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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Tuesday...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Seismic Hazard Analysis For Nuclear Facilities At The Hanford Site, Eastern Washington, USA Natural Phenomena Hazards DOE-STD 1020-2012 & DOE Handbook A Probabilistic Approach to...

2

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting- October 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On October 25-26, 2011, the DOE Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) hosted a Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) working meeting in Germantown, Maryland. The meeting brought together approximately 80 experts involved in the characterization of, and mitigation against, natural hazards that can impact critical facilities. The meeting was valuable for sharing and discussing research in NPH analysis and mitigation, as well as best practices and lessons learned. Representatives from DOE Headquarters and site offices, four National Laboratories, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and several DOE prime contractors and other private sector firms participated in the meeting. The meeting featured thirty five discussion topics over the two days. Presentation slides from most of these topics are available here, as well as papers on several topics from those speakers who chose to provide them. Questions about the NPH meeting can be directed to Dr. Steve McDuffie of the CNS staff at 509-373-6766, or stephen.mcduffie@rl.doe.gov.

3

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis Presented by B&W Technical Services, Pantex and Pro2Serve October, 2011

4

DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities, provides criteria and guidance for the analysis and design of facility structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that are necessary to implement the requirements of DOE Order (O) 420.1C, Facility Safety, and to ensure that the SSCs will be able to effectively perform their intended safety functions under the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPHs). This Standard also provides criteria and guidance for the use of industry building codes and voluntary

5

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop The Energy Department Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop, sponsored by the Chief of Nuclear Safety and the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety, was held October 25-26, 2011, in Germantown, Maryland. The workshop brought together approximately 80 experts involved in the characterization of, and mitigation against, natural hazards that can impact nuclear facilities. The workshop featured twenty presentations as well as a breakout session devoted to discussing the status of the commonly used structural analysis code SASSI, a System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction. A Method for Evaluating Fire after Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings_1.pdf Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs - A Case Study of Probabilistic

6

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop The Energy Department Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop, sponsored by the Chief of Nuclear Safety and the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety, was held October 25-26, 2011, in Germantown, Maryland. The workshop brought together approximately 80 experts involved in the characterization of, and mitigation against, natural hazards that can impact nuclear facilities. The workshop featured twenty presentations as well as a breakout session devoted to discussing the status of the commonly used structural analysis code SASSI, a System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction. A Method for Evaluating Fire after Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings_1.pdf Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs - A Case Study of Probabilistic

7

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting- Tuesday, October 21st Session Presentations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentations from the October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting - Tuesday, October 21st Session

8

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting- Wednesday, October 22nd Soil Structure Interaction Presentations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentations for the Soil Structure Interaction session at the October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting.

9

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting- Wednesday, October 22nd Session Presentations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentations from the October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting - Tuesday, October 21st Session

10

Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1020-2012 December 2012 _________________ Supersedes DOE-STD-1020-2002 DOE STANDARD Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA NPHZ Washington, D.C. 20585 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1020-2012 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1020-2012 i Foreword Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards

11

Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1020-2012 December 2012 _________________ Supersedes DOE-STD-1020-2002 DOE STANDARD Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA NPHZ Washington, D.C. 20585 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1020-2012 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1020-2012 i Foreword Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards

12

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting- Wednesday, October 22nd Session Presentations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentations from the Wednesday, October 22nd Session of the October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting

13

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis Presented by and October, 2011 Presentation Outline I. Introductions II. Pantex III. 10 Year Update IV. Final Results V. July 2010 Event VI. Emergency Planning VII.What's Next Pantex The Pantex Plant, located 17 miles northeast of Amarillo, Texas, in Carson County, is charged with maintaining the safety, security and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. Worked performed at Pantex supports three core missions. * Stockpile Stewardship * Nonproliferation and * Safeguards and Security Pantex (cont.) - Location Pantex (cont.) - Weather Patterns * Precipitation is typical for Southwest climate, mainly in the form of Spring and

14

DOE Standard Natural Phenomena Hazards Site Characterization Criteria  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2-94 2-94 March 1994 Change Notice No. 1 January 1996 Reaffirmed with Errata April 2002 DOE STANDARD NATURAL PHENOMENA HAZARDS SITE CHARACTERIZATION CRITERIA U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Environment Safety and Health Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4376, Fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. DOE-STD-1022-94 ERRATA FOR DOE-STD-1022-94 REVISED FOREWORD ADDED REFERENCE TO DOE G 420.1-2

15

Natural hazards phenomena mitigation with respect to seismic hazards at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information on the seismic hazard for design of the proposed Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), a facility designed for the disposal of wastes generated during the cleanup of Hanford Site aggregate areas. The preferred ERDF site is located south and east of 200 East and 200 West Areas. The Washington State Groundwater Protection Program (WAC 173-303-806 (4)(a)(xxi)) requires that the characteristics of local and regional hydrogeology be defined. A plan for that work has been developed (Weekes and Borghese 1993). In addition, WAC 173-303-282 provides regulatory guidance on siting a dangerous waste facility, and US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.28 requires consideration of natural phenomena hazards mitigation for DOE sites and facilities. This report provides information to evaluate the ERDF site with respect to seismic hazard. The ERDF will be a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) as defined by 40 CFR 260.10.

Reidel, S.P.

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

16

The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective Jeff Kimball Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Staff Department of Energy NPH Conference October 26, 2011

17

Guide for the Mitigation of Natural Phenomena Hazards for DOE Nuclear Facilities and NonNuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This document provides guidance in implementing the Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation requirements of DOE O 420.1, Facility Safety, Section 4.4, "Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation." This Guide does not establish or invoke any new requirements. Any apparent conflicts arising from the NPH guidance would defer to the requirements in DOE O 420.1. No cancellation.

2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

18

Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently Applied to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently Applied to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) By: Integrated NPH Team: David Luke, Lead, TJSO Rusty Sprouse, JSA Michael A. Epps, TJSO Richard Korynta, TJSO

19

Natural Phenomena Hazards Modeling Project: Seismic Hazard Models for Department of Energy Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed seismic and wind hazard models for the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS), Department of Energy (DOE). The work is part of a three-phase effort aimed at establishing uniform building design criteria for seismic and wind hazards at DOE sites throughout the US. In Phase 1, LLNL gathered information on the sites and their critical facilities, including nuclear reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, high-level waste storage and treatment facilities, and special nuclear material facilities. In Phase 2, development of seismic and wind hazard models, was initiated. These hazard models express the annual probability that the site will experience an earthquake or wind speed greater than some specified magnitude. This report summarizes the final seismic hazard models and response spectra recommended for each site and the methodology used to develop these models. 15 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

Coats, D.W.; Murray, R.C.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Adequacy of DOE Natural Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective Jeff Kimball Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Staff Department of Energy NPH Conference October 26, 2011 The views expressed are solely those of the author and no official support or endorsement of this presentation by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board or the federal government is intended or should be inferred. 1 OBJECTIVE: Assess whether the DOE NPH performance goal concept as used in the Documented Safety Analysis process is adequate or needs additional guidance Background * ANS Standard 2.26 and the concept of Seismic Design Categories (SDC) and Limit States (LS) * ASCE Standard 43-05 and the concept of Design Categories

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0-2002 0-2002 January 2002 Superseding DOE-STD-1020-94 April 1994 DOE STANDARD NATURAL PHENOMENA HAZARDS DESIGN AND EVALUATION CRITERIA FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA NPHZ Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1020-2002 iii Foreword This revision provides information to help meet the requirements of 10 CFR Part 830, "Nuclear

22

DOE-STD-1023-95; Natural Phenomena Hazards Assessment Criteria  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3-95 3-95 March 1995 Change Notice No. 1 January 1996 Reaffirmed with Errata April 2002 DOE STANDARD NATURAL PHENOMENA HAZARDS ASSESSMENT CRITERIA U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Environment Safety and Health Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4376, Fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. DOE-STD-1023-95 i ERRATA FOR DOE-STD-1023-95 S FOREWORD RE-WRITTEN S ADDED REFERENCE TO 10 CFR PART 830, SSHAC (1997) AND UCRL-ID-140922

23

Natural phenomena hazards performance categorization guidelines for structures, systems, and components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) requires in DOE 5480.23 the use of a ``graded approach`` in performing safety analysis and evaluation of DOE facilities for normal operating and accident conditions, including accidents caused by natural phenomena hazard (NPH) events. DOE 5480.28 uses this graded approach and requires, for the purpose of NPH design and evaluation, placing the structures, systems, and components (SSCs) comprising the DOE facilities into five performance categories. This standard is a revision to DOE-STD-1021-92, December 1992, and provides guidelines to be used for such categorization of SSCs, and recommends systematic procedures to implement these guidelines. It applies to all DOE facilities that are covered by DOE 5480.28. (JDB)

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Natural phenomena hazards performance categorization guidelines for structures, systems, and components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) requires in DOE 5480.23 the use of a graded approach'' in performing safety analysis and evaluation of DOE facilities for normal operating and accident conditions, including accidents caused by natural phenomena hazard (NPH) events. DOE 5480.28 uses this graded approach and requires, for the purpose of NPH design and evaluation, placing the structures, systems, and components (SSCs) comprising the DOE facilities into five performance categories. This standard is a revision to DOE-STD-1021-92, December 1992, and provides guidelines to be used for such categorization of SSCs, and recommends systematic procedures to implement these guidelines. It applies to all DOE facilities that are covered by DOE 5480.28. (JDB)

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1-93 1-93 July 1993 Change Notice No. 1 January 1996 Reaffirmed with Errata April 2002 DOE STANDARD NATURAL PHENOMENA HAZARDS PERFORMANCE CATEGORIZATION GUIDELINES FOR STRUCTURES, SYSTEMS, AND COMPONENTS U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1021-93 ERRATA FOR DOE-STD-1021-93 ADDED REFERENCE TO 10 CFR PART 830

26

Natural phenomena hazards performance categorization criteria for structures, systems, and components. [Contains references  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Department of Energy (DOE) requires in DOE 5480.23 the use of a graded approach'' in performing safety analysis and evaluation of DOE facilities for normal operating and accident conditions, including accidents caused by natural phenomena hazard (NPH) events. DOE 5480.28 uses this graded approach'' and requires, for the purpose of NPH design and evaluation, placing the structures, systems, and components (SSCS) comprising the DOE facilities into five performance categories. This Standard provides the criteria to be used for such categorization of SSCs, and recommends systematic procedures to implement these criteria. It applies to all DOE facilities that are covered by DOE 5480.28. Basic categorization criteria have been provided to determine the preliminary performance category of SSCS. These criteria are based on the system safety classification and hazard categorization/classification data obtained from the application of DOE 5480.23, DOE-STD-1027-92, and the general design criteria (DOE 6430.1B) and safety design criteria (DOE 5480.30 and 5480.NNFDC) documents (these documents are under development). The final performance category is then determined considering applicable system interaction.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) at Rocky Flats Plant: An overview of practical management issues for evaluation of natural phenomena hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of the buildings at the Rocky Flats Plant were designed and built before modern standards were developed, including standards for protection against extreme natural phenomenon such as tornadoes, earthquakes, and floods. The purpose of the SEP is to establish an integrated approach to assessing the design adequacy of specific high and moderate hazard Rocky Flats facilities from a safety perspective and to establish a basis for defining any needed facility improvements. The SEP is to be carried out in three Phases. In Phase 1, topics to be evaluated and an evaluation plan for each topic were developed. Any differences between Current Design Requirements (CDR) or acceptance criteria and the design of existing facilities, will be identified during Phase 2 and assessed using an integrated systematic approach during Phase 3. The integrated assessment performed during Phase 3 provides a process for evaluating the differences between existing facility design and CDRs so that decisions on corrective actions can be made on the basis of relative risk reduction and cost effectiveness. These efforts will ensure that a balanced and integrated level of safety is achieved for long-term operation of these buildings. Through appropriate selection of topics and identification of the structures, systems, and components to be evaluated, the SEP will address outstanding design issues related to the prevention and mitigation of design basis accidents, including those arising from natural phenomena. The objective of the SEP is not to bring these buildings into strict compliance with current requirements, but rather to ensure that an adequate level of safety is achieved in an economical fashion.

Badwan, F.M. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant; Herring, K.S. [NUS Corp. (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5-26, 2011 5-26, 2011 Germantown, MD S S National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Chief of Nuclear Safety October 25 Agenda Tuesday, October 25 7:30 a.m. Registration; coffee and bagels will be served 8:00 a.m. Welcome and introductions 8:10 a.m. Workshop Overview - Chip Lagdon, CNS Theme 1: Soil-structure interaction issues 8:30 a.m. SASSI Subtraction Method Effects at Various DOE Projects Greg Mertz, Michael Costantino, Thomas Houston, and Andrew Maham 9:00 a.m. Application of the Computer Program SASSI for Seismic SSI Analysis for DOE Facilities Farhang Ostadan and Raman Venkata 9:30 a.m. BREAK Oct. 25 Agenda (cont'd.) 9:45 a.m. SASSI Analytical Methods Compared with SHAKE Free-Field Results Dennis Niehoff, Jayprakash Amin, Shawn Carey, and J. Bhatt

29

On the Nature of Quantum Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that a coherent understanding of all quantized phenomena, including those governed by unitary evolution equations as well as those related to irreversible quantum measurements, can be achieved in a scenario of successive nonequilibrium phase transitions, with the lowest hierarchy of these phase transitions occurring in a ``resonant cavity'' formed by the entire matter and energy content of the universe. In this formalism, the physical laws themselves are resonantly-selected and ordered in the universe cavity in a hierarchical manner, and the values of fundamental constants are determined through a Generalized Mach's Principle. The existence of a preferred reference frame in this scenario is shown to be consistent with the relational nature of the origin of physical laws. Covariant unitary evolution is shown to connect smoothly with the reduction of wavefunction in the preferred frame during quantum measurement. The superluminal nature of quantum processes in the lowest hierarchy coexists with the universal speed limit obeyed by processes in higher hierarchies. A natural quantum-to-classical transition is also obtained which is stable against the diffusive tendency of the unitary quantum evolution processes. In this formalism a realistic quasi-classical ontology is established for the foundations of quantum mechanics.

Xiaolei Zhang

2007-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

30

Assesment and Prediction of Natural Hazards from Satellite Imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

31(5) real-time assessments of natural hazards have beenAssessment and Prediction of Natural Hazards from Satellite459–470 Assessment and prediction of natural hazards from

Gillespie, Thomas; Chu, Jasmine; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Thomas, Duncan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events - August  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events - Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events - August 21, 2012 CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events - August 21, 2012 August 21, 2012 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility (HSS CRAD 45-54) The focus of this CRAD is on evaluating processes for identifying emergency response capabilities and maintaining them in a state of readiness in case a severe natural phenomena event occurs that exceeds the design basis of the Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facility. This CRAD is intended to ensure that the NNSA SRS Site Office (SRSO) plans, procedures, and performance identified in DOE Order 151.lC, Comprehensive Emergency Management System, and the Contractors Requirements Document (CRD)

32

Assessment of Natural Hazard Damage and Reconstruction: A Case Study from Band Aceh, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thomas. 2007. Assessment and prediction of natural hazardsAssessment of Natural Hazard Damage and Reconstruction: AWorking Paper Series Assessment of Natural Hazard Damage and

Gillespie, Thomas; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Braughton, Matt; Cooke, Abigail M.; Armenta, Tiffany; Thomas, Duncan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EIS results one can back out the relationship between offsite consequences and Latent Cancer Fatality Risk (Safety Goal) - Example 1.00E-09 1.00E-08 1.00E-07 1.00E-06 1.00E-05 1...

34

DOE-STD-1020 Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

racks 2 3 -* Electrical cabinets and other equipment 3 4 5** Liquid containing metal tanks Impulsive mode 2 3 4 Sloshing mode 0.5 0.5 0.5 * Should not be stressed to Response...

35

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Wednesday...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Validation of the SASSI2010 Subtraction Method Using Full Scale Independent Verification 3D Site Response using NLSSI Development of Nonlinear SSI Time Domain Methodology...

36

CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events- January 3, 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events for DOE/NNSA sites and nuclear facilities (HSS CRAD 45-56, Rev. O)

37

Natural Hazards manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

choices on, for example, the level of acceptable risk to be made a priori and these choices are not solely · acceptable risk J. Douglas · T. Ulrich · C. Negulescu RIS/RSI, BRGM, 3 avenue Claude-Guillemin, BP 36009Natural Hazards manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor) Risk-targeted seismic design maps

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

38

Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment Ahmed “Jemie” Dababneh, Ph.D., P.E. and Jeffrey Oskamp, E.I.T. Presentation for U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 22, 2014

39

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2002) 2: 121128 c European Geosciences Union 2002 Natural Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.-L. Michaux2, and M. Zimmerli1 1Swiss Federal Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF, Fl¨uelastr. 11 obser- vations at the SLF experimental site Versuchsfeld Weiss- fluhjoch, two acoustic wind drift because of its complex nature. Correspondence to: M. Lehning (lehning@slf.ch) Current models on snow drift

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

40

Hazard Categorization Reduction via Nature of the Process Argument  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper documents the Hazard Categorization (HC) and Critical Safety Evaluation (CSE) for activities performed using an Inspection Object (IO) in excess of the single parameter subcritical limit of 700 g of U-235. By virtue of exceeding the single parameter subcritical limit and the subsequent potential for criticality, the IO HC is initially categorized as HC2. However, a novel application of the nature of the process argument was employed to reduce the IO HC from HC2 to less than HC3 (LTHC3). The IO is composed of five separate uranium metal plates that total no greater than 3.82 kg of U-235 (U(20)). The IO is planned to be arranged in various configurations. As the IO serves as a standard for experimentation aimed at establishing techniques for detection of fissionable materials, it may be placed in close proximity to various reflectors, moderators, or both. The most reactive configurations of the IO were systematically evaluated and shown that despite the mass of U-235 and potential positioning near various reflectors and moderators, the IO cannot be assembled into a critical configuration. Therefore, the potential for criticality does not exist. With Department of Energy approval, a Hazards Assessment Document with high-level (facility-level) controls on the plates negates the potential for criticality and satisfies the nature of the process argument to reduce the HC from HC2 to LTHC3.

Chelise A. Van De Graaff; Dr. Chad Pope; J. Todd Taylor

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Natural convection phenomena in a nuclear power plant during a postulated TMLB' accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After the TMI (Three Mile Island) accident, there has been significant interest in analyzing and understanding the phenomena that may occur in a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) accident which may lead to partial or total core meltdown and degradation. Natural convection is one of the important phenomena. In the present paper the results of two numerical simulations of (1) four-loop PWR and (2) three-loop PWR are presented. The simulations were performed with the COMMIX(2) computer code. Our analysis shows that in severe accident scenarios, natural convection phenomena does occur and that it helps to delay core degradation by transferring decay heat from the reactor core to other internal structures of the reactor system. The amount of heat transfer and delay in core degradation depends on the geometry and internal structures of the system and on the events of an accident.

Domanus, H.M.; Schmitt, R.C.; Sha, W.T.; Shah, V.L.; Han, J.T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Paducah Site, April 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of Independent Oversight Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Paducah Site May 2011 April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 2

43

Independent Oversight Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Hanford Site, September 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Hanford Site May 2011 September 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Methodology ....................................................................................................................................... 3

44

Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Paducah Site, April 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Paducah Site May 2011 April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Methodology ....................................................................................................................................... 3

45

Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, July 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of Independent Oversight Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory May 2011 July 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 2

46

Quantum Computing The fundamental goal of Science is to explain/predict natural phenomena using simple models. For example, a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 Quantum Computing The fundamental goal of Science is to explain/predict natural phenomena involve O(n) parameters, and not, say#5 n ). This requirement seems so natural and obvious that it is hardly discussed. On the other hand, the behaviour of nature at microscopic levels seems to defy

Ranade, Abhiram G.

47

DOE-STD-1023-95; Natural Phenomena Hazards Assessment Criteria  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

DBFL - Design Basis Flood DOE - Department of Energy ES&H - Environment, Safety, and Health EPRI - Electric Power Research Institute FEMA - Federal Emergency Management Agency...

48

Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

49

A Probabilistic Approach to Site-Specific, Hazard-Consistent Vertical-to-Horizontal Spectral Ratio Model  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A Probabilistic Approach to Site-Specific, Hazard-Consistent Vertical-to-Horizontal Spectral Ratio Model Rizzo Associates Presented at U.S. DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 21, 2014

50

Environmental consequences of postulated plutonium releases from Exxon Nuclear MOFP, Richland, Washington, as a result of severe natural phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Exxon Nuclear Company Mixed Oxide Fabrication Plant (MOFP), Richland, Washington. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, high straight-line winds, and floods. Maximum plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values most likely to occur offsite are also given.

Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

NATURAL HAZARDS ON ALLUVIAL FANS: THE VENEZUELA DEBRIS FLOW AND FLASH FLOOD DISASTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL HAZARDS ON ALLUVIAL FANS: THE VENEZUELA DEBRIS FLOW AND FLASH FLOOD DISASTER In December Venezuela. Rainfall on December 2-3 totaled 200 millimeters (8 inches) and was followed by a major storm, Denver, Colorado, Naples, Italy, and Vargas, Venezuela. In time scales spanning thousands of years

Eaton, L. Scott

52

Targeted Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Evens at the Y-12 National Security Complex, February 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Y-12 National Security Complex May 2011 February 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 2

53

Independent Oversight Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, November 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant May 2011 November 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology ....................................................................................................................................... 2

54

Natural Circulation in Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants Phenomena, models, and methodology for system reliability assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years it has been recognized that the application of passive safety systems (i.e., those whose operation takes advantage of natural forces such as convection and gravity), can contribute to simplification and potentially to improved economics of new nuclear power plant designs. In 1991 the IAEA Conference on ''The Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future'' noted that for new plants the use of passive safety features is a desirable method of achieving simplification and increasing the reliability of the performance of essential safety functions, and should be used wherever appropriate''.

Jose Reyes

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

55

Potential hazards of compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a preliminary assessment of the ignition and explosion potential in a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir from air cycling associated with compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media. The study identifies issues associated with this phenomenon as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media has been proposed to help supplement renewable energy sources (e.g., wind and solar) by providing a means to store energy when excess energy is available, and to provide an energy source during non-productive or low productivity renewable energy time periods. Presently, salt caverns represent the only proven underground storage used for CAES. Depleted natural gas reservoirs represent another potential underground storage vessel for CAES because they have demonstrated their container function and may have the requisite porosity and permeability; however reservoirs have yet to be demonstrated as a functional/operational storage media for compressed air. Specifically, air introduced into a depleted natural gas reservoir presents a situation where an ignition and explosion potential may exist. This report presents the results of an initial study identifying issues associated with this phenomena as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered.

Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Bauer, Stephen J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2004) 4: 757767 SRef-ID: 1684-9981/nhess/2004-4-757  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Atmospheric perturbation of tempera- ture and density could follow preseismic hot water/gas re- lease resulting in generation of atmospheric gravity waves (AGW) with periods in a range of 6­60 min; 4. Seismo. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling as governing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

57

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 5, 583592, 2005 SRef-ID: 1684-9981/nhess/2005-5-583  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with other weather- related satellite products (i.e. rain rate estimation) might rep- resent a useful/wetness monitoring. Most of the satellite-based techniques use microwave data, thanks to the all-weather and all. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Monitoring soil wetness variations by means of satellite passive

Boyer, Edmond

58

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2004) 4: 117131 SRef-ID: 1684-9981/nhess/2004-4-117  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the acceptable risk (defined in the aforemen- tioned regulation), so that for these locations risk reduction. Acceptable individual risk to life levels have been de- fined and three different risk zones-4-117 © European Geosciences Union 2004 Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Quantitative risk analysis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

59

Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

60

An integrated quantitative hazard analysis method for natural gas jet release from underground gas storage caverns in salt rock. II: A sample computation and parametric study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is of great importance and necessity to perform quantitative hazard analysis on possible accidental leakage from gas storage cavern in salt rock. To improve the working safety in the cavern, an integrated quantitative method for hazard analysis on natural gas jet release from caverns in salt rock was presented. In this paper, a sample of gas storage cavern in salt rock was analyzed to demonstrate the presented method. Furthermore, the factors that influence the hazard range of leakage accidents from gas storage cavern in salt rock were discussed. The results indicated that the release rate diminishes with increased pipe length due to friction in steady-state. Meanwhile, the hazard distance from production casing also diminishes with increased pipe length. As the pipeline gets as long as several kilometers, the predicted hazard distance will be constant. However, the hazard distance increases with increasing the operating pressure and pipeline diameter.

