Sample records for natural rock bottom

  1. Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As repositories for CO? and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air–water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  2. The influence of rock heterogeneity on the scaling properties of simulated3 and natural stylolites4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 1 2 The influence of rock heterogeneity on the scaling properties of simulated3 and natural prominent deformation patterns in sedimentary rocks that24 document localized pressure solution. Recent is caused by the composition of27 the host rock, i.e. heterogeneities in the material, or is governed

  3. SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER, and Architectural Engineering 2006 #12;ii This thesis entitled: Sources and Effects of Mining-Related and Natural Acid Rock Drainage Quantified Using Tracer Dilution, Coal Creek Watershed, Gunnison County, Colorado

  4. Rocks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources ResourcesRobust, High-ThroughputRocks Rocks

  5. Production of 239 Pu from a natural Uranium disk and "hot" rock using a neutron howitzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Steiner; Aaron Anderson; Michael De Marco

    2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron howitzer was used to produce 239Np from the targets of natural U and a hot rock. An intrinsic Germanium detector enabled the observations of the gamma rays in the decay of 239Np and a determination of its half life of 2.3 days. This shows that 239Pu had been produced in both targets

  6. Commercial potential of natural gas storage in lined rock caverns (LRC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geologic conditions in many regions of the United States will not permit the development of economical high-deliverability gas storage in salt caverns. These regions include the entire Eastern Seaboard; several northern states, notably Minnesota and Wisconsin; many of the Rocky Mountain States; and most of the Pacific Northwest. In late 1997, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Federal Energy Technology Center engaged Sofregaz US to investigate the commercialization potential of natural gas storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC). Sofregaz US teamed with Gaz de France and Sydkraft, who had formed a consortium, called LRC, to perform the study for the USDOE. Underground storage of natural gas is generally achieved in depleted oil and gas fields, aquifers, and solution-mined salt caverns. These storage technologies require specific geologic conditions. Unlined rock caverns have been used for decades to store hydrocarbons - mostly liquids such as crude oil, butane, and propane. The maximum operating pressure in unlined rock caverns is limited, since the host rock is never entirely impervious. The LRC technology allows a significant increase in the maximum operating pressure over the unlined storage cavern concept, since the gas in storage is completely contained with an impervious liner. The LRC technology has been under development in Sweden by Sydkraft since 1987. The development process has included extensive technical studies, laboratory testing, field tests, and most recently includes a storage facility being constructed in southern Sweden (Skallen). The LRC development effort has shown that the concept is technically and economically viable. The Skallen storage facility will have a rock cover of 115 meters (375 feet), a storage volume of 40,000 cubic meters (250,000 petroleum barrels), and a maximum operating pressure of 20 MPa (2,900 psi). There is a potential for commercialization of the LRC technology in the United States. Two regions were studied in some detail - the Northeast and the Southeast. The investment cost for an LRC facility in the Northeast is approximately $182 million and $343 million for a 2.6-billion cubic foot (bcf) working gas facility and a 5.2-bcf working gas storage facility, respectively. The relatively high investment cost is a strong function of the cost of labor in the Northeast. The labor union-related rules and requirements in the Northeast result in much higher underground construction costs than might result in Sweden, for example. The LRC technology gas storage service is compared to other alternative technologies. The LRC technology gas storage service was found to be competitive with other alternative technologies for a variety of market scenarios.

  7. The nature of fire-cracked rock: new insights from ethnoarchaeological and laboratory experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Michael A

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermal weathering better than metamorphic or sedimentary rock types. Ethnoarchaeological results are applied to six archaeological FCR features, and provide new insights on the use-history of five of the features. Microscopic observations...

  8. Bottoms Up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Boyd, David

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: "Bottoms up!" Or, "gan bei," as they say here in China. But what are you drinking? It could either be the authentic 144-proof sorghum-based liquor Moutai, or a clever counterfeit. Moutai has been dubbed the "national wine...

  9. Petrology and micromechanics of experimentally deformed natural rock salt: Physical processes: Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, F.D.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of impurities and microprocesses on the creep of natural salt samples are presented. Salts are analyzed from four sites (Palo Duro Unit 4 and Palo Duro Unit 5, Texas; Avery Island, Louisiana; and Salina Basin, Michigan). The salts have been deformed at temperatures and pressures that simulate repository conditions. Bulk chemistry, optical petrology, and microprobe analyses are used to identify the species and to quantify the amount of each impurity. General effects of impurities on the rheology of natural salt are discussed. The physical processes that control creep deformation of salt are identified by etchpit techniques. The nature of desolation motion which controls the creep behavior of salt changes dramatically over the temperature range of 25 to 200/degree/C. Physical bases for constitutive modeling are established through observations documented in this report. Composition of the salts range from nearly pure, uniform halite to a heterogeneous composite of halite and anhydrite. Impurities evidently increase creep resistance at lower test temperatures. At higher test temperatures, creep deformation is much less sensitive to the presence of impurities. Anhydrite is the only mineral species that correlates strongly with creep response. Generally, greater amounts of anhydrite increase the creep resistance. 13 refs., 11 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. 2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    , followed by waterflooding, were performed at reservoir conditions to investigate rock wettability. A two Berea and Spraberry cores at reservoir conditions to illustrate the actual process of waterflooding- 31 - 2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS

  11. Bottom head assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs.

  12. Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huyge, Dirk

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The archaeology of early Egypt: Social transformations inAlexander 1938 Rock-drawings of southern Upper Egypt. Vol.1. London: The Egypt Exploration Society. 1939 Rock-drawings

  13. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Phosphate Rock Platinum Potash Pumice Quartz Crystal Rare Earths Rhenium Rubidium Salt Sand and Gravel Graphite Peat Sulfur Beryllium Gypsum Perlite Talc Bismuth Hafnium Phosphate Rock Tantalum Boron Helium on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards

  14. SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eugene A. Fritzler

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

  15. Pipeline bottoming cycle study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical and economic feasibility of applying bottoming cycles to the prime movers that drive the compressors of natural gas pipelines was studied. These bottoming cycles convert some of the waste heat from the exhaust gas of the prime movers into shaft power and conserve gas. Three typical compressor station sites were selected, each on a different pipeline. Although the prime movers were different, they were similar enough in exhaust gas flow rate and temperature that a single bottoming cycle system could be designed, with some modifications, for all three sites. Preliminary design included selection of the bottoming cycle working fluid, optimization of the cycle, and design of the components, such as turbine, vapor generator and condensers. Installation drawings were made and hardware and installation costs were estimated. The results of the economic assessment of retrofitting bottoming cycle systems on the three selected sites indicated that profitability was strongly dependent upon the site-specific installation costs, how the energy was used and the yearly utilization of the apparatus. The study indicated that the bottoming cycles are a competitive investment alternative for certain applications for the pipeline industry. Bottoming cycles are technically feasible. It was concluded that proper design and operating practices would reduce the environmental and safety hazards to acceptable levels. The amount of gas that could be saved through the year 2000 by the adoption of bottoming cycles for two different supply projections was estimated as from 0.296 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a low supply projection to 0.734 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a high supply projection. The potential market for bottoming cycle equipment for the two supply projections varied from 170 to 500 units of varying size. Finally, a demonstration program plan was developed.

  16. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of exper- iments for some time, it is interesting compute this spectrum from QCD and compare results between lattice calculations and continuum theoretical models. Several lattice calculations ex- ist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. Here, we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. We present preliminary results for the ground state spectrum.

  17. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  18. Mixture Theories for Rock Properties James G. Berryman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mixture Theories for Rock Properties James G. Berryman Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by Batchelor [3], Hale [41], Hashin [42], Torquato [95], and Willis [110] are also recommended. 1.1. Rocks Are Inhomogeneous Materials A rock is a naturally occurring mixture of minerals. Rocks are normally inhomogeneous

  19. Q00906010024 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    00906010024 rock check dam Q00906010025 rock check dam Q00906010021 rock check dam Q00906010022 rock check dam Q00906010027 rock check dam Q00906010026 rock check dam Q00906010018 rock check dam Q00906010023 rock check dam Q00906010011 rock check dam Q00906010008 rock check dam Q00906010007 rock check dam Q

  20. Beowawe Binary Bottoming Cycle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher| Department ofBeowawe Binary Bottoming

  1. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Peach Bottom

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Peach Bottom" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  2. Bottom Conditions & Effects Chart 02/04/99 Bottom descript

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    waters only Generally unrestricted by diver movement As above Gravel Relatively smooth, granular base Generally unrestricted by diver movement Good, occasional sloping bottoms of loose gravel impair walking cause sinking and impaired movement Sand Common type of bottom, packs hard Generally unrestricted

  3. Overview of conservation treatments applied to rock glyph archaeological sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandridge, Debra E

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock glyphs, ubiquitously referred to as rock art, are often the most highly visible components of archaeological sites. Such artifacts, therefore, are most prone to deterioration and degradation from human caused and natural elements...

  4. Modeling of crack initiation, propagation and coalescence in rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonçalves da Silva, Bruno Miguel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural or artificial fracturing of rock plays a very important role in geologic processes and for engineered structures in and on rock. Fracturing is associated with crack initiation, propagation and coalescence, which ...

  5. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Kyanite Lead Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Graphite Peat Sulfur Beryllium Gypsum Perlite Talc Bismuth Hafnium Phosphate Rock Tantalum Boron Helium information on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources

  6. Shotgun cartridge rock breaker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

  7. V00306010057 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« XY! 16-020 16-030(c) 16-026(l) 16-028(c) 16-026(l) V00306010057 rock check dam V00306010012 rock check dam V00306010040 rock check dam V00306010039 rock check dam V00306010058 rock check dam V00306010064 rock check dam V00306010061 rock check dam V00306010062 rock check dam V00306010063

  8. Lithology and Alteration Mineralogy of Reservoir Rocks at Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material. The nature of the low-angle outflow zone and the...

  9. Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material. The nature of the low-angle outflow zone and the...

  10. Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, M.; Swanson-Hysell, N. L

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and significance of magnetism in sedimentary rocks. Journal1997. Rock Magnetism. ¨ zdemir, O Dunlop, D. J. & Oon July 30, 2013 ROCK MAGNETISM: REMAGNETIZED CARBONATES

  11. V01406010015 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« ¬« V01406010015 rock check dam V01406010014 rock check dam V01406010013 rock check dam 1501403010012 earthen berm V01403010008 earthen berm V01406010003 rock check dam V01406010004 rock check dam V01406010010 rock check dam V01406010011 rock check dam 15-0651 15-0307 15-0588 15-0532 15-0575 stormdrain 7160

  12. Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, J.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

  13. Hydraulic transmissivity and heat exchanges: aperture lowpass filtering model 1 Natural open joints in rocks commonly present multi-scale self-affine apertures. This

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydraulic transmissivity and heat exchanges: aperture lowpass filtering model 1 SUMMARY Natural aperture that describes at best the macroscopic properties (hydraulic conductivity, heat exchange of the effective hydraulic and thermal properties (apertures). A detailed study of the influence of the bandwidth

  14. T00406010008 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« T00406010008 rock check dam T00406010009 rock check dam T00406010010 rock check dam T00406010011 rock check dam T-SMA-2.85 0.344 Acres 35-014(g) 35-016(n) T00406010005 rock check dam T00406010006 rock check dam T00403090004 curb T00402040007 established vegetation, green hatch area 7200 7200 7180

  15. Composite attachment: the Trek bottom bracket

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallard, David

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Bottom bracket failures have been one of the most common failures in the composite bicycle frames produced by the Trek Bicycle Corporation. The bottom bracket is the portion of the frame that supports the crank and pedals. An aluminum insert...

  16. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

    2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  17. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Peach Bottom

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayPeach Bottom"

  18. J00206010020 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! J00206010020 rock check dam J00206010023 rock check dam 09-009 09-009 09-009 PJ-SMA-2 0.901 Acres J00206010021 rock check dam J00206010019 rock check dam J00206010014 rock check dam J00203010007 Smith DATE: 14-November-2014 REVISION NUMBER: 8 XY! IP sampler location Berm Channel/swale Check dam

  19. W02106010008 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W-SMA-14.1 5.169 Acres W02106010008 rock check dam W02106010009 rock check dam W02106010010 rock check dam W02106010011 rock check dam W02106010012 rock check dam W02103010018 earthen berm W02103010016 dam Established vegetation Seed and mulch Sediment trap/basin Gabion Cap SWMU boundary SMA drainage

  20. Chapter Eight Rock Varnish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    ) Coating Description Carbonate skin Coating composed primarily of carbonate, usually calcium carbonate; the agent may be manganese, sulphate, carbonate, silica, iron, oxalate, organisms, or anthropogenic Dust, cyanobacteria, algae Nitrate crust Potassium and calcium nitrate coatings on rocks, often in caves and rock

  1. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  2. Incident at the Rock Pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birgfeld, Doug

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the off limit rock pile At a Portland school Where theDoug. “Incident at the Rock Pile” http://escholarship.org/Doug. “Incident at the Rock Pile” http://escholarship.org/

  3. Summary of core damage frequency from internal initiators: Peach Bottom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Lambright, J.A.; Cathey, N.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) based on internal initiators are being conducted on a number of reference plants to provide the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with updated information about light-water reactor risk. The results of these analyses will be used by the NRC to prepare NUREG-1150 which will examine the NRC's current perception of risk. Peach Bottom has been chosen as one of the reference plants. The Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station has two boiling water reactor (BWR) units, each with a capacity of 1150 MW(e). The reactors are each housed in a Mark I containment. Peach Bottom Unit 2 analyzed here, was studied before as part of WASH-1400. A number of plant features tend to be important in determining the nature and frequency of the core melt scenarios for Peach Bottom. These features include the recent above-average diesel generator performance history, the single emergency service water system for both units, the numerous emergency core cooling systems, recent procedure modifications and the low volume containment.

  4. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  5. anti-top bottom anti-bottom: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to searches at the LHC, in particular to top anti-top H production where the Higgs boson decays into a bottom anti-bottom pair. A successful analysis of top anti-top H at...

  6. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

  7. Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RadEMSL Science Theme: Biosystem Dynamics & Design Energy Materials & Processes Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Instruments: X-ray Computed Tomography Publication year: 2012...

  8. ,"Tennessee Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  9. ,"Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  10. ,"Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  11. ,"Iowa Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  12. ,"Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  13. ,"Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  14. ,"Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  15. ,"Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  16. ,"Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  17. ,"Kansas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  18. ,"Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  19. ,"Alaska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  20. ,"Nebraska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  1. ,"Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  2. ,"Utah Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  3. ,"Illinois Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  4. ,"Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  5. ,"Arkansas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  6. ,"Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  7. ,"California Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  8. ,"Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  9. ,"Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  10. ,"Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  11. ,"Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  12. ,"Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  13. ,"Washington Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  14. ,"Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  15. ,"Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  16. Enzyme Design From the Bottom Up: An Active Nickel Electrocatalyst...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Design From the Bottom Up: An Active Nickel Electrocatalyst with a Structured Peptide Outer Coordination Sphere. Enzyme Design From the Bottom Up: An Active Nickel...

  17. Configuration and performance of the indirect-fired fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The natural gas, indirect-fired fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFFC) is introduced as a novel power plant system for the distributed power and on-site markets in the 20--200 megawatt (MW) size range. The novel indirect-fired carbonate fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFCFC) power plant system configures the ambient pressure carbonate fuel cell with a gas turbine, air compressor, combustor, and ceramic heat exchanger. Performance calculations from ASPEN simulations present material and energy balances with expected power output. The results indicate efficiencies and heat rates for the NG-IFCFC are comparable to conventionally bottomed carbonate fuel cell steam bottomed cycles, but with smaller and less expensive components.

  18. Manufactured caverns in carbonate rock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruce, David A.; Falta, Ronald W.; Castle, James W.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a process for manufacturing underground caverns suitable in one embodiment for storage of large volumes of gaseous or liquid materials. The method is an acid dissolution process that can be utilized to form caverns in carbonate rock formations. The caverns can be used to store large quantities of materials near transportation facilities or destination markets. The caverns can be used for storage of materials including fossil fuels, such as natural gas, refined products formed from fossil fuels, or waste materials, such as hazardous waste materials. The caverns can also be utilized for applications involving human access such as recreation or research. The method can also be utilized to form calcium chloride as a by-product of the cavern formation process.

  19. The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Robert James

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Lines: Ethnographic Sources and Rock Art Interpretationwhen applying these sources toward rock art interpretation.information source for developing rock art interpretations.

  20. Software Engineer RockAuto www.RockAuto.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Software Engineer ­ RockAuto www.RockAuto.com Position Description Software is the foundation · Familiarity with open-source development technologies like PHP, Perl, JavaScript and C (Linux system Lane, Madison, WI 53719) Why RockAuto? Strategic and tactical impact. We're an e-commerce company

  1. Characterizing Hydraulic Properties and Ground-Water Chemistry in Fractured-Rock Aquifers: A User's Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterizing Hydraulic Properties and Ground-Water Chemistry in Fractured-Rock Aquifers: A User source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards., 2007, Characterizing hydraulic properties and ground-water chemistry in fractured-rock aquifers: A user

  2. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  3. Processing NPP Bottoms by Ferrocyanide Precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savkin, A. E.; Slastennikov Y. T.; Sinyakin O. G.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of work is a laboratory test of a technological scheme for cleaning bottoms from radionuclides by use of ozonization, ferrocyanide precipitation, filtration and selective sorption. At carrying out the ferrocyanide precipitation after ozonization, the specific activity of bottoms by Cs{sup 137} is reduced in 100-500 times. It has been demonstrated that the efficiency of ferrocyanide precipitation depends on the quality of consequent filtration. Pore sizes of a filter has been determined to be less than 0.2 {micro}m for complete separation of ferrocyanide residue. The comparison of two technological schemes for cleaning bottoms from radionuclides, characterized by presence of the ferrocyanide precipitation stage has been performed. Application of the proposed schemes allows reducing volumes of radioactive waste in many times.

  4. Transfer of hot dry rock technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

  5. A resting bottom sodium cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costes, D. [Consultant (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This follows ICAPP 2011 paper 11059 'Fast Reactor with a Cold Bottom Vessel', on sodium cooled reactor vessels in thermal gradient, resting on soil. Sodium is frozen on vessel bottom plate, temperature increasing to the top. The vault cover rests on the safety vessel, the core diagrid welded to a toric collector forms a slab, supported by skirts resting on the bottom plate. Intermediate exchangers and pumps, fixed on the cover, plunge on the collector. At the vessel top, a skirt hanging from the cover plunges into sodium, leaving a thin circular slit partially filled by sodium covered by argon, providing leak-tightness and allowing vessel dilatation, as well as a radial relative holding due to sodium inertia. No 'air conditioning' at 400 deg. C is needed as for hanging vessels, and this allows a large economy. The sodium volume below the slab contains isolating refractory elements, stopping a hypothetical corium flow. The small gas volume around the vessel limits any LOCA. The liner cooling system of the concrete safety vessel may contribute to reactor cooling. The cold resting bottom vessel, proposed by the author for many years, could avoid the complete visual inspection required for hanging vessels. However, a double vessel, containing support skirts, would allow introduction of inspecting devices. Stress limiting thermal gradient is obtained by filling secondary sodium in the intermediate space. (authors)

  6. Bottom current measurements under the Gulf Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halikas, George

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Richardson type (RICHARDSON, STIMSON and WILKINS 1963) . A similar instrument partly dismantled is shown in Fig. 2 where the cage at the bottom of. the instrument contains the vane and the Savonius rotor for direction and speed sensing. The current...

  7. Bottom-strange mesons in hyperonic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Divakar Pathak; Amruta Mishra

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The in-medium behavior of bottom-strange pseudoscalar mesons in hot, isospin asymmetric and dense hadronic environment is studied using a chiral effective model. The same was recently generalized to the heavy quark sector and employed to study the behavior of open-charm and open-bottom mesons. The heavy quark (anti-quark) is treated as frozen and all medium modifications of these bottom-strange mesons are due to their strange anti-quark (quark) content. We observe a pronounced dependence of their medium mass on baryonic density and strangeness content of the medium. Certain aspects of these in-medium interactions are similar to those observed for the strange-charmed mesons in a preceding investigation, such as the lifting of mass-degeneracy of $B_S^0$ and ${\\bar B}_S^0$ mesons in hyperonic matter, while the same is respected in vacuum as well as in nuclear matter. In general, however, there is a remarkable distinction between the two species, even though the formalism predicts a completely analogous in-medium interaction Lagrangian density. We discuss in detail the reason for different in-medium behavior of these bottom-strange mesons as compared to charmed-strange mesons, despite the dynamics of the heavy quark being treated as frozen in both cases.

  8. Spectroscopy and decays of charm and bottom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After a brief review of the quark model, we discuss our present knowledge of the spectroscopy of charm and bottom mesons and baryons. We go on to review the lifetimes, semileptonic, and purely leptonic decays of these particles. We conclude with a brief discussion B and D mixing and rare decays.

  9. ,"Lower 48 States Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  10. ,"AGA Producing Region Underground Natural Gas Storage - All...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  11. ,"AGA Western Consuming Region Underground Natural Gas Storage...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  12. ,"West Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  13. ,"AGA Eastern Consuming Region Underground Natural Gas Storage...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  14. ,"New York Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  15. ,"New Mexico Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  16. ,"International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

  17. ,"Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","L...

  18. ,"Corsby, ND Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Corsby, ND Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

  19. ,"Sault St Marie, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sault St Marie, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

  20. ,"Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

  1. ,"North Troy, VT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Troy, VT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

  2. ,"Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

  3. ,"Champlain, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Champlain, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

  4. ,"Portal, ND Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Portal, ND Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

  5. Rock Bands/Rock Brands: Mediation and Musical Performance in Post-liberalization Bangalore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coventry, Chloe Louise

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    these recorded sources important rock pedagogical tools inwere a primary source of western rock music for young fans,Nevertheless, a source of funding for rock music performance

  6. Rock Properties Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Lum

    2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

  7. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Phosphate Rock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Appendix C--Resource/Reserve Definitions . . . . . . 195 Commodities: Abrasives (Manufactured

  8. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Phosphate Rock Platinum Potash Pumice Quartz Crystal Rare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Appendix C--A Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals

  9. Drill-back studies examine fractured, heated rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Flexser, S.; Myer, L.R.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the effects of heating on the mineralogical, geochemical, and mechanical properties of rock by high-level radioactive waste, cores are being examined from holes penetrating locations where electric heaters simulated the presence of a waste canister, and from holes penetration natural hydrothermal systems. Results to date indicate the localized mobility and deposition of uranium in an open fracture in heated granitic rock, the mobility of U in a breccia zone in an active hydrothermal system in tuff, and the presence of U in relatively high concentration in fracture-lining material in tuff. Mechanical -- property studies indicate that differences in compressional- and shear-wave parameters between heated and less heated rock can be attributed to differences in the density of microcracks. Emphasis has shifted from initial studies of granitic rock at Stripa, Sweden to current investigations of welded tuff at the Nevada Test Site. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 #12;Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 Published: 14 May 2004

  11. Fractionation apparatus providing improved heat recovery from bottom stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnham, R.A.

    1981-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy efficient design of fractionation column in which the liquid at the column bottom must be cooled to prevent thermal degradation, the column being provided with a perforated annular baffle through which liquid from the lowermost tray is channeled to the outlet of the column bottom, while a body of cooler recycled liquid is maintained in the column bottom outside of said baffle.

  12. Oil and Gas CDT Bots in Rocks: Intelligent Rock Deformation for Fault Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Heriot-Watt University, Institute of Petroleum Engineering Supervisory Team · Dr Helen Lewis, Heriot://www.pet.hw.ac.uk/staff-directory/jimsomerville.htm Key Words Nano/Micro sensors; faults; fault zones; geomechanics; rock mechanics; rock deformation-deformed equivalent, a different lab-deformed example and a geomechanical simulation of a fault zone showing permanent

  13. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Zachary S; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass usingmore »SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.« less

  14. CMS kinematic edge from s-bottoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peisi Huang; Carlos E. M. Wagner

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present two scenarios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) that can lead to an explanation of the excess in the invariant mass distribution of two opposite charged, same flavor leptons, and the corresponding edge at an energy of about 78 GeV, recently reported by the CMS collaboration. In both scenarios, s-bottoms are pair produced, and decay to neutralinos and a b-jet. The heavier neutralinos further decay to a pair of leptons and the lightest neutralino through on-shell s-leptons or off-shell neutral gauge bosons. These scenarios are consistent with the current limits on the s-bottoms, neutralinos, and s-leptons. Assuming that the lightest neutralino is stable we discuss the predicted relic density as well as the implications for Dark Matter direct detection. We show that consistency between the predicted and the measured value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment may be obtained in both scenarios. Finally, we define the signatures of these models that may be tested at the 13 TeV run of the LHC.

  15. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Zachary S; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.

  16. Strength of transversely isotropic rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pei, Jianyong, 1975-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes a new Anisotropic Matsuoka-Nakai (AMN) criterion to characterize the failure of transversely isotropic rocks under true triaxial stress states. One major obstacle in formulating an anisotropic criterion ...

  17. Rock physics at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock physics refers to the study of static and dynamic chemical and physical properties of rocks and to phenomenological investigations of rocks reacting to man-made forces such as stress waves and fluid injection. A bibliography of rock physics references written by LASL staff members is given. Listing is by surname of first author. (RWR)

  18. Discovering bottom squark coannihilation at the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyaev, Alexander; Lastovicka, Tomas; Nomerotski, Andrei; Lastovicka-Medin, Gordana [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom) and Particle Physics Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); University of Montenegro, Cetinjska bb, 81 000 Podgorica (Montenegro)

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the potential of the international linear collider (ILC) at {radical}(s)=500 GeV to probe new dark matter motivated scenario where the bottom squark (sbottom) is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle. For this scenario, which is virtually impossible for the LHC to test, the ILC has a potential to cover a large fraction of the parameter space. The challenge is due to a very low energy of jets, below 20-30 GeV, which pushes the jet clustering and flavor tagging algorithms to their limits. The process of sbottom pair production was studied within the SiD detector concept. We demonstrate that ILC offers a unique opportunity to test the supersymmetry parameter space motivated by the sbottom-neutralino coannihilation scenario in cases when the sbottom production is kinematically accessible. The study was done with the full SiD simulation and reconstruction chain including all standard model and beam backgrounds.

