rock interaction systems as well-mixed reactors was challenged and it was shown how an...Q, Lichtner PC, Zhang D (2007) An improved lattice Boltzmann model for multicomponent...Eric H. editor CNRS-Universite Paul Sabatier, Laboratoire de Mecanisme de Transfert...

Carl I. Steefel; Kate Maher

406

Rock-physics Models for Gas-hydrate Systems Associated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rock-physics Models for Gas-hydrate Systems Associated with Unconsolidated Marine Sediments Diana associated with unconsolidated marine sediments. The goals are to predict gas-hydrate concentration from intercalated with unconsolidated sediments. We show that the geometrical details of how gas hy- drates

Texas at Austin, University of

407

Characterization of Geomechanical Poroelastic Parameters in Tight Rocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In petroleum engineering and geophysics, it is often assumed that the rocks are completely rigid bodies with a totally interconnected pore space and that the fluid within the pores does not affect and are independent of the strains in the porous...

Chen Valdes, Clotilde Raquel

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

ROCK: A Robust Clustering Algorithm for Categorical Attributes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For data with categorical attributes, our findings indicate that ROCK not only generates better quality The problem of data mining or knowledge discovery has become increasingly important in recent years the author was visiting Bell Laboratories. 1 #12;and Italian wine, Swiss cheese and Belgian chocolate

Pennsylvania, University of

409

1 INTRODUCTION Stressing brittle rocks leads to the development of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dependent creep driven by stress corrosion and subcritical crack growth (Lockner, 1998). This creep strongly of fa- tigue and crack growth velocity function. The present experimental work was conducted at the Rock- uniform distributions of microfractures are related to fault nucleation and growth (Reches & Lockner, 1994

Ze'ev, Reches

410

MATLOC. Transient Non Lin Deformation in Fractured Rock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MATLOC is a nonlinear, transient, two-dimensional (planer and axisymmetric), thermal stress, finite-element code designed to determine the deformation within a fractured rock mass. The mass is modeled as a nonlinear anistropic elastic material which can exhibit stress-dependent bi-linear locking behavior.

Boonlualohr, P.; Mustoe, G.; Williams, J.R.; Lester, B.H.; Huyakorn, P.S. [Geotrans Inc., (United States)

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Wave Generation from Explosions in Rock Cavities CANGLI LIU1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Generation from Explosions in Rock Cavities CANGLI LIU1 and THOMAS J. AHRENS1 Abstract Ð We have developed a measurement method to monitor P- and S-waves generated from laboratory diameter cavities. Stress waves generated by the explosions were recorded within a radius of 25 cm

Stewart, Sarah T.

412

Two-billion-year-old nuclear reactors: Nature goes fission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Once it was thought that the isotopic composition of natural uranium was invariant. It was thus surprising in 1972 when French scientists observed small but significant deficiencies of the minor isotope {sup 235}U in uranium ore. Subsequent investigations traced the isotopically anomalous material to the Oklo mine in the African Republic of Gabon. In the mine, cubic-dekametre-sized pods of rock were found to contain extraordinary concentrations of uranium, as much as 65%, with as little as half the normal isotopic abundance of {sup 235}U. In these rocks, neodymium was found to be deficient in the premordial isotope {sup 142}Nd and enriched in the fission-produced isotopes {sup 143-150}Nd. The presence of fission products was unambiguous evidence that the {sup 235}U deficiencies were the result of sustained nuclear fission. Within the heart of the natural reactors, the fission densities were on the order of 10{sup 20} fissions/cm{sup 3}, producing hundreds of megajoules of energy and tens of microwatts of power per gram of rock. Nature had forestalled man`s great discovery of energy production by nuclear fission.

Curtis, D.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Inverse natural convection problem of estimating wall heat flux using a moving sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inverse heat transfer problems have many applications in various branch of science and engineering. Here, the inverse problem of determining heat flux at the bottom wall of a two-dimensional cavity from temperature measurement in the domain is considered. The Boussinesq equation is used to model the natural convection induced by the wall heat flux. The inverse natural convection problem is posed as a minimization problem of the performance function, which is the sum of square residuals between calculated and observed temperature, by means of a conjugate gradient method. Instead of employing several fixed sensors, a single sensor is used which is moving at a given frequency over the bottom wall. The present method solves the inverse natural convection problem accurately without a priori information about the unknown function to be estimated.

Park, H.M.; Chung, O.Y.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Palaeomagnetism and Potassium-Argon Ages of Volcanic Rocks of Ngorongoro Caldera, Tanzania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Volcanic Rocks of Ngorongoro Caldera, Tanzania* * Publication authorized by the Director...south-west wall of Ngorongoro caldera, Tanzania. The lowest three lavas are normally...Volcanic Rocks of Ngorongoro Caldera, Tanzania* C. S. Gromme, T. A. Reilly, A......

C. S. Grommé; T. A. Reilly; A. E. Mussett; R. L. Hay

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

New techniques in rock mass classification: application to welded tuffs at the Nevada Yucca Mountain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many rock mass classification systems exist to assist the engineer in assessing the rock support requirements for underground design. On-going research in this area is directed at attempting to utilize the fracta...

R. J. Watters; J. R. Carr; D. M. Chuck

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Transport and seismoelectric properties of porous permeable rock : numerical modeling and laboratory measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this thesis is to better understand the transport and seismoelectric (SE) properties of porous permeable rock. Accurate information of rock transport properties, together with pore geometry, can aid us to ...

Zhan, Xin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid volcano-plutonic rocks Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the first of a long string of bad jokes, and start looking at rocks. Get yer hiking boots ready. Purpose... will be placed on the field relationships of the various rock units...

418

Measurement of thermal properties of select intact and weathered granulites and their relationship to rock properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in hard rock: Renewable Energy, 28 , no.-14...basalt samples in Egypt: Journal of Thermal...in hard rock: Renewable Energy, 28, no. 14...basalt samples in Egypt: Journal of Thermal...parameterization on surface energy fluxes and temperatures...