Shigang Yang; Qin Fang; Hao Wu; Yadong Zhang; Hengbo Xiang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Lessons Learned from the 2012 Targeted Reviews of Emergency Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at Select DOE Facilities, April 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oversight Oversight Lessons Learned from the 2012 Targeted Reviews of Emergency Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at Select Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Facilities May 2011 Late Fall 2012 April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents Acronyms ..................................................................................................................................................... ii 1.0 Introduction............................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Overall Assessment ................................................................................................................................ 3

62

Lessons Learned from the 2012 Targeted Reviews of Emergency Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at Select DOE Facilities, April 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oversight Oversight Lessons Learned from the 2012 Targeted Reviews of Emergency Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at Select Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Facilities May 2011 Late Fall 2012 April 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents Acronyms ..................................................................................................................................................... ii 1.0 Introduction............................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Overall Assessment ................................................................................................................................ 3

63

Collaborative simulation and scientific big data analysis: Illustration for sustainability in natural hazards management and chemical process engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Classical approaches for remote visualization and collaboration used in Computer-Aided Design and Engineering (CAD/E) applications are no longer appropriate due to the increasing amount of data generated, especially using standard networks. We introduce ... Keywords: 3D visualization, API, Big data, CAD, CAD/E, CSV, Chemical process engineering, Computer-aided design, GIS, GMT, GUI, HPC, HTTP, HTTPS, ICT, ICT platform, IT, LAN, MS, Natural hazards management, SME, SOA, SVG, SaaS, TCP, VTK, WAN, WYSIWIS, X3D, XML

Jean-Pierre Belaud, Stéphane Negny, Fabrice Dupros, David Michéa, Benoít Vautrin

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Environmental consequences of postulate plutonium releases from Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF), Santa Susana, California, as a result of severe natural phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF), in the Santa Susana site, California. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the earthquake, and the 150-mph and 170-mph tornadoes are above the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The deposition values following the 110-mph and the 130-mph tornadoes are below the EPA proposed guideline.

Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Environmental consequences of postulated plutonium releases from General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California, as a result of severe natural phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Maximum plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the earthquakes, and the 180-mph and 230-mph tornadoes are above the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The deposition values following the 135-mph tornado are below the EPA proposed guidelines.

Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

AN APPLICATION OF THE SSHAC LEVEL 3 PROCESS TO THE PROBABILISTIC SEISMIC HAZARD ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES AT THE HANFORD SITE, EASTERN WASHINGTON, USA  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An Application of the SSHAC Level 3 Process to the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for Nuclear Facilities at the Hanford Site, Eastern Washington, USA Kevin J. Coppersmith Coppersmith Consulting, Inc. Julian J. Bommer Consultant Robert W. Bryce Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 21-22, 2014 Germantown, MD

67

Effects of chemical modifications and MMT nanoclay addition on transport phenomena of naturally woven coconut sheath/polyester nanocomposites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Studies on the behavior of molecular transport properties such as thermal conductivity, gas permeability, volume and surface resistivity have been carried out for the naturally woven coconut sheath (CS) fiber rei...

N. Rajini; J. T. Winowlin Jappes; S. Rajakarunakaran…

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Emergency Management Program Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry - Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events, January 3, 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of17 of17 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Criteria Review and Approach Document Subject: Emergency Management Program Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events HS: HSS CRAD 45-56 Rev: 0 Eff. Date: January 3, 2013 Page I of 17 Acting birector, Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Date: January 3, 2013 Crit~ria Le!d, Jim~~ gency Management Date: January 3, 2013 1.0 PURPOSE Within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), the Office of Enforcement and Oversight, Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations' mission is to assess the effectiveness of those emergency management systems and practices used by site/facility organizations in implementing its

69

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2004) 4: 103116 SRef-ID: 1684-9981/nhess/2004-4-103  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Published: 9 March 2004 Part of Special Issue "Landslide and flood hazards assessment" Abstract. As over. More specifically, highly sheared quartz boulders, outcropping mylonite (a foliated fine grained

Boyer, Edmond

70

An integrated quantitative hazard analysis method for natural gas jet release from underground gas storage caverns in salt rock. I: Models and validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is very important and necessary to perform quantitative hazard analysis for possible accidental leakage from an underground gas storage cavern in salt rock. An integrated quantitative hazard analysis method for natural gas jet release from salt caverns is presented in this paper, which was constituted by a revised model for gas leakage rate calculation, a consequence analysis and a model of probability assessment for harm. The presented method was validated by comparing the analytical results with the data collected from the real accidents (including the leakage, jet fire, fireball and vapor cloud explosion). It is indicated that the proposed method was more accurate than the TNT equivalence method for vapor cloud explosion and gave more reasonable results when applied to the consequence analysis for the thermal radiation from jet fire and fireball.

Shigang Yang; Qin Fang; Yadong Zhang; Hao Wu; Linjian Ma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2004) 4: 257262 SRef-ID: 1684-9981/nhess/2004-4-257  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Klingler2, J. Rhyner1, and W. J. Ammann1 1WSL Swiss Federal Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF- ing, the Swiss Federal Institute for Snow and Avalanche Re- search SLF, and the local safety services, the concept of hazard maps that subdivide avalanche threatened Correspondence to: M. Br¨undl (bruendl@slf

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

72

PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat aqueous mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses evaporation to separate organics and water from radionuclides and solids, and catalytic oxidation to convert the hazardous into byproducts. This process hazards analysis evaluated a number of accident scenarios not directly related to the operation of the MTU, such as natural phenomena damage and mishandling of chemical containers. Worst case accident scenarios were further evaluated to determine the risk potential to the MTU and to workers, the public, and the environment. The overall risk to any group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.

Richardson, R.B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Environmental consequences of postulated radionuclide releases from the Battelle Memorial Institute Columbus Laboratories JN-1b Building at the West Jefferson site as a result of severe natural phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated radionuclide releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Battelle Memorial Institute Columbus Laboratories JN-1b Building at the West Jefferson site. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Maximum radioactive material deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum radioactive material deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the events are well below the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The likely maximum residual contamination from beta and gamma emitters are far below the background produced by fallout from nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere.

Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Electrical hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and certification by ANL prior to use. The Control of Hazardous Energy Sources - LockoutTagout (LOTO) Types of Energy Sources 1. Electricity 2. Gas, steam & pressurized...

75

Hazards Survey and Hazards Assessments  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This volume is to assist DOE Operations/Field Offices and operating contractors in complying with the DOE O 151.1 requirement that Hazards Surveys and facility-specific Hazards Assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-2.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

76

The nature of technological hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1977 ). LAVE, L.B., CONFLICTING...LOWRANCE, W.W., ACCEPTABLE RISK SCI ( 1976 ). RASMUSSEN...ofActual vs. Perceived Risks, V. Co-vello...19. P. Slovic, B. Fischhoff, S. Lichtenstein, in Soci-etal Risk Assessment: How...

C Hohenemser; RW Kates; P Slovic

1983-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

77

Analysis of nuclear reactor instability phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phenomena known as density-wave instability often occurs in phase change systems, such as boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRS). Our current understanding of density-wave oscillations is in fairly good shape for linear phenomena (eg, the onset of instabilities) but is not very advanced for non-linear phenomena [Lahey and Podowski, 1989]. In particular, limit cycle and chaotic instability modes are not well understood in boiling systems such as current and advanced generation BWRs (eg, SBWR). In particular, the SBWR relies on natural circulation and is thus inherently prone to problems with density-wave instabilities. The purpose of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of nonlinear nuclear-coupled density-wave instability phenomena in BWRS. This research builds on the work of Achard et al [1985] and Clausse et al [1991] who showed, respectively, that Hopf bifurcations and chaotic oscillations may occur in boiling systems.

Lahey, R.T. Jr.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Natural Phenomena Exhibited by Forest Fires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

column is carried forward in a long relatively narrow band per- pendicular with the wind. Vertical development of the convec- tion column is restricted by the wind. Relatively small vertical smoke columns. Both regular speed and time-lapse motion picture photographic techniques are employed. During parts

79

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond ... The column summarizes research articles from Nature that report on anthropogenic activities and natural phenomena that influence the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere. ...

Sabine Heinhorst; Gordon Cannon

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

CRITICAL BEHAVIOR OF INTERFACES: ROUGHENING AND WETTING PHENOMENA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The critical behavior of interfaces is discussed from a theoretical point of view. Two classes of critical phenomena will be considered: (i) Roughening phenomena related to changes in the interfacial morphology; and (ii) Wetting phenomena related to changes in the interfacial structure. In two dimensions, the critical behavior can be determined exactly for a variety of models. As a result, one obtains different universality classes depending on the nature of the intermolecular forces. 1.

unknown authors

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Measurement of natural radioactivity and assessment of associated radiation hazards in soil around Baoji second coal-fired thermal power plant, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......10001 g) were sealed in gas-tight, radon-impermeable...concentrations of the natural radionuclides 226Ra...Comparative study of natural radioactivity levels...radioactive samples from Cyprus characteristic geological...Mechanisms of enrichment of natural radioactivity along the......

Xinwei Lu; Xiaoxue Li; Pujun Yun; Dacheng Luo; Lijun Wang; Chunhui Ren; Cancan Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Natural radionuclide content and radiological hazard associated with usage of quartzite sand samples from Ovacik–Silifke–Mersin open pit as building material in Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......building materials such as gas concrete and concrete...respectively. CONCLUSIONS The natural radioactivity due to...Xiaolan Z. Measurement of natural radioactivity in sand...concentrations in surface soils in Cyprus samples. J. Environ...Karahan G., Karack Z. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides......

S. Turhan; A. S. Aykamis; A. M. Kiliç

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

High speed imaging of transient non-Newtonian fluid phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I investigate the utility of high speed imaging for gaining scientific insight into the nature of short-duration transient fluid phenomena, specifically applied to the Kaye effect. The Kaye effect, noted ...

Gallup, Benjamin H. (Benjamin Hodsdon), 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Turbulent phenomena in protein folding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Protein folding and hydrodynamic turbulence are two long-standing challenges, in molecular biophysics and fluid dynamics, respectively. The theories of these phenomena have been developed independently and used different formalisms. Here we show that the protein folding flows can be surprisingly similar to turbulent fluid flows. Studying a benchmark model protein (an SH3 domain), we have found that the flows for the slow folding trajectories of the protein, in which a partly formed N- and C-terminal ? sheet hinders the RT loop from attaching to the protein core, have many properties of turbulent flows of a fluid. The flows are analyzed in a three-dimensional (3D) space of collective variables, which are the numbers of native contacts between the terminal ? strands, between the RT loop and the protein core, and the rest of the native contacts. We have found that the flows have fractal nature and are filled with 3D eddies; the latter contain strange attractors, at which the tracer flow paths behave as saddle trajectories. Two regions of the space increment have been observed, in which the flux variations are self-similar with the scaling exponent h=1/3, in surprising agreement with the Kolmogorov inertial range theory of turbulence. In one region, the cascade of protein rearrangements is directed from larger to smaller scales (net folding), and in the other, it is oppositely directed (net unfolding). Folding flows for the fast trajectories are essentially “laminar” and do not have the property of self-similarity. Based on the results of our study, we infer, and support this inference by simulations, that the origin of the similarity between the protein folding and turbulent motion of a fluid is in a cascade mechanism of structural transformations in the systems that underlies these phenomena.

Igor V. Kalgin and Sergei F. Chekmarev

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Track 3: Exposure Hazards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

86

Emergent Phenomena at Oxide Interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transition metal oxides (TMOs) are an ideal arena for the study of electronic correlations because the s-electrons of the transition metal ions are removed and transferred to oxygen ions, and hence the strongly correlated d-electrons determine their physical properties such as electrical transport, magnetism, optical response, thermal conductivity, and superconductivity. These electron correlations prohibit the double occupancy of metal sites and induce a local entanglement of charge, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom. This gives rise to a variety of phenomena, e.g., Mott insulators, various charge/spin/orbital orderings, metal-insulator transitions, multiferroics, and superconductivity. In recent years, there has been a burst of activity to manipulate these phenomena, as well as create new ones, using oxide heterostructures. Most fundamental to understanding the physical properties of TMOs is the concept of symmetry of the order parameter. As Landau recognized, the essence of phase transitions is the change of the symmetry. For example, ferromagnetic ordering breaks the rotational symmetry in spin space, i.e., the ordered phase has lower symmetry than the Hamiltonian of the system. There are three most important symmetries to be considered here. (i) Spatial inversion (I), defined as r {yields} -r. In the case of an insulator, breaking this symmetry can lead to spontaneous electric polarization, i.e. ferroelectricity, or pyroelectricity once the point group belongs to polar group symmetry. (ii) Time-reversal symmetry (T) defined as t {yields} -t. In quantum mechanics, the time-evolution of the wave-function {Psi} is given by the phase factor e{sup -iEt/{h_bar}} with E being the energy, and hence time-reversal basically corresponds to taking the complex conjugate of the wave-function. Also the spin, which is induced by the 'spinning' of the particle, is reversed by time-reversal. Broken T-symmetry is most naturally associated with magnetism, since the spin operator changes sign with T-operation. (iii) Gauge symmetry (G), which is associated with a change in the phase of the wave-function as {Psi} {yields} e{sup i{theta}}{Psi}. Gauge symmetry is connected to the law of charge conservation, and broken G-symmetry corresponds to superconductivity/superfluidity. To summarize, the interplay among these electronic degrees of freedom produces various forms of symmetry breaking patterns of I, T, and G, leading to novel emergent phenomena, which can appear only by the collective behavior of electrons and cannot be expected from individual electrons. Figure 1 shows this schematically by means of several representative phenomena. From this viewpoint, the interfaces of TMOs offer a unique and important laboratory because I is already broken by the structure itself, and the detailed form of broken I-symmetry can often be designed. Also, two-dimensionality usually enhances the effects of electron correlations by reducing their kinetic energy. These two features of oxide interfaces produce many novel effects and functions that cannot be attained in bulk form. Given that the electromagnetic responses are a major source of the physical properties of solids, and new gauge structures often appear in correlated electronic systems, we put 'emergent electromagnetism' at the center of Fig. 1.

Hwang, H.Y.

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

87

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High- importance phenomena related to the RPV include crack initiation and subcritical crack growth; field fabrication process control; property control in heavy...

88

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 ORNLTM-2007147, Vol. 5 Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research...

89

LABORATORY VIII NUCLEAR PHENOMENA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by radioactive decay. Our bodies are built of some naturally occurring radioactive nuclei such as potassium 40 emitted from the nucleus, given the generic name of radiation, often have a high enough energy's repair mechanisms or to cause a mutation. Some food products are treated with radiation to kill existing

Minnesota, University of

90

Measurements of activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil samples from Punjab province of Pakistan and assessment of radiological hazards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......G. Natural radioactivity of some Mongolian building materials. Nuclear Research Center, National University of Mongolia, INIS Electronic form No. E16-20002-46 (2000). 13. Sam, A. K., Ahmed, M. M. O., El-Khangi, F. A., El-nigumi......

S. N. A. Tahir; K. Jamil; J. H. Zaidi; M. Arif; Nasir Ahmed; Syed Arif Ahmad

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Hazard Analysis Database report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Database for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

Niemi, B.J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

92

Mann, C.P., Stix, J., Vallance, J.W., and Richer, M., 2004, Subaqueous intracaldera volcanism, Ilopango Caldera, El Salvador, Central America, in Rose, W.I., Bommer, J.J., Lpez, D.L., Carr, M.J., and Major, J.J., eds., Natural hazards in El Salvador: Boul  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Ilopango Caldera, El Salvador, Central America, in Rose, W.I., Bommer, J.J., López, D.L., Carr, M.J., and Major, J.J., eds., Natural hazards in El Salvador: Boulder, Colorado, Geological Society of America of America Special Paper 375 2004 Subaqueous intracaldera volcanism, Ilopango Caldera, El Salvador, Central

Long, Bernard

93

Hazardous Materials and Controlled Hazardous Substances (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A permit is required to own, establish, operate, or maintain a facility in the state of Maryland that transfers quantities of a single hazardous material in excess of 100,000 pounds at any time...

94

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Fuel Distributor Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources It is the public policy of the state of South Dakota to regulate the control and generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous wastes. The state operates a comprehensive regulatory program of hazardous waste management, and the South Dakota Department of Environment

95

Natural  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 2,094,387 2,266,751 2,566,049 2,816,408 2,883,277 Mexico .............................. 0 1,678 7,013 6,722 13,862 Total Pipeline Imports....... 2,094,387 2,268,429 2,573,061 2,823,130 2,897,138 LNG Algeria .............................. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 35,325 United Arab Emirates ....... 0 0 0 0 4,949 Total LNG Imports............. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 40,274 Total Imports......................... 2,137,504 2,350,115 2,623,839 2,841,048 2,937,413 Average Price (dollars per thousand cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 1.84 2.02 1.86 1.48 1.96 Mexico .............................. - 1.94 1.99 1.53 2.25 Total Pipeline Imports.......

96

Analysis of nuclear reactor instability phenomena. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phenomena known as density-wave instability often occurs in phase change systems, such as boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRS). Our current understanding of density-wave oscillations is in fairly good shape for linear phenomena (eg, the onset of instabilities) but is not very advanced for non-linear phenomena [Lahey and Podowski, 1989]. In particular, limit cycle and chaotic instability modes are not well understood in boiling systems such as current and advanced generation BWRs (eg, SBWR). In particular, the SBWR relies on natural circulation and is thus inherently prone to problems with density-wave instabilities. The purpose of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of nonlinear nuclear-coupled density-wave instability phenomena in BWRS. This research builds on the work of Achard et al [1985] and Clausse et al [1991] who showed, respectively, that Hopf bifurcations and chaotic oscillations may occur in boiling systems.

Lahey, R.T. Jr.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

About Chemical Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in our homes and can result in serious injuries if not properly handled. Household items such as bleach can result in harmful chlorine gas or hydrochloric acid if carelessly used. Gasoline fumes from containers for lawnmowers or boats can result in major health hazards if inhaled. DOE Oak Ridge uses thousands of chemicals in its varied research and other operations. New chemicals are or can be created as a result of the research or other activities. DOE follows national safety requirements in storing and handling these chemicals to minimize the risk of injuries from its chemical usage. However, accidents can occur despite careful attention to proper handling and storage procedures.

98

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

99

Rotary kilns - transport phenomena and transport processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rotary kilns and rotating industrial drying ovens are used for a wide variety of applications including processing raw minerals and feedstocks as well as heat-treating hazardous wastes. They are particularly critical in the manufacture of Portland cement. Their design and operation is critical to their efficient usage, which if done incorrectly can result in improperly treated materials and excessive, high fuel costs. This book treats all engineering aspects of rotary kilns, including thermal and fluid principles involved in their operation, as well as how to properly design an engineering process that uses rotary kilns. Chapter 1: The Rotary Kiln Evolution and Phenomenon Chapter 2: Basic Description of Rotary Kiln Operation Chapter 3: Freeboard Aerodynamic Phenomena Chapter 4: Granular Flows in Rotary Kilns Chapter 5: Mixing and Segregation Chapter 6: Combustion and Flame - includes section on types of fuels used in rotary kilns, coal types, ranking and analysis, petroleum coke combustion, scrap tire combustion, pulverized fuel (coal/coke) firing in kilns, pulverized fuel delivery and firing systems. Chapter 7: Freeboard Heat Transfer Chapter 8: Heat Transfer Processes in the Rotary Kiln Bed Chapter 9: Mass and Energy Balance Chapter 10: Rotary Kiln Minerals Process Applications.

Boateng, A.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Comments on Several Friction Phenomena  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is suggested that the term dry friction be limited to phenomena observed under highly outgassed conditions. Two theorems are suggested one on the distribution of heat energy between two friction surfaces and the other on the independence of the heat loss in certain clutches on the coefficient of friction.

G. P. Brewington

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Graphene tests of Klein phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene is characterized by chiral electronic excitations. As such it provides a perfect testing ground for the production of Klein pairs (electron/holes). If confirmed, the standard results for barrier phenomena must be reconsidered with, as a byproduct, the accumulation within the barrier of holes.

Stefano De Leo; Pietro Rotelli

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

102

Accretion Disks and Eruptive Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes eruptive phenomena in pre-main sequence stars. The eruptions of FU Orionis stars have much in common with outbursts in other accreting systems, such as dwarf novae and some symbiotic stars. These common features are best understood as increases in the rate material flows through an accretion disk. The spectroscopic properties, decay of the light curves, and outflow phenomena suggest that these outbursts arise from thermal instabilities in the disk. Available data and estimates for recurrence times indicate that young stars can accrete much, perhaps all, of their mass in FU Ori accretion events. Future observations can test this notion and place better constraints on the importance of eruptive events in the early life of a low mass star.

Scott J. Kenyon

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

103

Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Oil or Hazardous Spills Law requires notice to the Environmental

104

Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Waste Management Act Hazardous Waste Management Act Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a

105

Studies of Novel Quantum Phenomena in Ruthenates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strongly correlated oxides have been the subject of intense study in contemporary condensed matter physics, and perovskite ruthenates (Sr,Ca)n+1RunO3n+1 have become a new focus in this field. One of important characteristics of ruthenates is that both lattice and orbital degrees of freedom are active and are strongly coupled to charge and spin degrees of freedom. Such a complex interplay of multiple degrees of freedom causes the properties of ruthenates to exhibit a gigantic response to external stimuli under certain circumstances. Magnetic field, pressure, and chemical composition all have been demonstrated to be effective in inducing electronic/magnetic phase transitions in ruthenates. Therefore, ruthenates are ideal candidates for searching for novel quantum phenomena through controlling external parameters. The objective of this project is to search for novel quantum phenomena in ruthenate materials using high-quality single crystals grown by the floating-zone technique, and investigate the underlying physics. The following summarizes our accomplishments. We have focused on trilayered Sr4Ru3O10 and bilayered (Ca1-xSrx)3Ru2O7. We have succeeded in growing high-quality single crystals of these materials using the floating-zone technique and performed systematic studies on their electronic and magnetic properties through a variety of measurements, including resistivity, Hall coefficient, angle-resolved magnetoresistivity, Hall probe microscopy, and specific heat. We have also studied microscopic magnetic properties for some of these materials using neutron scattering in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory. We have observed a number of unusual exotic quantum phenomena through these studies, such as an orbital selective metamagnetic transition, bulk spin valve effect, and a heavy-mass nearly ferromagnetic state with a surprisingly large Wilson ratio. Our work has also revealed underlying physics of these exotic phenomena. Exotic phenomena of correlated electron has been among central topics of contempary condensed matter physics. Ultrfast phase transitions accompanied by switching of conductivity or magnetization in stronly correlated materials are believed to be promising in developing next generation of transistors. Our work on layered ruthenates has remarkably advanced our understanding of how the exotic phenomena of correlated electrons is governed by the complex interplay between charge, spin, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom. In addition to studies on ruthenates, we have also expanded our research to the emerging field of Fe-based superconductors, focusing on the iron chalcogenide Fe1+y(Te1-xSex) superconductor system. We first studied the superconductivity of this alloy system following the discovery of superconductivity in FeSe using polycrystalline samples. Later, we successfuly grew high-quality single crystals of these materials. Using these single crystals, we have determined the magnetic structure of the parent compound Fe1+yTe, observed spin resonance of superconducting state in optimally doped samples, and established a phase diagram. Our work has produced an important impact in this burgeoning field. The PI presented an invited talk on this topic at APS March meeting in 2010. We have published 19 papers in these two areas (one in Nature materials, five in Physical Review Letters, and nine in Physical Review B) and submitted two (see the list of publications attached below).

Mao, Zhiqiang

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

106

Surveillance Guides - Hazards Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazards Control Hazards Control 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs and policy for establishing controls to mitigate hazards affecting the public, worker, and environment. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to verify implementation of DOE 450.4-1A Volume 2 Appendix E core expectation #3 (CE II-3). CE II-3: An integrated process has been established and is utilized to develop controls which mitigate the identified hazards present within a facility or activity. The set of controls ensure adequate protection of the public, worker, and the environment and are established as agreed upon by DOE.

107

CHSP: HAZARD CONTROLS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HYGIENE HYGIENE AND SAFETY PLAN CHSP SITE MAP HAZARD CONTROLS CONTROLS FOR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS arrow image WORK PRACTICE CONTROLS arrow image CHEMICAL STORAGE GUIDELINES DECOMISSIONING LAB AND SHOP SPACES SPECIFIC CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES arrow image EMERGENCY PROCEDURES AND EQUIPMENT arrow image APPENDICES arrow image FAQs QUESTIONS Search the CHSP: > Go spacer image EH&S Home PUB 3000 LBNL Home LBNL A-Z Index LBNL Search LBNL Phone Book Privacy & Security Notice spacer spacer image spacer image spacer image HAZARD CONTROLS This section discusses control procedures for limiting employee exposure to chemical hazards. Technical Areas Technical areas include laboratories, shops, workrooms, and similar areas where non-administrative activities are performed. For the purpose of the

108

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

109

WEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Wildfires (Jun 02) Recent Declared Disasters in Colorado No Map from FEMA provided #12;National WeatherWEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology Colorado Climate Center Funding provided by NOAA Sectoral

110

Automated Job Hazards Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AJHA Program - The Automated Job Hazard Analysis (AJHA) computer program is part of an enhanced work planning process employed at the Department of Energy's Hanford worksite. The AJHA system is routinely used to performed evaluations for medium and high risk work, and in the development of corrective maintenance work packages at the site. The tool is designed to ensure that workers are fully involved in identifying the hazards, requirements, and controls associated with tasks.

111

Climate change and geomorphological hazards in the eastern European Alps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...traditional hazard-management framework that focuses on emergency management responses and procedures...an integrated risk-management approach with an ex ante and scenario...integrates natural-science and social-science...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard Mitigation Plan Colorado Multi-Hazards Mitigation Plan July 2002 the May 2001 Report to the Governor, Colorado Wildland Urban Interface; Section 2 includes the Hazard the status of the Wildland Urban Interface in Colorado; the hazards that exist; mitigation measures

113

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

114

Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes To appear in "Chemistry of Carbon@acclab.helsinki.fi 1 #12;2CHAPTER 1. IRRADIATION-INDUCED PHENOMENA IN CARBON NANOTUBES #12;Contents 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes 1 1.1 Introduction

Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

115

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Natural Toxicants in Foods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of exploring the potential naturally occurring toxic hazards of food plants is not to suggest an irrational avoidance of these common foods. However, it is important to identify, define, and invest...