  19. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Triple bottom line assessment of transport options for the UBC farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and analyzes viable vehicle options to be used at the UBC Farm using Triple bottom line assessment. These options include powering the vehicle with the traditional fossil fuels, natural gas, biodiesel, or use a hybrid or battery powered electric vehicle. After collaborative research on these methods, this report

  20. Bottom-Up Top-Down 3D Human Pose Estimation Integrating Bottom-Up and Top-Down Approach from Monocular Image

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takiguchi, Tetsuya

    Bottom-Up Top-Down 3 3D Human Pose Estimation Integrating Bottom-Up and Top-Down Approach from and Technology, Kobe University 2 Organization of Advanced Science and Technology 1 3 HOG 3 Bottom-up Top-down 2 3 x web [1] HOG [2] 3 3D Bottom-Up Top-Down Bottom-Up Top-Down 3.1 Bottom-Up HOG z 3 x x = Rz + (1

  1. ,"Port of Del Bonita, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Del Bonita, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

  2. Numerical Simulation of the Wave Bottom Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slinn, Donald

    boundary layer. Oscillatory boundary layers are examined using a high-resolution time-dependent threeNumerical Simulation of the Wave Bottom Boundary Layer Over a Smooth Surface. Part 1: Three for turbulent boundary layers that occur over a smooth bottom. Results indicate that turbulence levels

  3. Nanowires As Building Blocks for Bottom-Up Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    #12;Nanowires As Building Blocks for Bottom-Up Nanotechnology The field of nanotechnology/or combinations of function in an integrated nanosystem. To enable this bottom-up approach for nanotechnology-dimensional (1D) nanostruc- tures at the forefront of nanoscience and nanotechnology. NWs and NBs are typi- cally

  4. Reconstruction of Sedimentary Rock Based on Mechanical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Guodong; Patzek, Tad W.; Silin, Dmitry B.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the veri?cation of rock mechanical properties. The dynamicis white. IV. ROCK MECHANICAL PROPERTIES FIG. 9: Cementationextracting meaningful rock transport properties from these

  5. Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda R Pace

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 13,500 years, human populations have lived in and productively utilized the natural resources offered by the cold desert environment of the northeastern Snake River Plain in eastern Idaho. Within an overall framework of hunting and gathering, groups relied on an intimate familiarity with the natural world and developed a variety of technologies to extract the resources that they needed to survive. Useful items were abundant and found everywhere on the landscape. Even the basaltic terrain and the rocks, themselves, were put to productive use. This paper presents a preliminary classification scheme for rock structures built on the Idaho National Laboratory landscape by prehistoric aboriginal populations, including discussions of the overall architecture of the structures, associated artifact assemblages, and topographic placement. Adopting an ecological perspective, the paper concludes with a discussion of the possible functions of these unique resources for the desert populations that once called the INL home.

  6. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 126 (2001) 93108 Rock-magnetic properties of TRM carrying baked and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 126 (2001) 93­108 Rock-magnetic properties of TRM produced large areas of thermally altered sedimentary rocks with large magnetic moments. The natural remanent magnetization (NRM) and thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) intensities and low

  7. Lichen: the challenge for rock art conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandridge, Debra Elaine

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the effects that lichens have on rock surfaces in which ancient rock art (petroglyphs and pictographs) may be found. The study area includes four sites in the United States: one quartzite site in southwest Minnesota, two...

  8. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  9. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  10. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  11. Annual Fish Passage Report -Rock Island Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By Paul D. Zimmer L. McKeman, Director Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965;#12;Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By PAUL D. ZIMMER, Fishery

  12. Introduction 1.1 Why study rocks?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    2 Chapter 1 Introduction 1.1 Why study rocks? I am a petrologist and I study rocks. Petrology and modification of certain types of rocks. On one level, petrology involves the art of identifying and classifying. This is of course the reverse of the historical development of petrology. I have chosen this approach because all

  13. Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look MIKE JACKSON* & NICHOLAS L. SWANSON-HYSELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas

    Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look MIKE JACKSON* & NICHOLAS L. SWANSON-HYSELL Institute for Rock Magnetism, Winchell School of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, US, dominantly in the super- paramagnetic and stable single-domain size range, also give rise to distinctive rock-magnetic

  14. Water Rock Interaction [WRI 14] Chemical weathering of granitic rocks: experimental approach and Pb-Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of water/rock interactions both in terms of source and extent of weathering, by measuring major and traceWater Rock Interaction [WRI 14] Chemical weathering of granitic rocks: experimental approach and Pb, France Abstract In order to characterize water/rock interactions of granite, we performed laboratory

  15. Analysis of rock-fall and rock-fall avalanche seismograms in the French Alps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the source rock slope (Figure 1), the falling mass strikes the talus slope and breaks up and/or bounces1 Analysis of rock-fall and rock-fall avalanche seismograms in the French Alps J. Deparis, D reviews seismograms from 10 rock-fall events recorded between 1992 and 2001 by the permanent seismological

  16. 2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals -Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals - Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals R. J. Harrison, R 621 622 623 623 579 #12;580 Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals 2.20.5.3 2.20.5.4 2, and are present in all types of rocks, sediments, and soils. These minerals retain a memory of the geomagnetic

  17. 37The Oldest Lunar Rocks Apollo astronauts recovered over 840 pounds of lunar rocks, and during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    37The Oldest Lunar Rocks Apollo astronauts recovered over 840 pounds of lunar rocks, and during applied to the different rock samples. Location Mission Rock Type Age (Myr) Mare Tranquillitatis Apollo-11 Basalt 3,500 Oceanus Procellarum Apollo-12 Basalt 3,200 Fra Mauro Formation Apollo-14 Basalt 4,150 Apollo

  18. IntroductIon The range-restricted Rock Firefinch Lagonosticta sangui

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    Reserve, a protected area where the species appears to thrive (Brandt & Cresswell 2008, Wright & Jones not recorded in farmland or semi-natural areas without rocks, but only in areas where there are large boulders (inselbergs, kopjes) rising abruptly from the surrounding dry scrub-savanna. Much of the natural vegetation

  19. Efficient bottom cathodes for organic light-emitting devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Jie; Duggal, Anil R.; Shiang, Joseph J.; Heller, Christian M. [General Electric Global Research, 1 Research Circle, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States)

    2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Bilayers of aluminum and an alkali fluoride are well-known top cathode contacts for organic light-emitting devices but have never been successfully applied as bottom contacts. We describe a bilayer bottom cathode contact for organic electronic devices based on reversing the well-known top cathode structure such that the aluminum, rather than the alkali fluoride, contacts the organic material. Electron-only devices were fabricated showing enhanced electron injection from this bottom contact. Kelvin probe, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments, and thermodynamic calculations suggest that the enhancement results from n doping of the organic material by dissociated alkali metals.

  20. Gravimeter yields rock density for cavern during operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folle, S.; Rolfs, O. [Kavernen Bau- and Betriebs-GmbH, Hannover (Germany)

    1996-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing underground cavities and especially planning for caverns in salt formations for storage require investigations of several questions that are posed in this paper. A downhole gravimeter can determine rock density in a natural gas storage cavern while it is in operation or still being solution mined. Operating conditions or solution mining in progress precludes use of a standard density tool during conventional well-logging procedures. Rock density is one of the principal input parameters for rock mechanical investigations in specifying optimum pressure levels in storage caverns. The advantages and disadvantages of the system, as well as of the technical logging procedures, follow. The gravimeter tool: measures rock densities up to approximately 20 m into the formation; logs through casing (independent of a drilling rig); is unaffected by drilling mud; is unaffected by size and variation of caliber. But it also: does not measure continuously; makes logging time-consuming and requires a certain mobilization time; delivers data whose accuracy depends o the homogeneity of the formation or level of information available on the structure in question.

  1. Acoustic characteristics of bay bottom sediments in Lavaca Bay, TX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patch, Mary Catherine

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    acoustic return of the bay bottom, and 2) strong, shallow reflectors??surface strong, mounds, buried strong, andburied multiples, which describe strong acoustic returns in the upper 5 m of stratigraphy. Within the lower package, four categories were...

  2. air bottoming cycle: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Memb e... Holley, James Andrew 1978-01-01 2 Combined-cycle solarised gas turbine with steam, organic and CO2 bottoming cycles Renewable Energy Websites Summary: mounted at the...

  3. Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    representation of the EscJ monomer, showing two domains. Top right: Arc-shaped EscJ tetramer. Bottom left: Interface between domain 1 of two EscJ monomers, colored green and...

  4. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Introduction into Induction and Natural Gas Stoves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into Induction and Natural Gas Stoves: A Triple Bottom Line Analysis for the new Student Union Building Jordan Ho of a project/report". #12;APSC 262 An Introduction Into Induction and Natural Gas Stoves A triple-bottom line, 2011 #12;Page 2 of 21 ABSTRACT This report compares the attributes of induction and natural gas stoves

  5. Engineering a 70-percent efficient, indirect-fired fuel-cell bottomed turbine cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.C.; Micheli, P.L.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors introduce the natural gas, indirect-fired fuel-cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFFC) as a novel power plant system for the distributed power and on-site markets in the 20 to 200 megawatt (MW) size range. The NG-IFFC system is a new METC-patented system. This power-plant system links the ambient pressure, carbonate fuel cell in tandem with a gas turbine, air compressor, combustor, and ceramic heat exchanger. Performance calculations based on Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN) simulations show material and energy balances with expected power output. Early results indicated efficiencies and heat rates for the NG-IFFC are comparable to conventionally bottomed, carbonate fuel-cell steam-bottomed cycles. More recent calculations extended the in-tandem concept to produce near-stoichiometric usage of the oxygen. This is made possible by reforming the anode stream to completion and using all hydrogen fuel in what will need to be a special combustor. The performance increases dramatically to 70%.

  6. Precision directional drilling of hot-dry-rock geothermal production well EE-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carden, R.S.; Rowley, J.C.; Helmick, C.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The deviated directional drilling of the hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal production well EE-3 (Energy Extraction No. 3) was successfully completed on August 1981. The injection well, EE-2, previously had been drilled with its lower part at an inclination of 35/sup 0/ to the vertical. It reached an on-line depth of 15,292 feet and its bottom-hole temperature was 608/sup 0/F (320/sup 0/C). The production well EE-3 was required to be drilled 1200 feet (370 m) above and parallel to the injection well. This necessitated high precision, controlled-trajectory directional drilling operations. The directional drilling of EE-3 was accomplished within the required tolerances at a depth of 13,933 feet and a bottom-hole temperature of 580/sup 0/F (280/sup 0/C).

  7. The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2014: Powering the Bottom Line...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: Powering the Bottom Line for Businesses and Communities The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2014: Powering the Bottom Line for Businesses and Communities This report, written and...

  8. Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Y.C.

    1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities and findings from a field experiment devised to estimate the rates and mechanisms of transport of carbon across the continental shelves. The specific site chosen for the experiment was the mid-Atlantic Bight, a region off the North Carolina coast. The experiment involved a large contingent of scientists from many institutions. The specific component of the program was the transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer. The postulate mechanisms of transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer are: resuspension and advection, downward deposition, and accumulation. The high turbulence levels in the bottom boundary layer require the understanding of the coupling between turbulence and bottom sediments. The specific issues addressed in the work reported here were: (a) What is the sediment response to forcing by currents and waves? (b) What is the turbulence climate in the bottom boundary layer at this site? and (c) What is the rate at which settling leads to carbon sequestering in bottom sediments at offshore sites?

  9. 2008 Rock Deformation GRC - Conference August 3-8, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James G. Hirth

    2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRC on Rock Deformation highlights the latest research in brittle and ductile rock mechanics from experimental, field and theoretical perspectives. The conference promotes a multi-disciplinary forum for assessing our understanding of rock strength and related physical properties in the Earth. The theme for the 2008 conference is 'Real-time Rheology'. Using ever-improving geophysical techniques, our ability to constrain the rheological behavior during earthquakes and post-seismic creep has improved significantly. Such data are used to investigate the frictional behavior of faults, processes responsible for strain localization, the viscosity of the lower crust, and viscous coupling between the crust and mantle. Seismological data also provide information on the rheology of the lower crust and mantle through analysis of seismic attenuation and anisotropy. Geologists are improving our understanding of rheology by combining novel analyses of microstructures in naturally deformed rocks with petrologic data. This conference will bring together experts and students in these research areas with experimentalists and theoreticians studying the same processes. We will discuss and assess where agreement exists on rheological constraints derived at different length/time scales using different techniques - and where new insight is required. To encompass the elements of these topics, speakers and discussion leaders with backgrounds in geodesy, experimental rock deformation, structural geology, earthquake seismology, geodynamics, glaciology, materials science, and mineral physics will be invited to the conference. Thematic sessions will be organized on the dynamics of earthquake rupture, the rheology of the lower crust and coupling with the upper mantle, the measurement and interpretation of seismic attenuation and anisotropy, the dynamics of ice sheets and the coupling of reactive porous flow and brittle deformation for understanding geothermal and chemical properties of the shallow crust that are important for developing ideas in CO2 sequestration, geothermal and petrochemical research and the mechanics of shallow faults.

  10. Natural thermal strains close to surface of rock slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    'Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Nancy, France. Present address: ANTEA, 1 rue du, Nancy-Université, Parc de Saurupt, CS 14234, F-54042 Nancy, France ** Institut National de l parc de Brabois, F-54500 Vandoeuvre, France Corresponding author: V. Merrien-Soukatchoff - Phone: (+33

  11. On the Relationship between Stress and Elastic Strain for Porous and Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Berryman, James G.

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling the mechanical deformations of porous and fractured rocks requires a stress-strain relationship. Experience with inherently heterogeneous earth materials suggests that different varieties of Hook's law should be applied within regions of the rock having significantly different stress-strain behavior, e.g., such as solid phase and various void geometries. We apply this idea by dividing a rock body conceptually into two distinct parts. The natural strain (volume change divided by rock volume at the current stress state), rather than the engineering strain (volume change divided by the unstressed rock volume), should be used in Hooke's law for accurate modeling of the elastic deformation of that part of the pore volume subject to a relatively large degree of relative deformation (i.e., cracks or fractures). This approach permits the derivation of constitutive relations between stress and a variety of mechanical and/or hydraulic rock properties. We show that the theoretical predictions of this method are generally consistent with empirical expressions (from field data) and also laboratory rock experimental data.

  12. Threshold Corrections to the Bottom Quark Mass Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archana Anandakrishnan; B. Charles Bryant; Stuart Raby

    2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Threshold corrections to the bottom quark mass are often estimated under the approximation that tan$\\beta$ enhanced contributions are the most dominant. In this work we revisit this common approximation made to the estimation of the supersymmetric threshold corrections to the bottom quark mass. We calculate the full one-loop supersymmetric corrections to the bottom quark mass and survey a large part of the phenomenological MSSM parameter space to study the validity of considering only the tan$\\beta$ enhanced corrections. Our analysis demonstrates that this approximation underestimates the size of the threshold corrections by $\\sim$12.5% for most of the considered parameter space. We discuss the consequences for fitting the bottom quark mass and for the effective couplings to Higgses. We find that it is important to consider the additional contributions when fitting the bottom quark mass but the modifications to the effective Higgs couplings are typically $\\mathcal{O}$(few)% for the majority of the parameter space considered.

  13. Remote controlled ISI devices for RPV bottom head

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiga, S. [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Mori, H. [Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Japan); Kobayashi, K. Sasaki, T. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bottom head of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) is one of the areas on which it is very difficult to perform an inservice inspection (ISI). Welds in a bottom head central disk and a drain nozzle are required to be inspected, but its accessibility is restricted by a RPV skirt, a thermal insulation, control rod drive housings and incore monitor housings. Therefore, the remote mechanized scanners are necessary to access and examine the welds. Two kinds of new device were developed to accomplish this inspection. The bottom head central disk weld inspection device has a parallel link mechanism scanning arm with a combined-transducer module to get as much as wide scanning area between control rod drive housings. The device is driven along the weld by moving on the separable track which is set temporally on the bottom head insulation. The drain nozzle weld inspection device has a horseshoe shaped gear mechanism to drive a combined-transducer module. The device is set up on to the drain nozzle using an insertion handle. Both devices have an emergency retrieval mechanism to withdraw the devices in case of power loss accident. Those devices were demonstrated by a mock-up test to be applicable to the inspection of the RPV bottom head.

  14. Laboratory characterization of rock joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsiung, S.M.; Kana, D.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Ghosh, A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed.

  15. The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Robert James

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I incorporate results from the XRF and projectile pointRay Fluorescence (hereafter, XRF) to help affiliate rock artstudies or reports in which XRF analysis have been done.

  16. Rock Bands/Rock Brands: Mediation and Musical Performance in Post-liberalization Bangalore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coventry, Chloe Louise

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as in its modes of fandom, production and dissemination. Inaspects of rock music fandom: America had everything a youngthe beginnings of rock music fandom in India, even while, as

  17. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  18. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Kyanite Lead Lime Lithium Magnesium Manganese Mercury Mica Molybdenum Nickel Nitrogen Peat Perlite Niobium Stone Barite Gold Nitrogen Strontium Bauxite Graphite Peat Sulfur Beryllium Gypsum Perlite Talc, its natural and living resources, natural hazards, and the environment: World Wide Web: http

  19. Variability of bottom nepheloid layers near the Flower Garden Banks, Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cecil, Thomas Martin

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ( Linear and/or Sinusoid), percent mud, and bottom current speed and transmissivity of October 1980 PHISH stations. BNL type (I inear and/or Sinusoid ), percent mud, and bottom current speed and transmissivity of March 1981 pHISH stations. 50 BNL type... (I inear and/or Sinusoid), percent mud, and bottom transmissivity of July 1981 PHISH stations. 51 Multiple regression results relating bottom transmissivity and the independent variables, percent mud and bottom current speed. . . . . . . . . . 53...

  20. Microhole Coiled Tubing Bottom Hole Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Macune

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The original objective of the project, to deliver an integrated 3 1/8-inch diameter Measurement While Drilling (MWD) and Logging While Drilling (LWD) system for drilling small boreholes using coiled tubing drilling, has been achieved. Two prototype systems have been assembled and tested in the lab. One of the systems has been successfully tested downhole in a conventional rotary drilling environment. Development of the 3 1/8-inch system has also lead to development and commercialization of a slightly larger 3.5-inch diameter system. We are presently filling customer orders for the 3.5-inch system while continuing with commercialization of the 3 1/8-inch system. The equipment developed by this project will be offered for sale to multiple service providers around the world, enabling the more rapid expansion of both coiled tubing drilling and conventional small diameter drilling. The project was based on the reuse of existing technology whenever possible in order to minimize development costs, time, and risks. The project was begun initially by Ultima Labs, at the time a small company ({approx}12 employees) which had successfully developed a number of products for larger oil well service companies. In September, 2006, approximately 20 months after inception of the project, Ultima Labs was acquired by Sondex plc, a worldwide manufacturer of downhole instrumentation for cased hole and drilling applications. The acquisition provided access to proven technology for mud pulse telemetry, downhole directional and natural gamma ray measurements, and surface data acquisition and processing, as well as a global sales and support network. The acquisition accelerated commercialization through existing Sondex customers. Customer demand resulted in changes to the product specification to support hotter (150 C) and deeper drilling (20,000 psi pressure) than originally proposed. The Sondex acquisition resulted in some project delays as the resistivity collar was interfaced to a different MWD system and also as the mechanical design was revised for the new pressure requirements. However, the Sondex acquisition has resulted in a more robust system, secure funding for completion of the project, and more rapid commercialization.

  1. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat so as to insulate the reactor vessel bottom end wall from the containment structure base mat and allow the reactor vessel bottom end wall to freely expand as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof. Further, a deck is supported upon the side wall of the containment structure above the top open end of the reactor vessel, and a plurality of serially connected extendible and retractable annular bellows extend between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnect the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck. An annular guide ring is disposed on the containment structure and extends between its side wall and the top open end of the reactor vessel for providing lateral support of the reactor vessel top open end by limiting imposition of lateral loads on the annular bellows by the occurrence of a lateral seismic event.

  2. WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS C. L. Liu and Thomas J. Ahrens Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 In order to record P- and S-waves on the interactions between incident P- and SV-waves and free-surfaces of rocks. The relations between particle

  3. Rheology of rock glaciers: a preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giardino, J.R.; Vitek, J.D.; Hoskins, E.R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Movement of rock debris under the influence of gravity, i.e., mass movement, generates a range of phenomena from soil creep, through solifluction,debris flows and rock glaciers to rock falls. Whereas the resultant forms of these phenomena are different, common elements in the mechanics of movement are utilized in the basic interpretation of the processes of formation. Measurements of morphologic variables provide data for deductive analyses of processes that operate too slowly to observe or for processes that generated relict phenomena. External and internal characteristics or rock glacier morphometry and measured rates of motion serve as the basis for the development of a rheological model to explain phenomena classified as rock glaciers. A rock glacier in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Southern Colorado, which exhibits a large number of ridges and furrows and lichen bare fronts of lobes, suggests present day movement. A strain-net established on the surface provides evidence of movement characteristics. These data plus morphologic and fabric data suggest two rheological models to explain the flow of this rock glacier. Model one is based upon perfect plastic flow and model two is based upon stratified fluid movement with viscosity changing with depth. These models permit a better understanding of the movement mechanics and demonstrate that catastrophic events and slow creep contribute to the morphologic characteristics of this rock glacier.

  4. Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks: Part 1. Damage fracturing Seth Busetti, Kyran mechanics, fluid flow in fractured reservoirs, and geomechanics in nonconventional reservoirs. Kyran Mish finite deformation of reservoir rocks. We present an at- tempt to eliminate the main limitations

  5. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1960 . SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1960 by Paul D. Zimmer and Clifton C. Davidson United States Fish This annual report of fishway operations at Rock Island Dam in 1960 is dedicated to the memory of co

  6. ROCK ELASTIC PROPERTIES: DEPENDENCE ON MICROSTRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ROCK ELASTIC PROPERTIES: DEPENDENCE ON MICROSTRUCTURE James G. Berryman and Patricia A. Berge Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory P. O. Box 808 L­202 Livermore, CA 94551­9900 #12; ROCK ELASTIC PROPERTIES: DEPENDENCE ON MICROSTRUCTURE James G. Berryman and Patricia A. Berge Lawrence Livermore National

  7. Integrated geochemical and paleoecological approach to petroleum source rock evaluation, Lower Niobrara Formation (Cretaceous), Lyons, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, L.K.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of paleoecological, geochemical, and stable isotopic properties of the lower Niobrara Formation (upper Turonian to lower Coniacian) was undertaken in order to evaluate petroleum source rock potential and to gain an understanding of the processes affecting variation in organic carbon content. The highest organic carbon contents in the lower Niobrara Formation occur in the lower shale unit of the Smoky Hill Shale Member. Trends in extent of bioturbation, organic carbon contents, and oxygen isotopic ratios of carbonates suggest that paleoclimatic factors influenced bottom water environments during deposition of this unit. A shift toward a more negative oxygen isotopic ratio in the lower shale unit is interpreted to be a result of decreased surface water salinity due to increased fresh water input and possibly to climatic warming. Resultant stratification of the water column limited benthic oxygenation thereby limiting benthic activity, enhancing the preservation of marine organic matter, and increasing source rock potential for petroleum. Data from underlying and overlying units in the lower Niobrara Formation suggest more normal marine conditions with well-oxygenated bottom waters, normal levels of bioturbation, and relatively low organic carbon contents. Pyrolysis data are interpreted to reflect a principally marine source of organic matter with substantial alteration due to bioturbation and thermal evolution. Elevated thermal maturity of the sections at Lyons is inferred to be a local feature caused by local heating associated with fluid movement along fault zones or with emplacement of tertiary sills.

  8. Specific energy for pulsed laser rock drilling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.; Reed, C. B.; Kornecki, G.; Gahan, B. C.; Parker, R. A.; Batarseh, S.; Graves, R. M.; Figueroa, H.; Skinner, N.; Technology Development

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of advanced high power laser technology to oil and gas well drilling has been attracting significant research interests recently among research institutes, petroleum industries, and universities. Potential laser or laser-aided oil and gas well drilling has many advantages over the conventional rotary drilling, such as high penetration rate, reduction or elimination of tripping, casing, and bit costs, and enhanced well control, perforating and side-tracking capabilities. The energy required to remove a unit volume of rock, namely the specific energy (SE), is a critical rock property data that can be used to determine both the technical and economic feasibility of laser oil and gas well drilling. When a high power laser beam is applied on a rock, it can remove the rock by thermal spallation, melting, or vaporization depending on the applied laser energy and the way the energy is applied. The most efficient rock removal mechanism would be the one that requires the minimum energy to remove a unit volume of rock. Samples of sandstone, shale, and limestone were prepared for laser beam interaction with a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser beam to determine how the beam size, power, repetition rate, pulse width, exposure time and energy can affect the amount of energy transferred to the rock for the purposes of spallation, melting, and vaporization. The purpose of the laser rock interaction experiment was to determine the optimal parameters required to remove a maximum rock volume from the samples while minimizing energy input. Absorption of radiant energy from the laser beam gives rise to the thermal energy transfer required for the destruction and removal of the rock matrix. Results from the tests indicate that each rock type has a set of optimal laser parameters to minimize specific energy (SE) values as observed in a set of linear track and spot tests. As absorbed energy outpaces heat diffusion by the rock matrix, local temperatures can rise to the melting points of the minerals and quickly increase observed SE values. Tests also clearly identified the spallation and melting zones for shale samples while changing the laser power. The lowest SE values are obtained in the spalling zone just prior to the onset of mineral melt. The laser thermally spalled and saw mechanically cut rocks show similarity of surface microstructure. The study also found that increasing beam repetition rate within the same material removal mechanism would increase the material removal rate, which is believed due to an increase of maximum temperature, thermal cycling frequency, and intensity of laser-driven shock wave within the rock.

  9. Flow dynamics and solute transport in unsaturated rock fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, G. W.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock fractures play an important role in flow and contaminant transport in fractured aquifers, production of oil from petroleum reservoirs, and steam generation from geothermal reservoirs. In this dissertation, phenomenological aspects of flow in unsaturated fractures were studied in visualization experiments conducted on a transparent replica of a natural, rough-walled rock fracture for inlet conditions of constant pressure and flow rate over a range of angles of inclination. The experiments demonstrated that infiltrating liquid proceeds through unsaturated rock fractures along non-uniform, localized preferential flow paths. Even in the presence of constant boundary conditions, intermittent flow was a persistent flow feature observed, where portions of the flow channel underwent cycles of snapping and reforming. Two modes of intermittent flow were observed, the pulsating blob mode and the rivulet snapping mode. A conceptual model for the rivulet snapping mode was proposed and examined using idealized, variable-aperture fractures. The frequency of intermittent flow events was measured in several experiments and related to the capillary and Bond numbers to characterize this flow behavior.