D. Ramakrishnan; Rishikesh Bharti; M. Nithya; K. N. Kusuma; K. D. Singh

419

Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excavated Hard Rock Caverns. Pacific Northwest Laboratory,Lux, K.H. Design of salt caverns for the storage of naturalgas storage in unlined rock caverns. Int J Rock Mech Min Sc

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Disruption of Vessel-Spanning Bubbles with Sloped Fins in Flat-Bottom and 2:1 Elliptical-Bottom Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive sludge was generated in the K-East Basin and K-West Basin fuel storage pools at the Hanford Site while irradiated uranium metal fuel elements from the N Reactor were being stored and packaged. The fuel has been removed from the K Basins, and currently, the sludge resides in the KW Basin in large underwater Engineered Containers. The first phase to the Sludge Treatment Project being led by CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is to retrieve and load the sludge into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and transport the sludge to T Plant for interim storage. The STSCs will be stored inside T Plant cells that are equipped with secondary containment and leak-detection systems. The sludge is composed of a variety of particulate materials and water, including a fraction of reactive uranium metal particles that are a source of hydrogen gas. If a situation occurs where the reactive uranium metal particles settle out at the bottom of a container, previous studies have shown that a vessel-spanning gas layer above the uranium metal particles can develop and can push the overlying layer of sludge upward. The major concern, in addition to the general concern associated with the retention and release of a flammable gas such as hydrogen, is that if a vessel-spanning bubble (VSB) forms in an STSC, it may drive the overlying sludge material to the vents at the top of the container. Then it may be released from the container into the cell’s secondary containment system at T Plant. A previous study demonstrated that sloped walls on vessels, both cylindrical coned-shaped vessels and rectangular vessels with rounded ends, provided an effective approach for disrupting a VSB by creating a release path for gas as a VSB began to rise. Based on the success of sloped-wall vessels, a similar concept is investigated here where a sloped fin is placed inside the vessel to create a release path for gas. A key potential advantage of using a sloped fin compared to a vessel with a sloped wall is that a small fin decreases the volume of a vessel available for sludge storage by a very small fraction compared to a cone-shaped vessel. The purpose of this study is to quantify the capability of sloped fins to disrupt VSBs and to conduct sufficient tests to estimate the performance of fins in full-scale STSCs. Experiments were conducted with a range of fin shapes to determine what slope and width were sufficient to disrupt VSBs. Additional tests were conducted to demonstrate how the fin performance scales with the sludge layer thickness and the sludge strength, density, and vessel diameter based on the gravity yield parameter, which is a dimensionless ratio of the force necessary to yield the sludge to its weight.( ) Further experiments evaluated the difference between vessels with flat and 2:1 elliptical bottoms and a number of different simulants, including the KW container sludge simulant (complete), which was developed to match actual K-Basin sludge. Testing was conducted in 5-in., 10-in., and 23-in.-diameter vessels to quantify how fin performance is impacted by the size of the test vessel. The most significant results for these scale-up tests are the trend in how behavior changes with vessel size and the results from the 23-in. vessel. The key objective in evaluating fin performance is to determine the conditions that minimize the volume of a VSB when disruption occurs because this reduces the potential for material inside the STSC from being released through vents.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Chun, Jaehun; Russell, Renee L.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Mastor, Michael M.

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Parametric Investigation of the Performance of Solar Heating Systems with Rock Bed Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of solar air collector domestic heating systems with rock bed storage, as obtained from theoretical analysis, is...

W. L. Dutre; J. Vanheelen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Esimation of field-scale thermal conductivities of unsaturated rocks from in-situ temperature data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Properties in Hard Rock, Ph.D. Thesis, Lulea Universityof Technology, Lulea, Sweden. Kolditz, O. and C. Clauser, (

Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Method of predicting the characteristics of a rock mass in hydrotechnical construction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1. The proposed method makes it possible to predict the characteristics of a rock mass when designing rockfill a...

O. A. Pakhomov

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

We present two systems, reliable sockets (rocks) and reliable packets (racks), that provide transparent network connection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract We present two systems, reliable sockets (rocks) and reliable packets (racks of the connection changes IP address, with correct recovery of in-flight data. To allow rocks and racks Protocol that enables the remote detection of rocks and racks, or any other socket enhancement system

Miller, Barton P.

426

Fluid substitution in carbonate rocks based on the Gassmann equation and Eshelby–Walsh theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fluid substitution in carbonate rocks is more difficult than it is in clastic rocks for two reasons. Firstly, the rock physics modeling uncertainties in carbonate rocks, this is due to the difficulty of accurately acquiring the moduli of carbonate rocks' solid matrix because the experimental data on carbonate rocks have not been as thoroughly studied as silici-clastic sedimentary rocks. Secondly, due to the complex pore systems of carbonate rocks, it is very difficult to model pore geometry of carbonates, and hence hard to assess how the elastic properties change as fluid saturation changes based on the traditional Biot and Gassmann theories. In order to solve these problems, we present a new fluid substitution equation of carbonate rocks using the Gassmann equation and Eshelby–Walsh theory (GEW) in this paper. Then, the specific procedures of how to calculate the moduli of carbonate rocks' solid matrix and how to measure the effect of pore geometry in fluid substitution based on the new fluid substation equation were illustrated by experimental testing about 12 carbonate rock samples in different fluid saturation scenarios and logging data. Finally, we further compared the new fluid substitution method with the conventional Gassmann fluid substitution based on the experimental data. The results verified that the new method is more accurate and reliable in the fluid substitution of complex carbonate rocks.

Quanxiong Feng; Lian Jiang; Mingquan Liu; Huan Wan; Li Chen; Wei Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

RoBOT: "Rocks Beneath Our Toes" An experiential learning opportunity in mineralogy and geochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RoBOT: "Rocks Beneath Our Toes" An experiential learning opportunity in mineralogy Foundation What is RoBOT? The "Rocks Beneath Our Toes" or RoBOT Program began in 2006 with funding from high school RoBOT participants on a weekend field trip to collect and document rock samples

Baxter, Ethan F.