Ross C. Beier; Herbert N. Nigg

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Ordering Phenomena in Undercooled Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much of the work performed under this grant was devoted to using modern ideas in kinetics to understand atom movements in metallic alloys far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Kinetics arguments were based explicitly on the vacancy mechanism for atom movements. The emphasis was on how individual atom movements are influenced by the local chemical environment of the moving atom, and how atom movements cause changes in the local chemical environments. The author formulated a kinetic master equation method to treat atom movements on a crystal lattice with a vacancy mechanism. Some of these analyses [3,10,16] are as detailed as any treatment of the statistical kinetics of atom movements in crystalline alloys. Three results came from this work. Chronologically they were (1) A recognition that tracking time dependencies is not necessarily the best way to study kinetic phenomena. If multiple order parameters can be measured in a material, the ''kinetic path'' through the space spanned by these order parameters maybe just as informative about the chemical factors that affect atom movements [2,3,5-7,9-11,14-16,18,19,21,23,24,26,36,37]. (2) Kinetic paths need not follow the steepest gradient of the free energy function (this should be well-known), and for alloys far from equilibrium the free energy function can be almost useless in describing kinetic behavior. This is why the third result surprised me. (3) In cluster approximations with multiple order parameters, saddle points are common features of free energy functions. Interestingly, kinetic processes stall or change time scale when the kinetic path approaches a state at a saddle point in the free energy function, even though these states exist far from thermodynamic equilibrium. The author calls such a state a ''pseudostable'' (falsely stable) state [6,21,26]. I have also studied these phenomena by more ''exact'' Monte Carlo simulations. The kinetic paths showed features similar to those found in analytical theories. The author found that a microstructure with interfaces arranged in space as a periodic minimal surface is a probably an alloy at a saddle point in its free energy function [21,26,37].

Fultz, Brent

1997-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

118

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. How to report wildland fire hazard Use the following form to report any wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. Fill out this form as completely as possible so we can better assess the hazard. All submissions will be assessed as promptly as possible. For assistance with a non-emergency situation, contact the Operations Support Center at 667-6211. Name (optional): Hazard Type (check one): Wildlife Sighting (check box if animal poses serious threat) Trails (access/egress)

119

Identifying and modeling safety hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hazard model described in this paper is designed to accept data over the Internet from distributed databases. A hazard object template is used to ensure that all necessary descriptors are collected for each object. Three methods for combining the data are compared and contrasted. Three methods are used for handling the three types of interactions between the hazard objects.

DANIELS,JESSE; BAHILL,TERRY; WERNER,PAUL W.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

120

Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

forested land. A large area of the reservation is leased to the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife. The Manager of the PortsmouthPaducah Project Office (PPPO) reports to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

capabilities identified by the site's analyses and the site's level of preparedness in terms of attaining and maintaining the needed response capabilities. Of particular interest...

122

CRAD, Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Criteria Review and Approach Document (HSS CRAD 45-54) establishes review criteria and lines of inquiry used by the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Safety and...

123

Review of Sitet Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

monitors radio communications through several radio consoles. In addition, LANL can patch the radios of mutual aid responders into the radio system, and the LANL protective...

124

Detonation Phenomena in Homogeneous Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... In considering the effect of the container on the detonation of an explosive charge, the natural impulse is to look for an interpretati9n of ... is usually meant the resistance offered by the envelope to the lateral expansion of the detonation products. It is known, however, that the initial mass movement of the pro- ...

ELWYN JONES

1956-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Cold Weather Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 Cold Weather Hazards June 2010 NSA_cwh_Rev10.doc 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Cold Weather Hazards Winter Conditions at the North Slope of Alaska The North Slope of Alaska is north of the Arctic Circle at latitudes ranging from 69 to 72 degrees. Barrow, the largest town on the North Slope (pop. 4500), is the site of a National Weather Service Station, which has been active for several decades, so the climatology of the Alaska arctic coastal region as represented by Barrow is relatively well known. The North Slope is covered with ice and snow typically eight months of the year (October-May). During part of November, all of December, and most of January, the sun does not come above the horizon; this

126

Safety Hazards of Batteries  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Safety Hazards of Batteries Safety Hazards of Batteries Battery technology is at the heart of much of our technological revolution. One of the most prevalent rechargeable batteries in use today is the Lithium-ion battery. Cell phones, laptop computers, GPS systems, iPods, and even cars are now using lithium- ion rechargeable battery technology. In fact, you probably have a lithium-ion battery in your pocket or purse right now! Although lithium-ion batteries are very common there are some inherent dangers when using ANY battery. Lithium cells are like any other technology - if they are abused and not used for their intended purpose catastrophic results may occur, such as: first-, second-, and third-degree burns, respiratory problems, fires, explosions, and even death. Please handle the lithium-ion batteries with care and respect.

127

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2003) 3: 179195 c European Geosciences Union 2003 Natural Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the SW Hellenic ARC A. Tzanis1 and F. Vallianatos2 1Department of Geophysics and Geothermy, University

Boyer, Edmond

128

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2001) 1: 159164 c European Geophysical Society 2001 Natural Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for instantaneous radon measure- ments in soil gas, before and after setting ATDs at the radon stations. Continuous stations has been es- tablished in the Langadas Basin, northern Greece for radon monitoring by various monitoring of radon gas exhaling from the ground started from the middle of August 1999 by us- ing silicon

Boyer, Edmond

129

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2003) 3: 703712 European Geosciences Union 2003 Natural Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for strong earthquake prediction J. Z. Li1, Z. Q. Bai1, W. S. Chen1, Y. Q. Xia1, Y. R. Liu1, and Z. Q. Ren2 1

Boyer, Edmond

130

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2003) 3: 443455 c European Geosciences Union 2003 Natural Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of River Vezza (Tuscany Region ­ Italy). This area (51.6 km2) was affected by over 250 landslides in the north-western sector of Tuscany in the Apuan Alps with a total catchment area of 51.6 km2 (Fig. 1 outcropping in the area, triggered by the pluviometric event of 19 June 1996. In the last decades landslide

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

131

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2002) 2: 247253 c European Geosciences Union 2002 Natural Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forecasting M. Gassner and B. Brabec WSL, Swiss Federal Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research, SLF Fl at the Swiss Federal Institute for Snow and Avalanche Re- search (SLF). Even both are based on the nearest can reproduce the official SLF avalanche forecasts in about 52% of the days. 1 Introduction Avalanche

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

132

Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(North Carolina) (North Carolina) Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Fuel Distributor Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environment and Natural Resources These rules identify and list hazardous waste and set standards for the generators and operators of such waste as well as owners or operators of waste facilities. They also stats standards for surface impoundments and location standards for facilities. An applicant applying for a permit for a hazardous waste facility shall

133

KINETIC ROUGHENING PHENOMENA, STOCHASTIC GROWTH, DIRECTED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KINETIC ROUGHENING PHENOMENA, STOCHASTIC GROWTH, DIRECTED POLYMERS AND ALL THAT Aspects 254 (1995) 215-414 Kinetic roughening phenomena, stochastic growth, directed polymers and all that for the nonlinear term 3.2. Dynamic RG analysis 3.3. A worthy detour: kinetic roughening with conservation law 3

Halpin-Healy, Tim

134

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Presented by Kevin R. Blackwell, Radioactive Materials...

135

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration...

136

CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the sector grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the one-twelfth grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Experiment Hazard Class 11 - Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 - Hydrogen 1 - Hydrogen Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments and processes involving the use of gaseous hydrogen. This class includes work performed in the Experiment Hall Beamline Stations and any preparatory/setup/testing work performed in the LOM laboratories. Other hazard controls such as fire protection and life safety regulations may apply to experiments of this hazard class. A summary of controls for hydrogen use is available in the hydrogen summary document. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls qualify for categorized as medium risk. Experiments involving new equipment or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Applicable controls for storage and use of

139

Gaseous isotope separation using solar wind phenomena  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...isotope separation using solar wind phenomena Chia-Gee...essentially the same as that of the solar wind propagation, in which...the author was measuring solar wind parameters under Dr. H. S. Bridge at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in...

Chia-Gee Wang

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Hazardous Substances Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Commissioner of the Department of Agriculture has the authority to promulgate regulations declaring specified substances to be hazardous and establishing labeling, transportation, storage, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

142

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can without any treatment. Hazardous Glass and Plastic: Items that can puncture, cut or scratch if disposed of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover

Sheridan, Jennifer

143

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation More Documents &...

144

2011 CNM Workshop: Emergent Interfacial Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting, May 2-5, 2011 APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting, May 2-5, 2011 Thematic Workshop B: Emergent Interfacial Phenomena Organizers: Tiffany Santos (formerly CNM, now Hitachi GST), Olle Heinonen (MSD), Paul Fenter (CSE), and Robert Klie (UIC) Sponsors: Argonne Photon Sciences Directorate, Argonne Physical Sciences and Engineering Directorate Heterostructures in which different materials are layered together display a range of emergent phenomena, which can be controlled through effects such as geometric confinement and interface structure. Both of these effects can lead to charge transfer and band structure modification giving rise to novel behavior. Understanding and control of these phenomena require advanced deposition and characterization methods, as well as state-of-the-art modeling

145

Visualizing infrared phenomena with a webcam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of light (electromagnetic radiation) outside of the visible spectrum is an abstract concept for students in an introductory science class. When students are presented with demonstrations or experiments meant to explore this portion of the spectrum the equipment involved often hides the phenomena. A simple modification to a standard inexpensive web camera (webcam) can take advantage of the sensitivity of the charged-coupled-device (CCD) to the infrared (IR) portion of the spectrum allowing students to visualize many IR phenomena. This note reports how such a modified webcam can be used in lecture demonstrations and laboratory activities to study infrared phenomena including an IR light emitting diode(LED) the IR component of different light sources IR spectroscopy and blackbody radiation. As a final example the modified camera can be employed to view the charcoal under-drawing of a “painting” created for this paper and used in our classroom demonstrations.

N. A. Gross; M. Hersek; A. Bansil

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Static Friction Phenomena The following static friction phenomena have a direct dependency on velocity.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coulomb Friction Viscous Friction Stribeck Friction Static Friction Phenomena The following static friction phenomena have a direct dependency on velocity. Static Friction Model: Friction force opposes the direction of motion when the sliding velocity is zero. Coulomb Friction Model: Friction force

Simpkins, Alex

147

Dissipative phenomena in quark-gluon plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transport coefficients of small-chemical-potential quark-gluon plasmas are estimated and dissipative corrections to the scaling hydrodynamic equations for ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions are studied. The absence of heat-conduction phenomena is clarified. Lower and upper bounds on the shear-viscosity coefficient are derived. QCD phenomenology is used to estimate effects of color-electric and -magnetic shielding, and nonperturbative antiscreening. Bulk viscosity associated with the plasma-to-hadron transition is estimated within the relaxation-time approximation. Finally, effects of dissipative phenomena on the relation between initial energy density and final rapidity density are estimated.

Danielewicz, P.; Gyulassy, M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

ASSESSMENTOF BURNING-PLASMA PHENOMENA COMPACTIGNITION TOKAMAK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report+ on ASSESSMENTOF BURNING-PLASMA PHENOMENA . in a COMPACTIGNITION TOKAMAK presented-coil tokamak configurations that would achieve ignition under presently accepted scaling laws. Studies the extent to which these compact tokamak ignition experiments can resolve the technical issue of under

149

Photo-Galvano-Mechanical Phenomena in Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photo-Galvano-Mechanical Phenomena in Nanotubes Petr KraI\\ E. J. Mele2 , David Tomanek3 and Moshe elec- trical "ballistic current". The photo-currents can be generated even in centrosym- metric be also generated in semiconductor nanotubes or in higher bands of metallic nanotubes [2]. The photo

150

Quantization makes Relativity Compatible with Superluminal Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By relativity we show that, although the superluminal motion of classical particles is forbidden, the superluminal transportation of quanta of any massive matter field is possible. Exact theoretical derivation and precise numerical computation are presented. To search the superluminal phenomena is therefore still meaningful.

Qi-Ren Zhang

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

Resonant phenomena in slowly perturbed elliptic billiards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider an elliptic billiard whose shape slowly changes. During slow evolution of the billiard certain resonance conditions can be fulfilled. We study the phenomena of capture into a resonance and scattering on resonances which lead to the destruction of the adiabatic invariance in the system.

A. P. Itin; A. I. Neishtadt

2005-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

152

ARM - SGP Rural Driving Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rural Driving Hazards Rural Driving Hazards SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Rural Driving Hazards The rural location of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site facilities requires that visitors travel on unpaved, dirt and gravel, roads. Visitors should be aware of the driving hazards this presents by taking the following precautions: Proceed cautiously: Many rural roads have unmarked and blind intersections. Slow down: Sanded and gravel raods can cause a vehicle to swerve. Maintain a safe following distance: During the dry season, vehicles

153

Surveillance Guides - Identification of Hazards  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Identification of Hazards Identification of Hazards 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs. Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety basis documentation (SARs, ISBs, BIOs, JCOs, HASPs etc) as well as activity level hazards identification via JHAs, AJHAs, JSAs etc.) 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 2.3 DOE O 5480.21, Unreviewed Safety Questions 2.4 DOE O 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance verifies implementation of guiding principle #5 and core value #2 as specified in 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 (b) (5) and (c) (2) respectively. Additionally, it verifies implementation of

154

Portable sensor for hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective was to develop a field-portable monitor for sensitive hazardous waste detection using active nitrogen energy transfer (ANET) excitation of atomic and molecular fluorescence (active nitrogen is made in a dielectric-barrier discharge in nitrogen). It should provide rapid field screening of hazardous waste sites to map areas of greatest contamination. Results indicate that ANET is very sensitive for monitoring heavy metals (Hg, Se) and hydrocarbons; furthermore, chlorinated hydrocarbons can be distinguished from nonchlorinated ones. Sensitivity is at ppB levels for sampling in air. ANET appears ideal for on-line monitoring of toxic heavy metal levels at building sites, hazardous waste land fills, in combustor flues, and of chlorinated hydrocarbon levels at building sites and hazardous waste dumps.

Piper, L.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION Huiying Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION by Huiying Sun Ph.D, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, CHINA, 1991 .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA September, 1999 c flHuiying Sun, 1999 #12; Abstract We propose using

Heckman, Nancy E.

156

A multi-attribute method for ranking the risks from multiple hazards in a small community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural hazards, human-induced accidents, and malicious acts have caused great losses and disruptions to society. After September 11, 2001, critical infrastructure protection has become a national focus in the United States ...

Li, Hua, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Response Act (Georgia) Site Response Act (Georgia) Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Public Benefits Fund Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act is Georgia's version of

158

Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

July, 2004 Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated Posture Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated it is possible for these injuries to heal themselves when the ergonomic hazard is removed, cases do exist where;PAGE 2 ERGONOMIC HAZARDS of the SEATED POSTURE BULLETIN NO. 233 Ergonomic interventions to reduce

Martin, Jeff

159

CRAD, Targeted Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2011 November 17, 2011 Emergency Management Program Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry - Targeted Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events...

160

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and investigations. The legislation also states responsibilities of generators and transporters of hazardous waste as well as responsibilities of hazardous waste storage and treatment facility and hazardous waste disposal site operators. There

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process.

Rodgers, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Lorentz violation at high energy: concepts, phenomena and astrophysical constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider here the possibility of quantum gravity induced violation of Lorentz symmetry (LV). Even if suppressed by the inverse Planck mass such LV can be tested by current experiments and astrophysical observations. We review the effective field theory approach to describing LV, the issue of naturalness, and many phenomena characteristic of LV. We discuss some of the current observational bounds on LV, focusing mostly on those from high energy astrophysics in the QED sector at order E/M_Planck. In this context we present a number of new results which include the explicit computation of rates of the most relevant LV processes, the derivation of a new photon decay constraint, and modification of previous constraints taking proper account of the helicity dependence of the LV parameters implied by effective field theory.

Ted Jacobson; Stefano Liberati; David Mattingly

2005-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

163

Thoughts on Hazard Assessment (Oct)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences J.M. Logue, T.E. McKone, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2010 Funding was provided by the U.S. Dept. of Energy Building Technologies Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy under DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231; by the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through Interagency Agreement I-PHI-01070, and by the California Energy Commission through Contract 500-08-06. LBNL Report Number 3650-E 1 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States

164

Subsurface Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results from this report are preliminary and cannot be used as input into documents supporting procurement, fabrication, or construction. This technical report identifies fire hazards and proposes their mitigation for the subsurface repository fire protection system. The proposed mitigation establishes the minimum level of fire protection to meet NRC regulations, DOE fire protection orders, that ensure fire containment, adequate life safety provisions, and minimize property loss. Equipment requiring automatic fire suppression systems is identified. The subsurface fire hazards that are identified can be adequately mitigated.

Logan, R.C.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

165

Advances in modelling of condensation phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physical parameters in the modelling of condensation phenomena in the CANDU reactor system codes are discussed. The experimental programs used for thermal-hydraulic code validation in the Canadian nuclear industry are briefly described. The modelling of vapour generation and in particular condensation plays a key role in modelling of postulated reactor transients. The condensation models adopted in the current state-of-the-art two-fluid CANDU reactor thermal-hydraulic system codes (CATHENA and TUF) are described. As examples of the modelling challenges faced, the simulation of a cold water injection experiment by CATHENA and the simulation of a condensation induced water hammer experiment by TUF are described.

Liu, W.S.; Zaltsgendler, E. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada); Hanna, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

BEAM COUPLING PHENOMENA IN FAST KICKER SYSTEMS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beam coupling phenomena have been observed in most fast kicker systems through out Brookhaven Collider-Accelerator complex. With ever-higher beam intensity, the signature of the beam becomes increasingly recognizable. The beam coupling at high intensity produced additional heat dissipation in high voltage modulator, thyratron grids, thyratron driver circuit sufficient to damage some components, and causes trigger instability. In this paper, we will present our observations, basic coupling mode analysis, relevance to the magnet structures, issues related to the existing high voltage modulators, and considerations of the future design of the fast kicker systems.

ZHANG,W.; AHRENS,L.A.; GLENN,J.; SANDBERG,J.; TSOUPAS,N.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

167

WHC fire hazards analysis policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to establish the fire protection policy for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) relative to US Department of Energy (DOE) directives for Fire Hazards Analyses (FHAs) and their relationship to facility Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) as promulgated by the DOE Richland Operations Office.

Evans, C.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Induction Phenomena in Laser-Sustained Scramjets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary study on induction phenomena in a laser-sustained scramjet was conducted. The induction processes include absorption process of a laser pulse by a reactive mixture, plasma formation, diffusion of active species, shock formation, thermalization process of ambient mixture, induction of local turbulence, etc. For observation of the initial phenomena, an experimental study on effects of a focused laser pulse (Nd:YAG, 335mJ/pulse, pulse width 5nsec) into a hydrogen-air mixture was conducted. Temporal evolutions of typical line spectrum of a laser-induced plasma of the mixture were measured with the photodiode or the photo-multiplier-tube through specific band-pass filters for each spectrum for OH, O+, N+, H, and O. It was shown that the emission from O abruptly increased at 2 nsec, peaked at about 5 nsec, followed by an abrupt drop at 6 nsec. The emission from H atoms secondly increased. Other emissions of N+, O+, and OH peaked at about 17 nsec and continued for about 1 msec.

Ohkawa, Yoko; Tamada, Kazunobu; Horisawa, Hideyuki [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Tokai University, 1117 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa, 259-1292 (Japan); Kimura, Itsuro [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8856 (Japan)

2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

169

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Management Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act contains regulations for safe disposal of hazardous waste, and establishes that a valid license is required to collect, transport, store, treat, use, or dispose of hazardous waste. Short...

170

CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY 12.A GENERAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on or near any system that produces, uses, or stores hazardous energy, a hazardous energy control program by the contractor-managed HECP (e.g., QA's on construction sites, etc.), they shall comply with the contractor and implementation of these activities. Each shall inform the other of their HECPs and Hazardous Energy Control (HEC

US Army Corps of Engineers

171

OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals ACETALDEHYDE ACETAMIDE ACETIC ACID ACETIC ANHYDRIDE ACETONE ACETONItr ILE ACETYLAMINOFLUORENE, 2- ACETYLENE ACETYLENE DICHLORIDE ACETYLENE TETRABROMIDE ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID (ASPIRIN) ACROLEIN ACRYLAMIDE ACRYLIC ACID ACRYLONITRILE ACTINOMYCIN D ADRIAMYCIN AFLATOXINS ALDRIN ALLYL ALCOHOL ALLYL CHLORIDE ALLYL GLYCIDYL ETHER (AGE) ALLYL PROPYL DISULFIDE ALUMINA ALUMINUM, METAL DUST, AS AL ALUMINUM, PYRO POWDERS, AS AL ALUMINUM, SOLUBLE SALTS, AS AL ALUMINUM, WELDING FUMES, AS AL ALUMINUM, ALKYLS, NOT OTHERWISE CLASSIFIED, AS AL ALUMINUM OXIDE, AS AL AMINOANTHRAQUINONE (AAQ), AMINOAZOTOLUENE, O- AMINOBIPHENYL, 4- AMINOETHANOL, 2- AMINO-2-METHYLANTHRAQUINONE, 1- AMINO-5-(5-NITRO-2-FURYL)- -1, 3,4-THIADIADIAZOLE, 2- AMINOPYRIDINE, 2- AMINO-1,2,4-TRIAZOLE, 3-

172

Magneto-photonic phenomena at terahertz frequencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magneto-terahertz phenomena are the main focus of the thesis. This work started as supporting research for the science of an X-ray laser (SwissFEL). X-ray lasers have recently drawn great attention as an unprecedented tool for scientific research on the ultrafast scale..... To answer this fundamental question, we performed original numerical simulations using a coupled Landau- Lifshitz-Gilbert Maxwell model. ... Those requirements were the motivations for the experiments performed in the second part of the thesis. To shape the terahertz pulses, .... Regarding the field intensities, we followed two approaches. The first deals with field enhancement in nanoslits arrays. We designed a subwavelength structure characterized by simultaneous high field enhancement and high transmission at terahertz frequencies to suit nonlinear sources. The second approach depended on up-scaling the generation from laser-induced plasma by increasing the pump wavelengths. Numerical calculations have also brought to our attention the ...

Shalaby, Mostafa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Shock phenomena in baryonless strongly interacting matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shock phenomena associated with the quark-to-hadron matter phase transition are studied using the concept of adiabats. To allow for an analysis of a medium with vanishing baryon density, the shock and Poisson adiabats are formulated in terms of hydrodynamic fluxes, rather than only thermodynamic variables. The bag-model equation of state is used to describe the phase transition. It is shown that deflagrations from the quark phase above the critical temperature and strong detonations from the supercooled quark phase to the superheated hadron phase are unlikely. Instead the possibility of weak condensation detonations from the supercooled quark phase to a mixed phase is indicated. Strong detonations can occur if the latent energy density of the phase transition is small compared to the energy density of the hadron gas. Simple properties of the adiabats and of the equation of state are employed to derive several analytic results.

Danielewicz, P.; Ruuskanen, P.V.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Implementation of the hazardous debris rule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous debris includes objects contaminated with hazardous waste. Examples of debris include tree stumps, timbers, boulders, tanks, piping, crushed drums, personal protective clothing, etc. Most of the hazardous debris encountered comes from Superfund sites and other facility remediation, although generators and treaters of hazardous waste also generate hazardous debris. Major problems associated with disposal of debris includes: Inappropriateness of many waste treatments to debris; Difficulties in obtaining representative samples; Costs associated with applying waste specific treatments to debris; Subtitle C landfill space was being used for many low hazard debris types. These factors brought about the need for debris treatment technologies and regulations that addressed these issues. The goal of such regulation was to provide treatment to destroy or remove the contamination if possible and, if this is achieved, to dispose of the cleaned debris as a nonhazardous waste. EPA has accomplished this goal through promulgation of the Hazardous Debris Rule, August 18, 1992.

Sailer, J.E.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

175

Emergent Phenomena at Complex Oxide Interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coupling in high-temperature superconductors. Nature 412,Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7 (high temperature superconductor) layer at thebuilt with high temperature superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 (

Yu, Pu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Temporal and spatial changes in social vulnerability to natural hazards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...employed in agriculture, mining, fishing, or forestry...of mapped scores using standard deviations from the mean...assessment and mitigation plans to make them more responsive...with Risk: A Global Review of Disaster Reduction Initiatives ( United...place-based emergency plans accordingly. The concept...

Susan L. Cutter; Christina Finch

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Lab 9: Coasts Natural and Man-made Hazards Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lakes and the oceans. These are wind-produced waves that affect only the top part of the body of water) equals half the wavelength (L). Types Waves are produced as wind blows over a water surface. Originates a continuous water surface) Variations of these three factors produce different wave types: seas are short

Chen, Po

178

Extreme natural hazards: population growth, globalization and environmental change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of mangrove swamps in Sri Lanka increased the...social order, failure of international and national organizations...also supported by the International Association of Volcanology...tsunamis on coastal Sri Lanka would have been...that nations and the international community are not well...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Geology, Geotechnical Engineering, and Natural Hazards of Memphis, Tennessee, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and Nonconnah) also have bordering patches of Pleistocene terrace surfaces that reflect...and Kentucky are frequently called to repair shallow foundations, particularly slabs-on-grade...implications, given the transportation and pipeline infrastructure that passes through the...