  10. Example of latest techniques for bottom-sludge dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamasuna, J.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently in Japan, the biggest problems of the bottom sludge dredging are lack of enough room for dumping areas and preventing water contamination during dredging in terms of environmental aspects. The new dredging system introduced at this time has been developed for the above purposes.

  11. Sustainable Impact at the Bottom of the Pyramid Ankita Goyal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    1 Sustainable Impact at the Bottom of the Pyramid Ankita Goyal Namitta Shankar Advisor: Morten enterprises as well as consumers living on $2 or less a day. However, empirically, several stories About two fifths of the world's population can be classified as poor, living on less than $2.00 a day

  12. Near-Shore and Bottom Fish Tahoe sucker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    Near-Shore and Bottom Fish Tahoe sucker Lahontan redsidePaiute sculpin Speckled dace Benthic Macroinvertebrate Asian clam Craysh Mountain whitesh Mackinaw Kokanee salmon Tui chub Off-Shore Fish BosminaDaphnia Diaptomus Epischura Mysis shrimp Current Food Web of Lake Tahoe Bluegill Zooplankton Largemouth bass

  13. Analytic Results for Higgs Production in Bottom Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemal J. Ozeren

    2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate analytically the cross section for Higgs production plus one jet through bottom quark fusion. By considering the small pT limit we derive expressions for the resummation coefficients governing the structure of large logarithms, and compare these expressions with those available in the literature.

  14. C AND M BOTTOM LOADING FURNACE TEST DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemonds, D

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The test was performed to determine the response of the HBL Phase III Glovebox during C&M Bottom Loading Furnace operations. In addition the data maybe used to benchmark a heat transfer model of the HBL Phase III Glovebox and Furnace.

  15. Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm 2004 Survey Report No. 1 March protection and at the wind turbine towers at six turbine sites. Video recordings were planned at different- scription. 2. Methodology Weather and wind conditions as well as hydrographical data such as current

  16. Bottom Drag, eddy diffusivity, wind work and the power integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William R.

    Bottom Drag, eddy diffusivity, wind work and the power integrals Bill Young, Andrew Thompson field i.e., the meridional heat flux is pro Moreover, the mechanical energy balance in a statistical Moreover, the mechanical energy balance in a statistically st Appendix A) is U-2 x = | - 2 |2 + hyp

  17. FRACTURE DETECTION IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK USING ULTRASONIC SHEAR WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waters, K.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the piezoelectric source plate and the rock surface. With aThe S^j sources were bonded to the rock surface with a fast-^ source plate was epoxied in position on the rock specimen.

  18. Brazilian uranium mine decommissioning-chemical and radiological study of waste rock piles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiikmann, L. O. [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil, Pocos de Caldas (Brazil)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pocos de Caldas plateau is a high-natural-radioactivity area in the state of Minas Gerais, southeast Brazil. Uranium occurrence in the plateau was first observed in 1948. Mining started in 1977 with mine scouring, and the first ore pile was constructed in 1981. Waste rocks are derived from the mine material. The analysis of core samples is discussed.

  19. altered granitic rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 Everglades National Park Groundwater wells Surface water monitoring locations Rock mining locations 12 Demers, Nora Egan 211 Nova Scotia Rock Garden Club Membership...

  20. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines...

  1. aspo hard rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  2. antarctic rocks colonized: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  3. algonquin class rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  4. acidic crystalline rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  5. aphanitic melt rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  6. aespoe hard rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  7. Stress and fault rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rock controls on fault zone hydrology, Coso geothermal field, CA Abstract In crystalline rock of the Coso Geothermal Field, CA, fractures are the primary source of permeability....

  8. EIS-0471: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID EIS-0471: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID May 20, 2011 EIS-0471: Final Environmental...

  9. Rock bed behavior and reverse thermosiphon effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, J.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two rock beds, in the Mark Jones and Doug Balcomb houses, have been instrumented, monitored, and analyzed. Observed experimental operation has been compared with, or explained by, theoretical predictions. The latter are based on one-dimensional finite-difference computer calculation of rock bed charging and discharging, with fixed or variable inputs of air flow rate and temperature. Both rock beds exhibit appreciable loss of stored heat caused by lack of backdraft dampers or incomplete closure of such dampers. These topics are discussed, and some improvements that might be made in future installations are noted.

  10. Mining earth's heat: development of hot-dry-rock geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettitt, R.A.; Becker, N.M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy-extraction concept of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Program, as initially developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is to mine this heat by creating a man-made reservoir in low-permeability, hot basement rock. This concept has been successfully proven at Fenton Hill in northern New Mexico by drilling two holes to a depth of approximately 3 km (10,000 ft) and a bottom temperature of 200/sup 0/C (392/sup 0/F), then connecting the boreholes with a large-diametervertical hydraulic fracture. Water is circulated down one borehole, heated by the hot rock, and rises up the second borehole to the surface where the heat is extracted and the cooled water is reinjected into the underground circulation loop. This system has operated for a cumulative 416 days during engineering and reservoir testing. An energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t) was produced without adverse environmental problems. During one test, a generator was installed in the circulation loop and produced 60 kW of electricity. A second-generation system, recently drilled to 4.5 km (15,000 ft) and temperatures of 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F), entails creating multiple, parallel fractures between a pair of inclined boreholes. This system should produce 5 to 10 MW(e) for 20 years. Significant contributions to underground technology have been made through the development of the program.

  11. Rock Slopes from Mechanics to Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einstein, Herbert H.

    Rock slope instabilities are discussed in the context of decision making for risk assessment and management. Hence, the state of the slope and possible failure mechanism need to be defined first. This is done with geometrical ...

  12. First Rocks from Outside the Solar System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westphal, Andrew

    2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Andrew Westphal presents his findings in examining the first rocks from outside the solar system at our '8 Big Ideas' Science at the Theater event on October 8th, 2014, in Oakland, California.

  13. Determination of mechanical properties of reservoir rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, Ashley

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus, experimental procedure, and methodology have been developed to determine the mechanical response of reservoir rock. The apparatus is capable of subjecting cylindrical core specimens to triaxial stress states and temperatures...

  14. Donor solvent coal liquefaction with bottoms recycle at elevated pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauman, Richard F. (Houston, TX); Taunton, John W. (Seabrook, TX); Anderson, George H. (Houston, TX); Trachte, Ken L. (Baytown, TX); Hsia, Steve J. (Friendswood, TX)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein increased naphtha yields are achieved by effecting the liquefaction at a pressure within the range from about 1750 to about 2800 psig in the presence of recycled bottoms and a hydrogen-donor solvent containing at least 0.8 wt % donatable hydrogen. The liquefaction is accomplished at a temperature within the range from about 700.degree. to about 950.degree. F. The coal:bottoms ratio in the feed to liquefaction will be within the range from about 1:1 to about 5:1 and the solvent or diluent to total solids ratio will be at least 1.5:1 and preferably within the range from about 1.6:1 to about 3:1. The yield of naphtha boiling range materials increases as the pressure increases but generally reaches a maximum at a pressure within the range from about 2000 to about 2500 psig.

  15. Stress-induced transverse isotropy in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, L.M.; Murphy, W.F. III [Schlumberger-Doll Research Center, Ridgefield, CT (United States); Berryman, J.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of uniaxial pressure can induce elastic anisotropy in otherwise isotropic rock. We consider models based on two very different rock classes, granites and weakly consolidated granular systems. We show that these models share common underlying assumptions, that they lead to similar qualitative behavior, and that both provide a microscopic basis for elliptical anisotropy. In the granular case, we make experimentally verifiable predictions regarding the horizontally propagating modes based on the measured behavior of the vertical modes.

  16. Search for scalar top and bottom quarks at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calfayan, Philippe; /Munich U.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reviews recent results on the search for scalar top and scalar bottom quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The analyses presented are based on data samples with integrated luminosities from 1.0 to 1.9 fb{sup -1} recorded at the Tevatron with the D0 and CDF detectors.

  17. Bonus bidding and bottom lines: Federal offshore oil and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohrenz, J.; Dougherty, E.L.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much can be observed in the statistics of bonus bids. For one thing, more information about a lease may not mean bidders agree more with their bids. However, whether any or all bidders are achieving satisfactory results at their bottom lines cannot be observed from bid statistics. Indeed, it does appear that bidders' results are not satisfactory. Furthermore, an aggressive bidder who ''wins'' at bidding time appears, in this study, less profitable than a conservative bodder.

  18. Bottom-up graphene nanoribbon field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, Patrick B. [Applied Science and Technology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Applied Science and Technology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Pedramrazi, Zahra [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Madani, Ali [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chen, Yen-Chia; Crommie, Michael F. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Oteyza, Dimas G. de [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Centro de Física de Materiales CSIC/UPV-EHU-Materials Physics Center, San Sebastián E-20018 (Spain); Chen, Chen [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Fischer, Felix R. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bokor, Jeffrey, E-mail: jbokor@eecs.berkeley.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently developed processes have enabled bottom-up chemical synthesis of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with precise atomic structure. These GNRs are ideal candidates for electronic devices because of their uniformity, extremely narrow width below 1?nm, atomically perfect edge structure, and desirable electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate nano-scale chemically synthesized GNR field-effect transistors, made possible by development of a reliable layer transfer process. We observe strong environmental sensitivity and unique transport behavior characteristic of sub-1?nm width GNRs.

  19. Theoretical predictions for charm and bottom production at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Cacciari; Stefano Frixione; Nicolas Houdeau; Michelangelo L. Mangano; Paolo Nason; Giovanni Ridolfi

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present predictions for a variety of single-inclusive observables that stem from the production of charm and bottom quark pairs at the 7 TeV LHC. They are obtained within the FONLL semi-analytical framework, and with two "Monte Carlo + NLO" approaches, MC@NLO and POWHEG. Results are given for final states and acceptance cuts that are as close as possible to those used by experimental collaborations and, where feasible, are compared to LHC data.

  20. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

  1. An integrated top-down and bottom-up proteomic approach to characteriz...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications An integrated top-down and bottom-up proteomic approach to characterize the antigen binding fragment of antibodies. An integrated top-down and bottom-up proteomic...

  2. Design of tabular excavations in foliated rock: an integrated numerical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the mineralized zone (development openings), extracting the ore from the surrounding host rock (stopes. The first stage in the design process is the characterization of the rock mass using both in situ of the mining process, requiring that the rock mass stability, both within the orebody and in the rock adjacent

  3. Bottom-up, social innovation for addressing climate change Noam Bergman, University of Oxford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Bottom-up, social innovation for addressing climate change Noam Bergman, University of Oxford and practice in the area of bottom-up, social innovation could yield benefits if integrated into wider employing new technical solutions, we identify these as warranting more research, policy and support. Bottom-up

  4. Open bottom mesons in hot asymmetric hadronic medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Divakar Pathak; Amruta Mishra

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The in-medium masses and optical potentials of $B$ and ${\\bar B}$ mesons are studied in an isospin asymmetric, strange, hot and dense hadronic environment using a chiral effective model. The chiral $SU(3)$ model originally designed for the light quark sector, is generalized to include the heavy quark sector ($c$ and $b$) to derive the interactions of the $B$ and $\\bar B$ mesons with the light hadrons. Due to large mass of bottom quark, we use only the empirical form of these interactions for the desired purpose, while treating the bottom degrees of freedom to be frozen in the medium. Hence, all medium effects are due to the in-medium interaction of the light quark content of these open-bottom mesons. Both $B$ and $\\bar B$ mesons are found to experience net attractive interactions in the medium, leading to lowering of their masses in the medium. The mass degeneracy of particles and antiparticles, ($B^+$, $B^-$) as well as ($B^0$, ${\\bar B}^0$), is observed to be broken in the medium, due to equal and opposite contributions from a vectorial Weinberg-Tomozawa interaction term. Addition of hyperons to the medium lowers further the in-medium mass for each of these four mesons, while a non-zero isospin asymmetry is observed to break the approximate mass degeneracy of each pair of isospin doublets. These medium effects are found to be strongly density dependent, and bear a considerably weaker temperature dependence. The results obtained in the present investigation are compared to predictions from the quark-meson coupling model, heavy meson effective theory, and the QCD Sum Rule approach.

  5. A Bottom-Up Approach to SUSY Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, Claus; /SLAC

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a new way to do event generation and analysis in searches for new physics at the LHC. An abstract notation is used to describe the new particles on a level which better corresponds to detector resolution of LHC experiments. In this way the SUSY discovery space can be decomposed into a small number of eigenmodes each with only a few parameters, which allows to investigate the SUSY parameter space in a model-independent way. By focusing on the experimental observables for each process investigated the Bottom-Up Approach allows to systematically study the boarders of the experimental efficiencies and thus to extend the sensitivity for new physics.

  6. A Bottom-Up Approach to SUSY Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claus Horn

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a new way to do event generation and analysis in searches for new physics at the LHC. An abstract notation is used to describe the new particles on a level which better corresponds to detector resolution of LHC experiments. In this way the SUSY discovery space can be decomposed into a small number of eigenmodes each with only a few parameters, which allows to investigate the SUSY parameter space in a model-independent way. By focusing on the experimental observables for each process investigated the Bottom-Up Approach allows to systematically study the boarders of the experimental efficiencies and thus to extend the sensitivity for new physics.

  7. Condensate polishing cost reduction at Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blomquist, R.J. [Peco Energy Company, Delta, PA (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1995, PECO Nuclear began an investment of over 3 million dollars for improvements in the condensate polishers at Peach Bottom Unit 3. Based on current performance, the investment is expected to be returned by the first quarter of 1997. The centerpiece of the improvements is the backfit of pleat filters on most of the vessels. Manual isolation valves and new precoating equipment will assure sustained performance. This report summarizes the improved performance and the new equipment and methods used to achieve it.

  8. Ship Bottom, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York: EnergySumoncleShida BatteryShip Bottom, New Jersey:

  9. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  10. Source rock maturation, San Juan sag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gries, R.R.; Clayton, J.L.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic modeling for thermal histories was simulated for seven wells in the San Juan sag honoring measured geochemical data. Wells in the area of Del Norte field (Sec. 9, T40N, R5E), where minor production has been established from an igneous sill reservoir, show that the Mancos Shale source rocks are in the mature oil generation window as a combined result of high regional heat flow and burial by approximately 2,700 m of Oligocene volcanic rocks. Maturation was relatively recent for this area and insignificant during Laramide subsidence. In the vicinity of Gramps field (Sec. 24, T33N, R2E) on the southwest flank of the San Juan sag, these same source rocks are exposed due to erosion of the volcanic cover but appear to have undergone a similar maturation history. At the north and south margins of the sag, two wells (Champlin 34A-13, Sec. 13, T35N, R4.5E; and Champlin 24A-1, Sec. 1, T44N, R5E) were analyzed and revealed that although the regional heat flow was probably similar to other wells, the depth of burial was insufficient to cause maturation (except where intruded by thick igneous sills that caused localized maturation). The Meridian Oil 23-17 South Fork well (Sec. 17, T39N, R4E) was drilled in a deeper part of the San Juan sag, and source rocks were intruded by numerous igneous sills creating a complex maturation history that includes overmature rocks in the lowermost Mancos Shale, possible CO{sub 2} generation from the calcareous Niobrara Member of the Mancos Shale, and mature source rocks in the upper Mancos Shale.

  11. Rock melting tool with annealer section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

  12. Oilfield rock bits: Are they a commodity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, R.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the quality of various types of rock drill bits and evaluates cost of these bits against service and performance to determine if bits should be viewed as a commodity when drilling a production or exploration well. Continuing advancements in materials technology, machining capabilities, hydraulics arrangements, bearing configuration, seal technology and cutter design continue to push the performance curve for oilfield rock bits. However, some very important advancements are patented, proprietary features of individual manufacturers. This paper reviews some of these design and performance features to help determine if they are worth the extra investment based on actual field drilling experience.

  13. Specific energy for laser removal of rocks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.; Kornecki, G.; Reed, C. B.; Gahan, B. C.; Parker, R. A.; Batarseh, S.; Graves, R. M.

    2001-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of advanced high power laser technology into oil and gas well drilling has been attracting significant research interests recently among research institutes, petroleum industries, and universities. Potential laser or laser-aided oil and gas well drilling has many advantages over the conventional rotary drilling, such as high penetration rate, reduction or elimination of tripping, casing, and bit costs, and enhanced well control, perforating and side-tracking capabilities. The energy required to remove a unit volume of rock, namely the specific energy (SE), is a critical rock property data that can be used to determine both the technical and economic feasibility of laser oil and gas well drilling.

  14. Metamorphic Rocks, Processes, and Resources Metamorphic rocks are rocks changed from one form to another by intense heat, intense pressure,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    important ­ Rising temperature causes water to be released from unstable minerals ­ Hot water very reactive refers to the temperature and pressure under which a rock was metamorphosed, considered low grade or high ­ If range exceeded, new mineral structures result ­ If temperature gets high enough, melting will occur

  15. Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amos Nur

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

  16. Esimation of field-scale thermal conductivities of unsaturated rocks from in-situ temperature data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vicinity of the heat source, and rock temperature exceededand the dry rock near the heat source. The other differencesources, heat transfer takes place through the wet rock (see

  17. Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Valerie Louise

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems  and  rock  fall  source  and  impact  areas,  it  meters  from  a  rock  fall  source  area.   The   success  possible  to  the  rock  fall  source  areas,   spacing  

  18. GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN CRYSTALLINE AND ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR DETERMINING ROCK PROPERTIES..Acknowledgements • ROCK PROPERTIES Participant Listing.OF MODELING IN ROCK PROPERTIES EVALUATION AND APPLICATION. •

  19. Parameter estimation from flowing fluid temperature logging data in unsaturated fractured rock using multiphase inverse modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have assumed the same rock properties for the entire packed-earlier, among the rock properties (permeability, porosity,However, these are not rock properties and are constrained

  20. Coupled thermohydromechanical analysis of a heater test in unsaturated clay and fractured rock at Kamaishi Mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kamaishi mine. Laboratory rock property tests. Power reactor5.2 Near field rock properties and fiactire geometand hydraulic rock properties, and hydraulic conditions

  1. An Integrated Modeling Analysis of Unsaturated Flow Patterns in Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    because large contrasts in rock properties exist across thetransitional changes in rock properties argues that lateralthe distribution of rock properties within different units.

  2. On the relationship between stress and elastic strain for porous and fractured rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the other associated rock properties. Important examples ofand/or hydraulic rock properties. We show that theand other rock mechanical/hydraulic properties, and these

  3. SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallenberg, H.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to complie and correlate rock properties and preliminaryProject Table 1. Rock properties and project characteristicsof Information Rock properties - Bad Creek area Exhibit 1.

  4. Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

  5. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  6. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  7. Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks: Part 2. Propagation of a hydraulic fracture Seth fracture and fault mechanics, fluid flow in fractured reservoirs, and geome- chanics in nonconventional the development of complex hydraulic fractures (HFs) that are commonly ob- served in the field and in experiments

  8. Radiocarbon dating of ancient rock paintings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilger, W.A.; Hyman, M.; Rowe, M.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Southon, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents progress made on a technique for {sup 14}C dating pictographs. A low-temperature oxygen plasma is used coupled with high-vacuum technologies to selectively remove C-containing material in the paints without contamination from inorganic carbon from rock substrates or accretions.

  9. Life cycle assessment of a rock crusher

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landfield, A.H.; Karra, V.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nordberg, Inc., a capital equipment manufacturer, performed a Life Cycle Assessment study on its rock crusher to aid in making decisions on product design and energy improvements. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a relatively new cutting edge environmental tool recently standardized by ISO that provides quantitative environmental and energy data on products or processes. This paper commences with a brief introduction to LCA and presents the system boundaries, modeling and assumptions for the rock crusher study. System boundaries include all life major cycle stages except manufacturing and assembly of the crusher. Results of the LCA show that over 99% of most of the flows into and out of the system may be attributed to the use phase of the rock crusher. Within the use phase itself, over 95% of each environmental inflow and outflow (with some exceptions) are attributed to electricity consumption, and not the replacement of spares/wears or lubricating oil over the lifetime of the crusher. Results tables and charts present selected environmental flows, including CO{sub 2} NOx, SOx, particulate matter, and energy consumption, for each of the rock crusher life cycle stages and the use phase. This paper aims to demonstrate the benefits of adopting a rigorous scientific approach to assess energy and environmental impacts over the life cycle of capital equipment. Nordberg has used these results to enhance its engineering efforts toward developing an even more energy efficient machine to further progress its vision of providing economic solutions to its customers by reducing the crusher operating (mainly electricity) costs.

  10. Purdue University Forestry and Natural Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and escape cover. Landscapes that provide a mixture of mature hardwood forests with meadows, gardens nectar feeders. Insects and other invertebrates are the primary source of protein for adult hummingbirds will forage for insects in naturalized areas, but will also search rock walls, bricks, cliffs, and other

  11. Rock Classification in Organic Shale Based on Petrophysical and Elastic Rock Properties Calculated from Well Logs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aranibar Fernandez, Alvaro A

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    classification method was then applied to the field examples from the Haynesville shale and Woodford shales for rock classification. The estimates of porosity, TOC, bulk modulus, shear modulus, and volumetric concentrations of minerals were obtained...

  12. Rock Bands/Rock Brands: Mediation and Musical Performance in Post-liberalization Bangalore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coventry, Chloe Louise

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 PolyGram advertisement Coca-cola and MTV contest PepsiNokia, Pepsi, Seagrams, and Coca Cola sponsored rock showsGroup and Brigade Group, Coca-Cola, and the biotechnology

  13. FACTORS IN THE DESIGN OF A ROCK MECHANICS CENTRIFUGE FOR STRONG ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, George B

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 . Capacit i es of known centrifuges and v proposed SoftSolla I rock mechanics centrifuge r, ---------1~ --- dxB. , (1980), Geotechnical centrifuges for model studies and

  14. Study of Acid Response of Qatar Carbonate Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhaohong

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of understanding of Qatar carbonate especially Middle East carbonates and the abundance of Middle East carbonate reservoirs is the main motivation behind this study. This work is an experimental study to understand the acid response to Qatar rocks in rocks...

  15. Inversion of seismic attributes for petrophysical parameters and rock facies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahraeeni, Mohammad Sadegh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction of rock and fluid properties such as porosity, clay content, and water saturation is essential for exploration and development of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Rock and fluid property maps obtained from such predictions ...

  16. MULTI-ATTRIBUTE SEISMIC/ROCK PHYSICS APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project consists of three key interrelated Phases, each focusing on the central issue of imaging and quantifying fractured reservoirs, through improved integration of the principles of rock physics, geology, and seismic wave propagation. This report summarizes the results of Phase I of the project. The key to successful development of low permeability reservoirs lies in reliably characterizing fractures. Fractures play a crucial role in controlling almost all of the fluid transport in tight reservoirs. Current seismic methods to characterize fractures depend on various anisotropic wave propagation signatures that can arise from aligned fractures. We are pursuing an integrated study that relates to high-resolution seismic images of natural fractures to the rock parameters that control the storage and mobility of fluids. Our goal is to go beyond the current state-of-the art to develop and demonstrate next generation methodologies for detecting and quantitatively characterizing fracture zones using seismic measurements. Our study incorporates 3 key elements: (1) Theoretical rock physics studies of the anisotropic viscoelastic signatures of fractured rocks, including up scaling analysis and rock-fluid interactions to define the factors relating fractures in the lab and in the field. (2) Modeling of optimal seismic attributes, including offset and azimuth dependence of travel time, amplitude, impedance and spectral signatures of anisotropic fractured rocks. We will quantify the information content of combinations of seismic attributes, and the impact of multi-attribute analyses in reducing uncertainty in fracture interpretations. (3) Integration and interpretation of seismic, well log, and laboratory data, incorporating field geologic fracture characterization and the theoretical results of items 1 and 2 above. The focal point for this project is the demonstration of these methodologies in the Marathon Oil Company Yates Field in West Texas.

  17. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Phillips, 2004)...

  18. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995)...

  19. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995) Exploration...

  20. Reach the Bottom Line of the Sbottom Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, Ezequiel; Bai, Yang

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new search strategy for directly-produced sbottoms at the LHC with a small mass splitting between the sbottom and its decayed stable neutralino. Our search strategy is based on boosting sbottoms through an energetic initial state radiation jet. In the final state, we require a large missing transverse energy and one or two b-jets besides the initial state radiation jet. We also define a few kinematic variables to further increase the discovery reach. For the case that the sbottom mainly decays into the bottom quark and the stable neutralino, we have found that even for a mass splitting as small as 10 GeV sbottoms with masses up to around 400 GeV can be excluded at the 95% confidence level with 20 inverse femtobarn data at the 8 TeV LHC.

  1. Efficient airflow design for cleanrooms improves business bottom lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tengfang

    2003-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a review of airflow design factors and in-situ energy measurements in ISO Cleanliness Class-5 cleanrooms, this paper addresses the importance of energy efficiency in airflow design and opportunities of cost savings in cleanroom practices. The paper discusses design factors that can long lastingly affect cleanroom system performance, and demonstrates benefits of energy efficient cleanroom design from viewpoints of environmental control and business operations. The paper suggests that a high performance cleanroom should not only be effective in contamination control, but also be efficient in energy and environmental performance. The paper also suggests that energy efficient design practice stands to bring in immediate capital cost savings and operation cost savings, and should be regarded by management as a strategy to improve business bottom lines.