428

Compressional and shear velocities of dry and saturated jointed rock: a laboratory study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......classification of rock mass qualities, Geophys...shallow jointed rock, Int. J...a jointed sandstone, in Mechanical...fracture permeability, Int. J...microcrack porosity. By modelling...and steam reservoirs require...hot-dry-rock method are...evaluating the quality of large...and fluid permeability. Seismic...aperture or porosity. Moos...velocity in a sandstone is independent......

R. M. Stesky

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

430

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

431

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

432

Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

433

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

434

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

435

Leon Lederman, the K-meson, the Muon Neutrino, and the Bottom Quark  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Leon Lederman, the K-meson, the Muon Leon Lederman, the K-meson, the Muon Neutrino, and the Bottom Quark His Honors · His Involvement in Science Education His Wisdom and Humor · Resources with Additional Information Leon Lederman started his career in Physics at Columbia University, where he earned his Ph.D. in 1952. He 'stayed on at Columbia following his studies, remaining for nearly 30 years, as the Eugene Higgins Professor and, from 1961 until 1979, as director of Nevis Laboratories in Irvington, the Columbia physics department center for experimental research in high-energy physics. ... Leon Lederman Courtesy of Fermilab In 1956, working with a Columbia team at the Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, Lederman discovered a new particle, the long-lived neutral K-meson, which had been predicted from theory. Further research at Columbia demonstrated the non-conservation of parity during muon decay. ...

436

Analysis of core damage frequency: Peach Bottom, Unit 2 internal events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the appendices for the accident sequence analysis of internally initiated events for the Peach Bottom, Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant. This is one of the five plant analyses conducted as part of the NUREG-1150 effort for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The work performed and described here is an extensive reanalysis of that published in October 1986 as NUREG/CR-4550, Volume 4. It addresses comments from numerous reviewers and significant changes to the plant systems and procedures made since the first report. The uncertainty analysis and presentation of results are also much improved, and considerable effort was expended on an improved analysis of loss of offsite power. The content and detail of this report is directed toward PRA practitioners who need to know how the work was done and the details for use in further studies. 58 refs., 58 figs., 52 tabs.

Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Cramond, W.R.; Sype, T.T.; Maloney, K.J.; Wheeler, T.A.; Daniel, S.L. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA); Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

New results on CLEO`s heavy quarks - bottom and charm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the top quark is confined to virtual reality for CLEO, the increased luminosity of the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) and the improved photon detection capabilities of the CLEO`s {open_quotes}heavy{close_quotes} quarks - bottom and charm. I will describe new results in the B meson sector including the first observation of exclusive b {yields} ulv decays, upper limits on gluonic penguin decay rates, and precise measurements of semileptonic and hadronic b {yields} c branching fractions. The charmed hadron results that are discussed include the observation of isospin violation in D{sub s}*{sup +} decays, an update on measurements of the D{sub s}{sup +} decay constant, and the observation of a new excited {Xi}{sub c} charmed baryon. These measurements have had a large impact on our understanding of heavy quark physics.

Menary, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Bottom-quark fragmentation: comparing results from tuned event generators and resummed calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study bottom-quark fragmentation in e+e- annihilation, top and Higgs decay H -> b bbar, using Monte Carlo event generators, as well as calculations, based on the formalism of perturbative fragmentation functions, which resum soft- and collinear-radiation effects in the next-to-leading logarithmic approximation. We consider the PYTHIA and HERWIG generators, and implement matrix-element corrections to the parton shower simulation of the H -> b bbar process in HERWIG. We tune the Kartvelishvili, string and cluster models to B-hadron data from LEP and SLD, and present results in both x_B and moment spaces. The B-hadron spectra yielded by HERWIG, PYTHIA and resummed calculations show small discrepancies, which are due to the different approaches and models employed and to the quality of the fits to the e+e- data.

Gennaro Corcella; Volker Drollinger

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

439

Modeling Energy Recovery Using Thermoelectric Conversion Integrated with an Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hot engine exhaust represents a resource that is often rejected to the environment without further utilization. This resource is most prevalent in the transportation sector, but stationary engine-generator systems also typically do not utilize this resource. Engine exhaust is a source of high grade thermal energy that can potentially be utilized by various approaches to produce electricity or to drive heating and cooling systems. This paper describes a model system that employs thermoelectric conversion as a topping cycle integrated with an organic Rankine bottoming cycle for waste heat utilization. This approach is being developed to fully utilize the thermal energy contained in hot exhaust streams. The model is composed of a high temperature heat exchanger which extracts thermal energy for driving the thermoelectric conversion elements. However, substantial sensible heat remains in the exhaust stream after emerging from the heat exchanger. The model incorporates a closely integrated bottoming cycle to utilize this remaining thermal energy in the exhaust stream. The model has many interacting parameters that define combined system quantities such as overall output power, efficiency, and total energy utilization factors. In addition, the model identifies a maximum power operating point for the system. That is, the model can identify the optimal amount of heat to remove from the exhaust flow to run through the thermoelectric elements. Removing too much or too little heat from the exhaust stream in this stage will reduce overall cycle performance. The model has been developed such that heat exchanger UAh values, thermal resistances, ZT values, and multiple thermoelectric elements can be investigated in the context of system operation. The model also has the ability to simultaneously determine the effect of each cycle design parameter on the performance of the overall system, thus giving the ability to utilize as much waste heat as possible. Key analysis results are presented showing the impact of critical design parameters on power output, system performance and inter-relationships between design parameters in governing performance.

