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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Natural phenomena hazards, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the natural phenomena hazard loads for use in implementing DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, and supports development of double-shell tank systems specifications at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The natural phenomena covered are seismic, flood, wind, volcanic ash, lightning, snow, temperature, solar radiation, suspended sediment, and relative humidity.

Conrads, T.J.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

2

WESF natural phenomena hazards survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A team of engineers conducted a systematic natural hazards phenomena (NPH) survey for the 225-B Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The survey is an assessment of the existing design documentation to serve as the structural design basis for WESF, and the Interim Safety Basis (ISB). The lateral force resisting systems for the 225-B building structures, and the anchorages for the WESF safety related systems were evaluated. The original seismic and other design analyses were technically reviewed. Engineering judgment assessments were made of the probability of NPH survival, including seismic, for the 225-B structures and WESF safety systems. The method for the survey is based on the experience of the investigating engineers,and documented earthquake experience (expected response) data.The survey uses knowledge on NPH performance and engineering experience to determine the WESF strengths for NPH resistance, and uncover possible weak links. The survey, in general, concludes that the 225-B structures and WESF safety systems are designed and constructed commensurate with the current Hanford Site design criteria.

Wagenblast, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities...

4

Natural phenomena hazards site characterization criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The criteria and recommendations in this standard shall apply to site characterization for the purpose of mitigating Natural Phenomena Hazards (wind, floods, landslide, earthquake, volcano, etc.) in all DOE facilities covered by DOE Order 5480.28. Criteria for site characterization not related to NPH are not included unless necessary for clarification. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology, and geotechnical studies.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

WHC natural phenomena hazards mitigation implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural phenomena hazards (NPH) are unexpected acts of nature which pose a threat or danger to workers, the public or to the environment. Earthquakes, extreme winds (hurricane and tornado),snow, flooding, volcanic ashfall, and lightning strike are examples of NPH at Hanford. It is the policy of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to design, construct and operate DOE facilitiesso that workers, the public and the environment are protected from NPH and other hazards. During 1993 DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) transmitted DOE Order 5480.28, ``Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation,`` to Westinghouse Hanford COmpany (WHC) for compliance. The Order includes rigorous new NPH criteria for the design of new DOE facilities as well as for the evaluation and upgrade of existing DOE facilities. In 1995 DOE issued Order 420.1, ``Facility Safety`` which contains the same NPH requirements and invokes the same applicable standards as Order 5480.28. It will supersede Order 5480.28 when an in-force date for Order 420.1 is established through contract revision. Activities will be planned and accomplished in four phases: Mobilization; Prioritization; Evaluation; and Upgrade. The basis for the graded approach is the designation of facilities/structures into one of five performance categories based upon safety function, mission and cost. This Implementation Plan develops the program for the Prioritization Phase, as well as an overall strategy for the implemention of DOE Order 5480.2B.

Conrads, T.J.

1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

6

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Tuesday...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Tuesday, October 21st Session Presentations October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Tuesday, October 21st Session Presentations Presentations Relative Movements for...

7

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis Presented by and October, 2011 Presentation Outline I. Introductions II. Pantex III. 10 Year Update IV. Final...

8

Natural Phenomena Hazards Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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9

Fourth DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation Conference: Proceedings. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference allowed an interchange in the natural phenomena area among designers, safety professionals, and managers. The papers presented in Volume I of the proceedings are from sessions I - VIII which cover the general topics of: DOE standards, lessons learned and walkdowns, wind, waste tanks, ground motion, testing and materials, probabilistic seismic hazards, risk assessment, base isolation and energy dissipation, and lifelines and floods. Individual papers are indexed separately. (GH)

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Natural hazards phenomena mitigation with respect to seismic hazards at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information on the seismic hazard for design of the proposed Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), a facility designed for the disposal of wastes generated during the cleanup of Hanford Site aggregate areas. The preferred ERDF site is located south and east of 200 East and 200 West Areas. The Washington State Groundwater Protection Program (WAC 173-303-806 (4)(a)(xxi)) requires that the characteristics of local and regional hydrogeology be defined. A plan for that work has been developed (Weekes and Borghese 1993). In addition, WAC 173-303-282 provides regulatory guidance on siting a dangerous waste facility, and US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.28 requires consideration of natural phenomena hazards mitigation for DOE sites and facilities. This report provides information to evaluate the ERDF site with respect to seismic hazard. The ERDF will be a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) as defined by 40 CFR 260.10.

Reidel, S.P.

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

11

Review of Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) Assessments for the DOE Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this review is to assess the need for updating Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) assessments for the DOE's Hanford Site, as required by DOE Order 420.1B Chapter IV, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, based on significant changes in state-of-the-art NPH assessment methodology or site-specific information. This review is an update and expansion to the September 2010 review of PNNL-19751, Review of Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) Assessments for the Hanford 200 Areas (Non-Seismic).

Snow, Robert L.; Ross, Steven B.

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Design and evaluation guidelines for Department of Energy facilities subjected to natural phenomena hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) and the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Panel have developed uniform design and evaluation guidelines for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of the guidelines is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. The guidelines apply to both new facilities (design) and existing facilities (evaluation, modification, and upgrading). The intended audience is primarily the civil/structural or mechanical engineers conducting the design or evaluation of DOE facilities. The likelihood of occurrence of natural phenomena hazards at each DOE site has been evaluated by the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazard Program. Probabilistic hazard models are available for earthquake, extreme wind/tornado, and flood. Alternatively, site organizations are encouraged to develop site-specific hazard models utilizing the most recent information and techniques available. In this document, performance goals and natural hazard levels are expressed in probabilistic terms, and design and evaluation procedures are presented in deterministic terms. Design/evaluation procedures conform closely to common standard practices so that the procedures will be easily understood by most engineers. Performance goals are expressed in terms of structure or equipment damage to the extent that: (1) the facility cannot function; (2) the facility would need to be replaced; or (3) personnel are endangered. 82 refs., 12 figs., 18 tabs.

Kennedy, R.P. (Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (USA)); Short, S.A. (ABB Impell Corp., Mission Viejo, CA (USA)); McDonald, J.R. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (USA)); McCann, M.W. Jr. (Benjamin (J.R.) and Associates, Inc., Mountain View, CA (USA)); Murray, R.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Hill, J.R. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and He

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - October 2011 | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecemberInitiativesNational Environmental Policy ActEnergy 1 Natural Phenomena

14

Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued an Order 420.1 which establishes policy for its facilities in the event of natural phenomena hazards (NPH) along with associated NPH mitigation requirements. This DOE Standard gives design and evaluation criteria for NPH effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE Order 420.1 and the associated implementation Guides. These are intended to be consistent design and evaluation criteria for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of these criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. These criteria apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities. They may also be used for modification and upgrading of existing facilities as appropriate. The design and evaluation criteria presented herein control the level of conservatism introduced in the design/evaluation process such that earthquake, wind, and flood hazards are treated on a consistent basis. These criteria also employ a graded approach to ensure that the level of conservatism and rigor in design/evaluation is appropriate for facility characteristics such as importance, hazards to people on and off site, and threat to the environment. For each natural phenomena hazard covered, these criteria consist of the following: Performance Categories and target performance goals as specified in the DOE Order 420.1 NPH Implementation Guide, and DOE-STD-1 021; specified probability levels from which natural phenomena hazard loading on structures, equipment, and systems is developed; and design and evaluation procedures to evaluate response to NPH loads and criteria to assess whether or not computed response is permissible.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - October 2014 | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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16

Guide for the Mitigation of Natural Phenomena Hazards for DOE Nuclear Facilities and NonNuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This document provides guidance in implementing the Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation requirements of DOE O 420.1, Facility Safety, Section 4.4, "Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation." This Guide does not establish or invoke any new requirements. Any apparent conflicts arising from the NPH guidance would defer to the requirements in DOE O 420.1. No cancellation.

2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

17

Natural phenomena hazards evaluation of equipment and piping of Gaseous Diffusion Plant Uranium Enrichment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report Upgrade program (GDP SARUP), a natural phenomena hazards evaluation was performed for the main process equipment and piping in the uranium enrichment buildings at Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants. In order to reduce the cost of rigorous analyses, the evaluation methodology utilized a graded approach based on an experience data base collected by SQUG/EPRI that contains information on the performance of industrial equipment and piping during past earthquakes. This method consisted of a screening walkthrough of the facility in combination with the use of engineering judgment and simple calculations. By using these screenings combined with evaluations that contain decreasing conservatism, reductions in the time and cost of the analyses were significant. A team of experienced seismic engineers who were trained in the use of the DOE SQUG/EPRI Walkdown Screening Material was essential to the success of this natural phenomena hazards evaluation.

Singhal, M.K.; Kincaid, J.H.; Hammond, C.R.; Stockdale, B.I.; Walls, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Technical Programs and Services; Brock, W.R.; Denton, D.R. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE standard gives design and evaluation criteria for natural phenomena hazards (NPH) effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE 5480.28. Goal of the criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, flooding, etc. They apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities; they may also be used for modification and upgrading of the latter.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Natural Phenomena Hazards DOE-STD 1020-2012 & DOE Handbook | Department of  

Energy Savers [EERE]

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fires After Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings Raymond Tell and Elizabeth Kelly 10:15 a.m. The Need for an Integrated Risk Model Michael Salmon and Lawrence Goen...

22

DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2Consolidated Edison5Operate WasteResearchEnergy Off5-26, 2011

23

US Department of Energy natural phenomena design/evaluation guidelines/lessons learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the spring of 1988, DOE Order 6430.1A, General Design Criteria (1), was issued for use. This document references UCRL-15910, Design and Evaluation Guidelines for DOE Facilities Subjected to Natural Phenomena Hazards (2), which is to be used as the basis for the design and evaluation of new and existing facilities to natural phenomena loading. Rather than use the historical deterministic methods for computing structural and component loading from potential natural phenomena, UCRL-15910 incorporated the years of hazards studies conducted throughout the US Department of Energy complex into probabilistic-based methods. This paper describes the process used to incorporate US Department of Energy natural phenomena design guidelines into the Hanford Plant Standards -- Standard Design Criteria for Architectural and Civil Standards (3). It also addresses the subsequent use of these criteria during structural assessments of facilities, systems, and components of various vintage in support of updating safety analysis reports. The paper includes comparison of results using these most recent probabilistic-based natural phenomena loading criteria to those obtained from previous assessments, and it addresses the lessons learned from the many structural evaluations of 1940--1960 vintage buildings.

Conrads, T.J.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

US Department of Energy natural phenomena design/evaluation guidelines/lessons learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the spring of 1988, DOE Order 6430.1A, General Design Criteria [1], was issued for use. This document references UCRL-15910, Design and Evaluation Guidelines for DOE Facilities Subjected to Natural Phenomena Hazards [2], which is to be used as the basis for the design and evaluation of new and existing facilities to natural phenomena loading. Rather than use the historical deterministic methods for computing structural and component loading from potential natural phenomena, UCRL-15910 incorporated the years of hazards studies conducted throughout the US Department of Energy complex into probabilistic-based methods. This paper describes the process used to incorporate US Department of Energy natural phenomena design guidelines into the Hanford Plant Standards -- Standard Design Criteria for Architectural and Civil Standards [3]. It also addresses the subsequent use of these criteria during structural assessments of facilities, systems, and components of various vintage in support of updating safety analysis reports. The paper includes comparison of results using these most recent probabilistic-based natural phenomena loading criteria to those obtained from previous assessments, and it addresses the lessons learned from the many structural evaluations of 1940--1960 vintage buildings.

Conrads, T.J.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility (HSS CRAD 45-54) This Criteria Review and Approach Document (HSS CRAD 45-54)...

26

TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT FOR NATURAL EVENT HAZARDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical basis document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for natural event hazard (NEH)-initiated accidents. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls.

KRIPPS, L.J.

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Wednesday...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Validation of the SASSI2010 Subtraction Method Using Full Scale Independent Verification 3D Site Response using NLSSI Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology...

28

The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EIS results one can back out the relationship between offsite consequences and Latent Cancer Fatality Risk (Safety Goal) - Example 1.00E-09 1.00E-08 1.00E-07 1.00E-06 1.00E-05 1...

29

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Program - Guidelines | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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30

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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31

Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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32

Natural Phenomena Hazards Program Reports | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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33

Natural Phenomena Hazard Analysis and Design Criteria for Department of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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34

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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35

Seismic & Natural Phenomena Hazards | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

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36

DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop - Opening Remarks & Agenda |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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37

DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria  

Energy Savers [EERE]

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38

DOE Standard Natural Phenomena Hazards Site Characterization Criteria  

Energy Savers [EERE]

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39

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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40

Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently Applied to  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Tuesday, October  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010 PrintingNeed|3Programs in21st Session Presentations |

42

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Wednesday, October  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010 PrintingNeed|3Programs in21st Session Presentations |22nd

43

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Wednesday, October  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010 PrintingNeed|3Programs in21st Session Presentations

44

Hazard Categorization Reduction via Nature of the Process Argument  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper documents the Hazard Categorization (HC) and Critical Safety Evaluation (CSE) for activities performed using an Inspection Object (IO) in excess of the single parameter subcritical limit of 700 g of U-235. By virtue of exceeding the single parameter subcritical limit and the subsequent potential for criticality, the IO HC is initially categorized as HC2. However, a novel application of the nature of the process argument was employed to reduce the IO HC from HC2 to less than HC3 (LTHC3). The IO is composed of five separate uranium metal plates that total no greater than 3.82 kg of U-235 (U(20)). The IO is planned to be arranged in various configurations. As the IO serves as a standard for experimentation aimed at establishing techniques for detection of fissionable materials, it may be placed in close proximity to various reflectors, moderators, or both. The most reactive configurations of the IO were systematically evaluated and shown that despite the mass of U-235 and potential positioning near various reflectors and moderators, the IO cannot be assembled into a critical configuration. Therefore, the potential for criticality does not exist. With Department of Energy approval, a Hazards Assessment Document with high-level (facility-level) controls on the plates negates the potential for criticality and satisfies the nature of the process argument to reduce the HC from HC2 to LTHC3.

Chelise A. Van De Graaff; Dr. Chad Pope; J. Todd Taylor

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Natural convection phenomena in a nuclear power plant during a postulated TMLB' accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After the TMI (Three Mile Island) accident, there has been significant interest in analyzing and understanding the phenomena that may occur in a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) accident which may lead to partial or total core meltdown and degradation. Natural convection is one of the important phenomena. In the present paper the results of two numerical simulations of (1) four-loop PWR and (2) three-loop PWR are presented. The simulations were performed with the COMMIX(2) computer code. Our analysis shows that in severe accident scenarios, natural convection phenomena does occur and that it helps to delay core degradation by transferring decay heat from the reactor core to other internal structures of the reactor system. The amount of heat transfer and delay in core degradation depends on the geometry and internal structures of the system and on the events of an accident.

Domanus, H.M.; Schmitt, R.C.; Sha, W.T.; Shah, V.L.; Han, J.T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Natural Phenomena Hazards Design Criteria and Other Characterization Information for the MFFF at SRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a comprehensive complication applicable to the general Savannah River Site area, developed by both the original contractor, the DuPont Company, and by the current plant operator, Westinghouse Savannah River Company, over the full plant lifetime period (1950 - 2000).

Wyatt, D.E.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

DOE-STD-1020 Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACME | NationalTbilisi08 to17NOT

48

DOE-STD-1023-95; Natural Phenomena Hazards Assessment Criteria  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACME | NationalTbilisi08 to17NOTSENSITIVE

49

Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2Energy Second Quarter Report

50

Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2Energy Second Quarter Report1-93 July 1993 Change

51

DOE-STD-1023-95; Natural Phenomena Hazards Assessment Criteria  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSofDATE M a y 9, 2005 REPLYDepartment of Energy Amy

52

The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternationalTechnology Validation Technology ValidationTexasEnergy

53

The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned Small BusinessEMPLOYMENTTechnology ForumInteriorTestimonyI0 THEAPRILJULY

54

Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

55

Environmental consequences of postulated plutonium releases from Exxon Nuclear MOFP, Richland, Washington, as a result of severe natural phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Exxon Nuclear Company Mixed Oxide Fabrication Plant (MOFP), Richland, Washington. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, high straight-line winds, and floods. Maximum plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values most likely to occur offsite are also given.

Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Mining Extreme Values: Climate and Natural Hazards Debasish Das1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extremes time-series. Besides providing insights on climate change or natural hazards and the consequences for climate change science or the re- insurance industry, the methods can be generalized to multiple domains, cyber- security and mapping technologies. Keywords Precipitation, Climate Change, Extremes Regression

Obradovic, Zoran

57

NATURAL HAZARDS ON ALLUVIAL FANS: THE VENEZUELA DEBRIS FLOW AND FLASH FLOOD DISASTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL HAZARDS ON ALLUVIAL FANS: THE VENEZUELA DEBRIS FLOW AND FLASH FLOOD DISASTER In December Venezuela. Rainfall on December 2-3 totaled 200 millimeters (8 inches) and was followed by a major storm, Denver, Colorado, Naples, Italy, and Vargas, Venezuela. In time scales spanning thousands of years

Eaton, L. Scott

58

Eurographics Workshop on Natural Phenomena (2009) E. Galin and J. Schneider (Editors)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phenomenon able to evoke great beauty in all kinds of scenes. However, there still does not exist an all.g. smoke as in [SB08], or water [IGLF06] or plants [DL05]). However, there are many phenomena where innovation is our model's founda- tion on real snow observations. We condensed these obser- vations

Gumhold, Stefan

59

Computer modelling and natural phenomena Author: Giuseppe Longo Ecole Normale Suparieure, Paris et CREA, Ecole Polytechnique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CREA, Ecole Polytechnique Published in: ESEC/FSE-11 Proceedings of the 9th European software engineering conference held jointly with 11th ACM SIGSOFT international symposium on Foundations of software projection of our fantastic machine onto Biological and Cognitive phenomena. The conference lecture

Longo, Giuseppe

60

Joint probability safety assessment for NPP defense infrastructure against extreme external natural hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the increasing tendency of natural hazards, the typhoon, hurricane and tropical Cyclone induced surge, wave, precipitation, flood and wind as extreme external loads menacing Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) in coastal and inland provinces of China. For all of planned, designed And constructed NPP the National Nuclear Safety Administration of China and IAEA recommended Probable Maximum Hurricane /Typhoon/(PMH/T), Probable Maximum Storm Surge (PMSS), Probable Maximum Flood (PMF), Design Basis Flood (DBF) as safety regulations for NPP defense infrastructures. This paper discusses the joint probability analysis of simultaneous occurrence typhoon induced extreme external hazards and compare with IAEA 2006-2009 recommended safety regulation design criteria for some NPP defense infrastructures along China coast. (authors)

Guilin, L. [College of Engineering, Ocean Univ. ot China, Yushan Road No. 5, Qingdao 266003 (China); Defu, L. [Disaster Prevention Research Inst., Ocean Univ. ot China, Yushan Road No. 5, Qingdao 266003 (China); Huajun, L. [College of Engineering, Ocean Univ. ot China, Yushan Road No. 5, Qingdao 266003 (China); Fengqing, W. [Disaster Prevention Research Inst., Ocean Univ. of China, Songling Road No.238, Qingdao 266100 (China); Tao, Z. [College of Engineering, Ocean Univ. of China, Songling Road No.238, Qingdao 266100 (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

INTERNAL HAZARDS ANALYSIS FOR LICENSE APPLICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this internal hazards analysis is to identify and document the internal hazards and potential initiating events associated with preclosure operations of the repository at Yucca Mountain. Internal hazards are those hazards presented by the operation of the facility and by its associated processes that can potentially lead to a radioactive release or cause a radiological hazard. In contrast to external hazards, internal hazards do not involve natural phenomena and external man-made hazards. This internal hazards analysis was performed in support of the preclosure safety analysis and the License Application for the Yucca Mountain Project. The methodology for this analysis provides a systematic means to identify internal hazards and potential initiating events that may result in a radiological hazard or radiological release during the repository preclosure period. These hazards are documented in tables of potential internal hazards and potential initiating events (Section 6.6) for input to the repository event sequence categorization process. The results of this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply to the performance of event sequence analyses for the repository preclosure period. The evolving design of the repository will be re-evaluated periodically to ensure that internal hazards that have not been previously evaluated are identified.

R.J. Garrett

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

62

Natural Circulation in Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants Phenomena, models, and methodology for system reliability assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years it has been recognized that the application of passive safety systems (i.e., those whose operation takes advantage of natural forces such as convection and gravity), can contribute to simplification and potentially to improved economics of new nuclear power plant designs. In 1991 the IAEA Conference on ''The Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future'' noted that for new plants the use of passive safety features is a desirable method of achieving simplification and increasing the reliability of the performance of essential safety functions, and should be used wherever appropriate''.

Jose Reyes

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

63

Potential hazards of compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a preliminary assessment of the ignition and explosion potential in a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir from air cycling associated with compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media. The study identifies issues associated with this phenomenon as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media has been proposed to help supplement renewable energy sources (e.g., wind and solar) by providing a means to store energy when excess energy is available, and to provide an energy source during non-productive or low productivity renewable energy time periods. Presently, salt caverns represent the only proven underground storage used for CAES. Depleted natural gas reservoirs represent another potential underground storage vessel for CAES because they have demonstrated their container function and may have the requisite porosity and permeability; however reservoirs have yet to be demonstrated as a functional/operational storage media for compressed air. Specifically, air introduced into a depleted natural gas reservoir presents a situation where an ignition and explosion potential may exist. This report presents the results of an initial study identifying issues associated with this phenomena as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered.

Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Bauer, Stephen J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

65

Hazardous Waste Management (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The act authorizes the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environment Control (DNREC) to regulate hazardous waste and create a program to manage sources of hazardous waste. The act...

66

Environmental consequences of postulate plutonium releases from Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF), Santa Susana, California, as a result of severe natural phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF), in the Santa Susana site, California. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the earthquake, and the 150-mph and 170-mph tornadoes are above the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The deposition values following the 110-mph and the 130-mph tornadoes are below the EPA proposed guideline.

Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Environmental consequences of postulated plutonium releases from General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California, as a result of severe natural phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Maximum plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the earthquakes, and the 180-mph and 230-mph tornadoes are above the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The deposition values following the 135-mph tornado are below the EPA proposed guidelines.

Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Modern tornado design of nuclear and other potentially hazardous facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tornado wind loads and other tornado phenomena, including tornado missiles and differential pressure effects, have not usually been considered in the design of conventional industrial, commercial, or residential facilities in the United States; however, tornado resistance has often become a design requirement for certain hazardous facilities, such as large nuclear power plants and nuclear materials and waste storage facilities, as well as large liquefied natural gas storage facilities. This article provides a review of current procedures for the design of hazardous industrial facilities to resist tornado effects. 23 refs., 19 figs., 13 tabs.

Stevenson, J.D. [J.D. Stevenson Consulting Engineer, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zhao, Y. [Battele Energy Systems Group, Columbus, OH (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Measurement of natural radioactivity and assessment of radiation hazard indices in soil samples at Pengerang, Kota Tinggi, Johor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pengerang area consists of a mix of private plantation, individual residential lots and state land, which is leased for agriculture related activities. The analysis was conducted to determine the specific activity of the initial value and the radiation hazard indices in the surrounding area in Pengerang. This area will be developed into a major downstream for oil and gas. The aims of this preliminary study were 1) to determine the specific activities of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 40}K of soil samples at six selected areas by Gamma-ray spectrometry and 2) to calculate the radiation hazard indices. The specific activities (Bq/kg) of the samples ranged from 7.08±5.01 to 36.29±25.72 Bq/kg, 5.62±3.98 to 34.53±24.07 Bq/kg, 4.75±3.42 to 24.76±17.66 Bq/kg and 10.58±7.51 to 101.25±72.00 Bq/kg for {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 40}K, respectively. These values were well within the range that reported by UNSCEAR. The study also examined the radiation hazard indices, the mean values obtained were 48.49±28.06 Bq/kg for Radium Equivalent Activity (Raeq), 0.34 Bq/kg for Representative Level Index (I{sub ?}), 21.83 nGy/h for Absorbed dose rates (D), 0.27 mSv/y for Annual Effective Dose Rates (Deff), 0.13 and 0.18 for External Hazards Index (H{sub ex}) and Internal Hazard Index (H{sub in}), respectively. These calculated hazard indices were used to estimate the potential radiological health risk in soil and the dose rates associated with it were well below their permissible limit. The overall findings show that no radiological threat to the health of the population in the study area.