  2. Variability of bottom water domes and geostrophic currents in the eastern Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottlieb, Erik S

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    entering Georges Bas- in, the slope water mixes with the endemic, less-dense bottom water (Hopkins and Gar- field, 1979). The newly formed bottom water accumulates in Georges Basin, resulting in an upward doming of the interface (found between 50 and 200...VARIABILITY OF BOTTOM WATER DOMES AND GEOSTROPHIC CURRENTS IN THE EASTERN GULF OF MAINE A Thesis by ERIK SAUL GQTTLIEB Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

  3. Comparative Studies on Deterministic and RVT-based SASSI Analyses of Nuclear Structures for Soil and Rock Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Comparative Studies on Deterministic and RVT-based SASSI Analyses of Nuclear Structures for Soil and Rock Sites Dr. Dan M. Ghiocel Ghiocel Predictive Technologies Inc. http://www.ghiocel-tech.com 2014 DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting Germantown, MD, October 21-22, 2014

  4. A CONSTITUTIVE MODEL TO PREDICT THE HYDROMECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    in the presence of water to better assess the stability of rock structures under many situations. The accurate conditions. A rock mass behaviour can also be influenced by the water flow and ensuing pore pressure. For example, a previously stable rock structure can become unstable with an increase of water pressure inside

  5. Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society Rock Varnish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society Rock Varnish Author(s): Ronald I. Dorn Source: American;Rock Varnish Over thousandsofyears,a thincoatingofclay,cementedtorocksbymanganese and iron that appeared "smooth, black, and as ifcoated with plumbago." Indian legends explained that these rocks had been

  6. Technical Note Evaluation of mechanical rock properties using a Schmidt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    Technical Note Evaluation of mechanical rock properties using a Schmidt Hammer O. Katza, b, c, *, Z, 91904, Israel b Geological Survey of Israel, 30 Malkhe Yisrael St., Jerusalem, 95501, Israel c Rock of concrete hardness [1], and was later used to estimate rock strength [2,3]. It con- sists of a spring

  7. A NEW MODEL FOR PERFORMANCE PREDICTION OF HARD ROCK TBMS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TBMs. The model uses information on the rock properties and cutting geometry to calculate TBM rate on data collected in the field and is merely a regression between machine parameters, rock properties is introduced to provide an estimate of disc cutting forces as a function of rock properties and the cutting

  8. Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core | Universe Additional Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Benjamin P.

    Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core | Universe Today Subscribe Podcast Home Additional Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core Written by Nancy Atkinson If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to my RSS feed. Thanks for visiting! Apollo Rock Reveals Moon Had Molten Core | Universe Today

  9. A new bottom-up search method for determining all maximal efficient ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ta Van Tu

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 4, 2014 ... Abstract: Bottom-up search methods for determining the efficient set of a multiple objective linear programming (MOLP) problem have a ...

  10. An integrated top-down and bottom-up proteomic approach to characteriz...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    approach to characterize the antigen binding fragment of antibodies. An integrated top-down and bottom-up proteomic approach to characterize the antigen binding fragment of...

  11. art bottom-up methods: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    liquor Moutai, or a clever counterfeit. Moutai has been dubbed the "national wine... Hacker, Randi; Boyd, David 2011-03-30 2 introduction videogame stimuli bottom-up...

  12. Mesoscale regulation comes from the bottom-up: intertidal interactions between consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Karina J.

    REPORT Mesoscale regulation comes from the bottom-up: intertidal interactions between consumers variation in nutrient supply to shift community structure over mesoscales. Keywords Macroalgae, upwelling

  13. A Statistical Analysis Of Bottom-Hole Temperature Data In The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Considerable differences in the spread of bottom-hole temperature values from petroleum exploration well logs plotted as a function of depth are observed over a region of...

  14. ROCK PROPERTIES AND THEIR EFFECT ON THERMALLY-INDUCED DISPLACEMENTS AND STRESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of laboratory rock property measurements. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT10517 u>ve-'zz&\\--lo ROCK PROPERTIES AND THEIR EFFECT OHin values i for the rock properties for an 1n-s1tu rock mass

  15. GEOL 103 Writing Assignment 2. Rock Cycle 1. How do each of the three major rock types form? Include the source of the material and the rock-forming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Carl S.

    ? Include the source of the material and the rock-forming process. · Igneous rocks form from the hiGEOL 103 Writing Assignment 2. Rock Cycle 1. How do each of the three major rock types form-temperature (650-1200 °C) melting of other rocks (ign. mmorphic, or sed), following by cooling, possibly

  16. GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN CRYSTALLINE AND ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of Rock Masses Structural GeologicalCharacterization of Rock Masses . • • • • • • • • 5.2.1 Structural Geological

  17. Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Valerie Louise

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Happy  Isles  and  the  1999  Glacier  Point  rock  falls,  there   was   an   attempt   to   monitor   rock   fall   in   Yosemite   Valley  

  18. A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

  19. Rock Chalk Report, May 7, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Trouble seeing something? view it online or To unsubscribe, click here or send an email to: unsubscribe- 87@pacmail.em.marketinghq.net. May 7, 2014 Rock Chalk Report The Official Newsletter of Kansas Athletics... an email to: unsubscribe-87@pacmail.em.marketinghq.net. © 2014, University of Kansas. The team names, logos and uniform designs are registered trademarks of the teams indicated. No logos, photographs or graphics in this email may be reproduced without...

  20. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, D.J.; McNamee, M.J.

    1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

  2. Squirt flow in fully saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvorkin, J.; Mavko, G.; Nur, A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors estimate velocity/frequency dispersion and attenuation in fully saturated rocks by employing the squirt-flow mechanism of solid-fluid interaction. In this model, pore fluid is squeezed from thin soft cracks into the surrounding large pores. Information about the compliance of these soft cracks at low confining pressures is extracted from high-pressure velocity data. The frequency dependence of squirt-induced pressure in the soft cracks is linked with the porosity and permeability of the soft pore space, and the characteristic squirt-flow length. These unknown parameters are combined into one expression that is assumed to be a fundamental rock property that does not depend on frequency. The appropriate value of this expression for a given rock can be found by matching the authors theoretical predictions with the experimental measurements of attenuation or velocity. The low-frequency velocity limits, as given by their model, are identical to those predicted by Gassmann`s formula. The high-frequency limits may significant exceed those given by the Biot theory: the high-frequency frame bulk modulus is close to that measured at high confining pressure. They have applied their model to D`Euville Limestone, Navajo Sandstone, and Westerly Granite. The model realistically predicts the observed velocity/frequency dispersion, and attenuation.

  3. Merguerian, Charles; and Ozdemir, Levent, 2003, Rock Mass Properties and Hard Rock TBM Penetration Rate Investigations, Queens Tunnel Complex, NYC Water Tunnel #3, Stage 2: p.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Merguerian, Charles; and Ozdemir, Levent, 2003, Rock Mass Properties and Hard Rock TBM Penetration Properties and Hard Rock TBM Penetration Rate Investigations, Queens Tunnel Complex, NYC Water Tunnel #3 quantification that the rock mass exhibited an unusually high degree of toughness and rock directional properties

  4. Feasibility study for mapping the polar ice bottom topography using interferometric synthetic-aperture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    interferometric synthetic-aperture radar processing for basal surface topography mapping of the thickest GreenlandFeasibility study for mapping the polar ice bottom topography using interferometric synthetic sheets. Ice bottom topography drives ice dynamics, which affects the mass balance. Accurate information

  5. Top-down and bottom-up diversity cascades in detrital vs. living food webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Lee

    REPORT Top-down and bottom-up diversity cascades in detrital vs. living food webs Lee A. Dyer1 for maintaining diversity in biotic communities, but the indirect (ÔcascadingÕ) effects of top-down and bottom in decomposer food webs. We measured effects of top predators and plant resources on the diversity of endophytic

  6. Top-down versus bottom-up learning in cognitive skill acquisition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    Top-down versus bottom-up learning in cognitive skill acquisition Action editor: Vasant Honavar Ron between implicit and explicit processes during skill learning, in terms of top-down learning (that is learning that takes into account both implicit and explicit processes and both top-down and bottom

  7. ABUNDANCE AND VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF FISHES IN A COBBLE-BOTTOM KELP FOREST OFF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABUNDANCE AND VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF FISHES IN A COBBLE-BOTTOM KELP FOREST OFF SAN ONOFRE composition,vertical distribution,and standingstockoffishes ina forest of giant kelp and a nearby kelp substrates, were rare or absent in these low-relief, cobble- bottom habitats. The species present in the kelp

  8. The effect of bottom sediment transport on wave set-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is confined to the bottom boundary layer, or is suspended throughout a larger portion of the water column the oscillatory wave field over the wave phase to obtain a set of equations describing the evolution of the mean). To remedy this, we modify the well-known wave-averaged mean field equations by a 2 #12;bottom boundary

  9. Looking for Dark Matter through the Bottom of a Wine Glass!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    Looking for Dark Matter through the Bottom of a Wine Glass! (IYA Strange Telescope Series://cfcpwork.uchicago.edu/mailman/listinfo/cafe! #12;Looking for Dark Matter through the Bottom of a Wine Glass! (IYA Strange Telescope Series and energy in the Universe. Dark Matter, an exotic new form of matter that has never been directly detected

  10. POLCA-T code validation against Peach Bottom 2 End of Cycle 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    : Three Turbine Trip transient experiments were performed prior to shutdown for refueling at the endE: 10 POLCA-T code validation against Peach Bottom 2 End of Cycle 2 Turbine Trip Test 2 by: Henric at the Department of Energy Technology Title: POLCA-T code validation against Peach Bottom 2 End of Cycle 2 Turbine

  11. OVERLAP OF PREDICTED COLD-WATER CORAL HABITAT AND BOTTOM-CONTACT FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OVERLAP OF PREDICTED COLD-WATER CORAL HABITAT AND BOTTOM-CONTACT FISHERIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA of Resource Management Title of Thesis: Overlap of predicted cold-water coral habitat and bottom- contact-contact fishing on cold-water corals (class Anthozoa) due to the role corals play in providing biogenic habitat

  12. Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Micheli, Paul L. (Morgantown, WV); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Parsons, Edward L. (Morgantown, WV)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes.

  13. Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L.

    1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes. 1 fig.

  14. Method for using fast fluidized bed dry bottom coal gasification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snell, George J. (Fords, NJ); Kydd, Paul H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonaceous solid material such as coal is gasified in a fast fluidized bed gasification system utilizing dual fluidized beds of hot char. The coal in particulate form is introduced along with oxygen-containing gas and steam into the fast fluidized bed gasification zone of a gasifier assembly wherein the upward superficial gas velocity exceeds about 5.0 ft/sec and temperature is 1500.degree.-1850.degree. F. The resulting effluent gas and substantial char are passed through a primary cyclone separator, from which char solids are returned to the fluidized bed. Gas from the primary cyclone separator is passed to a secondary cyclone separator, from which remaining fine char solids are returned through an injection nozzle together with additional steam and oxygen-containing gas to an oxidation zone located at the bottom of the gasifier, wherein the upward gas velocity ranges from about 3-15 ft/sec and is maintained at 1600.degree.-200.degree. F. temperature. This gasification arrangement provides for increased utilization of the secondary char material to produce higher overall carbon conversion and product yields in the process.

  15. Source rock evaluation, oil-source rock correlation, and kinetic modeling - San Juan Sag, CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, J.L. (Geological survey, Denver, CO (USA)); Gries, R.R.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, oil and gas shows have been reported in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks of the San Juan sag, and minor oil production was established from volcanic rocks (Kirby Petroleum 1 Jynnifer well, Sec. 9, T40N, R5E.). Potential source rocks present in the San Juan sag are the upper and lower (including the Niobrara Member) Mancos Shale (Upper Cretaceous). The combined upper and lower Mancos Shale is about 666 m thick and contains between about 0.5 and 5.5% organic carbon, although most values are between about 1.5 and 2.0%. The Niobrara Member of the lower Mancos Shale has the highest overall organic matter content in the section (organic carbon averages <2.0%). Pyrolysis and solvent extraction data (typically 2,000-6,000 and 1,000-4,000 ppm, respectively) indicate that the upper and lower Mancos Shale and the Niobrara Member are all good potential source rocks for oil and gas. Oil-source rock correlations using gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and stable carbon isotope ratios indicate that the upper Mancos Shale is the most likely source for the oil produced from the 1 Jynnifer discovery well. The source of the oil produced from the nearby Gramps field is less certain, but may be the lower Mancos Shale or Niobrara Member. The hydrocarbon generation history of the San Juan sag is complex because of highly variable heat flow in the area caused by Oligocene volcanism. Sills have caused thermal alteration of organic matter in shales on a local scale, and larger volcanic bodies may have produced proportionality larger thermal effects. More regional heating by larger volcanic bodies is an important factor in the oil generation history of the area. The authors have constructed kinetic models at several locations in the area to estimate the timing and amount of hydrocarbon products generated from the source rocks. The main phase of oil and gas generation and expulsion occurred during the Oligocene.

  16. STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS FROM STATIC AND DYNAMIC IMBIBITION EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS FROM STATIC AND DYNAMIC IMBIBITION experiments, followed by waterflooding, were performed at reservoir conditions to investigate rock wettability Berea and Spraberry cores at reservoir conditions to illustrate the actual process of waterflooding

  17. An underground characterization program for a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault in plutonic rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, P.M.; Everitt, R.A. [AECL Research, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP) is developing a concept for disposing of nuclear fuel waste that involves placing and sealing it in a disposal vault excavated 500 to 1,000 m deep in the stable plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. In this concept, engineered and natural barriers serve to isolate the waste from the biosphere. Since 1983, underground characterization and testing in support of the CNFWMP has been ongoing at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in southeastern Manitoba. This paper draws on experience gained at the URL to recommend an approach to underground characterization that would provide the necessary information to make design decisions for a disposal vault in plutonic rock.

  18. Analysis Of 2H-Evaporator Scale Pot Bottom Sample [HTF-13-11-28H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L. N.

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is planning to remove a buildup of sodium aluminosilicate scale from the 2H-evaporator pot by loading and soaking the pot with heated 1.5 M nitric acid solution. Sampling and analysis of the scale material from the 2H evaporator has been performed so that the evaporator can be chemically cleaned beginning July of 2013. Historically, since the operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), silicon in the DWPF recycle stream combines with aluminum in the typical tank farm supernate to form sodium aluminosilicate scale mineral deposits in the 2H-evaporator pot and gravity drain line. The 2H-evaporator scale samples analyzed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) came from the bottom cone sections of the 2H-evaporator pot. The sample holder from the 2H-evaporator wall was virtually empty and was not included in the analysis. It is worth noting that after the delivery of these 2H-evaporator scale samples to SRNL for the analyses, the plant customer determined that the 2H evaporator could be operated for additional period prior to requiring cleaning. Therefore, there was no need for expedited sample analysis as was presented in the Technical Task Request. However, a second set of 2H evaporator scale samples were expected in May of 2013, which would need expedited sample analysis. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) confirmed the bottom cone section sample from the 2H-evaporator pot consisted of nitrated cancrinite, (a crystalline sodium aluminosilicate solid), clarkeite and uranium oxide. There were also mercury compound XRD peaks which could not be matched and further X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of the sample confirmed the existence of elemental mercury or mercuric oxide. On ''as received'' basis, the scale contained an average of 7.09E+00 wt % total uranium (n = 3; st.dev. = 8.31E-01 wt %) with a U-235 enrichment of 5.80E-01 % (n = 3; st.dev. = 3.96E-02 %). The measured U-238 concentration was 7.05E+00 wt % (n=3, st. dev. = 8.25E-01 wt %). Analyses results for Pu-238 and Pu-239, and Pu-241 are 7.06E-05 {+-} 7.63E-06 wt %, 9.45E-04 {+-} 3.52E-05 wt %, and <2.24E-06 wt %, respectively. These results are provided so that SRR can calculate the equivalent uranium-235 concentrations for the NCSA. Because this 2H evaporator pot bottom scale sample contained a significant amount of elemental mercury (11.7 wt % average), it is recommended that analysis for mercury be included in future Technical Task Requests on 2H evaporator sample analysis at SRNL. Results confirm that the uranium contained in the scale remains depleted with respect to natural uranium. SRNL did not calculate an equivalent U-235 enrichment, which takes into account other fissionable isotopes U-233, Pu-239 and Pu-241.

  19. Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

  20. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  1. Rock Energy Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to: navigation, searchRochester Gas &JumpRock

  2. Rim Rock Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | RoadmapRenewableGeothermalsourceOhio:RigbyRim Rock Wind

  3. ArchRock Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrim County,Delhi (NCT),Arborview CapitalArchRock Corporation

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Slick Rock

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K Le BlondSantaWyomingSlick Rock Slick

  5. Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy ResourcesRock Lab Analysis Jump

  6. Rock, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy Jump to: navigation, searchRock,

  7. Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open Jump to:(RES-AEI) |Rock Geothermal Facility

  8. Evaluation of MELCOR improvements: Peach Bottom station blackout analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madni, I.K.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term station blackout analyses in Peach Bottom were first carried out using MELCOR 1.8BC, and later with 1.8DN, as part of an overall program between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), to provide independent assessment of MELCOR as a severe accident/source term analysis tool. In addition to the reference MELCOR calculation, several sensitivity calculations were also performed to explore the impact of varying user-input modeling and timestep control parameters on the accident progression and radionuclide releases to the environment calculated by MELCOR. An area of concern that emerged from these studies was the impact of the selection of maximum allowable timestep ({Delta}t{sub max}) on the calculational behavior of MELCOR, where the results showed significant differences in timing of key events, and a lack of convergence of the solution with reduction of {Delta}t{sub max}. These findings were reported to the NRC, SNL, and the MELCOR Peer Review Committee. As a consequence, a significant effort was undertaken to eliminate or mitigate these sensitivities. The latest released version of MELCOR, Version 1.8.2, released in April 1993, contains several new or improved models, and has corrections to mitigate numerical sensitivities. This paper presents the results of updating the earlier sensitivity studies on maximum timestep, to more properly represent the abilities of the improved MELCOR version 1.8.2. Results are presenter in terms of timing of key events, thermal-hydraulic response of the system, and environmental release of radionuclides. The impact of some of the newer models, such as falling debris quench model, and ORNL`s new BH model, is also evaluated.

  9. Sensitivity analysis of GSI based mechanical characterization of rock mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ván, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the rock mechanical and rock engineering designs and calculations are frequently based on Geological Strength Index (GSI) method, because it is the only system that provides a complete set of mechanical properties for design purpose. Both the failure criteria and the deformation moduli of the rock mass can be calculated with GSI based equations, which consists of the disturbance factor, as well. The aim of this paper is the sensitivity analysis of GSI and disturbance factor dependent equations that characterize the mechanical properties of rock masses. The survey of the GSI system is not our purpose. The results show that the rock mass strength calculated by the Hoek-Brown failure criteria and both the Hoek-Diederichs and modified Hoek-Diederichs deformation moduli are highly sensitive to changes of both the GSI and the D factor, hence their exact determination is important for the rock engineering design.

  10. THERMO-HYDRO-MECHANICAL MODELING OF WORKING FLUID INJECTION AND THERMAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN EGS FRACTURES AND ROCK MATRIX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Podgorney; Chuan Lu; Hai Huang

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) will require creation of a reservoir of sufficient volume to enable commercial-scale heat transfer from the reservoir rocks to the working fluid. A key assumption associated with reservoir creation/stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing), to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock-fracture-fluid-heat system and our ability to reliably predict how reservoirs behave under stimulation and production. Reliable performance predictions of EGS reservoirs require accurate and robust modeling for strongly coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes. Conventionally, these types of problems have been solved using operator-splitting methods, usually by coupling a subsurface flow and heat transport simulators with a solid mechanics simulator via input files. An alternative approach is to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations that govern multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, and rock mechanics simultaneously, using a fully coupled, fully implicit solution procedure, in which all solution variables (pressure, enthalpy, and rock displacement fields) are solved simultaneously. This paper describes numerical simulations used to investigate the poro- and thermal- elastic effects of working fluid injection and thermal energy extraction on the properties of the fractures and rock matrix of a hypothetical EGS reservoir, using a novel simulation software FALCON (Podgorney et al., 2011), a finite element based simulator solving fully coupled multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, rock deformation, and fracturing using a global implicit approach. Investigations are also conducted on how these poro- and thermal-elastic effects are related to fracture permeability evolution.

  11. United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunton, G.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock.

  12. Shallow water modeling of Antarctic Bottom Water crossing the equator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choboter, Paul

    path is consistent with existing observations [DeMadron and Weatherly, 1994; Speer and Zenk, 1993 observed [Hall et al., 1997; Mercier and Speer, 1998; Rhein et al., 1995], the source and nature-Atlantic Ridge to the northeast of the basin is 1.22 ± 0.25 Sv [Mercier and Speer, 1998]. The remaining 3.6 Sv

  13. Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system that runs a steam turbine system (bottom cycle).This report focuses on the steam turbine system since these

  14. Velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.

    1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpretation of seismic velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks has been limited, with few exceptions, to models that assume the melt to be distributed either as spheres or as thin films. However, other melt phase geometries, such as interconnected tubes along grain edges, might equally well account for seismic observations if there is a much larger fraction of melt. Seismic velocity and attenuation are estimated in rocks in which the melt phase has the tube geometry, and the results are compared with results expected for the more familiar film model under similar conditions. For a given melt fraction, tubes are found to give moduli intermediate between moduli for rigid spherical inclusions and compliant films. For example, in polycrystalline olivine at 20 kbar the model predicts a decrease in V/sub s/ of 10% and a decrease in V/sub p/ of 5% at 0.05 melt fraction, without considering inelastic relaxation. Shear attenuation appears to be dominated by viscous flow of melt between the tubes and/or films. For olivine the tube model predicts the increment of relaxation due to melt, ..delta mu../..mu.., to be 0.01 at 0.05 melt fraction. Relaxation of the bulk modulus is dominated by flow between melt pockets of different shape, heat flow, and solid-melt phase change. If melt is present, considerable bulk attenuation is expected, although the relaxation may be observable only at long periods, outside the seismic body wave band.

  15. The US Hot Dry Rock project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, R.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the precambrian basement rock outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase I, 1978-1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/sup 0/C. A second (Phase II) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/sup 0/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development.

  16. archaean sedimentary rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    situations, much more dependent on the properties of joints Aubertin, Michel 302 Rock Mining Operation Effects on Water Quality in the Everglades Biology and Medicine Websites...

  17. artificial rock fractures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    drainage. ISRM 2003Technology roadmap for rock mechanics, South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, 2 Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: subsidence...

  18. archean supracrustal rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interesting than whales's research interests include sustainable transportation, life-cycle assessment, and the national security Zhang, Junshan 164 ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF...

  19. archean metavolcanic rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interesting than whales's research interests include sustainable transportation, life-cycle assessment, and the national security Zhang, Junshan 156 ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF...

  20. acid rock discharges: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interesting than whales's research interests include sustainable transportation, life-cycle assessment, and the national security Zhang, Junshan 226 ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF...

  1. alkalic rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interesting than whales's research interests include sustainable transportation, life-cycle assessment, and the national security Zhang, Junshan 120 ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF...

  2. Elastic properties of saturated porous rocks with aligned fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This unexpected result is caused by the wave-induced flow of fluids between pores and fractures. ..... For non-fractured rock setting fracture weaknesses. DN and ...

  3. average sedimentary rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    challenge of interpreting environmental tracer concentrations in fractured rock and carbonate aquifers Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources Websites Summary: are reported to...

  4. alum rock sulfur: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -resolution carbon and sulfur isotope profiles from Early to Middle Ordovician carbonate rocks from the Argentine Investigation of isotopic compositions recorded in...

  5. altered sedimentary rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    challenge of interpreting environmental tracer concentrations in fractured rock and carbonate aquifers Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources Websites Summary: are reported to...

  6. Poroelastic damage rheology: Dilation, compaction, and failure of rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    Poroelastic damage rheology: Dilation, compaction, and failure of rocks Yariv Hamiel Institute December 2004; Published 26 January 2005. Hamiel, Y., V. Lyakhovsky, and A. Agnon (2005), Poroelastic

  7. Reservoir Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico- Tracer Test Results Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Reservoir Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System,...

  8. Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  9. AltaRock Energy Announces Successful Multiple-Zone Stimulation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Announces Successful Multiple-Zone Stimulation of Well at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal Systems Demonstration AltaRock Energy Announces Successful Multiple-Zone Stimulation...

  10. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Task 3: Mechanical behaviors of carbonated minerals. - Task 4: Modeling of CO2- reservoir rock interactions. - Task 5: Preparation of report covering the four tasks previous task,...

  11. Use of ammonia to reduce the viscosity of bottoms streams produced in hydroconversion processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaczepinski, Sioma (Houston, TX); Billimoria, Rustom M. (Houston, TX); Tao, Frank (Baytown, TX); Lington, Christopher G. (Houston, TX); Plumlee, Karl W. (Baytown, TX)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal, petroleum residuum and similar carbonaceous feed materials are subjected to hydroconversion in the presence of molecular hydrogen to produce a hydroconversion effluent which is then subjected to one or more separation steps to remove lower molecular weight liquids and produce a heavy bottoms stream containing high molecular weight liquids and unconverted carbonaceous material. The viscosity of the bottoms streams produced in the separation step or steps is prevented from increasing rapidly by treating the feed to the separation step or steps with ammonia gas prior to or during the separation step or steps. The viscosity of the heavy bottoms stream produced in the final separation step is also controlled by treating these bottoms with ammonia gas. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the effluent from the hydroconversion reactor is subjected to an atmospheric distillation followed by a vacuum distillation and the feeds to these distillations are contacted with ammonia during the distillations.

  12. Best practices for the sustainable scaleup of lighting technologies in bottom of the pyramid communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alekal, Pragnya Y. (Pragnya Yogesh), 1977-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis deduces a set of best practices for sustainably scaling up lighting technologies in developing countries with a focus on Bottom-of-the-Pyramid (BOP) communities, whose annual incomes are US $3000 or less (in ...

  13. BOTTOM TRAWLING IMPACTS ON DIVERSITY AND COMPOSITION OF HABITAT-FORMING BENTHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -forming benthic communities in Hecate Strait, British Columbia Examining Committee: Chair: Malissa Smith Master management. Currently, procedures do not exist for assessing the regional- scale impact of bottom trawling

  14. Geotechnical properties of fly and bottom ash mixtures for use in highway embankments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, B.; Prezzi, M.; Salgado, R. [Korean Institute for Water & Environment, Taejon (Republic of Korea). Dam Safety Research Center

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Class F fly ash and bottom ash are the solid residue byproducts produced by coal-burning electric utilities. They are usually disposed of together as a waste in utility disposal sites with a typical disposal rate of 80% fly ash and 20% bottom ash. Direct use of these materials in construction projects consuming large volumes of materials, such as highway embankment construction, not only provides a promising solution to the disposal problem, but also an economic alternative to the use of traditional materials. Representative samples of class F fly and bottom ash were collected from two utility power plants in Indiana and tested for their mechanical properties (compaction, permeability, strength, stiffness, and compressibility). Three mixtures of fly and bottom ash with different mixture ratios (i.e., 50, 75, and 100% fly ash content by weight) were prepared for testing. Test results indicated that ash mixtures compare favorably with conventional granular materials.