Miller, Erik W.; Hendricks, Terry J.; Peterson, Richard B.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Pilot scale evaluation of the BABIU process – Upgrading of landfill gas or biogas with the use of MSWI bottom ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biogas or landfill gas can be converted to a high-grade gas rich in methane with the use of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash as a reactant for fixation of CO2 and H2S. In order to verify results previously obtained at a laboratory scale with 65–90 kg of bottom ash (BA), several test runs were performed at a pilot scale, using 500–1000 kg of bottom ash and up to 9.2 N m3/h real landfill gas from a landfill in the Tuscany region (Italy). The input flow rate was altered. The best process performance was observed at a input flow rate of 3.7 N m3/(h tBA). At this flow rate, the removal efficiencies for H2S were approximately 99.5–99%.

P. Mostbauer; L. Lombardi; T. Olivieri; S. Lenz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Microsoft Word - CX-Wautoma-Rock Creek_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3, 2010 3, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Corinn Castro Project Manager - TELM-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Replace spacer dampers along the Wautoma-Rock Creek No. 1 500-kV Transmission Line. Budget Information: Work Order # 00234527 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1507 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment...routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain... infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Location: Wautoma-Rock Creek No. 1 500-kV Transmission Line. The proposed project is

442

Picture Rocks, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Picture Rocks, Arizona: Energy Resources Picture Rocks, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.3459069°, -111.2462146° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.3459069,"lon":-111.2462146,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

443

MHK Projects/Race Rocks Demonstration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Race Rocks Demonstration Race Rocks Demonstration < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.2844,"lon":-123.531,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

444

Rock County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock County, Minnesota: Energy Resources Rock County, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.6927003°, -96.3226072° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.6927003,"lon":-96.3226072,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

445

Microsoft Word - CX-Hat_Rock_Switch_14June2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7, 2013 7, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Glenn Russell Project Manager -TPCV-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Hat Rock Switching Station Replacement Project Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: Umatilla County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund PacifiCorp's rebuild of BPA's Hat Rock Tap Switching Station, which is located within PacifiCorp's McNary-Wallula 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line right-of-way (ROW). Rebuilding the switching station would include the replacement of sectionalizing switches, the grounding grid, and all signage. The approximately 0.5-acre yard would

446

Round Rock, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Round Rock, Texas: Energy Resources Round Rock, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.5082551°, -97.678896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.5082551,"lon":-97.678896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

447

Rock River LLC Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River LLC Wind Farm River LLC Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search The Rock River LLC Wind Farm is in Carbon County, Wyoming. It consists of 50 turbines and has a total capacity of 50 MW. It is owned by Shell Wind Energy.[1] Based on assertions that the site is near Arlington, its approximate coordinates are 41.5946899°, -106.2083459°.[2] References ↑ http://www.wsgs.uwyo.edu/Topics/EnergyResources/wind.aspx ↑ http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Shell+WindEnergy+Acquires+Second+Wind+Farm+in+the+U.S.,+in+an...-a082345438 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Rock_River_LLC_Wind_Farm&oldid=132230" Category: Wind Farms What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

448

Big Rock, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock, Illinois: Energy Resources Rock, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7639181°, -88.5470219° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7639181,"lon":-88.5470219,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

449

East Flat Rock, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flat Rock, North Carolina: Energy Resources Flat Rock, North Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.2801166°, -82.4220631° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2801166,"lon":-82.4220631,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

450

West Valley Demonstration Project 10282 Rock Springs Road  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

West Valley Demonstration Project West Valley Demonstration Project 10282 Rock Springs Road West Valley, NY 141 71 -9799 Mr. Daniel W. Coyne President & General Manager CH2M HILL B&W West Valley, LLC West Valley Demonstration Project 10282 Rock Springs Road West Valley, NY 141 71 -9799 ATTENTION: J. D. Rendall, Regulatory Strategy, AC-EA SUBJECT: Environmental Checklist WVDP-20 12-0 1, " WVDP Reservoir Interconnecting Canal Maintenance Activities" REFERENCE: Letter WD:2012:0409 (357953), D. W. Coyne to R. W. Reffner, "CONTRACT NO. DE-EM000 1529, Section 5-3, Item 105, NEPA Documentation (Transmittal of Environmental Checklist WVDP-20 12-0 1, WVDP Reservoir Interconnecting Canal Maintenance Activities), Revision 1 ," dated July 24, 20 12 Dear Mr. Coyne:

451

A wellbore stability model for formations with anisotropic rock strengths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shale formations, due to the presence of laminations and weak planes, exhibit directional strength characteristics. In most conventional wellbore stability analyses, rock formations are typically assumed to have isotropic strength. This may cause erroneous results in anisotropic formations such as shales which show strength variations with changing loading directions with respect to the plane of weakness. Therefore a more complex wellbore stability model is required. We have developed such a model in which the anisotropic rock strength characteristic is incorporated. Applying this model to two case studies shows that shear failures occur either along or across the bedding planes depending on the relative orientation between the wellbore trajectories and the bedding planes. Additionally, the extent of failure region around the wellbore and the safe mud weights are significantly affected by the wellbore orientation with respect to the directions of bedding plane and in-situ stress field.

Hikweon Lee; See Hong Ong; Mohammed Azeemuddin; Harvey Goodman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

WIPP air-intake shaft disturbed-rock zone study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disturbed-rock zone surrounding the air-intake shaft at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site was investigated to determine the extent and the permeability of the disturbed-rock zone as a function of radial distance from the 6.1 m diameter shaft, at different elevations within the Salado. Gas- and brine-permeability tests were performed in the bedded halite of the Salado formation at two levels within the air-intake shaft. The gas- and brine-permeability test results demonstrated that the radial distance to an undisturbed formation permeability of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}21} m{sup 2} was less than 3.0 m.