Hassan, Nur Nazihah; Khoo, Kok Siong [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

70

Environmental consequences of postulated radionuclide releases from the Battelle Memorial Institute Columbus Laboratories JN-1b Building at the West Jefferson site as a result of severe natural phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated radionuclide releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Battelle Memorial Institute Columbus Laboratories JN-1b Building at the West Jefferson site. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Maximum radioactive material deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum radioactive material deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the events are well below the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The likely maximum residual contamination from beta and gamma emitters are far below the background produced by fallout from nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere.

Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

72

additive hazards model: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of spatial occurrence of landslides by discriminant analysis Boyer, Edmond 212 Lesson 1. Natural Hazards & Natural Disasters Geosciences Websites Summary: Lesson 1. Natural...

73

Hazards Survey and Hazards Assessments  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This volume is to assist DOE Operations/Field Offices and operating contractors in complying with the DOE O 151.1 requirement that Hazards Surveys and facility-specific Hazards Assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-2.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

74

Environmental Hazards and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 2. Pollution -Mexico. 3. Transboundary pollution. 4. Conservation of natural resources - UnitedEnvironmental Hazards and Bioresource Management in the United States- Mexico Borderlands Edited. -(Special studies ;v. 3) Includes bibliographical references. ISBN 0-87903-503-X 1. Pollution -United States

Murphy, Bob

75

Landslide hazards assessment and uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landslides are natural phenomena which are difficult to predict because their initiation depends on many factors and on the interaction between these factors. The annual number of causalities caused by landslides is in the ...

Karam, Karim S. (Karim Semaan), 1977-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Analysis of nuclear reactor instability phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phenomena known as density-wave instability often occurs in phase change systems, such as boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRS). Our current understanding of density-wave oscillations is in fairly good shape for linear phenomena (eg, the onset of instabilities) but is not very advanced for non-linear phenomena [Lahey and Podowski, 1989]. In particular, limit cycle and chaotic instability modes are not well understood in boiling systems such as current and advanced generation BWRs (eg, SBWR). In particular, the SBWR relies on natural circulation and is thus inherently prone to problems with density-wave instabilities. The purpose of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of nonlinear nuclear-coupled density-wave instability phenomena in BWRS. This research builds on the work of Achard et al [1985] and Clausse et al [1991] who showed, respectively, that Hopf bifurcations and chaotic oscillations may occur in boiling systems.

Lahey, R.T. Jr.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Toxic hazards of underground excavation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inadvertent intrusion into natural or man-made toxic or hazardous material deposits as a consequence of activities such as mining, excavation or tunnelling has resulted in numerous deaths and injuries in this country. This study is a preliminary investigation to identify and document instances of such fatal or injurious intrusion. An objective is to provide useful insights and information related to potential hazards due to future intrusion into underground radioactive-waste-disposal facilities. The methodology used in this study includes literature review and correspondence with appropriate government agencies and organizations. Key categories of intrusion hazards are asphyxiation, methane, hydrogen sulfide, silica and asbestos, naturally occurring radionuclides, and various mine or waste dump related hazards.

Smith, R.; Chitnis, V.; Damasian, M.; Lemm, M.; Popplesdorf, N.; Ryan, T.; Saban, C.; Cohen, J.; Smith, C.; Ciminesi, F.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Ion exchange phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Possible new wave phenomena in the brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose to search for new wave phenomena in the brain by using interference effects in analogy to the well-known double slit (Young) experiment. This method is able to extend the range of oscillation frequencies to much higher values than currently accessible. It is argued that such experiments may test the hypothesis of the wave nature of information coding.

Jerzy Szwed

2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

Sensor network localization based on natural phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autonomous localization is crucial for many sensor network applications. The goal of this thesis is to develop a distributed localization algorithm for the PLUG indoor sensor network by analyzing sound and light sensory ...

Kim, Daniel Sang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Natural Phenomena Exhibited by Forest Fires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

column is carried forward in a long relatively narrow band per- pendicular with the wind. Vertical development of the convec- tion column is restricted by the wind. Relatively small vertical smoke columns. Both regular speed and time-lapse motion picture photographic techniques are employed. During parts

82

Hazard Baseline Documentation  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This standard establishes uniform Office of Environmental Management (EM) guidance on hazard baseline documents that identify and control radiological and non-radiological hazards for all EM facilities.

1995-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

83

High speed imaging of transient non-Newtonian fluid phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I investigate the utility of high speed imaging for gaining scientific insight into the nature of short-duration transient fluid phenomena, specifically applied to the Kaye effect. The Kaye effect, noted ...

Gallup, Benjamin H. (Benjamin Hodsdon), 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

MULTISCALE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project developed and supported a technology base in nonequilibrium phenomena underpinning fundamental issues in condensed matter and materials science, and applied this technology to selected problems. In this way the increasingly sophisticated synthesis and characterization available for classes of complex electronic and structural materials provided a testbed for nonlinear science, while nonlinear and nonequilibrium techniques helped advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of material microstructure, their evolution, fundamental to macroscopic functionalities. The project focused on overlapping areas of emerging thrusts and programs in the Los Alamos materials community for which nonlinear and nonequilibrium approaches will have decisive roles and where productive teamwork among elements of modeling, simulations, synthesis, characterization and applications could be anticipated--particularly multiscale and nonequilibrium phenomena, and complex matter in and between fields of soft, hard and biomimetic materials. Principal topics were: (i) Complex organic and inorganic electronic materials, including hard, soft and biomimetic materials, self-assembly processes and photophysics; (ii) Microstructure and evolution in multiscale and hierarchical materials, including dynamic fracture and friction, dislocation and large-scale deformation, metastability, and inhomogeneity; and (iii) Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phases and phase transformations, emphasizing competing interactions, frustration, landscapes, glassy and stochastic dynamics, and energy focusing.

A. BISHOP

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Oil or Hazardous Spills Law requires notice to the Environmental Protection Division of the State Department of Natural Resources Emergency Operations Center when there is a spill or release of...

86

Hazardous Waste Management Training  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working with hazardous materials should receive annual training that addresses storage, use, and disposal of hazardous before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

Dai, Pengcheng

87

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANNEX Q HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE #12;ANNEX Q - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE 03/10/2014 v.2.0 Page Q-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex Q: Hazardous Materials Emergency Response, and contents within, is a guide to how the University conducts a response specific to a hazardous materials

88

Track 3: Exposure Hazards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

89

Prevention, Abatement, and Control of Hazardous Substance Release (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Natural Resources is authorized to establish rules regarding the prevention and mitigation of hazardous substance release. These sections contain information on the notification...

90

Emergent Phenomena at Oxide Interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transition metal oxides (TMOs) are an ideal arena for the study of electronic correlations because the s-electrons of the transition metal ions are removed and transferred to oxygen ions, and hence the strongly correlated d-electrons determine their physical properties such as electrical transport, magnetism, optical response, thermal conductivity, and superconductivity. These electron correlations prohibit the double occupancy of metal sites and induce a local entanglement of charge, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom. This gives rise to a variety of phenomena, e.g., Mott insulators, various charge/spin/orbital orderings, metal-insulator transitions, multiferroics, and superconductivity. In recent years, there has been a burst of activity to manipulate these phenomena, as well as create new ones, using oxide heterostructures. Most fundamental to understanding the physical properties of TMOs is the concept of symmetry of the order parameter. As Landau recognized, the essence of phase transitions is the change of the symmetry. For example, ferromagnetic ordering breaks the rotational symmetry in spin space, i.e., the ordered phase has lower symmetry than the Hamiltonian of the system. There are three most important symmetries to be considered here. (i) Spatial inversion (I), defined as r {yields} -r. In the case of an insulator, breaking this symmetry can lead to spontaneous electric polarization, i.e. ferroelectricity, or pyroelectricity once the point group belongs to polar group symmetry. (ii) Time-reversal symmetry (T) defined as t {yields} -t. In quantum mechanics, the time-evolution of the wave-function {Psi} is given by the phase factor e{sup -iEt/{h_bar}} with E being the energy, and hence time-reversal basically corresponds to taking the complex conjugate of the wave-function. Also the spin, which is induced by the 'spinning' of the particle, is reversed by time-reversal. Broken T-symmetry is most naturally associated with magnetism, since the spin operator changes sign with T-operation. (iii) Gauge symmetry (G), which is associated with a change in the phase of the wave-function as {Psi} {yields} e{sup i{theta}}{Psi}. Gauge symmetry is connected to the law of charge conservation, and broken G-symmetry corresponds to superconductivity/superfluidity. To summarize, the interplay among these electronic degrees of freedom produces various forms of symmetry breaking patterns of I, T, and G, leading to novel emergent phenomena, which can appear only by the collective behavior of electrons and cannot be expected from individual electrons. Figure 1 shows this schematically by means of several representative phenomena. From this viewpoint, the interfaces of TMOs offer a unique and important laboratory because I is already broken by the structure itself, and the detailed form of broken I-symmetry can often be designed. Also, two-dimensionality usually enhances the effects of electron correlations by reducing their kinetic energy. These two features of oxide interfaces produce many novel effects and functions that cannot be attained in bulk form. Given that the electromagnetic responses are a major source of the physical properties of solids, and new gauge structures often appear in correlated electronic systems, we put 'emergent electromagnetism' at the center of Fig. 1.

Hwang, H.Y.

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

91

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High- importance phenomena related to the RPV include crack initiation and subcritical crack growth; field fabrication process control; property control in heavy...

92

LABORATORY VIII NUCLEAR PHENOMENA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by radioactive decay. Our bodies are built of some naturally occurring radioactive nuclei such as potassium 40 emitted from the nucleus, given the generic name of radiation, often have a high enough energy's repair mechanisms or to cause a mutation. Some food products are treated with radiation to kill existing

Minnesota, University of

93

Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a comprehensive, Statewide program to manage hazardous wastes through regulating hazardous waste generation, transportation, storage,...

94

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7...

95

FOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

size distribution model for estimating oil reserves and for use in forest management under the `natural estimates of oil reserves, and be of use for ecosystem based forest management under the `naturalFOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA. William J. Reed #3; JUNE, 1999. Abstract

Reed, W.J.

96

Hazard Analysis Database report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Database for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

Niemi, B.J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hazard analysis results report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Results for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

Niemi, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

WEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction Center (SPC) Watch Atmospheric conditions are right for hazardous weather ­ hazardous weather is likely to occur Issued by SPC Warning Hazardous weather is either imminent or occurring Issued by local NWS office #12;Outlooks--SPC Storm Prediction Center (SPC) Outlook=Convective Outlook Day 1 Day 2

99

Sustainable System for Residual Hazards Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous, radioactive and other toxic substances have routinely been generated and subsequently disposed of in the shallow subsurface throughout the world. Many of today’s waste management techniques do not eliminate the problem, but rather only concentrate or contain the hazardous contaminants. Residual hazards result from the presence of hazardous and/or contaminated material that remains on-site following active operations or the completion of remedial actions. Residual hazards pose continued risk to humans and the environment and represent a significant and chronic problem that require continuous longterm management (i.e. >1000 years). To protect human health and safeguard the natural environment, a sustainable system is required for the proper management of residual hazards. A sustainable system for the management of residual hazards will require the integration of engineered, institutional and land-use controls to isolate residual contaminants and thus minimize the associated hazards. Engineered controls are physical modifications to the natural setting and ecosystem, including the site, facility, and/or the residual materials themselves, in order to reduce or eliminate the potential for exposure to contaminants of concern (COCs). Institutional controls are processes, instruments, and mechanisms designed to influence human behavior and activity. System failure can involve hazardous material escaping from the confinement because of system degradation (i.e., chronic or acute degradation) or by externalintrusion of the biosphere into the contaminated material because of the loss of institutional control. An ongoing analysis of contemporary and historic sites suggests that the significance of the loss of institutional controls is a critical pathway because decisions made during the operations/remedial action phase, as well as decisions made throughout the residual hazards management period, are key to the longterm success of the prescribed system. In fact, given that society has become more reliant on and confident of engineered controls, there may be a growing tendency to be even less concerned with institutional controls.

Kevin M. Kostelnik; James H. Clarke; Jerry L. Harbour

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Hazard Analysis Database Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U S . Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved Authorization Basis (AB) for the River Protection Project (RPP). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the Tank Farms FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The Hazard Analysis Database supports the preparation of Chapters 3 ,4 , and 5 of the Tank Farms FSAR and the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Analysis Database: Data from the results of the hazard evaluations, and (2) Hazard Topography Database: Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

GRAMS, W.H.

2000-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Hazardous Materials and Controlled Hazardous Substances (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A permit is required to own, establish, operate, or maintain a facility in the state of Maryland that transfers quantities of a single hazardous material in excess of 100,000 pounds at any time...

102

Missouri Department of Natural Resources Hazardous Waste Program Weldon Spring site remedial action project - status of project to date January 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the progress made by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) during the fourth year (1996) of the Agreement in Support (AIS) in its oversight role of the Weldon Springs Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The fourth year at the Weldon Springs Site shows sustained progress as the project moves through the final design and into the remedial action phases of the Chemical Plant Operable Unit. The remedial action phase includes the Foundations Removal work package, Chemical Solidification and Stabilization, and disposal cell.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Mann, C.P., Stix, J., Vallance, J.W., and Richer, M., 2004, Subaqueous intracaldera volcanism, Ilopango Caldera, El Salvador, Central America, in Rose, W.I., Bommer, J.J., Lpez, D.L., Carr, M.J., and Major, J.J., eds., Natural hazards in El Salvador: Boul  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Ilopango Caldera, El Salvador, Central America, in Rose, W.I., Bommer, J.J., López, D.L., Carr, M.J., and Major, J.J., eds., Natural hazards in El Salvador: Boulder, Colorado, Geological Society of America of America Special Paper 375 2004 Subaqueous intracaldera volcanism, Ilopango Caldera, El Salvador, Central

Long, Bernard

104

Analysis of nuclear reactor instability phenomena. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phenomena known as density-wave instability often occurs in phase change systems, such as boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRS). Our current understanding of density-wave oscillations is in fairly good shape for linear phenomena (eg, the onset of instabilities) but is not very advanced for non-linear phenomena [Lahey and Podowski, 1989]. In particular, limit cycle and chaotic instability modes are not well understood in boiling systems such as current and advanced generation BWRs (eg, SBWR). In particular, the SBWR relies on natural circulation and is thus inherently prone to problems with density-wave instabilities. The purpose of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of nonlinear nuclear-coupled density-wave instability phenomena in BWRS. This research builds on the work of Achard et al [1985] and Clausse et al [1991] who showed, respectively, that Hopf bifurcations and chaotic oscillations may occur in boiling systems.

Lahey, R.T. Jr.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and...

106

Surveillance Guides - Hazards Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

briefings adequately address controls for the identified hazards? Examples would be lockouttagout requirements, hold points, confined space, radiological work permits, fire...

107

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

108

Hazardous Material Security (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All facilities processing, storing, managing, or transporting hazardous materials must be evaluated every five years for security issues. A report must be submitted to the Department of the...

109

Preliminary hazards analysis for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In summary, it provides: a general description of the facility and its operation; identification of hazards at the facility; and details of the hazards analysis, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions. As part of the safety analysis procedure set forth by DOE, a PHA must be performed for the NIF. The PHA characterizes the level of intrinsic potential hazard associated with a facility, and provides the basis for hazard classification. The hazard classification determines the level of safety documentation required, and the DOE Order governing the safety analysis. The hazard classification also determines the level of review and approval required for the safety analysis report. The hazards of primary concern associated with NIF are radiological and toxicological in nature. The hazard classification is determined by comparing facility inventories of radionuclides and chemicals with threshold values for the various hazard classification levels and by examining postulated bounding accidents associated with the hazards of greatest significance. Such postulated bounding accidents cannot take into account active mitigative features; they must assume the unmitigated consequences of a release, taking into account only passive safety features. In this way, the intrinsic hazard level of the facility can be ascertained.

Brereton, S.J.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Nuclear pairing: basic phenomena revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review the phenomena associated with pairing in nuclear physics, most prominently the ubiquitous presence of odd-even mass differences and the properties of the excitation spectra, very different for even-even and odd-A nuclei. There are also significant dynamical effects of pairing, visible in the inertias associated with nuclear rotation and large-amplitude shape deformation.

G. F. Bertsch

2012-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

111

Graphene tests of Klein phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene is characterized by chiral electronic excitations. As such it provides a perfect testing ground for the production of Klein pairs (electron/holes). If confirmed, the standard results for barrier phenomena must be reconsidered with, as a byproduct, the accumulation within the barrier of holes.

Stefano De Leo; Pietro Rotelli

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

112

K Basin Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K East (KE)/K West (KW) Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site have been used for storage of irradiated N Reactor and single-pass reactor fuel. Remaining spent fuel is continuing to be stored underwater in racks and canisters in the basins while fuel retrieval activities proceed to remove the fuel from the basins. The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project is adding equipment to the facility in preparation for removing the fuel and sludge from the basins In preparing this hazard analysis, a variety of hazard analysis techniques were used by the K Basins hazard analysis team, including hazard and operability studies, preliminary hazard analyses, and ''what if'' analyses (WHC-SD-SNF-PHA-001, HNF-2032, HNF-2456, and HNF-SD-SNF-SAD-002). This document summarizes the hazard analyses performed as part of the safety evaluations for the various modification projects and combines them with the original hazard analyses to create a living hazard analysis document. As additional operational activities and modifications are developed, this document will be updated as needed to ensure it covers all the hazards at the K Basins in a summary form and to ensure the subsequent safety analysis is bounding. This hazard analysis also identifies the preliminary set of design features and controls that the facility could rely on to prevent or reduce the frequency or mitigate consequences of identified accident conditions based on their importance and significance to safety. The operational controls and institutional programs relied on for prevention or mitigation of an uncontrolled release are identified as potential technical safety requirements. All operational activities and energy sources at the K Basins are evaluated in this hazard analysis. Using a systematic approach, this document identifies hazards created by abnormal operating conditions and external events (e.g., earthquakes) that have the potential for causing undesirable consequences to the facility worker, the onsite individual, or the public. This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and complies with the requirements of 10 CFR 830.

SEMMENS, L.S.

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

113

Hazardous Waste Management (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The New Mexico Environment Department's Hazardous Waste Bureau is responsible for the management of hazardous waste in the state. The Bureau enforces the rules established by the Environmental...

114

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act tasks the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection with regulating hazardous waste. The department is charged with siting, review, permitting and development of hazardous waste...

115

Accretion Disks and Eruptive Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes eruptive phenomena in pre-main sequence stars. The eruptions of FU Orionis stars have much in common with outbursts in other accreting systems, such as dwarf novae and some symbiotic stars. These common features are best understood as increases in the rate material flows through an accretion disk. The spectroscopic properties, decay of the light curves, and outflow phenomena suggest that these outbursts arise from thermal instabilities in the disk. Available data and estimates for recurrence times indicate that young stars can accrete much, perhaps all, of their mass in FU Ori accretion events. Future observations can test this notion and place better constraints on the importance of eruptive events in the early life of a low mass star.

Scott J. Kenyon

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

116

New phenomena searches at CDF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report on recent results from the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment, which is accumulating data from proton-antiproton collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The new phenomena being explored include Higgs, Supersymmetry, and large extra dimensions. They also present the latest results of searches for heavy objects, which would indicate physics beyond the Standard Model.

Soha, Aron; /UC, Davis

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Studies of Novel Quantum Phenomena in Ruthenates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strongly correlated oxides have been the subject of intense study in contemporary condensed matter physics, and perovskite ruthenates (Sr,Ca)n+1RunO3n+1 have become a new focus in this field. One of important characteristics of ruthenates is that both lattice and orbital degrees of freedom are active and are strongly coupled to charge and spin degrees of freedom. Such a complex interplay of multiple degrees of freedom causes the properties of ruthenates to exhibit a gigantic response to external stimuli under certain circumstances. Magnetic field, pressure, and chemical composition all have been demonstrated to be effective in inducing electronic/magnetic phase transitions in ruthenates. Therefore, ruthenates are ideal candidates for searching for novel quantum phenomena through controlling external parameters. The objective of this project is to search for novel quantum phenomena in ruthenate materials using high-quality single crystals grown by the floating-zone technique, and investigate the underlying physics. The following summarizes our accomplishments. We have focused on trilayered Sr4Ru3O10 and bilayered (Ca1-xSrx)3Ru2O7. We have succeeded in growing high-quality single crystals of these materials using the floating-zone technique and performed systematic studies on their electronic and magnetic properties through a variety of measurements, including resistivity, Hall coefficient, angle-resolved magnetoresistivity, Hall probe microscopy, and specific heat. We have also studied microscopic magnetic properties for some of these materials using neutron scattering in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory. We have observed a number of unusual exotic quantum phenomena through these studies, such as an orbital selective metamagnetic transition, bulk spin valve effect, and a heavy-mass nearly ferromagnetic state with a surprisingly large Wilson ratio. Our work has also revealed underlying physics of these exotic phenomena. Exotic phenomena of correlated electron has been among central topics of contempary condensed matter physics. Ultrfast phase transitions accompanied by switching of conductivity or magnetization in stronly correlated materials are believed to be promising in developing next generation of transistors. Our work on layered ruthenates has remarkably advanced our understanding of how the exotic phenomena of correlated electrons is governed by the complex interplay between charge, spin, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom. In addition to studies on ruthenates, we have also expanded our research to the emerging field of Fe-based superconductors, focusing on the iron chalcogenide Fe1+y(Te1-xSex) superconductor system. We first studied the superconductivity of this alloy system following the discovery of superconductivity in FeSe using polycrystalline samples. Later, we successfuly grew high-quality single crystals of these materials. Using these single crystals, we have determined the magnetic structure of the parent compound Fe1+yTe, observed spin resonance of superconducting state in optimally doped samples, and established a phase diagram. Our work has produced an important impact in this burgeoning field. The PI presented an invited talk on this topic at APS March meeting in 2010. We have published 19 papers in these two areas (one in Nature materials, five in Physical Review Letters, and nine in Physical Review B) and submitted two (see the list of publications attached below).

Mao, Zhiqiang

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

118

Hazardous Waste Management (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A person shall not generate, dispose, store, treat, or transport hazardous waste in this state without complying with the requirements of this article. The department, in the conduct of its duties...

119

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

120

Proceedings Hazards and Disasters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liang-Chun Chen, Jie-Ying Wu, Yi-Chung Liu, Sung-Ying Chien HAZARDS EDUCATION BY GEOGRAPHERS: A DECADE-DISASTER CONDOMINIUM HOUSING RECONSTRUCTION AND HOUSEHOLD CHARACTERISTICS............. 35 Jie-Ying Wu, Liang-Chun Chen

Wang, Hai

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

K Basins Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

WEBB, R.H.

1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

122

K Basin Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

PECH, S.H.

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

123

Automated Job Hazards Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AJHA Program - The Automated Job Hazard Analysis (AJHA) computer program is part of an enhanced work planning process employed at the Department of Energy's Hanford worksite. The AJHA system is routinely used to performed evaluations for medium and high risk work, and in the development of corrective maintenance work packages at the site. The tool is designed to ensure that workers are fully involved in identifying the hazards, requirements, and controls associated with tasks.