  15. Top-down modification of bottom-up processes: selective grazing reduces macroalgal nitrogen uptake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bracken, MES; Stachowicz, J J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flow and clear plastic tops to maximize light penetration.RC, Kohrs DG, Alberte RS (1996) Top-down im- pact through aSer Published January 25 Top-down modification of bottom-up

  16. When Top-Down Meets Bottom-Up: Auditory Training Enhances VerbalMemory in Schizophrenia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinogradov, Sophia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    September 10, 2009 When Top-Down Meets Bottom-Up: Auditorynot only the higher order or ‘‘top-down’’ processes of cog-representations as well as ‘‘top-down’’ attention and

  17. Bottom-Up and Top-Down Processes in Emotion Generation: Common and Distinct Neural Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ochsner, Kevin N.

    Emotions are generally thought to arise through the interaction of bottom-up and top-down processes. However, prior work has not delineated their relative contributions. In a sample of 20 females, we used functional magnetic ...

  18. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-74 OBSERVATIONS OF CURRENTS, SURFACE WINDS AND BOTTOM PRESSURE IN SHELIKOF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IN SHELIKOF STRAIT, AUTUMN 1984 A. T. Roach J. D. Schumacher P. Stabeno Pacific Marine Environmental OF CURRENTS, SURFACE WINDS AND BOTTOM PRESSURE IN SHELIKOF STRAIT, AUTUMN 1984 A.T. Roach J.D. Schumacher P

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash bottom ash Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: of bottom ash, 3 million tons of boiler slag, and 28 million tons of clean-coal ash materials) were produced... CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By...

  20. An Architecture for Ocean Bottom UnderWater Acoustic Sensor Networks (UWASN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melodia, Tommaso

    An Architecture for Ocean Bottom UnderWater Acoustic Sensor Networks (UWASN) Dario Pompili, Tommaso collection, pollution monitoring, offshore exploration, and tactical surveillance applications. To make Acoustic Networking (UWASN) is the en- abling technology for these applications [1]. Underwater Networks

  1. Representing energy technologies in top-down economic models using bottom-up information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, James R.; Reilly, John M.; Herzog, Howard J.

    This paper uses bottom-up engineering information as a basis for modeling new technologies within the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy. ...

  2. Some recent advances in the bottom-up holographic approach to QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afonin, S. S. [Saint Petersburg State University, 1 ul. Ulyanovskaya, St. Petersburg, 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a brief report on our recent results in the bottom-up holographic approach to QCD. The holographic description of the heavy vector quarkonia and generalization of the Soft Wall model are discussed.

  3. A top-injection bottom-production cyclic steam stimulation method for enhanced heavy oil recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matus, Eric Robert

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method to enhance oil production during cyclic steam injection has been developed. In the Top-Injection and Bottom-Production (TINBOP) method, the well contains two strings separated by two packers (a dual and a ...

  4. Three-dimensional acoustic propagation through shallow water internal, surface gravity and bottom sediment waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shmelev, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the physics of fully three-dimensional low frequency acoustic interaction with internal waves, bottom sediment waves and surface swell waves that are often observed in shallow waters and on continental ...

  5. More than profits : supporting small businesses in their pursuit of the triple bottom line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubuchon, Tara

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing recognition of the importance of triple bottom line (TBL) strategies that address economic, social, and environmental impacts. Cities and regions need to respond effectively to the challenges posed by ...

  6. PTYS 109 LAB EXPLORATION AND DISCOVERY IN PLANETARY SCIENCE ROCKS AND MINERALS 133

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Barbara Anne

    PTYS 109 LAB EXPLORATION AND DISCOVERY IN PLANETARY SCIENCE ROCKS AND MINERALS 133 Rocks and Minerals I. OBJECTIVES One of the many ways to study Earth is by examining the rocks that make up its types of rocks and minerals; · determine the formation and the history of each rock and mineral; · infer

  7. The use of sulfer modified bottom ash (SMBA) as an aggregate in asphaltic mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chimakurthy, Harshavardhan

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , bottom ash is lighter in weight and generally much cheaper than conventional quality aggregates such as limestone, sand and gravel. This research was designed to up-grade the load-bearing charactcnstics of bottom ash and maximize its usc m asphaltic... and gravel. According to a study done by Hafizuddin Ahmad in 1974, sulfur was used extensively in sand-asphalt sulfur to upgrade marginal aggregates for use in asphaltic mixtures, was developed at Texas Transportation Institute (TT1) (JO). TTI's work...

  8. In situ measurements of rock salt permeability changes due to nearby excavation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stormont, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Howard, C.L. (RE/SPEC, Inc., Carlsbad, NM (United States)); Daemen, J.J.K. (Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines)

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small-Scale Mine-By was an in situ experiment to measure changes in brine and gas permeability of rock salt as a result of nearby excavation. A series of small-volume pressurized brine- and gas-filled test intervals were established 8 m beneath the floor of Room L1 in the WIPP underground. The test intervals were isolated in the bottom of the 4.8-cm diameter monitoring boreholes with inflatable rubber packers, and are initially pressurized to about 2 MPa. Both brine- and gas-filled test intervals were located 1.25, 1.5, 2, 3, and 4 r from the center of a planned large-diameter hole, where r is the radius of the large-diameter hole. Prior to the drilling of the large-diameter borehole, the responses of both the brine- and gas-filled test intervals were consistent with the formation modeled as a very low permeability, low porosity porous medium with a significant pore (brine) pressure and no measurable gas permeability. The drilling of the mine-by borehole created a zone of dilated, partially saturated rock out to about 1.5 r. The formation pressure increases from near zero at 1.5 r to the pre-excavation value at 4 r. Injection tests reveal a gradient of brine permeabilities from 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} at 1.25 r to about the pre-excavation value (10{sup {minus}21} m{sup 2}) by 3 r. Gas-injection tests reveal measurable gas permeability is limited to within 1.5 r. 17 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Integrated geochemical and paleoecological approach to petroleum source rock evaluation, Cretaceous Niobrara formation, Lyons, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, L.K.; Pratt, L.M.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of the upper Turonian to upper Coniacian or lower part of Niobrara Formation (in ascending order, the Forty Hays Limestone Member and the marlstone, shale, and limestone of the lower part of the Smoky Hill Shale Member) reveal a significant relationship between petroleum source rock potential and paleoclimate. Trends in bioturbation, sigmaO/sup 18/ (oxygen isotopic ratio), and C/sub org/ (organic carbon content) during lower Niobrara deposition suggest that paleoclimatic factors limited bioturbation of the sediment, favored high C/sub org/ contents, and resulted in excellent source rock potential in the shale unit of the lower Smokey Hill Member. From the Fort Hays through the overlying malstone unit, sigmaO/sup 19/ in inoceramid shells shows a gradual shift from nearly normal marine values (-2 to -4%) to lighter values (-4 to -6%); over the same interval, C/sub org/ changes from relatively low values (0.1-1.4%) to moderate values (0.5-2.5%). Bioturbation throughout these units is high. A marked shift toward heavier sigmaO/sup 18/ (-6.0 to -9.1%) occurs upward into the shale unit and coincides with increase in C/sub org/ (2.3-4.9%) and an absence of bioturbation. In the limestone unit, sigmaO/sup 18/ shifts to less negative values (-6.2 to -6.5%), C/sub org/ decreases (average 1.5%), and bioturbation returns. The trend toward more negative sigmaO/sup 18/ and higher C/sub org/ values in the shale unit is inferred to reflect a lowering of surface-water salinity in the Western Interior seaway due to climatic warming and increased freshwater input. Resultant salinity stratification of the water column apparently inhibited vertical mixing and oxygenation of the bottom waters, resulting in limited benthic activity and enhanced preservation of organic matter.

  10. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Effects of pore texture on porosity, permeability, and sonic velocity. We show how a relation can be found between porosity, permeability, and velocity by separating the formations of rocks with similar pore textures.

  11. Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raney, Robert 1987-

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    /water reaction, which will depend on the rate at which water can be segregated from a melting ice/rock core. For the liquid water phase to migrate toward the surface, the denser rock phase must compact. The primary question that this thesis will answer is how...

  12. Geophysical detection and structural characterization of discontinuities in rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical detection and structural characterization of discontinuities in rock slopes (J. Deparis geophysical methods (seismic, electric and electromagnetic) are available to address this problem, differing and geophysical methods for characterizing the rock mass. Section 2 is dedicated to a review of the main

  13. RUPTURE BY DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN ROCKS David Amitrano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RUPTURE BY DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN ROCKS David Amitrano LIRIGM, Université J. Fourier, Grenoble of rocks is associated with microcracks nucleation and propagation, i.e. damage. The accumulation of damage as strength and modulus. The damage process can be studied both statically by direct observation of thin

  14. ROCK: A Robust Clustering Algorithm for Categorical Attributes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennsylvania, University of

    ROCK: A Robust Clustering Algorithm for Categorical Attributes Sudipto Guha Stanford University/proximity between a pair of data points. We develop a robust hierarchical clustering algorithm ROCK that employs measures that are relevant in situations where a domain expert/similarity table is the only source

  15. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project Objectives: Elucidate comprehensively the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments at temperatures of up to 250ºC, and to develop chemical modeling of CO2-reservior rock interactions.

  16. Rock to Regolith Earth's Critical Zone on Volcanic Ocean Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Dennis

    increases monotonically towards surface #12;Frost creep transport Frequency and depth of freezing event (f in a landscape? (the w question) What governs the efficiency of regolith transport? (the Q question) What lens growth #12;Ice lenses in soils Ice lenses in rock Water freezing in soil and rocks Murton et al

  17. ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to successfully produce low permeability gas reservoirs. My study links rock physics to well log and seismic data shales to reservoir sandstones. Typically, the presence of gas-saturated sandstones lowers the Vp/Vs evenELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AT RULISON FIELD

  18. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydraulic rock properties 25  a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flowmechanical and/or hydraulic rock properties. The theoretical

  19. A comparative simulation study of coupled THM processes and their effect on fractured rock permeability around nuclear waste repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    European countries. The initial rock properties for the twoinduced changes in rock properties. The purpose of the model3. Some basic THM rock properties Parameter Bulk Density, [

  20. RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE IN MINED CAVERNS IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK-RESULTS OF FIELD INVESTIGATIONS AT STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and M. Board. 1980. "Rock Properties and Their Effect onerature dependence of rock properties has been taken intomeasurements of the rock properties we need to understand

  1. Characterization of Spatial Variability of Hydrogeologic Properties for Unsaturated Flow in the Fractured Rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Liu, Hui-Hai; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    variables and prior rock properties are obtained from theircalibration of rock properties. Zhou et al, CharacterizationLateral variability of rock properties can be seen from the

  2. Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in cavern sealing and operation. The MDCF model is used in three simulations of field experiments in which indirect measures were obtained of the generation of damage. The results of the simulations help to verify the model and suggest that the model captures the correct fracture behavior of rock salt. The model is used in this work to estimate the generation and location of damage around a cylindrical storage cavern. The results are interesting because stress conditions around the cylindrical cavern do not lead to large amounts of damage. Moreover, the damage is such that general failure can not readily occur, nor does the extent of the damage suggest possible increased permeation when the surrounding salt is impermeable.

  3. 1.4 PETROPHYSICS: Combined Rock and Fluid Character Integration of geological and petrophysical data allows development of a rock-fluid model for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    data allows development of a rock-fluid model for upper Spraberry rocks. This study identifies the different rock types that comprise the subject reservoirs, marginal reservoirs and non-reservoir rocks shales, clay rich siltstones and very fine sandstones units uses gamma-ray logs (Fig.1.2-1) and is widely

  4. Estimation of hydrologic properties of an unsaturated, fractured rock mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klavetter, E.A.; Peters, R.R.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document, two distinctly different approaches are used to develop continuum models to evaluate water movement in a fractured rock mass. Both models provide methods for estimating rock-mass hydrologic properties. Comparisons made over a range of different tuff properties show good qualitative and quantitative agreement between estimates of rock-mass hydrologic properties made by the two models. This document presents a general discussion of: (1) the hydrology of Yucca Mountain, and the conceptual hydrological model currently being used for the Yucca Mountain site, (2) the development of two models that may be used to estimate the hydrologic properties of a fractured, porous rock mass, and (3) a comparison of the hydrologic properties estimated by these two models. Although the models were developed in response to hydrologic characterization requirements at Yucca Mountain, they can be applied to water movement in any fractured rock mass that satisfies the given assumptions.

  5. Evidence for the incorporation of lead into barite from waste rock pile materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COURTIN-NOMADE, ALEXANDRA

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into Barite from Waste Rock Pile Materials A L E X A N D R Awithin the waste rock pile resulting from the excavationdeveloped within waste rock pile originated from a former

  6. Full waveform inversion of a 3-D source inside an artificial rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    To, A C; Glaser, Steven D

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a 3-D Source Inside an Artificial Rock Albert C. To andof a 3-D source inside an artificial rock plate inof a 3-D source inside an artificial rock plate is

  7. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and in induratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of heterogeneity in rock property (clay content and henceNon-linear) elastic properties of the rock. Biot coefficientNon-linear) elastic properties of the rock including their

  8. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jové Colón, Carlos F.; Weck, Philippe F.; Sassani, David H.; Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Steefel, Carl I.; Kim, Kunhwi; Nakagawa, Seiji; Houseworth, James; Birkholzer, Jens; Caporuscio, Florie A.; Cheshire, Michael; Rearick, Michael S.; McCarney, Mary K.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Benedicto, Ana; Kersting, Annie B.; Sutton, Mark; Jerden, James; Frey, Kurt E.; Copple, Jacqueline M.; Ebert, William

    2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, anomalous groundwater pressures, and widespread geologic occurrence. Clay/shale rock formations are characterized by their high content of clay minerals such as smectites and illites where diffusive transport and chemisorption phenomena predominate. These, in addition to low permeability, are key attributes of shale to impede radionuclide mobility. Shale host-media has been comprehensively studied in international nuclear waste repository programs as part of underground research laboratories (URLs) programs in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. These investigations, in some cases a decade or more long, have produced a large but fundamental body of information spanning from site characterization data (geological, hydrogeological, geochemical, geomechanical) to controlled experiments on the engineered barrier system (EBS) (barrier clay and seals materials). Evaluation of nuclear waste disposal in shale formations in the USA was conducted in the late 70’s and mid 80’s. Most of these studies evaluated the potential for shale to host a nuclear waste repository but not at the programmatic level of URLs in international repository programs. This report covers various R&D work and capabilities relevant to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in shale/argillite media. Integration and cross-fertilization of these capabilities will be utilized in the development and implementation of the shale/argillite reference case planned for FY15. Disposal R&D activities under the UFDC in the past few years have produced state-of-the-art modeling capabilities for coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development to evaluate generic disposal concepts. The THMC models have been developed for shale repository leveraging in large part on the information garnered in URLs and laboratory data to test and demonstrate model prediction capability and to accurately represent behavior of the EBS and the natural (barrier) system (NS). In addition, experimental work to improve our understanding of clay barrier interactions and TM couplings at high temperatures are key to evaluate thermal effects as a result of relatively high heat loads from waste and the extent of sacrificial zones in the EBS. To assess the latter, experiments and modeling approaches have provided important information on the stability and fate of barrier materials under high heat loads. This information is central to the assessment of thermal limits and the implementation of the reference case when constraining EBS properties and the repository layout (e.g., waste package and drift spacing). This report is comprised of various parts, each one describing various R&D activities applicable to shale/argillite media. For example, progress made on modeling and experimental approaches to analyze physical and chemical interactions affecting clay in the EBS, NS, and used nuclear fuel (source term) in support of R&D objectives. It also describes the development of a reference case for shale/argillite media. The accomplishments of these activities are summarized as follows: ? Development of a reference case for shale/argillite; ? Investigation of Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in EBS: FY14; ? Update on Experimental Activities on Buffer/Backfill Interactions at elevated Pressure and Temperature; ? Thermodynamic Database Development: Evaluation Strategy, Modeling Tools, First-Principles Modeling of Clay, and Sorption Database Assessment; ? ANL Mixed Potential Model For Used Fuel Degradation: Application to Argillite and Crystalline Rock Environments.

  9. Hot dry rock geothermal energy. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This second EPRI workshop on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy, held in May 1994, focused on the status of worldwide HDR research and development and used that status review as the starting point for discussions of what could and should be done next: by U.S. federal government, by U.S. industry, by U.S. state governments, and by international organizations or through international agreements. The papers presented and the discussion that took place indicate that there is a community of researchers and industrial partners that could join forces, with government support, to begin a new effort on hot dry rock geothermal development. This new heat mining effort would start with site selection and confirmatory studies, done concurrently. The confirmatory studies would test past evaluations against the most current results (from the U.S. site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, and from the two sites in Japan, the one in Russia, and the two in western Europe) and the best models of relevant physical and economic aspects. Site selection would be done in the light of the confirmatory studies and would be influenced by the need to find a site where success is probable and which is representative enough of other sites so that its success would imply good prospects for success at numerous other sites. The test of success would be circulation between a pair of wells, or more wells, in a way that confirmed, with the help of flow modeling, that a multi-well system would yield temperatures, flows and lifetimes that support economically feasible power generation. The flow modeling would have to have previously achieved its own confirmation from relevant data taken from both heat mining and conventional hydrothermal geothermal experience. There may be very relevant experience from the enhancement of ''hot wet rock'' sites, i.e., sites where hydrothermal reservoirs lack, or have come to lack, enough natural water or steam and are helped by water injected cold and produced hot. The new site would have to be selected in parallel with the confirmatory studies because it would have to be modeled as part of the studies and because its similarity to other candidate sites must be known well enough to assure that results at the selected site are relevant to many others. Also, the industry partners in the joint effort at the new site must be part of the confirmatory studies, because they must be convinced of the economic feasibility. This meeting may have brought together the core of people who can make such a joint effort take place. EPRI sponsored the organization of this meeting in order to provide utilities with an update on the prospects for power generation via heat mining. Although the emerging rules for electric utilities competing in power generation make it very unlikely that the rate-payers of any one utility (or small group of utilities) can pay the differential to support this new heat mining research and development effort, the community represented at this meeting may be able to make the case for national or international support of a new heat mining effort, based on the potential size and economics of this resource as a benefit for the nation as a whole and as a contribution to reduced emissions of fossil CO{sub 2} worldwide.

  10. Field-Scale Effective Matrix Diffusion Coefficient for FracturedRock: Results From Literature Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui Hai; Molz, Fred J.; Zhang, Yingqi; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Matrix diffusion is an important mechanism for solutetransport in fractured rock. We recently conducted a literature survey onthe effective matrix diffusion coefficient, Dem, a key parameter fordescribing matrix diffusion processes at the field scale. Forty fieldtracer tests at 15 fractured geologic sites were surveyed and selectedfor study, based on data availability and quality. Field-scale Dem valueswere calculated, either directly using data reported in the literature orby reanalyzing the corresponding field tracer tests. Surveyed dataindicate that the effective-matrix-diffusion-coefficient factor FD(defined as the ratio of Dem to the lab-scale matrix diffusioncoefficient [Dem]of the same tracer) is generally larger than one,indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient in the fieldis comparatively larger than the matrix diffusion coefficient at therock-core scale. This larger value could be attributed to the manymass-transfer processes at different scales in naturally heterogeneous,fractured rock systems. Furthermore, we observed a moderate trend towardsystematic increase in the emDFmDDF value with observation scale,indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient is likely tobe statistically scale dependent. The FD value ranges from 1 to 10,000for observation scales from 5 to 2,000 m. At a given scale, the FD valuevaries by two orders of magnitude, reflecting the influence of differingdegrees of fractured rock heterogeneity at different sites. In addition,the surveyed data indicate that field-scale longitudinal dispersivitygenerally increases with observation scale, which is consistent withprevious studies. The scale-dependent field-scale matrix diffusioncoefficient (and dispersivity) may have significant implications forassessing long-term, large-scale radionuclide and contaminant transportevents in fractured rock, both for nuclear waste disposal and contaminantremediation.

  11. ANALYSIS OF 2H-EVAPORATOR SCALE WALL [HTF-13-82] AND POT BOTTOM [HTF-13-77] SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is planning to remove a buildup of sodium aluminosilicate scale from the 2H-evaporator pot by loading and soaking the pot with heated 1.5 M nitric acid solution. Sampling and analysis of the scale material has been performed so that uranium and plutonium isotopic analysis can be input into a Nuclear Criticality Safety Assessment (NCSA) for scale removal by chemical cleaning. Historically, since the operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), silicon in the DWPF recycle stream combines with aluminum in the typical tank farm supernate to form sodium aluminosilicate scale mineral deposits in the 2Hevaporator pot and gravity drain line. The 2H-evaporator scale samples analyzed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) came from the bottom cone sections of the 2H-evaporator pot [Sample HTF-13-77] and the wall 2H-evaporator [sample HTF-13-82]. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) confirmed that both the 2H-evaporator pot scale and the wall samples consist of nitrated cancrinite (a crystalline sodium aluminosilicate solid) and clarkeite (a uranium oxy-hydroxide mineral). On “as received” basis, the bottom pot section scale sample contained an average of 2.59E+00 ± 1.40E-01 wt % total uranium with a U-235 enrichment of 6.12E-01 ± 1.48E-02 %, while the wall sample contained an average of 4.03E+00 ± 9.79E-01 wt % total uranium with a U-235 enrichment of 6.03E-01% ± 1.66E-02 wt %. The bottom pot section scale sample analyses results for Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-241 are 3.16E- 05 ± 5.40E-06 wt %, 3.28E-04 ± 1.45E-05 wt %, and <8.80E-07 wt %, respectively. The evaporator wall scale samples analysis values for Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-241 averages 3.74E-05 ± 6.01E-06 wt %, 4.38E-04 ± 5.08E-05 wt %, and <1.38E-06 wt %, respectively. The Pu-241 analyses results, as presented, are upper limit values. These results are provided so that SRR can calculate the equivalent uranium-235 concentrations for the NCSA. Results confirm that the uranium contained in the scale remains depleted with respect to natural uranium. SRNL did not calculate an equivalent U-235 enrichment, which takes into account other fissionable isotopes U-233, Pu-239 and Pu-241. The applicable method for calculation of equivalent U-235 will be determined in the NCSA.

  12. NATURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.F. Fenster

    2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the scientific work that was performed to evaluate and assess the occurrence and economic potential of natural resources within the geologic setting of the Yucca Mountain area. The extent of the regional areas of investigation for each commodity differs and those areas are described in more detail in the major subsections of this report. Natural resource assessments have focused on an area defined as the ''conceptual controlled area'' because of the requirements contained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulation, 10 CFR Part 60, to define long-term boundaries for potential radionuclide releases. New requirements (proposed 10 CFR Part 63 [Dyer 1999]) have obviated the need for defining such an area. However, for the purposes of this report, the area being discussed, in most cases, is the previously defined ''conceptual controlled area'', now renamed the ''natural resources site study area'' for this report (shown on Figure 1). Resource potential can be difficult to assess because it is dependent upon many factors, including economics (demand, supply, cost), the potential discovery of new uses for resources, or the potential discovery of synthetics to replace natural resource use. The evaluations summarized are based on present-day use and economic potential of the resources. The objective of this report is to summarize the existing reports and information for the Yucca Mountain area on: (1) Metallic mineral and mined energy resources (such as gold, silver, etc., including uranium); (2) Industrial rocks and minerals (such as sand, gravel, building stone, etc.); (3) Hydrocarbons (including oil, natural gas, tar sands, oil shales, and coal); and (4) Geothermal resources. Groundwater is present at the Yucca Mountain site at depths ranging from 500 to 750 m (about 1,600 to 2,500 ft) below the ground surface. Groundwater resources are not discussed in this report, but are planned to be included in the hydrology section of future revisions of the ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' (CRWMS M&O 2000c).

  13. Mimicking Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into lakes and rivers, and the impact different water management decisions could have. ?We?re trying to mimic nature,? said Dr. Jeff Arnold, research leader and agricultural engineer for the Grassland Soil and Water Research Laboratory in Temple, part..., director of Texas A&M University?s Spatial Sciences Laboratory and professor in the Departments of Ecosystem Science and MIMICKING NATURE Computer model helps manage nation?s, world?s waters #2; Management, and Biological and Agricultural Engineering...

  14. Naturalness redux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Fabbrichesi; Alfredo Urbano

    2015-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea of naturalness, as originally conceived, refers only to the finite renormalization of the Higgs boson mass induced by the introduction of heavier states. In this respect, naturalness is still a powerful heuristic principle in model building beyond the standard model whenever new massive states are coupled to the Higgs field. The most compelling case is provided by the generation of neutrino masses. In this paper we confront this problem from a new perspective. The right-handed sector responsible for the seesaw mechanism---which introduces a large energy threshold above the electroweak scale---is made supersymmetric to comply with naturalness while the standard model is left unchanged and non-supersymmetric. Cancellations necessary to the naturalness requirement break down only at two loops, thus offering the possibility to increase the right-handed neutrino mass scale up to one order of magnitude above the usual values allowed by naturalness. If also the weak boson sector of the standard model is made supersymmetric, cancellations break down at three loops and the scale of new physics can be further raised. In the type-I seesaw, this implementation provides right-handed neutrino masses that are natural and at the same time large enough to give rise to baryogenesis (via leptogenesis). The model contains a dark matter candidate and distinctive new physics in the leptonic sector.

  15. Definition of heavy oil and natural bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.F.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Definition and categorization of heavy oils and natural bitumens are generally based on physical or chemical attributes or on methods of extraction. Ultimately, the hydrocarbon's chemical composition will govern both its physical state and the extraction technique applicable. These oils and bitumens closely resemble the residuum from wholecrude distillation to about 1,000/degree/F; if the residuum constitutes at least 15% of the crude, it is considered to be heavy. In this material is concentrated most of the trace elements, such as sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen, and metals, such as nickel and vanadium. A widely used definition separates heavy oil from natural bitumen by viscosity, crude oil being less, and bitumen more viscous than 10,000 cp. Heavy crude then falls in the range 10/degree/-20/degree/ API inclusive and extra-heavy oil less than 10/degree/ API. Most natural bitumen is natural asphalt (tar sands, oil sands) and has been defined as rock containing hydrocarbons more viscous than 10,000 cp or else hydrocarbons that may be extracted from mined or quarried rock. Other natural bitumens are solids, such as gilsonite, grahamite, and ozokerite, which are distinguished by streak, fusibility, and solubility. The upper limit for heavy oil may also be set at 18/degree/ API, the approximate limit for recovery by waterflood.