Dale, T. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Hurtado, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Dept.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

North Little Rock, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Little Rock, Arkansas: Energy Resources Little Rock, Arkansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.769536°, -92.2670941° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.769536,"lon":-92.2670941,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

454

City of North Little Rock, Arkansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Little Rock North Little Rock Place Arkansas Utility Id 13718 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png HPS- 100 Watt Lighting HPS- 1000 Watt (Floodlights) Lighting HPS- 150 Watt Lighting HPS- 250 Watt Lighting HPS- 250 Watt (Floodlights) Lighting HPS- 400 Watt (Floodlights) Lighting LCTOU Industrial LGS Industrial LPS Industrial MH- 1000 Watt (Floodlights) Lighting

455

Window Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.680573°, -109.0525929° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.680573,"lon":-109.0525929,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

456

Ocean Bluff-Brant Rock, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bluff-Brant Rock, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Bluff-Brant Rock, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.1080418°, -70.6633175° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1080418,"lon":-70.6633175,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

457

McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.4656244°, -80.0656106° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4656244,"lon":-80.0656106,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

458

Rough Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.4072229°, -109.8728929° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.4072229,"lon":-109.8728929,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

459

SIGNIFICANT NATURAL HERITAGE RESOURCES OF THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIGNIFICANT NATURAL HERITAGE RESOURCES OF THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE to assess the ecological values of the Rock Creek drainage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site from existing data at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. 2.Perform ground surveys to rank

460

Neutron Production from the Fracture of Piezoelectric Rocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A theoretical explanation is provided for the experimental evidence that fracturing piezoelectric rocks produces neutrons. The elastic energy micro-crack production ultimately yields the macroscopic fracture. The mechanical energy is converted by the piezoelectric effect into electric field energy. The electric field energy decays via radio frequency (microwave) electric field oscillations. The radio frequency electric fields accelerate the condensed matter electrons which then collide with protons producing neutrons and neutrinos.

A. Widom; J. Swain; Y. N. Srivastava

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Comparison and analysis of reservoir rocks and related clays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of instrumental and chemical analyses was made on sedimentary rocks to determine the surface chemical properties of sedimentry rocks and the physical characteristic of the pores. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray analytic capability was used to study the morphology of the samples, surface mineral composition and type and location of clays, and to obtain a qualitative estimate of the pore sizes. A centrifuge was used to determine the pore size distributions which are correlated with SEM observations. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with an inductively coupled plasma for complete spectral analysis was used to obtain analyses of the rocks, clays, and effluents from ion exchange tests. Two of the results are as follows: (1) Sweetwater gas sands have a bimodal pore size distribution composed of pores with a mean diameter of 0.2 microns which is attributed to intergranular spaces and cracks in the expanded laborboratory sample but which will be close under the pressure of the overburden formations, and these Sweetwater sands have a distribution of pores at 2 microns which are solution vugs rather than intergranular porosity since the sand grains are completely packed together with the cementing material due to the high overburden pressures; and (2) Ion-exchange capacities of two rocks were 5.3 meq/kg and 18.0 meq/kg, and the surface areas were 0.9 m/sup 2//g and 2.30 m/sup 2//g, respectively, even though each had almost identical mineral composition, clay type and quantity, and permeability. 7 references, 12 figures, 3 tables.

Crocker, M.E.; Donaldson, E.C.; Marchin, L.M.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Water-Rock interaction in the Long Valley Caldera (USA)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water-rock interactions within the main thermal aquifer in the Long Valley Caldera are evaluated using water chemistry data from a new suite of samples. The results reflect the impact of increased geothermal production and major CO2 loss, which appears to drive calcite precipitation in the aquifer. The study provides qualitative information on the rates of mineral reactions and the response times of chemical geothermometers to declining temperatures.

W.C. Evans; S. Hurwitz; D. Bergfeld; J. Lewicki; M.A. Huebner; C.F. Williams; S.T. Brown

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

464

Deformation of underground deep cavities in rock salts at their long-term operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The underground deep cavities are created in rock salts of various morphological types with the purpose of storage of petroleum, gas and nuclear wastes. It is well known that the rock salt has rheological properties, which can result in closure of caverns and loss of their stability. In the evaporitic rocks, especially those containing halite, time-dependent deformation is pronounced even at comparatively low stress levels. At high stress levels this creep becomes a dominant feature of the mechanical behavior of salt rocks. So the knowledge of creep behavior of rock salt is of paramount importance in underground storage application of gas, petroleum products and nuclear wastes.

Zhuravleva, T.; Shafarenko, E. [Podzemgasprom, STC, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Rock Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Corresponding Socorro caldera Carboniferous rocks were studied in the field in 1988-1992-Renault later completed geochemistry and silica-crystallite geothermometry, Armstrong petrographic analysis and cathodoluminescence, Oscarson SEM studies, and John Repetski (USGS, Reston, Virgina) conodont stratigraphy and color and textural alteration as guides to the carbonate rocks' thermal history. The carbonate-rock classification used in this

466

Emulating-and Surpassing-Nature | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reducing Stress in Multilayer Laue Lenses Reducing Stress in Multilayer Laue Lenses Novel Magnetic Material Operates under Extreme Stress Conditions Ringing the Hemoglobin Bell Bragg Reflectivity of X-rays: At the Limit of the Possible Sending a Message: How Receptors Talk to G Proteins Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Emulating-and Surpassing-Nature OCTOBER 18, 2011 Bookmark and Share Gold nanoparticles with DNA linkers assemble into lattices that maximize hybridization interactions between neighboring particles. The lattices shown have the same structures as (from left) Cr3Si, AlB2, CsCl, NaCl, and Cs6C60 crystals. (Image courtesy of C. Mirkin). Nature is a master builder. Using a bottom-up approach, nature takes tiny

467

Natural Gas for the Long Haul (Big Rigs Go Green)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Long Haul (Big Rigs Go Green) the Long Haul (Big Rigs Go Green) JOHN DAVIS: No one has been hit harder by rising fuel prices than America's long-haul commercial truckers. A big rig can easily burn 20,000 gallons of fuel a year, and with diesel prices projected to keep rising, this not only pinches the trucker's bottom line, but that extra cost is passed on to American consumers. Meanwhile, natural gas prices have remained stable and are forecast to stay that way for years to come. Up to now, demand for natural gas as a transportation fuel has been mostly for compressed natural gas used by light and medium-duty vehicles. City buses, refuse haulers, utilities, and