124

A modeling framework for investment planning in interdependent infrastructures in multi-hazard environments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, much of protection planning is conducted separately for each infrastructure and hazard. Limited funding requires a balance of expenditures between terrorism and natural hazards based on potential impacts. This report documents the results of a Laboratory Directed Research&Development (LDRD) project that created a modeling framework for investment planning in interdependent infrastructures focused on multiple hazards, including terrorism. To develop this framework, three modeling elements were integrated: natural hazards, terrorism, and interdependent infrastructures. For natural hazards, a methodology was created for specifying events consistent with regional hazards. For terrorism, we modeled the terrorist's actions based on assumptions regarding their knowledge, goals, and target identification strategy. For infrastructures, we focused on predicting post-event performance due to specific terrorist attacks and natural hazard events, tempered by appropriate infrastructure investments. We demonstrate the utility of this framework with various examples, including protection of electric power, roadway, and hospital networks.

Brown, Nathanael J. K.; Gearhart, Jared Lee; Jones, Dean A.; Nozick, Linda Karen; Prince, Michael

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Hazardous Ignitable Reactive Toxic Oxidizer Other ( explain ) Generator Building Dept. HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL: Generator Building Dept. Please fill out the hazardous waste label on line and download labels on to a plainHAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY 5-4170 Corrosive Non

Schaefer, Marcus

126

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

127

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard Mitigation Plan Colorado Multi-Hazards Mitigation Plan July 2002 the May 2001 Report to the Governor, Colorado Wildland Urban Interface; Section 2 includes the Hazard the status of the Wildland Urban Interface in Colorado; the hazards that exist; mitigation measures

128

Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes To appear in "Chemistry of Carbon@acclab.helsinki.fi 1 #12;2CHAPTER 1. IRRADIATION-INDUCED PHENOMENA IN CARBON NANOTUBES #12;Contents 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes 1 1.1 Introduction

Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

129

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Identification of Aircraft Hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

K. Ashley

2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

131

NGNP SITE 2 HAZARDS ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project initiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act, is based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is a helium-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor that can operate at temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, to generate process heat in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. Nuclear energy in the form of LWRs has been used in the U.S. and internationally principally for the generation of electricity. However, because the HTGR operates at higher temperatures than LWRs, it can be used to displace the use of fossil fuels in many industrial applications. It also provides a carbon emission-free energy supply. For example, the energy needs for the recovery and refining of petroleum, for the petrochemical industry and for production of transportation fuels and feedstocks using coal conversion processes require process heat provided at temperatures approaching 800 C. This temperature range is readily achieved by the HTGR technology. This report summarizes a site assessment authorized by INL under the NGNP Project to determine hazards and potential challenges that site owners and HTGR designers need to be aware of when developing the HTGR design for co-location at industrial facilities, and to evaluate the site for suitability considering certain site characteristics. The objectives of the NGNP site hazard assessments are to do an initial screening of representative sites in order to identify potential challenges and restraints to be addressed in design and licensing processes; assure the HTGR technology can be deployed at variety of sites for a range of applications; evaluate potential sites for potential hazards and describe some of the actions necessary to mitigate impacts of hazards; and, provide key insights that can inform the plant design process. The report presents a summary of the process methodology and the results of an assessment of hazards typical of a class of candidate sites for the potential deployment of HTGR reactor technology. The assessment considered health and safety, and other important siting characteristics to determine the potential impact of identified hazards and potential challenges presented by the location for this technology. A four reactor module nuclear plant (2000 to 2400 MW thermal), that co-generates steam, electricity for general use in the plant, and hot gas for use in a nearby chemical processing facility, to provide the requisite performance and reliability was assumed for the assessment.

Wayne Moe

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Hazardous Waste Management (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health is the designated agency to administer and coordinate a hazardous waste management program to provide for the reduction of hazardous waste generation, reuse, recovery, and...

133

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act addresses the safe and proper management of hazardous wastes and used oil, the permitting of hazardous waste facilities, and the siting of facilities. The Department of Environmental...

134

PUREX facility hazards assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the hazards assessment for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Operation of PUREX is the responsibility of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for PUREX. DOE Order 5500.3A requires an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification. In October of 1990, WHC was directed to place PUREX in standby. In December of 1992 the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management authorized the termination of PUREX and directed DOE-RL to proceed with shutdown planning and terminal clean out activities. Prior to this action, its mission was to reprocess irradiated fuels for the recovery of uranium and plutonium. The present mission is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration at the PUREX facility and to preserve that condition for 10 years. The ten year time frame represents the typical duration expended to define, authorize and initiate follow-on decommissioning and decontamination activities.

Sutton, L.N.

1994-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

135

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin...

136

Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

improvement in siting of command and response centers, emergency egress lighting, radio preventive maintenance, emergency communication equipment testing, and the Metal Finishing...

137

Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

forested land. A large area of the reservation is leased to the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife. The Manager of the PortsmouthPaducah Project Office (PPPO) reports to...

138

Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

capabilities identified by the site's analyses and the site's level of preparedness in terms of attaining and maintaining the needed response capabilities. Of particular interest...

139

Review of Sitet Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

capabilities identified by the site's analyses and the site's level of preparedness in terms of attaining and maintaining the needed response capabilities. Of particular interest...

140

Targeted Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and contains the same verbiage as the Contractor Requirements Document in DOE Order 151.1C for operational emergencies not further classified and for operational emergencies...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events - August  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 <Ones |Laboratory, JuneDid31-2, REV. 0) |21, 2012 |

142

CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events - January  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 <Ones |Laboratory, JuneDid31-2, REV. 0) |21, 2012

143

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2003) 3: 703712 European Geosciences Union 2003 Natural Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for strong earthquake prediction J. Z. Li1, Z. Q. Bai1, W. S. Chen1, Y. Q. Xia1, Y. R. Liu1, and Z. Q. Ren2 1

Boyer, Edmond

144

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2003) 3: 713724 European Geosciences Union 2003 Natural Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Hot block and ash avalanche deposits can be distinguished by the presence of radially-oriented joints has produced hot block and ash avalanche deposits. The ability to discrimi- nate between these "hot by the presence of clasts that preserve pre-depositional weathering and jointing sur- faces. Volcanic avalanches

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

145

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2003) 3: 423433 c European Geosciences Union 2003 Natural Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

joints, this basal discontinuity delimited a 20- mio-m3 rock block, with a potential sliding direction mass were less persistent and separated by rock bridges; this rock volume acted as key block of the key block. Acceleration of this mechanical degradation occurred during the 20-year pe- riod before

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

146

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2003) 3: 8193 c European Geosciences Union 2003 Natural Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the dynamic factors that control landslide triggering (rainfall pattern, land-use). For this reason, and a transient diffusive model. A comparative test of these models was performed to simulate landslide oc- curred model results in the best model for the simulation of shallow landslide triggering after a rainfall

Boyer, Edmond

147

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2003) 3: 443455 c European Geosciences Union 2003 Natural Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of River Vezza (Tuscany Region ­ Italy). This area (51.6 km2) was affected by over 250 landslides in the north-western sector of Tuscany in the Apuan Alps with a total catchment area of 51.6 km2 (Fig. 1 outcropping in the area, triggered by the pluviometric event of 19 June 1996. In the last decades landslide

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

148

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2003) 3: 341351 c European Geosciences Union 2003 Natural Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conical circular lake, islands in an open domain and submarine mountains in an open domain) and different of the geophysical processes, which are at the origin of the tsunami generation. Different methods for tsunami as distributed point sources. Koike and Imamura (2001) proposed a wavelet basis for the sub fault distribution

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

149

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2003) 3: 179195 c European Geosciences Union 2003 Natural Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the SW Hellenic ARC A. Tzanis1 and F. Vallianatos2 1Department of Geophysics and Geothermy, University

Boyer, Edmond

150

Hazardous Materials Introduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL Secretary MonizSiteAboutRadioactiveHazardous

151

ORISE: Hazard Assessments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACK Mapping ApplicationEnvironment AtGraduateHazard

152

Fire Hazards Listing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:EpitaxialtransatlanticUnified| DepartmentFindingHazards Listing

153

Shedding a new light on hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sun's ability to detoxify waterborne chemicals has long been known; polluted streams, for example, become cleaner as they flow through sunlit areas. Solar detoxification harnesses this natural degradation process for beneficial ends, producing simple, nonhazardous substances from hazardous organic chemicals. Solar detoxification systems now being developed break down these chemicals without using the fossil fuels required by conventional technologies. Sunlight destroys hazardous waste because of the distinctive properties of photons, the packets of energy that make up sunlight. Low-energy photons add thermal energy that will heat toxic chemicals; high-energy photons add the energy needed to break the chemical bonds of these chemicals. The detoxification process discussed here takes advantage of this latter group of photons found in the ultraviolet portion of the solar spectrum. 4 figs.

Reece, N.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the sector grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the one-twelfth grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Hazardous Substances Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Commissioner of the Department of Agriculture has the authority to promulgate regulations declaring specified substances to be hazardous and establishing labeling, transportation, storage, and...

157

Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure, and post-closure of these facilities.

158

Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Transportation of hazardous wastes into or through the State of Connecticut requires a permit. Some exceptions apply. The regulations provide information about obtaining permits and other permit...

159

Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to hazardous waste management, waste standards, permitting requirements, and land disposal...

160

Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may:  cause or significantly...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fractal Geometry and Spatial Phenomena A Bibliography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractal Geometry and Spatial Phenomena A Bibliography January 1991 Mark MacLennan, A. Stewart. MEASUREMENT ISSUES........................................................... 8 II.1 ESTIMATION OF FRACTAL DIMENSION - GENERAL ISSUES .......... 8 II.2 ESTIMATION OF FRACTAL DIMENSION FOR CURVES/PROFILES ... 9 II.3

California at Santa Barbara, University of

162

Smouldering Combustion Phenomena in Science and Technology   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smouldering is the slow, low-temperature, flameless form of combustion of a condensed fuel. It poses safety and environmental hazards and allows novel technological application but its fundamentals remain mostly unknown ...

Rein, Guillermo

163

Reproductive phenomena of a sexual buffelgrass plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPRODUCTIVE PHENOMENA OF A SEXUAL EUFFELGRASS PLANT A Thesis 3y Charles Millard Taliaferro . Submitted to the Graduate School of the A & M University of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... January 1964 Major Sub?'ect Agronomy REPRODUCTIVE PHENOMENA OF A SEXUAL BUFFELGRASS PLANT A Thesis Charles Millard Taliaferro Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) / ember) (Member) Memb er) January...

Taliaferro, Charles Millard

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

165

Hazardous Waste Management Standards and Regulations (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act states the standards and regulations for the management of hazardous waste. No person shall construct, modify or operate a hazardous waste facility or otherwise dispose of hazardous waste...

166

Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting Board is responsible for overseeing the siting of hazardous waste facilities in Maryland, and will treat hazardous waste facilities separately from low-level...

167

Static Friction Phenomena The following static friction phenomena have a direct dependency on velocity.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coulomb Friction Viscous Friction Stribeck Friction Static Friction Phenomena The following static friction phenomena have a direct dependency on velocity. Static Friction Model: Friction force opposes the direction of motion when the sliding velocity is zero. Coulomb Friction Model: Friction force

Simpkins, Alex

168

Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the Gasoline Tank Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the...

169

Dissipative phenomena in quark-gluon plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transport coefficients of small-chemical-potential quark-gluon plasmas are estimated and dissipative corrections to the scaling hydrodynamic equations for ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions are studied. The absence of heat-conduction phenomena is clarified. Lower and upper bounds on the shear-viscosity coefficient are derived. QCD phenomenology is used to estimate effects of color-electric and -magnetic shielding, and nonperturbative antiscreening. Bulk viscosity associated with the plasma-to-hadron transition is estimated within the relaxation-time approximation. Finally, effects of dissipative phenomena on the relation between initial energy density and final rapidity density are estimated.

Danielewicz, P.; Gyulassy, M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 941954, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/941/2006/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the discontinuity and natural slope features. First, to obtain rock source areas (RSAs), data obtained from Sciences Determination of the rockfall source in an urban settlement area by using a rule-based fuzzy of the rockfall hazard was determined by various techniques basing on the selec- tion of a rockfall source

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

171

Method of recycling hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of primary metal from ores has long been a necessary, but environmentally devastating process. Over the past 20 years, in an effort to lessen environmental impacts, the metal processing industry has developed methods for recovering metal values from certain hazardous wastes. However, these processes leave residual molten slag that requires disposal in hazardous waste landfills. A new process recovers valuable metals, metal alloys, and metal oxides from hazardous wastes, such as electric arc furnace (EAF) dust from steel mills, mill scale, spent aluminum pot liners, and wastewater treatment sludge from electroplating. At the same time, the process does not create residual waste for disposal. This new method uses all wastes from metal production processes. These hazardous materials are converted to three valuable products - mineral wool, zinc oxide, and high-grade iron.

NONE

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

172

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes standards that must be met by facilities generating and processing hazardous and industrial waste, as well as required permits for the construction and operation of such a...

173

Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Management Regulations follow the EPA's definitions and guidelines for the most part, which are listed in 40 CFR parts 260-282. In addition to these federal regulations the...

174

Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules identify and list hazardous waste and set standards for the generators and operators of such waste as well as owners or operators of waste facilities. They also stats standards for...

175

Health Hazards in Indoor Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Hazards in Indoor Air. In Proceedings of the 2010for VOCs from post-1990 indoor air concentration studies inUnion project on indoor air pollutants. Allergy, 2008. 63(

Logue, Jennifer M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

FIRE HAZARDS ANALYSIS - BUSTED BUTTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas at the Busted Butte Test Facility and to ascertain whether the DOE fire safety objectives are met. The objective, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Section 4.2, is to establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees. (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

R. Longwell; J. Keifer; S. Goodin

2001-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

177

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION Huiying Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION by Huiying Sun Ph.D, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, CHINA, 1991 .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA September, 1999 c flHuiying Sun, 1999 #12; Abstract We propose using

Heckman, Nancy E.

178

PHASE COHERENCE PHENOMENA IN DISORDERED SUPERCONDUCTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHASE COHERENCE PHENOMENA IN DISORDERED SUPERCONDUCTORS A. LAMACRAFT AND B. D. SIMONS Cavendish on the quasi­particle properties of disordered superconductors. Again, attempts to develop a consistent theory has been formulated. Yet, a complete description of the phenomenology of the disordered superconductor

Simons, Ben

179

Resonant phenomena in slowly perturbed elliptic billiards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider an elliptic billiard whose shape slowly changes. During slow evolution of the billiard certain resonance conditions can be fulfilled. We study the phenomena of capture into a resonance and scattering on resonances which lead to the destruction of the adiabatic invariance in the system.

A. P. Itin; A. I. Neishtadt

2005-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

180

Preliminary hazards analysis -- vitrification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for mixed waste vitrification by joule heating. The purpose of performing a PHA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PHA is then followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title 1 and 2 design. The PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during the facility`s construction and testing. It should be completed before routine operation of the facility commences. This PHA addresses the first four chapters of the safety analysis process, in accordance with the requirements of DOE Safety Guidelines in SG 830.110. The hazards associated with vitrification processes are evaluated using standard safety analysis methods which include: identification of credible potential hazardous energy sources; identification of preventative features of the facility or system; identification of mitigative features; and analyses of credible hazards. Maximal facility inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials are postulated to evaluate worst case accident consequences. These inventories were based on DOE-STD-1027-92 guidance and the surrogate waste streams defined by Mayberry, et al. Radiological assessments indicate that a facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous materials assessment indicates that a Mixed Waste Vitrification facility will be a Low Hazard facility having minimal impacts to offsite personnel and the environment.

Coordes, D.; Ruggieri, M.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The effects of hazardous waste taxes on generation and disposal of chlorinated solvent waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1989, 30 states levied taxes on e generation or management of hazardous waste. These taxes constitute one of the broadest applications of an emissions tax in U.S. environmental policy and provide a natural experiment ...

Sigman, Hilary

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management- December 4, 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hazardous Waste Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-30)

183

Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

July, 2004 Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated Posture Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated it is possible for these injuries to heal themselves when the ergonomic hazard is removed, cases do exist where;PAGE 2 ERGONOMIC HAZARDS of the SEATED POSTURE BULLETIN NO. 233 Ergonomic interventions to reduce

Martin, Jeff

184

Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process.

Rodgers, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Lorentz violation at high energy: concepts, phenomena and astrophysical constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider here the possibility of quantum gravity induced violation of Lorentz symmetry (LV). Even if suppressed by the inverse Planck mass such LV can be tested by current experiments and astrophysical observations. We review the effective field theory approach to describing LV, the issue of naturalness, and many phenomena characteristic of LV. We discuss some of the current observational bounds on LV, focusing mostly on those from high energy astrophysics in the QED sector at order E/M_Planck. In this context we present a number of new results which include the explicit computation of rates of the most relevant LV processes, the derivation of a new photon decay constraint, and modification of previous constraints taking proper account of the helicity dependence of the LV parameters implied by effective field theory.

Ted Jacobson; Stefano Liberati; David Mattingly

2005-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Hazard Posed by Depleted Uranium Munitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper assesses the radiological and chemical hazards resulting from the use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions. Due to the low radioactivity of DU, radiological hazards to individuals would become significant in comparison to natural background radiation doses only in cases of prolonged contact---for example, when shards of a DU penetrator remain embedded in a soldier's body. Although the radiation doses to virtually all civilians would be very low, the cumulative "population dose" resulting from the dispersal of hundreds of tons of DU, as occurred during the Gulf War, could result in up to ten cancer deaths. It is highly unlikely that exposures of persons downwind from the use of DU munitions or consuming food or water contaminated by DU dust would reach the estimated threshold for chemical heavy-metal effects. The exposures of soldiers in vehicles struck by DU munitions could be much higher, however, and persons who subsequently enter such vehicles without adequate respiratory protection could potentially be at risk. Soldiers should be trained to avoid unnecessary exposure to DU, and vehicles struck by DU munitions should be made inaccessible to curious civilians. INTRODUCTION

Steve Fetter And; Steve Fetter A

187

WHC fire hazards analysis policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to establish the fire protection policy for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) relative to US Department of Energy (DOE) directives for Fire Hazards Analyses (FHAs) and their relationship to facility Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) as promulgated by the DOE Richland Operations Office.

Evans, C.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover bodies (without needles) Container: Sturdy and leakproof with Hazardous Glass label. Either: Plastic resistant, leakproof plastic carboy with green sharps label. Do not fill these containers completely. Leave

Sheridan, Jennifer

189

Advances in modelling of condensation phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physical parameters in the modelling of condensation phenomena in the CANDU reactor system codes are discussed. The experimental programs used for thermal-hydraulic code validation in the Canadian nuclear industry are briefly described. The modelling of vapour generation and in particular condensation plays a key role in modelling of postulated reactor transients. The condensation models adopted in the current state-of-the-art two-fluid CANDU reactor thermal-hydraulic system codes (CATHENA and TUF) are described. As examples of the modelling challenges faced, the simulation of a cold water injection experiment by CATHENA and the simulation of a condensation induced water hammer experiment by TUF are described.

Liu, W.S.; Zaltsgendler, E. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada); Hanna, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Management Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act contains regulations for safe disposal of hazardous waste, and establishes that a valid license is required to collect, transport, store, treat, use, or dispose of hazardous waste. Short...

191

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A hazardous waste facility permit from the Department of Environmental Quality is required to store, treat or dispose of hazardous waste materials, or to construct, own or operate any facility...

192

Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act is Georgia’s version of Superfund. The Act provides for graduated fees on the disposal of hazardous waste, a trust fund to enable the EPD to clean up or plan...

193

Induction Phenomena in Laser-Sustained Scramjets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary study on induction phenomena in a laser-sustained scramjet was conducted. The induction processes include absorption process of a laser pulse by a reactive mixture, plasma formation, diffusion of active species, shock formation, thermalization process of ambient mixture, induction of local turbulence, etc. For observation of the initial phenomena, an experimental study on effects of a focused laser pulse (Nd:YAG, 335mJ/pulse, pulse width 5nsec) into a hydrogen-air mixture was conducted. Temporal evolutions of typical line spectrum of a laser-induced plasma of the mixture were measured with the photodiode or the photo-multiplier-tube through specific band-pass filters for each spectrum for OH, O+, N+, H, and O. It was shown that the emission from O abruptly increased at 2 nsec, peaked at about 5 nsec, followed by an abrupt drop at 6 nsec. The emission from H atoms secondly increased. Other emissions of N+, O+, and OH peaked at about 17 nsec and continued for about 1 msec.

Ohkawa, Yoko; Tamada, Kazunobu; Horisawa, Hideyuki [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Tokai University, 1117 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa, 259-1292 (Japan); Kimura, Itsuro [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8856 (Japan)

2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

194

D-Area Preliminary Hazards Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive review of hazards associated with the D-Area was performed to identify postulated event scenarios.

Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Paik, I.R. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, , ()

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY 12.A GENERAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on or near any system that produces, uses, or stores hazardous energy, a hazardous energy control program by the contractor-managed HECP (e.g., QA's on construction sites, etc.), they shall comply with the contractor and implementation of these activities. Each shall inform the other of their HECPs and Hazardous Energy Control (HEC

US Army Corps of Engineers

196

15,000 Years of mass-movement history in Lake Lucerne: Implications for seismic and tsunami hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

15,000 Years of mass-movement history in Lake Lucerne: Implications for seismic and tsunami hazards, Central Switzerland 15,000 Years of mass-movement history in Lake Lucerne 409 ABSTRACT A chronological Lucerne (Vierwaldstät- tersee) reveals a complex history of natural hazards affecting the lake and its

Gilli, Adrian

197

Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-hazardous solid chemicals may go in the trash. Have you disposed of "waste-like", legacy and unknown c Manage anyFocus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste inspectors. See a hazardous waste inspection. ons, rrosive. n hemicals? ical waste. Waste-like chemicals have als Are you

Wilcock, William

198

Canister Storage Building (CSB) Hazard Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Hazard Analysis to support the final CSB Safety Analysis Report and documents the results. This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the CSB final safety analysis report (FSAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis process identified hazardous conditions and material-at-risk, determined causes for potential accidents, identified preventive and mitigative features, and qualitatively estimated the frequencies and consequences of specific occurrences. The hazard analysis was performed by a team of cognizant CSB operations and design personnel, safety analysts familiar with the CSB, and technical experts in specialty areas. The material included in this report documents the final state of a nearly two-year long process. Attachment A provides two lists of hazard analysis team members and describes the background and experience of each. The first list is a complete list of the hazard analysis team members that have been involved over the two-year long process. The second list is a subset of the first list and consists of those hazard analysis team members that reviewed and agreed to the final hazard analysis documentation. The material included in this report documents the final state of a nearly two-year long process involving formal facilitated group sessions and independent hazard and accident analysis work. The hazard analysis process led to the selection of candidate accidents for further quantitative analysis. New information relative to the hazards, discovered during the accident analysis, was incorporated into the hazard analysis data in order to compile a complete profile of facility hazards. Through this process, the results of the hazard and accident analyses led directly to the identification of safety structures, systems, and components, technical safety requirements, and other controls required to protect the public, workers, and environment.

POWERS, T.B.

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

199

Shock phenomena in baryonless strongly interacting matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shock phenomena associated with the quark-to-hadron matter phase transition are studied using the concept of adiabats. To allow for an analysis of a medium with vanishing baryon density, the shock and Poisson adiabats are formulated in terms of hydrodynamic fluxes, rather than only thermodynamic variables. The bag-model equation of state is used to describe the phase transition. It is shown that deflagrations from the quark phase above the critical temperature and strong detonations from the supercooled quark phase to the superheated hadron phase are unlikely. Instead the possibility of weak condensation detonations from the supercooled quark phase to a mixed phase is indicated. Strong detonations can occur if the latent energy density of the phase transition is small compared to the energy density of the hadron gas. Simple properties of the adiabats and of the equation of state are employed to derive several analytic results.

Danielewicz, P.; Ruuskanen, P.V.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Critical phenomena in N=2* plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use gauge theory/string theory correspondence to study finite temperature critical behaviour of mass deformed N=4 SU(N) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling, also known as N=2* gauge theory. For certain range of the mass parameters, N=2* plasma undergoes a second-order phase transition. We compute all the static critical exponents of the model and demonstrate that the transition is of the mean-field theory type. We show that the dynamical critical exponent of the model is z=0, with multiple hydrodynamic relaxation rates at criticality. We point out that the dynamical critical phenomena in N=2* plasma is outside the dynamical universality classes established by Hohenberg and Halperin.

A. Buchel; C. Pagnutti

2010-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Implementation of the hazardous debris rule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous debris includes objects contaminated with hazardous waste. Examples of debris include tree stumps, timbers, boulders, tanks, piping, crushed drums, personal protective clothing, etc. Most of the hazardous debris encountered comes from Superfund sites and other facility remediation, although generators and treaters of hazardous waste also generate hazardous debris. Major problems associated with disposal of debris includes: Inappropriateness of many waste treatments to debris; Difficulties in obtaining representative samples; Costs associated with applying waste specific treatments to debris; Subtitle C landfill space was being used for many low hazard debris types. These factors brought about the need for debris treatment technologies and regulations that addressed these issues. The goal of such regulation was to provide treatment to destroy or remove the contamination if possible and, if this is achieved, to dispose of the cleaned debris as a nonhazardous waste. EPA has accomplished this goal through promulgation of the Hazardous Debris Rule, August 18, 1992.

Sailer, J.E.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

202

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

203

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

204

Lab 9: Coasts Natural and Man-made Hazards Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lakes and the oceans. These are wind-produced waves that affect only the top part of the body of water) equals half the wavelength (L). Types Waves are produced as wind blows over a water surface. Originates a continuous water surface) Variations of these three factors produce different wave types: seas are short

Chen, Po

205

SEMIACTIVE CONTROL OF CIVIL STRUCTURES FOR NATURAL HAZARD MITIGATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of wind vibra- tions in cable structures. The focus is on understanding the dynamic characteristics, axial stiffness, angle of inclination, and damper location on the control performance is examined. Specific levels of sag, axial stiff- ness, angle of inclination, and damper location resulting in poor

Spencer Jr., B.F.

206

MATERIALS, INTERFACES, AND ELECTROCHEMICAL PHENOMENA Hydrophilic Zeolite Coatings for Improved  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATERIALS, INTERFACES, AND ELECTROCHEMICAL PHENOMENA Hydrophilic Zeolite Coatings for Improved Heat the system, decreases the oper- ation noise and the pumping cost. Another major consideration for a heat

Aguilar, Guillermo

207

Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish hazardous waste management procedures for facilities operated under authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA). The procedures will follow. to the extent practicable, regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Although Department of Energy (DOE) operations conducted under authority other than the AEA are subject to EPA or State regulations conforming with RCRA, facilities administered under the authority of the AEA are not bound by such requirements.

1982-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

ARM - SGP Rural Driving Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstrumentsPolarExtendedRural Driving Hazards

209

Assessment of External Hazards at Radioactive Waste and Used Fuel Management Facilities - 13505  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the key lessons from the Fukushima accident is the importance of having a comprehensive identification and evaluation of risks posed by external events to nuclear facilities. While the primary focus has been on nuclear power plants, the Canadian nuclear industry has also been updating hazard assessments for radioactive waste and used fuel management facilities to ensure that lessons learnt from Fukushima are addressed. External events are events that originate either physically outside the nuclear site or outside its control. They include natural events, such as high winds, lightning, earthquakes or flood due to extreme rainfall. The approaches that have been applied to the identification and assessment of external hazards in Canada are presented and analyzed. Specific aspects and considerations concerning hazards posed to radioactive waste and used fuel management operations are identified. Relevant hazard identification techniques are described, which draw upon available regulatory guidance and standard assessment techniques such as Hazard and Operability Studies (HAZOPs) and 'What-if' analysis. Consideration is given to ensuring that hazard combinations (for example: high winds and flooding due to rainfall) are properly taken into account. Approaches that can be used to screen out external hazards, through a combination of frequency and impact assessments, are summarized. For those hazards that cannot be screened out, a brief overview of methods that can be used to conduct more detailed hazard assessments is also provided. The lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident have had a significant impact on specific aspects of the approaches used to hazard assessment for waste management. Practical examples of the effect of these impacts are provided. (authors)

Gerchikov, Mark; Schneider, Glenn; Khan, Badi; Alderson, Elizabeth [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)] [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.

Cirillo, R.R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K.C.; Conzelmann, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carpenter, R.A.; Indriyanto, S.H. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Advanced computational simulation of flow phenomena associated with orifice meters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents and discusses results from a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of fluid flow phenomena associated with orifice meters. These simulations were performed using a new, state-of-the-art CFD code developed at Southwest Research Institute. This code is based on new techniques designed to take advantage of parallel computers to increase computational performance and fidelity of simulation results. This algorithm uses a domain decomposition strategy to create grid systems for very complex geometries composed of simpler geometric subregions, allowing for the accurate representation of the fluid flow domain. The domain decomposition technique maps naturally to parallel computer architectures. Here, the concept of message-passing is used to create a parallel algorithm, using the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) library. This code is then used to simulate the flow through an orifice meter run consisting of an orifice with a beta ratio of 0.5 and air flowing at a Reynolds number of 91,100. The work discussed in this paper is but the first step in developing a Virtual Metering Research Facility to support research, analysis, and formulation of new standards for metering.

Freitas, C.J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Freeze Concentration Applied to Hazardous Waste Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steps to remove or destroy the hazardous components prior to discharge. Incineration is widely used to destroy a broad range of these hazardous components. Its disposal efficiency is often used when defining the Best Available Technology for EPA... standards. However, high water content streams are expensive to incinerate since the incinerator must be designed to handle the feed volume even though the water in the feed is in itself harmless. Some hazardous components require operating temperatures...

Ruemekorf, R.

213

Hazardous Liquid Pipelines and Storage Facilities (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute regulates the permitting, construction, monitoring, and operation of pipelines transporting hazardous liquids, including petroleum products and coal slurries. The definition used in...

214

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces or eliminates waste at the source. It is the policy of...

215

Hazardous Waste Management System-General (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides general regulations regarding hazardous waste, including landfills. Specific passages refer to the...

216

Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions for storage, treatment, recycling, or disposal of hazardous waste. It provides information about permits and specific requirements...

217

Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations set minimum distance requirements between certain types of facilities that generate, process, store, and dispose of hazardous waste and other land uses. The regulations require an...

218

Identification of Hazards, 3/9/95  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs.  Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety...

219

Mission Support Alliance, LLC Volpentest Hazardous Materials...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Organization (FERO) roles and responsibilities, training requirements and the conduct of operations. Each project is responsible for developing and maintaining EP Hazards...

220

Canister storage building hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the CSB final safety analysis report (FSAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with the DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', and meets the intent of HNF-PRO-704, ''Hazard and Accident Analysis Process''. This hazard analysis implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, ''Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports''.

POWERS, T.B.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hazardous Material Transportation Safety (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the Division of Highway Safety, in the Department of Public Safety, to promulgate regulations pertaining to the safe transportation of hazardous materials by a motor...

222

Hazardous Material Packaging for Transport - Administrative Procedures  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establ1sh administrative procedures for the certification and use of radioactive and other hazardous materials packaging by the Department of Energy (DOE).

1986-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for administering the Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law and the regulations created under that law.

224

Fire hazards analysis of central waste complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document analyzes the fire hazards associated with operational the Central Waste Complex. It provides the analysis and recommendations necessary to ensure compliance with applicable fire codes.

Irwin, R.M.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Extremely Hazardous Substances Risk Management Act (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act lays out provisions for local governments to implement regulations and standards for the management of extremely hazardous substances, which are defined and categorized as follows:

226

Oil and Hazardous Substance Discharge Preparedness (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Anyone who owns or operates a vessel or facility that transports, stores, or otherwise handles hazardous wastes must take reasonable steps to prevent the discharge of those materials.

227

Petrovay: Solar physics Activity phenomena 1 Overall structure: umbra + penumbra.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Petrovay: Solar physics Activity phenomena 1 SUNSPOTS Overall structure: umbra + penumbra in decaying spots (hysteresis-like behaviour). #12;Petrovay: Solar physics Activity phenomena 1 Temperature, H2, CH, CN Maltby effect: Umbrae slightly hotter in solar maximum than in minimum. Recent studies

Petrovay, Kristóf

228

Diagnostics for transport phenomena in strongly coupled dusty plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diagnostics for transport phenomena in strongly coupled dusty plasmas J Goree, Bin Liu and Yan Feng@gmail.com #12;Diagnostics for transport phenomena in strongly coupled dusty plasmas 2 1. Introduction Dusty]. This paper is based on a presentation at the EPS Satellite Conference on Plasma Diagnostics 2013. Our

Goree, John

229

CHAPTER 1. COLLECTIVE PLASMA PHENOMENA 1 Collective Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 1. COLLECTIVE PLASMA PHENOMENA 1 Chapter 1 Collective Plasma Phenomena The properties of a medium are determined by the microscopic processes in it. In a plasma the microscopic processes is actually limited to a distance of order the Debye length in a plasma. On length scales longer than

Callen, James D.

230

Numerical simulation on dense gas dispersion and fire characteristics after liquefied natural gas release.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This PhD dissertation mainly studies the prediction, simulation and mitigation methods of the two main hazards in LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) industry, LNG vapor dense… (more)

Sun, Biao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Comparison of Hazard Analysisp y Requirements of I&C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) M di l D i A id tShip Accident (Ferry Sewol) Medical Device Accident (Therac-25) 3 NPP Accident­ Software Fault Tree Analysis ­ By AECL, Nancy Leveson Name of Software Hazards No % Remarks For construct hazard 4 7For construct hazard 4 7 Initialization hazard 4 7 IF-THEN-ELSE construct hazard 38 67 CASE

232

Frozen Ground 9 PERMAFROST HAZARDS IN MOUNTAINS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and other forms of creeping mountain permafrost may be the source of a number of hazards. Rock glaciers of large rock avalanche disasters are examples of mountain hazards. In the case of the September 20, 2002, rock-ice avalanche at Kolka-Karmadon in the Russian Caucasus, a combined rock-ice avalanche

Kääb, Andreas

233

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Homes built the destruction of fire-tolerant trees if a wildfire moves through the area. Creating fuel breaks (such ignite it. · When ERC grows in forests and wood- lands, it acts as a ladder fuel to allow fire to climb

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

234

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT Offered by The College of Architecture and The Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center Texas A&M University #12;2 THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL..................................................................................3 C. Approved Courses in the College of Architecture .............................4 D. Approved

235

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Energy and solid/hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

None

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Fire hazard analysis of the radioactive mixed waste trenchs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) is intended to assess comprehensively the risk from fire associated with the disposal of low level radioactive mixed waste in trenches within the lined landfills, provided by Project W-025, designated Trench 31 and 34 of the Burial Ground 218-W-5. Elements within the FHA make recommendations for minimizing risk to workers, the public, and the environment from fire during the course of the operation`s activity. Transient flammables and combustibles present that support the operation`s activity are considered and included in the analysis. The graded FHA contains the following elements: description of construction, protection of essential safety class equipment, fire protection features, description of fire hazards, life safety considerations, critical process equipment, high value property, damage potential--maximum credible fire loss (MCFL) and maximum possible fire loss (MPFL), fire department/brigade response, recovery potential, potential for a toxic, biological and/or radiation incident due to a fire, emergency planning, security considerations related to fire protection, natural hazards (earthquake, flood, wind) impact on fire safety, and exposure fire potential, including the potential for fire spread between fire areas. Recommendations for limiting risk are made in the text of this report and printed in bold type. All recommendations are repeated in a list in Section 18.0.

McDonald, K.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

238

Uintah -a scalable framework for hazard analysis Martin Berzins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uintah - a scalable framework for hazard analysis Martin Berzins Scientific Computing and Imaging of Uintah to a petascale problem in hazard analysis arising from "sympathetic" explosions in which. Devices containing such materials undergo extensive testing for hazard classification prior

Utah, University of

239

CORROSION—A NATURAL BUT CONTROLLABLE PROCESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion is a naturally occurring phenomenon commonly defined as the deterioration of a substance (usually a metal) or its properties because of a reaction with its environment. [1] Like other natural hazards such as earthquakes or severe weather disturbances, corrosion can cause dangerous

Gretchen A. Jacobson

240

Simulation and design optimization for linear wave phenomena on metamaterials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Periodicity can change materials properties in a very unintuitive way. Many wave propagation phenomena, such as waveguides, light bending structures or frequency filters can be modeled through finite periodic structures ...

Saà-Seoane, Joel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Infrared thermometry study of nanofluid pool boiling phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Infrared thermometry was used to obtain first-of-a-kind, time- and space-resolved data for pool boiling phenomena in water-based nanofluids with diamond and silica nanoparticles at low concentration (<0.1 vol.%). ...

Gerardi, Craig

242

Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with...

243

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations is to help maintain accountability and track data on the hazardous and nonhazardous waste sites in...

244

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

245

Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground Motion Model Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground Motion Model Evaluation of...

246

New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Maximizes Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

National Laboratories developed the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT), a free Web-based tool that can quickly calculate potential visual hazards from proposed solar...

247

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than...

248

Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan (HWCPP) describes how the Rocky Flats Plant institutes a more effective waste management program designed to achieve and maintain strict adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Emphasis is given to improve integration of line operations with programmatic and functional support activities necessary to achieve physical compliance to RCRA regulated equipment, facilities and operations at the floor level. This program focuses on specific activities occurring or which need to occur within buildings containing RCRA regulated units and activities. The plan describes a new approach to achieving and maintaining compliance. This approach concentrates authority and accountability for compliance with the line operating personnel, with support provided from the programmatic functions. This approach requires a higher degree of integration and coordination between operating and program support organizations. The principal changes in emphases are; (1) increased line operations involvement, knowledge and accountability in compliance activities, (2) improved management systems to identify, correct and/or avoid deficiencies and (3) enhanced management attention and employee awareness of compliance related matters.

Potter, G.L.; Holstein, K.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluidtight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC (about 1" WC) higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes.

Chang, Robert C. W. (Martinez, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is described for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluid-tight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes. 1 figure.

Chang, R.C.W.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive or other hazardous samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis. An adjustable top door is located on the top side of the storage member, and the top door includes a channel capable of being selectively placed in registration with the respective storage chambers thereby permitting the samples to selectively enter the respective storage chambers. The top door, when closed, isolates the respective samples within the storage chambers. A plurality of spring-biased bottom doors are located on the bottom sides of the respective storage chambers. The bottom doors isolate the samples in the respective storage chambers when the bottom doors are in the closed position. The bottom doors permit the samples to leave the respective storage chambers from the bottom side when the respective bottom doors are in respective open positions. The bottom doors permit the samples to be loaded into the respective storage chambers after the analysis for storage and transport to a permanent storage location.

Osterman, Robert A. (Canonsburg, PA); Cox, Robert (West Mifflin, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Vulnerability of the New York City Metropolitan Area to Coastal Hazards,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trade Center site in Lower Manhattan, and of the Brooklyn water- front, long home to the former Brooklyn-Level Rise: Inferences for Urban Coastal Risk Management and Adaptation Policies Klaus Jacob, Vivien Gornitz at or near sea level. Major coastal urban centers have long been vulnerable to natural hazards, such as storm

253

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

254

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

Schiffbauer, William H. (Connellsville, PA); Ganoe, Carl W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

283-E and 283-W hazards assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the hazards assessment for the 200 area water treatment plants 283-E and 283-W located on the US DOE Hanford Site. Operation of the water treatment plants is the responsibility of ICF Kaiser Hanford Company (ICF KH). This hazards assessment was conducted to provide emergency planning technical basis for the water treatment plants. This document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE ORDER 5500.3A which requires an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification.

Sutton, L.N.

1994-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hazards Control Department annual technology review, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes some of the research performed in the LLNL Hazards Control Department from October 1986 to September 1987. The sections in the Annual report cover scientific concerns in the areas of Health Physics, Industrial Hygiene, Industrial Safety, Aerosol Science, Resource Management, Dosimetry and Radiation Physics, Criticality Safety, and Fire Science. For a broader overview of the types of work performed in the Hazards Control Department, we have also compiled a selection of abstracts of recent publications by Hazards Control employees. Individual reports are processed separately for the data base.

Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, K.J. (eds.)

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hazardous waste operational plan for site 300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan outlines the procedures and operations used at LLNL's Site 300 for the management of the hazardous waste generated. This waste consists primarily of depleted uranium (a by-product of U-235 enrichment), beryllium, small quantities of analytical chemicals, industrial type waste such as solvents, cleaning acids, photographic chemicals, etc., and explosives. This plan details the operations generating this waste, the proper handling of this material and the procedures used to treat or dispose of the hazardous waste. A considerable amount of information found in this plan was extracted from the Site 300 Safety and Operational Manual written by Site 300 Facility personnel and the Hazards Control Department.

Roberts, R.S.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

258

DZero (D0) Experiment Results for New Phenomena from the Fermilab Tevatron  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The D0 (DZero) Experiment is a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter. The experiment is located at the Tevatron Collider, Fermilab. The research is focused on precise studies of interactions of protons and antiprotons and involves an intense search for subatomic clues that reveal the character of the building blocks of the universe. This web page provides access to Run II research results of the New Phenomena Physics group, including preliminary, submitted, and published results. Figures and data plots are found in the same directories with their respective papers.

259

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act establishes the means by which developers of proposed hazardous waste facilities will work with the community in which they wish to construct a facility. When the intent to construct,...

260

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the public policy of the state of South Dakota to regulate the control and generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous wastes. The state operates a comprehensive...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Improving Tamper Detection for Hazardous Waste Security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide effective security for their hazardous wastes. Tamper-indicating seals can help. This paper discusses seals, and offers recommendations for how to choose and use them.

Johnston, R. G.; Garcia, A. R. E.; Pacheco, N.; Martinez, R. K.; Martinez, D. D.; Trujillo, S. J.; Lopez, L. N.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

262

Hazardous Materials Packaging and Transportation Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials, and for modal transportation.

2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

CONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

working practice and will encourage the evolution of a positive health and safety culture within the orgCONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH) Guidance Notes on Risk Assessment HEALTH & SAFETY............................................................................................................9 2.6. Safety Data Sheets (SDS

264

Rainfall-induced Landslide Hazard Rating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research develops a Landslide Hazard Rating System for the rainfall-induced landslides in the Chenyulan River basin area in central Taiwan. This system is designed to provide a simplified and quick evaluation of the ...

Chen, Yi-Ting, Civ. E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Hazardous materials transportation and emergency response programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation consists of the following visual aids; (1) detailed routing capabilities of truck, rail, barge; (2) legislative data base for hazardous materials; and (3) emergency response of accident site Eddyville, Kentucky (airports in vicinity of Eddyville, KY).

Joy, D.S.; Fore, C.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment; Vital U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

Richard C. Logan

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

267

Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment. (3) Vital US. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

J. L. Kubicek

2001-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

268

Hazard Baseline Downgrade Effluent Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Hazard Baseline Downgrade reviews the Effluent Treatment Facility, in accordance with Department of Energy Order 5480.23, WSRC11Q Facility Safety Document Manual, DOE-STD-1027-92, and DOE-EM-STD-5502-94. It provides a baseline grouping based on the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the facility. The Determination of the baseline grouping for ETF will aid in establishing the appropriate set of standards for the facility.

Blanchard, A.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

269

Process safety management for highly hazardous chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose of this document is to assist US DOE contractors who work with threshold quantities of highly hazardous chemicals (HHCs), flammable liquids or gases, or explosives in successfully implementing the requirements of OSHA Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119). Purpose of this rule is to prevent releases of HHCs that have the potential to cause catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Canister storage building hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the final CSB safety analysis report (SAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Report, and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

Krahn, D.E.; Garvin, L.J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

Krahn, D.E.

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

272

Advanced Technology for Railway Hydraulic Hazard Forecasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1.1 Map of Total Railway Hydraulic Hazard Events from 1982-2011 ............ 2 1.2 90 mi Effective Radar Coverage for Reliable Rainfall Rate Determination ....................................................................... 5 3... Administration (FRA) for the period of 1982-2011. This data was compiled from the FRA Office of Safety Analysis website (FRA, 2011). A map of the railway hydraulic hazard events over the same time period is displayed in Figure 1.1. Table 1.1. U.S. Railway...

Huff, William Edward 1988-

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

273

Rules and Regulations for Hazardous Waste Management (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations establish permitting and operational requirements for hazardous waste facilities. They are designed to minimize...

274

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers, cabinets

Boynton, Walter R.

275

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers

Boynton, Walter R.

276

Uranium Pyrophoricity Phenomena and Prediction (FAI/00-39)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a topical reference on the phenomena and prediction of uranium pyrophoricity for the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project with specific applications to SNF Project processes and situations. Spent metallic uranium nuclear fuel is currently stored underwater at the K basins in the Hanford 100 area, and planned processing steps include: (1) At the basins, cleaning and placing fuel elements and scrap into stainless steel multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) holding about 6 MT of fuel apiece; (2) At nearby cold vacuum drying (CVD) stations, draining, vacuum drying, and mechanically sealing the MCOs; (3) Shipping the MCOs to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) on the 200 Area plateau; and (4) Welding shut and placing the MCOs for interim (40 year) dry storage in closed CSB storage tubes cooled by natural air circulation through the surrounding vault. Damaged fuel elements have exposed and corroded fuel surfaces, which can exothermically react with water vapor and oxygen during normal process steps and in off-normal situations, A key process safety concern is the rate of reaction of damaged fuel and the potential for self-sustaining or runaway reactions, also known as uranium fires or fuel ignition. Uranium metal and one of its corrosion products, uranium hydride, are potentially pyrophoric materials. Dangers of pyrophoricity of uranium and its hydride have long been known in the U.S. Department of Energy (Atomic Energy Commission/DOE) complex and will be discussed more below; it is sufficient here to note that there are numerous documented instances of uranium fires during normal operations. The motivation for this work is to place the safety of the present process in proper perspective given past operational experience. Steps in development of such a perspective are: (1) Description of underlying physical causes for runaway reactions, (2) Modeling physical processes to explain runaway reactions, (3) Validation of the method against experimental data, (4) Application of the method to plausibly explain operational experience, and (5) Application of the method to present process steps to demonstrate process safety and margin. Essentially, the logic above is used to demonstrate that runaway reactions cannot occur during normal SNF Project process steps, and to illustrate the depth of the technical basis for such a conclusion. Some off-normal conditions are identified here that could potentially lead to runaway reactions. However, this document is not intended to provide an exhaustive analysis of such cases. In summary, this report provides a ''toolkit'' of models and approaches for analysis of pyrophoricity safety issues at Hanford, and the technical basis for the recommended approaches. A summary of recommended methods appears in Section 9.0.

PLYS, M.G.

2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

Modified Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) for Uncertainty Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a methodology of characterizing important phenomena, which is also part of a broader research by the authors called 'Modified PIRT'. The methodology provides robust process of phenomena identification and ranking process for more precise quantification of uncertainty. It is a two-step process of identifying and ranking methodology based on thermal-hydraulics (TH) importance as well as uncertainty importance. Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP) has been used for as a formal approach for TH identification and ranking. Formal uncertainty importance technique is used to estimate the degree of credibility of the TH model(s) used to represent the important phenomena. This part uses subjective justification by evaluating available information and data from experiments, and code predictions. The proposed methodology was demonstrated by developing a PIRT for large break loss of coolant accident LBLOCA for the LOFT integral facility with highest core power (test LB-1). (authors)

Gol-Mohamad, Mohammad P.; Modarres, Mohammad; Mosleh, Ali [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) Panel Meeting Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) is a systematic way of gathering information from experts on a specific subject and ranking the importance of the information. NRC, in collaboration with DOE and the working group, conducted the PIRT exercises to identify safety-relevant phenomena for NGNP, and to assess and rank the importance and knowledge base for each phenomenon. The overall objective was to provide NRC with an expert assessment of the safety-relevant NGNP phenomena, and an overall assessment of R and D needs for NGNP licensing. The PIRT process was applied to five major topical areas relevant to NGNP safety and licensing: (1) thermofluids and accident analysis (including neutronics), (2) fission product transport, (3) high temperature materials, (4) graphite, and (5) process heat for hydrogen cogeneration.