  16. America's Atomic Army: The Historical Archaeology of Camp Desert Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan R. Edwards

    2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Established in 1951, Camp Desert Rock served as the training ground for America's 'Atomic Army'. For the next six years, U.S. ground troops traveled to the Nevada desert to participate in military maneuvers during atmospheric atomic weapons testing. Nearly 60,000 soldiers received physical and psychological training in atomic warfare. Abandoned when atmospheric testing ended, Camp Desert Rock was dismantled and its buildings moved to other locations. Today, the camp appears as a sterile expanse of desert marked by rock-lined tent platforms, concrete foundations, and trash scatters. Although visually unimposing, the site is rich with the history of America's nuclear testing program.

  17. The $m$'bottom-up parton system with two momentum scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khachatryan, Vladimir; Hemmick, Thomas K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One possible evolutionary scenario of the dense gluon system produced in an ultrarelativistic heavy ion collision is the bottom-up thermalization scenario, which describes the dynamics of the system shortly after the collision via the decay of originally produced hard gluons to soft ones through QCD branching processes. The soft gluons form a thermal bath that subsequently reaches thermalization and/or equilibration. There is a scaling solution to the bottom-up problem that interpolates between its early stage, which has a highly anisotropic gluon distribution, and its final stage of equilibration which occurs later. Such a solution depends on a single parameter, the so called momentum asymmetry parameter $\\delta$. With this scaling solution, the bottom-up scenario gets modified and the evolving parton system, referred to as the $m$'bottom-up parton system throughout this paper, is described by this modification. The time evolution of the system in the original bottom-up ansatz is driven by the saturation sca...

  18. Measurements of bottom anti-bottom azimuthal production correlations in proton - anti-proton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.8-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amidei, D.; Anikeev, K.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Baroiant, S.; Barone, M.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /INFN,

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have measured the azimuthal angular correlation of b{bar b} production, using 86.5 pb{sup -1} of data collected by Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV during 1994-1995. In high-energy p{bar p} collisions, such as at the Tevatron, b{bar b} production can be schematically categorized into three mechanisms. The leading-order (LO) process is ''flavor creation'', where both b and {bar b} quarks substantially participate in the hard scattering and result in a distinct back-to-back signal in final state. The ''flavor excitation'' and the ''gluon splitting'' processes, which appear at next-leading-order (NLO), are known to make a comparable contribution to total b{bar b} cross section, while providing very different opening angle distributions from the LO process. An azimuthal opening angle between bottom and anti-bottom, {Delta}{phi}, has been used for the correlation measurement to probe the interaction creating b{bar b} pairs. The {Delta}{phi} distribution has been obtained from two different methods. one method measures the {Delta}{phi} between bottom hadrons using events with two reconstructed secondary vertex tags. The other method uses b{bar b} {yields} (J/{psi}X)({ell}X') events, where the charged lepton ({ell}) is an electron (e) or a muon ({mu}), to measure {Delta}{phi} between bottom quarks. The b{bar b} purity is determined as a function of {Delta}{phi} by fitting the decay length of the J/{psi} and the impact parameter of the {ell}. Both methods quantify the contribution from higher-order production mechanisms by the fraction of the b{bar b} pairs produced in the same azimuthal hemisphere, f{sub toward}. The measured f{sub toward} values are consistent with both parton shower Monte Carlo and NLO QCD predictions.

  19. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keys, Ryan S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    pressure. A hydrochloric acid solution is used in carbonate reservoirs, which actually dissolves the calcite rock matrix in the form of conductive channels called wormholes. These wormholes propagate from the wellbore out into the reservoir, bypassing...

  20. Characterizing Flow in Oil Reservoir Rock Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, David W.

    In this paper, a 3D Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulator for modeling grain scale fluid flow in porous rock is presented. The versatility of the SPH method has driven its use in increasingly complex areas of flow ...

  1. Experimental Study on Rock Deformation and Permeability Variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Jihui

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a petroleum reservoir would inevitably induce a rearrangement of the in-situ stress field. The rearrangement of the stress field would then bring about a deformation of the reservoir rock and a change of the permeability...

  2. A Study of Hydraulic Fracturing Initiation in Transversely Isotropic Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serajian, Vahid

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    fractures and also can be used to develop information about in-situ rock properties using failure pressure values observed in the field. Finally, mechanical and permeability anisotropy are measured using Pulse Permeameter and triaxial tests on Pierre shale....

  3. Modeling of Seismic Signatures of Carbonate Rock Types 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan, Badr H.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonate reservoirs of different rock types have wide ranges of porosity and permeability, creating zones with different reservoir quality and flow properties. This research addresses how seismic technology can be used ...

  4. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keys, Ryan S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore ...

  5. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Elastic properties of clay minerals using Pulse Transmission experiments. We show measurements of elastic moduli and strain in clay minerals.

  6. ROCK MASS CHARACTERIZATION FOR STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WASTE IN GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of an in-situ jointed granite. Intl. J. Rock Mech. and Min.of Groundwaters in the Stripa Granite: Results and Pre­of water through Westerly Granite at temperatures of 100 -

  7. Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999)...

  8. Drilling Complete on Australian Hot Dry Rock Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first commercial attempt to create a commercial geothermal power plant using hot dry rock technology reached a crucial milestone on January 22, when a production well successfully reached its target depth.

  9. FREE ROCKING OF PRISMATIC BLOCKS By P. R. Lipscombe1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    FREE ROCKING OF PRISMATIC BLOCKS By P. R. Lipscombe1 and S. Pellegrino2 ABSTRACT: This paper. This cycle comes to an end when the block becomes vertical and starts to rotate again about A. Because some

  10. Modeling of Seismic Signatures of Carbonate Rock Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan, Badr H.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonate reservoirs of different rock types have wide ranges of porosity and permeability, creating zones with different reservoir quality and flow properties. This research addresses how seismic technology can be used to identify different...

  11. Mimbres rock art: a graphic legacy of cultural expression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tidemann, Kathryn

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock art abounds along the Mimbres River banks and drainage tributaries reflecting the rich cultural remains of the ancient Mimbres people. The Mimbres are a well established cultural group who lived in southwest New Mexico and northern Mexico from...

  12. Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Zeolitization Of...

  13. Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Usa Abstract Quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis of about 80 rhyolite and associated...

  14. DNAPL remediation of fractured rock evaluated via numerical simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Ti Wee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractured rock formations represent a valuable source of groundwater and can be highly susceptible to contamination by dense, non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). The goal of this research is to evaluate the effectiveness ...

  15. Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in the ANWR 1002 and Coastal Plain Area of the Alaska North Slope. Potentially Productive Reservoirs and Plays Assessed by...

  16. Rock Hill Utilities- Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the SmartChoice program, Rock Hill Utilities offers rebates for water heater and heat pump replacements. Information on financing for heat pumps can also be found on the web site listed...

  17. Rock glacier monitoring with low-cost GPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    moving stations on rock glacier Low-cost L1 GPS receivers (blox) Power source: solar panels Local data Rock glacier GPS antennaGPS antenna Solar panelSolar panel Box incl.Box incl. -GPS receiverData logger Instruments Solar panelSolar panel (24W, 12V, 50x50cm)(24W, 12V, 50x50cm) Costs per station: 2

  18. Reservoir rock-property calculations from thin section measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sneed, David Richard

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESERVOIR ROCK-PROPERTY CALCULATIONS FROM THIN SECTION MEASUREMENTS A Thesis by DAVID RICHARD SNEED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Geology RESERVOIR ROCK-PROPERTY CALCULATIONS FROM THIN SECTION MEASUREMENTS A Thesis by DAVID RICHARD SNEED Approved as to style and content by: Robert R. Berg (Chair of Committee) ~ c(. Thomas T. Tieh (Member...

  19. Regional efforts through the IJC to address contaminated bottom-sediment problems in the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kizlauskas, A.G.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Joint Commission (IJC) is a binational (United States and Canada) organization that was established under the Boundary Waters Treaty of 1909. In 1978, the two countries signed a Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, pursuant to the Boundary Waters Treaty. Carrying out the provisions of this Agreement, the United States and Canada, through the IJC, are addressing the problem of contaminated bottom sediments both in the traditional context of dredging projects and in the newer context of the potentially harmful environmental impacts of contaminated bottom sediments, even in the absence of dredging activity.

  20. Differential Higgs+jet production in bottom quark annihilation and gluon fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marius Wiesemann

    2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present recent developments concerning Higgs production in bottom quark annihilation and gluon fusion. For bottom quark annihilation, we show the transverse momentum distribution of the associated jets. Furthermore, we discuss the distribution of events into n-jet bins for n=0 and n>0 at NNLO and NLO, respectively. For gluon fusion, the quality of the heavy-top limit for differential quantities at O(\\alpha_s^4) is studied by taking into account higher order terms in the 1/m_{top} expansion.

  1. Analysis Of 2H-Evaporator Scale Wall [HTF-13-82] And Pot Bottom [HTF-13-77] Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L. N.

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is planning to remove a buildup of sodium aluminosilicate scale from the 2H-evaporator pot by loading and soaking the pot with heated 1.5 M nitric acid solution. Sampling and analysis of the scale material has been performed so that uranium and plutonium isotopic analysis can be input into a Nuclear Criticality Safety Assessment (NCSA) for scale removal by chemical cleaning. Historically, since the operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), silicon in the DWPF recycle stream combines with aluminum in the typical tank farm supernate to form sodium aluminosilicate scale mineral deposits in the 2H-evaporator pot and gravity drain line. The 2H-evaporator scale samples analyzed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) came from two different locations within the evaporator pot; the bottom cone sections of the 2H-evaporator pot [Sample HTF-13-77] and the wall 2H-evaporator [sample HTF-13-82]. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) confirmed that both the 2H-evaporator pot scale and the wall samples consist of nitrated cancrinite (a crystalline sodium aluminosilicate solid) and clarkeite (a uranium oxyhydroxide mineral). On ''as received'' basis, the bottom pot section scale sample contained an average of 2.59E+00 {+-} 1.40E-01 wt % total uranium with a U-235 enrichment of 6.12E-01 {+-} 1.48E-02 %, while the wall sample contained an average of 4.03E+00 {+-} 9.79E-01 wt % total uranium with a U-235 enrichment of 6.03E-01% {+-} 1.66E-02 wt %. The bottom pot section scale sample analyses results for Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-241 are 3.16E-05 {+-} 5.40E-06 wt %, 3.28E-04 {+-} 1.45E-05 wt %, and <8.80E-07 wt %, respectively. The evaporator wall scale samples analysis values for Pu-238, Pu-239, and Pu-241 averages 3.74E-05 {+-} 6.01E-06 wt %, 4.38E-04 {+-} 5.08E-05 wt %, and <1.38E-06 wt %, respectively. The Pu-241 analyses results, as presented, are upper limit values. For these two evaporator scale samples obtained at two different locations within the evaporator pot the major radioactive components (on a mass basis) in the additional radionuclide analyses were Sr-90, Cs-137 Np-237, Pu-239/240 and Th-232. Small quantities of americium and curium were detected in the blanks used for Am/Cm method for these radionuclides. These trace radionuclide amounts are assumed to come from airborne contamination in the shielded cells drying or digestion oven, which has been replaced. Therefore, the Am/Cm results, as presented, may be higher than the true Am/Cm values for these samples. These results are provided so that SRR can calculate the equivalent uranium-235 concentrations for the NCSA. Results confirm that the uranium contained in the scale remains depleted with respect to natural uranium. SRNL did not calculate an equivalent U-235 enrichment, which takes into account other fissionable isotopes U-233, Pu-239 and Pu-241. The applicable method for calculation of equivalent U-235 will be determined in the NCSA. With a few exceptions, a comparison of select radionuclides measurements from this 2013 2H evaporator scale characterization (pot bottom and wall scale samples) with those measurements for the same radionuclides in the 2010 2H evaporator scale analysis shows that the radionuclide analysis for both years are fairly comparable; the analyses results are about the same order of magnitude.

  2. FIELD-SCALE EFFECTIVE MATRIX DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT FOR FRACTURED ROCK:RESULTS FROM LITERATURE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Q. Zhou; Hui-Hai Liu; F.J. Molz; Y. Zhang; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Matrix diffusion is an important mechanism for solute transport in fractured rock. We recently conducted a literature survey on the effective matrix diffusion coefficient, D{sub m}{sup e}, a key parameter for describing matrix diffusion processes at the field scale. Forty field tracer tests at 15 fractured geologic sites were surveyed and selected for the study, based on data availability and quality. Field-scale D{sub m}{sup e} values were calculated, either directly using data reported in the literature or by reanalyzing the corresponding field tracer tests. Surveyed data indicate that the effective-matrix-diffusion-coefficient factor F{sub D} (defined as the ratio of D{sub m}{sup e} to the lab-scale matrix diffusion coefficient [D{sub m}] of the same tracer) is generally larger than one, indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient in the field is comparatively larger than the matrix diffusion coefficient at the rock-core scale. This larger value can be attributed to the many mass-transfer processes at different scales in naturally heterogeneous, fractured rock systems. Furthermore, we observed a moderate trend toward systematic increase in the F{sub D} value with observation scale, indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient is likely to be statistically scale dependent. The F{sub D} value ranges from 1 to 10,000 for observation scales from 5 to 2,000 m. At a given scale, the F{sub D} value varies by two orders of magnitude, reflecting the influence of differing degrees of fractured rock heterogeneity at different sites. In addition, the surveyed data indicate that field-scale longitudinal dispersivity generally increases with observation scale, which is consistent with previous studies. The scale-dependent field-scale matrix diffusion coefficient (and dispersivity) may have significant implications for assessing long-term, large-scale radionuclide and contaminant transport events in fractured rock, both for nuclear waste disposal and contaminant remediation.

  3. Natural Predator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 10 Natural Predator Story by Kathy Wythe Natural Predator Foreign beetle shows promise for controlling saltcedar In the northern part of the Texas Panhandle andalong the West Texas banks of the Colorado andPecos rivers, Texas... scientists are successfully intro- ducing a foreign beetle to help control an invasive and exotic water-thirsty plant. Saltcedar, or Tamarix, was introduced to the western United States in the 1800s from central Asia as an ornamental tree and planted...

  4. Estimating seismic velocities at ultrasonic frequencies in partially saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nolen-Hoeksema, R. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic velocities in rocks at ultrasonic frequencies depend not only on the degree of saturation but also on the distribution of the fluid phase at various scales within the pore space. Two scales of saturation heterogeneity are important: (1) saturation differences between thin compliant pores and larger stiffer pores, and (2) differences between saturated patches and undersaturated patches at a scale much larger than any pore. The authors propose a formalism for predicting the range of velocities in partially saturated rocks that avoids assuming idealized pore shapes by using measured dry rock velocity versus pressure and dry rock porosity versus pressure. The pressure dependence contains all of the necessary information about the distribution of pore compliance for estimating effects of saturation at the finest scales where small amounts of fluid in the thinnest, most compliant parts of the pore space stiffen the rock in both compression and shear (increasing both P- and S-wave velocities) in approximately the same way that confining pressure stiffens the rock by closing the compliant pores. Large-scale saturation patches tend to increase only the high-frequency bulk modulus by amounts roughly proportional to the saturation. The pore-scale effects will be most important at laboratory and logging frequencies when pore-scale pore pressure gradients are unrelaxed. The patchy-saturation effects can persist even at seismic field frequencies if the patch sizes are sufficiently large and the diffusivities are sufficiently low for the larger-scale pressure gradients to be unrelaxed.

  5. International Journal of Rock Mechanics & Mining Sciences 38 (2001) 9951027 Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ernie

    of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canada. The procedure

  6. USING GEOPHYSICAL METHODS TO IMAGE THE INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF MINE WASTE ROCK PILES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    USING GEOPHYSICAL METHODS TO IMAGE THE INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF MINE WASTE ROCK PILES Campos, D.1-Noranda, Canada (bruno.bussiere@uqat.uquebec.ca) INTRODUCTION Mine waste rock piles, or rockwaste dumps rock piles. One of the most critical of these is water flow and water distribution in the waste rock

  7. SPE 159255-PP Rock Classification from Conventional Well Logs in Hydrocarbon-Bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    typing method for application in hydrocarbon-bearing shale (specifically source rock) reservoirs using conventional well logs and core data. Source rock reservoirs are known to be highly heterogeneous and often, petrophysical description of source rock reservoirs with well logs has been focused to quantifying rock

  8. 1. INTRODUCTION There are breaks or cracks in every rock mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maerz, Norbert H.

    [2]. Discontinuity influences all the engineering properties and behavior of rock [3]. When dealing with discontinuous rock masses, the properties of the discontinuities become a prime importance since that determines. The presence of discontinuities also affects rock properties such as the strength of the rock and the hydraulic

  9. Dynamic measurements of the nonlinear elastic parameter A in rock under varying conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    saturation. INDEX TERMS: 5102 Physical Properties of Rocks: Acoustic properties; 5112 Physical Properties of Rocks: Microstructure; 5199 Physical Properties of Rocks: General or miscellaneous; 9810 GeneralDynamic measurements of the nonlinear elastic parameter A in rock under varying conditions Paul A

  10. The Valles natural analogue project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stockman, H.; Krumhansl, J.; Ho, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McConnell, V. [Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The contact between an obsidian flow and a steep-walled tuff canyon was examined as an analogue for a highlevel waste repository. The analogue site is located in the Valles Caldera in New Mexico, where a massive obsidian flow filled a paleocanyon in the Battleship Rock tuff. The obsidian flow provided a heat source, analogous to waste panels or an igneous intrusion in a repository, and caused evaporation and migration of water. The tuff and obsidian samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and mineralogy by INAA, XRF, X-ray diffraction; and scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe. Samples were also analyzed for D/H and {sup 39}Ar/{sup 4O} isotopic composition. Overall,the effects of the heating event seem to have been slight and limited to the tuff nearest the contact. There is some evidence of devitrification and migration of volatiles in the tuff within 10 meters of the contact, but variations in major and trace element chemistry are small and difficult to distinguish from the natural (pre-heating) variability of the rocks.

  11. Energy Conservation and Cogeneration in Bottom-of-the-Barrel Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, J. B.; Chang, C. P.; Pierce, V. E.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the increased use of coal and the reduced demand for Bunker C and other heavy liquid fuels, more refiners are adding or increasing the capacity of their facilities for converting the bottom-of-the-barrel streams into more desirable products...

  12. An integrated top-down and bottom-up strategy for characterization protein isoforms and modifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Si; Tolic, Nikola; Tian, Zhixin; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Bottom-up and top-down strategies are two commonly used methods for mass spectrometry (MS) based protein identification; each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. In this chapter, we describe an integrated top-down and bottom-up approach facilitated by concurrent liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis and fraction collection for comprehensive high-throughput intact protein profiling. The approach employs a high resolution reversed phase (RP) LC separation coupled with LC eluent fraction collection and concurrent on-line MS with a high field (12 Tesla) Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Protein elusion profiles and tentative modified protein identification are made using detected intact protein mass in conjunction with bottom-up protein identifications from the enzymatic digestion and analysis of corresponding LC fractions. Specific proteins of biological interest are incorporated into a target ion list for subsequent off-line gas-phase fragmentation that uses an aliquot of the original collected LC fraction, an aliquot of which was also used for bottom-up analysis.

  13. The ventilation of near-bottom shelf waters in the North-Western Black Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Georgy

    The ventilation of near-bottom shelf waters in the North-Western Black Sea Georgy Shapiro, Fred of these areas to be ventilated by horizontal ex- changes during that period is assessed by a long-term time however be ventilated horizontally with deep-sea waters through isopycnal exchanges across the shelf break

  14. A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme Alice Bows-up analysis of including aviation within the EU's Emissions Trading Scheme Alice Bows & Kevin Anderson Tyndall's emissions trading scheme. Results indicate that unless the scheme adopts both an early baseline year

  15. TOP-DOWN/BOTTOM-UP APPROACH FOR DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT INDICATORS FOR MINING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 TOP-DOWN/BOTTOM-UP APPROACH FOR DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT INDICATORS FOR MINING: APPLICATION TO THE ARLIT URANIUM MINES (NIGER) A. Chamareta)b) , M. O'Connor a) and G. Récoché b) a indicators for assessing impacts and performances of mining sites thus appears necessary to inform

  16. Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events: Peach Bottom, Unit 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Lambright, J.A.; Ferrell, W.L.; Cathey, N.G.; Najafi, B.; Harper, F.T.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the internal event initiated accident sequence analyses for Peach Bottom, Unit 2; one of the reference plants being examined as part of the NUREG-1150 effort by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-1150 will document the risk of a selected group of nuclear power plants. As part of that work, this report contains the overall core damage frequency estimate for Peach Bottom, Unit 2, and the accompanying plant damage state frequencies. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses provided additional insights regarding the dominant contributors to the Peach Bottom core damage frequency estimate. The mean core damage frequency at Peach Bottom was calculated to be 8.2E-6. Station blackout type accidents (loss of all ac power) were found to dominate the overall results. Anticipated Transient Without Scram accidents were also found to be non-negligible contributors. The numerical results are largely driven by common mode failure probability estimates and to some extent, human error. Because of significant data and analysis uncertainties in these two areas (important, for instance, to the most dominant scenario in this study), it is recommended that the results of the uncertainty and sensitivity analyses be considered before any actions are taken based on this analysis.

  17. RC-1 organic Rankine bottoming cycle for an adiabatic diesel engine. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiNanno, L.R.; DiBella, F.A.; Koplow, M.D.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system analysis and preliminary design were conducted for an organic Rankine-cycle system to bottom the high-temperature waste heat of an adiabatic diesel engine. The bottoming cycle is a compact package that includes a cylindrical air-cooled condenser-regenerator module and other unique features. The bottoming cycle output is 56 horsepower at design point conditions when compounding the reference 317 horsepower turbocharged (TC) diesel engine with a resulting brake specific fuel consumption of 0.268 lb/hp-hr for the compound engine. The bottoming cycle when applied to a turbocompound (TCPD) diesel delivers a compound engine brake specific fuel consumption of 0.258 lb/hp-hr. This system for heavy-duty trnsport applications uses the organic working fluid RC-1, which is a mixture of 60 mole percent pentafluorobenzene (PFB) and 40 mole percent hexafluorobenzene (HFB). Included in these 1983 work efforts was the thermal stability testing of the RC-1 organic fluid in a dynamic fluid test loop that simulates the operation of Rankine-cycle. More than 1600 hours of operation were completed with results showing that the RC-1 is thermally stable up to 900/sup 0/F. This report describes the work performed for one of the multiple contracts awarded under the Department of Energy's Heavy-Duty Transport Technology Program.

  18. Bottom-up and top-down emotion generation: implications for emotion regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    Bottom-up and top-down emotion generation: implications for emotion regulation Kateri McRae,1, The University of Denver, Denver, CO 80209 and 2 Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA Emotion regulation plays a crucial role in adaptive functioning and mounting evidence suggests that some emotion regulation

  19. Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill By Ed Killer Saturday, June 12 like if touched by an underwater plume of oil. No doubt, much of it would be gone forever. Reed inhabiting the reefs, Reed hoped the oil would not be swept around the tip of Florida and onto the fragile

  20. Abstract--Three aspects of a survey bottom trawl performance--1) trawl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - ronmental conditions. Variables such as surface and bottom currents, sea state, wind direction, varying sub- strate types and inclinations, and depth of tow may all contribute to dif- ferences in gear efficiency. Other than by controlling towing speed and direction, these surveys are unable to compensate

  1. Solution of 2D Boussinesq systems with FreeFem++: the flat bottom case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the wave energy, in contrast, in other situations we seek to harness this energy: some companies even offer projects underwater reefs for erectile produce energy from waves (see http: //www Introduction It has often been observed that variations of the bottom could influence the damping of the waves

  2. Combined-cycle solarised gas turbine with steam, organic and CO2 bottoming cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combined-cycle solarised gas turbine with steam, organic and CO2 bottoming cycles John Pye, Keith of the technical feasibility a solarised combined-cycle gas turbines with a dish concentrator, with several, optimised for the new SG4 collector. This study aims to determine whether a combined-cycle gas turbine (CCGT

  3. Hydrodynamics of high speed planing hulls with partially ventilated bottom and hydrofoils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheingart, Zvi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of a cambered shaped bottom step on the performance of sea going V-stepped planing hulls is investigated using numerical methods. The shape of the step was designed to decrease the Drag/Lift ratio of the hull ...

  4. Effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the Chemistry of Bottom Sediments in Lake Pontchartrain, La.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the Chemistry of Bottom Sediments in Lake Pontchartrain, gasoline stations, automobiles, industrial facilities, commercial buildings and houses, and historically was to characterize the effect of the discharge of flood waters from New Orleans on the sediment chemistry of Lake

  5. A top-injection bottom-production cyclic steam stimulation method for enhanced heavy oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matus, Eric Robert

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method to enhance oil production during cyclic steam injection has been developed. In the Top-Injection and Bottom-Production (TINBOP) method, the well contains two strings separated by two packers (a dual and a single packer): the short...

  6. Numerical Simulations of the Wave Bottom Boundary Layer over Sand Ripples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slinn, Donald

    locations. Under conditions of oscillatory potential flow external to the boundary layer causedNumerical Simulations of the Wave Bottom Boundary Layer over Sand Ripples by Thomas Pierro A Thesis boundary layer are believed to play a major role in the re-suspension and transport of sediment, as well

  7. Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three Major Floods, Gila RiverKelvey, Director Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Burkham, D. E. 1927 Hydraulic effects 19.16:655-J 1. Gila River-Floods. 2. Hydraulics. 3. Botany-Ecology-Gila River. 1. Title: Hydraulic

  8. Direct fired reciprocating engine and bottoming high temperature fuel cell hybrid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A. (New Alexandria, PA); Holcombe, Norman T. (McMurray, PA)

    2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of a fuel cell bottoming an internal combustion engine. The engine exhaust gas may be combined in varying degrees with air and fed as input to a fuel cell. Reformer and oxidizers may be combined with heat exchangers to accommodate rich and lean burn conditions in the engine in peaking and base load conditions without producing high concentrations of harmful emissions.