ROY B VAN ARSDALE; DAVID ARELLANO; KRISTA C STEVENS; ARLEEN A HILL; JUSTIN D LESTER; ALAN G PARKS; RYAN M CSONTOS; MELANIE A RAPINO; THOMAS S DEEN; EDWARD W WOOLERY; JAMES B HARRIS

180

Temporal and spatial changes in social vulnerability to natural hazards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Native Americans, % Hispanic); Gender (% female, % female-headed households, % female participation in...and ethnicity (e.g., Hispanic, Asian, or Hawaiian Islanders...measure of ethnicity, Hispanics or the percentage of persons...

Susan L. Cutter; Christina Finch

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

SEMIACTIVE CONTROL OF CIVIL STRUCTURES FOR NATURAL HAZARD MITIGATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of wind vibra- tions in cable structures. The focus is on understanding the dynamic characteristics, axial stiffness, angle of inclination, and damper location on the control performance is examined. Specific levels of sag, axial stiff- ness, angle of inclination, and damper location resulting in poor

Spencer Jr., B.F.

182

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

183

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

MATERIALS, INTERFACES, AND ELECTROCHEMICAL PHENOMENA Hydrophilic Zeolite Coatings for Improved  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATERIALS, INTERFACES, AND ELECTROCHEMICAL PHENOMENA Hydrophilic Zeolite Coatings for Improved Heat the system, decreases the oper- ation noise and the pumping cost. Another major consideration for a heat

Aguilar, Guillermo

185

Assessment of External Hazards at Radioactive Waste and Used Fuel Management Facilities - 13505  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the key lessons from the Fukushima accident is the importance of having a comprehensive identification and evaluation of risks posed by external events to nuclear facilities. While the primary focus has been on nuclear power plants, the Canadian nuclear industry has also been updating hazard assessments for radioactive waste and used fuel management facilities to ensure that lessons learnt from Fukushima are addressed. External events are events that originate either physically outside the nuclear site or outside its control. They include natural events, such as high winds, lightning, earthquakes or flood due to extreme rainfall. The approaches that have been applied to the identification and assessment of external hazards in Canada are presented and analyzed. Specific aspects and considerations concerning hazards posed to radioactive waste and used fuel management operations are identified. Relevant hazard identification techniques are described, which draw upon available regulatory guidance and standard assessment techniques such as Hazard and Operability Studies (HAZOPs) and 'What-if' analysis. Consideration is given to ensuring that hazard combinations (for example: high winds and flooding due to rainfall) are properly taken into account. Approaches that can be used to screen out external hazards, through a combination of frequency and impact assessments, are summarized. For those hazards that cannot be screened out, a brief overview of methods that can be used to conduct more detailed hazard assessments is also provided. The lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident have had a significant impact on specific aspects of the approaches used to hazard assessment for waste management. Practical examples of the effect of these impacts are provided. (authors)

Gerchikov, Mark; Schneider, Glenn; Khan, Badi; Alderson, Elizabeth [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)] [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish hazardous waste management procedures for facilities operated under authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA). The procedures will follow. to the extent practicable, regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Although Department of Energy (DOE) operations conducted under authority other than the AEA are subject to EPA or State regulations conforming with RCRA, facilities administered under the authority of the AEA are not bound by such requirements.

1982-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Advanced computational simulation of flow phenomena associated with orifice meters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents and discusses results from a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of fluid flow phenomena associated with orifice meters. These simulations were performed using a new, state-of-the-art CFD code developed at Southwest Research Institute. This code is based on new techniques designed to take advantage of parallel computers to increase computational performance and fidelity of simulation results. This algorithm uses a domain decomposition strategy to create grid systems for very complex geometries composed of simpler geometric subregions, allowing for the accurate representation of the fluid flow domain. The domain decomposition technique maps naturally to parallel computer architectures. Here, the concept of message-passing is used to create a parallel algorithm, using the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) library. This code is then used to simulate the flow through an orifice meter run consisting of an orifice with a beta ratio of 0.5 and air flowing at a Reynolds number of 91,100. The work discussed in this paper is but the first step in developing a Virtual Metering Research Facility to support research, analysis, and formulation of new standards for metering.

Freitas, C.J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

BNL | CFN: Transport of Hazardous Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials The following contains guidance for transporting materials to and from BNL and for on-site transfers. All staff and users must adhere to Laboratory guidelines when making plans to move materials either by commercial carrier or in rented or personal vehicles. BNL hazardous material transport guidelines apply for products that meet the definition of hazardous materials according to 49 CFR 171.8 and any nanomaterial that has known hazardous properties (toxic, flammable, reactive). BNL guidelines are also provided for all other nanomaterials even if they have not been identified as hazardous materials. Some materials may be transported in personal vehicles as per "Materials of Trade" (MOT) guidance. The regulations for transporting MOT are much

189

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Sales Tax Incentive Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7-202.) The Hazardous Waste Program is based off of the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act set forth in 40 CFR parts 260-279. Due to the great similarity to the

190

Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.

Cirillo, R.R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K.C.; Conzelmann, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carpenter, R.A.; Indriyanto, S.H. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

How to Do Agent-Based Simulations in the Future: From Modeling Social Mechanisms to Emergent Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

understanding of social and economic systems. While relevant also for the statistical analysis of data and data Phenomena and Interactive Systems Design Dirk Helbing1,2 and Stefano Balietti1 1 ETH Zurich, CLU E-mail: dhelbing@ethz.ch and sbalietti@ethz.ch Abstract Since the advent of computers, the natural

192

Freeze Concentration Applied to Hazardous Waste Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steps to remove or destroy the hazardous components prior to discharge. Incineration is widely used to destroy a broad range of these hazardous components. Its disposal efficiency is often used when defining the Best Available Technology for EPA... standards. However, high water content streams are expensive to incinerate since the incinerator must be designed to handle the feed volume even though the water in the feed is in itself harmless. Some hazardous components require operating temperatures...

Ruemekorf, R.

193

Computer Viruses and Other Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Viruses and Other Hazards Computer Viruses and Other Hazards Name: Paul Status: other Grade: 12+ Location: IL Country: USA Date: May 2, 2011 Question: What is a Computer Virus? What do viruses do? How do viruses Spread? How do I prevent a virus? What are Trojan Horse programs? Malware? Phishing? Replies: Paul From National Institute of Science and Technology Which is the US government office in charge of this problem and should be your reference for this subject At this URL: http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-61-rev1/SP800-61rev1.pdf Please find the following definitions from paragraph 5: 5.1.1 Virus: A virus is designed to self-replicate-make copies of itself-and distribute the copies to other files, programs, or computers. Viruses insert themselves into host programs and propagate when the infected program is executed, generally by user interaction (e.g., opening a file, running a program, clicking on a file attachment). Viruses have many purposes-some are designed to play annoying tricks, whereas others have destructive intent. Some viruses present themselves as jokes while performing secret destructive functions. There two major types of viruses are compiled viruses, which are executed by the operating system, and interpreted viruses, which are executed by an application.

194

Hazard of intermittent noise exposures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chief shortcoming of the “equal energy” hypothesis—the notion that equal products of time and intensity provide equal hazard—is that the recuperative powers of the auditory system are essentially ignored. A single sustained stimulus is regarded as no more dangerous than an intermittent one of the same total energy. A two?year study of the effect of intermittency on the TTS produced in normal young adults by 6? or 8?h exposures to octave bands of noise whose center frequencies ranged from 250 to 4000 Hz indicates that even for the most hazardous noise (the 4000?Hz OB) cutting the cumulative exposure time in half by interjecting regular quiet periods will permit an increase in level of 5 dB for constant TTS at least up to about 100 dB SPL. At 1000 Hz the trading relation is 6–7 dB for halving time and at 250 Hz is even greater. Thus the 5?dBA?per?halving?time relation employed by the present OSHA standard is essentially correct for intermittent noise except perhaps above 100 to 105 dBA where the equal?energy hypothesis may be more appropriate for spectra with high?frequency dominance. A single 5?dBA “correction for intermittency” is an oversimplification. [Research supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Public Health Service.

W. D. Ward

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Numerical simulation on dense gas dispersion and fire characteristics after liquefied natural gas release.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This PhD dissertation mainly studies the prediction, simulation and mitigation methods of the two main hazards in LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) industry, LNG vapor dense… (more)

Sun, Biao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Environmental Management The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental Management is tasked regulating hazardous waste management facilities and practices. Provisions pertaining to permitting, site approval, construction, reporting, transportation, and remediation practices and fees are discussed in these

197

Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for administering the Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law and the regulations created under that law.

198

Oil and Hazardous Substance Discharge Preparedness (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Anyone who owns or operates a vessel or facility that transports, stores, or otherwise handles hazardous wastes must take reasonable steps to prevent the discharge of those materials.

199

Hazardous Waste Management System-General (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides general regulations regarding hazardous waste, including landfills. Specific passages refer to the...

200

Identification of Hazards, 3/9/95  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs.  Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Mission Support Alliance, LLC Volpentest Hazardous Materials...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Organization (FERO) roles and responsibilities, training requirements and the conduct of operations. Each project is responsible for developing and maintaining EP Hazards...

202

Hazardous Material Packaging for Transport - Administrative Procedures  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establ1sh administrative procedures for the certification and use of radioactive and other hazardous materials packaging by the Department of Energy (DOE).

1986-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fire hazards analysis of central waste complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document analyzes the fire hazards associated with operational the Central Waste Complex. It provides the analysis and recommendations necessary to ensure compliance with applicable fire codes.

Irwin, R.M.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Hazardous Liquid Pipelines and Storage Facilities (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute regulates the permitting, construction, monitoring, and operation of pipelines transporting hazardous liquids, including petroleum products and coal slurries. The definition used in...

205

Extremely Hazardous Substances Risk Management Act (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act lays out provisions for local governments to implement regulations and standards for the management of extremely hazardous substances, which are defined and categorized as follows:

206

Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

seismic events are typically shallow (for example blasts generated in mines, quarries, and roadcuts; volcanoes; atmospheric phenomena). In the crustal earthquake catalog...

207

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be damaged when corrosive chemicals are put down the drain. Burning hazardous wastes simply distributes themHousehold Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products containing toxic chemicals. These wastes CANNOT be disposed of in regular garbage. Any

de Lijser, Peter

208

Prediction and Uncertainty in Computational Modeling of Complex Phenomena: A Whitepaper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes some challenges associated with the use of computational science to predict the behavior of complex phenomena. As such, the document is a compendium of ideas that have been generated by various staff at Sandia. The report emphasizes key components of the use of computational to predict complex phenomena, including computational complexity and correctness of implementations, the nature of the comparison with data, the importance of uncertainty quantification in comprehending what the prediction is telling us, and the role of risk in making and using computational predictions. Both broad and more narrowly focused technical recommendations for research are given. Several computational problems are summarized that help to illustrate the issues we have emphasized. The tone of the report is informal, with virtually no mathematics. However, we have attempted to provide a useful bibliography that would assist the interested reader in pursuing the content of this report in greater depth.

Trucano, T.G.

1999-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

209

Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Root Out Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards For many Americans, working outdoors on the lawn and in the garden is a great way to exercise and relax. However, safety experts warn that, if caution is not employed with lawn and garden tools, you could wind up spending more time indoors, starting with a trip to a hospital emergency room. "The most frequent injuries are from lawn mowers, which are unforgiving machines," cautions John Drengenberg, manager of Consumer Affairs for Underwriters Laboratories Inc., Northbrook, Ill., a not-for-profit product safety testing organization. "Statistics tell us that each year lawn mower accidents send close to 85,000 people to emergency rooms. But that's not all. Nearly 15,000 others need medical treatment for injuries from trimmers and other power garden

210

POTENTIAL HEALTH HAZARDS OF RADIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During World War II and the Cold War, the federal government developed and operated industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Some of these sites processed uranium and vanadium, and upon closure, left behind millions of cubic yards of mill tailings on the sites and throughout the nearby communities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the cleanup of these areas to minimize the risks to the public and environment from exposure to the tailings and the radon gas they produce.

none,

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

211

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Homes built the destruction of fire-tolerant trees if a wildfire moves through the area. Creating fuel breaks (such ignite it. · When ERC grows in forests and wood- lands, it acts as a ladder fuel to allow fire to climb

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

212

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Energy and solid/hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

None

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT Offered by The College of Architecture and The Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center Texas A&M University #12;2 THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL..................................................................................3 C. Approved Courses in the College of Architecture .............................4 D. Approved

215

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act establishes the means by which developers of proposed hazardous waste facilities will work with the community in which they wish to construct a facility. When the intent to construct, maintain, and/or operate a hazardous waste facility in a city or town is demonstrated, a local assessment committee will be established by that community. The

216

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EHSS EHSS Industrial Hygiene Group HazMat Transport/Shipping Home Biological & Infectious Substances Chemicals Compressed Gas Cryogens Dry Ice Engineered Nanomaterials Gasoline Lithium Betteries Radioactive Materials Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Mixed Hazardous Materials Personal/Rental Vehicles HazMat Transport/Shipping Transporting and shipping hazardous materials can be dangerous, but both activities can be done safely - much of it by the researchers themselves. Each of the items below is subject to some transportation or shipping restrictions. Click on the applicable hazardous material icon below to learn how you can safely (and legally) transport that hazardous material and to learn what laboratory resources are available to you for your shipping needs.

217

Fire hazard analysis of the radioactive mixed waste trenchs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) is intended to assess comprehensively the risk from fire associated with the disposal of low level radioactive mixed waste in trenches within the lined landfills, provided by Project W-025, designated Trench 31 and 34 of the Burial Ground 218-W-5. Elements within the FHA make recommendations for minimizing risk to workers, the public, and the environment from fire during the course of the operation`s activity. Transient flammables and combustibles present that support the operation`s activity are considered and included in the analysis. The graded FHA contains the following elements: description of construction, protection of essential safety class equipment, fire protection features, description of fire hazards, life safety considerations, critical process equipment, high value property, damage potential--maximum credible fire loss (MCFL) and maximum possible fire loss (MPFL), fire department/brigade response, recovery potential, potential for a toxic, biological and/or radiation incident due to a fire, emergency planning, security considerations related to fire protection, natural hazards (earthquake, flood, wind) impact on fire safety, and exposure fire potential, including the potential for fire spread between fire areas. Recommendations for limiting risk are made in the text of this report and printed in bold type. All recommendations are repeated in a list in Section 18.0.

McDonald, K.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

218

Simulation and design optimization for linear wave phenomena on metamaterials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Periodicity can change materials properties in a very unintuitive way. Many wave propagation phenomena, such as waveguides, light bending structures or frequency filters can be modeled through finite periodic structures ...

Saà-Seoane, Joel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Lattice Boltzmann Simulations for Microfluidics and Mesoscale Phenomena  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Lattice Boltzmann Equation (LBE) method is described for...2 bubbly flow demonstrate its capability in simulating multiphysics phenomena that are challenging for conventional Navier-Stokes based techniques.

E. Monaco; K. H. Luo; R. S. Qin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Novel applications of Maxwell's equations to quantum and thermal phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is concerned with the extension of Maxwell's equations to situations far removed from standard electromagnetism, in order to discover novel phenomena. We discuss our contributions to the efforts to describe ...

McCauley, Alexander P. (Alexander Patrick)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 41300 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 41300 The objective of this surveillance is to...

222

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety Design Guide Fluorescent are hazardous waste, so take care to ensure the tubes remain intact during removal and storage. Fluorescent

Wilcock, William

223

Hazardous Waste Generator Treatment Permit by Rule | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Hazardous Waste Generator Treatment by Rule. Authors Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division Published...

224

Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with...

225

New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Maximizes Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

National Laboratories developed the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT), a free Web-based tool that can quickly calculate potential visual hazards from proposed solar...

226

Abatement of Air Pollution: Hazardous Air Pollutants (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe maximum allowable stack concentrations and hazard limiting values for the emission of hazardous air pollutants. The regulations also discuss sampling procedures for...

227

Geoengineering, climate change scepticism and the ‘moral hazard’ argument: an experimental study of UK public perceptions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...supplement to mitigation policies. Hale [23] argues that moral hazard...and behaviour [14]. Echoing Hale's concerns about counter-factual...to use oil, coal and natural gas [25]. In initial focus groups...Law Q. 40, 673-712. 15 Hale, B . 2009 What's so moral...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Sustainable Hazard Resistant Construction Using Indigenous Materials -Bamboo Construction in Darjeeling and Sikkim-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Hazard Resistant Construction Using Indigenous Materials -Bamboo Construction July 2014 4pm A206a � School of Engineering ABSTRACT Interest in sustainable construction materials material resources, such as bamboo, are an integral part of sustainable development. The use of natural

Davies, Christopher

229

Vulnerability of the New York City Metropolitan Area to Coastal Hazards,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trade Center site in Lower Manhattan, and of the Brooklyn water- front, long home to the former Brooklyn-Level Rise: Inferences for Urban Coastal Risk Management and Adaptation Policies Klaus Jacob, Vivien Gornitz at or near sea level. Major coastal urban centers have long been vulnerable to natural hazards, such as storm

230

Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan (HWCPP) describes how the Rocky Flats Plant institutes a more effective waste management program designed to achieve and maintain strict adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Emphasis is given to improve integration of line operations with programmatic and functional support activities necessary to achieve physical compliance to RCRA regulated equipment, facilities and operations at the floor level. This program focuses on specific activities occurring or which need to occur within buildings containing RCRA regulated units and activities. The plan describes a new approach to achieving and maintaining compliance. This approach concentrates authority and accountability for compliance with the line operating personnel, with support provided from the programmatic functions. This approach requires a higher degree of integration and coordination between operating and program support organizations. The principal changes in emphases are; (1) increased line operations involvement, knowledge and accountability in compliance activities, (2) improved management systems to identify, correct and/or avoid deficiencies and (3) enhanced management attention and employee awareness of compliance related matters.

Potter, G.L.; Holstein, K.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

232

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

Schiffbauer, William H. (Connellsville, PA); Ganoe, Carl W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Hazards Control Department annual technology review, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes some of the research performed in the LLNL Hazards Control Department from October 1986 to September 1987. The sections in the Annual report cover scientific concerns in the areas of Health Physics, Industrial Hygiene, Industrial Safety, Aerosol Science, Resource Management, Dosimetry and Radiation Physics, Criticality Safety, and Fire Science. For a broader overview of the types of work performed in the Hazards Control Department, we have also compiled a selection of abstracts of recent publications by Hazards Control employees. Individual reports are processed separately for the data base.

Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, K.J. (eds.)

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

DZero (D0) Experiment Results for New Phenomena from the Fermilab Tevatron  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The D0 (DZero) Experiment is a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter. The experiment is located at the Tevatron Collider, Fermilab. The research is focused on precise studies of interactions of protons and antiprotons and involves an intense search for subatomic clues that reveal the character of the building blocks of the universe. This web page provides access to Run II research results of the New Phenomena Physics group, including preliminary, submitted, and published results. Figures and data plots are found in the same directories with their respective papers.

235

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the InSalah CO2 Storage Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the In Salah CO 2 Storage Project Background Safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs is critical to geologic sequestration. The In Salah Project (joint venture of British Petroleum (BP), Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro) has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 billion cubic feet per year (bcfy) natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian

236

The application of expansion foam on liquefied natural gas (LNG) to suppress LNG vapor and LNG pool fire thermal radiation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) hazards include LNG flammable vapor dispersion and LNG pool fire thermal radiation. A large LNG pool fire emits high thermal radiation… (more)

Suardin, Jaffee Arizon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Railroad Hazardous g Railroad Hazardous g Materials Transportation Safety Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Radioactive Materials Program Manager Radioactive Materials Program Manager H d M t i l Di i i H d M t i l Di i i Hazmat Hazardous Materials Division Hazardous Materials Division Federal Railroad Administration Federal Railroad Administration Presentation for the Presentation for the DOE NTSF Meeting DOE NTSF Meeting May 10 May 10- -12, 2011 12, 2011 Our Regulated Community * More than 550 l d railroads * 170,000 miles of track * 220,000 employees * 1.3 million railcars * 20,000 locomotives Hazmat * 3,500 chemical shippers * Roughly 2 Million Roughly 2 Million annual HM shipments HM-232E Introduction * Notice of Proposed Rulemaking d b * Issued December 21, 2006 * Interim Final Rule

238

All Hazard Awareness Employee Pocket Guide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hazard Hazard Awareness Employee Pocket Guide produced by Emergency Services Program For emergencies dial x7911 911 from cell phones berkeley lab Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 Emergency Preparedness Response FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE x7911 911 from cell phones Employee Pocket Guide 3 FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE x7911 911 from cell phones Employee Emergency Response Expectations Before an emergency: * Accept personal responsibility for your own safety. * Prepare your personal/family emergency plan. * Review your Building Emergency Plan (BEP) or Emergency Response Guide. * Know the location of all your building's exits and Assembly Areas. * Know the specific hazards in your area and the response procedures for each hazard. * Understand how to report an emergency.

239

CONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

working practice and will encourage the evolution of a positive health and safety culture within the orgCONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH) Guidance Notes on Risk Assessment HEALTH & SAFETY............................................................................................................9 2.6. Safety Data Sheets (SDS

240

Hazards Control Department 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report of the Hazards Control Department activities in 1995 is part of the department`s efforts to foster a working environment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where every person desire to work safely.

Campbell, G.W.

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Owning Hazard, A Tragedy Barbara Young Welke*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Minnesota. This play is part of her ongoing research on the history of products liability. In addition in the ownership of hazard from the individuals who suffered injury, to the enterprises involved in manufacturing

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

242

Improving Tamper Detection for Hazardous Waste Security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide effective security for their hazardous wastes. Tamper-indicating seals can help. This paper discusses seals, and offers recommendations for how to choose and use them.

Johnston, R. G.; Garcia, A. R. E.; Pacheco, N.; Martinez, R. K.; Martinez, D. D.; Trujillo, S. J.; Lopez, L. N.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

243

Lab optimizes burning of hazardous wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new thermal destruction laboratory has gone into operation at Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, Mo. The bench-scale facility, which can accommodate gram quantities of hazardous wastes in liquid, slurry, or solid forms, is used to determine ...

WARD WORTHY

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Probabilistic seismic hazard maps for Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Probabilistic seismic hazard maps in term of Modified Mercalli (MM) intensity are derived by applying the ‘Cornell-McGuire’ method to four earthquake source zones in Panama and adjacent areas. The maps contain es...

Aristoteles Vergara Muñoz

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Gis Technology in Mapping Landslide Hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the recent years, the ever-increasing diffusion of GIS technology has facilitated the application of quantitative ... potential of such technological advancements, landslide hazard mapping remains a major, lar...

Alberto Carrara; Mauro Cardinali…

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Home insulation may increase radiation hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... pose a potential health hazard, by increasing exposure to low levels of the radioactive gas radon. ... .Radon-222 is produced as part of the decay chain of uranium-238. Both the ...

David Dickson

1978-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

Hazard Baseline Downgrade Effluent Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Hazard Baseline Downgrade reviews the Effluent Treatment Facility, in accordance with Department of Energy Order 5480.23, WSRC11Q Facility Safety Document Manual, DOE-STD-1027-92, and DOE-EM-STD-5502-94. It provides a baseline grouping based on the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the facility. The Determination of the baseline grouping for ETF will aid in establishing the appropriate set of standards for the facility.

Blanchard, A.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

248

Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

Krahn, D.E.

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

249

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers, cabinets

Boynton, Walter R.

250

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers

Boynton, Walter R.

251

Rules and Regulations for Hazardous Waste Management (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations establish permitting and operational requirements for hazardous waste facilities. They are designed to minimize...

252

19 - Natural disasters and earth buildings: resistant design and construction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Earth buildings are particularly vulnerable to earthquakes, tropical storms, major wind storms and floods; the risks, causal mechanisms and failure modes for these natural hazards are described. Thousands die each year due to unreinforced earth building collapses in earthquakes; designers must assess the hazard, ground conditions and seismic lateral loads and use suitable structural forms and reinforcement. Unstabilised earth materials are highly susceptible to flood inundation requiring site consideration; in severe winds the low tensile strength requires special attention especially to the roof tie-down anchorage. The risks from other natural hazards are overviewed and the design principles are discussed.