Mark Holbrook

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

Wasserman, Stephen R. (Darien, IL); Anderson, Kenneth B. (Lisle, IL); Song, Kang (Woodridge, IL); Yuchs, Steven E. (Naperville, IL); Marshall, Christopher L. (Naperville, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

RELAP5-3D Code Validation for RBMK Phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RELAP5-3D thermal-hydraulic code was assessed against Japanese Safety Experiment Loop (SEL) and Heat Transfer Loop (HTL) tests. These tests were chosen because the phenomena present are applicable to analyses of Russian RBMK reactor designs. The assessment cases included parallel channel flow fluctuation tests at reduced and normal water levels, a channel inlet pipe rupture test, and a high power, density wave oscillation test. The results showed that RELAP5-3D has the capability to adequately represent these RBMK-related phenomena.

Fisher, James Ebberly

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

RELAP5-3D code validation for RBMK phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RELAP5-3D thermal-hydraulic code was assessed against Japanese Safety Experiment Loop (SEL) and Heat Transfer Loop (HTL) tests. These tests were chosen because the phenomena present are applicable to analyses of Russian RBMK reactor designs. The assessment cases included parallel channel flow fluctuation tests at reduced and normal water levels, a channel inlet pipe rupture test, and a high power, density wave oscillation test. The results showed that RELAP5-3D has the capability to adequately represent these RBMK-related phenomena.

Fisher, J.E.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation.

Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Advanced Materials Laboratory hazards assessment document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Order 55OO.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the AML. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 23 meters. The highest emergency classification is a General Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is a nominal area that conforms to DOE boundaries and physical/jurisdictional boundaries such as fence lines and streets.

Barnett, B.; Banda, Z.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Investigation of Transient Phenomena of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of Transient Phenomena of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells by Roongrojana of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells by Roongrojana Songprakorp BSc, Prince of Songkhla University to the modeling and under- standing of the dynamic behavior of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs

Victoria, University of

286

Critical phenomena of asymmetric nuclear matter in the extended  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Critical phenomena of asymmetric nuclear matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model K nuclear matter produced by heavy-ion reactions is isospin asymmetric. Although the critical exponents. Miyazaki Abstract We have studied the liquid-gas phase transition of warm asymmetric nuclear matter

287

MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN A FINITE ELEMENT between pore fluid flow and the concurring deformation of the solid rock matrix. The governing equations and constitutive relations of fluid flow are coupled to stress-strain relations. With the appropriate boundary

288

Computational analysis of temperature rise phenomena in electric induction motors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational analysis of temperature rise phenomena in electric induction motors Ying Huai Institute, University of Southern Denmark, Grundvigs Alle 150, Sonderborg, DK-6400, Denmark c Danfoss Drives A/S, Denmark Received 12 October 2002; accepted 20 December 2002 Abstract In developing electric

Melnik, Roderick

289

General Search for New Phenomena in ep Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General Search for New Phenomena in ep Scattering at HERA The IVIIth Rencontres de Moriond on QCD algorithm investigate all final states produced at high PT in ep collisions do not rely on assumptions about 3 General Search @ H1 Data samples HERA I (1992-2000) HERA II (2002-2007) HERA I: e+p dominated (GS

290

Electromagnetically and Thermally Driven Flow Phenomena in Electroslag Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Electromagnetically and Thermally Driven Flow Phenomena in Electroslag Welding A. H. DILAWARI, J for the Electroslag Welding Process. In the formulation, allowance has been made {or both etee- tromagnetic and b in the use of electroslag welding (ESW), particularly for the construction of thick walled pressure vessels

Eagar, Thomas W.

291

Phenomena identification and ranking tables (PIRT) for LBLOCA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is sponsoring a program to provide validated reactor safety computer codes with quantified uncertainties. The intent is to quantify the accuracy of the codes for use in best estimate licensing applications. One of the tasks required to complete this program involves the identification and ranking of thermal-hydraulic phenomena that occur during particular accidents. This paper provides detailed tables of phenomena and importance ranks for a PWR LBLOCA. The phenomena were identified and ranked according to perceived impact on peak cladding temperature. Two approaches were used to complete this task. First, a panel of experts identified the physical processes considered to be most important during LBLOCA. A second team of experienced analysts then, in parallel, assembled complete tables of all plausible LBLOCA phenomena, regardless of perceived importance. Each phenomenon was then ranked in importance against every other phenomenon associated with a given component. The results were placed in matrix format and solved for the principal eigenvector. The results as determined by each method are presented in this report.

Shaw, R.A.; Dimenna, R.A.; Larson, T.K.; Wilson, G.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Chapter 7. Renewal Phenomena Renewal is life reborn.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

51 Chapter 7. Renewal Phenomena Renewal is life reborn. 7.1. Definitions and basic concepts. 7. Then, N(t) : t 0, is a renewal process. A mathematical definition: N(t) = max{n : n i=0 Xi t, } where, ...} or continuous: [0, ). Obviously, the path of a renewal process is non-decreasing. The renewal literally means

Chen, Kani

293

Geophysical phenomena during an ionospheric modication experiment at Troms, Norway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geophysical phenomena during an ionospheric modi®cation experiment at Tromsù, Norway N. F-9037, Tromsù, and The University Courses of Svalbard, Svalbard, Norway 3 EISCAT, N-9027 Ramfjùrdbotn, Norway Received: 13 October 1997 / Revised: 11 May 1998 / Accepted: 26 May 1998 Abstract. We present

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

294

Fundamental phenomena of quantum mechanics explored with neutron interferometers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ongoing fascination with quantum mechanics keeps driving the development of the wide field of quantum-optics, including its neutron-optics branch. Application of neutron-optical methods and, especially, neutron interferometry and polarimetry has a long-standing tradition for experimental investigations of fundamental quantum phenomena. We give an overview of related experimental efforts made in recent years.

J. Klepp; S. Sponar; Y. Hasegawa

2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

295

Robots, systems, and methods for hazard evaluation and visualization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A robot includes a hazard sensor, a locomotor, and a system controller. The robot senses a hazard intensity at a location of the robot, moves to a new location in response to the hazard intensity, and autonomously repeats the sensing and moving to determine multiple hazard levels at multiple locations. The robot may also include a communicator to communicate the multiple hazard levels to a remote controller. The remote controller includes a communicator for sending user commands to the robot and receiving the hazard levels from the robot. A graphical user interface displays an environment map of the environment proximate the robot and a scale for indicating a hazard intensity. A hazard indicator corresponds to a robot position in the environment map and graphically indicates the hazard intensity at the robot position relative to the scale.

Nielsen, Curtis W.; Bruemmer, David J.; Walton, Miles C.; Hartley, Robert S.; Gertman, David I.; Kinoshita, Robert A.; Whetten, Jonathan

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

Coyne, Martin J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fiscus, Gregory M. (McMurray, PA); Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

298

Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

McCarthy, T.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Modified Hazard Ranking System/Hazard Ranking System for sites with mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes: Software documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mHRS/HRS software package was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a uniform method for DOE facilities to use in performing their Conservation Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Phase I Modified Hazard Ranking System or Hazard Ranking System evaluations. The program is designed to remove the tedium and potential for error associated with the performing of hand calculations and the interpreting of information on tables and in reference books when performing an evaluation. The software package is designed to operate on a microcomputer (IBM PC, PC/XT, or PC/AT, or a compatible system) using either a dual floppy disk drive or a hard disk storage system. It is written in the dBASE III language and operates using the dBASE III system. Although the mHRS/HRS software package was developed for use at DOE facilities, it has direct applicability to the performing of CERCLA Phase I evaluations for any facility contaminated by hazardous waste. The software can perform evaluations using either the modified hazard ranking system methodology developed by DOE/PNL, the hazard ranking system methodology developed by EPA/MITRE Corp., or a combination of the two. This document is a companion manual to the mHRS/HRS user manual. It is intended for the programmer who must maintain the software package and for those interested in the computer implementation. This manual documents the system logic, computer programs, and data files that comprise the package. Hardware and software implementation requirements are discussed. In addition, hand calculations of three sample situations (problems) with associated computer runs used for the verification of program calculations are included.

Stenner, R.D.; Peloquin, R.A.; Hawley, K.A.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Eurographics Workshop on Natural Phenomena (2005) E. Galin, P. Poulin (Editors)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Interactive Visualization of High-Density Plant Ecosystems Andreas Dietrich , Carsten Colditz , Oliver Deussen: Example screenshots taken with our framework during a walkthrough of a complex plant ecosystem model containing more than 365,000 individual plants. Note the extremely high geoemetric detail, resulting

Reiterer, Harald

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Eurographics Workshop on Natural Phenomena (2005) E. Galin, P. Poulin (Editors)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulation of evolving plant communities, which involves, aside from the known symmetric competition/or species. The discrete simulation methods proposed in this work help to visually simulate complex plant ecosystems for computer graphics. 1. Introduction Simulation and visualization of plant competition is an im

Reiterer, Harald

302

Eurographics Workshop on Natural Phenomena (2005) E. Galin, P. Poulin (Editors)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

algorithms 1. Introduction Trees and forests covering hills appear to be a strange mate- rial: while or branches on the rear of tree or inside the forest are statistically less visible than front ones, and sometimes one can see deep inside. The volumetric na- ture of the forest `matter' is especially obvious when

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

303

Eurographics Workshop on Natural Phenomena (2005) E. Galin, P. Poulin (Editors)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g. water trans- portation or wind. On the other hand some algorithms gen- erate the eroded terrain from are simply displaced around the actual point if the local inclination is greater than a specified material be dissolved, transported and deposited. Now in the simulation, depending on the local inclination and water

Reiterer, Harald

304

Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Control Of Hazardous Energy Lockout/Tagout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control Of Hazardous Energy Lockout/Tagout Millersville University - Office Of Environmental Health & Safety Scope & Application The Lockout/Tagout program applies to the control of energy during servicing of this program is to establish procedures for affixing appropriate lockout or tagout devices to energy

Hardy, Christopher R.

306

Burning hazardous waste in cement kilns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cement manufacturing process is one of the oldest in the world, having been in practice for over 2000 years. It is also one of the most energy intensive, with up to 65 percent of the cost of the product attributable to energy consumption. In addition to high energy demand, the process conditions include extremely high temperatures. Cement clinker forms when the correct mixture of raw materials is heated to 2650/sup 0/ F. This requires combustion temperatures exceeding 3000/sup 0/ F. under oxidizing conditions. To accomplish this, gas temperatures above 2000/sup 0/ F. occur for several seconds (typically five seconds), which is much longer than residence times in permitted hazardous waste incinerators. These conditions are extremely favorable to the destruction of organic compounds and have led to extensive investigation into the potential for burning hazardous waste in cement kilns. Cement kilns consuming hazardous wastes have been tested for air emissions under various operating conditions. The substantial body of information on the emissions and handling of hazardous wastes from these studies has demonstrated that effective destruction of wastes can be accomplished with the added benefits of energy conservation and no significant change in air emissions.

Chadbourne, J.F.; Helmsteller, A.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) hazardous and radioactive mixed waste policies and requirements and to implement the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) within the framework of the environmental programs established under DOE O 5400.1. This directive does not cancel any directives.

1989-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

308

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 John D. Godchaux Trinity University, San Antonio, TX Noah Hughes University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 Key Terms: earthquake

Sheehan, Anne F.

309

Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Waste in the Mediterranean Regional Context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HAZARDOUS WASTE IN MEDITERRANEAN Moreover, the Mediterranean Protocol,Protocol Area by transboundary movements of hazardous wastes (wastes subject to this Protocol; Annex II: List of hazardous

Scovazzi, Tullio

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

E-Print Network 3.0 - agency listed hazardous Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Listing of Hazardous Waste 40 CFR... Hazardous Waste Management Regulations 6 NYCRR 371 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste 6 NYCRR 372... Substance Bulk Storage...

312

Single channel flow blockage accident phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) for the advanced Candu reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Candu Reactor (ACRTM) is an evolutionary advancement of the current Candu 6{sup R} reactor, aimed at producing electrical power for a capital cost and at a unit-energy cost significantly less than that of the current reactor designs. The ACR retains the modular concept of horizontal fuel channels surrounded by a heavy water moderator, as with all Candu reactors. However, ACR uses slightly enriched uranium (SEU) fuel, compared to the natural uranium used in Candu 6. This achieves the twin goals of improved economics (e.g., via reductions in the heavy water requirements and the use of a light water coolant), as well as improved safety. This paper documents the results of Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) results for a very limited frequency, beyond design basis event of the ACR design. This PIRT is developed in a highly structured process of expert elicitation that is well supported by experimental data and analytical results. The single-channel flow blockage event in an ACR reactor assumes a severe flow blockage of one of the reactor fuel channels, which leads to a reduction of the flow in the affected channel, leading to fuel cladding and fuel temperature increase. The paper outlines the design characteristics of the ACR reactor that impact the PIRT process and computer code applicability. It also describes the flow blockage phenomena, lists all components and systems that have an important role during the event, discusses the PIRT process and results, and presents the finalized PIRT tables. (authors)

Popov, N.K.; Abdul-Razzak, A.; Snell, V.G.; Langman, V. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada); Sills, H. [Consultant, Deep River, Ontario (Canada)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate. 3 figs.

Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

314

Hazardous waste management in the Texas construction industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This pilot study reports the statewide, regulatory compliance of general construction contractors in Texas who generated regulated amounts of hazardous waste during 1990, defined by existing state and federal hazardous-waste-management regulations...

Sprinkle, Donald Lee

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 6: Process Heat and Hydrogen Co-Generation PIRTs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) exercise was conducted to identify potential safety-0-related physical phenomena for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) when coupled to a hydrogen production or similar chemical plant. The NGNP is a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) with the design goal to produce high-temperature heat and electricity for nearby chemical plants. Because high-temperature heat can only be transported limited distances, the two plants will be close to each other. One of the primary applications for the VHTR would be to supply heat and electricity for the production of hydrogen. There was no assessment of chemical plant safety challenges. The primary application of this PIRT is to support the safety analysis of the NGNP coupled one or more small hydrogen production pilot plants. However, the chemical plant processes to be coupled to the NGNP have not yet been chosen; thus, a broad PIRT assessment was conducted to scope alternative potential applications and test facilities associated with the NGNP. The hazards associated with various chemicals and methods to minimize risks from those hazards are well understood within the chemical industry. Much but not all of the information required to assure safe conditions (separation distance, relative elevation, berms) is known for a reactor coupled to a chemical plant. There is also some experience with nuclear plants in several countries that have produced steam for industrial applications. The specific characteristics of the chemical plant, site layout, and the maximum stored inventories of chemicals can provide the starting point for the safety assessments. While the panel identified events and phenomena of safety significance, there is one added caveat. Multiple high-temperature reactors provide safety-related experience and understanding of reactor safety. In contrast, there have been only limited safety studies of coupled chemical and nuclear plants. The work herein provides a starting point for those studies; but, the general level of understanding of safety in coupling nuclear and chemical plants is less than in other areas of high-temperature reactor safety.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Gorensek, M. B. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Herring, S. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Pickard, P. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

ESM of Ionic and Electrochemical Phenomena on the Nanoscale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of energy storage and conversion devices is ultimately controlled by series of intertwined ionic and electronic transport processes and electrochemical reactions at surfaces and interfaces, strongly mediated by strain and mechanical processes [1-4]. In a typical fuel cell, these include chemical species transport in porous cathode and anode materials, gas-solid electrochemical reactions at grains and triple-phase boundaries (TPBs), ionic and electronic flows in multicomponent electrodes, and chemical and electronic potential drops at internal interfaces in electrodes and electrolytes. All these phenomena are sensitively affected by the microstructure of materials from device level to the atomic scales as illustrated in Fig. 1. Similar spectrum of length scales and phenomena underpin operation of other energy systems including primary and secondary batteries, as well as hybrid systems such flow and metal-air/water batteries.

Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Kumar, Amit [Pennsylvania State University; Balke, Nina [ORNL; McCorkle, Morgan L [ORNL; Guo, Senli [ORNL; Arruda, Thomas M [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Modified hazard ranking system for sites with mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes. User manual.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes both the original Hazard Ranking System and the modified Hazard Ranking System as they are to be used in evaluating the relative potential for uncontrolled hazardous substance facilities to cause human health or safety problems or ecological or environmental damage. Detailed instructions for using the mHRS/HRS computer code are provided, along with instructions for performing the calculations by hand. Uniform application of the ranking system will permit the DOE to identify those releases of hazardous substances that pose the greatest hazard to humans or the environment. However, the mHRS/HRS by itself cannot establish priorities for the allocation of funds for remedial action. The mHRS/HRS is a means for applying uniform technical judgment regarding the potential hazards presented by a facility relative to other facilities. It does not address the feasibility, desirability, or degree of cleanup required. Neither does it deal with the readiness or ability of a state to carry out such remedial action, as may be indicated, or to meet other conditions prescribed in CERCLA. 13 refs., 13 figs., 27 tabs.

Hawley, K.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Stenner, R.D.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Permit Fees for Hazardous Waste Material Management (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe applicable fees for permit application, modification, and transfer for permits related to hazardous waste management.

319

340 Waste handling Facility Hazard Categorization and Safety Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis presented in this document provides the basis for categorizing the facility as less than Hazard Category 3.

T. J. Rodovsky

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

320

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be shipped directly from site and recycled through the WA State Hazardous Waste Service Contract. Please call

Wilcock, William

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Search for Higgs and new phenomena at colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present status of searches for the Higgs boson(s) and new phenomena is reviewed. The focus is on analyses and results from the current runs of the HERA and Tevatron experiments. The LEP experiments have released their final combined MSSM Higgs results for this conference. Also included are results from sensitivity studies of the LHC experiments and lepton flavor violating searches from the B factories, KEKB and PEP-II.

Lammel, Stephan; /Fermilab

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Hazards Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) located on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for WESF. DOE Orders require an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification.

COVEY, L.I.

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

323

NIH POLICY MANUAL 3034 -Working with Hazardous Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NIH POLICY MANUAL 3034 - Working with Hazardous Materials Issuing Office: ORS/DOHS (301) 496-2960 Release Date: 3/21/06 1. Explanation of Material Transmitted: This release establishes NIH policy and procedure governing work with hazardous chemicals as described in the NIH Hazard Communication Program

Bandettini, Peter A.

324

Mapping future hazards for south east London Dr Stephen Blenkinsop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Vulnerability information Risk maps #12;Heat Outputs · 5km heat wave prediction grids. · 1km pro-rata disaggregated temperature & heat wave projection grids. · 1km relative heat wave hazard grid combining heat wave hazard (relative). · 200m heat wave risk grids combining relative heat wave hazard with predictions

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

325

Diesel particles -a health hazard 1 Diesel particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesel particles - a health hazard 1 Diesel particles - a health hazard #12;The Danish Ecological Council - August 20042 Diesel particles - a health hazard ISBN: 87-89843-61-4 Text by: Christian Ege 33150777 Fax no.: +45 33150971 E-mail: info@ecocouncil.dk www.ecocouncil.dk #12;Diesel particles - a health

326

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 779802, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/779/2006/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-induced hazards that are representative for a whole class of hazards: Accidents due to nuclear power plants (NPP- ments (like embassies in the case of conventional threats) dis- play in the eye of potential aggressors

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

327

Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination.

Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination. 1 fig.

Ramirez, A.L.; Cooper, J.F.; Daily, W.D.

1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

329

Safe Method of Use for Hazardous Substances of Higher Risk 16 Version 2 July 2008 Page 1 of 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safe Method of Use for Hazardous Substances of Higher Risk 16 Version 2 July 2008 Page 1 of 5 SafeBr depend on the nature of the waste materials and the concentration of EtBr that they contain. Much a choice of protocols, the sodium nitrite method is preferred as the reaction products retain very little

Auckland, University of

330

Split driveshaft pump for hazardous fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pump having a split driveshaft for use in pumping hazardous fluids wherein only one driveshaft becomes contaminated by the fluid while the second remains isolated from the fluid. The pump has a first portion and a second portion. The first portion contains a pump motor, the first driveshaft, a support pedestal, and vapor barriers and seals. The second portion contains a second, self-lubricating driveshaft and an impeller. The first and second driveshafts are connected together by a releasable coupling. A shield and a slinger deployed below the coupling prevent fluid from the second portion from reaching the first portion. In operation, only the second assembly comes into contact with the fluid being pumped, so the risk of contamination of the first portion by the hazardous fluid is reduced. The first assembly can be removed for repairs or routine maintenance by decoupling the first and second driveshafts and disconnecting the motor from the casing.

Evans, II, Thomas P. (Aiken, SC); Purohit, Jwalit J. (Evans, GA); Fazio, John M. (Orchard Park, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic hazard to Hispaniola and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic hazard to Hispaniola and the northeast Caribbean region" Uri S. ten Brink, William H. Bakun), Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic

ten Brink, Uri S.

332

The HIT method: A hazard identification technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explains a technique for analyzing systems and operations to identify hazards and needed controls. The HIT method can be used both as a design tool and as a risk analysis tool. As a design tool, this method identifies requirements for design criteria. As part of a risk analysis effort, HIT identifies potential accident sequences that can become part of the safety analysis documentation. Within this report the HIT method is described in detail with emphasis on application of the technique.

Howard, H.H.; Faust, C.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

Unger, Samuel L. (Los Angeles, CA); Telles, Rodney W. (Alhambra, CA); Lubowitz, Hyman R. (Rolling Hills Estates, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Lattice analysis for the energy scale of QCD phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We formulate a new framework in lattice QCD to study the relevant energy scale of QCD phenomena. By considering the Fourier transformation of link variable, we can investigate the intrinsic energy scale of a physical quantity nonperturbatively. This framework is broadly available for all lattice QCD calculations. We apply this framework for the quark-antiquark potential and meson masses in quenched lattice QCD. The gluonic energy scale relevant for the confinement is found to be less than 1 GeV in the Landau or Coulomb gauge.

Arata Yamamoto; Hideo Suganuma

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

335

Hazard Communication (Worker Right to Know) As a UW employee, you have the right to know about hazards to which you may be exposed as part  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hazard Communication (Worker Right to Know) As a UW employee, you have the right to know about hazards to which you may be exposed as part of your work assignment. The University's Hazard Communication the hazard communication training you need? A combination of hazard communication training resources

Wilcock, William

336

Method and apparatus for using hazardous waste form non-hazardous aggregate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an apparatus for converting hazardous waste into non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregate, the apparatus. It comprises: a source of particulate solid materials, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products; oxidizing means comprising at least one refractory-lined, water-cooled, metal-walled vessel; means for introducing the particulate solid material, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products to the oxidizing means; means for inducing combustion in the oxidizing means, the heat of combustion forming molten slag and noncombustible fines from noncombustible material; means for accumulating the slag; means for introducing the noncombustible fines to the molten slag; means for removing the mixture from the apparatus; and means for cooling the mixture to form the non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregates.

Kent, J.M.; Robards, H.L. Jr.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

337

Hydrates represent gas source, drilling hazard  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas hydrates look like ordinary ice. However, if a piece of such ice is put into warm water its behavior will be different from the ordinary melting of normal ice. In contrast, gas hydrates cause bubbles in the warm water, which indicates the high content of gas in the hydrate crystals. The presence of four components is required: gas itself, water, high pressure, and low temperature. The paper discusses how hydrates form, hydrates stability, South Caspian hydrates, and hydrates hazards for people, ships, pipelines, and drilling platforms.

Bagirov, E. [Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Lerche, I. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Hazardous Material Shipments | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200cell 9Harvey Brooks, 1960Options forHazardous

339

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES AND INTER-JURISDICTIONAL CHALLENGESRailroad Hazardous g Materials

340

Base catalyzed decomposition of toxic and hazardous chemicals. [Final report, September 4, 1990--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are vast amounts of toxic and hazardous chemicals, which have pervaded our environment during the past fifty years, leaving us with serious, crucial problems of remediation and disposal. The accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), ``dioxins`` and pesticides in soil sediments and living systems is a serious problem that is receiving considerable attention concerning the cancer-causing nature of these synthetic compounds.US EPA scientists developed in 1989 and 1990 two novel chemical Processes to effect the dehalogenation of chlorinated solvents, PCBs, PCDDs, PCDFs, PCP and other pollutants in soil, sludge, sediment and liquids. This improved technology employs hydrogen as a nucleophile to replace halogens on halogenated compounds. Hydrogen as nucleophile is not influenced by steric hinderance as with other nucleophile where complete dehalogenation of organohalogens can be achieved. This report discusses catalyzed decomposition of toxic and hazardous chemicals.