  9. Optimal Design of a Special Class of Curvilinear Bottomed Channel Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chahar, B. R.

    Optimal Design of a Special Class of Curvilinear Bottomed Channel Section Bhagu R. Chahar1 Abstract- sidering seepage and presented results in tabular and graphical form. Chahar 2005b and Swamee et al. 2000a-Koopaei et al. 2000 , and Chahar 2005a . Exact analytical solutions for seepage from curved channels like

  10. Chemical and petrological characteristics of the intrusive rocks of the Quitman Mountains, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seay, Christopher Sidney

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    differentiated rock types from the diorite (1) to the last emplaced granite (9). 42 7. Calcium concentration and fluorine concentration vs. the various differentiated rock types from the diorite (1) to the last emplaced granite (9) 8. Ca percentage plotted... concentration for the various rock types from the diorite (1) to the final granite (9). . . . . . . ~ 53 13. Rb/Sr ratios for the intrusive rock types 56 14. Uranium concentrations for the intrusive rock types for the initially emplaced diorite (1...

  11. MECHANICAL DEGRADATION OF EMPLACEMENT DRIFTS AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN - A CASE STUDY IN ROCK MECHANICS, PART 1: NONLITHOPHYSAL ROCK, PART 2: LITHOPHYSAL ROCK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Lin, D. Kicker, B. Damjanac, M. Board, and M. Karakouzian

    2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for a US high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation throughout the regulatory period for repository performance.

  12. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the slick rock Uranium Mill Tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 12 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 61 8,300 cubic yards. In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. All solid contaminated materials would be buried under 5 feet (ft) of rock and soil materials. The proposed disposal site area is currently used by ranchers for cattle grazing over a 7-month period. The closest residence to the proposed disposal site is 2 air mi. An estimated 44 ac of land would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future use.

  13. Teaching application-orientated mathematics and developing didactic from the bottom up Regina Puscher and Rdiger Vernay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    261 Teaching application-orientated mathematics and developing didactic from the bottom up Regina the possibilities of didactic development from the bottom, from the work of practising teachers, and illustrate of the MUED the latest developements in math-didactics can be discussed from the view of schoolteachers

  14. Search for bottom squarks in pp-bar collisions at s?=1.8?TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a search for bottom squarks (b?) produced in pp-bar collisions at s?=1.8?TeV using the DØ detector at Fermilab. Bottom squarks are assumed to be produced in pairs and to decay to the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) and a b quark...

  15. 94 IAEI NEWS November.December 2008 www.iaei.org a top to bottom perspective on a pv system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    94 IAEI NEWS November.December 2008 www.iaei.org a top to bottom perspective on a pv system P in the "Perspectives on PV" series of articles. In this article and the next few articles in the series, let's start at the "bottom." A utility-interactive PV system is a series-connected system, so where we start is not important

  16. Near-bottom circulation and dispersion of sediment containing Alexandrium fundyense cysts in the Gulf of Maine during 20102011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGillicuddy Jr., Dennis J.

    Near-bottom circulation and dispersion of sediment containing Alexandrium fundyense cysts evaluates model near-bottom flow during storms, when sediment resuspension and redistribution are most a r t i c l e i n f o Available online 16 December 2013 Keywords: Sediment connectivity Near

  17. Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka [RAWRA, Czech Republic

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

  18. Potential for tunneling based on rock and soil melting. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, J.C.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rock-melting drill was invented at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1960. Electrically heated, laboratory-scale drills were subsequently shown to penetrate igneous rocks at usefully high rates, with moderate power consumptions. The development of compact nuclear reactors and of heat pipes now makes possible the extension of this technology to much larger melting penetrators, potentially capable of producing holes up to several meters in diameter and several tens of kilometers long or deep. Development of a rapid, versatile, economical method of boring large, long shafts and tunnels offers solutions to many of man's most urgent ecological, scientific, raw-materials, and energy-supply problems. A melting method appears to be the most promising and flexible means of producing such holes. It is relatively insensitive to the composition, hardness, structure, and temperature of the rock, and offers the possibilities of producing self-supporting, glass-lined holes in almost any formation and (using a technique called lithofracturing) of eliminating the debris-removal problem by forcing molten rock into cracks created in the bore wall. Large rock-melting penetrators, called Electric Subterrenes or Nuclear Subterrenes according to the energy source used, are discussed in this report, together with problems anticipated in their development. It is concluded that this development is within the grasp of present technology.

  19. Mechanical interaction between rock, buffer and canister in repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borgesson, L. [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The bentonite clay buffer, which is used in the repository concept of Sweden as well as many other countries, has an important role for mechanical protection of the canister. Of special interest is the effect of a rock shear, i.e. displacement of the rock along a fracture intersecting the deposition hole, on the canister. The article shows the results of some FEM calculations of a rock shear when the new composite copper/steel canister, is used. The effect of the swelling pressure from the bentonite before shear and the effect of a symmetric as well as an asymmetric rock shear will be shown. The calculations have been preceded by extensive laboratory tests and verification calculations by which material models for the buffer and proper calculation techniques have been developed. The material model for the clay is an elastic plastic model in which porous elasticity, based on the effective stress theory, is combined with Drucker-Prager plasticity. The results indicate that the bentonite clay acts as a very good mechanical buffer against such rock displacements. Although plastic yielding may occur, mainly in the copper, the plastic strain is not more than a few percent just after the shear.

  20. Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks from Malta Escarpment (central Mediterranean)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scandone, P. (Istituto di Geologia e Paleontologia, Pisa, Italy); Patacca, E.; Radoicic, R.; Ryan, W.B.F.; Cita, M.B.; Rawson, M.; Chezar, H.; Miller, E.; McKenzie, J.; Rossi, S.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sedimentary rocks of Triassic-Neogene age are present on the Malta Escarpment of the eastern Mediterranean. Upper Triassic dolomitic limestones of shallow-water origin, at depths between 2.5 and 3.5 km, are similar in lithofacies to coeval platform carbonates of the Siracusa (Syracuse) belt of southern Sicily. Jurassic rocks include lower-middle Liassic shallow-water limestones followed by condensed hemipelagic lime deposits indicative of sinking and starving of the former platform. Cretaceous materials are represented by both red marls rich in planktonic faunas and reworkd volcaniclastic breccias including shallow-water skeletal material. Paleogene rocks are both shallow-water limestones with corals, algae, and bivalves, and redeposited calcarenites of lithofacies similar to those from surface and subsurface of the Ragusa zone. Oligocene-lower Miocene rocks from the escarpment are also similar in lithology to the coeval Ragusa deposits. Tortonian is represented by hemipelagic marls indicating open-marine environment. Pervasive dolomitization on lime crusts and on initial-stage fissure fillings with strongly positive isotopic oxygen ratio is thought to be a product of Messinian evaporitic drawdown. Pliocene sediments belong to the Trubi facies and consist of pelagic foraminiferal chalk. An impressive vertical relief existed by Miocene times, as attested by Messinian crusts and veins on or in rocks as old as Late Triassic. Our data do not provide evidence that this morphologic feature necessarily coincides with a continent-ocean transition. The present escarpment was produced by faulting, erosion, and defacement. 14 figures, 1 table.

  1. Use of stratigraphic models as soft information to constrain stochastic modeling of rock properties: Development of the GSLIB-Lynx integration module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cromer, M.V. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rautman, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geohydrology Dept.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock properties in volcanic units at Yucca Mountain are controlled largely by relatively deterministic geologic processes related to the emplacement, cooling, and alteration history of the tuffaceous lithologic sequence. Differences in the lithologic character of the rocks have been used to subdivide the rock sequence into stratigraphic units, and the deterministic nature of the processes responsible for the character of the different units can be used to infer the rock material properties likely to exist in unsampled regions. This report proposes a quantitative, theoretically justified method of integrating interpretive geometric models, showing the three-dimensional distribution of different stratigraphic units, with numerical stochastic simulation techniques drawn from geostatistics. This integration of soft, constraining geologic information with hard, quantitative measurements of various material properties can produce geologically reasonable, spatially correlated models of rock properties that are free from stochastic artifacts for use in subsequent physical-process modeling, such as the numerical representation of ground-water flow and radionuclide transport. Prototype modeling conducted using the GSLIB-Lynx Integration Module computer program, known as GLINTMOD, has successfully demonstrated the proposed integration technique. The method involves the selection of stratigraphic-unit-specific material-property expected values that are then used to constrain the probability function from which a material property of interest at an unsampled location is simulated.

  2. A Coupled Model for Natural Convection and Condensation in Heated Subsurface Enclosures Embedded in Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    packages such as the “21 PWR” or the “44 BWR” (Figure 3).drift length (for the “21 PWR”). For comparison: the initialdrift) "5 HLW Long" "21 PWR AP" "44 BWR AP" "5 HLW SHORT"

  3. Two-Phase Flow Simulations In a Natural Rock Fracture using the VOF Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H., Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to exhibit several shortcomings that might be partially overcome with a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles (Hassanizadeh and Gray, 1990). This alternative two-phase flow model contains a set of new and non-standard parameters, including specific interfacial area. By incorporating interfacial area production, destruction, and propagation into functional relationships that describe the capillary pressure and saturation, a more physical model has been developed. Niessner and Hassanizadeh (2008) have examined this model numerically and have shown that the model captures saturation hysteresis with drainage/imbibition cycles. Several static experimental studies have been performed to examine the validity of this new thermodynamically based approach; these allow the determination of static parameters of the model. To date, no experimental studies have obtained information about the dynamic parameters required for the model. A new experimental porous flow cell has been constructed using stereolithography to study two-phase flow phenomena (Crandall et al. 2008). A novel image analysis tool was developed for an examination of the evolution of flow patterns during displacement experiments (Crandall et al. 2009). This analysis tool enables the direct quantification of interfacial area between fluids by matching known geometrical properties of the constructed flow cell with locations identified as interfaces from images of flowing fluids. Numerous images were obtained from two-phase experiments within the flow cell. The dynamic evolution of the fluid distribution and the fluid-fluid interface locations were determined by analyzing these images. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the thermodynamically based two-phase flow model, review the properties of the stereolithography flow cell, and show how the image analysis procedure has been used to obtain dynamic parameters for the numerical model. These parameters include production/destruction of interfacial area as a function of saturation and capillary pressure. Our preliminary results for primary drainage in porous media show that the specific interfacial area increased linearly with increasing gas saturation until breakthrough of the displacing gas into the exit manifold occurred.

  4. Multiporosity Flow in Fractured Low-Permeability Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L; Heath, Jason E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiporosity extension of classical double and triple porosity fractured rock flow models for slightly compressible fluids is presented. The multiporosity model is an adaptation of the multirate solute transport model of Haggerty and Gorelick (1995) to viscous flow in fractured rock reservoirs. It is a generalization of both pseudo-steady-state and transient interporosity flow double porosity models. The model includes a fracture continuum and an overlapping distribution of multiple rock matrix continua, whose fracture-matrix exchange coefficients are specified through a discrete probability mass function. Semi-analytical cylindrically symmetric solutions to the multiporosity mathematical model are developed using the Laplace transform to illustrate its behavior. The multiporosity model presented here is conceptually simple, yet flexible enough to simulate common conceptualizations of double and triple porosity flow. This combination of generality and simplicity makes the multiporosity model a good choice ...

  5. Superhard nanophase cutter materials for rock drilling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voronov, O.; Tompa, G.; Sadangi, R.; Kear, B.; Wilson, C.; Yan, P.

    2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low Pressure-High Temperature (LPHT) System has been developed for sintering of nanophase cutter and anvil materials. Microstructured and nanostructured cutters were sintered and studied for rock drilling applications. The WC/Co anvils were sintered and used for development of High Pressure-High Temperature (HPHT) Systems. Binderless diamond and superhard nanophase cutter materials were manufactured with help of HPHT Systems. The diamond materials were studied for rock machining and drilling applications. Binderless Polycrystalline Diamonds (BPCD) have high thermal stability and can be used in geothermal drilling of hard rock formations. Nanophase Polycrystalline Diamonds (NPCD) are under study in precision machining of optical lenses. Triphasic Diamond/Carbide/Metal Composites (TDCC) will be commercialized in drilling and machining applications.

  6. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have (1) Studied relationships between velocity and permeability. (2) Used independent experimental methods to measure the elastic moduli of clay minerals as functions of pressure and saturation. (3) Applied different statistical methods for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. (4) Analyzed the directional dependence of velocity and attenuation in different reservoir rocks (5) Compared Vp measured under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic stress conditions in sands. (6) Studied stratification as a source of intrinsic anisotropy in sediments using Vp and statistical methods for characterizing textures in sands.

  7. Planning and drilling geothermal energy extraction hole EE-2: a precisely oriented and deviated hole in hot granitic rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helmick, C.; Koczan, S.; Pettitt, R.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the preceding work (Phase I) of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Project at Fenton Hill, two holes were drilled to a depth of nearly 3048 m (10,000 ft) and connected by a vertical hydraulic fracture. In this phase, water was pumped through the underground reservoir for approximately 417 days, producing an energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t). Energy Extraction Hole No. 2 (EE-2) is the first of two deep holes that will be used in the Engineering-Resource Development System (Phase II) of the ongoing HDR Project of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This phase of the work consists of drilling two parallel boreholes, inclined in their lower, open-hole sections at 35/sup 0/ to the vertical and separated by a vertical distance of 366 m (1200 ft) between the inclined parts of the drill holes. The holes will be connected by a series of vertical, hydraulically produced fractures in the Precambrian granitic rock complex. EE-2 was drilled to a depth of 4660 m (15,289 ft), where the bottom-hole temperature is approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F). Directional drilling techniques were used to control the azimuth and deviation of the hole. Upgrading of the temperature capability of existing hardware, and development of new equipment was necessary to complete the drilling of the hole in the extremely hot, hard, and abrasive granitic formation. The drilling history and the problems with bits, directional tools, tubular goods, cementing, and logging are described. A discussion of the problems and recommendations for overcoming them are also presented.

  8. Radar cross section of triangular trihedral reflector with extended bottom plate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brock, Billy C.; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trihedral corner reflectors are the preferred canonical target for SAR performance evaluation for many radar development programs. The conventional trihedrals have problems with substantially reduced Radar Cross Section (RCS) at low grazing angles, unless they are tilted forward, but in which case other problems arise. Consequently there is a need for better low grazing angle performance for trihedrals. This is facilitated by extending the bottom plate. A relevant analysis of RCS for an infinite ground plate is presented. Practical aspects are also discussed.

  9. Hot dry rock energy: Hot dry rock geothermal development program. Progress report. Fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, J.; Brown, M. [eds.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extended flow testing at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test facility concluded in Fiscal Year 1993 with the completion of Phase 2 of the long-term flow test (LTFT) program. As is reported in detail in this report, the second phase of the LTFT, although only 55 days in duration, confirmed in every way the encouraging test results of the 112-day Phase I LTFT carried out in Fiscal Year 1992. Interim flow testing was conducted early in FY 1993 during the period between the two LTFT segments. In addition, two brief tests involving operation of the reservoir on a cyclic schedule were run at the end of the Phase 2 LTFT. These interim and cyclic tests provided an opportunity to conduct evaluations and field demonstrations of several reservoir engineering concepts that can now be applied to significantly increase the productivity of HDR systems. The Fenton Hill HDR test facility was shut down and brought into standby status during the last part of FY 1993. Unfortunately, the world`s largest, deepest, and most productive HDR reservoir has gone essentially unused since that time.

  10. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the processing sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the ground water from further degradation. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the processing sites on land administered by the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project.

  11. Thermally stable perpendicular magnetic anisotropy features of [Co/Pd]{sub m} multilayer matrix integrated with [CoO/Pd]{sub n} bottom layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, JaBin; An, GwangGuk; Yang, SeungMo; Hong, JinPyo, E-mail: jphong@hanyang.ac.kr [Novel Functional Materials and Device Laboratory, Department of Physics, The Research Institute for Natural Science, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, WooSeong [Nano Quantum Electronics Laboratory, Department of Electronics and Computer Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluated the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) features of a hybrid [CoO/Pd]{sub 2}/[Co/Pd]{sub 7} multilayer (ML) matrix under annealing in which the [CoO/Pd]{sub 2} bottom layer was inserted. Annealing allowed for the diffusion of oxygen atoms existing in the inserted [CoO/Pd]{sub 2} layer, leading to an atomic structural reconfiguration event. The hybrid matrix was crucial to result in a higher effective anisotropy energy (3.40 Merg/cc) than an ordinary [Co/Pd]{sub 7} ML matrix (1.25 Merg/cc) under annealing at 450?°C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of Co-O bonding states and annealing dependent oxygen atom diffusion. The possible nature of the enhanced PMA features is discussed.

  12. Can the third dredge-up extinguish hot-bottom burning in massive AGB stars?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paola Marigo

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Marigo (2002) has highlighted the crucial importance of molecular opacities in modelling the evolution of AGB stars at varying surface C/O ratio. In particular, it has been shown the large inadequacy of solar-scaled opacities when applied to models of carbon stars, and hence the need for correctly coupling the molecular opacities to the current surface chemical composition of AGB stars. The aim of the present follow-up study is to investigate the effects of variable molecular opacities on the evolutionary properties of luminous AGB stars with massive envelopes, i.e. with initial masses from ~3.5 Msun up to 5-8 Msun, which are predicted to experience both the third dredge-up and hot-bottom burning. It is found that if the dredge-up of carbon is efficient enough to lead to an early transition from C/O1, then hot-bottom burning may be weakened, extinguished, or even prevented. The physical conditions for this occurrence are analysed and a few theoretical and observational implications are discussed. Importantly, it is found that the inclusion of variable molecular opacities could significantly change the current predictions for the chemical yields contributed by intermediate-mass AGB stars, with M~3.5 - 4.0 Msun that make as much as ~ 30-50 % of all stars expected to undergo hot-bottom burning.

  13. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fife, Alex Blair (San Jose, CA); Ballas, Gary J. (San Jose, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening.

  14. Construction of an embankment with a fly and bottom ash mixture: field performance study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, S.; Balunaini, U.; Yildirim, I.Z.; Prezzi, M.; Siddiki, N.Z. [Louisiana Transportation Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash and bottom ash are coal combustion by-products (CCBPs) that are generated in large quantities throughout the world. It is often economical to dispose ash as mixtures rather than separately; that notwithstanding, only a few studies have been performed to investigate the behavior of fly and bottom ash mixtures, particularly those with high contents of fly ash. Also, there is very limited data available in the literature on the field performance of structures constructed using ash mixtures. This paper describes the construction and the instrumentation of a demonstration embankment built with an ash mixture (60:40 by weight of fly ash:bottom ash) on State Road 641, Terre Haute, Ind. Monitoring of the demonstration embankment was conducted for a period of 1 year from the start of construction of the embankment. The settlement of the embankment stabilized approximately 5 months after the end of its construction. According to horizontal inclinometer readings, the differential settlement at the top of the embankment is about 5 mm. Results from field quality control tests performed during construction of the demonstration embankment and monitoring data from vertical and horizontal inclinometers and settlement plates indicate that the ash mixture investigated can be considered an acceptable embankment construction material.

  15. Detecting a Higgs Pseudoscalar with a Z Boson Produced in Bottom Quark Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung Kao; Shankar Sachithanandam

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the prospects of detecting a Higgs pseudoscalar ($A^0$) in association with a $Z$ gauge boson produced from bottom quark fusion ($b\\bar{b} \\to ZA^0$) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A general two Higgs doublet model and the minimal supersymmetric standard model are adopted to study the discovery potential of $pp \\to ZA^0 \\to \\ell \\bar{\\ell} b\\bar{b} +X (\\ell = e, \\mu)$, via $b\\bar{b} \\to ZA^0$ with physics backgrounds and realistic cuts. Promising results are found for $m_A \\alt 400$ GeV in a general two Higgs doublet model when the heavier Higgs scalar ($H^0$) can decay into a $Z$ boson and a Higgs pseudoscalar ($H^0 \\to ZA^0$). We compare the production rates from bottom quark fusion ($b\\bar{b} \\to ZA^0$) and gluon fusion ($gg \\to ZA^0$) and find that they are complementary processes to produce $ZA^0$ in hadron collisions. While gluon fusion is the major source for producing a Higgs pseudoscalar associated with a $Z$ boson at the LHC for $\\tan\\beta \\alt 10$, bottom quark fusion can make dominant contributions for $\\tan\\beta \\agt 10$.

  16. The Laconia, New Hampshire bottom ash paving project: Volume 3, Physical Performance Testing Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bottom ash is the principal waste stream from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW). It is comprised of grate ash (97%), the slag material discharged at the end of the grate system, and grate sifting (3%), the material that melts or falls through the grate structure. This project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using municipal solid waste grate ash as an aggregate substitute in the construction of a pavement binder course for a portion of Rt. 3 in Laconia, New Hampshire. The research was conducted over a two year period during 1993 and 1994. This study is the culmination of an earlier two year characterization study between 1990 and 1992 that documented the physical and environmental characteristics of the bottom ash as it was produced at the Concord, N.H. waste-to-energy (@) facility and used in an asphaltic binder course. Together, these two studies provide a complete evaluation of the potential for using grate ash or bottom ash in asphalt binder course or as recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) in base courses in pavements.

  17. Multi-Attribute Seismic/Rock Physics Approach to Characterizing Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Most current seismic methods to seismically characterize fractures in tight reservoirs depend on a few anisotropic wave propagation signatures that can arise from aligned fractures. While seismic anisotropy can be a powerful fracture diagnostic, a number of situations can lessen its usefulness or introduce interpretation ambiguities. Fortunately, laboratory and theoretical work in rock physics indicates that a much broader spectrum of fracture seismic signatures can occur, including a decrease in P- and S-wave velocities, a change in Poisson's ratio, an increase in velocity dispersion and wave attenuation, as well as well as indirect images of structural features that can control fracture occurrence. The goal of this project was to demonstrate a practical interpretation and integration strategy for detecting and characterizing natural fractures in rocks. The approach was to exploit as many sources of information as possible, and to use the principles of rock physics as the link among seismic, geologic, and log data. Since no single seismic attribute is a reliable fracture indicator in all situations, the focus was to develop a quantitative scheme for integrating the diverse sources of information. The integrated study incorporated three key elements: The first element was establishing prior constraints on fracture occurrence, based on laboratory data, previous field observations, and geologic patterns of fracturing. The geologic aspects include analysis of the stratigraphic, structural, and tectonic environments of the field sites. Field observations and geomechanical analysis indicates that fractures tend to occur in the more brittle facies, for example, in tight sands and carbonates. In contrast, strain in shale is more likely to be accommodated by ductile flow. Hence, prior knowledge of bed thickness and facies architecture, calibrated to outcrops, are powerful constraints on the interpreted fracture distribution. Another important constraint is that fracturing is likely to be more intense near faults--sometimes referred to as the damaged zone. Yet another constraint, based on world-wide observations, is that the maximum likely fracture density increases with depth in a well-defined way. Defining these prior constrains has several benefits: they lead to a priori probability distributions of fractures, that are important for objective statistical integration; they limit the number of geologic hypotheses that need to be theoretically modeled; they provide plausible models for fracture distributions below the seismic resolution. The second element was theoretical rock physics modeling of optimal seismic attributes, including offset and azimuth dependence of traveltime, amplitude, and impedance signatures of anisotropic fractured rocks. The suggested workflow is to begin with an elastic earth model, based on well logs, theoretically add fractures to the likely facies as defined by the geologic prior information, and then compute synthetic seismic traces and attributes, including variations in P and S-wave velocities, Poisson's ratio, reflectivity, travel time, attenuation, and anisotropies of these parameters. This workflow is done in a Monte-Carlo fashion, yielding ranges of expected fracture signatures, and allowing realistic assessments of uncertainty to be honored. The third element was statistical integration of the geophysical data and prior constraints to map fracture intensity and orientations, along with uncertainties. A Bayesian framework was developed that allowed systematic integration of the prior constraints, the theoretical relations between fractures and their seismic signatures, and the various observed seismic observations. The integration scheme was successfully applied on an East Texas field site. The primary benefit from the study was the optimization and refinement of practical workflows for improved geophysical characterization of natural fractures and for quantifying the uncertainty of these interpretations. By presenting a methodology for integrating various types of information, the workflow will

  18. Predicting flow through low-permeability, partially saturated, fractured rock: A review of modeling and experimental efforts at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, R.R.; Bixler, N.E.; Glass, R.J.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current interest in storing high-level nuclear waste in underground repositories has resulted in an increased effort to understand the physics of water flow through low-permeability rock. The US Department of Energy is investigating a prospective repository site located in volcanic ash (tuff) hundreds of meters above the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Consequently, mathematical models and experimental procedures are being developed to provide a better understanding of the hydrology of this low-permeability, partially saturated, fractured rock. Modeling water flow in the vadose zone in soils and in relatively permeable rocks such as sandstone has received considerable attention for many years. The treatment of flow (including nonisothermal conditions) through materials such as the Yucca Mountain tuffs, however, has not received the same level of attention, primarily because it is outside the domain of agricultural and petroleum technology. This paper reviews the status of modeling and experimentation currently being used to understand and predict water flow at the proposed repository site. Several areas of research needs emphasized by the review are outlined. The extremely nonlinear hydraulic properties of these tuffs in combination with their heterogeneous nature makes it a challenging and unique problem from a computational and experimental view point. 101 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  19. An experimental investigaion of seawater/basalt interactions: the role of water/rock ratios and temperature gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Paul Lawrence

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1978) Paul Lawrence Archer, B. S. , The Pennsylvania State University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Andrew Hajash Natural seawater and mid-ocean ridge tholeiitic basalt were allowed to react at 100-500'C, and 1000 bars at water/rock mass ratios... temperature experiments at 500'C and temperature- gradient experiments reacted from 200'C to 500 C 53 57 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Graphs of Na, Ca, K, and Mg concentrations in 5/1 and 50/1 seawater/basalt experiments as a function of temperature 17...

  20. ACG Practical Rock Mechanics and Ground Support in Mining Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    CENTRE FOR GEOMECHANICS Ph: +61 8 6488 3300 Fax: +61 8 6488 1130 info for Geomechanics. Practical Rock Mechanics (Introduction) Short Course 28­29 July 2014 Course objectives This course is designed to develop specific underground mining geomechanics competencies for mine geologists

  1. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Methods for detection of stress-induced velocity anisotropy in sands. (2) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

  2. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

  3. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing well logs and microstructural constraints on seismic signatures. We report results of three studies in this report. The first one deals with fractures and faults that provide the primary control on the underground fluid flow through low permeability massive carbonate rocks. Fault cores often represent lower transmissibility whereas the surrounding damaged rocks and main slip surfaces are high transmissibility elements. We determined the physical properties of fault rocks collected in and around the fault cores of large normal faults in central Italy. After studying the P- and S-wave velocity variation during cycles of confining pressure, we conclude that a rigid pore frame characterizes the fault gouge whereas the fractured limestone comprises pores with a larger aspect ratio. The second study was to characterize the seismic properties of brine as its temperature decreases from 25 C to -21 C. The purpose was to understand how the transmitted wave changes with the onset of freezing. The main practical reason for this experiment was to use partially frozen brine as an analogue for a mixture of methane hydrate and water present in the pore space of a gas hydrate reservoir. In the third study we analyzed variations in dynamic moduli in various carbonate reservoirs. The investigations include log and laboratory data from velocity, porosity, permeability, and attenuation measurements.

  4. Multispectral rock-type separation and classification Biliana Paskaleva

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayat, Majeed M.

    , igneous and sedimentary rocks. The study is performed under ideal conditions for which the data-selection method is also employed based on spectral indices comprising a small subset of all possible ratios, an optimization strategy is performed for the selection of optimal multispectral filters, other than the MTI

  5. Investigation of a hydraulic impact a technology in rock breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in mining industry. The impact process of a high speed piston on liquid water, previously introduced on the environment such as fly rocks, air blast, noise pollution and toxic fumes. When blasting occurs close to residential areas, or during tunnel construction, environmental protection regulation could seriously affect

  6. Ion beam analyses of radionuclide migration in heterogeneous rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, Ursula; Missana, Tiziana; Garcia-Gutierrez, Miguel [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Patelli, Alessandro [CIVEN, Via delle Industrie 5, Venezia-Marghera 30175 (Italy); Rigato, Valentino; Ceccato, Daniele [LNL-INFN, Viale dell' Universita 2, Legnaro-Padova 35020 (Italy)

    2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The migration of radionuclides (RN) in the environment is a topic of general interest, for its implications on public health, and it is an issue for the long-term safety studies of deep geological repositories (DGR) for high-level radioactive waste. The role played by colloids on RN migration is also of great concern. Diffusion and sorption are fundamental mechanisms controlling RN migration in rocks and many experimental approaches are applied to determine transport parameters for low sorbing RN in homogeneous rocks. However, it is difficult to obtain relevant data for high sorbing RN or colloids, for which diffusion lengths are extremely short, or within heterogeneous rocks, where transport might be different in different minerals. The ion beam techniques Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and micro-Particle Induced X-Ray Emission ({mu}PIXE), rarely applied in the field, were selected for their micro-analytical potential to study RN diffusion and surface retention within heterogeneous rocks. Main achievements obtained during last 12 years are highlighted.

  7. Onboard Autonomous Rock Shape Analysis For Mars Rovers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in this process, we present an automated technique to allow a rover to classify the shape and other geologic were conducted by characterizing the two-dimensional rock shape while the three-dimensional shape developed and implemented. The per- formance of each measure was characterized by analyzing images from

  8. ConocoPhillips Canada rocks UAlberta science and engineering students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    ConocoPhillips Canada rocks UAlberta science and engineering students Teaching, research spaces. As an ongoing supporter of geoscience field schools, ConocoPhillips Canada has provided more than $3.1 million Program at the U of A, the only one of its kind in Canada. "The support from ConocoPhillips Canada

  9. Morphology and dynamics of explosive vents through cohesive rock formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galland, Olivier

    to test the effects of these parameters. The experiments were used to test the effect of 2 on vent simulations were used to test the effect of 3 on vent morphology and dynamics. In the numerical models we see to underground explosions that blast the overlaying rock formations [e.g., Gisler, 2009]. This phenomenon occurs

  10. Rock-physics Models for Gas-hydrate Systems Associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Rock-physics Models for Gas-hydrate Systems Associated with Unconsolidated Marine Sediments Diana at Austin, Austin, Texas, U.S.A. ABSTRACT R ock-physics models are presented describing gas-hydrate systems associated with unconsolidated marine sediments. The goals are to predict gas-hydrate concentration from

  11. NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

  12. TOP-DOWN AND BOTTOM-UP EFFECTS IN A DETRITAL FOOD WEB: THE PITCHER PLANT INQUILINE COMMUNITY AS A MODEL FOOD WEB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notre Dame, University of

    TOP-DOWN AND BOTTOM-UP EFFECTS IN A DETRITAL FOOD WEB: THE PITCHER PLANT INQUILINE COMMUNITY;TOP-DOWN AND BOTTOM-UP EFFECTS IN A DETRITAL FOOD WEB: THE PITCHER PLANT INQUILINE COMMUNITY that regulate food web dynamics. Both top-down and bottom-up forces affect populations within a food web

  13. Search for underground openings for in situ test facilities in crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Strisower, B.; Corrigan, D.J.; Graf, A.N.; O'Brien, M.T.; Pratt, H.; Board, M.; Hustrulid, W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With a few exceptions, crystalline rocks in this study were limited to plutonic rocks and medium to high-grade metamorphic rocks. Nearly 1700 underground mines, possibly occurring in crystalline rock, were initially identified. Application of criteria resulted in the identification of 60 potential sites. Within this number, 26 mines and 4 civil works were identified as having potential in that they fulfilled the criteria. Thirty other mines may have similar potential. Most of the mines identified are near the contact between a pluton and older sedimentary, volcanic and metamorphic rocks. However, some mines and the civil works are well within plutonic or metamorphic rock masses. Civil works, notably underground galleries associated with pumped storage hydroelectric facilities, are generally located in tectonically stable regions, in relatively homogeneous crystalline rock bodies. A program is recommended which would identify one or more sites where a concordance exists between geologic setting, company amenability, accessibility and facilities to conduct in situ tests in crystalline rock.

  14. Fundamental Investigation of Pore Pressure Prediction During Drilling from the Mechanical Behavior of Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivas Cardona, Juan 1980-

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation was conducted as a preliminary effort to develop a methodology to predict pore pressure in a rock formation during drilling, for all types of rocks and situations. Specifically, it was investigated whether or not the virgin pore...

  15. The effects of acid contact time and rock surfaces on acid fracture conductivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melendez Castillo, Maria Georgina

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    likely to retain conductivity after closure. The hardness of the rock is the dominating factor to determine the conductivity response when no channeling is present. Among the rocks tested, Texas Cream chalk had the lowest hardness measurement before...

  16. Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Yvonne

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the heat source and encounters cooler rock, it condenses,fractured rock near the radioactive-decay heat source isrock, giving rise to a reflux of liquid back to the heat source.

  17. Transport and seismoelectric properties of porous permeable rock : numerical modeling and laboratory measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Xin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to better understand the transport and seismoelectric (SE) properties of porous permeable rock. Accurate information of rock transport properties, together with pore geometry, can aid us to ...

  18. The Effect of Rock Properties on Hydraulic Fracture Conductivity in the Eagle Ford and Fayetteville Shales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansen, Timothy A

    2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    . Optimizing fracture designs to improve well performance requires knowledge of how fracture conductivity is affected by rock and proppant characteristics. This study investigates the relationship between rock characteristics and laboratory measurements...

  19. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems I. Fluid...

  20. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems II....

  1. Importance of Low Permeability Natural Gas Reservoirs (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40% of natural gas production and about 35% of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in darcies.)

  2. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and in induratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at Grimsel. In Coupled Thermo-Hydro- Mechanical-ChemicalCOUPLED HYDRO-MECHANICAL PROCESSES IN CRYTALLINE ROCK AND IN

  3. Biomonitoring of the genotoxic potential of aqueous extracts of soils and bottom ash resulting from municipal solid waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    municipal solid waste incineration, using the comet and micronucleus tests on amphibian (Xenopus laevis ash resulting from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWIBA percolate), using amphibian larvae waste incineration bottom ash; Percolate 1. Introduction Environmental management of municipal solid

  4. Stochastic numerical simulations of long term unsaturated flow in waste rock piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    Stochastic numerical simulations of long term unsaturated flow in waste rock piles O. Fala Genivar water flow in waste rock piles using selected realizations of stochastically distributed hydraulic term hydrogeological behaviour of waste rock piles, to help select the construction sequence

  5. Determining the modal mineralogy of mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks using thermal emission spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Victoria E.

    Determining the modal mineralogy of mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks using thermal emission, Tempe Abstract. The modal mineralogies of 20 mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks were determined from mineralogical information from thermal infrared emission spectra of bulk rock samples. Furthermore, convolution

  6. THE CONVERSION OF BIOMASS TO ETHANOL USING GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DERIVED FROM HOT DRY ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    97505 THE CONVERSION OF BIOMASS TO ETHANOL USING GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DERIVED FROM HOT DRY ROCK between a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy source and the power requirements for the conversion -- geothermal energy derived from the vast resource of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) in our country, and biomass

  7. A Mechanism of Improved Oil Recovery by Low-Salinity Waterflooding in Sandstone Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasralla, Ramez

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    -salinity water has an impact on the rock wettability; the more reduction in water salinity, the more a water-wet rock surface is produced. In addition, NaCl solutions made the rock more water-wet compared to CaCl2 or MgCl2 at the same concentration. Low...

  8. URTeC 1620617 Thermal Shock in Reservoir Rock Enhances the Hydraulic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    URTeC 1620617 Thermal Shock in Reservoir Rock Enhances the Hydraulic Fracturing of Gas Shales Saeid through strain and stress. As the temperature diffuses from hydraulic fracture into reservoir the rock matrix beyond hydraulic fracturing stimulation by cooling down the rock. The physics

  9. EFFECT OF ENCROACHMENT OF WANAPUM DAM RESERVOIR ON FISH PASSAGE OVER ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECT OF ENCROACHMENT OF WANAPUM DAM RESERVOIR ON FISH PASSAGE OVER ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA the lower sections of the three fish ladders at Rock Island Dam, 61 km upstream from Wanapum Dam of the center and left-bank fish ladders of Rock Island Dam were rebuilt and a new sequence of spill patterns

  10. Organic Geochemistry of the CenomanianTuronian Bahloul Formation Petroleum Source Rock, Central and Northern Tunisia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Organic Geochemistry of the Cenomanian­Turonian Bahloul Formation Petroleum Source Rock, Central and around diapirs of the Triassic salt. Key words: Organic matter, Petroleum Source Rock, Cenomanian (TOC) determination, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, extractable organic matter content (EOM) fractionation

  11. SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO Belanger, Laura (M.S., Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering) Source and Effect of Acid Rock (the weathering of disseminated pyrite) sources of acid rock drainage (ARD). Stream waters

  12. The Rock Varnish Revolution: New Insights from Microlaminations and the Contributions of Tanzhuo Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    in potential source materials. In the ensuing two centu- ries, investigations into rock varnish have beenThe Rock Varnish Revolution: New Insights from Microlaminations and the Contributions of Tanzhuo Liu Ronald I. Dorn* School of Geographical Sciences, Arizona State University Abstract Rock varnish

  13. Chemical weathering of granitic rock: experiments and Pb-Li isotopes tracing Romain Millot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is to better constrain the processes of water/rock interactions both in terms of source (dissolutionChemical weathering of granitic rock: experiments and Pb-Li isotopes tracing Romain Millot Philippe of weathering. In order to go further and to better characterize water/rock interactions, we performed

  14. Organic matter characteristics of CenomanianTuronian source rocks: implications for petroleum and gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Organic matter characteristics of Cenomanian­Turonian source rocks: implications for petroleum from the Senegal margin basin, believed to be the main source rocks in the area, have been matter sources; Depositional environment; Petroleum source rock #12;1. Introduction Fig. 1. (a) Map

  15. SIZE COMPOSITION AND GROWTH OF YOUNG ROCK CRAB, CANCER IRRORATUS, ON A ROCKY BEACH IN MAINE!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Because rock crab is a valuable commercial species as well as an important food source of lobsters (EnnisSIZE COMPOSITION AND GROWTH OF YOUNG ROCK CRAB, CANCER IRRORATUS, ON A ROCKY BEACH IN MAINE! JAY S KROUSE' ABSTRACT Monthly hand collections of small rock crab, Cancer irrorallls, were made from

  16. Creep of Two Alpine Rock Glaciers Observation and Modelling (tztal-and Stubai Alps, Austria)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brückl, Ewald

    glaciers. The source areas of these rock glaciers are situated at altitudes of 2700 to 2800 m aCreep of Two Alpine Rock Glaciers ­ Observation and Modelling (Ötztal- and Stubai Alps, Austria), Wolfram Mostler (Innsbruck) Abstract Our study concentrates on two active rock glaciers in the Eastern

  17. RELATING GEOPHYSICAL AND HYDROLOGIC PROPERTIES USING FIELD-SCALE ROCK PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Rosemary

    CMWRXVI 1 RELATING GEOPHYSICAL AND HYDROLOGIC PROPERTIES USING FIELD-SCALE ROCK PHYSICS STEPHEN has been made by rock physics investigations that define how pore-scale variations in properties like in pore-scale rock properties with an understanding of geophysical sampling at the field

  18. Diagenetic variation in the Oregon Coast Range: Implications for rock strength, soil production,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roering, Joshua J.

    properties and their influence on rock strength, hillslope processes, and landscape morphology in two, providing a framework to quantify how seemingly subtle variations in rock properties can impose first on landscape evolution has been noted by many observers, functional relationships between rock properties

  19. Bidirectional Seismic Behavior of Controlled Rocking Four-Legged Bridge Steel Truss Piers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    Bidirectional Seismic Behavior of Controlled Rocking Four-Legged Bridge Steel Truss Piers Michael rocking bridge steel truss piers to three components of seismic excitation are presented in this paper. The controlled rocking approach for seismic protection allows a pier to uplift from its base, limiting the force

  20. Mitigation of light rail transit construction on jurisdictional areas in the White Rock Creek floodplain, Dallas, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schieffer, Emily; Smiley, Jerry

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AREAS IN THE WHITE ROCK CREEK FLOODPLAIN, DALLAS, TEXAS1.2-miles of the White Rock Creek floodplain near theconfluence of three creeks and adjacent to approximately

  1. Determination of the thermodynamic performance of a bottom outlet cyclone steam-water separator for geothermal use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Mark Andrew

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF THE THERMODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF A BOTTOM OUTLET CYCLONE STEAN-MATER SEPARATOR FOR GEOTHERMAL USE A Thesis by Mark Andrew Chappell Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AEM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DETERMINATION OF THE THERMODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF A BOTTOM OUTLET CYCLONE STEAM-WATER SEPARATOR FOR GEOTHERMAL USE A Thesis by Mark Andrew Chappell...

  2. Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

  3. SUSY QCD Corrections to Higgs Pair Production from Bottom Quark Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sally Dawson; Chung Kao; Yili Wang

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation for the total cross section for inclusive Higgs pair production via bottom-quark fusion at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and the minimal supergravity model (mSUGRA). We emphasize the contributions of squark and gluino loops (SQCD) and the decoupling properties of our results for heavy squark and gluino masses. The enhanced couplings of the b quark to the Higgs bosons in supersymmetric models with large tanb yield large NLO SQCD corrections in some regions of parameter space.

  4. DE-AI26-06NT42878 - Bottom Source Task | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4Customer-Comments Sign8SeeBottom Source Task Gas

  5. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Rigby

    2004-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components).

  6. Numerical evaluation of effective unsaturated hydraulic properties for fractured rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Zhiming [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwicklis, Edward M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To represent a heterogeneous unsaturated fractured rock by its homogeneous equivalent, Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain upscaled (effective) flow properties. In this study, we present a numerical procedure for upscaling the van Genuchten parameters of unsaturated fractured rocks by conducting Monte Carlo simulations of the unsaturated flow in a domain under gravity-dominated regime. The simulation domain can be chosen as the scale of block size in the field-scale modeling. The effective conductivity is computed from the steady-state flux at the lower boundary and plotted as a function of the averaging pressure head or saturation over the domain. The scatter plot is then fitted using van Genuchten model and three parameters, i.e., the saturated conductivity K{sub s}, the air-entry parameter {alpha}, the pore-size distribution parameter n, corresponding to this model are considered as the effective K{sub s}, effective {alpha}, and effective n, respectively.

  7. ForPeerReview Cavity expansion in cross anisotropic rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Peter

    for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics Manuscript ID: NAG-10-0026.R1 Wiley - Manuscript type in Geomechanics #12;ForPeerReview Only Cavity expansion in cross-anisotropic rock Dimitrios Kolymbas Peter Wagner://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/nag International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

  8. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

  9. Neutron Production from the Fracture of Piezoelectric Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Widom; J. Swain; Y. N. Srivastava

    2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical explanation is provided for the experimental evidence that fracturing piezoelectric rocks produces neutrons. The elastic energy micro-crack production ultimately yields the macroscopic fracture. The mechanical energy is converted by the piezoelectric effect into electric field energy. The electric field energy decays via radio frequency (microwave) electric field oscillations. The radio frequency electric fields accelerate the condensed matter electrons which then collide with protons producing neutrons and neutrinos.

  10. Rock climbing sub-worlds: a segmentation study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapelje, Brandon Wayne

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , participated in some form of climbing in 2001. The number of rock climbing participants has steadily increased over the past three decades (Attarian & Pyke, 2000; Cordell et al., 1997; Heath, 1997;). While the number of participants has been increasing... to the glamorization it received by the popular media (Dierick, 2002; Heath, 1997). Movies showing action stars performing incredible feats, such as Tom Cruise in ?Mission Impossible 2? and Sylvester Stallone in ?Cliffhanger,? are only part of the total exposure...

  11. Compaction around a rigid, circular inclusion in partially molten rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alisic, Laura; Rudge, John F.; Katz, Richard F.; Wells, Garth N.; Rhebergen, Sander

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    of melt from the mantle control the chemical evolution of the mantle and crust over geological time. Observations of petrological and isotopic disequilibrium suggest that melt extraction to produce oceanic crust is rapid and potentially localized... . 5919 Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth 10.1002/2013JB010906 Holtzman, B. K., and D. L. Kohlstedt (2007), Stress-driven melt segregation and strain partitioning in partially molten rocks: Effects of stress and strain, J. Petrology, 48...

  12. REDUCING RISK IN LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS FORMATIONS: UNDERSTANDING THE ROCK/FLUID CHARACTERISTICS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN LARAMIDE BASINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Surdam

    2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An anomalous velocity model was constructed for the Wind River Basin (WRB) based on {approx}2000 mi of 2-D seismic data and 175 sonic logs, for a total of 132,000 velocity/depth profiles. Ten cross sections were constructed through the model coincident with known gas fields. In each cross section, an intense, anomalously slow velocity domain coincided with the gas-productive rock/fluid interval. The anomalous velocity model: (1) Easily isolates gas-charged rock/fluid systems characterized by anomalously slow velocities and water-rich rock/fluid systems characterized by normal velocities; and (2) Delineates the regional velocity inversion surface, which is characterized by steepening of the Ro/depth gradient, a significant increase in capillary displacement pressure, a significant change in formation water composition, and acceleration of the reaction rate of smectite-to-illite diagenesis in mixed-layer clays. Gas chimneys are observed as topographic highs on the regional velocity inversion surface. Beneath the surface are significant fluid-flow compartments, which have a gas-charge in the fluid phase and are isolated from meteoric water recharge. Water-rich domains may occur within regional gas-charged compartments, but are not being recharged from the meteoric water system (i.e., trapped water). The WRB is divided into at least two regionally prominent fluid-flow compartments separated by the velocity inversion surface: a water-dominated upper compartment likely under strong meteoric water drive and a gas-charged, anomalously pressured lower compartment. Judging from cross sections, numerous gas-charged subcompartments occur within the regional compartment. Their geometries and boundaries are controlled by faults and low-permeability rocks. Commercial gas production results when a reservoir interval characterized by enhanced porosity/permeability intersects one of these gas-charged subcompartments. The rock/fluid characteristics of the Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins (RMLB) described in this work determine the potential for significant, relatively unconventional, so-called ''basin-center'' hydrocarbon accumulations. If such accumulations occur, they will be characterized by the following critical attributes: (1) Location beneath a regional velocity inversion surface that typically is associated with low-permeability lithologies; (2) Anomalous pressure, both over- and underpressure, and when, less commonly, they appear to be normally pressured, they are not in contact with the meteoric water system; (3) A significant gas component in the regional multiphase fluid-flow system (water-gas-oil) that occurs beneath the regional velocity inversion surface; (4) Domains of intense gas charge (i.e., high gas saturation) within the regional multiphase fluid-flow system; (5) Compartmentalization of the rock/fluid system to a far greater extent beneath the regional velocity inversion surface than above it (i.e., convection of fluids across the regional velocity inversion surface is reduced or eliminated depending on the nature of the capillary properties of the low-permeability rocks associated with the inversion surface); (6) Commercial gas accumulations occurring at the intersection of reservoir intervals characterized by enhanced porosity and permeability and gas-charged domains; (7) Productive intersections of reservoir intervals and gas-charged domains, which are controlled by the structural, stratigraphic, and diagenetic elements affecting the rock/fluid system; and (8) No apparent meteoric water connection with the gas accumulations and gas columns up to several thousand feet in height. Because some of these critical attributes are not associated with conventional hydrocarbon accumulations, a new set of diagnostic tools are required in order to explore for and exploit these types of gas prospects efficiently and effectively. Some of these new diagnostic tools have been discussed in this report; other have been described elsewhere. In order to maximize risk reduction, it is recommended when exploring for these types of gas accu

  13. Hilbert transform based analyses on ship-rocking signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei; Kang, Deyong; Chen, Zhi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ship-rocking is a crucial factor which affects the accuracy of the ocean-based flight vehicle measurement. Here we have analyzed four groups of ship-rocking time series in horizontal and vertical directions utilizing a Hilbert based method from statistical physics. Our method gives a way to construct an analytic signal on the two-dimensional plane from a one-dimensional time series. The analytic signal share the complete property of the original time series. From the analytic signal of a time series, we have found some information of the original time series which are often hidden from the view of the conventional methods. The analytic signals of interest usually evolve very smoothly on the complex plane. In addition, the phase of the analytic signal is usually moves linearly in time. From the auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions of the original signals as well as the instantaneous amplitudes and phase increments of the analytic signals we have found that the ship-rocking in horizontal directi...

  14. Protected Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bits For Hard Rock Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Lee Cardenas

    2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two bits were designed. One bit was fabricated and tested at Terra-Tek's Drilling Research Laboratory. Fabrication of the second bit was not completed due to complications in fabrication and meeting scheduled test dates at the test facility. A conical bit was tested in a Carthage Marble (compressive strength 14,500 psi) and Sierra White Granite (compressive strength 28,200 psi). During the testing, Hydraulic Horsepower, Bit Weight, Rotation Rate, were varied for the Conical Bit, a Varel Tricone Bit and Varel PDC bit. The Conical Bi did cut rock at a reasonable rate in both rocks. Beneficial effects from the near and through cutter water nozzles were not evident in the marble due to test conditions and were not conclusive in the granite due to test conditions. At atmospheric drilling, the Conical Bit's penetration rate was as good as the standard PDC bit and better than the Tricone Bit. Torque requirements for the Conical Bit were higher than that required for the Standard Bits. Spudding the conical bit into the rock required some care to avoid overloading the nose cutters. The nose design should be evaluated to improve the bit's spudding characteristics.

  15. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado. Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VP) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the groundwater from further degradation. Remedial actions at the Slick Rock sites must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  16. Paradox of Peroxy Defects and Positive Holes in Rocks Part II: Outflow of Electric Currents from Stressed Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoville, John; Freund, Friedemann

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the electrical properties of rocks is of fundamental interest. We report on currents generated when stresses are applied. Loading the center of gabbro tiles, 30x30x0.9 cm$^3$, across a 5 cm diameter piston, leads to positive currents flowing from the center to the unstressed edges. Changing the constant rate of loading over 5 orders of magnitude from 0.2 kPa/s to 20 MPa/s produces positive currents, which start to flow already at low stress levels, rock-forming minerals. The peroxy break-up leads to positive holes h$^{\\bullet}$, i.e. electronic states associated with O$^-$ in a matrix of O$^{2-}$, plus electrons, e'. Propagating...

  17. Petrofabric analysis of experimentally folded multilithologic, layered rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pattison, Linda Jean

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of shortening and elongation parallel to the layering and normal to the fold axis and regions of relatively small differen- tial stress are located from the study of the orientations and positions of small thrust and normal faults, macro- and microfrac... to the bottom layer of the fold in the central anticline or to the top layer of the syncline. Movement on type G fractures creates a 0 thrust fault, and the displacement is at 20 to the direction of 25 loading (F'igure 6, p. 27 ). Type G fractures do...

  18. 1901.] NATURAL SCIENCES OF PHILADELPHIA. 213 OBSERVATIONSMADE IN 1900 ON GLACIERS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Dan

    1901.] NATURAL SCIENCES OF PHILADELPHIA. 213 OBSERVATIONSMADE IN 1900 ON GLACIERS IN BRITISH to this rule was reported,but the advance could not be provedwith any certainty. VICTORIA GLACIER. The rocks markedlast year to determinethe motionand shrink- age of this glacier were again noted on July 24, 1900

  19. Surface controls on the characteristics of natural CO2 seeps: implications for engineered CO2 stores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    of the CO2 seeps is most strongly governed by the flow properties of the outcropping rocks, and local emerge where valleys erode into CO2 aquifers, and these are typically high flux seeps. Seep type is knownSurface controls on the characteristics of natural CO2 seeps: implications for engineered CO2

  20. Search for New Physics with Top and Bottom Quarks with ATLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanov, Alexander

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The studies performed by the principal investigator during the period of the grant constitute the ground work for search for new physics in channels including top and bottom quarks with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The PI has been involved in search for heavy charged Higgs bosons decaying into top and bottom quark pairs, and top quark rare decays involving Higgs bosons and c-quarks. Both channels have the top quark pair production as their main background, which was studied in detail. The search for heavy charged Higgs and top quark rare decays requires signi#12;cant amount of data accumulated by the experiment. In case no signal is observed in the present data sample collected by ATLAS (5 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at proton-anti proton center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 20 fb{sup -1} at 8 TeV), data from the upgraded detector running at 14 TeV needs to be analyzed. The PI has been working on physics and performance studies at upgraded detector.