H.W. Morris

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Experiment Hazard Class 15.2 - USDA Soil Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 - USDA Regulated Soil 2 - USDA Regulated Soil Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving soils regulated by the United States Department of Agricultute (USDA). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiment Category Experiments involving this hazard class categorized as low risk experiments unless other hazard classes apply. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - None required. Procedural Controls - All work with regulated soils must be performed in compliance with the APS Protocols for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Untreated Foreign Soil and Regulated Domestic Soil. The APS protocols state the requirements for handling, storage, shipment, and disposal of regulated

254

Uranium Pyrophoricity Phenomena and Prediction (FAI/00-39)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a topical reference on the phenomena and prediction of uranium pyrophoricity for the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project with specific applications to SNF Project processes and situations. Spent metallic uranium nuclear fuel is currently stored underwater at the K basins in the Hanford 100 area, and planned processing steps include: (1) At the basins, cleaning and placing fuel elements and scrap into stainless steel multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) holding about 6 MT of fuel apiece; (2) At nearby cold vacuum drying (CVD) stations, draining, vacuum drying, and mechanically sealing the MCOs; (3) Shipping the MCOs to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) on the 200 Area plateau; and (4) Welding shut and placing the MCOs for interim (40 year) dry storage in closed CSB storage tubes cooled by natural air circulation through the surrounding vault. Damaged fuel elements have exposed and corroded fuel surfaces, which can exothermically react with water vapor and oxygen during normal process steps and in off-normal situations, A key process safety concern is the rate of reaction of damaged fuel and the potential for self-sustaining or runaway reactions, also known as uranium fires or fuel ignition. Uranium metal and one of its corrosion products, uranium hydride, are potentially pyrophoric materials. Dangers of pyrophoricity of uranium and its hydride have long been known in the U.S. Department of Energy (Atomic Energy Commission/DOE) complex and will be discussed more below; it is sufficient here to note that there are numerous documented instances of uranium fires during normal operations. The motivation for this work is to place the safety of the present process in proper perspective given past operational experience. Steps in development of such a perspective are: (1) Description of underlying physical causes for runaway reactions, (2) Modeling physical processes to explain runaway reactions, (3) Validation of the method against experimental data, (4) Application of the method to plausibly explain operational experience, and (5) Application of the method to present process steps to demonstrate process safety and margin. Essentially, the logic above is used to demonstrate that runaway reactions cannot occur during normal SNF Project process steps, and to illustrate the depth of the technical basis for such a conclusion. Some off-normal conditions are identified here that could potentially lead to runaway reactions. However, this document is not intended to provide an exhaustive analysis of such cases. In summary, this report provides a ''toolkit'' of models and approaches for analysis of pyrophoricity safety issues at Hanford, and the technical basis for the recommended approaches. A summary of recommended methods appears in Section 9.0.

PLYS, M.G.

2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Modified Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) for Uncertainty Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a methodology of characterizing important phenomena, which is also part of a broader research by the authors called 'Modified PIRT'. The methodology provides robust process of phenomena identification and ranking process for more precise quantification of uncertainty. It is a two-step process of identifying and ranking methodology based on thermal-hydraulics (TH) importance as well as uncertainty importance. Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP) has been used for as a formal approach for TH identification and ranking. Formal uncertainty importance technique is used to estimate the degree of credibility of the TH model(s) used to represent the important phenomena. This part uses subjective justification by evaluating available information and data from experiments, and code predictions. The proposed methodology was demonstrated by developing a PIRT for large break loss of coolant accident LBLOCA for the LOFT integral facility with highest core power (test LB-1). (authors)

Gol-Mohamad, Mohammad P.; Modarres, Mohammad; Mosleh, Ali [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) Panel Meeting Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) is a systematic way of gathering information from experts on a specific subject and ranking the importance of the information. NRC, in collaboration with DOE and the working group, conducted the PIRT exercises to identify safety-relevant phenomena for NGNP, and to assess and rank the importance and knowledge base for each phenomenon. The overall objective was to provide NRC with an expert assessment of the safety-relevant NGNP phenomena, and an overall assessment of R and D needs for NGNP licensing. The PIRT process was applied to five major topical areas relevant to NGNP safety and licensing: (1) thermofluids and accident analysis (including neutronics), (2) fission product transport, (3) high temperature materials, (4) graphite, and (5) process heat for hydrogen cogeneration.

Mark Holbrook

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

RELAP5-3D Code Validation for RBMK Phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RELAP5-3D thermal-hydraulic code was assessed against Japanese Safety Experiment Loop (SEL) and Heat Transfer Loop (HTL) tests. These tests were chosen because the phenomena present are applicable to analyses of Russian RBMK reactor designs. The assessment cases included parallel channel flow fluctuation tests at reduced and normal water levels, a channel inlet pipe rupture test, and a high power, density wave oscillation test. The results showed that RELAP5-3D has the capability to adequately represent these RBMK-related phenomena.

Fisher, James Ebberly

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

RELAP5-3D code validation for RBMK phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RELAP5-3D thermal-hydraulic code was assessed against Japanese Safety Experiment Loop (SEL) and Heat Transfer Loop (HTL) tests. These tests were chosen because the phenomena present are applicable to analyses of Russian RBMK reactor designs. The assessment cases included parallel channel flow fluctuation tests at reduced and normal water levels, a channel inlet pipe rupture test, and a high power, density wave oscillation test. The results showed that RELAP5-3D has the capability to adequately represent these RBMK-related phenomena.

Fisher, J.E.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation.

Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Studies of local degradation phenomena in composite cathodes for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Studies of local degradation phenomena in composite cathodes for Studies of local degradation phenomena in composite cathodes for lithium-ion batteries Title Studies of local degradation phenomena in composite cathodes for lithium-ion batteries Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Kerlau, Marie, Marek Marcinek, Venkat Srinivasan, and Robert Kostecki Journal Electrochimica Acta Volume 52 Pagination 5422-5429 Keywords cathode, degradation, li-ion battery, raman microscopy Abstract LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 and LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 composite cathodes were cycled in model cells to study interfacial phenomena that could lead to electrode degradation. Ex situ spectroscopic analysis of the tested cathodes, which suffered substantial power and capacity loss, showed that the state of charge (SOC) of oxide particles on the cathode surface was highly non-uniform despite the deep discharge of the Li-ion cell at the end of the test. The inconsistent kinetic behavior of individual oxide particles was attributed to the degradation of electronic pathways within the composite cathodes. A simple theoretical model based on a distributed network showed that an increase of the contact resistance between composite electrode particles may be responsible for non-uniform local kinetic behavior of individual oxide particles and the overall degradation of electrochemical performance of composite electrodes.

262

Fundamental phenomena of quantum mechanics explored with neutron interferometers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ongoing fascination with quantum mechanics keeps driving the development of the wide field of quantum-optics, including its neutron-optics branch. Application of neutron-optical methods and, especially, neutron interferometry and polarimetry has a long-standing tradition for experimental investigations of fundamental quantum phenomena. We give an overview of related experimental efforts made in recent years.

J. Klepp; S. Sponar; Y. Hasegawa

2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

263

Phenomena identification and ranking tables (PIRT) for LBLOCA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is sponsoring a program to provide validated reactor safety computer codes with quantified uncertainties. The intent is to quantify the accuracy of the codes for use in best estimate licensing applications. One of the tasks required to complete this program involves the identification and ranking of thermal-hydraulic phenomena that occur during particular accidents. This paper provides detailed tables of phenomena and importance ranks for a PWR LBLOCA. The phenomena were identified and ranked according to perceived impact on peak cladding temperature. Two approaches were used to complete this task. First, a panel of experts identified the physical processes considered to be most important during LBLOCA. A second team of experienced analysts then, in parallel, assembled complete tables of all plausible LBLOCA phenomena, regardless of perceived importance. Each phenomenon was then ranked in importance against every other phenomenon associated with a given component. The results were placed in matrix format and solved for the principal eigenvector. The results as determined by each method are presented in this report.

Shaw, R.A.; Dimenna, R.A.; Larson, T.K.; Wilson, G.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Lattice-Boltzmann Method for Simulating Gaseous Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Lattice-Boltzmann Method for Simulating Gaseous Phenomena Xiaoming Wei, Student Member, IEEE animation. We introduce the Lattice Boltzmann Model (LBM), which simulates the microscopic movement of fluid in real-time, while still maintaining highly plausible visual details. Index Terms--Lattice Boltzmann

Mueller, Klaus

265

Chapter 7. Renewal Phenomena Renewal is life reborn.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

51 Chapter 7. Renewal Phenomena Renewal is life reborn. 7.1. Definitions and basic concepts. 7. Then, N(t) : t 0, is a renewal process. A mathematical definition: N(t) = max{n : n i=0 Xi t, } where, ...} or continuous: [0, ). Obviously, the path of a renewal process is non-decreasing. The renewal literally means

Chen, Kani

266

Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions CSIRO CSS TCP Detournay (UMN) Eduard Siebrits (SLB) #12;2 Outline · Examples of hydraulic fractures · Governing equations well stimulation Fracturing Fluid Proppant #12;5 Quarries #12;6 Magma flow Tarkastad #12;7 Model EQ 1

Peirce, Anthony

267

Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions SANUM Conference (UMN) Eduard Siebrits (SLB) #12;2 Outline · Examples of hydraulic fractures · Governing equations well stimulation Fracturing Fluid Proppant #12;5 Quarries #12;6 Magma flow Tarkastad #12;7 Model EQ 1

Peirce, Anthony

268

Computational analysis of temperature rise phenomena in electric induction motors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational analysis of temperature rise phenomena in electric induction motors Ying Huai Institute, University of Southern Denmark, Grundvigs Alle 150, Sonderborg, DK-6400, Denmark c Danfoss Drives A/S, Denmark Received 12 October 2002; accepted 20 December 2002 Abstract In developing electric

Melnik, Roderick

269

General Search for New Phenomena in ep Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General Search for New Phenomena in ep Scattering at HERA The IVIIth Rencontres de Moriond on QCD algorithm investigate all final states produced at high PT in ep collisions do not rely on assumptions about 3 General Search @ H1 Data samples HERA I (1992-2000) HERA II (2002-2007) HERA I: e+p dominated (GS

270

Nonlocal collisionless phenomena in Plasmas PPPL, Princeton 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Nonlocal collisionless phenomena in Plasmas PPPL, Princeton 2005 A. Dunaevsky Measurements. of Astrophysical Sciences Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 #12;2 Diagnostics in expanding plasmas" by A. Dunaevsky Princeton 2005 #12;3 Kinetics of expanding plasmaKinetics of expanding plasma Kinetics

Kaganovich, Igor

271

Shooting Methods for Locating Grazing Phenomena in Hybrid Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shooting Methods for Locating Grazing Phenomena in Hybrid Systems Vaibhav Donde Ian A. Hiskens Abstract Hybrid systems are typified by strong coupling between continuous dynamics and discrete events using shooting methods that are applicable for general nonlinear hybrid (piecewise smooth) dynamical

272

Definition: Liquid natural gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Liquid natural gas Liquid natural gas Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Liquid natural gas Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Liquefied natural gas or LNG is natural gas that has been converted to liquid form for ease of storage or transport. Liquefied natural gas takes up about 1/600th the volume of natural gas in the gaseous state. It is odorless, colorless, non-toxic and non-corrosive. Hazards include flammability after vaporization into a gaseous state, freezing and asphyxia. The liquefaction process involves removal of certain components, such as dust, acid gases, helium, water, and heavy hydrocarbons, which could cause difficulty downstream. The natural gas is then condensed into a

273

Implementing DOE guidance for hazards assessments at Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazards Assessments are performed for a variety of activities and facilities at Rocky Flats Plant. Prior to 1991, there was no guidance for performing Hazards Assessments. Each organization that performed Hazards Assessments used its own methodology with no attempt at standardization. In 1991, DOE published guidelines for the performance of Hazards Assessments for Emergency Planning (DOE-EPG-5500.1, ``Guidance for a Hazards Assessment Methodology``). Subsequently, in 1992, DOE published a standard for the performance of Hazards Assessments (DOE-STD-1027-92, ``Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis, Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports``). Although these documents are a step in the direction of standardization, there remains a great deal of interpretation and subjective implementation in the performance of Hazards Assessments. Rocky Flats Plant has initiated efforts to develop a uniform and standard process to be used for Hazards Assessments.

Zimmerman, G.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

McCarthy, T.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

Coyne, Martin J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fiscus, Gregory M. (McMurray, PA); Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

277

Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Idaho National Laboratory, July 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Idaho National Laboratory Idaho National Laboratory May 2011 July 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Results................................................................................................................................................... 3

278

Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Idaho National Laboratory, July 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Idaho National Laboratory Idaho National Laboratory May 2011 July 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Results................................................................................................................................................... 3

279

Eurographics Workshop on Natural Phenomena (2005) E. Galin, P. Poulin (Editors)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

algorithms 1. Introduction Trees and forests covering hills appear to be a strange mate- rial: while or branches on the rear of tree or inside the forest are statistically less visible than front ones, and sometimes one can see deep inside. The volumetric na- ture of the forest `matter' is especially obvious when

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

280

Eurographics Workshop on Natural Phenomena (2005) E. Galin, P. Poulin (Editors)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g. water trans- portation or wind. On the other hand some algorithms gen- erate the eroded terrain from are simply displaced around the actual point if the local inclination is greater than a specified material be dissolved, transported and deposited. Now in the simulation, depending on the local inclination and water

Reiterer, Harald

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality This Act addresses the safe and proper management of hazardous wastes and used oil, the permitting of hazardous waste facilities, and the siting of facilities. The Department of Environmental Quality is authorized to enact regulations pertaining to all aspects of hazardous waste storage and disposal, and the Act addresses permitting requirements for disposal

283

Burning hazardous waste in cement kilns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cement manufacturing process is one of the oldest in the world, having been in practice for over 2000 years. It is also one of the most energy intensive, with up to 65 percent of the cost of the product attributable to energy consumption. In addition to high energy demand, the process conditions include extremely high temperatures. Cement clinker forms when the correct mixture of raw materials is heated to 2650/sup 0/ F. This requires combustion temperatures exceeding 3000/sup 0/ F. under oxidizing conditions. To accomplish this, gas temperatures above 2000/sup 0/ F. occur for several seconds (typically five seconds), which is much longer than residence times in permitted hazardous waste incinerators. These conditions are extremely favorable to the destruction of organic compounds and have led to extensive investigation into the potential for burning hazardous waste in cement kilns. Cement kilns consuming hazardous wastes have been tested for air emissions under various operating conditions. The substantial body of information on the emissions and handling of hazardous wastes from these studies has demonstrated that effective destruction of wastes can be accomplished with the added benefits of energy conservation and no significant change in air emissions.

Chadbourne, J.F.; Helmsteller, A.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Appendix B: Wastes and Potential Hazards for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

muds and other drilling wastes 01 05 05* oil-containing drilling muds and wastes M Oil-containing muds or their compounds and should be considered under the following hazards: H5 to H7, H10, H11, or H14. 01 05 drilling and wastes should be assessed on the basis of the concentration of oil present in the waste. Typically

Siddharthan, Advaith

285

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Herrmann, 1981) and secondary oil recovery in western Colorado at the Rangely oil field (Gibbs et al. 1973COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 John D. Godchaux Trinity University, San Antonio, TX Noah

Sheehan, Anne F.

286

Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Control Of Hazardous Energy Lockout/Tagout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control Of Hazardous Energy Lockout/Tagout Millersville University - Office Of Environmental Health & Safety Scope & Application The Lockout/Tagout program applies to the control of energy during servicing of this program is to establish procedures for affixing appropriate lockout or tagout devices to energy

Hardy, Christopher R.

288

Hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently evaluating hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation technologies in existence and under development to determine applicability to remediation needs of the DOE facilities under the Albuquerque Operations Office and to determine areas of research need. To assist LANL is this effort, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) conducted an assessment of technologies and monitoring methods that have been demonstrated or are under development. The focus of this assessment is to: (1) identify existing technologies for hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation of old waste sites; (2) identify technologies under development and the status of the technology; (3) assess new technologies that need development to provide adequate hazardous waste treatment and remedial action technologies for DOD and DOE sites; and (4) identify hazardous waste and remediation problems for environmental research and development. There are currently numerous research and development activities underway nationwide relating to environmental contaminants and the remediation of waste sites. To perform this effort, SAIC evaluated current technologies and monitoring methods development programs in EPA, DOD, and DOE, as these are the primary agencies through which developmental methods are being demonstrated. This report presents this evaluation and provides recommendations as to pertinent research needs or activities to address waste site contamination problems. The review and assessment have been conducted at a programmatic level; site-specific and contaminant-specific evaluations are being performed by LANL staff as a separate, related activity.

Not Available

1989-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

289

Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - agency listed hazardous Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Listing of Hazardous Waste 40 CFR... Hazardous Waste Management Regulations 6 NYCRR 371 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste 6 NYCRR 372... Substance Bulk Storage...

291

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... CHOOSING an awkward moment, Phillips Petroleum Exploration have announced a new find of natural ...naturalgas ...

1967-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

292

Single channel flow blockage accident phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) for the advanced Candu reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Candu Reactor (ACRTM) is an evolutionary advancement of the current Candu 6{sup R} reactor, aimed at producing electrical power for a capital cost and at a unit-energy cost significantly less than that of the current reactor designs. The ACR retains the modular concept of horizontal fuel channels surrounded by a heavy water moderator, as with all Candu reactors. However, ACR uses slightly enriched uranium (SEU) fuel, compared to the natural uranium used in Candu 6. This achieves the twin goals of improved economics (e.g., via reductions in the heavy water requirements and the use of a light water coolant), as well as improved safety. This paper documents the results of Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) results for a very limited frequency, beyond design basis event of the ACR design. This PIRT is developed in a highly structured process of expert elicitation that is well supported by experimental data and analytical results. The single-channel flow blockage event in an ACR reactor assumes a severe flow blockage of one of the reactor fuel channels, which leads to a reduction of the flow in the affected channel, leading to fuel cladding and fuel temperature increase. The paper outlines the design characteristics of the ACR reactor that impact the PIRT process and computer code applicability. It also describes the flow blockage phenomena, lists all components and systems that have an important role during the event, discusses the PIRT process and results, and presents the finalized PIRT tables. (authors)

Popov, N.K.; Abdul-Razzak, A.; Snell, V.G.; Langman, V. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada); Sills, H. [Consultant, Deep River, Ontario (Canada)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

ESM of Ionic and Electrochemical Phenomena on the Nanoscale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of energy storage and conversion devices is ultimately controlled by series of intertwined ionic and electronic transport processes and electrochemical reactions at surfaces and interfaces, strongly mediated by strain and mechanical processes [1-4]. In a typical fuel cell, these include chemical species transport in porous cathode and anode materials, gas-solid electrochemical reactions at grains and triple-phase boundaries (TPBs), ionic and electronic flows in multicomponent electrodes, and chemical and electronic potential drops at internal interfaces in electrodes and electrolytes. All these phenomena are sensitively affected by the microstructure of materials from device level to the atomic scales as illustrated in Fig. 1. Similar spectrum of length scales and phenomena underpin operation of other energy systems including primary and secondary batteries, as well as hybrid systems such flow and metal-air/water batteries.

Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Kumar, Amit [Pennsylvania State University; Balke, Nina [ORNL; McCorkle, Morgan L [ORNL; Guo, Senli [ORNL; Arruda, Thomas M [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches November 1, 2013 - 8:45am Addthis Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, requires all DOE Federal and contractor employees with hazardous chemicals in their workplaces to complete new Hazard Communication Standard Training. The major changes to the standard include hazard classification, labeling, Safety Data Sheets, information and training. In order to assist you with meeting this deadline, training materials can be found at: http://orise.orau.gov/ihos/hottopics/training.htm; or http://efcog.org/wg/esh_cslm/index.htm The Hazard Communication Standard can be found at: https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/ghs-final-rule.html

295

Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24-27 Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24-27 Bomb squads compete in timed scenarios at Los...

296

ORISE Resources: Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

partners with CDC to develop Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment to identify gaps in planning efforts The Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment, or HAH, is designed to help...

297

ARM 17-53 - Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: ARM 17-53 - Hazardous WasteLegal Abstract Sets forth rules...

298

EPA Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting Process | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting Process Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting...

299

Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact Sheet | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact SheetLegal Abstract Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact Sheet,...

300

6 CCR 1007-3: Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1007-3: Hazardous Waste Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 6 CCR 1007-3: Hazardous WasteLegal Abstract This...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ADEQ Managing Hazardous Waste Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste Handbook Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: ADEQ Managing Hazardous Waste HandbookLegal Abstract...

302

EPA Hazardous Waste TSDF Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: EPA Hazardous Waste TSDF GuideLegal Abstract Guidance document prepared by the EPA for hazardous waste...

303

EM Eliminates Potential Safety Hazard at SRS | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Potential Safety Hazard at SRS EM Eliminates Potential Safety Hazard at SRS September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Shown here is H-Canyon, where workers recently dissolved the last...

304

Application of release rate data to hazard load calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The author illustrates methods of applying heat, smoke and toxic gas release rate data to calculating fire hazard loading values.

Edwin E. Smith

1974-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Mapping future hazards for south east London Dr Stephen Blenkinsop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Vulnerability information Risk maps #12;Heat Outputs · 5km heat wave prediction grids. · 1km pro-rata disaggregated temperature & heat wave projection grids. · 1km relative heat wave hazard grid combining heat wave hazard (relative). · 200m heat wave risk grids combining relative heat wave hazard with predictions

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

306

Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination.

Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination. 1 fig.

Ramirez, A.L.; Cooper, J.F.; Daily, W.D.

1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

308

Identifying Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Root Out Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards Root Out Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards For many Americans, working outdoors on the lawn and in the garden is a great way to exercise and relax. However, safety experts warn that, if caution is not employed with lawn and garden tools, you could wind up spending more time indoors, starting with a trip to a hospital emergency room. "The most frequent injuries are from lawn mowers, which are unforgiving machines," cautions John Drengenberg, manager of Consumer Affairs for Underwriters Laboratories Inc., Northbrook, Ill., a not-for-profit product safety testing organization. "Statistics tell us that each year lawn mower accidents send close to 85,000 people to emergency rooms. But that's not all. Nearly 15,000 others need medical treatment for injuries from trimmers and other power garden

309

Experiment Hazard Class 2 - Cryogenic Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 - Cryogenic Systems 2 - Cryogenic Systems Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving the use of cryogenic systems. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements General requirements The use of detectors/alarms, warning signs, and adequate ventilation are recommended for areas where release of a cryogen can result in an oxygen-deficient atmosphere. Cryogenic systems and vessels are always insulated to reduce heat exchange and are labeled with the common name of the cryogen. Cryogenic systems are pressure protected and equipment are insptected and maintained. The use of flammable cryogens requires technical consultation. Initial consultation may be obtained from the divisional ESH Coordinator. A written emergency evacuation response plan must be available

310

Hazard Analysis Reports for Nuclear Explosive Operations  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NA-STD-3016-2006 NA-STD-3016-2006 May 2006 DOE LIMITED STANDARD HAZARD ANALYSIS REPORTS FOR NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE OPERATIONS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-NA-STD-3016-2006 iii FORWARD This Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) technical standard is approved for use by the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Application and Stockpile Operations (NA-12), and is available for use to prepare Nuclear Explosive Operation (NEO) Hazard Analysis Reports (HARs) as required by 10 CFR 830, "Nuclear Safety Management." This Standard is

311

Radioactivity in mushrooms: A health hazard?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Mushrooms are a complementary foodstuff and considered to be consumed locally. The demand for mushrooms has increased in recent years, and the mushroom trade is becoming global. Mushroom origin is frequently obscured from the consumer. Mushrooms are considered excellent bioindicators of environmental pollution. The accumulation of radionuclides by mushrooms, which are then consumed by humans or livestock, can pose a radiological hazard. Many studies have addressed the radionuclide content in mushrooms, almost exclusively the radiocaesium content. There is a significant lack of data about their content from some of the main producer countries. An exhaustive review was carried out in order to identify which radionuclide might constitute a health hazard, and the factors conditioning it. Regulatory values for the different radionuclides were used. The worldwide range for radiocaesium, 226Ra, 210Pb, and 210Po surpasses those values. Appropriate radiological protection requires that the content of those radionuclides in mushrooms should be monitored.

J. Guillén; A. Baeza

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The HIT method: A hazard identification technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explains a technique for analyzing systems and operations to identify hazards and needed controls. The HIT method can be used both as a design tool and as a risk analysis tool. As a design tool, this method identifies requirements for design criteria. As part of a risk analysis effort, HIT identifies potential accident sequences that can become part of the safety analysis documentation. Within this report the HIT method is described in detail with emphasis on application of the technique.

Howard, H.H.; Faust, C.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOT/PHMSA DOT/PHMSA A ti iti Activities Michael Conroy U S Department of Transportation - 1 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Radioactive Materials U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Overview * Harmonization with International Regulations * Update on Revisions to International Regulations * Recent Letters of Interpretation * Update on Rulemakings * PHMSA Information Resources - 2 - * PHMSA Information Resources 2 U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration HM-230 Harmonized with 2000 Version of IAEA's 1996 Edition - 3 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

314

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response. This model has been adopted and applied to work for response to transportation accidents involving radioactive material or other hazardous materials incidents Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure.docx More Documents & Publications Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

315

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Grant Program Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act tasks the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection with regulating hazardous waste. The department is charged with siting, review, permitting and development of hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities in order to protect public health and safety, foster economic growth and protect the environment. Pennsylvania law establishes a fund to provide to the Department the

316

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Siting of Industrial 1: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used for the purpose of treating, storing, compacting, recycling, exchanging or disposing of industrial hazardous waste materials, including treatment, compacting,

317

Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

Unger, Samuel L. (Los Angeles, CA); Telles, Rodney W. (Alhambra, CA); Lubowitz, Hyman R. (Rolling Hills Estates, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Effects of oceanic and atmospheric phenomena on precipitation and flooding in the Manafwa River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation was performed to determine the relationship between certain oceanic and atmospheric phenomena and the precipitation patterns in the Manafwa River Basin of eastern Uganda. Such phenomena are the El Niño ...