468

RockPort Capital Partners (California) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RockPort Capital Partners (California) RockPort Capital Partners (California) Name RockPort Capital Partners (California) Address 3000 Sand Hill Road, Building 2, Suite 110 Place Menlo Park, California Zip 94025 Region Bay Area Product Venture capital firm that partners with cleantech entrepreneurs around the world Phone number (650) 854-9300 Website http://www.rockportcap.com/ Coordinates 37.4244767°, -122.1942422° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.4244767,"lon":-122.1942422,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

469

RockPort Capital Partners (Massachusetts) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RockPort Capital Partners (Massachusetts) RockPort Capital Partners (Massachusetts) Name RockPort Capital Partners (Massachusetts) Address 160 Federal Street, 18th Floor Place Boston, Massachusetts Zip 02110 Region Greater Boston Area Product Venture capital firm that partners with cleantech entrepreneurs around the world Phone number (617) 912-1420 Website http://www.rockportcap.com/ Coordinates 42.3537726°, -71.0562094° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3537726,"lon":-71.0562094,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

470

Diagenesis in halite-cemented source rocks, Middle Devonian, Saskatchewan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Porosity in Dawson Bay carbonates is halite plugged and the formation is sandwiched between thick units of bedded halite. The presence of displacive halite crystals within fine-grained carbonates (implying sediment plasticity during halite emplacement) and uncompacted organic-rich, carbonate-poor stromatolites indicate halite cementation occurred at an early stage. Also, halite cementation must have been completed prior to porosity loss in overlying bedded halites. By comparison with Holocene/Pleistocene bedded halites, this cementation occurred with only tens of meters of overburden. Early complete halite cementation should have converted Dawson Bay carbonates into virtually a closed system and greatly curtailed or inhibited organic-matter maturation within them Organic-rich carbonates occur immediately below Dawson Bay evaporites as rocks containing an anomalously abundant benthos (stromatoporoids, brachiopods) or as a more restricted facies, lacking megafossils or containing gastropods. Some restricted carbonates contain more than 2% extractable organic carbon. The n-alkane, pentacyclic triterpane, nonrearranged sterane and disterane distributions suggest two distinct populations of samples are present. Biomarker distributions are difficult to interpret in terms of estimating organic maturity because of source rock environmental factors (hypersalinity), but appear to be inconsistent with the geological prognosis that these source rocks would have been isolated early in their diagenesis. The problem of how kerogens can be altered in an apparently closed system has yet to be resolved.

Kendall, A.C. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (England)); Abbott, G.D.; D'Elia, V.A.A. (Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (England))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Black Rock Point Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Rock Point Geothermal Area Black Rock Point Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Black Rock Point Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9553,"lon":-119.1141,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

472

,"AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030872m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030872m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

473

,"AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","AGA Eastern Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030882m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030882m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

474

,"AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","AGA Western Consuming Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5030892m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5030892m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

475

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage - Salt Cavern Storage Fields"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Cavern Storage Fields" Salt Cavern Storage Fields" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Underground Natural Gas Storage - Salt Cavern Storage Fields",8,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm10vmall.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/oil_gas/natural_gas/data_publications/natural_gas_monthly/ngm.html" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

476

Elemental relationships in rock varnish as seen with SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray) elemental line profiling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The heterogeneous nature of rock varnish requires a thorough survey of elemental and mineralogic compositions before relating chemical variability of rock varnish to past geochemical environments. Elemental relationships in rock varnish can be examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with an elemental line profiling routine using semi-quantitative, energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis. Results of SEM/EDX analysis suggest: variations in cation concentrations used in varnish cation ratio dating relate more specifically to variations in detritus within the varnish than to element mobility as defined by weathering indices; Mn concentration rather than Mn:Fe ratios may be a more appropriate indicator of paleoclimatic fluctuations; and the Mn-oxide phase existing in varnish is most likely a Ba-enriched phase rather than birnessite. Element line profiling offers great potential for gaining insights into geochemical processes affecting the deposition and diagenesis of rock varnish and for testing hypotheses relating to its chemical variability. 27 refs., 9 figs.

Raymond, R. Jr.; Reneau, S.L.; Harrington, C.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© 2009 APS Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology Published online: 17 July 2009 | doi:10 perfect fluid. Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 025301 (2009). | Article |1. Nature Nanotechnology ISSN 1748 : Nature Nanotechnology http://www.nature.com/nnano/reshigh/2009/0709/full/nnano.2009.222.html 1 of 1 18

Müller, Markus

478

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

479

Development of a rock mass characteristics model for TBM penetration rate prediction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The TBM tunneling process in hard rock is actually a rock or rock mass breakage process, which determines the efficiency of tunnel boring machine (TBM). On the basis of the rock breakage process, a rock mass conceptual model that identifies the effect of rock mass properties on TBM penetration rate is proposed. During the construction of T05 and T06 tunnels of DTSS project in Singapore, a comprehensive program was performed to obtain the relevant rock mass properties and TBM performance data. A database, including rock mass properties, TBM specifications and the corresponding TBM performance, was established. Combining the rock mass conceptual model for evaluating rock mass boreability with the established database, a statistical prediction model of TBM penetration rate is set up by performing a nonlinear regression analysis. The parametric studies of the new model showed that the rock uniaxial compressive strength and the volumetric joint count have predominantly effects on the penetration rate. These results showed good agreement with the numerical simulations. The model limitations were also discussed.

Q.M. Gong; J. Zhao

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

REDUCING RISK IN LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS FORMATIONS: UNDERSTANDING THE ROCK/FLUID CHARACTERISTICS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN LARAMIDE BASINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An anomalous velocity model was constructed for the Wind River Basin (WRB) based on {approx}2000 mi of 2-D seismic data and 175 sonic logs, for a total of 132,000 velocity/depth profiles. Ten cross sections were constructed through the model coincident with known gas fields. In each cross section, an intense, anomalously slow velocity domain coincided with the gas-productive rock/fluid interval. The anomalous velocity model: (1) Easily isolates gas-charged rock/fluid systems characterized by anomalously slow velocities and water-rich rock/fluid systems characterized by normal velocities; and (2) Delineates the regional velocity inversion surface, which is characterized by steepening of the Ro/depth gradient, a significant increase in capillary displacement pressure, a significant change in formation water composition, and acceleration of the reaction rate of smectite-to-illite diagenesis in mixed-layer clays. Gas chimneys are observed as topographic highs on the regional velocity inversion surface. Beneath the surface are significant fluid-flow compartments, which have a gas-charge in the fluid phase and are isolated from meteoric water recharge. Water-rich domains may occur within regional gas-charged compartments, but are not being recharged from the meteoric water system (i.e., trapped water). The WRB is divided into at least two regionally prominent fluid-flow compartments separated by the velocity inversion surface: a water-dominated upper compartment likely under strong meteoric water drive and a gas-charged, anomalously pressured lower compartment. Judging from cross sections, numerous gas-charged subcompartments occur within the regional compartment. Their geometries and boundaries are controlled by faults and low-permeability rocks. Commercial gas production results when a reservoir interval characterized by enhanced porosity/permeability intersects one of these gas-charged subcompartments. The rock/fluid characteristics of the Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins (RMLB) described in this work determine the potential for significant, relatively unconventional, so-called ''basin-center'' hydrocarbon accumulations. If such accumulations occur, they will be characterized by the following critical attributes: (1) Location beneath a regional velocity inversion surface that typically is associated with low-permeability lithologies; (2) Anomalous pressure, both over- and underpressure, and when, less commonly, they appear to be normally pressured, they are not in contact with the meteoric water system; (3) A significant gas component in the regional multiphase fluid-flow system (water-gas-oil) that occurs beneath the regional velocity inversion surface; (4) Domains of intense gas charge (i.e., high gas saturation) within the regional multiphase fluid-flow system; (5) Compartmentalization of the rock/fluid system to a far greater extent beneath the regional velocity inversion surface than above it (i.e., convection of fluids across the regional velocity inversion surface is reduced or eliminated depending on the nature of the capillary properties of the low-permeability rocks associated with the inversion surface); (6) Commercial gas accumulations occurring at the intersection of reservoir intervals characterized by enhanced porosity and permeability and gas-charged domains; (7) Productive intersections of reservoir intervals and gas-charged domains, which are controlled by the structural, stratigraphic, and diagenetic elements affecting the rock/fluid system; and (8) No apparent meteoric water connection with the gas accumulations and gas columns up to several thousand feet in height. Because some of these critical attributes are not associated with conventional hydrocarbon accumulations, a new set of diagnostic tools are required in order to explore for and exploit these types of gas prospects efficiently and effectively. Some of these new diagnostic tools have been discussed in this report; other have been described elsewhere. In order to maximize risk reduction, it is recommended when exploring for these types of gas accu

Ronald C. Surdam

2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural rock bottom" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Slick Rock Mill Site - CO 08  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Slick Rock Mill Site - CO 08 Slick Rock Mill Site - CO 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Slick Rock Mill Site (CO.08) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Site Documents Related to Slick Rock Mill Site 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Slick Rock, Colorado, Disposal Site. LMS/S09461. February 2013 Verification Monitoring Report for the Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites, 2007 Update June 2008 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1577 2008 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S.

482

EIA - AEO2010 -Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs Introduction Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40 percent of natural gas production and about 35 percent of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in “darcies.”)

483

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado. Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VP) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the groundwater from further degradation. Remedial actions at the Slick Rock sites must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

NONE

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Learning Joint Top-Down and Bottom-up Processes for 3D Visual Inference Cristian Sminchisescu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-down and bottom-up processing for monocular 3d human motion reconstruction. Learning progresses in alter- native. Introduction Analyzing three-dimensional human motion in real world environments is an actively growing field and surveillance. The problem has been traditionally attacked using the powerful machinery of top-down, generative

Sminchisescu, Cristian

485

Small Businesses Save Big: A Borrower's Guide To Increase the Bottom Line Using Energy Efficiency (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dollars saved through energy efficiency can directly impact your bottom line. Whether you are planning for a major renovation or upgrading individual pieces of building equipment, these improvements can help reduce operating costs, save on utility bills, and boost profits. This fact sheet provides a guide for small businesses to find the resources to increase the energy efficiency of their buildings.

Not Available

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

A Top-down and Bottom-up look at Emissions Abatement in Germany in response to the EU ETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper uses top-down trend analysis and a bottom-up power sector model to define upper and lower boundaries on abatement in Germany in the first phase of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (2005-2007). Long-term trend ...

Feilhauer, Stephan M. (Stephan Marvin)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Warming shifts top-down and bottom-up control of pond food web structure and function  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...top-down and bottom-up control of pond food web structure and function Jonathan B. Shurin...structuring experimental freshwater pond food webs in western Canada over 16 months. Experimental...temperatures produced top-heavy food webs with lower biomass of benthic and pelagic...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models for the US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy efficiency and the cost of GHG abatement: A comparison of bottom-up and hybrid models of energy efficiency potential and green- house gas (GHG) abatement potential that have been highly, and that profitable energy efficiency improvements are the reason. For the US, McKinsey estimates that GHG emissions

489

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~;;$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6x10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90percent (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90percent of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2>_ 0.99) increase from 2.4x105 to 7.2x105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than filtration of micron-scale particles, further contributing to the affordability of a community-scale water treatment center.

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.; GADGIL, ASHOK J.; ADDY, SUSAN E.A.; KOWOLIK, KRISTIN

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

0022-3530/93 $3.00 Long-Term Evolution of Fluid-Rock Interactions in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the evolving Sierra Nevada magmatic arc is preserved in metavolcanic rocks of the Ritter Range pendant oxygen isotopic values of the rocks of the lower section indicate that these rocks interacted extensively with coeval volcanic centers. Metavolcanic rocks of the upper section evidently interacted with meteoris

Barton, Mark D.

491

Source rock screening studies of Ordovician Maquoketa shale in western Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rock-Eval (pyrolysis) studies of Ordovician Maquoketa Shale samples (cuttings and cores) from the shallow subsurface (500-800 ft deep) in western Illinois indicate that facies within the Maquoketa have potential as hydrocarbon source rocks. Dark, presumably organic-rich zones within the Maquoketa Shale were selected and analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC), Rock-Eval (pyrolysis), and bulk and clay mineralogy using x-ray diffraction. Preliminary results from six samples from Schuyler, McDonough, and Fulton Counties show TOC values ranging from 4.70% to as high as 12.90%. Rock-Eval parameters, measured by heating organic matter in an inert atmosphere, indicate source rock maturity and petroleum-generative potential. Screening studies, using the Rock-Eval process, describe very good source rock potential in facies of the Maquoketa Shale. Further studies at the Illinois State Geological Survey will expand on these preliminary results. This study complements a proposed exploration model in western Illinois and further suggests the possibility of source rocks on the flanks of the Illinois basin. Long-distance migration from more deeply buried effective source rocks in southern Illinois has been the traditional mechanism proposed for petroleum in basin-flank reservoirs. Localized source rocks can be an alternative to long-distance migration, and can expand the possibilities of basin-flank reservoirs, encouraging further exploration in these areas.

Autrey, A.; Crockett, J.E.; Dickerson, D.R.; Oltz, D.F.; Seyler, B.J.; Warren, R.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Geochemistry of Natural Components in the Near-Field Environment, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The natural near-field environment in and around the emplacement drifts of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, includes the host rock, dust, seepage, and pore water. The chemical compositions of these components have been determined for assessing possible chemical and mineralogical reactions that may occur after nuclear waste is emplaced. The rock hosting the proposed repository is relatively uniform as shown by a mean coefficient of variation (CV) of 9 percent for major elements. In contrast, compositional variations of dust (bulk and water-soluble fractions), pore water, and seepage are large with mean CVs ranging from 28 to 64 percent. (authors)

Peterman, Zell E. [Yucca Mountain Project Branch, U.S. Geological Survey, MS 963 Box 25046 Denver Federal Center, 6th and Kipling Sts., Denver, CO, 80225 (United States); Oliver, Thomas A. [c/o U.S. Geological Survey, S.M. Stoller Corporation, MS 421 Box 25046 Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO, 80225 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mineral-Surfactant Interactions for Minimum Reagents Precipitation and Adsorption for Improved Oil Recovery Mineral-Surfactant Interactions for Minimum Reagents Precipitation and Adsorption for Improved Oil Recovery DE-FC26-03NT15413 Project Goal The overall objective of this project is to understand the role of mineralogy of reservoir rocks in determining interactions of reservoir minerals and their dissolved species with externally added reagants (surfactants/polymers) and their effects on solid-liquid and liquid-liquid interfacial properties, such as adsorption, wettability, and interfacial tension. A further goal is to devise schemes to control these interactions in systems relevant to reservoir conditions. Particular emphasis will be placed on the type and nature of different minerals in oil reservoirs. Performer Columbia University, New York, NY Background

494

Weight and power optimization of steam bottoming cycle for offshore oil and gas installations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Offshore oil and gas installations are mostly powered by simple cycle gas turbines. To increase the efficiency, a steam bottoming cycle could be added to the gas turbine. One of the keys to the implementation of combined cycles on offshore oil and gas installations is for the steam cycle to have a low weight-to-power ratio. In this work, a detailed combined cycle model and numerical optimization tools were used to develop designs with minimum weight-to-power ratio. Within the work, single-objective optimization was first used to determine the solution with minimum weight-to-power ratio, then multi-objective optimization was applied to identify the Pareto frontier of solutions with maximum power and minimum weight. The optimized solution had process variables leading to a lower weight of the heat recovery steam generator while allowing for a larger steam turbine and condenser to achieve a higher steam cycle power output than the reference cycle. For the multi-objective optimization, the designs on the Pareto front with a weight-to-power ratio lower than in the reference cycle showed a high heat recovery steam generator gas-side pressure drop and a low condenser pressure.

Lars O. Nord; Emanuele Martelli; Olav Bolland

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Measurements of Direct CP-Violating Asymmetries in Charmless Decays of Bottom Baryons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report final measurements of direct $\\mathit{CP}$--violating asymmetries in charmless decays of neutral bottom hadrons to pairs of charged hadrons with the upgraded Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Using the complete $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV proton-antiproton collisions data set, corresponding to 9.3 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity, we measure $\\mathcal{A}(\\Lambda^0_b \\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}) = +0.06 \\pm 0.07\\mathrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.03\\mathrm{(syst)}$ and $\\mathcal{A}(\\Lambda^0_b \\rightarrow pK^{-}) = -0.10 \\pm 0.08\\mathrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.04\\mathrm{(syst)}$, compatible with no asymmetry. In addition we measure the $\\mathit{CP}$--violating asymmetries in $B^0_s \\rightarrow K^{-}\\pi^{+}$ and $B^0 \\rightarrow K^{+}\\pi^{-}$ decays to be $\\mathcal{A}(B^0_s \\rightarrow K^{-}\\pi^{+}) = +0.22 \\pm 0.07\\mathrm{stat)} \\pm 0.02\\mathrm{(syst)}$ and $\\mathcal{A}(B^0 \\rightarrow K^{+}\\pi^{-}) = -0.083\\pm 0.013 \\mathrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.004\\mathrm{(syst)}$, respectively, which are significantly different from zero and consistent with current world averages.

CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Lucà; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maest