Rogers, C.J.; Kornel, A.; Sparks, H.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Rapid guide to hazardous air pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concise and easy to use, this book brings together a wealth of hard-to-gather information in one compact pocket guide. It offers--in alphabetical order--detailed profiles of the 189 elements and compounds determined to be hazardous air pollutants by the 1990 Amendments of the Clean Air Act. The profile for each pollutant includes: fundamental identification data (CAS number, molecular formula, formula weight, synonyms); uses (primarily in the manufacture of chemicals and as a component in the manufacturing process); physical properties (such as boiling point, density, vapor pressures, color); chemical properties (such as air/water reactivity, reactivity with skin or metal, flash point, heat of combustion); health risks, including toxic exposure guidelines, toxicity data, and acute and chronic risks; hazard risks (the substance`s potential for accidents, fires, explosions, corrosion, and chemical incompatibility); exposure routes tracking the activities, environment, sources, and occupations that tend to lead to exposure; regulatory status, listing the primary laws and citations of regulated chemicals; and important additional information on symptoms, first aid, firefighting methods, protective equipment, and safe storage.

Beim, H.J.; Spero, J.; Theodore, L.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Method and apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An incineration apparatus and method for disposal of infectious hazardous waste including a fluidized bed reactor containing a bed of granular material. The reactor includes a first chamber, a second chamber, and a vertical partition separating the first and second chambers. A pressurized stream of air is supplied to the reactor at a sufficient velocity to fluidize the granular material in both the first and second chambers. Waste materials to be incinerated are fed into the first chamber of the fluidized bed, the fine waste materials being initially incinerated in the first chamber and subsequently circulated over the partition to the second chamber wherein further incineration occurs. Coarse waste materials are removed from the first chamber, comminuted, and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. Any partially incinerated waste materials and ash from the bottom of the second chamber are removed and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. This process is repeated until all infectious hazardous waste has been completely incinerated.

Korenberg, Jacob (York, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Management of hazardous medical waste in Croatia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article provides a review of hazardous medical waste production and its management in Croatia. Even though Croatian regulations define all steps in the waste management chain, implementation of those steps is one of the country's greatest issues. Improper practice is evident from the point of waste production to final disposal. The biggest producers of hazardous medical waste are hospitals that do not implement existing legislation, due to the lack of education and funds. Information on quantities, type and flow of medical waste are inadequate, as is sanitary control. We propose an integrated approach to medical waste management based on a hierarchical structure from the point of generation to its disposal. Priority is given to the reduction of the amounts and potential for harm. Where this is not possible, management includes reduction by sorting and separating, pretreatment on site, safe transportation, final treatment and sanitary disposal. Preferred methods should be the least harmful for human health and the environment. Integrated medical waste management could greatly reduce quantities and consequently financial strains. Landfilling is the predominant route of disposal in Croatia, although the authors believe that incineration is the most appropriate method. In a country such as Croatia, a number of small incinerators would be the most economical solution.

Marinkovic, Natalija [Medical School University of Zagreb, Department for Chemistry and Biochemistry, Salata 3b, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: nmarinko@snz.hr; Vitale, Ksenija; Holcer, Natasa Janev; Dzakula, Aleksandar ['Andrija Stampar' School of Public Health, Medical School University of Zagreb, Rockefellerova 4, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia); Pavic, Tomo [Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, Ksaver 200, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Fire hazard analysis for the fuel supply shutdown storage buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of a fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire and other perils within individual fire areas in a DOE facility in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection, are met. This Fire Hazards Analysis was prepared as required by HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazards Analysis Requirements, (Reference 7) for a portion of the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility.

REMAIZE, J.A.

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

345

HAZARD CATEGORIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION SITES AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration activities, defined here as work to identify and characterize contaminated sites and then contain, treat, remove or dispose of the contamination, now comprises a significant fraction of work in the DOE complex. As with any other DOE activity, a safety analysis must be in place prior to commencing restoration. The rigor and depth of this safety analysis is in part determined by the site's hazard category. This category in turn is determined by the facility's hazardous material inventory and the consequences of its release. Progressively more complicated safety analyses are needed as a facility's hazard category increases from radiological to hazard category three (significant local releases) to hazard category two (significant on-site releases). Thus, a facility's hazard category plays a crucial early role in helping to determine the level of effort devoted to analysis of the facility's individual hazards. Improper determination of the category can result in either an inadequate safety analysis in the case of underestimation of the hazard category, or an unnecessarily cumbersome analysis in the case of overestimation. Contaminated sites have been successfully categorized and safely restored or remediated at the former DOE production site at Hanford, Washington. This paper discusses various means used to categorize former plutonium production or support sites at Hanford. Both preliminary and final hazard categorization is discussed. The importance of the preliminary (initial) hazard categorization in guiding further DOE involvement and approval of the safety analyses is discussed. Compliance to DOE direction provided in ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'', DOE-STD-1027-92, is discussed. DOE recently issued 10 CFR 830, Subpart B which codifies previous DOE safety analysis guidance and orders. The impact of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B on hazard categorization is also discussed.

BISHOP, G.E.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

A Method for Evaluating Fire After Earthquake Scenarios for Single...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Evaluating Fire After Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings Authors: Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell Intended Use: Handout for DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Workshop,...

347

A Method for Evaluating Fire after Earthquake Scenarios for Single...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Method for Evaluating Fire After Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell, LANL U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Workshop...

348

Hanford site seismic monitoring instrumentation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a plan to comply with the seismic monitoring provisions of US DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards.

Reidel, S.P.

1996-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

349

Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

M.; Im, J.; Tullis, J. A remote sensing and GIS-assisted spatial decision support system for hazardous waste site monitoring. Photogramm. Eng. Remote Sensing 2009, 75,...

350

Fees For Disposal Of Hazardous Waste Or Substances (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The article lists annual payments to be made to counties, restrictions on disposal of hazardous waste, additional fees collected by counties and penalties.

351

Chapter 32 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This administrative regulation establishes procedures to establish the applicable general provisions for generators of hazardous waste. It also establishes recordkeeping and reporting standards....

352

EIS-0286: Hanford Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement (HSW EIS) analyzes the proposed waste management practices at the Hanford Site.

353

Dust: A major environmental hazard on the earth's moon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the Earth's Moon, obvious hazards to humans and machines are created by extreme temperature fluctuations, low gravity, and the virtual absence of any atmosphere. The most important other environmental factor is ionizing radiation. Less obvious environmental hazards that must be considered before establishing a manned presence on the lunar surface are the hazards from micrometeoroid bombardment, the nuisance of electro-statically-charged lunar dust, and an alien visual environment without familiar clues. Before man can establish lunar bases and lunar mining operations, and continue the exploration of that planet, we must develop a means of mitigating these hazards. 4 refs.

Heiken, G.; Vaniman, D.; Lehnert, B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Title 40 CFR 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal...

355

Chapter 31 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions necessary for identification and listing of a hazardous waste. The regulation also establishes the criteria for identifying the...

356

Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Office 2 3 TITLE: 4 Revised Draft Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact 5 Statement, Richland, Benton County, Washington (DOE...

357

Program Review, Workplace Inspections, Hazards Analysis And Abatement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document provides guidance information and suggested procedures for performing program review, workplace inspections, hazards analysis, and abatement, successfully at DOE Federal employee worksites.

358

asteroid impact hazard: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Peter 2015-01-01 87 Ten years after wildfires: How does varying tree mortality impact fire hazard and forest resiliency? Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: 30...

359

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSANevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance...

360

South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health and Environmental Control is authorized to promulgate rules and regulations to prevent exposure of persons, animals, or the environment to hazardous waste. The construction...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.5 Hazardous Waste Operations and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RL Facility Representative Program March 21, 1995 Surveillance Guide OSS 19.5 Revision 0 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Page 6 of Error Bookmark...

362

Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

for NNSA's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control Events at...

363

NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Burealt SUSANA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Burealt SUSANA MARTINEZ Governor 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 875056303 Phone (50S) 476-6000 Fax...

364

Key Thermal Fluid Phenomena In Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several types of gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been suggested as part of the international Generation IV initiative with the proposed NGNP (Next Generation Nuclear Plant) as one of the main concepts [MacDonald et al., 2003]. Meaningful studies for these designs will require accurate, reliable predictions of material temperatures to evaluate the material capabilities; these temperatures depend on the thermal convection in the core and in other important components. Some of these reactors feature complex geometries and wide ranges of temperatures, leading to significant variations of the gas thermodynamic and transport properties plus possible effects of buoyancy during normal and reduced power operations and loss-of-flow (LOFA) and loss-of-coolant scenarios. Potential issues identified to date include ''hot streaking'' in the lower plenum evolving from ''hot channels'' in prismatic cores. In order to predict thermal hydraulic behavior of proposed designs effectively and efficiently, it is useful to identify the dominant phenomena occurring.

D. M. McEligot; G. E. McCreery; P. D. Bayless; T. D. Marshall

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Magnetic Phenomena in Holographic Superconductivity with Lifshitz Scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the effects of Lifshitz dynamical critical exponent z on a family of minimal D=4+1 holographic superconducting models, with a particular focus on magnetic phenomena. We see that it is possible to have a consistent Ginzburg-Landau approach to holographic superconductivity in a Lifshitz background. By following this phenomenological approach we are able to compute a wide array of physical quantities. We also calculate the Ginzburg-Landau parameter for different condensates, and conclude that in systems with higher dynamical critical exponent, vortex formation is more strongly unfavored energetically and exhibit a stronger Type I behavior. Finally, following the perturbative approach proposed by Maeda, Natsuume and Okamura, we calculate the critical magnetic field of our models for different values of z.

Dector, Aldo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Analogue gravitational phenomena in Bose-Einstein condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analogue gravity is based on the simple observation that perturbations propagating in several physical systems can be described by a quantum field theory in a curved spacetime. While phenomena like Hawking radiation are hardly detectable in astrophysical black holes, these effects may be experimentally tested in analogue systems. In this Thesis, focusing on Bose-Einstein condensates, we present our recent results about analogue models of gravity from three main perspectives: as laboratory tests of quantum field theory in curved spacetime, for the techniques that they provide to address various issues in general relativity, and as toy models of quantum gravity. The robustness of Hawking-like particle creation is investigated in flows with a single black hole horizon. Furthermore, we find that condensates with two (white and black) horizons develop a dynamical instability known in general relativity as black hole laser effect. Using techniques borrowed from analogue gravity, we also show that warp drives, which...

Finazzi, Stefano

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Experimental Studies of Light Emission Phenomena in Superconducting RF Cavitites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental studies of light emission phenomena in superconducting RF cavities, which we categorize under the general heading of cavity lights, are described. The cavity lights data, which were obtained using a small CCD video camera, were collected in a series of nine experimental runs ranging from {approx} 1/2 to {approx} 2 h in duration. The video data were recorded on a standard VHS tape. As the runs progressed, additional instrumentation was added. For the last three runs a LabVIEW controlled data acquisition system was included. These runs furnish evidence for several, possibly related, light emission phenomena. The most intriguing of these is what appear to be small luminous objects {le} 1.5 mm in size, freely moving about in the vacuum space, generally without wall contact, as verified by reflections of the tracks in the cavity walls. In addition, on a number of occasions, these objects were observed to bounce off of the cavity walls. The wall-bounce aspect of most of these events was clearly confirmed by pre-bounce and post-bounce reflections concurrent with the tracks. In one of the later runs, a mode of behavior was observed that was qualitatively different from anything observed in the earlier runs. Perhaps the most perplexing aspect of this new mode was the observation of as many as seven luminous objects arrayed in what might be described as a macromolecular formation, coherently moving about in the interior of the cavity for extended periods of time, evidently without any wall contact. It is suggested that these mobile luminous objects are without explanation within the realm of established physics. Some remarks about more exotic theoretical possibilities are made, and future plans are discussed.

Anthony, P.L.; /SLAC; Delayen, J.R.; /Jefferson Lab; Fryberger, D.; /SLAC; Goree, W.S.; Mammosser, J.; /Jefferson Lab /SNS Project, Oak Ridge; Szalata, Z.M.; II, J.G.Weisend /SLAC

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

368

Resilience-Based design of Natural Gas Pipelines G. P. Cimellaro, O. Villa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resilience-Based design of Natural Gas Pipelines G. P. Cimellaro, O. Villa Department of Structural systems. No models are available in literature to measure the performance of natural gas network of natural or manmade hazard which might lead to the disruption of the system. The gas distribution network

Bruneau, Michel

369

The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard; light-gray areas have a lower ash fall hazard. Information is based on data during the past 10,000 years. Bottom, from left

Torgersen, Christian

370

A complete electrical hazard classification system and its application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, NFPA 70E, and relevant OSHA electrical safety standards evolved to address the hazards of 60-Hz power that are faced primarily by electricians, linemen, and others performing facility and utility work. This leaves a substantial gap in the management of electrical hazards in Research and Development (R&D) and specialized high voltage and high power equipment. Examples include lasers, accelerators, capacitor banks, electroplating systems, induction and dielectric heating systems, etc. Although all such systems are fed by 50/60 Hz alternating current (ac) power, we find substantial use of direct current (dc) electrical energy, and the use of capacitors, inductors, batteries, and radiofrequency (RF) power. The electrical hazards of these forms of electricity and their systems are different than for 50160 Hz power. Over the past 10 years there has been an effort to develop a method of classifying all of the electrical hazards found in all types of R&D and utilization equipment. Examples of the variation of these hazards from NFPA 70E include (a) high voltage can be harmless, if the available current is sufficiently low, (b) low voltage can be harmful if the available current/power is high, (c) high voltage capacitor hazards are unique and include severe reflex action, affects on the heart, and tissue damage, and (d) arc flash hazard analysis for dc and capacitor systems are not provided in existing standards. This work has led to a comprehensive electrical hazard classification system that is based on various research conducted over the past 100 years, on analysis of such systems in R&D, and on decades of experience. Initially, national electrical safety codes required the qualified worker only to know the source voltage to determine the shock hazard. Later, as arc flash hazards were understood, the fault current and clearing time were needed. These items are still insufficient to fully characterize all types of electrical hazards. The new comprehensive electrical hazard classification system uses a combination of voltage, shock current available, fault current available, power, energy, and waveform to classify all forms of electrical hazards. Based on this electrical hazard classification system, many new tools have been developed, including (a) work controls for these hazards, (b) better selection of PPE for R&D work, (c) improved training, and (d) a new Severity Ranking Tool that is used to rank electrical accidents and incidents with various forms of electrical energy.

Gordon, Lloyd B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cartelli, Laura [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

327 Building fire hazards analysis implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 1998, the 327 Building Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) (Reference 1) was approved by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-E) for implementation by B and W Hanford Company (BWC). The purpose of the FHA was to identify gaps in compliance with DOE Order 5480.7A (Reference 2) and Richland Operations Office Implementation Directive (RLID) 5480.7 (Reference 3), especially in regard to loss limitation. The FHA identified compliance gaps in five areas and provided nine recommendations (11 items) to bring the 327 Building into compliance. A status is provided for each recommendation in this document. BWHC will use this Implementation Plan to bring the 327 Building and its operation into compliance with DOE Order 5480.7A and IUD 5480.7.

BARILO, N.F.

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

372

Potential health hazards of radiation. Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During World War II and the Cold War, the federal government developed and operated industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Some of these sites processed uranium and vanadium, and upon closure, left behind millions of cubic yards of mill tailings on the sites and throughout the nearby communities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the cleanup of these areas to minimize the risks to the public and environment from exposure to the tailings and the radon gas they produce.

none,

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

373

Improving tamper detection for hazardous waste security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide improved levels of security for the hazardous materials in their charge. Many low-level wastes that previously had minimal or no security must now be well protected, while high-level wastes require even greater levels of security than previously employed. This demand for improved security comes, in many cases, without waste managers being provided the necessary additional funding, personnel, or security expertise. Contributing to the problem is the fact that--at least in our experience--waste managers often fail to appreciate certain types of security vulnerabilities. They frequently overlook or underestimate the security risks associated with disgruntled or compromised insiders, or the potential legal and political liabilities associated with nonexistent or ineffective security. Also frequently overlooked are potential threats from waste management critics who could resort to sabotage, vandalism, or civil disobedience for purposes of discrediting a waste management program.

Johnston, R. G. (Roger G.); Garcia, A. R. E. (Anthony R. E.); Pacheco, A. N. (Adam N.); Trujillo, S. J. (Sonia J.); Martinez, R. K. (Ronald K.); Martinez, D. D. (Debbie D.); Lopez, L. N. (Leon N.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Preliminary Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRT) for SBWR start-up stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRT) have been developed for start-up transient for SBWP. The information used for PIRT came from RAMONA-4B and TRACG analyses of the transient and from related small scale tests. The transient was divided into four distinct phases, namely, Subcooled Core Heat-up, Subcooled Chimney, Saturated Chimney and Power Ascension. The assessment criterion selected was Minimum Critical Power Ratio. The SBWR system was divided into ten components. A total of 33 distinct phenomena among the components were identified. The Phase I has 28 ranked phenomena with 17 low, 6 medium and 5 high ranking. The Phase II has 39 ranked phenomena with 18 low, 13 median and 8 high ranking. The Phase III has 47 ranked phenomena with 22 low, 10 medium and 15 high ranking. The Phase IV has 46 ranked phenomena with 16 low, 12 medium and 18 high ranking. 12 refs., 22 figs., 21 tabs.

Rohatgi, U.S.; Cheng, H.S.; Khan, H.J.; Wulff, K.W.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

MULTI-HAZARD RESISTANT HIGHWAY BRIDGE PIERS HAVING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of California to its main suspension bridges and the detailed shots of the Golden Gate and Brooklyn bridgesMULTI-HAZARD RESISTANT HIGHWAY BRIDGE PIERS HAVING CONCRETE-FILLED STEEL TUBE Shuichi FUJIKURA1 of a multi-hazard bridge pier concept, i.e., a bridge pier system capable of providing an adequate level

Bruneau, Michel

376

Overview of hazardous-waste regulation at federal facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is organized in a fashion that is intended to explain the legal duties imposed on officials responsible for hazardous waste at each stage of its existence. Section 2 describes federal hazardous waste laws, explaining the legal meaning of hazardous waste and the protective measures that are required to be taken by its generators, transporters, and storers. In addition, penalties for violation of the standards are summarized, and a special discussion is presented of so-called imminent hazard provisions for handling hazardous waste that immediately threatens public health and safety. Although the focus of Sec. 2 is on RCRA, which is the principal federal law regulating hazardous waste, other federal statutes are discussed as appropriate. Section 3 covers state regulation of hazardous waste. First, Sec. 3 explains the system of state enforcement of the federal RCRA requirements on hazardous waste within their borders. Second, Sec. 3 discusses two peculiar provisions of RCRA that appear to permit states to regulate federal facilities more strictly than RCRA otherwise would require.

Tanzman, E.; LaBrie, B.; Lerner, K.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Open problem: Dynamic Relational Models for Improved Hazardous Weather Prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Current weather radar detection and prediction sys- tems primarily rely on numerical models. We proposeOpen problem: Dynamic Relational Models for Improved Hazardous Weather Prediction Amy McGovern1, #12;Dynamic Relational Models for Improved Hazardous Weather Prediction Radar velocity Radar

McGovern, Amy

378

Chemical Applications of Electrohydraulic Cavitation for Hazardous Waste Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the destruction or transformation of hazardous chemical substances such as high-temperature incineration, amended activated sludge digestion, anaerobic digestion and conventional physicochemical treatment. Pulsed-power plasma discharge technology may have.... Current approaches to the treatment of hazardous chemical wastes include high temperature incineration, chemical oxidation with and UV light, membrane separation, activated carbon adsorption, substrate-specific biodegration, electron beam bombardment...

Hoffmann, M. R.

379

Fire hazards analysis for solid waste burial grounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document comprises the fire hazards analysis for the solid waste burial grounds, including TRU trenches, low-level burial grounds, radioactive mixed waste trenches, etc. It analyzes fire potential, and fire damage potential for these facilities. Fire scenarios may be utilized in future safety analysis work, or for increasing the understanding of where hazards may exist in the present operation.

McDonald, K.M.

1995-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

380

Compliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through prevention, minimization, and recycling · Classroom or one-on-one waste generator training, other DOE and University waste organizations · Flammable waste cans, 30-gallon, 55-gallon drums (steelCompliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs) All Hazardous waste generated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural Resource Damage Assessment Cooperation and Integration  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq., Executive Order 12580, and CERCLA's implementing regulations in the National Contingency Plan (NCP), 40 CFR Part 300, give the DOE three roles at DOE facilities undergoing environmental cleanup: lead response agency, natural resource trustee, and the party responsible for releases and threatened releases of hazardous substances. Does not cancel other directives.

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

382

Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

JOHNSON, D.M.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

383

Hazardous waste research and development in the Pacific Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effective management of hazardous waste is an issue that all countries of the Pacific Basin must address. By very rough estimates, almost 272 million metric tons of hazardous wastes are being generated every year in the region. While the data are not consistently defined and reported, they do indicate the extent of the problem. Increasing development brings along an increase in the rate of hazardous waste generation. On this basis, the developing countries of the region can be expected to experience some of the same problems of the developed countries as their economies become more industrialized. Fundamental problems are involved in the compilation of consistent hazardous-waste generation statistics in the Pacific Basin. One involves the definition of what constitutes hazardous waste.

Cirillo, R.R.; Carpenter, R.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Environment and Policy Inst., Honolulu, HI (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Evaluation of Horizontal Seismic Hazard of Shahrekord, Iran  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents probabilistic horizontal seismic hazard assessment of Shahrekord, Iran. It displays the probabilistic estimate of Peak Ground Horizontal Acceleration (PGHA) for the return period of 75, 225, 475 and 2475 years. The output of the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis is based on peak ground acceleration (PGA), which is the most common criterion in designing of buildings. A catalogue of seismic events that includes both historical and instrumental events was developed and covers the period from 840 to 2007. The seismic sources that affect the hazard in Shahrekord were identified within the radius of 150 km and the recurrence relationships of these sources were generated. Finally four maps have been prepared to indicate the earthquake hazard of Shahrekord in the form of iso-acceleration contour lines for different hazard levels by using SEISRISK III software.

Amiri, G. Ghodrati [Iran University of Science and Technology--Islamic Azad University of Shahrekord, Narmak, Tehran 16846 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dehkordi, M. Raeisi [Department of Civil Engineering, Islamic Azad University of Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amrei, S. A. Razavian [College of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kamali, M. Koohi [Department of Civil Engineering, Islamic Azad University of Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric phenomena Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Dynamical Processes. Summary: . TRANSPORT PHENOMENA Microscopic description of transport processes for particles Random walks and relation... with grey atmospheres Defining...

386

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric pressure phenomena Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

flow solver Master Project Summary: , commonly accepted as well if Mach > 5 sees the rise of more complex phenomena at molecular and atomic level... , due to the high...

387

Reasoning about Probabilistic Phenomena: Lessons Learned and Applied in Software Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probabilistic Phenomena: Lessons Learned and Applied inand empirical data. The lessons learned from students’ worksome of the key lessons learned within each of these

Lee, Hollylynne S; Lee, J. Todd

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Hazardous-waste combustion in industrial processes: cement and lime kilns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of several studies relating to hazardous-waste combustion in cement and lime kilns. The tests included in the study are four kilns tested by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, four kilns tested by State agencies or the kiln operator, two Canadian tests, and one Swedish test. The predominant types of wastes tested included chlorinated organic compounds, aromatic compounds, and metal-contaminated waste oil. The kiln types include lime kilns and cement kilns, which included the dry, wet, and preheated processes. Fabric filters and electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) were the pollution-control devices used in these processes, and the primary fuels included coal, coke, coal/coke, fuel oil, and natural gas/coke. The parameters examined in the report were Destruction and Removal Efficiency (DRE) of the Principal Organic Hazardous Constitutents, particulate and HCl emissions, metals, and the effect of burning hazardous waste on SO/sub 2/, NOx, and CO emissions. The primary conclusion of the study is that DRE's of 99.99% or greater can be obtained in properly-operated calcining kilns. Particulate matter can increase when chlorinated wastes are burned in a kiln equipped with an electrostatic precipitator. Those kilns equipped with fabric filters showed no change in emissions.

Mournighan, R.E.; Branscome, M.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Quantum entanglement phenomena in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review recent theoretical calculations of quantum entanglement in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes. These works establish, for the first time, a manifestation of this characteristically quantum mechanical phenomenon in biologically functional structures. We begin by summarizing calculations on model biomolecular systems that aim to reveal non-trivial characteristics of quantum entanglement in non-equilibrium biological environments. We then discuss and compare several calculations performed recently of excitonic dynamics in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson light harvesting complex and of the entanglement present in this widely studied pigment-protein structure. We point out the commonalities between the derived results and also identify and explain the differences. We also discuss recent work that examines entanglement in the structurally more intricate light harvesting complex II (LHCII). During this overview, we take the opportunity to clarify several subtle issues relating to entanglement in such biomolecular systems, including the role of entanglement in biological function, the complexity of dynamical modeling that is required to capture the salient features of entanglement in such biomolecular systems, and the relationship between entanglement and other quantum mechanical features that are observed and predicted in light harvesting complexes. Finally, we suggest possible extensions of the current work and also review the options for experimental confirmation of the predicted entanglement phenomena in light harvesting complexes.

K. Birgitta Whaley; Mohan Sarovar; Akihito Ishizaki

2010-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

390

Kinetic theory of nonlinear transport phenomena in complex plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In contrast to the prevalent use of the phenomenological theory of transport phenomena, a number of transport properties of complex plasmas have been evaluated by using appropriate expressions, available from the kinetic theory, which are based on Boltzmann's transfer equation; in particular, the energy dependence of the electron collision frequency has been taken into account. Following the recent trend, the number and energy balance of all the constituents of the complex plasma and the charge balance on the particles is accounted for; the Ohmic loss has also been included in the energy balance of the electrons. The charging kinetics for the complex plasma comprising of uniformly dispersed dust particles, characterized by (i) uniform size and (ii) the Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck power law of size distribution has been developed. Using appropriate expressions for the transport parameters based on the kinetic theory, the system of equations has been solved to investigate the parametric dependence of the complex plasma transport properties on the applied electric field and other plasma parameters; the results are graphically illustrated.

Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre for Energy Studies (CES), Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Fluctuations around Bjorken Flow and the onset of turbulent phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study how fluctuations in fluid dynamic fields can be dissipated or amplified within the characteristic spatio-temporal structure of a heavy ion collision. The initial conditions for a fluid dynamic evolution of heavy ion collisions may contain significant fluctuations in all fluid dynamical fields, including the velocity field and its vorticity components. We formulate and analyze the theory of local fluctuations around average fluid fields described by Bjorken's model. For conditions of laminar flow, when a linearized treatment of the dynamic evolution applies, we discuss explicitly how fluctuations of large wave number get dissipated while modes of sufficiently long wave-length pass almost unattenuated or can even be amplified. In the opposite case of large Reynold's numbers (which is inverse to viscosity), we establish that (after suitable coordinate transformations) the dynamics is governed by an evolution equation of non-relativistic Navier-Stokes type that becomes essentially two-dimensional at late times. One can then use the theory of Kolmogorov and Kraichnan for an explicit characterization of turbulent phenomena in terms of the wave-mode dependence of correlations of fluid dynamic fields. We note in particular that fluid dynamic correlations introduce characteristic power-law dependences in two-particle correlation functions.

Stefan Floerchinger; Urs Achim Wiedemann

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

392

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing hazards aircraft Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard; light-gray areas have... a lower ash fall hazard. Information is based on data during the past 10,000 years. Bottom, from...

393

Solvation Phenomena in Dilute Solutions: Formal, Experimental Evidence, and Modeling Implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review the fundamentals underlying a general molecular-based formalism for the microscopic interpretation of the solvation phenomena involving sparingly soluble solutes in compressible media, an approach that hinges around the unambiguous splitting of the species correlation function integrals into short-(finite) and long-ranged (diverging) contributions at infinite dilution, where this condition is taken as the reference system for the derivation of composition expansions. Then, we invoke the formalism (a) to illustrate the well-behaved nature of the solvation contributions to the mechanical partial molecular properties of solutes at infinite dilution, (b) to guide the development of, and provide molecular-based support to, the macroscopic modeling of high-temperature dilute aqueous-electrolyte solutions, (c) to study solvation effects on the kinetic rate constants of reactions in near-critical solvents in an attempt to understand from a microscopic perspective the macroscopic evidence regarding the thermodynamic pressure effects, and (d) to interpret the microscopic mechanism behind synergistic solvation effects involving either co-solutes or co-solvents, and provide a molecular argument on the unsuitability of the van der Waals one-fluid (vdW-1f) mixing rules for the 2 description of weakly attractive solutes in compressible solvents. Finally, we develop thermodynamically consistent perturbation expansions, around the infinite dilution reference, for the species residual properties in binary and ternary mixtures, and discuss the theoretical and modeling implications behind ad hoc first-order truncated expansions.

Chialvo, Ariel A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) was issued on October 27, 1999 [1]. Since that time, the WIPP has sought modifications to clarify the permit language, provide alternative methods for meeting permit requirements and to update permit conditions. Significant advancements have been made in transuranic (TRU) waste management as the result of modifications to the HWFP. Among these advancements is a modification to obtain a drum age criteria (DAC) value to perform headspace gas sampling on drums to be super-compacted and placed in a 100-gallon overpack drum. In addition, the Section 311 permit modification request that would allow for more efficient waste characterization, and the modification to authorize the shipment and disposal of Remote-Handled (RH) TRU waste were merged together and submitted to the regulator as the Consolidated Permit Modification Request (PMR). The submittal of the Consolidated PMR came at the request of the regulator as part of responses to Notices of Deficiency (NODs) for the separate PMRs which had been submitted in previous years. Section 311 of the fiscal year 2004 Energy and Water Developments Appropriations Act (Public Law 108-137) [2] directs the Department of Energy to submit a permit modification that limits waste confirmation to radiography or visual examination of a statistical subpopulation of containers. Section 311 also specifically directs that disposal room performance standards be to be met by monitoring for volatile organic compounds in the underground disposal rooms. This statute translates into the elimination of other waste confirmation methods such as headspace gas sampling and analysis and solids sampling and analysis. These methods, as appropriate, will continue to be used by the generator sites during hazardous waste determinations or characterization activities. This modification is expected to reduce the overall cost of waste analysis by hundreds of millions of dollars [3]. Combining both the chap. 311 and RH TRU waste permit modification requests allows for both the regulator and DOE to expedite action on the modification requests. The Combined PMR reduces costs by having only one administrative process for both modification requests. (authors)

Kehrman, B.; Most, W. [Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services, 4021 National Parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

none,

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act, State Superfund Law (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act contains information on prevention strategies for hazardous material release, permits for facilities managing hazardous waste, and response tactics and liability in the event such release...

397

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used...

398

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management System (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations prescribe the management of hazardous waste facilities in New York State. They identify and list different types of hazardous wastes and describe standards for generators,...

399

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoiding hazards caused Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

published... . If so, the hazardous energy must be controlled using an appropriate lockout procedure (see Control... of Hazardous Energy: General Requirements). This procedure...

400

E-Print Network 3.0 - arrows radiological hazards Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

published... . If so, the hazardous energy must be controlled using an appropriate lockout procedure (see Control... of Hazardous Energy: General Requirements). This procedure...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Parts 595-599: Hazardous Substances (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations aim to prevent the release of hazardous substances into surface water and groundwater resources. They contain guidance for facilities which store and process hazardous substances,...

402

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid gas hazards Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AND SCOPE Arizona State University... Management, generate a variety of hazardous chemical wastes. ASU is classified as a hazardous waste generator... ) and has been assigned...

403

324 Building fire hazards analysis implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 1998, the 324 Building Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) (Reference 1) was approved by the U S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) for implementation by B and W Hanford Company (BWHC). The purpose of the FHA was to identify gaps in compliance with DOE Order 5480.7A (Reference 2) and Richland Operations Office Implementation Directive (RLID) 5480.7 (Reference 3), especially in regard to loss limitation. The FHA identified compliance gaps in six areas and provided 20 recommendations to bring the 324 Building into compliance with DOE Order 5480 7A. Additionally, one observation was provided. A status is provided for each recommendation in this document. The actions for recommendations associated with the safety related part of the 324 Building and operation of the cells and support areas were evaluated using the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process BWHC will use this Implementation Plan to bring the 324 Building and its operation into compliance with DOE Order 5480 7A and RLID 5480.7.

BARILO, N.F.

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

404

Investigating the Physical Origin of Unconventional Low-Energy Excitations and Pseudogap Phenomena in Cuprate Superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigating the Physical Origin of Unconventional Low-Energy Excitations and Pseudogap Phenomena associated with the pseudogap phenomena, with the high-energy pseudogap probably of magnetic origin with the competing order, whereas the higher-energy pseudogap seems to be of magnetic origin. In this work, we

Yeh, Nai-Chang

405

FINITE VOLUME METHODS APPLIED TO THE COMPUTATIONAL MODELLING OF WELDING PHENOMENA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 FINITE VOLUME METHODS APPLIED TO THE COMPUTATIONAL MODELLING OF WELDING PHENOMENA Gareth A.Taylor@brunel.ac.uk ABSTRACT This paper presents the computational modelling of welding phenomena within a versatile numerical) and Computational Solid Mechanics (CSM). With regard to the CFD modelling of the weld pool fluid dynamics, heat

Taylor, Gary

406

Remote Sensing for Hazard Mitigation and Resource Protection in Pacific Latin America Gregg Bluth (PI); John Gierke, Bill Rose, Essa Gross (Co-PI's)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, monitoring, and exploring large regions in a cost-effective manner, it has not met with much acceptance in furthering remote sensing capabilities for natural hazard mitigation and resource development (Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Ecuador), focusing on the collaborative development of remote sensing

407

Health and Safety Procedures Manual for hazardous waste sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Chemical Assessments Team (ORNL/CAT) has developed this Health and Safety Procedures Manual for the guidance, instruction, and protection of ORNL/CAT personnel expected to be involved in hazardous waste site assessments and remedial actions. This manual addresses general and site-specific concerns for protecting personnel, the general public, and the environment from any possible hazardous exposures. The components of this manual include: medical surveillance, guidance for determination and monitoring of hazards, personnel and training requirements, protective clothing and equipment requirements, procedures for controlling work functions, procedures for handling emergency response situations, decontamination procedures for personnel and equipment, associated legal requirements, and safe drilling practices.

Thate, J.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

Dominick, J

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

409

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 1: Main Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process was conducted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) design. This design (in the conceptual stage) is a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) that generates both electricity and process heat for hydrogen production. Expert panels identified safety-relevant phenomena, ranked their importance, and assessed the knowledge levels in the areas of accidents and thermal fluids, fission-product transport and dose, high-temperature materials, graphite, and process heat for hydrogen production. This main report summarizes and documents the process and scope of the reviews, noting the major activities and conclusions. The identified phenomena, analyses, rationales, and associated ratings of the phenomena, plus a summary of each panel's findings, are presented. Individual panel reports for these areas are provided as attached volumes to this main report and provide considerably more detail about each panel's deliberations as well as a more complete listing of the phenomena that were evaluated.

Ball, Sydney J [ORNL

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

eArth science College of Natural Science and Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eArth science College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics 907 provides broad training in various aspects of earth systems science. Three concentrations are available: earth systems science, geo- logical hazards and mitigation, and secondary education. The concen

Hartman, Chris

411

Who we are NERC the Natural Environment Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of research on your business NERC research enables safe and efficient access to the natural resources on which with business Improving competitiveness NERC climate science helps improve the catastrophe modelling all businesses depend. Our modelling of environmental hazards helps industry mitigate and adapt

Brierley, Andrew

412

Compressed Gas Cylinder Safety I. Background. Due to the nature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compressed Gas Cylinder Safety I. Background. Due to the nature of gas cylinders hazards of a ruptured cylinder. There are almost 200 different types of materials in gas cylinders, there are several general procedures to follow for safe storage and handling of a compressed gas cylinder: II

Suzuki, Masatsugu

413

EA-0688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct the Hazardous Waste Staging Facility that would help to alleviate capacity problems as well as provide a single compliant...

414

Category 3 threshold quantities for hazard categorization of nonreactor facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the information necessary to determine Hazard Category 3 threshold quantities for those isotopes of interest not listed in WHC-CM-4-46, Section 4, Table 1.''Threshold Quantities.''

Mandigo, R.L.

1996-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

415

Job Hazard Analysis Manual Updated 10/6/04  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and fire hazards from area Electrical Shock Improper grounding, improper operations and maintenance Lockout Activation during repair Auto start and/or human error Lockout/Tagout Noise Equipment Operation Use Hearing

Escher, Christine

416

Trends and Opportunities in Industrial Hazardous Waste Minimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes trends and opportunities in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste minimization. It uses U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data gathered since 1989 from over 20,000 facilities that account for almost all...

Atlas, M.

417

Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program annual progress report, FY 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Programs (HAZWRAP), a unit of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., supports the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office in broadly environmental areas, especially those relating to waste management and environmental restoration. HAZWRAP comprises six program areas, which are supported by central administrative and technical organizations. Existing programs deal with airborne hazardous substances, pollution prevention, remedial actions planning, environmental restoration, technology development, and information and data systems. HAZWRAP's mission to develop, promote, and apply-cost-effective hazardous waste management and environmental technologies to help solve national problems and concerns. HAZWRAP seeks to serve as integrator for hazardous waste and materials management across the federal government. It applies the unique combination of research and development (R D) capabilities, technologies, management expertise, and facilities in the Energy Systems complex to address problems of national importance. 24 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Hazardous Materials Shipping Policy for Laboratories Policy Statement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 Hazardous Materials Shipping Policy for Laboratories Policy Statement In order to ensure shall follow the procedures established in this policy. Reason for Policy/Purpose Transportation # Policy Statement............................................................................... 1 Reason

Shull, Kenneth R.

419

RCRA Hazardous Waste Part A Permit Application: Instructions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Part A Permit Application: Instructions and Form (EPA Form 8700-23) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: RCRA Hazardous Waste Part A Permit...

420

Geologic Hazards Associated With a Proposed Dam on the Yarlung-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such reports (Biron and Dodin, 2007). However, given the persistent media reports, the pressing water-resources downstream in the Brahmapu- tra system in northeastern India and Bangladesh, and hazards asso- ciated

Kidd, William S. F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Order Module--self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

also help prepare you for the practice at the end of this module and for the criterion test. Before continuing, you should obtain a copy of the regulation at Hazardous waste...

422

RFPs Due for Hazardous Fuel Wood to Energy Grant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Forest Service requests proposals for the 2014 Hazardous Fuel Wood to Energy (W2E) Grant.  The outcome anticipated under this funding mechanism will advance the United States Department of...

423

PRECOMBUSTION REMOVAL OF HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT PRECURSORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to growing environmental concerns reflected in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored several research and development projects in late 1995 as part of an initiative entitled Advanced Environmental Control Technologies for Coal-Based Power Systems. The program provided cost-shared support for research and development projects that could accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. Clean coal technologies developed under this program would serve as prototypes for later generations of technologies to be implemented in the industrial sector. In order to identify technologies with the greatest potential for commercial implementation, projects funded under Phase I of this program were subject to competitive review by DOE before being considered for continuation funding under Phase II. One of the primary topical areas identified under the DOE initiative relates to the development of improved technologies for reducing the emissions of air toxics. Previous studies have suggested that many of the potentially hazardous air pollutant precursors (HAPPs) occur as trace elements in the mineral matter of run-of-mine coals. As a result, these elements have the potential to be removed prior to combustion at the mine site by physical coal cleaning processes (i.e., coal preparation). Unfortunately, existing coal preparation plants are generally limited in their ability to remove HAPPs due to incomplete liberation of the mineral matter and high organic associations of some trace elements. In addition, existing physical coal cleaning plants are not specifically designed or optimized to ensure that high trace element rejections may be achieved.

Unknown

2000-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

424

Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Hazards Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Hazard Analysis to support the CVDF Final Safety Analysis Report and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports,'' and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, ''Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.''

CROWE, R.D.

2000-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

425

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hazard classification criteria for non-nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories` Integrated Risk Management Department has developed a process for establishing the appropriate hazard classification of a new facility or operation, and thus the level of rigor required for the associated authorization basis safety documentation. This process is referred to as the Preliminary Hazard Screen. DOE Order 5481.1B contains the following hazard classification for non-nuclear facilities: high--having the potential for onsite or offsite impacts to large numbers of persons or for major impacts to the environment; moderate--having the potential for considerable onsite impacts but only minor offsite impacts to people or the environment; low--having the potential for only minor onsite and negligible offsite impacts to people or the environment. It is apparent that the application of such generic criteria is more than likely to be fraught with subjective judgment. One way to remove the subjectivity is to define health and safety classification thresholds for specific hazards that are based on the magnitude of the hazard, rather than on a qualitative assessment of possible accident consequences. This paper presents the results of such an approach to establishing a readily usable set of non-nuclear facility hazard classifications.

Mahn, J.A.; Walker, S.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 26632675, 2011 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/11/2663/2011/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is responsible for studying the safety and hazards of abandoned mines. One of the main scientific aims- gan on new extraction facilities and the mine operator kindly agreed to collaborate on the experiment

Boyer, Edmond

428

Putting It Down: Hazardous-Waste Management in the Throwaway Culture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

protocols existed for these indicators. 68 Even granting that EPA's testing criteria for hazardous waste

Stockton, Wendy

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Hazard Communication Definitions Chemical means any substance or mixture of substances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hazard or a health hazard, a simple asphyxiant, combustible dust, pyrophoric gas or hazard not otherwise of the following hazardous effects: explosive; flammable (gases, aerosols, liquids or solids); oxidizer (liquid a phrase that describes recommended measures that should be taken to minimize or prevent adverse effects

Slatton, Clint

430

Reuse in Hazard Analysis: Identification and Shamus P. Smith and Michael D. Harrison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for example, Hazard and Op- erability Studies (HAZOP) [11], Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA) [6

Harrison, Michael

431

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

John A. McLachlan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

Kirk, N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Frequency Analysis of Aircraft hazards for License Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The preclosure safety analysis for the monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain must consider the hazard that aircraft may pose to surface structures. Relevant surface structures are located beneath the restricted airspace of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) on the eastern slope of Yucca Mountain, near the North Portal of the Exploratory Studies Facility Tunnel (Figure 1). The North Portal is located several miles from the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), which is used extensively by the U.S. Air Force (USAF) for training and test flights (Figure 1). The NTS airspace, which is controlled by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for NTS activities, is not part of the NTTR. Agreements with the DOE allow USAF aircraft specific use of the airspace above the NTS (Reference 2.1.1 [DIRS 103472], Section 3.1.1 and Appendix A, Section 2.1; and Reference 2.1.2 [DIRS 157987], Sections 1.26 through 1.29). Commercial, military, and general aviation aircraft fly within several miles to the southwest of the repository site in the Beatty Corridor, which is a broad air corridor that runs approximately parallel to U.S. Highway 95 and the Nevada-California border (Figure 2). These aircraft and other aircraft operations are identified and described in ''Identification of Aircraft Hazards'' (Reference 2.1.3, Sections 6 and 8). The purpose of this analysis is to estimate crash frequencies for aircraft hazards identified for detailed analysis in ''Identification of Aircraft Hazards'' (Reference 2.1.3, Section 8). Reference 2.1.3, Section 8, also identifies a potential hazard associated with electronic jamming, which will be addressed in this analysis. This analysis will address only the repository and not the transportation routes to the site. The analysis is intended to provide the basis for: (1) Categorizing event sequences related to aircraft hazards; (2) Identifying design or operational requirements related to aircraft hazards.

K. Ashley

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

434

Aggregation phenomena in telechelic star polymer solutions Federica Lo Verso,1,* Athanassios Z. Panagiotopoulos,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recently shown to assemble into interpenetrating networks, featuring mul- tiple critical points 5Aggregation phenomena in telechelic star polymer solutions Federica Lo Verso,1,* Athanassios Z Received 16 October 2008; published 16 January 2009 Telechelic star polymers are macromolecules

Likos, Christos N.

435

Models of fragmentation phenomena based on the symmetric group S sub n and combinational analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various models for fragmentation phenomena are developed using methods from permutation groups and combinational analysis. The appearance and properties of power laws in these models are discussed. Various exactly soluble cases are studied.

Mekjian, A.Z. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory); Lee, S.J. (Rutgers--the State Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

1991-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

436

Models of fragmentation phenomena based on the symmetric group S{sub n} and combinational analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various models for fragmentation phenomena are developed using methods from permutation groups and combinational analysis. The appearance and properties of power laws in these models are discussed. Various exactly soluble cases are studied.

Mekjian, A.Z. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory; Lee, S.J. [Rutgers--the State Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

1991-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

437

Optical, electronic, and dynamical phenomena in the shock compression of condensed matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite the study of shock wave compression of condensed matter for over 100 years, scant progress has been made in understanding the microscopic details. This thesis explores microscopic phenomena in shock compression of ...

Reed, Evan J. (Evan John), 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 26, 052001 (2014) Capturing non-equilibrium phenomena in rarefied  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 26, 052001 (2014) Capturing non-equilibrium phenomena in rarefied polyatomic: 142.104.86.60 On: Mon, 05 May 2014 20:27:14 #12;052001-2 B. Rahimi and H. Struchtrup Phys. Fluids 26

Struchtrup, Henning

439

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation’s site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides that are resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds, dust-devils) along with historically-contaminated soils on the NTS. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (40 Code of Federal Regulations 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent (EDE) to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS for inhaling radioactive particles that may be carried by wind off of the NTS. This limit assumes that members of the public surrounding the NTS may also inhale “background levels” or radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities that come from naturally-occurring elements in the environment (e.g., radon gas from the earth or natural building materials) or from other man-made sources (e.g., cigarette smoke). The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires DOE facilities (e.g., the NTS) to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP dose limit by annually estimating the dose to a hypothetical member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI), or the member of the public who resides within an 80-kilometer (50-mile) radius of the facility who would experience the highest annual dose. This dose to a hypothetical person living close to the NTS cannot exceed 10 mrem/yr. C.1 This report has been produced annually for the EPA Region IX, and for the state of Nevada since 1992 and documents that the estimated EDE to the MEI has been, and continues to be, well below the NESHAP dose limit. The report format and level of technical detail has been dictated by the EPA and DOE Headquarters over the years. It is read and evaluated for NESHAP compliance by federal and state regulators. Each section and appendix presents technical information (e.g., NTS emission source estimates, onsite air sampling data, air transport model input parameters, dose calculation methodology, etc.), which supports the annual dose assessment conclusions. In 2005, as in all previous years for which this report has been produced, the estimated dose to the public from inhalation of radiological emissions from current and past NTS activities is shown to be well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. This was demonstrated by air sampling data collected onsite at each of six EPA-approved “critical receptor” stations on the NTS. The sum of measured EDEs from the four stations at the NTS boundaries is 2.5 mrem/yr. This dose is 25 percent of the allowed NESHAP dose limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, this individual receives only a small fraction of this dose. NESHAP compliance does not require DOE facilities to estimate annual inhalation dose from non-DOE activities. Therefore, this report does not estimate public radiation doses from any other sources or activities (e.g., naturally-occurring radon, global fallout).

Bechtel Nevada

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Assessment of Natural Hazard Damage and Reconstruction: A Case Study from Band Aceh, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mortality in Aceh Province, Indonesia. Bulletin of the Worlda case study of Aceh, Indonesia. Geoscience and Remote1-12. Davies, M. 2006. Indonesia’s war over Aceh: Last stand

Gillespie, Thomas; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Braughton, Matt; Cooke, Abigail M.; Armenta, Tiffany; Thomas, Duncan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization using combusted oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory study was conducted at the Western Research Institute to evaluate the ability of combusted oil shale to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents of hazardous wastes. The oil shale used in the research was a western oil shale retorted in an inclined fluidized-bed reactor. Two combustion temperatures were used, 1550{degrees}F and 1620{degrees}F (843{degrees}C and 882{degrees}C). The five wastes selected for experimentation were an API separator sludge, creosote-contaminated soil, mixed metal oxide/hydroxide waste, metal-plating sludge, and smelter dust. The API separator sludge and creosote-contaminated soil are US EPA-listed hazardous wastes and contain organic contaminants. The mixed metal oxide/hydroxide waste, metal-plating sludge (also an EPA-listed waste), and smelter dust contain high concentrations of heavy metals. The smelter dust and mixed metal oxide/hydroxide waste fail the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for cadmium, and the metalplating sludge fails the TCLP for chromium. To evaluate the ability of the combusted oil shales to stabilize the hazardous wastes, mixtures involving varying amounts of each of the shales with each of the hazardous wastes were prepared, allowed to equilibrate, and then leached with deionized, distilled water. The leachates were analyzed for the hazardous constituent(s) of interest.

Sorini, S.S.; Lane, D.C.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

AN ENHANCED HAZARD ANALYSIS PROCESS FOR THE HANFORD TANK FARMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., has expanded the scope and increased the formality of process hazards analyses performed on new or modified Tank Farm facilities, designs, and processes. The CH2M HILL process hazard analysis emphasis has been altered to reflect its use as a fundamental part of the engineering and change control process instead of simply being a nuclear safety analysis tool. The scope has been expanded to include identification of accidents/events that impact the environment, or require emergency response, in addition to those with significant impact to the facility worker, the offsite, and the 100-meter receptor. Also, there is now an expectation that controls will be identified to address all types of consequences. To ensure that the process has an appropriate level of rigor and formality, a new engineering standard for process hazards analysis was created. This paper discusses the role of process hazards analysis as an information source for not only nuclear safety, but also for the worker-safety management programs, emergency management, environmental programs. This paper also discusses the role of process hazards analysis in the change control process, including identifying when and how it should be applied to changes in design or process.

SHULTZ MV

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Identifying air pollutants that pose a potential hazard indoors can facilitate exposure mitigation. In this study, we compiled summary results from 77 published studies reporting measurements of chemical pollutants in residences in the United States and in countries with similar lifestyles. These data were used to calculate representative mid-range and upper bound concentrations relevant to chronic exposures for 267 pollutants and representative peak concentrations relevant to acute exposures for 5 activity-associated pollutants. Representative concentrations are compared to available chronic and acute health standards for 97 pollutants. Fifteen pollutants appear to exceed chronic health standards in a large fraction of homes. Nine other pollutants are identified as potential chronic health hazards in a substantial minority of homes and an additional nine are identified as potential hazards in a very small percentage of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as priority hazards based on the robustness of measured concentration data and the fraction of residences that appear to be impacted: acetaldehyde; acrolein; benzene; 1,3-butadiene; 1,4-dichlorobenzene; formaldehyde; naphthalene; nitrogen dioxide; and PM{sub 2.5}. Activity-based emissions are shown to pose potential acute health hazards for PM{sub 2.5}, formaldehyde, CO, chloroform, and NO{sub 2}.

Logue, J.M.; McKone, T.E.; Sherman, M. H.; Singer, B.C.

2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

Federal Agency Hazardous Waste Compliance Docket (docket). Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Facilities Hazardous Waste Compliance Docket (``docket``) identifies Federal facilities that may be contaminated with hazardous substances and that must be evaluated to determine if they pose a risk to public health or the environment The docket, required by Section 120(c) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), also provides a vehicle for making information about potentially contaminated facilities available to the public. Facilities listed on the docket must complete site assessments that provide the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with information needed to determine whether or not the facility should be included on he National Priorities List (NPL). This Information Brief, which revises the previous Federal Agency Hazardous Waste Compiliance Docket Information Brief, provides updated information on the docket listing process, the implications of listing, and facility status after listing.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Hazardous-waste analysis plan for LLNL operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is involved in many facets of research ranging from nuclear weapons research to advanced Biomedical studies. Approximately 80% of all programs at LLNL generate hazardous waste in one form or another. Aside from producing waste from industrial type operations (oils, solvents, bottom sludges, etc.) many unique and toxic wastes are generated such as phosgene, dioxin (TCDD), radioactive wastes and high explosives. One key to any successful waste management program must address the following: proper identification of the waste, safe handling procedures and proper storage containers and areas. This section of the Waste Management Plan will address methodologies used for the Analysis of Hazardous Waste. In addition to the wastes defined in 40 CFR 261, LLNL and Site 300 also generate radioactive waste not specifically covered by RCRA. However, for completeness, the Waste Analysis Plan will address all hazardous waste.

Roberts, R.S.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

446

Glass Formulation and Fabrication Laboratory, Building 864, Hazards assessment document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Glass Formulation and Fabrication Laboratory, Building 864. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distances at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the ERPG-2 threshold is 96 meters. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 100 meters.

Banda, Z.; Wood, C.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Simulation Technology Laboratory Building 970 hazards assessment document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Simulation Technology Laboratory, Building 970. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distances at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the ERPG-2 and Early Severe Health Effects thresholds are 78 and 46 meters, respectively. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 100 meters.

Wood, C.L.; Starr, M.D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Review of Sitet Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, May 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of Energy U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)WorldBriefAugust 14,ThisIndependent

449

Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Containment and stabilization technologies for mixed hazardous and radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prevalent approach to the cleanup of waste sites contaminated with hazardous chemicals and radionuclides is to contain and/or stabilize wastes within the site. Stabilization involves treating the wastes in some fashion, either in situ or above ground after retrieval, to reduce the leachability and release rate of waste constituents to the environment. This approach is generally reserved for radionuclide contaminants, inorganic hazardous contaminants such as heavy metals, and nonvolatile organic contaminants. This paper describes the recent developments in the technical options available for containing and stabilizing wastes. A brief description of each technology is given along with a discussion of the most recent developments and examples of useful applications.

Buelt, J.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

UNBC Hazardous Waste Guide Proper waste management practices are essential for the safety of all students, staff, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemical waste, hazardous solid chemical waste (i.e. items that have been contaminated with hazardous are preferred for all hazardous liquid chemical waste. - Plastic bags are preferred for all hazardous solidUNBC Hazardous Waste Guide Proper waste management practices are essential for the safety of all

Northern British Columbia, University of

452

Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

454

Modelling and Hazard Analysis for Contaminated Sediments Using Stamp Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling and Hazard Analysis for Contaminated Sediments Using Stamp Model Karim Hardy* , Franck or contaminants) of contaminated sediments have become very efficient. These technologies, which are particularly sections. The first describes the Novosol® process for treating contaminated sediments. The second

Boyer, Edmond

455

Studies on Hazard Characterization for Performance-based Structural Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based design procedures. This research examined and extended the state-of-the-art in hazard characterization (wind and surge) and risk-based design procedures (seismic). State-of-the-art hurricane models (including wind field, tracking and decay models...

Wang, Yue

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

456

Sorting and disposal of hazardous laboratory Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorting and disposal of hazardous laboratory waste Radioactive waste Solid radioactive waste or in a Perspex box. Liquid radioactive waste collect in a screw-cap plastic bottle, ½ or 1 L size. Place bottles in a tray to avoid spill Final disposal of both solid and radioactive waste into the yellow barrel

Maoz, Shahar

457

Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Health hazards of hydrofluoric acid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Health hazards of hydrofluoric acid Hydrofluoric acid (HF characterized by weight loss, brittle bones, anemia, and general ill health. Safe use If possible, avoid working to exposures. #12;Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Environmental Health and Safety Environmental Programs Office

Wilcock, William

458

Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Fire Hazard Analysis assesses the risk from fire within individual fire areas in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility at the Hanford Site in relation to existing or proposed fire protection features to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE Order 5480.7A Fire Protection are met.

JOHNSON, B.H.

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

459

Phase 2 fire hazard analysis for the canister storage building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fire hazard analysis assesses the risk from fire in a facility to ascertain whether the fire protection policies are met. This document provides a preliminary FHA for the CSB facility. Open items have been noted in the document. A final FHA will be required at the completion of definitive design, prior to operation of the facility.

Sadanaga, C.T., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Fire Hazards Analysis for the Inactive Equipment Storage Sprung Structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the analysis is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the fire protection objective of DOE Order 5480.1A are met. The order acknowledges a graded approach commensurate with the hazards involved.

MYOTT, C.F.

2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

air pollution control agency and the Department of Labor and Industries (L&I) at least ten (10) days construction and renovation projects. Asbestos is a stringently regulated hazardous material and many Construction projects which impact existing building materials must include an environmental consultant

Wilcock, William

462

Landslide hazard zonation in Namasigue and El Triunfo, Southern Honduras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was to test two models to determine the feasibility of creating landslide hazard maps. Data were used to determine how landslide occurrence was affected by the variables in the model. Four easily observable variables were used for both models: slope, aspect...

Perotto-Baldivieso, Humberto Lauro

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Recent Electrical Events Highlight Equipment-Failure Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent Electrical Events Highlight Equipment-Failure Hazards FOR DETAILS: Occurrence Reports: NA Investigators: Antonia Tallarico, 665-6988 Mark Hunsinger, 665-1496 Susan Voss, 667-5979 LANL Chief Electrical-OA at 665-0033. February 14, 2007 LANL 2007-0004 GUIDANCE: Resources at hand LIR 402-600-01.3, "Electrical

464

Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards: The Risks of Coastal Living See. Climate change is bringing increased temperatures, rising sea level, more frequent storms and increased in tide levels. From these records it is not only clear that water levels are rising, they appear

465

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

project having the potential to impact lead-containing building materials, including lead paint. ResultsUNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety Design Guide Lead Basis, lead-containing materials have the potential to negatively impact the health of construction workers

Wilcock, William

466

Guidance Note 052 RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;safety data or the condition of the substance is in doubt due to its age, it should be disposed and fresh with regard to all aspects of handling hazardous substances including receipt, storage, use, transport and disposal. Likewise, DSEAR requires assessment and control of fire and explosion risks presented

467

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

469

loods. Earthquakes. Winter storms. Fire. Hazardous spills. Public safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, break, or cause a fire--such as a water heater or bookshelf ). Annually inspect your home for hazards to your home. What would you do if basic services--water, gas, electricity, or telephones--were cut off the water, gas, and electric- ity at the main switches. Keep necessary tools near gas and water shut

Tullos, Desiree

470

Coding Hazardous Tree Failures for a Data Management System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management; computer programs; coding. The Author Lee A. Paine is a forest pathologist, stationed in Berkeley in the manual on the indicated pages. Page 7, just above H. Property or Person Directly Affected, insert: CityCoding Hazardous Tree Failures for a Data Management System Lee A. Paine PACIFIC SOUTHWEST

Standiford, Richard B.

471

Surface Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report-Constructor Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Facility Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment; Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

R.E. Flye

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

472

Electrical Sitchgear Building No. 5010-ESF Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Fire Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event; (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of the employees, the public, and the environment; (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related event.

N.M. Ruonavaara

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

473

Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS) Explorer Help Documentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS) Explorer Help Documentation Version 1.1 March 2014 #12;Page: ii Document History Number Date and Sections Notes 1 August 2013 Original document 1.0 2 September information on Access to Events #12;Page: iii Table of contents Document History

474

ALTERNATE APPROACH TO HAZARD CATEGORIZATION FOR SALTSTONE FACILITY AT SRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saltstone Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) was originally segmented into two segments: the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Based on the inventory of radionuclides available for release the SPF and SDF were categorized as Nonreactor Hazard Category (HC)-3. The hazard categorization recognized the SDF will contain contributions of radionuclides which would exceed the HC-2 Threshold Quantity (TQ) in the form of grout. However it was determined not to impact the facility hazard categorization based on the grout being in a solid, monolithic form which was not easily dispersible. But, the impact of a quantity of unset grout expected to be present at the vault following operation of the process was not addressed. A Potential Inadequacy in Safety Analysis (PISA) was later issued based on the hazard categorization determination for the facility not addressing unset grout. This initiated a re-evaluation of the accident scenarios within the hazards analysis. During this re-evaluation, the segmentation of the facility was challenged based on the potential interaction between facility segments; specifically, the leachate return line and the grout transfer line, which were considered separate segments, are located in close proximity at one point. such that for certain events (NPH as well as External Vehicle Impact) both could be damaged simultaneously and spill contents on the ground that could commingle. This would violate the guideline for segmentation. Therefore, the Hazard Categorization (HC) was reevaluated based on the facility being a single segment and including the additional unset grout as part of total inventory. This total inventory far exceeded the limit for HC-2 TQ and made the facility's initial categorization as HC-2. However, alternative analysis methodology based on credible release fractions allowed in DOE-STD-1027-92 (Ref.1) showed that the Saltstone facility could still be categorized as Hazard Category 3 Nuclear Facility with no segmentation. Since it was the first time any facility at SRS tried this alternate approach safety analyst had to face substantial resistance and reservations from both the facility and local DOE customers which were eventually overcome with approval and acceptance from DOE-HQ.

Roy, B.

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

475

Analysis of hydrodynamic phenomena in simulant experiments investigating cavity interactions following postulated vessel meltthrough  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis of hydrodynamic phenomena in simulant experiments examining aspects of ex-vessel material interactions in a PWR reactor cavity following postulated core meltdown and localized breaching of the reactor vessel has been carried out. While previous analyses of the tests examined thresholds for the onset of sweepout of fluid from the cavity, the present analysis considers the progression of specific hydrodynamic phenomena involved in the dispersal process: crater formation due to gas jet impingement, radial wave motion and growth, entrainment and transport of liquid droplets, liquid layer formation due to droplet recombination, fluidization of liquid remaining in the cavity, removal of fluidized liquid droplets from the cavity, and the ultimate removal of the remaining liquid layer within the tunnel passageway. Phenomenological models which may be used to predict the phenomena are presented.

Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 6779, 2008 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/8/67/2008/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hazards and Earth System Sciences Is there a trend in extremely high river temperature for the next is corrected by the medium cluster length, which represents thermal inertia of water during extremely hot-evaluate the extreme hot tempera- tures, which the rivers water could reach in the next decades, by taking the climatic

Boyer, Edmond

477

Electrical Hazards The greater hazards related to electricity are electrical shock and fire. Electrical shock occurs when  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the amount of current, the duration of exposure, and whether the skin is wet or dry. Water is a good for the level of hazard. Lab coats (knee-length) and proper footwear are required for work involving chemicals or moving machinery. · Leave behind protective equipment (lab coats, gloves, etc.) when leaving the work

Petriu, Emil M.

478

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 559571, 2008 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/8/559/2008/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

frequently affect the slopes of ice-capped volcanoes. They can be triggered by volcano-ice interac- tions Hazards and Earth System Sciences Assessing lahars from ice-capped volcanoes using ASTER satellite data reservoirs are supposed to be a more realistic scenario for lahar genera- tion than sudden ice melting

Kääb, Andreas

479

LAB HAZARD CHECKLIST Please check the hazards that are associated with your lab and complete the section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Hazards ­Any work involving class 3b or 4 lasers Flammable Gas ­ Compressed gas cylinders that contain flammable gas Toxic Gas ­ Compressed gas cylinders that contain toxic gas Flammable Materials release Radioactive Materials ­ Radiochemicals and sealed radiation sources Radio Frequency or Microwave

Firestone, Jeremy

480

Emergency response planning for railroad transportation related spills of oil or other hazardous materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

awareness. Americans began to ask, "What if something similar happened here?" Chemicals with hazardous properties have become part of daily life. Industry, government, and the public have become aware of the need to respond to problems involving hazardous...

Reeder, Geoffrey Benton

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Application of probabilistic consequence analysis to the assessment of potential radiological hazards of fusion reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A methodology has been developed to provide system reliability criteria based on an assessment of the potential radiological hazards associated with a fusion reactor design and on hazard constraints which prevent fusion ...

Sawdye, Robert William

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

A model for determining the fate of hazardous constituents in waste during in-vessel composting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composting is one of the techniques that has evolved as a safe disposal and predisposal alternative to the stringent regulations on hazardous waste disposal. The implementation of this technique needs careful evaluation of the processes a hazardous...

Bollineni, Prasanthi

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Exclusive Processes: Tests of Coherent QCD Phenomena and Nucleon Substructure at CEBAF -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of exclusive processes such as electroproduction, photoproduction, and Compton scattering are among the most sensitive probes of proton structure and coherent phenomena in quantum chromodynamics. The continuous electron beam at CEBAF, upgraded in laboratory energy to 10--12 GeV, will allow a systematic study of exclusive, semi-inclusive, and inclusive reactions in a kinematic range well-tuned to the study of fundamental nucleon and nuclear substructure. I also discuss the potential at CEBAF for studying novel QCD phenomena at the charm production threshold, including the possible production of nuclear-bound quarkonium.

Stanley J. Brodsky; SLAC

1994-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

484

The Dynamics of Internet Traffic: Self-Similarity, Self-Organization, and Complex Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Internet is the most complex system ever created in human history. Therefore, its dynamics and traffic unsurprisingly take on a rich variety of complex dynamics, self-organization, and other phenomena that have been researched for years. This paper is a review of the complex dynamics of Internet traffic. Departing from normal treatises, we will take a view from both the network engineering and physics perspectives showing the strengths and weaknesses as well as insights of both. In addition, many less covered phenomena such as traffic oscillations, large-scale effects of worm traffic, and comparisons of the Internet and biological models will be covered.

Reginald D. Smith

2010-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

485

Mesoscopic modeling of multi-physicochemical transport phenomena in porous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present our recent progress on mesoscopic modeling of multi-physicochemical transport phenomena in porous media based on the lattice Boltzmann method. Simulation examples include injection of CO{sub 2} saturated brine into a limestone rock, two-phase behavior and flooding phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, and electroosmosis in homogeneously charged porous media. It is shown that the lattice Boltzmann method can account for multiple, coupled physicochemical processes in these systems and can shed some light on the underlying physics occuning at the fundamental scale. Therefore, it can be a potential powerful numerical tool to analyze multi-physicochemical processes in various energy, earth, and environmental systems.

Kang, Qinjin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Moran [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lichtner, Peter C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Inter-relation between technical and jurisdictional aspects of hazardous waste management in Houston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hazardous waste such as dump sites, landfills, hazardous material spills, underground storage tanks and others come from journals and reports. This literature is used for background information and for evaluating the Hazardous Waste Issues Groundwater... related Transport, ation related Wastewater related Spills Transportation Pretreatment Small quantity Generators Dump sites Landfi 1 Is Plant-site contamination Underground storage tanks Figure I-Hazardous waste ismm classification current...

Vasavada, Nishith Maheshbhai

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste identification (40 cfr part 261) updated July 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The module introduces a specific hazardous waste identification process, which involves asking and analyzing a series of questions about any waste being evaluated. It analyzes in detail the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) definition of `hazardous waste.` It explains concepts that are essential to identifying a RCRA hazardous waste: hazardous waste listing, hazardous waste characteristics, the `mixture` and `derived-from` rules, the `contained-in` policy, and the hazardous waste identification rules (HWIR).

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

The evaluation of an analytical protocol for the determination of substances in waste for hazard classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The evaluation of an analytical protocol for the determination of substances in waste for hazard The classification of waste as hazardous could soon be assessed in Europe using largely the hazard properties of its knowledge of the component constituents of a given waste will therefore be necessary. An analytical protocol

Boyer, Edmond

489

ELECTRICAL SAFETY HAZARDS HANDBOOK Littelfuse is the global leader in circuit protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICAL SAFETY HAZARDS HANDBOOK #12;Littelfuse is the global leader in circuit protection's Leading Provider of Circuit Protection Solutions #12;LITTELFuSE ELECTRICAL SAFETY HAZARDS HANDBOOK This Electrical Safety Hazards Handbook was developed for general education purposes only and is not intended

490

Introduction to NIH Hazard Communication Program The National Institutes of Health's comprehensive Occupational Safety and Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to NIH Hazard Communication Program The National Institutes of Health's comprehensive Occupational Safety and Health Program has been established to provide NIH employees with places and conditions of employment in which the risk of exposures to potential hazards is minimized. The NIH Hazard Communication

Bandettini, Peter A.

491

Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final hazard categorization (FHC) document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the commitments for the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks Remediation Project. The remediation activities analyzed in this FHC are based on recommended treatment and disposal alternatives described in the Engineering Evaluation for the Remediation to the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks (BHI 2005e).

T. M. Blakley; W. D. Schofield

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

492

Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: Indoor air quality; hazard analysis; residential; criteria pollutants; VOCs; air toxics Citation Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through

493

Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outline Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He: Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena Conference, Chernogolovka, 3 August 2009 McClintock Efimov Ganshin Kolmakov Mezhov-Deglin Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He #12;Outline Outline 1 Introduction Motivation 2 Modelling wave turbulence Need for models

Fominov, Yakov

494

Three-Dimensional Computational Analysis of Transport Phenomena in a PEM Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three-Dimensional Computational Analysis of Transport Phenomena in a PEM Fuel Cell by Torsten or other means, without permission of the author. #12;Supervisor: Dr. N. Djilali Abstract Fuel cells-isothermal computational model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The model was developed to improve

Victoria, University of

495

Atomization and Sprays 20(4), 297310 (2010) SPLASHING PHENOMENA DURING LIQUID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sound speed in liquid, m/s Tsat saturation temperature of droplet at 1 atm, C F force, N V droplet number (V µ/) tc characteristic spreading time, s Cg sound speed in ambient gas, m/s T temperature, C ClAtomization and Sprays 20(4), 297­310 (2010) SPLASHING PHENOMENA DURING LIQUID DROPLET IMPACT Jie

Aguilar, Guillermo

496

Paradoxical games, ratchets, and related phenomena Juan M.R. Parrondo Luis Dinis Javier Buceta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paradoxical games, ratchets, and related phenomena Juan M.R. Parrondo Luis Din´is Javier Buceta states in spatially extended systems [2, 3, 4]. Brownian ratchets show that noise can be rectified a Brownian ratchet. In fact, the paradox came up as a translation to gambling games of the flashing ratchet

Lindenberg, Katja

497

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 125424 (2012) Probing biological light-harvesting phenomena by optical cavities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. INTRODUCTION Plants and some types of bacteria can efficiently process solar light by converting photonsPHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 125424 (2012) Probing biological light-harvesting phenomena by optical Fiorentino, Italy 3 Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street

Saikin, Semion

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Critical phenomena of nuclear matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Critical phenomena of nuclear matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model K. Miyazaki Abstract in nuclear multifragmentation reactions and the critical temperature has been derived as TC = 20 3 MeV in Ref] to estimate the critical temperature for in...nite nuclear matter, that is, TC = 16:6 0:86 Me

499

Abstract --In electromagnetic applications, hysteresis phenomena in magnetic materials are responsible of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rotation. Furthermore, based on the balance of chemical equation analogies, this model has the advantage13. M M Abstract -- In electromagnetic applications, hysteresis phenomena in magnetic materials the implementation proceeding used for some hysteresis material models and how they are applied in a sensor study

Boyer, Edmond

500

A unifying mechanical equation with applications to non-holonomic constraints and dissipative phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mechanical covariant equation is introduced which retains all the effectingness of the Lagrange equation while being able to describe in a unified way other phenomena including friction, non-holonomic constraints and energy radiation (Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac force equation). A quantization rule adapted to the dissipative degrees of freedom is proposed which does not pass through the variational formulation.

E. Minguzzi

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z