Finney, William W., III (William Warner)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality A hazardous waste facility permit from the Department of Environmental Quality is required to store, treat or dispose of hazardous waste materials, or to construct, own or operate any facility engaged in the operation of storing, treating or disposing of hazardous waste or storing recyclable materials. The Department shall not issue a permit for the treatment, disposal or temporary storage of any liquid hazardous waste in a

320

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Experiment Hazard Class 10.2 - UV Light  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 - Ultraviolet Light 2 - Ultraviolet Light Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving the use of ultraviolet radiation generating equipment.Ultraviolet light (UV) is non-ionizing radiation in the 180 to 400-nanometer wavelength region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Ultraviolet light poses hazards: Eyes hazards - inflammation, cataracts, retinal damage Skin hazards - sunburn, accelerate wrinkling, increased risk of skin cancer Invisible Possible ozone generation Experiment Category Experiments involving only experiment hazard class 10.2 qualify for medium risk. The addition of other hazard classes may require the experiment to be categorized as high risk and undergo additional reviews. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Shield or contain UV as close to the source as

322

Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

Gray, P. [ed.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Thermomagnetic phenomena in the mixed state of high temperature superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Galvano- and thermomagnetic-phenomena in high temperature superconductors, based on kinetic coefficients, are discussed, along with a connection between the electric field and the heat flow in superconductor mixed state. The relationship that determines the transport coefficients of high temperature superconductors in the mixed state based on Seebeck and Nernst effects is developed. It is shown that this relationship is true for a whole transition region of the resistive mixed state of a superconductor. Peltier, Ettingshausen and Righi-Leduc effects associated with heat conductivity as related to high temperature superconductors are also addressed.

Meilikhov, E.Z.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

MAGNETIC QUANTUM TUNNELING AND RELATED PHENOMENA IN SINGLE MOLECULE MAGNETS Presentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAGNETIC QUANTUM TUNNELING AND RELATED PHENOMENA IN SINGLE MOLECULE MAGNETS Presentation A A A A A A MAGNETIC QUANTUM TUNNELING AND RELATED PHENOMENA IN SINGLE MOLECULE MAGNETS MAGNETIC QUANTUM TUNNELING AND RELATED PHENOMENA IN SINGLE MOLECULE MAGNETS ENRIQUE DEL BARCOENRIQUE DEL BARCO Physics Department - New

del Barco, Enrique

325

Method and apparatus for using hazardous waste form non-hazardous aggregate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an apparatus for converting hazardous waste into non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregate, the apparatus. It comprises: a source of particulate solid materials, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products; oxidizing means comprising at least one refractory-lined, water-cooled, metal-walled vessel; means for introducing the particulate solid material, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products to the oxidizing means; means for inducing combustion in the oxidizing means, the heat of combustion forming molten slag and noncombustible fines from noncombustible material; means for accumulating the slag; means for introducing the noncombustible fines to the molten slag; means for removing the mixture from the apparatus; and means for cooling the mixture to form the non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregates.

Kent, J.M.; Robards, H.L. Jr.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

326

Nanofiltration of hazardous Congo red dye: Performance and flux decline analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effectiveness of nanofiltration (NF) for dye wastewater treatment has been well established. However, detailed study on the fouling phenomena during the NF of dye is still limited. This paper provides the understanding on the performance and fouling phenomena of the polypiperazine amide nanofiltration (PA–NF) membrane for the treatment of hazardous Congo red (CR) dye. The 20 mg L?1 dye at pH 9 was successfully 100% removed with minimum flux decline under the specific conditions: room temperature (25 °C) and trans-membrane pressure 5 bar. In addition, the membrane retained more Na2SO4 (62–91%) than NaCl (14–31%), owing to the ion size and negative charges on the membrane surface. The experimental results showed that fouling was the significant reason of the membrane flux decline which principally caused by the favourable/irreversible adsorption. Mechanisms of the PA–NF membrane fouling were investigated using the linearized forms according to Wiesner and Aptel equations. It had been found that the fouling mechanisms were influenced by the solution pH and concentration. Under 20 mg L?1 of initial CR concentration at pH 9, the decline of permeate flux was due to standard blocking mechanism during the initial filtration. The cake formation took place rapidly at the second stage of filtration which contributed to the relatively constant permeate flux decline.

Nur Hanis Hayati Hairom; Abdul Wahab Mohammad; Abdul Amir Hassan Kadhum

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

An investigation of the creep phenomena exhibited by Solenhofen limestone, halite, and cement under medium confining pressures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BY SOLENHOFEN LIMESTONE, HALITE, AND CFMI-NT UNDFR MEPIUI CONFINING PRESSURES A THESIS Bv HALCOMBE A. KENDALL A PPROVEO AS TO STYLE AND CONTENT BY AIRMAN OF COMM TTEE EAD OF PEPARTMENT ~M* 19 8 A BSTRACT TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE 1 INTRODUCT ION... SPECI'i NS. . FIGURE 9 . FAILURE OF HALITE CRYSTALS . . ABSTRACT THE DYNAMICS OF THE CREEP PHENOMENA OF ROCKS I S KNOWN TO BE INTER RELATED WI TH THE NATURAL ENVIROMENTAL COND IT IONG FOUND DEEP IN THE CRUST OF THE EARTH ~ AHONG THESE COND I...

Kendall, Halcombe Augustus

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

328

Hydrates represent gas source, drilling hazard  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas hydrates look like ordinary ice. However, if a piece of such ice is put into warm water its behavior will be different from the ordinary melting of normal ice. In contrast, gas hydrates cause bubbles in the warm water, which indicates the high content of gas in the hydrate crystals. The presence of four components is required: gas itself, water, high pressure, and low temperature. The paper discusses how hydrates form, hydrates stability, South Caspian hydrates, and hydrates hazards for people, ships, pipelines, and drilling platforms.

Bagirov, E. [Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Lerche, I. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Animals as sentinels of environmental health hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Committee on Animals as Monitors of Environmental Hazards was formed when the Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry requested that the National Academy of Sciences gather an NRC committee to review and evaluate the usefulness of animal epidemiologic studies for human risk assessment and recommend the types of data that should be collected. With specific questions in mind, the committee attempted to determine how animals could be used for ecological and human health risk determinations as well as to provide an early-warning system for risk assessment and management.

Glickman, L.T.; Fairbrother, A.; Guarino, A.M.; Bergman, H.L.; Buck, W.B.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Uncertainty methodology for the strongly coupled physical phenomena associated with annular flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Best-Estimate plus Uncertainty (BEPU) methods are slowly supplanting the use of deterministic analysis methods for thermal-hydraulic analyses. As the uncertainty methodologies evolve it is expected that, where both experimental techniques allow and data are available, there will be a shift to quantifying the uncertainty in increasingly more fundamental parameters. For example, for annular flow in a three-field analysis environment (vapor, liquid film, droplet), the driving parameters would be: a) film interfacial shear stress, b) droplet drag, c) droplet entrainment rate and d) droplet deposition rate. An improved annular flow modeling package was recently developed and implemented in an in-house version of the COBRA-TF best-estimate subchannel analysis tool (Lane, 2009). Significant improvement was observed in the code-to-data predictions of several steam-water annular flow tests following the implementation of this modeling package; however, to apply this model set in formal BEPU analysis requires uncertainty distributions to be determined. The unique aspect of annular flow, and the topic of the present work, is the strong coupling between the interfacial drag, entrainment and deposition phenomena. Ideally the uncertainty in each phenomenon would be isolated; however, the situation is further complicated by an inability to experimentally isolate and measure the individual rate processes (particularly entrainment rate), which results in available experimental data that are inherently integral in nature. This paper presents a methodology for isolating the individual physical phenomena of interest, to the extent that the currently available experimental data allow, and developing the corresponding uncertainty distributions for annular flow. (authors)

Lane, J. W.; Aumiller Jr, D. L. [Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Base catalyzed decomposition of toxic and hazardous chemicals. [Final report, September 4, 1990--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are vast amounts of toxic and hazardous chemicals, which have pervaded our environment during the past fifty years, leaving us with serious, crucial problems of remediation and disposal. The accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), ``dioxins`` and pesticides in soil sediments and living systems is a serious problem that is receiving considerable attention concerning the cancer-causing nature of these synthetic compounds.US EPA scientists developed in 1989 and 1990 two novel chemical Processes to effect the dehalogenation of chlorinated solvents, PCBs, PCDDs, PCDFs, PCP and other pollutants in soil, sludge, sediment and liquids. This improved technology employs hydrogen as a nucleophile to replace halogens on halogenated compounds. Hydrogen as nucleophile is not influenced by steric hinderance as with other nucleophile where complete dehalogenation of organohalogens can be achieved. This report discusses catalyzed decomposition of toxic and hazardous chemicals.

Rogers, C.J.; Kornel, A.; Sparks, H.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Model for quantitative risk assessment on naturally ventilated metering-regulation stations for natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper presents a model for quantitative risk assessment on metering stations and metering-regulation stations for natural gas with natural ventilation. The model enables the assessment of risk for people who live in the vicinity of these stations and complements the existing models for risk assessment on natural gas pipelines. It is based on risk assessment methods suggested in relevant guides, recommendations and standards. Explosion and jet fire are considered as major hazardous events and are modelled according to analytical models and empirical data. Local or other accessible databases are used for modelling of event frequencies and ignition probabilities. A case study on a sample station is carried out. For each hazardous event, fault tree and event tree analysis is performed. Results show influence of each hazardous event on the whole risk relative to the distance from the hazardous source. Ventilation is found to be a significant factor in determination of risk magnitude; its influence on individual risk is presented in a quantitative way. The model should be of use for pipeline operators as well as for environmental- and urban planners.

Tom Bajcar; Franc Cimerman; Brane Širok

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Experiment Hazard Class 5.3 High Pressure Vessels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 High Pressure Vessels 3 High Pressure Vessels Applicability This hazard classification applies to working with pressure vessels and systems. Other hazard classifications and associated controls may apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls are catergorized as medium risk experiments. Experiments involving new equipment, processes or materials, or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk experiments. Hazard Control Plan Verification Statements Engineered Controls - The establishment of applicable controls in accordance with the (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) ASME Boiler and Pressure Code, ASME B.31 Piping Code and applicable federal, state, and local codes. Verify vessel is stampled with ASME Code Symbol or allowable

334

Experiment Hazard Class 13.0 - High Voltage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3.0 - High Voltage 3.0 - High Voltage Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving the use of High Voltage Equipment. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. The inspection of electric equipment is covered under the APS Policy For User Electric Equipment Inspections. NOTE: Unless required Argonne training has been completed, users are not authorized to perform electrical work. Experiment Category All Hazard Class 13 experiments are categorized as medium risk experiments. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Determined by review and results of a DEEI inspection of the equipment. Procedural Controls - Determined by review and results of a DEEI

335

Experiment Hazard Class 7.2 - BSL - 2 Biohazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 - BSL-2 Biohazards 2 - BSL-2 Biohazards Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments requiring Biosafety Level 2 (BSL-2) precautions. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiments involving human subjects/materials or living animals, even if not biohazardous, are included in this Hazard Class. Biosafety Level 2 is similar to Biosafety Level 1 and is suitable for work involving agents of moderate potential hazard to personnel and the environment. It differs from BSL-1 in that (1) laboratory personnel have specific training in handling pathogenic agents and are directed by competent scientists; (2) access to the laboratory is limited when work is being conducted; (3) extreme precautions are taken with contaminated sharp

336

EA-0688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, 688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas EA-0688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct the Hazardous Waste Staging Facility that would help to alleviate capacity problems as well as provide a single compliant facility to stage wastes at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD January 29, 1993 EA-0688: Finding of No Significant Impact Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas January 29, 1993 EA-0688: Final Environmental Assessment Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

337

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless April 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns hazardous waste into harmless end-products. Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns

338

Natural radioactivity measurements in rock samples of Cuihua Mountain National Geological Park, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......samples were stored in gas-tight, radon impermeable...concentrations of the natural radionuclides 226Ra...radiation hazard indices from natural radioactivity of some...radioactive samples from Cyprus characteristic geological...Matiullah, Kenawy M. A. Natural radioactivity in marble......

Xinwei Lu; Xiaolan Zhang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Resilience-Based design of Natural Gas Pipelines G. P. Cimellaro, O. Villa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resilience-Based design of Natural Gas Pipelines G. P. Cimellaro, O. Villa Department of Structural systems. No models are available in literature to measure the performance of natural gas network of natural or manmade hazard which might lead to the disruption of the system. The gas distribution network

Bruneau, Michel

340

Fire hazard analysis for the fuel supply shutdown storage buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of a fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire and other perils within individual fire areas in a DOE facility in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection, are met. This Fire Hazards Analysis was prepared as required by HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazards Analysis Requirements, (Reference 7) for a portion of the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility.

REMAIZE, J.A.

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

HAZARD CATEGORIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION SITES AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration activities, defined here as work to identify and characterize contaminated sites and then contain, treat, remove or dispose of the contamination, now comprises a significant fraction of work in the DOE complex. As with any other DOE activity, a safety analysis must be in place prior to commencing restoration. The rigor and depth of this safety analysis is in part determined by the site's hazard category. This category in turn is determined by the facility's hazardous material inventory and the consequences of its release. Progressively more complicated safety analyses are needed as a facility's hazard category increases from radiological to hazard category three (significant local releases) to hazard category two (significant on-site releases). Thus, a facility's hazard category plays a crucial early role in helping to determine the level of effort devoted to analysis of the facility's individual hazards. Improper determination of the category can result in either an inadequate safety analysis in the case of underestimation of the hazard category, or an unnecessarily cumbersome analysis in the case of overestimation. Contaminated sites have been successfully categorized and safely restored or remediated at the former DOE production site at Hanford, Washington. This paper discusses various means used to categorize former plutonium production or support sites at Hanford. Both preliminary and final hazard categorization is discussed. The importance of the preliminary (initial) hazard categorization in guiding further DOE involvement and approval of the safety analyses is discussed. Compliance to DOE direction provided in ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'', DOE-STD-1027-92, is discussed. DOE recently issued 10 CFR 830, Subpart B which codifies previous DOE safety analysis guidance and orders. The impact of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B on hazard categorization is also discussed.

BISHOP, G.E.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY Project 39GF71024-GPDI21000000 . PANTEX PLANT AMARILLO, TEXAS DOE/EA-0688 JUNE 1993 MASTER DiSTRiBUTiON OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLIMITEI) ffrl TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 1.0 Need for Action 1 2.0 Description of Proposed Facility Action 3.0 Location of the Action 8 4.0 Alternatives to Proposed Action 9 4.1 No Action 9 4.2 Redesign and Modify Existing staging Facilities 9 4.3 Use Other Existing Space at Pantex Plant 9 4.4 Use Temporary Structures 9 4.5 Stage Waste at Other Sites 10 4.6 Stage Wastes Separately 10 5.0 Environmental Impacts of Proposed Action 10 5.1 Archeology 10 5.2 FloodplainlW etlands 10 5.3 Threatened and Endangered Species 10 5.4 Surrounding La,nd Use 11 5.5 Construction 11 5.6 Air Emissions 11

343

Rapid guide to hazardous air pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concise and easy to use, this book brings together a wealth of hard-to-gather information in one compact pocket guide. It offers--in alphabetical order--detailed profiles of the 189 elements and compounds determined to be hazardous air pollutants by the 1990 Amendments of the Clean Air Act. The profile for each pollutant includes: fundamental identification data (CAS number, molecular formula, formula weight, synonyms); uses (primarily in the manufacture of chemicals and as a component in the manufacturing process); physical properties (such as boiling point, density, vapor pressures, color); chemical properties (such as air/water reactivity, reactivity with skin or metal, flash point, heat of combustion); health risks, including toxic exposure guidelines, toxicity data, and acute and chronic risks; hazard risks (the substance`s potential for accidents, fires, explosions, corrosion, and chemical incompatibility); exposure routes tracking the activities, environment, sources, and occupations that tend to lead to exposure; regulatory status, listing the primary laws and citations of regulated chemicals; and important additional information on symptoms, first aid, firefighting methods, protective equipment, and safe storage.

Beim, H.J.; Spero, J.; Theodore, L.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Method and apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An incineration apparatus and method for disposal of infectious hazardous waste including a fluidized bed reactor containing a bed of granular material. The reactor includes a first chamber, a second chamber, and a vertical partition separating the first and second chambers. A pressurized stream of air is supplied to the reactor at a sufficient velocity to fluidize the granular material in both the first and second chambers. Waste materials to be incinerated are fed into the first chamber of the fluidized bed, the fine waste materials being initially incinerated in the first chamber and subsequently circulated over the partition to the second chamber wherein further incineration occurs. Coarse waste materials are removed from the first chamber, comminuted, and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. Any partially incinerated waste materials and ash from the bottom of the second chamber are removed and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. This process is repeated until all infectious hazardous waste has been completely incinerated.

Korenberg, Jacob (York, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Accurate Numerical Simulations Of Chemical Phenomena Involved in Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Visualization of the spin density from the excess electron cluster. Robert Visualization of the spin density from the excess electron cluster. Robert Harrison Accurate Numerical Simulations Of Chemical Phenomena Involved in Energy Production and Storage with MADNESS and MPQC PI Name: Robert Harrison PI Email: harrisonrj@ornl.gov Institution: ORNL Allocation Program: ESP Allocation Hours at ALCF: 150 Million Year: 2010 to 2013 Research Domain: Chemistry Researchers propose to focus on the problems of catalysis and heavy element chemistry for fuel reprocessing-both of which are of immediate interest to the Department of Energy (DOE), are representative of a very broad class of problems in chemistry, and demand the enormous computational resources anticipated from the next generation of leadership computing facilities. Also common to both is the need for accurate electronic structure

346

Thermodynamics and Transport Phenomena in High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high temperature process heat. The overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. An overview of high temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic thermodynamics, experimental methods, heat and mass transfer phenomena, and computational fluid dynamics modeling.

James E. O'Brien

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Key Thermal Fluid Phenomena In Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several types of gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been suggested as part of the international Generation IV initiative with the proposed NGNP (Next Generation Nuclear Plant) as one of the main concepts [MacDonald et al., 2003]. Meaningful studies for these designs will require accurate, reliable predictions of material temperatures to evaluate the material capabilities; these temperatures depend on the thermal convection in the core and in other important components. Some of these reactors feature complex geometries and wide ranges of temperatures, leading to significant variations of the gas thermodynamic and transport properties plus possible effects of buoyancy during normal and reduced power operations and loss-of-flow (LOFA) and loss-of-coolant scenarios. Potential issues identified to date include ''hot streaking'' in the lower plenum evolving from ''hot channels'' in prismatic cores. In order to predict thermal hydraulic behavior of proposed designs effectively and efficiently, it is useful to identify the dominant phenomena occurring.

D. M. McEligot; G. E. McCreery; P. D. Bayless; T. D. Marshall

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) 8 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department for Environmental Protection This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions for storage, treatment, recycling, or disposal of hazardous waste. It provides information about permits and specific requirements for containers, tanks,

349

Chapter 32 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste 2 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky) Chapter 32 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department for Environmental Protection This administrative regulation establishes procedures to establish the applicable general provisions for generators of hazardous waste. It also

350

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This section describes standards that must be met by facilities generating and processing hazardous and industrial waste, as well as required permits for the construction and operation of such a facility. The statute also

351

Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Transportation of hazardous wastes into or through the State of Connecticut requires a permit. Some exceptions apply. The regulations provide

352

Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations [Nuclear Waste Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Safety Analysis, Hazard Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Modeling and analysis Unit Process Modeling Mass Tracking System Software Waste Form Performance Modeling Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Development, Design, Operation Overview Systems and Components Development Expertise System Engineering Design Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Waste Management using Electrometallurgical Technology Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Bookmark and Share NE Division personnel had a key role in the creation of the FCF Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), FCF Technical Safety Requirements (TSR)

353

Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Environmental Quality These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to hazardous waste management, waste standards, permitting requirements, and land disposal restrictions

354

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider District Department of the Environment This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces

355

Hazardous Waste Management (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Hazardous Waste Management (North Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting The Department of Health is the designated agency to administer and coordinate a hazardous waste management program to provide for the reduction of hazardous waste generation, reuse, recovery, and treatment as

356

Thermal radiation hazards associated with marine LNG spills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estimates of hazardous distances associated with a vapor cloud resulting from a major LNG ship accident have been based on predictions...

James H. Stannard Jr.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities Andrew Maham, Tom Houston, Carl J. Costantino DOE NPH Meeting, Germantown, MD October 2014

358

South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health and Environmental Control is authorized to promulgate rules and regulations to prevent exposure of persons, animals, or the environment to hazardous waste. The construction...

359

Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Honolulu Port Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Available for Download On March 13, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar...

360

EIS-0286: Hanford Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement (HSW EIS) analyzes the proposed waste management practices at the Hanford Site.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Dust: A major environmental hazard on the earth's moon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the Earth's Moon, obvious hazards to humans and machines are created by extreme temperature fluctuations, low gravity, and the virtual absence of any atmosphere. The most important other environmental factor is ionizing radiation. Less obvious environmental hazards that must be considered before establishing a manned presence on the lunar surface are the hazards from micrometeoroid bombardment, the nuisance of electro-statically-charged lunar dust, and an alien visual environment without familiar clues. Before man can establish lunar bases and lunar mining operations, and continue the exploration of that planet, we must develop a means of mitigating these hazards. 4 refs.

Heiken, G.; Vaniman, D.; Lehnert, B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

for NNSA's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control Events at...

363

Chapter 31 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions necessary for identification and listing of a hazardous waste. The regulation also establishes the criteria for identifying the...

364

Title 40 CFR 261 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste (2014). Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTitle40CFR261IdentificationandListingofHazardousWaste&oldid793417" Categories: References...

365

Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Download On March 13, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter Sandia developed the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool...

366

Program Review, Workplace Inspections, Hazards Analysis And Abatement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document provides guidance information and suggested procedures for performing program review, workplace inspections, hazards analysis, and abatement, successfully at DOE Federal employee worksites.

367

Fees For Disposal Of Hazardous Waste Or Substances (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The article lists annual payments to be made to counties, restrictions on disposal of hazardous waste, additional fees collected by counties and penalties.

368

Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and the Transport of Hazardous Materials More Documents & Publications The Role of GIS in Decision Support Systems Section 180(c) Ad Hoc Working Group Transportation Plan Ad...

369

CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4, 2007 Hazardous Waste Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-30) This Criteria Review and Approach Document (HSS CRAD...

370

EPA Hazardous Waste Generators Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generators Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Hazardous Waste Generators Website Abstract This webpage provides general...

371

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

evidence to suggest that particle aggregation is particularly successful in removing glass shards with high surface areasmass ratios. The primary atmospheric hazard of...

372

Consumer perspectives on household hazardous waste management in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We give an overview of the management systems of household hazardous waste (HHW) in Japan and discuss the management systems and their...

Misuzu Asari; Shin-ichi Sakai

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Title 40 CFR 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal...

374

Criteria for Selection of Seed Motions to Envelop Design Response Spectra  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Criteria for Selection of Seed Motions to Envelop Design Response Spectra DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Workshop October 25, 2011 Michael Costantino, Thomas Houston, Greg Mertz, Andrew Maham

375

A Method for Evaluating Fire After Earthquake Scenarios for Single...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Evaluating Fire After Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings Authors: Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell Intended Use: Handout for DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Workshop,...

376

A Method for Evaluating Fire after Earthquake Scenarios for Single...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Method for Evaluating Fire After Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell, LANL U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Workshop...

377

A Method for Evaluating Fire After Earthquake Scenarios for Single...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Method for Evaluating Fire After Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell, LANL U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Workshop...

378

Keeping ISRS Within Reason  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Keeping ISRS Within Reason Abe Lynn and Loring Wylie Degenkolb Engineers 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 21-22, 2014

379

Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant More Documents & Publications Briefing: DOE EM ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop...

380

Facility Safety Policy, Guidance & Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and System Engineer Program. DOE ORDER (O) 252.1A, TECHNICAL STANDARDS PROGRAM DOE O 252.1A promotes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Verification Method for SSI Problems with Extended Parameter Ranges  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Verification Method for SSI Problems with Extended Parameter Ranges 2014 U.S. DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting Carl J. Costantino and Associates www.cjcassoc.com

382

Natural Resource Damage Assessment Cooperation and Integration  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq., Executive Order 12580, and CERCLA's implementing regulations in the National Contingency Plan (NCP), 40 CFR Part 300, give the DOE three roles at DOE facilities undergoing environmental cleanup: lead response agency, natural resource trustee, and the party responsible for releases and threatened releases of hazardous substances. Does not cancel other directives.

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

natural gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

natural gasoline, condensate, distillate [Liquid hydrocarbons, generally clear or pale straw-coloured and of high API gravity (above 6o°), that are produced with wet gas] ? Gasbenzin n, Gasolin n ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 400  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References DC Power Supplies DC voltages < 72 Volts DC currents < 450 Amps Lifting < 75 lbs Supplies mounted in NEMA enclosures Rack doors locked Power source signage 120/208 VAC covered Emergency stop buttons Flashing strobes LOTO 1,7 31020101-00025 3108-00006 310202-00089 3102-00064 2202-00006 Power Supplies Hot Work Permits 6, 7 NA NA NA A ASD108/400 Hi Power DC Power Supply DC voltages < 72 Volts DC currents < 2600 Amps AC voltages < 600 Volts Supplies built in NEMA enclosures

385

Mr. James Bearzi, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carlsbad Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 October 12, 2010 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Notification of Results of Evaluation of Sampling Line Loss, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number NM4890139088 - TSDF Dear Mr. Bearzi: As required under Permit Condition IV.F.5.e, the Permittees are hereby notifying the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) of the results of the evaluation of the loss of two hydrogen and methane monitoring sampling lines. The sampling lines involved were in Panel 3 Rooms 7 and 6. These lines are identified as 7E (exhaust side) and 61 (inlet side). These line losses were previously reported to the NMED on September 2, 2010 and September 28, 2010, respectively.

386

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 420  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20 20 Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References DC Power Supplies DC voltages < 300 Volts DC currents < 500 Amps AC voltages < 600 Volts Lifting < 350 lbs Supplies mounted in relay racks Rack doors locked or bolted closed Power source signage 120/208/480 VAC covered Lifting fixture Emergency stop buttons Flashing strobes LOTO 1, 7 2202-00006 2402-00002 240201-00002 240202-00003 240204-00003 31020101-00025 2202-00004 2202-00006 2202-00009 220209-00057 31020101-00025 Power Supplies Hot Work Permits

387

Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FHWA FHWA R d W h M P FHWA R d W h M P FHWA Road Weather Management Program FHWA Road Weather Management Program " "Weather and the transport of Hazardous Materials" Ray Murphy Office of Technical Services Ray Murphy, Office of Technical Services U.S. DOT - Federal Highway Administration Breako t Session Using Technolog to Dispatch U.S. DOE National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Breakout Session: Using Technology to Dispatch and Monitor Shipments During Adverse Conditions Presentation Contents Presentation Contents * * Context Context Cl Cl I iti ti I iti ti * * Clarus Clarus Initiative Initiative * * Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather U.S. DOE National Transportation Stakeholder Forum

388

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 413  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

13 13 Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References DC Power Supplies DC voltages < 200 Volts DC currents < 200 Amps AC voltages < 600 Volts Lifting < 350 lbs Supplies mounted in relay racks Rack doors locked or bolted closed Power source signage 120/208/480 VAC covered Lifting fixture Emergency stop buttons Flashing strobes LOTO 1, 7 1110-00124 31020101-00025 1110-00125 Power Supplies Hot Work Permits 6, 7 NA NA NA A ASD108/400 GESPAC Power Supply Control Units 120 VAC Fans Fan blades covered 1, 7 Power Supplies Hot Work Permit

389

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 412  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References DC Power Supplies DC voltages < 300 Volts DC currents < 500 Amps AC voltages < 600 Volts Lifting < 350 lbs Supplies mounted in relay racks Rack doors locked or bolted closed Power source signage 120/208/480 VAC covered Lifting fixture Emergency stop buttons Flashing strobes LOTO 1, 7 2502-00005 2502-00006 2502-00007 2502-00008 2502-00010 250201-00028 250202-00001 2502-00006 2502-00007 250206-00007 2202-00006 2202-00009 250203-00006 250204-00002 250205-00004

390

Emerging electromembrane technologies in hazardous management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new generalized index of ecological estimation of different technological process is suggested. It is the number of salt equivalents which contaminate environment when a production unit is making. The quantity of salt equivalent have been calculated not only as necessary amount for the technological process by itself, but as amount of energy and different materials for an entire technology. The estimation of different methods of water treatment is shown. The electrodialysis is the most ecological method of water desalination in comparison with others. This conclusion was spreaded on other electromembrane technologies in hazardous management. Such as: (1) Brackish water desalination, (2) Acid rain prevention, (3) Recuperation of pure heavy metals from rinse galvanic water.

Grebenyuk, V.D. [Institute of Colloid and Water Chemistry, Kiev (Ukraine); Grebenyuk, O.V. [Dega Enterprises of NY, Inc., Flushing, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Improving tamper detection for hazardous waste security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide improved levels of security for the hazardous materials in their charge. Many low-level wastes that previously had minimal or no security must now be well protected, while high-level wastes require even greater levels of security than previously employed. This demand for improved security comes, in many cases, without waste managers being provided the necessary additional funding, personnel, or security expertise. Contributing to the problem is the fact that--at least in our experience--waste managers often fail to appreciate certain types of security vulnerabilities. They frequently overlook or underestimate the security risks associated with disgruntled or compromised insiders, or the potential legal and political liabilities associated with nonexistent or ineffective security. Also frequently overlooked are potential threats from waste management critics who could resort to sabotage, vandalism, or civil disobedience for purposes of discrediting a waste management program.

Johnston, R. G. (Roger G.); Garcia, A. R. E. (Anthony R. E.); Pacheco, A. N. (Adam N.); Trujillo, S. J. (Sonia J.); Martinez, R. K. (Ronald K.); Martinez, D. D. (Debbie D.); Lopez, L. N. (Leon N.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

327 Building fire hazards analysis implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 1998, the 327 Building Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) (Reference 1) was approved by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-E) for implementation by B and W Hanford Company (BWC). The purpose of the FHA was to identify gaps in compliance with DOE Order 5480.7A (Reference 2) and Richland Operations Office Implementation Directive (RLID) 5480.7 (Reference 3), especially in regard to loss limitation. The FHA identified compliance gaps in five areas and provided nine recommendations (11 items) to bring the 327 Building into compliance. A status is provided for each recommendation in this document. BWHC will use this Implementation Plan to bring the 327 Building and its operation into compliance with DOE Order 5480.7A and IUD 5480.7.

BARILO, N.F.

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

393

Consider multishaft compressors for hazardous applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

API specifies two types of centrifugal compressors: single-shaft (inline) and integrally geared. The latter are mainly air compressors, and API 672, which specifies the design, manufacturing and testing of these compressors, recommends that they may be used for gas services other than air that are nonhazardous and non-toxic. These compressors offer high efficiency, high control range, lower mechanical losses, lower investment and extremely compact design. Advances in gear making technology and design make API 672 compressors highly competitive in certain applications. The single-shaft compressor is used for general refinery services, is governed by API 617, and applicable for air or gas. There is no restriction on the type of gas. Therefore, this compressor is universally applicable for any gas--hazardous or nonhazardous. A large variety of integrally-geared multishaft compressors are available with respect to the number of stages, type of gas, type of drive and pressure range. These compressors have enormous range in terms of volumetric flows, pressure ratios, allowable inlet and discharge pressures, and attainable drive speeds. API 672 compressors find large applications in process, plant and instrument air service, air separation plants, etc. Apart from air, the gases handled by API 672 compressors had been for other nonhazardous applications such as nitrogen, steam, etc. Contrary to API 672 stipulations, multishaft compressors have been used for along time in hazardous applications like refinery offgas, CH{sub 4}, oxygen, or mixtures of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}, CO, HCN, etc., or even dry chlorine.

Roy, G.K. [Pt. Indo-Rama Synthetics, West Java (Indonesia)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

MULTI-HAZARD RESISTANT HIGHWAY BRIDGE PIERS HAVING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of California to its main suspension bridges and the detailed shots of the Golden Gate and Brooklyn bridgesMULTI-HAZARD RESISTANT HIGHWAY BRIDGE PIERS HAVING CONCRETE-FILLED STEEL TUBE Shuichi FUJIKURA1 of a multi-hazard bridge pier concept, i.e., a bridge pier system capable of providing an adequate level

Bruneau, Michel

395

The shape of the hazard function for cancer incidence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A population-based cohort consisting of 126,141 men and 122,208 women born between 1874 and 1931 and at risk for breast or colorectal cancer after 1965 was identified by linking the Utah Population Data Base and the Utah Cancer Registry. The hazard function ... Keywords: Breast cancer, Colorectal cancer, Hazard function, Survival analysis, Truncation

K. M. Boucher; R. A. Kerber

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Open problem: Dynamic Relational Models for Improved Hazardous Weather Prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Current weather radar detection and prediction sys- tems primarily rely on numerical models. We proposeOpen problem: Dynamic Relational Models for Improved Hazardous Weather Prediction Amy McGovern1, #12;Dynamic Relational Models for Improved Hazardous Weather Prediction Radar velocity Radar

McGovern, Amy

397

Guidance Note 052 RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH REGULATIONS (COSHH) and the DANGEROUS SUBSTANCES AND EXPLOSIVE ATMOSPHERES Involving the Use of Hazardous Chemicals. COSHH requires health risks to be assessed and controlled by dangerous substances. The sections below correspond approximately to the sections in the form. The major

398

Chemical Applications of Electrohydraulic Cavitation for Hazardous Waste Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the destruction or transformation of hazardous chemical substances such as high-temperature incineration, amended activated sludge digestion, anaerobic digestion and conventional physicochemical treatment. Pulsed-power plasma discharge technology may have.... Current approaches to the treatment of hazardous chemical wastes include high temperature incineration, chemical oxidation with and UV light, membrane separation, activated carbon adsorption, substrate-specific biodegration, electron beam bombardment...

Hoffmann, M. R.

399

Analysis and Design of Evapotranspirative Cover for Hazardous Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis and Design of Evapotranspirative Cover for Hazardous Waste Landfill Jorge G. Zornberg, M, Inc. OII Superfund landfill in southern California. This cover system constitutes the first ET cover:6 427 CE Database subject headings: Evapotranspiration; Coating; Landfills; Hazardous waste; Design

Zornberg, Jorge G.

400

Ferroresonant phenomena on 6- to 10-kV substation buses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ferroresonance phenomena in distributing networks with an insulated neutral caused by electromagnetic measuring voltage transformers and connecting cables are studied. Procedures for limiting and nonadmission ...

N. A. Kolechitskaya; N. S. Lazarev; R. N. Shul’gara…

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric phenomena Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Dynamical Processes. Summary: . TRANSPORT PHENOMENA Microscopic description of transport processes for particles Random walks and relation... with grey atmospheres Defining...

402

Experiment Hazard Class 8.1 - Radioactive Materials/Samples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 - Radioactive Materials 1 - Radioactive Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving radioactive materials as samples. The requirements of this hazard class also apply to sealed radioactive sources that are used as a sample (i.e. a target for x-ray radiation). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. The current requirements can be found in the APS Policy for Conducting Radioactive Sample Experiments in APS Experiment Enclosures. NOTE: The APS must be notified of shipment of any radioactive materials to the site well in advance of the proposed experiment. All radioactive materials must arrive through Argonne Receiving in Building 46 and the Argonne Materials Control & Accountability group (MC&A). Please contact

403

Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facility Siting Program (Maryland) Facility Siting Program (Maryland) Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting Board is responsible for overseeing the siting of hazardous waste facilities in Maryland, and will treat hazardous waste facilities separately from low-level nuclear waste facilities. This legislation describes the factors considered by the Board in making siting decisions. The Board is authorized to enact rules and regulations pertaining to the siting of hazardous and low-level nuclear

404

CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 December 4, 2007 Hazardous Waste Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-30) Line management ensures that the requirements for generating, storing, treating, transporting, and disposing of hazardous waste, universal waste, and used oil, established under 40 CFR Subchapter I, applicable permits, and DOE requirements have been effectively implemented for federal and contractor employees, including subcontractors. Written programs and plans are in place and updated when conditions or requirements change. Employees have been properly trained for the wastes they handle. Documentation of waste characterizations, manifests, land disposal restrictions,

405

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The large amount of scientific data collected on the Mount St. Helens eruption has resulted in significant changes in thinking about the atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than previously thought. The Mount St. Helens eruption released much fine ash in the upper atmosphere. These silicates were removed very rapidly due to a process of particle aggregation (Sorem, 1982;

406

Protocol, High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November 2012 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November 2012 Protocol, High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November 2012 November 2012 Protocol for High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight The purpose of this protocol is to establish the requirements and responsibilities for managing and conducting Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) independent oversight of high-hazard nuclear facility projects. As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) self regulatory framework for safety and security, DOE Order 227.1, Independent Oversight Program, assigns HSS the responsibility for implementing an independent oversight program. It also requires the HSS Office of Enforcement and Oversight to conduct independent evaluations of safety and security. This

407

Experiment Hazard Class 7.1 - BSL - 1 Biohazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 - BSL-1 Biohazards 1 - BSL-1 Biohazards Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving biohazards requiring Biosafety Level 1 (BSL-1). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Biosafety Level 1 is suitable for work involving well-characterized agents not known to consistently cause disease in healthy adult humans, and work that is of minimal potential hazard to laboratory personnel and the environment. The laboratory is not necessarily separated from the general traffic patterns in the building. However, laboratories should have doors for access control. A biohazard sign, though not required for BSL1, may be posted at the entrance to the laboratory. Work is generally conducted on open bench tops using standard

408

Microsoft Word - 3.3 Activity Hazard Documents 0913.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Activity Activity Hazard Documents Activity Hazard Documents (AHDs) are formal work authorizations, as described in ES&H Manual, Chapter 6, Appendix D, that are required for higher hazard activities, as described in the AFRD Hazards, Equipment, and Authorizations Review form. When planning a new experiment or project, the first step is to contact the AFRD ES&H Coordinator to assist in determining whether an AHD or other type of work authorization is needed. Short-term, moderate hazard work may be eligible for authorizations under the Task-Based JHA. Electrical work requires authorization from the employee's supervisor (see ES&H Manual, Section 8.8.2). Writing an AHD The process of writing and obtaining approvals for a new AHD can typically take several

409

Experiment Hazard Class 12 - Electrical and Electronic Equipment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 - Electrical and Electronic Equipment 2 - Electrical and Electronic Equipment Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving electrical and electronic equipment. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. The inspection of electric equipment is covered under the APS Policy For User Electric Equipment Inspections. Electrical hazards does not include work involving equipment where ALL of the following apply: (1) equipment use only in accordance with operating instructions AND/OR involves just plugging/unplugging, AND; (2) The equipment is either NRTL-listed or displays an Argonne barcoded ELECTRICAL SAFETY APPROVED sticker, AND; (3) The work involves no attempts to remove covers or panels that might expose energized electrical components.

410

Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

JOHNSON, D.M.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

411

Hazardous waste research and development in the Pacific Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effective management of hazardous waste is an issue that all countries of the Pacific Basin must address. By very rough estimates, almost 272 million metric tons of hazardous wastes are being generated every year in the region. While the data are not consistently defined and reported, they do indicate the extent of the problem. Increasing development brings along an increase in the rate of hazardous waste generation. On this basis, the developing countries of the region can be expected to experience some of the same problems of the developed countries as their economies become more industrialized. Fundamental problems are involved in the compilation of consistent hazardous-waste generation statistics in the Pacific Basin. One involves the definition of what constitutes hazardous waste.

Cirillo, R.R.; Carpenter, R.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Environment and Policy Inst., Honolulu, HI (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A comparison of thermoelectric phenomena in diverse alloy systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study of thermoelectric phenomena in solids provides a wealth of opportunity for exploration of the complex interrelationships between structure, processing, and properties of materials. As thermoelectricity implies some type of coupled thermal and electrical behavior, it is expected that a basic understanding of transport behavior in materials is the goal of such a study. However, transport properties such as electrical resistivity and thermal diffusivity cannot be fully understood and interpreted without first developing an understanding of the material's preparation and its underlying structure. It is the objective of this dissertation to critically examine a number of diverse systems in order to develop a broad perspective on how structure-processing-property relationships differ from system to system, and to discover the common parameters upon which any good thermoelectric material is based. The alloy systems examined in this work include silicon-germanium, zinc oxide, complex intermetallic compounds such as the half-Heusler MNiSn, where M = Ti, Zr, or Hf, and rare earth chalcogenides.

Cook, Bruce

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Stress and phase transformation phenomena in oxide films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ optical methods are reviewed for characterization of phase transformation processes and evaluation of residual stress in solution- deposited metastable oxide films. Such low density films most often are deposited as disordered phases making them prone to crystallization and attendant densification when subjected to increased temperature and/or applied pressure. Inherent stress imparted during film deposition and its evolution during the transformation are evaluated from phonon frequency shifts seen in Raman spectra (TiO{sub 2}) or from changes in the laser-induced fluorescence emission spectra for films containing rare earth (Sm{sup +3}:Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) or transition metal (Cr{sup +3}:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) dopants. The data in combination with measured increases in line intensities intrinsic to the evolving phase are used to follow crystallization processes in thin films. In general, film deposition parameters are found to influence the crystallite ingrowth kinetics and the magnitude of stress and stress relaxation in the film during the transformation. The utility of these methods to probe crystallization phenomena in oxide films will be addressed.

Exarhos, G.J.; Hess, N.J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Quantum Non-Objectivity from Performativity of Quantum Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the logical foundations of quantum mechanics (QM) by stressing non-objectivity of quantum observables which is a consequence of the absence of logical atoms in QM. We argue that the matter of quantum non-objectivity is that, on the one hand, the formalism of QM constructed as a mathematical theory is self-consistent, but, on the other hand, quantum phenomena as results of experimenter's performances are not self-consistent. This self-inconsistency is an effect of that the language of QM differs much from the language of human performances. The first is the language of a mathematical theory which uses some Aristotelian and Russellian assumptions (e.g., the assumption that there are logical atoms). The second language consists of performative propositions which are self-inconsistent only from the viewpoint of conventional mathematical theory, but they satisfy another logic which is non-Aristotelian. Hence, the representation of quantum reality in linguistic terms may be different: from a mathematical theory to a logic of performative propositions. To solve quantum self-inconsistency, we apply the formalism of non-classical self-referent logics.

Andrei Khrennikov; Andrew Schumann

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

415

Chapter Three - Magnetic Exchange Phenomena Probed by Neutron Scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Neutron scattering techniques are powerful tools for investigation of magnetic materials and magnetic exchange interactions on the nanoscale. Owing to the weak interaction of the neutron, results are representative of the bulk and not only comprised of surface properties. Nevertheless, due to the high atomic and magnetic contrast, high interface sensitivity is easily achieved. This chapter will review the applicability of neutron scattering techniques to the investigation magnetic exchange interactions based on two examples, interlayer exchange coupling and exchange bias in metallic multilayers. PNR will be employed to study the magnetic state of a Cu0.94Mn0.06/Co multilayer showing a temperature-dependent coupling originating from the dilute magnetic impurities. Exchange bias within mono-stoichiometric FePt3 thin films based on chemical order modulation will be investigated with PNR and diffraction techniques to elucidate the magnetic ordering on nanometer and atomic length scales. During the individual discussion of the phenomena, both interlayer exchange coupling and exchange bias will be reviewed.

Thomas Saerbeck

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Integrated optics and new wave phenomena in optical waveguides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Research in integrated optics has two goals: One is to apply thin-film technology to the formation of optical devices and circuits. The other is the integration of a large number of optical devices on a small substrate, so forming an optical circuit reminiscent of the integrated circuit in microelectronics. The result is a new breed of optical devices in the form of miniature optical waveguides. They include lasers, modulators, switches, detectors, prisms, lenses, and polarizers, and many of them have efficiencies better than their bulk counterparts. Simple integrated optical circuits have also been constructed, and rapidly advancing semiconductor technology indicates that monolithic integrated optical circuits can readily be developed using GaAs-related compounds. In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art of integrated optics and explore new wave phenomena in optical circuits. The specific topics to be discussed are: light-wave couplers and m-line spectroscopy, refraction and reflection of light in thin films, normal modes of the uniform, the graded and the metal-clad waveguides, optics in tapered films, theory of corrugated waveguides, and more importantly, physics of various thin-film optical devices and the method of the circuit formation.

P. K. Tien

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 779802, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/779/2006/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-induced hazards that are representative for a whole class of hazards: Accidents due to nuclear power plants (NPP) or air traffic, and terrorism. For the analysis of accidents, risk is measured with respect to getting statistics leading to an expected value of risk. Terrorism risk is assessed by the attraction certain ele

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

418

Solvation Phenomena in Dilute Solutions: Formal, Experimental Evidence, and Modeling Implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review the fundamentals underlying a general molecular-based formalism for the microscopic interpretation of the solvation phenomena involving sparingly soluble solutes in compressible media, an approach that hinges around the unambiguous splitting of the species correlation function integrals into short-(finite) and long-ranged (diverging) contributions at infinite dilution, where this condition is taken as the reference system for the derivation of composition expansions. Then, we invoke the formalism (a) to illustrate the well-behaved nature of the solvation contributions to the mechanical partial molecular properties of solutes at infinite dilution, (b) to guide the development of, and provide molecular-based support to, the macroscopic modeling of high-temperature dilute aqueous-electrolyte solutions, (c) to study solvation effects on the kinetic rate constants of reactions in near-critical solvents in an attempt to understand from a microscopic perspective the macroscopic evidence regarding the thermodynamic pressure effects, and (d) to interpret the microscopic mechanism behind synergistic solvation effects involving either co-solutes or co-solvents, and provide a molecular argument on the unsuitability of the van der Waals one-fluid (vdW-1f) mixing rules for the 2 description of weakly attractive solutes in compressible solvents. Finally, we develop thermodynamically consistent perturbation expansions, around the infinite dilution reference, for the species residual properties in binary and ternary mixtures, and discuss the theoretical and modeling implications behind ad hoc first-order truncated expansions.

Chialvo, Ariel A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Natural System  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural System Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development - FY11 Progress Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Program Yifeng Wang (SNL) Michael Simpson (INL) Scott Painter (LANL) Hui-Hai Liu (LBNL) Annie B. Kersting (LLNL) July 15, 2011 FCRD-USED-2011-000223 UFD Natural System Evaluation - FY11 Year-End Report July 15, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

420

Defect-induced magnetism and transport phenomena in epitaxial oxides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the transition metal dopants (i.e. Mn) have no influence on the ferromagnetic nature of the zinc oxide, but that localised magnetic moments on intrinsic defects are in fact responsible for the ferromagnetic behaviour. A relation between strain (related to defect...

Schoofs, Frank

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) was issued on October 27, 1999 [1]. Since that time, the WIPP has sought modifications to clarify the permit language, provide alternative methods for meeting permit requirements and to update permit conditions. Significant advancements have been made in transuranic (TRU) waste management as the result of modifications to the HWFP. Among these advancements is a modification to obtain a drum age criteria (DAC) value to perform headspace gas sampling on drums to be super-compacted and placed in a 100-gallon overpack drum. In addition, the Section 311 permit modification request that would allow for more efficient waste characterization, and the modification to authorize the shipment and disposal of Remote-Handled (RH) TRU waste were merged together and submitted to the regulator as the Consolidated Permit Modification Request (PMR). The submittal of the Consolidated PMR came at the request of the regulator as part of responses to Notices of Deficiency (NODs) for the separate PMRs which had been submitted in previous years. Section 311 of the fiscal year 2004 Energy and Water Developments Appropriations Act (Public Law 108-137) [2] directs the Department of Energy to submit a permit modification that limits waste confirmation to radiography or visual examination of a statistical subpopulation of containers. Section 311 also specifically directs that disposal room performance standards be to be met by monitoring for volatile organic compounds in the underground disposal rooms. This statute translates into the elimination of other waste confirmation methods such as headspace gas sampling and analysis and solids sampling and analysis. These methods, as appropriate, will continue to be used by the generator sites during hazardous waste determinations or characterization activities. This modification is expected to reduce the overall cost of waste analysis by hundreds of millions of dollars [3]. Combining both the chap. 311 and RH TRU waste permit modification requests allows for both the regulator and DOE to expedite action on the modification requests. The Combined PMR reduces costs by having only one administrative process for both modification requests. (authors)

Kehrman, B.; Most, W. [Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services, 4021 National Parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Wildfire hazard in the home ignition zone: An object-oriented analysis integrating LiDAR and VHR satellite imagery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many spatially explicit studies of wildfire hazard focus on the wildland–urban interface (WUI), the area where natural vegetation intersects or mixes with structures. However, research suggests that the characteristics of a small portion of the WUI, the home ignition zone, largely determine potential for ignition from wildfire. The home ignition zone (HIZ) is the area that includes a structure and its surroundings out to 30–60 m. The primary goal of this study is to develop metrics to characterize land cover, burned area, and topography in the HIZ. Pre-fire metrics (i.e. related to land cover and topography) help identify relatively hazardous individual \\{HIZes\\} or neighborhoods of HIZes. Post-fire metrics can be used to assess the burned area across land cover types, inside and outside the HIZ. To calculate the HIZ metrics, multiple data sources (e.g. high resolution 8-band multispectral imagery and LiDAR point clouds) were integrated using an object-oriented image analysis. The setting for the study is the Fourmile Canyon area west of Boulder, Colorado, a data-rich area which experienced a large, destructive wildfire in September 2010. The land cover, burn area, and topography metrics were successfully and accurately calculated and then pre-fire metrics were combined into a simple HIZ hazard index. HIZ characteristics broadly mirror the characteristics of the WUI within the fire perimeter as a whole, though the HIZ on average contains more bare and less forest land, has more widely spaced canopies, and experienced less burning during the fire. The HIZ hazard index values were spatially heterogeneous, but with several distinct high and low hazard clusters. The methods described in this study, paired with in situ data collection, can be applied to other areas to inform hazard mitigation plans.

Rutherford V. Platt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Compressed Gas Cylinder Safety I. Background. Due to the nature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compressed Gas Cylinder Safety I. Background. Due to the nature of gas cylinders hazards of a ruptured cylinder. There are almost 200 different types of materials in gas cylinders, there are several general procedures to follow for safe storage and handling of a compressed gas cylinder: II

Suzuki, Masatsugu

424

eArth science College of Natural Science and Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eArth science College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics 907 provides broad training in various aspects of earth systems science. Three concentrations are available: earth systems science, geo- logical hazards and mitigation, and secondary education. The concen

Hartman, Chris

425

Design and implementation of an integrated safety management system for compressed natural gas stations using ubiquitous sensor network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To increase awareness of safety in facilities where hazards may exist, operators, managers, and executive officers on the site should be able to monitor such facilities. However, most compressed natural gas (CNG)...

Jae Mo Yang; Byung Seok Ko; Chulhwan Park…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The application of expansion foam on liquefied natural gas (LNG) to suppress LNG vapor and LNG pool fire thermal radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) hazards include LNG flammable vapor dispersion and LNG pool fire thermal radiation. A large LNG pool fire emits high thermal radiation thus preventing fire fighters from approaching and extinguishing the fire. One...

Suardin, Jaffee Arizon

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

none,

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

NATURE STUDY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...last two numbers of SCIENCE have appeared articles by Drs. Wheeler and Chapman on the abuses of nature writing as exemplified...imprint of Rand, IeNally and Co., 1903, and its author is Katherine E. Dopp, of the Extension Division of the Chicago University...

E. C. CASE

1904-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Marketing Mother Nature’s Molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marketing Mother Nature’s Molecules ... Yet molecules made by Mother Nature, or derivatives thereof, still account for nearly half of the drugs on the market. ...

LISA JARVIS

2012-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

430

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Parts 595-599: Hazardous Substances (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations aim to prevent the release of hazardous substances into surface water and groundwater resources. They contain guidance for facilities which store and process hazardous substances,...

431

Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act, State Superfund Law (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act contains information on prevention strategies for hazardous material release, permits for facilities managing hazardous waste, and response tactics and liability in the event such release...

432

Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUTTAGOUT) FAMILIAR LEVEL Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUTTAGOUT) FAMILIAR LEVEL The familiar level of...

433

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoiding hazards caused Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

published... . If so, the hazardous energy must be controlled using an appropriate lockout procedure (see Control... of Hazardous Energy: General Requirements). This procedure...

434

E-Print Network 3.0 - arrows radiological hazards Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

published... . If so, the hazardous energy must be controlled using an appropriate lockout procedure (see Control... of Hazardous Energy: General Requirements). This procedure...

435

H.A.R. 11-261 - Hazardous Waste Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

11-261 - Hazardous Waste ManagementLegal Abstract The State of Hawaii Department of Health regulates hazardous waste management under this chapter of the administrative rules....

436

Remote Sensing for Hazard Mitigation and Resource Protection in Pacific Latin America Gregg Bluth (PI); John Gierke, Bill Rose, Essa Gross (Co-PI's)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, monitoring, and exploring large regions in a cost-effective manner, it has not met with much acceptance in furthering remote sensing capabilities for natural hazard mitigation and resource development (Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Ecuador), focusing on the collaborative development of remote sensing

437

Network growth for enhanced natural selection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural selection and random drift are competing phenomena for explaining the evolution of populations. Combining a highly fit mutant with a population structure that improves the odds that the mutation spreads through the whole population tips the balance in favor of natural selection. The probability that the spread occurs, known as the fixation probability, depends heavily on how the population is structured. Certain topologies, albeit highly artificially contrived, have been shown to exist that favor fixation. We present a randomized mechanism for network growth that is loosely inspired in some of these topologies’ key properties and demonstrate, through simulations, that it is capable of giving rise to structured populations for which the fixation probability significantly surpasses that of an unstructured population. This discovery provides important support to the notion that natural selection can be enhanced over random drift in naturally occurring population structures.

Valmir C. Barbosa; Raul Donangelo; Sergio R. Souza

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

438

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi) Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type

439

Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

Dominick, J

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

440

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

442

Mass transfer and kinetic phenomena at the nickel hydroxide electrode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin-film (10 to 40 nm thickness) nickel hydroxide intercalation electrodes were constructed using an electroprecipitation technique. Cyclic voltammetry, potentiostatic step, and galvanostatic discharge experiments were performed and interpreted in terms of a macroscopic model treating the simultaneous mass transfer, kinetic, and thermodynamic phenomena occurring within the cell. The side reaction, oxygen evolution, exhibited irreversible Tafel behavior, with a proton concentration-dependent exchange current density of 4.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} [(c{sub 0} {minus} c)/c{sub 0}] A/cm{sup 2} on pure nickel hydroxide films, and a constant exchange current density of 4.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} A/cm{sup 2} on cobalt hydroxide-containing nickel hydroxide films. The apparent anodic transfer coefficient for the oxygen reaction is 0.49 on pure nickel hydroxide films and 0.42 on cobalt hydroxide-containing nickel hydroxide films. The apparent anodic transfer coefficient for the oxygen reaction is 0.49 on pure nickel hydroxide films and 0.42 on cobalt hydroxide-containing nickel hydroxide films. The intercalation reaction is described with a Butler-Volmer-type expression with a large, proton concentration-dependent exchange current density of 9.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} [c(c{sub 0} {minus} c)]{sup 1/2} A/cm{sup 2}, and anodic and cathodic apparent transfer coefficients of 0.5 for both electrode types. Here c and c{sub 0} have units of mol/cm{sup 3}. The proton diffusion coefficient in pure nickel hydroxide was found to depend on the proton concentration, with values ranging from 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} to 1.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 2}/s, with a concentration-averaged value of 3.417 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 2}/s. In cobalt hydroxide-containing nickel hydroxide, the values ranged from 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} to 1.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 2}/s, with a concentration-averaged value of 8.402 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 2}/s.

Ta, K.P.; Newman, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Div.]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control Events at LANL Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control Events at LANL On October 17, 2012, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) for violations of Department of Energy (DOE) worker safety and health program requirements. LANS is the management and operating contractor for NNSA's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control Events at LANL More Documents & Publications Sandia Sled Track PNOV Press Release Fact Sheet LANS PNOV Fact Sheet LANS PNOV

444

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Solid Waste Disposal Laws and Regulations are found in Tenn. Code 68-211. These rules are enforced and subject to change by the Public Waste Board (PWB), which is established by the Division of Solid and Hazardous

445

Experiment Hazard Class 7.5 - Human Tissue/Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 - Human Tissue/Materials 5 - Human Tissue/Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving biohazards requiring the use of human tissue/materials. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Human tissue/materials must also be evaluated for their biosafety level and as such will have to go through the process for that particular Biosafety Level. IMPORTANT NOTE: For non-Argonne employees, all experiment protocols involving human tissue are required to be either reviewed or declared exempt from review by their home institution's Institutional Review Board (IRB). Documentation of the review should be filed in the ESAF system and with the APS BioSafety Officer (BSO) (Nena Moonier 2-8504,

446

Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground - River Corridor  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground - River Corridor Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground - River Corridor Contractor Spent Two Years Preparing to Remediate 618-10 Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground - River Corridor Contractor Spent Two Years Preparing to Remediate 618-10 August 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov 509-376-5365 Todd Nelson, Washington Closure media@wch-rcc.com 509-372-9097 RICHLAND, WASH. - After careful preparation and characterization, the Department of Energy's (DOE) River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has begun remediation of one of the most hazardous burial grounds tackled to date on the Hanford Site's River Corridor. The $57 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project began with nearly two years of preparation and characterization before reaching their

447

A collaborative program for earthquake fault hazard characterization and community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Reno, Nevada area R.N. Frary, J.N. Louie, W.J. Stephenson, J.K. Odum, L.M. Liberty, S;Project overview Complex geology Growing urban area Need for Urban Hazard Maps Collaboration

448

Geologic Hazards Associated With a Proposed Dam on the Yarlung-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such reports (Biron and Dodin, 2007). However, given the persistent media reports, the pressing water-resources downstream in the Brahmapu- tra system in northeastern India and Bangladesh, and hazards asso- ciated

Kidd, William S. F.

449

Trends and Opportunities in Industrial Hazardous Waste Minimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes trends and opportunities in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste minimization. It uses U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data gathered since 1989 from over 20,000 facilities that account for almost all...

Atlas, M.

450

Category 3 threshold quantities for hazard categorization of nonreactor facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the information necessary to determine Hazard Category 3 threshold quantities for those isotopes of interest not listed in WHC-CM-4-46, Section 4, Table 1.''Threshold Quantities.''

Mandigo, R.L.

1996-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

451

Chapter 2 - Threats and Hazards at Educational Institutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter describes the threats and hazards currently facing school administrators. It separately covers school districts (K-12) and higher education (colleges and universities), and includes information about legislation and protection measures.

Philip Purpura

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Job Hazard Analysis Manual Updated 10/6/04  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and fire hazards from area Electrical Shock Improper grounding, improper operations and maintenance Lockout Activation during repair Auto start and/or human error Lockout/Tagout Noise Equipment Operation Use Hearing

Escher, Christine

453

Order Module--self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

also help prepare you for the practice at the end of this module and for the criterion test. Before continuing, you should obtain a copy of the regulation at Hazardous waste...

454

A Multimedia Study of Hazardous Waste Landfill Gas Migration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hazardous waste landfills pose uniquely challenging environmental problems which arise as a result of the chemical complexity of waste sites, their involvement of many environmental media, and their very size ...

Robert D. Stephens; Nancy B. Ball; Danny M. Mar

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Is thioacetamide a serious health hazard in inorganic chemistry laboratories?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Is thioacetamide a serious health hazard in inorganic chemistry laboratories? ... The dangerous properties of thioacetamide seemingly are not well known by many of those who use it; presented here is a collection of data on its toxic effects. ...

Hannu Elo

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

RFPs Due for Hazardous Fuel Wood to Energy Grant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Forest Service requests proposals for the 2014 Hazardous Fuel Wood to Energy (W2E) Grant.  The outcome anticipated under this funding mechanism will advance the United States Department of...

457

ADEQ Hazardous Waste Management website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: ADEQ Hazardous Waste Management websiteLegal Abstract The ADEQ provides links and information related to...

458

Title 40 CFR 270: EPA Administered Programs: The Hazardous Waste...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

: EPA Administered Programs: The Hazardous Waste Program Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 40 CFR 270:...

459

RCRA Hazardous Waste Part A Permit Application: Instructions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: RCRA Hazardous Waste Part A Permit Application: Instructions and Form (EPA Form 8700-23) Abstract This...

460

Hazardous Waste Part A Permit Application | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Hazardous Waste Part A Permit ApplicationLegal Abstract Detailed instructions for filing a RCRA...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hawaii HEPCRA Hazardous Chemical Storage and Tier II Reporting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II Reporting Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii HEPCRA Hazardous Chemical Storage and Tier II Reporting Webpage Author...

462

Hawaii DOH Hazardous Waste Section Webpage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Section Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii DOH Hazardous Waste Section Webpage Abstract This webpage provides an overview...

463

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Agency/Company /Organization: International Solid Waste Association (ISWA), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) Sector: Energy, Land, Water Focus Area: Renewable Energy, - Waste to Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.trp-training.info/ Cost: Paid Language: English References: Training Resource Pack[1] "The new TRP+ provides a structured package of notes, technical summaries, visual aids and other training material concerning the (hazardous) waste

464

Experiment Hazard Class 8.3 - X-Ray Generators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 - X-Ray Generators 3 - X-Ray Generators Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving the use of X-Ray Generators (other than the APS storage ring). As specified in LMS-PROC-109 a Radiation Generating Device (RGD) must be registered with the Argonne RGD Safety Officer using the ANL-847 form. The RGD will be assigned an inventory number, hazard class, RWP requirement, and inspection and survey frequencies. Experiment Category Experiments the Experiment Hazard Class are always categorized as High Risk. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - As determined in LMS-PROC-109. Samples chambers and all beam paths are fully enclosed by barriers. Class 2 and higher RGDs require an interlock to fail-safe beam shutter/beam stop or radiation

465

Assessment of tsunami hazard to the U.S. Atlantic margin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Tsunami hazard is a very low-probability, but potentially high-risk natural hazard, posing unique challenges to scientists and policy makers trying to mitigate its impacts. These challenges are illustrated in this assessment of tsunami hazard to the U.S. Atlantic margin. Seismic activity along the U.S. Atlantic margin in general is low, and confirmed paleo-tsunami deposits have not yet been found, suggesting a very low rate of hazard. However, the devastating 1929 Grand Banks tsunami along the Atlantic margin of Canada shows that these events continue to occur. Densely populated areas, extensive industrial and port facilities, and the presence of ten nuclear power plants along the coast, make this region highly vulnerable to flooding by tsunamis and therefore even low-probability events need to be evaluated. We can presently draw several tentative conclusions regarding tsunami hazard to the U.S. Atlantic coast. Landslide tsunamis likely constitute the biggest tsunami hazard to the coast. Only a small number of landslides have so far been dated and they are generally older than 10,000 years. The geographical distribution of landslides along the margin is expected to be uneven and to depend on the distribution of seismic activity along the margin and on the geographical distribution of Pleistocene sediment. We do not see evidence that gas hydrate dissociation contributes to the generation of landslides along the U.S. Atlantic margin. Analysis of landslide statistics along the fluvial and glacial portions of the margin indicate that most of the landslides are translational, were probably initiated by seismic acceleration, and failed as aggregate slope failures. How tsunamis are generated from aggregate landslides remains however, unclear. Estimates of the recurrence interval of earthquakes along the continental slope may provide maximum estimates for the recurrence interval of landslide along the margin. Tsunamis caused by atmospheric disturbances and by coastal earthquakes may be more frequent than those generated by landslides, but their amplitudes are probably smaller. Among the possible far-field earthquake sources, only earthquakes located within the Gulf of Cadiz or west of the Tore-Madeira Rise are likely to affect the U.S. coast. It is questionable whether earthquakes on the Puerto Rico Trench are capable of producing a large enough tsunami that will affect the U.S. Atlantic coast. More information is needed to evaluate the seismic potential of the northern Cuba fold-and-thrust belt. The hazard from a volcano flank collapse in the Canary Islands is likely smaller than originally stated, and there is not enough information to evaluate the magnitude and frequency of flank collapse from the Azores Islands. Both deterministic and probabilistic methods to evaluate the tsunami hazard from the margin are available for application to the Atlantic margin, but their implementation requires more information than is currently available.

U.S. ten Brink; J.D. Chaytor; E.L. Geist; D.S. Brothers; B.D. Andrews

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences Title Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3650E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Thomas E. McKone, Max H. Sherman, and Brett C. Singer Journal Indoor Air Volume 21 Start Page 92 Issue 2 Pagination 92-109 Date Published 04/2011 Keywords resave Abstract Identifying air pollutants that pose a potential hazard indoors can facilitate exposure mitigation. In this study, we compiled summary results from 77 published studies reporting measurements of chemical pollutants were representative of concentrations in residences in the United States. These data were used to calculate representative mid-range and upper bound concentrations relevant to chronic exposures for 267 pollutants and representative peak concentrations relevant to acute exposures for 5 activity-associated pollutants. Representative concentrations are compared to available chronic and acute health standards for 97 pollutants. Fifteen pollutants are identified as contaminants of concern for chronic health effects in a large fraction of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as potential chronic health hazards in a substantial minority of homes and an additional nine are identified as potential hazards in a very small percentage of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as priority hazards based on robustness of reported concentration data and fraction of residences that appear to be impacted: acetaldehyde; acrolein; benzene; 1,3- butadiene; 1,4-dichlorobenzene; formaldehyde; naphthalene; nitrogen dioxide; and PM2.5. Activity-based emissions are shown to pose potential acute health hazards for PM2.5, formaldehyde, CO, chloroform, and NO2.

467

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Method of recovering hazardous waste from phenolic resin filters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for the recovery of hazardous wastes such as heavy metals and radioactive elements from phenolic resin filter by a circulating a solution of 8 to 16 molar nitric acid at a temperature of 110 to 190 degrees F. through the filter. The hot solution dissolves the filter material and releases the hazardous material so that it can be recovered or treated for long term storage in an environmentally safe manner.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bourne, Gary L. (Idaho Falls, ID); McFee, John N. (Albuquerque, NM); Burdge, Bradley G. (Idaho Falls, ID); McConnell, Jr., John W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Seismic Hazards at Kilauea and Mauna LOA Volcanoes, Hawaii  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant seismic hazard exists in south Hawaii from large tectonic earthquakes that can reach magnitude 8 and intensity XII. This paper quantifies the hazard by estimating the horizontal peak ground acceleration (PGA) in south Hawaii which occurs with a 90% probability of not being exceeded during exposure times from 10 to 250 years. The largest earthquakes occur beneath active, unbuttressed and mobile flanks of volcanoes in their shield building stage.

Klein, Fred W.

1994-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

470

Phorgotten phenomena: Verifying electrical CP contacts on gas distribution pipelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal and state regulations mandate that gas companies must maintain cathodic protection (CP) throughout distribution systems to protect against corrosion. From time to time, underground contacts occur. Any contact of metal lines depletes CP potentials. Finding and clearing these contacts is time-consuming and costly. Some gas companies report that only one in 10 of these underground contacts are found. The paper describes a method that has maintained a 98% efficiency in clearing underground contacts for the past 10 years for Cascade Natural Gas.

Maxwell, J.L. [Cascade Natural Gas Corp., Seattle, WA (United States)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Hazard classification criteria for non-nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories` Integrated Risk Management Department has developed a process for establishing the appropriate hazard classification of a new facility or operation, and thus the level of rigor required for the associated authorization basis safety documentation. This process is referred to as the Preliminary Hazard Screen. DOE Order 5481.1B contains the following hazard classification for non-nuclear facilities: high--having the potential for onsite or offsite impacts to large numbers of persons or for major impacts to the environment; moderate--having the potential for considerable onsite impacts but only minor offsite impacts to people or the environment; low--having the potential for only minor onsite and negligible offsite impacts to people or the environment. It is apparent that the application of such generic criteria is more than likely to be fraught with subjective judgment. One way to remove the subjectivity is to define health and safety classification thresholds for specific hazards that are based on the magnitude of the hazard, rather than on a qualitative assessment of possible accident consequences. This paper presents the results of such an approach to establishing a readily usable set of non-nuclear facility hazard classifications.

Mahn, J.A.; Walker, S.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory Building 878 hazards assessment document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The introduction of the hazards assessment process is to document the impact of the release of hazards at the Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory (AMPL) that are significant enough to warrant consideration in Sandia National Laboratories` operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment is prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requirement that facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment provides an analysis of the potential airborne release of chemicals associated with the operations and processes at the AMPL. This research and development laboratory develops advanced manufacturing technologies, practices, and unique equipment and provides the fabrication of prototype hardware to meet the needs of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The focus of the hazards assessment is the airborne release of materials because this requires the most rapid, coordinated emergency response on the part of the AMPL, SNL/NM, collocated facilities, and surrounding jurisdiction to protect workers, the public, and the environment.

Wood, C.; Thornton, W.; Swihart, A.; Gilman, T.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Reuse in Hazard Analysis: Identification and Shamus P. Smith and Michael D. Harrison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for example, Hazard and Op- erability Studies (HAZOP) [11], Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA) [6

Harrison, Michael

474

A comparative study of the radiological hazard in sediments samples from drinking water purification plants supplied from different sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The natural radiation level has been determined for 135 sediment samples from forty-six drinking water purification plants supplied from different sources (Nile River, Ibrahimia Canal and Bahr Yousif Canal) aiming to evaluate the radiation hazard. The concentration of natural radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th and 40K) has been investigated by using gamma spectrometry (NaI (Tl) 3? × 3?) detector. The results showed that the concentrations of average activity in the sediment samples collected from Nile River, Ibrahimia Canal and Bahr Yousif Canal are (29 ± 2, 30 ± 2 and 240 ± 8 Bq kg?1), (47 ± 3, 46 ± 8 and 258 ± 12 Bq kg?1) and (28 ± 2, 27 ± 3 and 219 ± 18 Bq kg?1) for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. The distributions of average activity concentrations of samples under investigation are within the world values although some extreme values have been determined. Radiological hazard effects such as: absorbed dose rate (D), outdoor and indoor annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE), radium equivalent activities (Raeq), hazard indices (Hex and Hin), gamma index (I?), excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR) and annual gonadal dose equivalent (AGDE) for the corresponding samples were also estimated.

Shams A.M. Issa; M.A.M. Uosif; Mahmoud Tammam; Reda Elsaman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

John A. McLachlan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

Kirk, N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Natural Hazards 31: 373390, 2004. 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cyclone life cycle and track forecast are summarized by Krishnamurti et al. (1993). In India, Mandal et al important fields including sea level pressure, horizontal wind and rainfall are compared with the verification analysis/observation to examine the performance of the model. The model simulated track

Raman, Sethu

478

Global early warning systems for natural hazards: systematic and people-centred  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...complex socio-political emergencies...personal health risks and many other...those most at risk at a local level...capture and sustain political commitment, to...knowledge, to assess risks and manage investments in systems, to...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Public exposure to hazards associated with natural radioactivity in open-pit mining in Ghana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......uranium and non-uranium mines(2,4...the long-lived uranium/radium and thorium...made between the standard and the sample...Anglogold Ashanti. Review of Operations...Community Development Plan, Iduapriem and...International Basic Safety Standards (BSS) for protection......

E. O. Darko; A. Faanu; A. R. Awudu; G. Emi-Reynolds; J. Yeboah; O. C. Oppon; E. H. K. Akaho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Public exposure to hazards associated with natural radioactivity in open-pit mining in Ghana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and Waste Safety in Mining and Mineral Procession...on the Kubi Forest Mining Project. Environmental...Anglogold Ashanti. Review of Operations. Annual...Community Development Plan, Iduapriem and Teberebe...International Basic Safety Standards (BSS) for protection...radioactivity in open-pit mining in Ghana. | The......

E. O. Darko; A. Faanu; A. R. Awudu; G. Emi-Reynolds; J. Yeboah; O. C. Oppon; E. H. K. Akaho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural phenomena hazards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Public exposure to hazards associated with natural radioactivity in open-pit mining in Ghana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......addition, the wastes are in most...monitoring and control of NORMS in...monitoring and control of NORMS in...collected from the plant areas and other...tailings from the wastes dumps. The...wells and water treatment plants for...the detector system at the peak...for adults integrated over a period......

E. O. Darko; A. Faanu; A. R. Awudu; G. Emi-Reynolds; J. Yeboah; O. C. Oppon; E. H. K. Akaho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Incremental seismic rehabilitation concept for Romanian civil buildings integrated in natural hazards prevention management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A recent study in Bucharest emphasised the need to rehabilitate 392 vulnerable buildings, but when investing in seismic strengthening, the authorities are facing both financial and technical obstacles. For this reason the present paper is studying the possibility to use the incremental seismic rehabilitation (ISR) method to Romanian damaged and/or vulnerable buildings that present a higher risk of collapse in case of a major earthquake. Also, it proposes a tool having as base the critical path method to help the implementation of ISR methodology.

Andreea Dutu; João Gomes Ferreira; Cristian Sandu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Potential Public Health Hazards, Exposures and Health Effects from Unconventional Natural Gas Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(23) The September 2013 catastrophic flood in northeastern Colorado, for example, resulted in 13 notable releases of oil, totaling 43?134 gallons, and 17 releases of produced water, totaling 26?385 gallons. ... It includes numerous case studies on perception and social behavior dealing with floods, droughts, earthquakes, volcano eruptions, wild fires, and landslides. ...

John L. Adgate; Bernard D. Goldstein; Lisa M. McKenzie

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

484

PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 26, 052001 (2014) Capturing non-equilibrium phenomena in rarefied  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 26, 052001 (2014) Capturing non-equilibrium phenomena in rarefied polyatomic: 142.104.86.60 On: Mon, 05 May 2014 20:27:14 #12;052001-2 B. Rahimi and H. Struchtrup Phys. Fluids 26

Struchtrup, Henning

485

Photo-Chemical Researches. Part II. Phenomena of Photo-Chemical Induction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 January 1857 research-article Photo-Chemical Researches. Part II. Phenomena of Photo-Chemical Induction Professor Bunsen Henry Enfield Roscoe The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Philosophical...

1857-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Photo-Chemical Researches. -- Part II. Phenomena of Photo-Chemical Induction.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1856-1857 research-article Photo-Chemical Researches. -- Part II. Phenomena of Photo-Chemical Induction. Prof. Bunsen Henry Enfield Roscoe The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Proceedings...

1856-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Dissipative particle dynamics simulation of wettability alternation phenomena in the chemical flooding process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wettability alternation phenomena is considered one of the most important enhanced oil recovery (EOR) mechanisms in the chemical flooding process and induced by the adsorption of ... external forces on the fluid ...

Xiaobo Li; Yuewu Liu; Jianfei Tang; Shujiao Li

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Models of fragmentation phenomena based on the symmetric group S sub n and combinational analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various models for fragmentation phenomena are developed using methods from permutation groups and combinational analysis. The appearance and properties of power laws in these models are discussed. Various exactly soluble cases are studied.

Mekjian, A.Z. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory); Lee, S.J. (Rutgers--the State Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

1991-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

489

Models of fragmentation phenomena based on the symmetric group S{sub n} and combinational analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various models for fragmentation phenomena are developed using methods from permutation groups and combinational analysis. The appearance and properties of power laws in these models are discussed. Various exactly soluble cases are studied.

Mekjian, A.Z. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory; Lee, S.J. [Rutgers--the State Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

1991-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

490

Nonlinear Acoustic Phenomena in Subsurface Bubble Layers and its Usage for Bubble Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper contains a brief review of our recent theoretical and experimental investigations of nonlinear acoustic phenomena in sub-surface bubble layers produced by breaking waves and results concerning linear a...

A. M. Sutin

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

492

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

493

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

494

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

495

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

496

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

497

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

498

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

499

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

500

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease