Sample records for natural gas-fired power

  1. Comparative Assessment of Coal-and Natural Gas-fired Power Plants under a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparative Assessment of Coal- and Natural Gas-fired Power Plants under a CO2 Emission Performance standard (EPS) for pulverized coal (PC) and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants; · Evaluate · Coal-fired Power Plant: Supercritical pulverized coal (SC PC) Illinois #6 Coal Capacity Factor 75

  2. The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power, Pennsylvania Presentation to the Natural Gas CCS Forum Washington, DC November 4, 2011 E.S. Rubin, Carnegie Mellon MotivationMotivation · Electric utilities again looking to natural gas combined cycle (NGCC

  3. The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    regulations for coal plants New concerns about nuclear power after Fukushima · Recent studies also show emissions · Most CCS cost studies have focused on coal-based power plants; relatively few on NGCC with CCS1 The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power

  4. Elevated Temperature Materials for Power Generation and Propulsion The energy industry is designing higher-efficiency land-based turbines for natural gas-fired

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Elevated Temperature Materials for Power Generation and Propulsion The energy industry is designing higher-efficiency land-based turbines for natural gas-fired power generation systems. The high inlet materials for these aggressive environments. For example, Ni-base superalloys are used to fabricate blades

  5. advanced natural gas-fired: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drum Dryer for Food Processing Applications is the final report 8 A Case Study from Norway on Gas-Fired Power Plants, Carbon Sequestration, and Politics Environmental Sciences...

  6. Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vs. AEO 2001 Price Forecast Natural Gas Price (nominal $/if forwards forecasts) or natural gas-fired generation (ifs reference case forecast of natural gas prices delivered to

  7. An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas-fired fuel cell: a model of a central utility plant.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This central utilities plant model details the major elements of a central utilities plant for several classes of users. The model enables the analyst to select optional, cost effective, plant features that are appropriate to a fuel cell application. These features permit the future plant owner to exploit all of the energy produced by the fuel cell, thereby reducing the total cost of ownership. The model further affords the analyst an opportunity to identify avoided costs of the fuel cell-based power plant. This definition establishes the performance and capacity information, appropriate to the class of user, to support the capital cost model and the feasibility analysis. It is detailed only to the depth required to identify the major elements of a fuel cell-based system. The model permits the choice of system features that would be suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

  8. A Case Study from Norway on Gas-Fired Power Plants, Carbon Sequestration, and Politics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Norwegian pollution laws. But the Labour Party and other opposition politicians insisted that regulations contended the gas-fired plants would slow Norway's dependence on imported electricity from Denmark, which is generated from even more carbon-intensive coal-fired plants. Over Bondevik objections, the parliament voted

  9. The Modeling of a Laboratory Natural GasFired Furnace with a HigherOrder Projection Method for Unsteady Combustion \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    method for axisymmetric, unsteady, low­ Mach number combustion is used to model a natural gas flame fromThe Modeling of a Laboratory Natural Gas­Fired Furnace with a Higher­Order Projection Method of Pember et al. [1] by using it to simulate a natural gas flame from a 300kW IFRF burner in the Burner

  10. Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Against the backdrop of increasingly volatile natural gas prices, renewable energy resources, which by their nature are immune to natural gas fuel price risk, provide a real economic benefit. Unlike many contracts for natural gas-fired generation, renewable generation is typically sold under fixed-price contracts. Assuming that electricity consumers value long-term price stability, a utility or other retail electricity supplier that is looking to expand its resource portfolio (or a policymaker interested in evaluating different resource options) should therefore compare the cost of fixed-price renewable generation to the hedged or guaranteed cost of new natural gas-fired generation, rather than to projected costs based on uncertain gas price forecasts. To do otherwise would be to compare apples to oranges: by their nature, renewable resources carry no natural gas fuel price risk, and if the market values that attribute, then the most appropriate comparison is to the hedged cost of natural gas-fired generation. Nonetheless, utilities and others often compare the costs of renewable to gas-fired generation using as their fuel price input long-term gas price forecasts that are inherently uncertain, rather than long-term natural gas forward prices that can actually be locked in. This practice raises the critical question of how these two price streams compare. If they are similar, then one might conclude that forecast-based modeling and planning exercises are in fact approximating an apples-to-apples comparison, and no further consideration is necessary. If, however, natural gas forward prices systematically differ from price forecasts, then the use of such forecasts in planning and modeling exercises will yield results that are biased in favor of either renewable (if forwards < forecasts) or natural gas-fired generation (if forwards > forecasts). In this report we compare the cost of hedging natural gas price risk through traditional gas-based hedging instruments (e.g., futures, swaps, and fixed-price physical supply contracts) to contemporaneous forecasts of spot natural gas prices, with the purpose of identifying any systematic differences between the two. Although our data set is quite limited, we find that over the past three years, forward gas prices for durations of 2-10 years have been considerably higher than most natural gas spot price forecasts, including the reference case forecasts developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This difference is striking, and implies that resource planning and modeling exercises based on these forecasts over the past three years have yielded results that are biased in favor of gas-fired generation (again, presuming that long-term stability is desirable). As discussed later, these findings have important ramifications for resource planners, energy modelers, and policy-makers.

  11. Estimated size and performance of a natural gas fired duplex Stirling for domestic refrigeration applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berchowitz, D.M. (Sunpower, Inc., Athens, OH (United States)); Shonder, J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calibrated calculations are used to size an integrated Stirling cooler and engine (Duplex configuration). Fuel for the engine is natural gas and the working fluid is helium. The potential exists for long life and low noise. Performance is shown to be very competitive when compared to standard vapor compression systems. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Stirling engines for gas fired micro-cogen and cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, N.W.; Beale, W.T. [Sunpower, Inc., Athens, OH (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the design and performance of free-piston Stirling engine-alternators particularly suited for use as natural gas fired micro-cogen and cooling devices. Stirling based cogen systems offer significant potential advantages over internal combustion engines in efficiency, to maintain higher efficiencies at lower power levels than than combustion engines significantly expands the potential for micro-cogen. System cost reduction and electric prices higher than the U.S. national average will have a far greater effect on commercial success than any further increase in Stirling engine efficiency. There exist niche markets where Stirling engine efficiency. There exist niche markets where Stirling based cogen systems are competitive. Machines of this design are being considered for production in the near future as gas-fired units for combined heat and power in sufficiently large quantities to assure competitive prices for the final unit.

  13. Comparative Performance Analysis of IADR Operating in Natural Gas-Fired and Waste-Heat CHP Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Sand, James R [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel utilization can be dramatically improved through effective recycle of 'waste' heat produced as a by-product of on-site or near-site power generation technologies. Development of modular compact cooling, heating, and power (CHP) systems for end-use applications in commercial and institutional buildings is a key part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy policy. To effectively use the thermal energy from a wide variety of sources which is normally discarded to the ambient, many components such as heat exchangers, boilers, absorption chillers, and desiccant dehumidification systems must be further developed. Recently a compact, cost-effective, and energy-efficient integrated active-desiccant vapor-compression hybrid rooftop (IADR) unit has been introduced in the market. It combines the advantages of an advanced direct-expansion cooling system with the dehumidification capability of an active desiccant wheel. The aim of this study is to compare the efficiency of the IADR operation in baseline mode, when desiccant wheel regeneration is driven by a natural gas burner, and in CHP mode, when the waste heat recovered from microturbine exhaust gas is used for desiccant regeneration. Comparative analysis shows an excellent potential for more efficient use of the desiccant dehumidification as part of a CHP system and the importance of proper sizing of the CHP components. The most crucial factor in exploiting the efficiency of this application is the maximum use of thermal energy recovered for heating of regeneration air.

  14. Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Profiles of Renewable and Natural Gas Electricity Contracts:Price Risk: Using Forward Natural Gas Prices Instead of Gas2001). “Which way the natural gas price: an attempt to

  15. Advanced Turbine Systems Program conceptual design and product development. Task 3.0, Selection of natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of Task 3 of the Westinghouse ATS Phase II program. Objective of Task 3 was to analyze and evaluate different cycles for the natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine Systems in order to select one that would achieve all ATS program goals. About 50 cycles (5 main types) were evaluated on basis of plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity, reliability-availability-maintainability (RAM), and program schedule requirements. The advanced combined cycle was selected for the ATS plant; it will incorporate an advanced gas turbine engine as well as improvements in the bottoming cycle and generator. Cost and RAM analyses were carried out on 6 selected cycle configurations and compared to the baseline plant. Issues critical to the Advanced Combined Cycle are discussed; achievement of plant efficiency and cost of electricity goals will require higher firing temperatures and minimized cooling of hot end components, necessitating new aloys/materials/coatings. Studies will be required in combustion, aerodynamic design, cooling design, leakage control, etc.

  16. Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Associates, citing NYMEX natural gas bid-offer spreadAnalysis of the Market for Natural Gas Futures. ” The Energyas a Physical Hedge Against Natural Gas Price Movements. ”

  17. Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Associates, citing NYMEX natural gas bid-offer spreadAnalysis of the Market for Natural Gas Futures. ” The EnergyProfiles of Renewable and Natural Gas Electricity Contracts:

  18. Residential gas-fired sorption heat Test and technology evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Residential gas-fired sorption heat pumps Test and technology evaluation Energiforskningsprogram EFP05 Journal nr: 33031-0054 December 2008 #12;Residential gas-fired sorption heat pumps Test.............................................................................................................................................5 1 Residential gas-fired thermally driven heat pumps

  19. Independent Validation and Verification of Process Design and Optimization Technology Diagnostic and Control of Natural Gas Fired Furnaces via Flame Image Analysis Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Daryl [ORNL

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program has invested in emerging Process Design and Optimizations Technologies (PDOT) to encourage the development of new initiatives that might result in energy savings in industrial processes. Gas fired furnaces present a harsh environment, often making accurate determination of correct air/fuel ratios a challenge. Operation with the correct air/fuel ratio and especially with balanced burners in multi-burner combustion equipment can result in improved system efficiency, yielding lower operating costs and reduced emissions. Flame Image Analysis offers a way to improve individual burner performance by identifying and correcting fuel-rich burners. The anticipated benefit of this technology is improved furnace thermal efficiency, and lower NOx emissions. Independent validation and verification (V&V) testing of the FIA technology was performed at Missouri Forge, Inc., in Doniphan, Missouri by Environ International Corporation (V&V contractor) and Enterprise Energy and Research (EE&R), the developer of the technology. The test site was selected by the technology developer and accepted by Environ after a meeting held at Missouri Forge. As stated in the solicitation for the V&V contractor, 'The objective of this activity is to provide independent verification and validation of the performance of this new technology when demonstrated in industrial applications. A primary goal for the V&V process will be to independently evaluate if this technology, when demonstrated in an industrial application, can be utilized to save a significant amount of the operating energy cost. The Seller will also independently evaluate the other benefits of the demonstrated technology that were previously identified by the developer, including those related to product quality, productivity, environmental impact, etc'. A test plan was provided by the technology developer and is included as an appendix to the summary report submitted by Environ (Appendix A). That plan required the V&V contractor to: (1) Establish the as-found furnace operating conditions; (2) Tune the furnace using currently available technology to establish baseline conditions; (3) Tune the furnace using the FIA technology; and (4) Document the improved performance that resulted from application of the FIA technology. It is important to note that the testing was not designed to be a competition or comparison between two different methodologies that could be used for furnace tuning. Rather, the intent was to quantify improvements in furnace performance that could not be achieved with existing technology. Therefore, the measure of success is improvement beyond the furnace efficiency obtainable using existing furnace optimization methods rather than improvement from the as found condition.

  20. Gas fired Advanced Turbine System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeCren, R.T.; White, D.J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the first phase of the Advanced Gas Turbine System (ATS) program was the concept definition of an advanced engine system that meets efficiency and emission goals far exceeding those that can be provided with today`s equipment. The thermal efficiency goal for such an advanced industrial engine was set at 50% some 15 percentage points higher than current equipment levels. Exhaust emissions goals for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), and unburned hydrocarbons (UH) were fixed at 8 parts per million by volume (ppmv), 20 ppmv, and 20 ppmv respectively, corrected to 15% oxygen (O{sub 2}) levels. Other goals had to be addressed; these involved reducing the cost of power produced by 10 percent and improving or maintaining the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) at current levels. This advanced gas turbine was to be fueled with natural gas, and it had to embody features that would allow it bum coal or coal derived fuels.

  1. Advanced natural gas-fired turbine system utilizing thermochemical recuperation and/or partial oxidation for electricity generation, greenfield and repowering applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance, economics and technical feasibility of heavy duty combustion turbine power systems incorporating two advanced power generation schemes have been estimated to assess the potential merits of these advanced technologies. The advanced technologies considered were: Thermochemical Recuperation (TCR), and Partial Oxidation (PO). The performance and economics of these advanced cycles are compared to conventional combustion turbine Simple-Cycles and Combined-Cycles. The objectives of the Westinghouse evaluation were to: (1) simulate TCR and PO power plant cycles, (2) evaluate TCR and PO cycle options and assess their performance potential and cost potential compared to conventional technologies, (3) identify the required modifications to the combustion turbine and the conventional power cycle components to utilize the TCR and PO technologies, (4) assess the technical feasibility of the TCR and PO cycles, (5) identify what development activities are required to bring the TCR and PO technologies to commercial readiness. Both advanced technologies involve the preprocessing of the turbine fuel to generate a low-thermal-value fuel gas, and neither technology requires advances in basic turbine technologies (e.g., combustion, airfoil materials, airfoil cooling). In TCR, the turbine fuel is reformed to a hydrogen-rich fuel gas by catalytic contact with steam, or with flue gas (steam and carbon dioxide), and the turbine exhaust gas provides the indirect energy required to conduct the endothermic reforming reactions. This reforming process improves the recuperative energy recovery of the cycle, and the delivery of the low-thermal-value fuel gas to the combustors potentially reduces the NO{sub x} emission and increases the combustor stability.

  2. An Embedded Boundary Method for the Modeling of Unsteady Combustion in an Industrial GasFired Furnace \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Embedded Boundary Method for the Modeling of Unsteady Combustion in an Industrial Gas the simulation of an experimental natural gas­fired furnace are shown. \\Lambda This work was performed under

  3. Economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas-fired fuel cell. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The final report provides a summary of results of the Cost of Ownership Model and the circumstances under which a distributed fuel cell is economically viable. The analysis is based on a series of micro computer models estimate the capital and operations cost of a fuel cell central utility plant configuration. Using a survey of thermal and electrical demand profiles, the study defines a series of energy user classes. The energy user class demand requirements are entered into the central utility plant model to define the required size the fuel cell capacity and all supporting equipment. The central plant model includes provisions that enables the analyst to select optional plant features that are most appropriate to a fuel cell application, and that are cost effective. The model permits the choice of system features that would be suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. Other applications are also practical; however, such applications have a higher relative demand for thermal energy, a characteristic that is well-suited to a fuel cell application with its free source of hot water or steam. The analysis combines the capital and operation from the preceding models into a Cost of Ownership Model to compute the plant capital and operating costs as a function of capacity and principal features and compares these estimates to the estimated operating cost of the same central plant configuration without a fuel cell.

  4. Gas-Fired Reciprocating Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The reciprocating, or piston-driven, engine is a widespread and well-known technology. Also called internal combustion engines, reciprocating engines require fuel, air, compression, and a combustion source to function. Depending on the ignition source, they generally fall into two categories: (1) spark-ignited engines, typically fueled by gasoline or natural gas, and (2) compression-ignited engines, typically fueled by diesel oil fuel.

  5. Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, L.; Hedman, B.; Knowles, D.; Freedman, S. I.; Woods, R.; Schweizer, T.

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is directing substantial programs in the development and encouragement of new energy technologies. Among them are renewable energy and distributed energy resource technologies. As part of its ongoing effort to document the status and potential of these technologies, DOE EERE directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to lead an effort to develop and publish Distributed Energy Technology Characterizations (TCs) that would provide both the department and energy community with a consistent and objective set of cost and performance data in prospective electric-power generation applications in the United States. Toward that goal, DOE/EERE - joined by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) - published the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations in December 1997.As a follow-up, DOE EERE - joined by the Gas Research Institute - is now publishing this document, Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations.

  6. Statkraft is Europe's largest generator of renewable energy and is the leading power company in Norway. The company owns, produces and develops hydropower, wind power, gas-fired power and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morik, Katharina

    Statkraft is Europe's largest generator of renewable energy and is the leading power company countries. For our office in Düsseldorf we are currently looking to hire a System Manager Renewable Energy. Share our passion for renewable energy and be a part of tomorrow's energy world. Your department

  7. DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 DIRECT USE OF NATURAL GAS: ANALYSIS AND POLICY OPTIONS Northwest Power Planning Council Issue Paper 94-41 August 11, 1994 Introduction Lower natural gas prices, apparently adequate gas supplies Power Plan, both natural gas-fired cogeneration and the use of combustion turbines as a means of backing

  8. A Gas-Fired Heat Pipe Zone Heater 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winn, C. B.; Burns, P.; Guire, J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-fired vented zone heater has recently been developed by the Altar Corporation for Colorado State University (CSU) under a Gas Research Institute (GRI) contract. The unit war developed for auxiliary heating applications in passive solar...

  9. A Gas-Fired Heat Pipe Zone Heater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winn, C. B.; Burns, P.; Guire, J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-fired vented zone heater has recently been developed by the Altar Corporation for Colorado State University (CSU) under a Gas Research Institute (GRI) contract. The unit war developed for auxiliary heating applications in passive solar...

  10. Energy Efficiency in the Future The Sixth Northwest Power Plan, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -demand energy and back-up power, and reduce reliance on existing coal-fired plants to help meet the power system-fuel power plants until future environmental legislation is clear and alternative low-carbon energy sources and flexibility of the power system. 4. Build new natural gas-fired power plants to meet local needs for on

  11. Direct Gas Fired Air Heating For 40 to 50% Fuel Savings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Searcy, J. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between direct and indirect gas fired unit heaters show why there is a minimum of 40% fuel savings. The application of direct gas-fired make-up heaters for industrial space heating as well as the safety of the direct gas fired systems, a simple...

  12. Research and development of a high efficiency gas-fired water heater. Volume 2. Task reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilakis, A.D.; Pearson, J.F.; Gerstmann, J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design and development of a cost-effective high efficiency gas-fired water heater to attain a service efficiency of 70% (including the effect of exfiltration) and a service efficiency of 78% (excluding exfiltration) for a 75 GPD draw at a 90/sup 0/F temperature rise, with a stored water to conditioned air temperature difference of 80/sup 0/F, are described in detail. Based on concept evaluation, a non-powered natural draft water heater was chosen as the most cost-effective design to develop. The projected installed cost is $374 compared to $200 for a conventional unit. When the project water heater is compared to a conventional unit, it has a payback of 3.7 years and life cycle savings of $350 to the consumer. A prototype water heater was designed, constructed, and tested. When operated with sealed combustion, the unit has a service efficiency of 66.4% (including the effect of exfiltration) below a burner input of 32,000 Btu/h. In the open combustion configuration, the unit operated at a measured efficiency of 66.4% Btu/h (excluding exfiltration). This compares with a service efficiency of 51.3% for a conventional water heater and 61% for a conventional high efficiency unit capable of meeting ASHRAE 90-75. Operational tests showed the unit performed well with no evidence of stacking or hot spots. It met or exceeded all capacity or usage tests specified in the program test plan and met all emission goals. Future work will concentrate on designing, building, and testing pre-production units. It is anticipated that both sealed combustion and open draft models will be pursued.

  13. Results of gas-fired flash-smelting tests. Phase 1-3. Topical technical report, November 1987-April 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pusateri, J.F.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A natural gas-fired burner for the HRD FLAME REACTOR Process was designed and successfully tested on over 450 tons of Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) dust, and over a wide range of operating conditions. The coal/coke-fired FLAME REACTOR Process has already been demonstrated as an efficient and economic means of recovering zinc from EAF dust as a salable oxide product, and a salable nonhazardous, iron-rich slag product. The results of the work indicate that the natural gas-fired process has a higher zinc capacity for a given reactor size, with zinc recoveries 5-10 percentage points higher than coal/coke processing at high throughputs. Gas-fired capital costs are about 15% less than coal for a 20,000 STPY EAF dust plant. Smaller plants show even higher break-even costs. Net processing costs are about $100/ton of EAF dust, which is extremely competitive with land-filling and other recycling options.

  14. The Future of Combustion Turbine Technology for Industrial and Utility Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, A. D.; Simbeck, D. R.

    Low capital cost and ample low-cost natural gas supplies will make natural gas-fired combustion turbine systems the power generation technology of choice over the next decade. Against the background of earlier use by electric utilities, this paper...

  15. Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Interim Report on Electric Price Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    because natural gas fired electric generating plants are on the margin much of the time in Western marketsBiennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Interim Report on Electric Price Forecasts Electricity prices in the Council's Power Plan are forecast using the AURORATM Electricity Market Model of the entire

  16. Application of advanced Stirling engine technology to a commercial size gas-fired heat pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johansson, L.; Agno, J.; Wurm, J.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gas Research Institute sponsored work on the kinematic Stirling engine-driven heat pump, which offers practical improvements in the use of natural gas. Results from the first phase of the program led to the selection of a method of introducing low pressure natural gas into the V160 engine's combustor and testing of the ejector system. Further engine modifications will be needed as well as demonstrations of the performance and reliability of the units. The first phase found all developmental needs to be achievable, making the concept technically feasible. Computer projections based on the system performance of components indicate the gas-fired pump will work better than electric models and be economically feasible as well. 5 figures, 1 table.

  17. PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP W. D. C. Richards and W. L. Auxer) which employs a natural gas fired Stirling engine to drive a Rankine cycle vapor compressor is presently by the heat pump effect. The Stirling engine/Rankine cycle refrigeration loop heat pump being developed would

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn England; Oliver Chang; Stephanie Wien

    2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides results from the second year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operation. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation tests results for a gas turbine, a process heater, and a commercial oil/gas fired boiler are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods. A series of pilot tests were conducted to identify the constraints to reduce the size of current research dilution sampler for future stack emission tests. Based on the test results, a bench prototype compact dilution sampler developed and characterized in GE EER in August 2002.

  19. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor DATE: March 25, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TO: Interested Parties FROM: Craig Hoffman, Compliance Project Manager SUBJECT: GILROY COGENERATION a revised petition with the California Energy Commission requesting to modify the Gilroy Cogeneration the district. The Gilroy Cogeneration Project is a 115-megawatt, natural gas-fired power plant located

  20. Pollutant Emission Factors from Residential Natural Gas Appliances: A Literature Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traynor, G.W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    journals related to natural gas combustion and air pollutionemitted from natural gas combustion are predominately lessNatural Gas- fired Appliances," Proceedings: How Significant Are Residential Combustion

  1. Pollutant Emission Factors from Residential Natural Gas Appliances: A Literature Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traynor, G.W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    related to natural gas combustion and air pollution wereemitted from natural gas combustion are predominately lessGas- fired Appliances," Proceedings: How Significant Are Residential Combustion

  2. ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    infrastructure includes the state’s natural gas-fired power generation facilities, electricinfrastructure includes the state’s natural gas-fired power generation facilities, electric

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn C. England; Stephanie Wien; Mingchih O. Chang

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides results from the first year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operations. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation test results for a refinery gas-fired process heater and plans for cogeneration gas turbine tests and pilot-scale tests are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods to compare PM2.5 mass and chemical speciation. Test plans are presented for a gas turbine facility that will be tested in the fourth quarter of 2002. A preliminary approach for pilot-scale tests is presented that will help define design constraints for a new dilution sampler design that is smaller, lighter, and less costly to use.

  4. Measurement and analysis of heating of paper with gas-fired infrared burner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Husain, Abdullah Nadir

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Gas-fired IR heaters produce combustion on the burner surface by ignition of a pre-mixed air and fuel streams. The combustion raises the surface temperature to ranges of 800-1,100°C to emit radiation, mainly in the medium IR range, which has a...

  5. Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable togas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2004-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike natural gas-fired generation, renewable generation (e.g., from wind, solar, and geothermal power) is largely immune to fuel price risk. If ratepayers are rational and value long-term price stability, then--contrary to common practice--any comparison of the levelized cost of renewable to gas-fired generation should be based on a hedged gas price input, rather than an uncertain gas price forecast. This paper compares natural gas prices that can be locked in through futures, swaps, and physical supply contracts to contemporaneous long-term forecasts of spot gas prices. We find that from 2000-2003, forward gas prices for terms of 2-10 years have been considerably higher than most contemporaneous long-term gas price forecasts. This difference is striking, and implies that comparisons between renewable and gas-fired generation based on these forecasts over this period have arguably yielded results that are biased in favor of gas-fired generation.

  6. Psm Nature Power Service Management Formerly Umweltkontor Renewable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Psm Nature Power Service Management Formerly Umweltkontor Renewable Energy AG Jump to: navigation, search Name: psm Nature Power Service & Management (Formerly Umweltkontor...

  7. Before Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Before Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of Mark Gabriel,...

  8. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of William K....

  9. Before House Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    House Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before House Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural Resources Before House Subcommittee on...

  10. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Kenneth E. Legg, Administrator SEPA...

  11. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Elliot E. Mainzer,...

  12. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Kenneth E. Legg,...

  13. Rates and rites of passage: The use of natural gas in power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, D.I. [Mayer, Brown & Platt, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many advantages to the use of natural gas in new or repowered electric generating facilities. These include lower capital costs, positive environmental impacts, the use of proven technology, and an adequate resource base with a highly reliable and flexible transportation system. However, it is also clear that FERC`s regulation of pipeline rates and operating practices has a direct impact on the bottom line of electric generators. a sober understanding of these rules, a careful integration of the rules into project documents, and a more commercial approach to transportation contracts will enhance the revenues and control the risks of the financially successful gas-fired electric generators.

  14. Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generation: 50% of electricity from central grid natural gas plantsgeneration: 100% of electricity from central grid natural gas plantselectricity comes from central station natural-gas- fired combined cycle generation, and the other half comes from natural-gas-fired single cycle plants. •

  15. Study of the Heating Load of a Manufactured Space with a Gas-fired Radiant Heating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, X.; Dong, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal balance mathematics model of a manufactured space with a gas-fired radiant heating system is established to calculate the heating load. Computer programs are used to solve the model. Envelope internal surface temperatures under different...

  16. Study of the Heating Load of a Manufactured Space with a Gas-fired Radiant Heating System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, X.; Dong, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal balance mathematics model of a manufactured space with a gas-fired radiant heating system is established to calculate the heating load. Computer programs are used to solve the model. Envelope internal surface temperatures under different...

  17. Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norwood, Zack

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pdf/E-20.pdf, May 2008. PG&E natural gas tariffs. http://pdf/G-NT.pdf, May 2008. PG&E natural gas tariffs. http://than less expensive natural gas fired reciprocating engine

  18. Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 17, 2008, the reference-case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO 2009) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables can play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. Note that this memo pertains only to natural gas fuel price risk (i.e., the risk that natural gas prices might differ over the life of a gas-fired generation asset from what was expected when the decision to build the gas-fired unit was made). We do not take into consideration any of the other distinct attributes of gas-fired and renewable generation, such as dispatchability (or lack thereof), differences in capital costs and O&M expenses, or environmental externalities. A comprehensive comparison of different resource types--which is well beyond the scope of this memo--would need to account for differences in all such attributes, including fuel price risk. Furthermore, our analysis focuses solely on natural-gas-fired generation (as opposed to coal-fired or nuclear generation, for example), for several reasons: (1) price volatility has been more of a concern for natural gas than for other fuels used to generate power; (2) for environmental and other reasons, natural gas has, in recent years, been the fuel of choice among power plant developers; and (3) natural gas-fired generators often set the market clearing price in competitive wholesale power markets throughout the United States. That said, a more-complete analysis of how renewables mitigate fuel price risk would also need to consider coal, uranium, and other fuel prices. Finally, we caution readers about drawing inferences or conclusions based solely on this memo in isolation: to place the information contained herein within its proper context, we strongly encourage readers interested in this issue to read through our previous, more-detailed studies, available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf.

  19. Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 12, 2007, the reference-case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO 2008) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables can play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. Note that this memo pertains only to natural gas fuel price risk (i.e., the risk that natural gas prices might differ over the life of a gas-fired generation asset from what was expected when the decision to build the gas-fired unit was made). We do not take into consideration any of the other distinct attributes of gas-fired and renewable generation, such as dispatchability (or lack thereof) or environmental externalities. A comprehensive comparison of different resource types--which is well beyond the scope of this memo--would need to account for differences in all such attributes, including fuel price risk. Furthermore, our analysis focuses solely on natural-gas-fired generation (as opposed to coal-fired generation, for example), for several reasons: (1) price volatility has been more of a concern for natural gas than for other fuels used to generate power; (2) for environmental and other reasons, natural gas has, in recent years, been the fuel of choice among power plant developers (though its appeal has diminished somewhat as prices have increased); and (3) natural gas-fired generators often set the market clearing price in competitive wholesale power markets throughout the United States. That said, a more-complete analysis of how renewables mitigate fuel price risk would also need to consider coal and other fuel prices. Finally, we caution readers about drawing inferences or conclusions based solely on this memo in isolation: to place the information contained herein within its proper context, we strongly encourage readers interested in this issue to read through our previous, more-detailed studies, available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf.

  20. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development task 5 -- market study of the gas fired ATS. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), in partnership with the Department of Energy, will develop a family of advanced gas turbine-based power systems (ATS) for widespread commercialization within the domestic and international industrial marketplace, and to the rapidly changing electric power generation industry. The objective of the jointly-funded Program is to introduce an ATS with high efficiency, and markedly reduced emissions levels, in high numbers as rapidly as possible following introduction. This Topical Report is submitted in response to the requirements outlined in Task 5 of the Department of Energy METC Contract on Advanced Combustion Systems, Contract No, DE AC21-93MC30246 (Contract), for a Market Study of the Gas Fired Advanced Turbine System. It presents a market study for the ATS proposed by Solar, and will examine both the economic and siting constraints of the ATS compared with competing systems in the various candidate markets. Also contained within this report is an examination and analysis of Solar`s ATS and its ability to compete in future utility and industrial markets, as well as factors affecting the marketability of the ATS.

  1. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Christopher M. Turner, Administrator SWPA Before the...

  2. Development and Validation of a Gas-Fired Residential Heat Pump Water Heater - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Garrabrant; Roger Stout; Paul Glanville; Janice Fitzgerald; Chris Keinath

    2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    For gas-fired residential water heating, the U.S. and Canada is predominantly supplied by minimum efficiency storage water heaters with Energy Factors (EF) in the range of 0.59 to 0.62. Higher efficiency and higher cost ($700 - $2,000) options serve about 15% of the market, but still have EFs below 1.0, ranging from 0.65 to 0.95. To develop a new class of water heating products that exceeds the traditional limit of thermal efficiency, the project team designed and demonstrated a packaged water heater driven by a gas-fired ammonia-water absorption heat pump. This gas-fired heat pump water heater can achieve EFs of 1.3 or higher, at a consumer cost of $2,000 or less. Led by Stone Mountain Technologies Inc. (SMTI), with support from A.O. Smith, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), and Georgia Tech, the cross-functional team completed research and development tasks including cycle modeling, breadboard evaluation of two cycles and two heat exchanger classes, heat pump/storage tank integration, compact solution pump development, combustion system specification, and evaluation of packaged prototype GHPWHs. The heat pump system extracts low grade heat from the ambient air and produces high grade heat suitable for heating water in a storage tank for domestic use. Product features that include conventional installation practices, standard footprint and reasonable economic payback, position the technology to gain significant market penetration, resulting in a large reduction of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from domestic hot water production.

  3. EIS-0140: Ocean State Power Project, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission prepared this statement to evaluate potential impacts of construction and operation of a new natural gas-fired, combined-cycle power plant which would be located on a 40.6-acre parcel in the town of Burrillville, Rhode Island, as well as construction of a 10-mile pipeline to transport process and cooling water to the plant from the Blackstone River and a 7.5-mile pipeline to deliver No. 2 fuel oil to the site for emergency use when natural gas may not be available. The Economic Regulatory Administration adopted the EIS on 7/15/1988.

  4. Impact of Natural Gas Infrastructure on Electric Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Yong

    Impact of Natural Gas Infrastructure on Electric Power Systems MOHAMMAD SHAHIDEHPOUR, FELLOW, IEEE of electricity has introduced new risks associated with the security of natural gas infrastructure on a sig the essence of the natural gas infrastructure for sup- plying the ever-increasing number of gas-powered units

  5. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3292015 10:05:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)"...

  6. Title: Ontario Wind Power Allocation Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Ontario Wind Power Allocation Data Creator / Copyright Owner: Ontario Ministry of Natural/A Updates: N/A Abstract: This data consists of a polygon shapefile, Wind Power Allocation Block. A Wind Power Allocation Block is an area that could be allocated for the exploration of wind power generation

  7. Combined Heat and Power System Achieves Millions in Cost Savings...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cleary Builders and Jacobs Engineering Group, installed a 45 MW high-efficiency, natural gas-fired CHP system consisting of a 34 MW combustion turbine, a 210,000-pound-per-hour...

  8. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3292015 10:05:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  9. ,"New York Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:13:19 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  10. ,"New York Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:13:19 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3045NY2"...

  11. Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas-fired power plants, which will increase California'spower plants, which will presumably increase California'sin California is PG&E's Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant,

  12. Duplex Stirling gas-fired heat pump. Phase 2. Breadboard demonstration. Final report, May 1981-November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gedeon, D.; Penswick, B.; Beale, W.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program represents the first attempt to design, fabricate, and test a breadboard gas-fired duplex Stirling heat pump in a heating only mode. The system was designed to obtain a COP of 1.5 at an ambient temperature of 17F and have an output sufficient for an average residential home. The design methodology, detailed system description and test results for sub components and the entire system are discussed. Technical problems encountered in the program, and recommendations for further efforts are detailed.

  13. 2 nature physics | VOL 2 | JANUARY 2006 | www.nature.com/naturephysics A high-power laser fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    -rich `blanket', to release heat to drive a steam turbine power plant and to generate tritium for a subsequentCOMMENTARY 2 nature physics | VOL 2 | JANUARY 2006 | www.nature.com/naturephysics A high-power opportunities for performing fundamental and applied research will be missed. A dedicated civilian high-power

  14. STAFF PAPER THERMAL EFFICIENCY OF GASFIRED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................................................................... 6 List of Tables Page Table 1: California Natural GasFired Heat Rates for 2001 ­ 2010 (Btu 5: Heat Rates for California's Natural GasFired Power Plants (Btu/kWh) ...................... 8 per kilowatt hour (Btu/kWh) from 2001 to 2010. Table 1: California Natural Gas-Fired Heat Rates

  15. Operation Synopsis of Gas-Fired Double-Effect Absorption Chillers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for an absorption refrigeration system was issued in 1860. Absorption systems can use many different heat sources to produce the refrigeration effect: natural gas, steam, solar, and oil. While absorption systems were popular in the U.S. in the early part of the 20th...

  16. Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EIA) (2000). Annual Energy Outlook 2001. DOE/EIA- 0383(DC. _______________ (2001). Annual Energy Outlook 2002. DOE/DC. _______________ (2003). Annual Energy Outlook 2003. DOE/

  17. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 8: Direct Use of Natural Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 8: Direct Use of Natural Gas....................................................................... 1 Analysis of the Direct Use of Natural Gas for the Sixth Power Plan electricity to natural gas for residential space and water heating a lower-cost and lower-risk alternative

  18. 228 POWER FLOW ANALYSIS parties, it is crucial to recognize the inherently subjective nature of OPF. Power flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    228 POWER FLOW ANALYSIS parties, it is crucial to recognize the inherently subjective nature of OPF. Power flow analysis by itself basically answers a question of physics. By contrast, OPF answers criteria. In short, "optim- ality" does not arise from a power system's intrinsic technical properties

  19. Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals-Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond Hobbs

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Hydrogasification Process (AHP)--conversion of coal to methane--is being developed through NETL with a DOE Grant and has successfully completed its first phase of development. The results so far are encouraging and have led to commitment by DOE/NETL to begin a second phase--bench scale reactor vessel testing, expanded engineering analysis and economic perspective review. During the next decade new means of generating electricity, and other forms of energy, will be introduced. The members of the AHP Team envision a need for expanded sources of natural gas or substitutes for natural gas, to fuel power generating plants. The initial work the team has completed on a process to use hydrogen to convert coal to methane (pipeline ready gas) shows promising potential. The Team has intentionally slanted its efforts toward the needs of US electric utilities, particularly on fuels that can be used near urban centers where the greatest need for new electric generation is found. The process, as it has evolved, would produce methane from coal by adding hydrogen. The process appears to be efficient using western coals for conversion to a highly sought after fuel with significantly reduced CO{sub 2} emissions. Utilities have a natural interest in the preservation of their industry, which will require a dramatic reduction in stack emissions and an increase in sustainable technologies. Utilities tend to rank long-term stable supplies of fuel higher than most industries and are willing to trade some ratio of cost for stability. The need for sustainability, stability and environmentally compatible production are key drivers in the formation and progression of the AHP development. In Phase II, the team will add a focus on water conservation to determine how the basic gasification process can be best integrated with all the plant components to minimize water consumption during SNG production. The process allows for several CO{sub 2} reduction options including consumption of the CO{sub 2} in the original process as converted to methane. The process could under another option avoid emissions following the conversion to SNG through an adjunct algae conversion process. The algae would then be converted to fuels or other products. An additional application of the algae process at the end use natural gas fired plant could further reduce emissions. The APS team fully recognizes the competition facing the process from natural gas and imported liquid natural gas. While we expect those resources to set the price for methane in the near-term, the team's work to date indicates that the AHP process can be commercially competitive, with the added benefit of assuring long-term energy supplies from North American resources. Conversion of coal to a more readily transportable fuel that can be employed near load centers with an overall reduction of greenhouses gases is edging closer to reality.

  20. A Framework for Environmental Assessment of CO2 Capture and Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathre, Roger

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy than natural gas combustion, coal-fired plantsnatural gas combined cycle power plant with post-combustioncoal- and natural gas- fired plants. Since coal combustion

  1. Direct Use of Natural Gas: Economic Fuel Choices from the Regional Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct Use of Natural Gas: Economic Fuel Choices from the Regional Power System and Consumer's Perspective Council document 2012-01 Background Is it better to use natural gas directly in water heaters; total-energy efficiency, fuel switching, direct use of gas, and others. The natural gas companies

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 24, NO. 3, AUGUST 2009 1523 Security-Constrained Unit Commitment With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Yong

    for the commitment and dispatch of gas-fired generating units. If any natural gas transmission violations arise and dispatch of generating units with natural gas transmission constraints. Index Terms--Benders decomposition consumption of compressor. Startup fuel. Gas delivery amount. Gas load. Pressure of node. Natural gas flow

  3. Resource Contingency Program - Oregon : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hermiston Power Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial, and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. In 1990, to cover the outer range of potential load growth with new resources, BPA embarked upon the Resource Contingency Program (RCP). Instead of buying or building generating plants now, BPA has purchased options to acquire power later, if and when it is needed. The decision to acquire any of these option energy projects to fulfill statutory supply obligations will be influenced by Federal system load growth, the outcome of BPA`s Business Plan, required operational changes in Columbia-Snake River Hydroelectric facilities, and the loss of major generating resources. In September 1993, three option development agreements were signed with three proposed natural gas-fired, combined cycle combustion turbine CT projects near Chehalis and Satsop, Washington, and near Hermiston, Oregon. Together these three projects could supply BPA with 1,090 average megawatts (aMW) of power. Under these agreements, sponsors are obtaining permits and conducting project design work, and BPA is completing this EIS process. In September 1993, BPA published a Notice of Intent to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) on these three proposed gas-fired combustion turbine projects and held public scoping meetings in October 1993 at each site. In February 1994, BPA released an Implementation Plan on the proposed scope of the EIS. A draft EIS on the three proposed projects was published in February 1995. The impacts of the Chehalis and Satsop projects located in Washington State will be covered in one EIS document, while the impacts of the Hermiston project located in Oregon are covered in this final EIS document. It is BPA`s intent to continue to base the analysis of impacts on the assumption that all three projects may be constructed at some point in the future.

  4. Carbon pricing, nuclear power and electricity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, R.; Keppler, J. H. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 12, boulevard des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010, the NEA in conjunction with the International Energy Agency produced an analysis of the Projected Costs of Electricity for almost 200 power plants, covering nuclear, fossil fuel and renewable electricity generation. That analysis used lifetime costs to consider the merits of each technology. However, the lifetime cost analysis is less applicable in liberalised markets and does not look specifically at the viewpoint of the private investor. A follow-up NEA assessment of the competitiveness of nuclear energy against coal- and gas-fired generation under carbon pricing has considered just this question. The economic competition in electricity markets is today between nuclear energy and gas-fired power generation, with coal-fired power generation not being competitive as soon as even modest carbon pricing is introduced. Whether nuclear energy or natural gas comes out ahead in their competition depends on a number of assumptions, which, while all entirely reasonable, yield very different outcomes. The analysis in this study has been developed on the basis of daily data from European power markets over the last five-year period. Three different methodologies, a Profit Analysis looking at historic returns over the past five years, an Investment Analysis projecting the conditions of the past five years over the lifetime of plants and a Carbon Tax Analysis (differentiating the Investment Analysis for different carbon prices) look at the issue of competitiveness from different angles. They show that the competitiveness of nuclear energy depends on a number of variables which in different configurations determine whether electricity produced from nuclear power or from CCGTs generates higher profits for its investors. These are overnight costs, financing costs, gas prices, carbon prices, profit margins (or mark-ups), the amount of coal with carbon capture and electricity prices. This paper will present the outcomes of the analysis in the context of a liberalised electricity market, looking at the impact of the seven key variables and provide conclusions on the portfolio that a utility would be advised to maintain, given the need to limit risks but also to move to low carbon power generation. Such portfolio diversification would not only limit financial investor risk, but also a number of non-financial risks (climate change, security of supply, accidents). (authors)

  5. Understanding the nature of nuclear power plant risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denning, R. S. [Ohio State Univ., 201 West 19th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1142 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the evolution of understanding of severe accident consequences from the non-mechanistic assumptions of WASH-740 to WASH-1400, NUREG-1150, SOARCA and today in the interpretation of the consequences of the accident at Fukushima. As opposed to the general perception, the radiological human health consequences to members of the Japanese public from the Fukushima accident will be small despite meltdowns at three reactors and loss of containment integrity. In contrast, the radiation-related societal impacts present a substantial additional economic burden on top of the monumental task of economic recovery from the nonnuclear aspects of the earthquake and tsunami damage. The Fukushima accident provides additional evidence that we have mis-characterized the risk of nuclear power plant accidents to ourselves and to the public. The human health risks are extremely small even to people living next door to a nuclear power plant. The principal risk associated with a nuclear power plant accident involves societal impacts: relocation of people, loss of land use, loss of contaminated products, decontamination costs and the need for replacement power. Although two of the three probabilistic safety goals of the NRC address societal risk, the associated quantitative health objectives in reality only address individual human health risk. This paper describes the types of analysis that would address compliance with the societal goals. (authors)

  6. Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EIA). 1996a. Annual Energy Outlook 1996. DOE/EIA- 0383(DC. _______________. 1996b. Annual Energy Outlook 1997. DOE/DC. _______________. 1997. Annual Energy Outlook 1998. DOE/

  7. Nebraska Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough2,869,9601. Natural5,19580Feet)

  8. Before House Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplication ofTribal RenewableBatteryHouse Natural

  9. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplication ofTribalNatural Resources Committee Before the

  10. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplication ofTribalNatural Resources Committee Before theDepartment

  11. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplication ofTribalNatural Resources Committee Before

  12. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplication ofTribalNatural Resources Committee BeforeDepartment of

  13. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2, 2015 TheB2 MarchDepartment of Energy House Natural

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - Ievlev_NaturePhys_2013.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand RetrievalsFinalModule8.ppt MicrosoftDOE's ARRA Smartnow widely

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - NatureComm_Idrobo_2013.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand RetrievalsFinalModule8.pptStates AOnline CA:Hexagonal boron nitride

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - NatureComm_Kravchenko_2013.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand RetrievalsFinalModule8.pptStates AOnline CA:Hexagonal boron

  17. Following Nature's Current HYDROELECTRIC POWER IN THE NORTHWEST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProofWorkingEnergyGo modelP e r f o r m a the

  18. FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

  19. Issues in Energy Economics Led by Emerging Linkages between the Natural Gas and Power Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, Jeremy B. [AAPG EMD Energy Economics and Technology (United States)], E-mail: jplatt@epri.com

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel prices in 2006 continued at record levels, with uranium continuing upward unabated and coal, SO{sub 2} emission allowances, and natural gas all softening. This softening did not continue for natural gas, however, whose prices rose, fell and rose again, first following weather influences and, by the second quarter of 2007, continuing at high levels without any support from fundamentals. This article reviews these trends and describes the remarkable increases in fuel expenses for power generation. By the end of 2005, natural gas claimed 55% of annual power sector fuel expenses, even though it was used for only 19% of electric generation. Although natural gas is enormously important to the power sector, the sector also is an important driver of the natural gas market-growing to over 28% of the market even as total use has declined. The article proceeds to discuss globalization, natural gas price risk, and technology developments. Forces of globalization are poised to affect the energy markets in new ways-new in not being only about oil. Of particular interest in the growth of intermodal traffic and its a little-understood impacts on rail traffic patterns and transportation costs, and expected rapidly expanding LNG imports toward the end of the decade. Two aspects of natural gas price risk are discussed: how understanding the use of gas in the power sector helps define price ceilings and floors for natural gas, and how the recent increase in the natural gas production after years of record drilling could alter the supply-demand balance for the better. The article cautions, however, that escalation in natural gas finding and development costs is countering the more positive developments that emerged during 2006. Regarding technology, the exploitation of unconventional natural gas was one highlight. So too was the queuing up of coal-fired power plants for the post-2010 period, a phenomenon that has come under great pressure with many consequences including increased pressures in the natural gas market. The most significant illustration of these forces was the early 2007 suspension of development plans by a large power company, well before the Supreme Court's ruling on CO{sub 2} as a tailpipe pollutant and President Bush's call for global goals on CO{sub 2} emissions.

  20. Building new power plants in a CO2 constrained world: A Case Study from Norway on Gas-Fired Power Plants, Carbon Sequestration, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    normale supérieure, Paris, France, 1998 Submitted to the Engineering Systems Division in Partial including technologies for carbon sequestration. Norway's primary energy production is dominated by oil consumption per capita in the world, with demand on the rise at about 2% per year. Consequently electricity

  1. Hydrogen Resource Assessment: Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, and Hydro Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Mann, M.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper estimates the quantity of hydrogen that could be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power by county in the United States. The study estimates that more than 72 million tonnes of hydrogen can be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power per year in the country (considering only 30% of their total annual production). The United States consumed about 396 million tonnes of gasoline in 2007; therefore, the report suggests the amount of hydrogen from these sources could displace about 80% of this consumption.

  2. Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

  3. Method and apparatus for dispensing compressed natural gas and liquified natural gas to natural gas powered vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis A.; Clark, Michael L.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Palmer, Gary L.

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A fueling facility and method for dispensing liquid natural gas (LNG), compressed natural gas (CNG) or both on-demand. The fueling facility may include a source of LNG, such as cryogenic storage vessel. A low volume high pressure pump is coupled to the source of LNG to produce a stream of pressurized LNG. The stream of pressurized LNG may be selectively directed through an LNG flow path or to a CNG flow path which includes a vaporizer configured to produce CNG from the pressurized LNG. A portion of the CNG may be drawn from the CNG flow path and introduced into the CNG flow path to control the temperature of LNG flowing therethrough. Similarly, a portion of the LNG may be drawn from the LNG flow path and introduced into the CNG flow path to control the temperature of CNG flowing therethrough.

  4. FTT:Power : A global model of the power sector with induced technological change and natural resource depletion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercure, J -F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work introduces a model of Future Technology Transformations for the power sector (FTT:Power), a representation of global power systems based on market competition, induced technological change (ITC) and natural resource use and depletion. It is the first component of a family of sectoral bottom-up models of technology, designed for integration into the global macroeconometric model E3MG. ITC occurs as a result of technological learning produced by cumulative investment and leads to highly nonlinear, irreversible and path dependent technological transitions. The model uses a dynamic coupled set of logistic differential equations. As opposed to traditional bottom-up energy models based on systems optimisation, such differential equations offer an appropriate treatment of the times and structure of change involved in sectoral technology transformations, as well as a much reduced computational load. Resource use and depletion are represented by local cost-supply curves, which give rise to different regional...

  5. Revisiting the Long-Term Hedge Value of Wind Power in an Era of Low Natural Gas Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nexus of Natural Gas and Renewable Energy. ” The Electricity2007. “Can Deployment of Renewable Energy Put DownwardDetermining the Real Cost: Why Renewable Power is More Cost-

  6. The Power, Beauty and Excitement of the Cross-Boundary Nature of Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasik-Duncan, Bozenna

    The Power, Beauty and Excitement of the Cross-Boundary Nature of Control National Science San Diego, California in conjunction with the 2006 Conference on Decision and Control Sponsored by: National Science Foundation Co-Sponsors: IEEE Control Systems Society University of Kansas College

  7. 2005 Nature Publishing Group Mammal-like muscles power swimming in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWitt, Thomas J.

    dorsal fin, where the RM is most abundant, showed that all sharks had a core temperature about 18­20 8C© 2005 Nature Publishing Group Mammal-like muscles power swimming in a cold-water shark Diego, within the fishes the tunas and lamnid sharks deviate from the ectothermic strategy, maintaining elevated

  8. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  9. Surface treated natural graphite as anode material for high-power Li-ion battery applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J.; Vissers, D. R.; Amine, K.; Barsukov, I. V.; Henry, F.; Doniger, J.; Chemical Engineering; Superior Graphite Co.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High power application of Li-ion battery in hybrid electrical vehicles requires low cost and safe cell materials. Among the various carbon anode materials used in lithium ion batteries, natural graphite shows the most promise with advantages in performance and cost. However, natural graphite is not compatible with propylene carbonate (PC)-based electrolytes, which have a lower melting point and improved safety characteristics. The problem with it is that the molecules of propylene carbonate intercalate with Li+ into graphite, and that frequently leads to the exfoliation of the graphite matrix.

  10. Design, fabrication and testing of a 15-kW gas-fired liquid-metal evaporator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development and testing of a compact heat- pipe heat exchanger that is designed to transfer thermal energy from hot combustion gases to the heater tubes of a 25-kW{sub e} Stirling engine. In this system, sodium evaporates from a surface that is heated by a stream of hot gases and the liquid metal then condenses on the heater tubes of a Stirling engine where energy is transferred to the engine's helium working fluid. Recent tests on a prototype unit illustrated that a compact (8 cm {times} 13 cm {times} 16 cm) sodium evaporator can routinely transfer 15-kW{sub t} of energy at an operating vapor temperature of 760{degrees}C. Four of these prototype units will eventually be used to power a 25-kW{sub e} Stirling engine system. Design details and test results from the prototype unit are presented in this paper.

  11. Design, fabrication and testing of a 15-kW gas-fired liquid-metal evaporator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development and testing of a compact heat- pipe heat exchanger that is designed to transfer thermal energy from hot combustion gases to the heater tubes of a 25-kW{sub e} Stirling engine. In this system, sodium evaporates from a surface that is heated by a stream of hot gases and the liquid metal then condenses on the heater tubes of a Stirling engine where energy is transferred to the engine`s helium working fluid. Recent tests on a prototype unit illustrated that a compact (8 cm {times} 13 cm {times} 16 cm) sodium evaporator can routinely transfer 15-kW{sub t} of energy at an operating vapor temperature of 760{degrees}C. Four of these prototype units will eventually be used to power a 25-kW{sub e} Stirling engine system. Design details and test results from the prototype unit are presented in this paper.

  12. 100-kWp photovoltaic power system at Natural Bridges National Monument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solman, F.J.; Helfrich, J.H.; Lyon, E.F.; Benoit, A.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Bridges National Monument in southeastern Utah is the location of the world's largest solar photovoltaic power system. This system, which operates in a stand-alone mode without utility backup, supplies from 300 to 400 kWh/day of 60-Hz AC electrical energy to the diversified loads in the monument headquarters area. A diesel-powered generator serves as backup for the system. The solutions to a number of problems encountered in the design, fabrication, testing and early operation of the system are discussed.

  13. Natural Circulation in Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants Phenomena, models, and methodology for system reliability assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jose Reyes

    2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years it has been recognized that the application of passive safety systems (i.e., those whose operation takes advantage of natural forces such as convection and gravity), can contribute to simplification and potentially to improved economics of new nuclear power plant designs. In 1991 the IAEA Conference on ''The Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future'' noted that for new plants the use of passive safety features is a desirable method of achieving simplification and increasing the reliability of the performance of essential safety functions, and should be used wherever appropriate''.

  14. The Nature of Power Synthesizing the History of Technology and Environmental History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Edmund P.; Allison, James; Finger, Thomas; Brown, John K.; Balogh, Brain; Carlson, W. Bernard

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at the University of Virginia. The National Science Foundation (grant no. 0241889) funded graduate stu- dents and a postdoctoral fellow associated with the committee. Postdoctoral fellow Alex Checkovich co-wrote an unpublished essay on energy and power in 2006.... This argument rests upon several propositions: 1. Most of the energy used by life on earth arrived as sunlight. 2. History is largely the story of the capture, transformation, and application of this solar energy. 3. Nature, technology, and people have all...

  15. Natural language interface and database issues in applying expert systems to power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rumpel, D.; Krost, G. (Univ. of Duisburg Gesamthochschule, Elektrische Anlagen und Netze, 4100 Duisburg 1 (DE))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applying expert systems (ES's) to power system operation means imbedding them in an existing environment which consists of computational facilities (SCADA, EMS) on one side, and the operating staff on the other side. To that aim, an interface between process data and ES data is required. Further, for an unambiguous and clear information exchange with, and good acceptance by , the operators and approximate natural language dialog of the ES is desirable. In this paper, several approaches to these problems are described.

  16. Multi-agent social and organizational modeling of the electric power and natural gas markets.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    North, M. J.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) can be applied to investigate large-scale socio-cognitive-technical systems. Viewing such systems from a multi-agent social and organizational perspective allows innovative computational policy analysis. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has taken such a perspective to produce an integrated model of the electric power and natural gas markets. This model focuses on the organizational interdependencies between these markets. These organizational interdependencies are being strained by fundamental market transformations.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn C. England

    2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated new National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter, including for the first time particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers ({micro}m) referred to as PM2.5. PM2.5 in the atmosphere also contributes to reduced atmospheric visibility, which is the subject of existing rules for siting emission sources near Class 1 areas and new Regional Haze rules. There are few existing data regarding emissions and characteristics of fine aerosols from oil, gas and power generation industry combustion sources, and the information that is available is generally outdated and incomplete. Traditional stationary source air emission sampling methods tend to underestimate or overestimate the contribution of the source to ambient aerosols because they do not properly account for primary aerosol formation, which occurs after the gases leave the stack. Primary aerosol includes both filterable particles that are solid or liquid aerosols at stack temperature plus those that form as the stack gases cool through mixing and dilution processes in the plume downwind of the source. These deficiencies in the current methods can have significant impacts on regulatory decision-making. PM2.5 measurement issues were extensively reviewed by the American Petroleum Institute (API) (England et al., 1998), and it was concluded that dilution sampling techniques are more appropriate for obtaining a representative particulate matter sample from combustion systems for determining PM2.5 emission rate and chemical speciation. Dilution sampling is intended to collect aerosols including those that condense and/or react to form solid or liquid aerosols as the exhaust plume mixes and cools to near-ambient temperature immediately after the stack discharge. These techniques have been widely used in recent research studies. For example, Hildemann et al. (1994) and McDonald et al. (1998) used filtered ambient air to dilute the stack gas sample followed by 80-90 seconds residence time to allow aerosol formation and growth to stabilize prior to sample collection and analysis. More accurate and complete emissions data generated using the methods developed in this program will enable more accurate source-receptor and source apportionment analysis for PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) implementation and streamline the environmental assessment of oil, gas and power production facilities. The overall goals of this program were to: (1) Develop improved dilution sampling technology and test methods for PM2.5 mass emissions and speciation measurements, and compare results obtained with dilution and traditional stationary source sampling methods. (2) Develop emission factors and speciation profiles for emissions of fine particulate matter, especially organic aerosols, for use in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses. (3) Identify and characterize PM2.5 precursor compound emissions that can be used in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses.

  18. Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagan, Colin R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas emissions from conven- tional power sources like coal.total emissions from coal- or natural gas-fired power plantsemissions, the lifecycle for natural gas power production is more complicated than that of coal.

  19. The nature of the optical---radio correlations for powerful radio galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. N. Tadhunter; R. Morganti; A. Robinson; R. Dickson; M. Villar-Martin; R. A. E. Fosbury

    1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of the optical--radio correlations for powerful radio galaxies is investigated using spectroscopic observations of a complete sample of southern 2Jy radio sources. In line with previous work, we find that significant correlations exist between the luminosities of the [OIII]5007, [OII]3727 and Hbeta emission lines and the radio luminosity. However, our observations are not easily reconciled with the idea that these correlations are caused by the increase in the power of the photoionizing quasar as the jet power increases, with average ISM properties not changing appreciably with redshift or radio power: not only do we find that the scatter in the L_[OIII] vs. L_radio correlation is significantly larger than in L_[OII]} vs. L_radio and L_Hbeta vs. L_radio correlations, but the ionization state deduced from the emission lines does not increase with radio power as predicted by the simple, constant ISM, photionization model. We conclude that: (a) there exists a considerable range in the quasar ionizing luminosity at a given redshift; and (b) that the mean density of the emission line clouds is larger in the high redshift/high power radio sources. The latter density enhancement may either be a consequence of the increased importance of jet-cloud interactions or, alternatively, due to a higher pressure in the confining hot ISM, in the high redshift objects. Deep spectra show that many of the sources in our sample are broad line radio galaxies (BLRG). The fact that the BLRG are observed out the redshift limit of the survey, overlapping in redshift with the quasars, argues against the idea that BLRG are simply the low radio power counterparts of high power, high redshift quasars.

  20. Inflation that runs naturally: Gravitational waves and suppression of power at large and small scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn E. Minor; Manoj Kaplinghat

    2015-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We point out three correlated predictions of the axion monodromy inflation model: large amplitude of gravitational waves, suppression of power on horizon scales and on scales relevant for the formation of dwarf galaxies. While these predictions are likely generic to models with oscillations in the inflaton potential, the axion monodromy model naturally accommodates the required running spectral index through Planck-scale corrections to the inflaton potential. Applying this model to a combined data set of Planck, ACT, SPT, and WMAP low-$\\ell$ polarization cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, we find a best-fit tensor-to-scalar ratio $r_{0.05} = 0.07^{+0.05}_{-0.04}$ due to gravitational waves, which may have been observed by the BICEP2 experiment. Despite the contribution of gravitational waves, the total power on large scales (CMB power spectrum at low multipoles) is lower than the standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology with a power-law spectrum of initial perturbations and no gravitational waves, thus mitigating some of the tension on large scales. There is also a reduction in the matter power spectrum of 20-30\\% at scales corresponding to $k = 10~{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$, which are relevant for dwarf galaxy formation. This will alleviate some of the unsolved small-scale structure problems in the standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology. The inferred matter power spectrum is also found to be consistent with recent Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest data, which is in tension with the Planck-favored $\\Lambda$CDM model with power-law primordial power spectrum.

  1. QuarterlyCouncilNorthwest Power and Conservation Council > Spring 2013 STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and federal agency, and energy groups together to discuss the challenges surrounding this key planning issue on recommendations from state and federal fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes in the Northwest,but anyone of natural gas-fired generation, as well as an emphasis on energy efficiency and development of renewable

  2. Plant Design and Cost Estimation of a Natural Circulation Lead-Bismuth Reactor with Helium Power Conversion Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, D.

    The analysis of an indirect helium power conversion system with lead-bismuth natural circulation primary system has been performed. The work of this report is focused on 1) identifying the allowable design region for the ...

  3. Plant Design and Cost Estimation of a Natural Circulation Lead-Bismuth Reactor with Steam Power Conversion Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, D.

    The analysis of an indirect steam power conversion system with lead-bismuth natural circulation primary system has been performed. The work of this report is focused on 1) identifying the allowable design region for the ...

  4. Hazards to nuclear power plants from large liquefied natural gas (LNG) spills on water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kot, C.A.; Eichler, T.V.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Pape, R.; Srinivasan, M.G.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hazards to nuclear power plants arising from large spills of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on water transportation routes are treated by deterministic analytical procedures. Global models, which address the salient features of the LNG spill phenomena are used in the analysis. A coupled computational model for the combined LNG spill, spreading, and fire scenario is developed. To predict the air blast environment in the vicinity of vapor clouds with pancake-like geometries, a scalable procedure using both analytical methods and hydrocode calculations is synthesized. Simple response criteria from the fire and weapons effects literature are used to characterize the susceptibility of safety-related power plant systems. The vulnerability of these systems is established either by direct comparison between the LNG threat and the susceptibility criteria or through simple response calculations. Results are analyzed.

  5. Toward a new, integrated interactive electric power and natural gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The movement toward a new, integrated interactive electric power and natural gas industry is discussed. This movement envisions more competition and fewer competitors. The key capabilities of the new market are described. It is concluded that what will make an energy business succeed is the ability to aggregate supply and markets, to optimize routing, to improve load factors, and to provide added levels of reliability through diversity. The strong organization that is able to deal in all forms of energy is a necessary part of this new paradigm of the integrated energy market.

  6. Ultra Clean 1.1MW High Efficiency Natural Gas Engine Powered System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zurlo, James; Lueck, Steve

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dresser, Inc. (GE Energy, Waukesha gas engines) will develop, test, demonstrate, and commercialize a 1.1 Megawatt (MW) natural gas fueled combined heat and power reciprocating engine powered package. This package will feature a total efficiency > 75% and ultra low CARB permitting emissions. Our modular design will cover the 1 – 6 MW size range, and this scalable technology can be used in both smaller and larger engine powered CHP packages. To further advance one of the key advantages of reciprocating engines, the engine, generator and CHP package will be optimized for low initial and operating costs. Dresser, Inc. will leverage the knowledge gained in the DOE - ARES program. Dresser, Inc. will work with commercial, regulatory, and government entities to help break down barriers to wider deployment of CHP. The outcome of this project will be a commercially successful 1.1 MW CHP package with high electrical and total efficiency that will significantly reduce emissions compared to the current central power plant paradigm. Principal objectives by phases for Budget Period 1 include: • Phase 1 – market study to determine optimum system performance, target first cost, lifecycle cost, and creation of a detailed product specification. • Phase 2 – Refinement of the Waukesha CHP system design concepts, identification of critical characteristics, initial evaluation of technical solutions, and risk mitigation plans. Background

  7. ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    loss to natural gas-fired simple-cycle combustion turbine (of natural gas power plants: (1) simple-cycle combustionnatural gas power plants are considered: simple- cycle combustion

  8. Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaswan, Alice

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    largely from coal and natural gas fired power plants. ENVIL.switching from coal to natural gas). 62. See infra note 110equivalent, and that natural gas generates much smaller co-

  9. Quantifying the value that wind power provides as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Pricing by Regulated Natural Gas Utilities, Docket No.A HEDGE AGAINST VOLATILE NATURAL GAS PRICES Mark Bolinger,A HEDGE AGAINST VOLATILE NATURAL GAS PRICES Mark Bolinger,

  10. NATURAL GAS HYDRATES STORAGE PROJECT PHASE II. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.E. Rogers

    1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE Contract DE-AC26-97FT33203 studied feasibility of utilizing the natural-gas storage property of gas hydrates, so abundantly demonstrated in nature, as an economical industrial process to allow expanded use of the clean-burning fuel in power plants. The laboratory work achieved breakthroughs: (1) Gas hydrates were found to form orders of magnitude faster in an unstirred system with surfactant-water micellar solutions. (2) Hydrate particles were found to self-pack by adsorption on cold metal surfaces from the micellar solutions. (3) Interstitial micellar-water of the packed particles were found to continue forming hydrates. (4) Aluminum surfaces were found to most actively collect the hydrate particles. These laboratory developments were the bases of a conceptual design for a large-scale process where simplification enhances economy. In the design, hydrates form, store, and decompose in the same tank in which gas is pressurized to 550 psi above unstirred micellar solution, chilled by a brine circulating through a bank of aluminum tubing in the tank employing gas-fired refrigeration. Hydrates form on aluminum plates suspended in the chilled micellar solution. A low-grade heat source, such as 110 F water of a power plant, circulates through the tubing bank to release stored gas. The design allows a formation/storage/decomposition cycle in a 24-hour period of 2,254,000 scf of natural gas; the capability of multiple cycles is an advantage of the process. The development costs and the user costs of storing natural gas in a scaled hydrate process were estimated to be competitive with conventional storage means if multiple cycles of hydrate storage were used. If more than 54 cycles/year were used, hydrate development costs per Mscf would be better than development costs of depleted reservoir storage; above 125 cycles/year, hydrate user costs would be lower than user costs of depleted reservoir storage.

  11. Published: December 28, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 724 dx.doi.org/10.1021/cr2003272 |Chem. Rev. 2012, 112, 724781

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is at stationary point sources, such as coal- and natural gas-fired power plants. In the United States, 41 of coal, oil, and natural gas (ca. 80% of CO2 emissions worldwide),1 are pro- jected to continue

  12. Conceptual design and system analysis of a poly-generation system for power and olefin production from natural gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yinlun

    -production system based on coal and natural gas for the production of electric- ity and Dimethyl ether (DME) and electricity being more thermodynamically efficient and economically viable than single purpose power resources and environmental considerations. In some senses, energy shortages and environmental pollution

  13. A comparative life cycle assessment of diesel and compressed natural gas powered refuse collection vehicles in a Canadian city

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    A comparative life cycle assessment of diesel and compressed natural gas powered refuse collection by the City of Surrey in British Columbia are utilized. c The life cycle energy use is similar for diesel and CNG RCVs. c A 24% reduction of GHG emissions (CO2-equivalent) may be realized by switching from diesel

  14. The new economics of the electric power industry and some implication for the natural gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, G.R. [Putnam, Hayes & Bartlett, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The current restructuring of the natural gas industry and its regulation have important implications for the natural gas industry. Some of these implications are positive, some negative. As in all situations of change and uncertainty, look before you leap, is good advice to those in the natural gas industry seeking to take advantage of the opportunities created by the startling changes that are occurring.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW-COST INFERENTIAL NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW RATE PROTOTYPE RETROFIT MODULE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Kelner; T.E. Owen; D.L. George; A. Minachi; M.G. Nored; C.J. Schwartz

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998, Southwest Research Institute{reg_sign} began a multi-year project co-funded by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy. The project goal is to develop a working prototype instrument module for natural gas energy measurement. The module will be used to retrofit a natural gas custody transfer flow meter for energy measurement, at a cost an order of magnitude lower than a gas chromatograph. Development and evaluation of the prototype retrofit natural gas energy flow meter in 2000-2001 included: (1) evaluation of the inferential gas energy analysis algorithm using supplemental gas databases and anticipated worst-case gas mixtures; (2) identification and feasibility review of potential sensing technologies for nitrogen diluent content; (3) experimental performance evaluation of infrared absorption sensors for carbon dioxide diluent content; and (4) procurement of a custom ultrasonic transducer and redesign of the ultrasonic pulse reflection correlation sensor for precision speed-of-sound measurements. A prototype energy meter module containing improved carbon dioxide and speed-of-sound sensors was constructed and tested in the GRI Metering Research Facility at SwRI. Performance of this module using transmission-quality natural gas and gas containing supplemental carbon dioxide up to 9 mol% resulted in gas energy determinations well within the inferential algorithm worst-case tolerance of {+-}2.4 Btu/scf (nitrogen diluent gas measured by gas chromatograph). A two-week field test was performed at a gas-fired power plant to evaluate the inferential algorithm and the data acquisition requirements needed to adapt the prototype energy meter module to practical field site conditions.

  16. Radiological Impact Associated to Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) from Coal-Fired Power Plants Emissions - 13436

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinis, Maria de Lurdes; Fiuza, Antonio; Soeiro de Carvalho, Jose; Gois, Joaquim [Geo-Environment and Resources Research Centre (CIGAR), Porto University, Faculty of Engineering - FEUP, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)] [Geo-Environment and Resources Research Centre (CIGAR), Porto University, Faculty of Engineering - FEUP, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Meira Castro, Ana Cristina [School of Engineering Polytechnic of Porto - ISEP, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 431, 4200-072, Porto (Portugal)] [School of Engineering Polytechnic of Porto - ISEP, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 431, 4200-072, Porto (Portugal)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain materials used and produced in a wide range of non-nuclear industries contain enhanced activity concentrations of natural radionuclides. In particular, electricity production from coal is one of the major sources of increased human exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials. A methodology was developed to assess the radiological impact due to natural radiation background. The developed research was applied to a specific case study, the Sines coal-fired power plant, located in the southwest coastline of Portugal. Gamma radiation measurements were carried out with two different instruments: a sodium iodide scintillation detector counter (SPP2 NF, Saphymo) and a gamma ray spectrometer with energy discrimination (Falcon 5000, Canberra). Two circular survey areas were defined within 20 km of the power plant. Forty relevant measurements points were established within the sampling area: 15 urban and 25 suburban locations. Additionally, ten more measurements points were defined, mostly at the 20-km area. The registered gamma radiation varies from 20 to 98.33 counts per seconds (c.p.s.) corresponding to an external gamma exposure rate variable between 87.70 and 431.19 nGy/h. The highest values were measured at locations near the power plant and those located in an area within the 6 and 20 km from the stacks. In situ gamma radiation measurements with energy discrimination identified natural emitting nuclides as well as their decay products (Pb-212, Pb-2142, Ra-226, Th-232, Ac-228, Th-234, Pa-234, U- 235, etc.). According to the results, an influence from the stacks emissions has been identified both qualitatively and quantitatively. The developed methodology accomplished the lack of data in what concerns to radiation rate in the vicinity of Sines coal-fired power plant and consequently the resulting exposure to the nearby population. (authors)

  17. Meeting the challenges of the new energy industry: The driving forces facing electric power generators and the natural gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The proceedings of the IGT national conference on meeting the challenges of the New Energy Industry: The driving forces facing Electric Power Generators and the Natural Gas Industry are presented. The conference was held June 19-21, 1995 at the Ambassador West Hotel in Downtown Chicago, Illinois. A separate abstract and indexing for each of the 18 papers presented for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  18. Steps being taken to resolve questions on natural gas use for power generation in the New England region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gulick, C. [Boston Gas Company, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Steps being taken to resolve questions on natural gas use for power generation in the New England Region are outlined. The following topics are discussed: bridging the gap, gas/electric discussion group, energy consumption by fuel, NEPOOL energy mix forecast, the players and their needs, pipelines serving New England, evaluation of pipeline reliability, industry survey, summary of survey conclusions, communications, operational differences, recommended red alert information sequence, handling a crisis, and major accomplishments to date.

  19. Low natural gas prices may drive up FY 2014-2015 power rates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    natural gas prices? Production Much has been written over the past few years about "fracking," the technology of hydraulic fracturing in horizontally drilled wells that has made...

  20. Power density spectrum of NGC 5548 and the nature of its variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Czerny; A. Schwarzenberg-Czerny; Z. Loska

    1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive power density spectra in the optical and X-ray band in the timescale range from several years down to $\\sim $ a day. We suggest that the optical power density spectrum consists of two separate components: long timescale variations and short timescale variations, with the dividing timescale around 100 days. The shape of the short timescale component is similar to X-ray power density spectrum which is consistent with the interpretation of short timescale optical variations being caused by X-ray reprocessing. We show that the observed optical long timescale variability is consistent with thermal pulsations of the accretion disc.

  1. Option valuation of flexible investments : the case of a coal gasifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbelot, Olivier

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the use of contingent claim analysis to evaluate the option of retrofitting a coal gasifier on an existing gas-fired power plant in order to take advantage of changes in the relative prices of natural ...

  2. Repowering of the Midland Nuclear Station 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gatlin, C. E. Jr.; Vellender, G. C.; Mooney, J. A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conversion of the Midland Nuclear Station to a combined cycle power facility is the first of its kind. The existing nuclear steam turbine, combined with new, natural-gas-fired gas turbines, will create the largest cogeneration facility...

  3. Neural Network Technology as a Pollution Prevention Tool in the Electric Utility Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, M. L.

    This paper documents efforts by the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) to pilot test the use of neural network technology as a pollution prevention tool for reducing stack emissions from a natural gas-fired power generating facility. The project...

  4. A partnership of the U.S. Department of Energy and Solar Turbines Incorporated to develop and commercialize the premier power source for the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilken, L.S.; Brent, R. [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Turbines Incorporated, a San Diego based subsidiary of Caterpillar, Inc., entered into a funded Cooperative Agreement on September 15, 1995 with the U.S. Department of Energy for a multi-phase cost share development and commercialization program focused on natural gas-fired industrial gas turbine generation systems. The Advanced Turbine System (ATS) program and Solar Turbine`s proposal are summarized below. 4 figs.

  5. Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

  6. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, and NaturalWellhead PriceNetCoalbed

  7. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future7,Dry Natural GasCoalbed

  8. Understanding the use of natural gas storage for generators of electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckman, K.L. [International Gas Consulting, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground natural gas storage is aggressively used by a handful of utility electric generators in the United States. While storage facilities are often utilized by the natural gas pipeline industry and the local distribution companies (LDCs), regional electric generators have taken advantgage of abundant storage and pipeline capacity to develop very cost efficient gas fired electric generating capacity, especially for peaking demand. Most types of natural gas storage facilities are located underground, with a few based above-ground. These facilities have served two basic types of natural gas storage service requirements: seasonal baseload and needle peakshaving. Baseload services are typically developed in depleted oil and gas reservoirs and aquifers while mined caverns and LNG facilities (also Propane-air facilities) typically provide needle peakshaving services. Reengineering of the natural gas infrastructure will alter the historical use patterns, and will provide the electric industry with new gas supply management tools. Electric generators, as consumers of natural gas, were among the first open access shippers and, as a result of FERC Order 636, are now attempting to reposition themselves in the {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} gas industry. Stated in terms of historical consumption, the five largest gas burning utilities consume 40% of all the gas burned for electric generation, and the top twenty accounted for approximately 70%. Slightly more than 100 utilities, including municipals, have any gas fired generating capacity, a rather limited number. These five are all active consumers of storage services.

  9. Phase I-B development of kinematic Stirling/Rankine commercial gas-fired heat-pump system. Final report, September 1983-December 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monahan, R.E.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kinematic Stirling/Rankine gas heat pump concept is based on the application of a Stirling engine that has been under development for over a decade. The engine has been converted to natural gas and is characterized with many thousand hours of operating experience. The goal of the project is to develop a commercial-size Stirling engine-driven gas heat pump with a cooling capacity of 10-ton, and a COP (heating) of 1.8 and COP (cooling) of 1.1. The project is a multi-phase development with commercialization planned for 1989. In this phase, an HVAC systems manufacturer (Borg-Warner) is working with SPS to develop a prototype gas-heat-pump system. To date, a piston-type open-shaft refrigeration compressor was selected as the best match for the engine. Both the engine and compressor have been tested and characterized by performance maps, and the experimental heat-pump systems designed, built, and preliminary testing performed. Close agreement with computer model output has been achieved. SPS has continued to focus on improving the Stirling-engine performance and reliability for the gas-heat-pump application.

  10. Phase 1-supplemental development of a kinematic Stirling/Rankine commercial gas-fired heat-pump system. Final report, January 1989-June 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monahan, R.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinematic Stirling/Rankine gas heat pump concept is based on the application of a Stirling engine that has been under development for over a decade. The engine has been converted to natural gas and is characterized with many thousand hours of operating experience. The goal of the project is to develop a commercial size Stirling engine-driven gas heat pump with a cooling capacity of 10 tons, a COP (heating) of 1.8 and a COP (cooling) of 1.1. The project is a multi-phase development with commercialization planned for the mid-1990's. In previous phases, an HVAC-systems manufacturer (York International) had been working with SPS to develop a prototype gas-heat-pump system. To date, two generations of prototype GHP systems have been built and tested and have demonstrated significant operating cost savings over the conventional electric heat pump. Under the program, a number of design and manufacturing process changes were made to the engine to reduce costs and improve endurance and shaft efficiency and are described. The adaptation and operation of a computer optimization code was accomplished under the program and is reported herein.

  11. U.S. Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSSCoal ProductionLiquefied NaturalYear

  12. U.S. Natural Gas Electric Power Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSSCoal ProductionLiquefied NaturalYearDecade

  13. U.S. Natural Gas Electric Power Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSSCoal ProductionLiquefied NaturalYearDecadeYear

  14. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancyNationalNatural GasImports by

  15. New Mexico Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural GasCubic2008 2009

  16. Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplication ofTribal RenewableBatteryHouse NaturalResources |

  17. Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplication ofTribal RenewableBatteryHouse NaturalResources

  18. Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Energy and Natural

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplication ofTribal RenewableBatteryHouse NaturalResourcesResources

  19. Development of a dynamic simulator for a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with post-combustion carbon capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liese, E.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AVESTAR Center located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and West Virginia University is a world-class research and training environment dedicated to using dynamic process simulation as a tool for advancing the safe, efficient and reliable operation of clean energy plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The AVESTAR Center was launched with a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion carbon capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator offers full-scope Operator Training Simulator (OTS) Human Machine Interface (HMI) graphics for realistic, real-time control room operation and is integrated with a 3D virtual Immersive Training Simulator (ITS), thus allowing joint control room and field operator training. The IGCC OTS/ITS solution combines a “gasification with CO{sub 2} capture” process simulator with a “combined cycle” power simulator into a single high-performance dynamic simulation framework. This presentation will describe progress on the development of a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) dynamic simulator based on the syngas-fired combined cycle portion of AVESTAR’s IGCC dynamic simulator. The 574 MW gross NGCC power plant design consisting of two advanced F-class gas turbines, two heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), and a steam turbine in a multi-shaft 2x2x1 configuration will be reviewed. Plans for integrating a post-combustion carbon capture system will also be discussed.

  20. Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 <Department of iiBiodieselWATER, POWER,Energythe Dynamics of|

  1. Hydrogen Resource Assessment: Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, and Hydro Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogen and Fuel CellFew-LayerGas Streamsof the

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - NatureNanotech_748_2013.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand RetrievalsFinalModule8.pptStates AOnline CA:Hexagonal

  3. NREL Melds Nature with Nanotech for Solar-Powered Hydrogen Production (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL researchers are finding ways to mimic photosynthesis by combining enzymes with nanoparticles - particles on the scale of a billionth of a meter - to produce hydrogen directly from water and sunlight. This breakthrough project began in 2008 with scientists and researchers asking how they might learn from nature and develop a synthetic process that is more efficient than plants at converting sunlight to hydrogen. The goal was to find a new way to produce hydrogen that could then be commercialized inexpensively for fuel cells and other uses. Among the various approaches to making hydrogen, the NREL researchers wondered about a hybrid molecular assembly that might pair the best natural molecule with a synthesized nanoparticle. Researchers looked at using hydrogenase enzymes as one part of the equation. These biological catalysts can convert electrons and protons into hydrogen gas, or convert hydrogen into electrons and protons. The choice seemed worthwhile because the hydrogenase enzyme has some intriguing properties: a high substrate selectivity, meaning a very high preference for catalyzing reactions with protons rather than with other atoms and molecules; and fast turnover, which enables it to produce a hydrogen molecule in milliseconds.

  4. Revisiting the Long-Term Hedge Value of Wind Power in an Era of Low Natural Gas Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Downward Pressure on Natural Gas Prices? ” Energy Policy.Tensions at the Nexus of Natural Gas and Renewable Energy. ”Profiles of Renewable and Natural Gas Electricity Contracts:

  5. Power-law of Aggregate-size Spectra in Natural Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Convertino; Filippo Simini; Filippo Catani; Igor Linkov; Gregory A. Kiker

    2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Patterns of animate and inanimate systems show remarkable similarities in their aggregation. One similarity is the double-Pareto distribution of the aggregate-size of system components. Different models have been developed to predict aggregates of system components. However, not many models have been developed to describe probabilistically the aggregate-size distribution of any system regardless of the intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of the aggregation process. Here we consider natural animate systems, from one of the greatest mammals - the African elephant (\\textit{Loxodonta africana}) - to the \\textit{Escherichia coli} bacteria, and natural inanimate systems in river basins. Considering aggregates as islands and their perimeter as a curve mirroring the sculpting network of the system, the probability of exceedence of the drainage area, and the Hack's law are shown to be the the Kor\\v{c}ak's law and the perimeter-area relationship for river basins. The perimeter-area relationship, and the probability of exceedence of the aggregate-size provide a meaningful estimate of the same fractal dimension. Systems aggregate because of the influence exerted by a physical or processes network within the system domain. The aggregate-size distribution is accurately derived using the null-method of box-counting on the occurrences of system components. The importance of the aggregate-size spectrum relies on its ability to reveal system form, function, and dynamics also as a function of other coupled systems. Variations of the fractal dimension and of the aggregate-size distribution are related to changes of systems that are meaningful to monitor because potentially critical for these systems.

  6. Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norwood, Zack; Lipman, Tim; Marnay, Chris; Kammen, Dan

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes the current economic and environmental performance of combined heat and power (CHP) systems in power interruption intolerant commercial facilities. Through a series of three case studies, key trade-offs are analyzed with regard to the provision of black-out ridethrough capability with the CHP systems and the resutling ability to avoid the need for at least some diesel backup generator capacity located at the case study sites. Each of the selected sites currently have a CHP or combined heating, cooling, and power (CCHP) system in addition to diesel backup generators. In all cases the CHP/CCHP system have a small fraction of the electrical capacity of the diesel generators. Although none of the selected sites currently have the ability to run the CHP systems as emergency backup power, all could be retrofitted to provide this blackout ride-through capability, and new CHP systems can be installed with this capability. The following three sites/systems were used for this analysis: (1) Sierra Nevada Brewery - Using 1MW of installed Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells operating on a combination of digestor gas (from the beer brewing process) and natural gas, this facility can produce electricty and heat for the brewery and attached bottling plant. The major thermal load on-site is to keep the brewing tanks at appropriate temperatures. (2) NetApp Data Center - Using 1.125 MW of Hess Microgen natural gas fired reciprocating engine-generators, with exhaust gas and jacket water heat recovery attached to over 300 tons of of adsorption chillers, this combined cooling and power system provides electricity and cooling to a data center with a 1,200 kW peak electrical load. (3) Kaiser Permanente Hayward Hospital - With 180kW of Tecogen natural gas fired reciprocating engine-generators this CHP system generates steam for space heating, and hot water for a city hospital. For all sites, similar assumptions are made about the economic and technological constraints of the power generation system. Using the Distributed Energy Resource Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we model three representative scenarios and find the optimal operation scheduling, yearly energy cost, and energy technology investments for each scenario below: Scenario 1 - Diesel generators and CHP/CCHP equipment as installed in the current facility. Scenario 1 represents a baseline forced investment in currently installed energy equipment. Scenario 2 - Existing CHP equipment installed with blackout ride-through capability to replace approximately the same capacity of diesel generators. In Scenario 2 the cost of the replaced diesel units is saved, however additional capital cost for the controls and switchgear for blackout ride-through capability is necessary. Scenario 3 - Fully optimized site analysis, allowing DER-CAM to specify the number of diesel and CHP/CCHP units (with blackout ride-through capability) that should be installed ignoring any constraints on backup generation. Scenario 3 allows DER-CAM to optimize scheduling and number of generation units from the currently available technologies at a particular site. The results of this analysis, using real data to model the optimal schedulding of hypothetical and actual CHP systems for a brewery, data center, and hospital, lead to some interesting conclusions. First, facilities with high heating loads will typically prove to be the most appropriate for CHP installation from a purely economic standpoint. Second, absorption/adsorption cooling systems may only be economically feasible if the technology for these chillers can increase above current best system efficiency. At a coefficient of performance (COP) of 0.8, for instance, an adsorption chiller paired with a natural gas generator with waste heat recovery at a facility with large cooling loads, like a data center, will cost no less on a yearly basis than purchasing electricity and natural gas directly from a utility. Third, at marginal additional cost, if the reliability of CHP systems proves to be at

  7. Testing of a naturally aged nuclear power plant inverter and battery charger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunther, W.E.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A naturally aged inverter and battery charger were obtained from the Shippingport facility. This equipment was manufactured in 1974, and was installed at Shippingport in 1975 as part of a major plant modification. Testing was performed on this equipment under the auspices of the NRC's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program to evaluate the type and extent of degradation due to aging, and to determine the effectiveness of condition monitoring techniques which could be used to detect aging effects. Steady state testing was conducted over the equipment's entire operating range. Step load changes were also initiated in order to monitor the electrical response. During this testing, component temperatures were monitored and circuit waveforms analyzed. Results indicated that aging had not substantially affected equipment operation. On the other hand, when compared with original acceptance test data, the monitoring techniques employed were sensitive to changes in measurable component and equipment parameters indicating the viability of detecting degradation prior to catastrophic failure. 7 refs., 34 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. System Design of a Natural Gas PEM Fuel Cell Power Plant for Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Ferrall, Tim Rehg, Vesna Stanic

    2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The following conclusions are made based on this analysis effort: (1) High-temperature PEM data are not available; (2) Stack development effort for Phase II is required; (3) System results are by definition preliminary, mostly due to the immaturity of the high-temperature stack; other components of the system are relatively well defined; (4) The Grotthuss conduction mechanism yields the preferred system characteristics; the Grotthuss conduction mechanism is also much less technically mature than the vehicle mechanism; (5) Fuel processor technology is available today and can be procured for Phase II (steam or ATR); (6) The immaturity of high-temperature membrane technology requires that a robust system design be developed in Phase II that is capable of operating over a wide temperature and pressure range - (a) Unpressurized or Pressurized PEM (Grotthuss mechanism) at 140 C, Highest temperature most favorable, Lowest water requirement most favorable, Pressurized recommended for base loaded operation, Unpressurized may be preferred for load following; (b) Pressurized PEM (vehicle mechanism) at about 100 C, Pressure required for saturation, Fuel cell technology currently available, stack development required. The system analysis and screening evaluation resulted in the identification of the following components for the most promising system: (1) Steam reforming fuel processor; (2) Grotthuss mechanism fuel cell stack operating at 140 C; (3) Means to deliver system waste heat to a cogeneration unit; (4) Pressurized system utilizing a turbocompressor for a base-load power application. If duty cycling is anticipated, the benefits of compression may be offset due to complexity of control. In this case (and even in the base loaded case), the turbocompressor can be replaced with a blower for low-pressure operation.

  9. The development of a solar thermal water purification, heating, and power generation system: A case study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    implemented in several desalination systems through the use of coal or gas-fired boilers. To date, however

  10. Electric and Gas Fired Radiant Tubes 'ERT'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nilsen, E. K.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper covers a unique development by the Surface Division of Midland Ross of a radiant tube heating element which will heat an industrial furnace with either gas or electric without any down time or physical conversion required...

  11. Electric and Gas Fired Radiant Tubes 'ERT' 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nilsen, E. K.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper covers a unique development by the Surface Division of Midland Ross of a radiant tube heating element which will heat an industrial furnace with either gas or electric without any down time or physical conversion required...

  12. System Study of Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL) Catalytic Combustion for Natural Gas and Coal-Derived Syngas Combustion Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahrokh Etemad; Lance Smith; Kevin Burns

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL{reg_sign}) technology has been successfully developed to provide improvement in Dry Low Emission gas turbine technology for coal derived syngas and natural gas delivering near zero NOx emissions, improved efficiency, extending component lifetime and the ability to have fuel flexibility. The present report shows substantial net cost saving using RCL{reg_sign} technology as compared to other technologies both for new and retrofit applications, thus eliminating the need for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) in combined or simple cycle for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and natural gas fired combustion turbines.

  13. CO{sub 2} reduction potential in power production and its cost efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aijala, M.; Salokoski, P.; Alin, J.; Siikavirta, H.; Nykaenen, J.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} reduction potential and the economy of it in power production are handled in this presentation. The main focus is on combined heat and power production, CHP. The reference case has been the conventional coal fired condensing power plant and district heating with heavy fuel oil. Various CHP concepts are handled as substitutive technology for the reference case. Considered fuels are coal and biomass. CO{sub 2} produced in biomass firing processes is not regarded to increase the net CO{sub 2} emissions to the atmosphere. Reference case can be substituted by a more efficient coal-fired power plant, so called USC plant or by natural gas-fired combined cycle power plant. Both changes lead to very limited reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions. On the other hand the shifting is profitable. CO{sub 2} reduction potential differs in various CHP concepts according to the fuel used. With biomass the reduction is 100% and in the smallest considered coal-fired industrial power plant it is only 6%. Looking at CO{sub 2} reduction costs, ECU/t CO{sub 2}, the best alternative seems to be the changing to coal-fired CHP in industrial power plants. Due to different reduction potentials of different methods the reduction cost illustrates poorly the quality of the method. For example, in a case where the profitability is good but reduction potential is small the reduction cost is strongly negative and the case seems to be cost-effective. To avoid the previous effects the profitability of the changes has to be studied with and without CO{sub 2} emission fees. Biomass-CHP will be cost-effective compared to coal-CHP with the prices 2.5--5 ECU/t CO{sub 2} saved. The industrial CHP plant will be cost-effective despite of the fuel used and without CO{sub 2} emission fees. The district heating CHP plant will be cost-effective, if the plant size is large. The small district heating CHP plants are cost-effective, if the saved CO{sub 2} ton has a price.

  14. Utilization of coal mine ventilation exhaust as combustion air in gas-fired turbines for electric and/or mechanical power generation. Semi-annual topical report, June 1995--August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane emitted during underground coal mining operations is a hazard that is dealt with by diluting the methane with fresh air and exhausting the contaminated air to the atmosphere. Unfortunately this waste stream may contain more than 60% of the methane resource from the coal, and in the atmosphere the methane acts as a greenhouse gas with an effect about 24.5 times greater than CO{sub 2}. Though the waste stream is too dilute for normal recovery processes, it can be used as combustion air for a turbine-generator, thereby reducing the turbine fuel requirements while reducing emissions. Preliminary analysis indicates that such a system, built using standard equipment, is economically and environmentally attractive, and has potential for worldwide application.

  15. A dynamic process model of a natural gas combined cycle -- Model development with startup and shutdown simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liese, Eric [U.S. DOE; Zitney, Stephen E. [U.S. DOE

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in dynamic process simulation for integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC) with carbon capture has been ongoing at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), culminating in a full operator training simulator (OTS) and immersive training simulator (ITS) for use in both operator training and research. A derivative work of the IGCC dynamic simulator has been a modification of the combined cycle section to more closely represent a typical natural gas fired combined cycle (NGCC). This paper describes the NGCC dynamic process model and highlights some of the simulator’s current capabilities through a particular startup and shutdown scenario.

  16. Speaker to Address Impact of Natural Gas Production on Greenhouse Gas Emissions When used for power generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions, but questions have been raised whether development of shale gas resources results in an overall lower greenhouse gas, "Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas," appeared in Environmental Research Letters

  17. Impact of Distributed Wind on Bulk Power System Operations in ISO-NE: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Palchak, D.; Miettinen, J.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work presented in this paper aims to study the impact of a range of penetration levels of distributed wind on the operation of the electric power system at the transmission level. This paper presents a case study on the power system in Independent System Operator New England. It is analyzed using PLEXOS, a commercial power system simulation tool. The results show that increasing the integration of distributed wind reduces total variable electricity generation costs, coal- and gas-fired electricity generation, electricity imports, and CO2 emissions, and increases wind curtailment. The variability and uncertainty of wind power also increases the start-up and shutdown costs and ramping of most conventional power plants.

  18. REQUEST BY WESTINGHOUSE POWER GENERATION, A FORMER DIVISION OF...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    selection and optimization to develop the next generation of gas-fired advanced turbine systems (ATS's) for green field and repowered electricity generation applications....

  19. Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiaolei; Rink, Nancy

    2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the research and development conducted on an Advanced Hydrogasification Process (AHP) conceived and developed by Arizona Public Service Company (APS) under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract: DE-FC26-06NT42759 for Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) production from western coal. A double-wall (i.e., a hydrogasification contained within a pressure shell) down-flow hydrogasification reactor was designed, engineered, constructed, commissioned and operated by APS, Phoenix, AZ. The reactor is ASME-certified under Section VIII with a rating of 1150 pounds per square inch gage (psig) maximum allowable working pressure at 1950 degrees Fahrenheit ({degrees}F). The reaction zone had a 1.75 inch inner diameter and 13 feet length. The initial testing of a sub-bituminous coal demonstrated ~ 50% carbon conversion and ~10% methane yield in the product gas under 1625{degrees}F, 1000 psig pressure, with a 11 seconds (s) residence time, and 0.4 hydrogen-to-coal mass ratio. Liquid by-products mainly contained Benzene, Toluene, Xylene (BTX) and tar. Char collected from the bottom of the reactor had 9000-British thermal units per pound (Btu/lb) heating value. A three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic model simulation of the hydrodynamics around the reactor head was utilized to design the nozzles for injecting the hydrogen into the gasifier to optimize gas-solid mixing to achieve improved carbon conversion. The report also presents the evaluation of using algae for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) management and biofuel production. Nannochloropsis, Selenastrum and Scenedesmus were determined to be the best algae strains for the project purpose and were studied in an outdoor system which included a 6-meter (6M) radius cultivator with a total surface area of 113 square meters (m{sup 2}) and a total culture volume between 10,000 to 15,000 liters (L); a CO{sub 2} on-demand feeding system; an on-line data collection system for temperature, pH, Photosynthetically Activate Radiation (PAR) and dissolved oxygen (DO); and a ~2 gallons per minute (gpm) algae culture dewatering system. Among the three algae strains, Scenedesmus showed the most tolerance to temperature and irradiance conditions in Phoenix and the best self-settling characteristics. Experimental findings and operational strategies determined through these tests guided the operation of the algae cultivation system for the scale-up study. Effect of power plant flue gas, especially heavy metals, on algae growth and biomass adsorption were evaluated as well.

  20. From gene families and genera to incomes and internet file sizes: Why power laws are so common in nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, W.J.

    of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia Received 5 August 2002; published 20 December 2002 We present a simple in nature William J. Reed Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, Victoria

  1. Revisiting the Long-Term Hedge Value of Wind Power in an Era of Low Natural Gas Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects. Berkeley,and M. Bolinger. 2012. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report.AWEA). 2012b. AWEA U.S. Wind Industry Fourth Quarter 2012

  2. ,"Vermont Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural GasU.S.Plantand Wyoming NaturalPrice

  3. Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Quarterly progress report No. 7, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluating the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and preparing an R&D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC) is leading a team of companies involved in this effort. The power generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. Goals have been specified that relate to the efficiency, emissions, costs, and general operation of the system. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800{degrees}F in furnaces fired with coal-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor to about 2400{degrees}F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuel gas is relatively clean, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need to be a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown in Figure 1.

  4. Study of the Effects of Ambient Conditions Upon the Performance of Fan Powered, Infrared Natural Gas Burners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark Atlanta University

    2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation was to characterize the operation of a fan-powered, infrared burner (IR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions, develop numerical model to simulate the burner performances, and provide design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance.

  5. ,"Utah Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural GasU.S.Plant Liquids, Expected

  6. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural GasU.S.PlantandCoalbed

  7. ,"Washington Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, and NaturalWellhead Price (DollarsPrice

  8. ,"Texas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold toDryDryDry NaturalCrude Oil +PricePrice

  9. ,"California Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNatural Gas,Crude OilPrice Sold to

  10. ,"Colorado Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNaturalDryCoalbed MethaneLNGPlantPrice

  11. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNaturalDryCoalbedNetGas,tofromLNGPrice

  12. ,"Hawaii Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPrice (Dollars per+Nonassociated NaturalPrice Sold to

  13. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPriceNonassociated Natural Gas, Wet AfterCrude OilLNGPrice

  14. ,"Maine Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPriceNonassociated NaturalCoalbedLNG Storage NetPrice Sold

  15. ,"Maryland Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPriceNonassociated NaturalCoalbedLNG StoragePrice Sold to

  16. ,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPriceNonassociated NaturalCoalbedLNGLNG Storage NetPrice

  17. ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - Shao_2014_CNMS StaffScienceHighlight_NatureComm.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPA / SPRA / USACE MarshallWe report a study of

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - Sumpter_Minghu_CNMS_higlight_NatureSciRep_v2_BRS.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPA / SPRA / USACE MarshallWeEarlWe demonstrate

  20. ,"New York Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, ExpectedLNG Storage NetPrice Sold to Electric Power

  1. The missing link: Merging neutron stars naturally produce jet-like structures and can power short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luciano Rezzolla; Bruno Giacomazzo; Luca Baiotti; Jonathan Granot; Chryssa Kouveliotou; Miguel A. Aloy

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Short Gamma-Ray Bursts (SGRBs) are among the most luminous explosions in the universe, releasing in less than one second the energy emitted by our Galaxy over one year. Despite decades of observations, the nature of their "central-engine" remains unknown. Considering a binary of magnetized neutron stars and solving Einstein equations, we show that their merger results in a rapidly spinning black hole surrounded by a hot and highly magnetized torus. Lasting over 35 ms and much longer than previous simulations, our study reveals that magnetohydrodynamical instabilities amplify an initially turbulent magnetic field of ~ 10^{12} G to produce an ordered poloidal field of ~ 10^{15} G along the black-hole spin-axis, within a half-opening angle of ~ 30 deg, which may naturally launch a relativistic jet. The broad consistency of our ab-initio calculations with SGRB observations shows that the merger of magnetized neutron stars can provide the basic physical conditions for the central-engine of SGRBs.

  2. Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fam powered, infrared, natural gas burners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Tiejun

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of a fan powered infrared burner (PIR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. The fan powered infrared burner is a technology introduced more recently in the residential and commercial markets. It is a surface combustor that elevates the temperature of the burner head to a radiant condition. A variety of metallic and ceramic materials are used for the burner heads. It has been demonstrated that infrared burners produce low CO and NO{sub x} emissions in a controlled geometric space. This project consists of both experimental research and numerical analysis. To conduct the experiments, an experimental setup has been developed and installed in the Combustion Laboratory at Clerk Atlanta University (CAU). This setup consists of a commercial deep fat fryer that has been modified to allow in-situ radiation measurements on the surface of the infrared burner via a view port installed on the side wall of the oil vat. Proper instrumentation including fuel/air flow rate measurement, exhaust gas emission measurement, and radiation measurement has been developed. The project is progressing well. The scheduled tasks for this period of time were conducted smoothly. Specifically: 1. Baseline experimental study at CAU has been completed. The data are now under detailed analysis and will be reported in next quarterly report. 2. Theoretical formulation and analysis of the PIR burner performance model are continuing. Preliminary results have been obtained.

  3. Drifting localization of ionization runaway: Unraveling the nature of anomalous transport in high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Pavel; Rauch, Albert

    2011-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The plasma over the magnetron’s erosion “racetrack” is not azimuthally uniform but concentrated in distinct dense plasma zones which move in the {vector E}×{vector B} direction with about 10% of the electrons’ {vector E}×{vector B}/B{sup 2} drift velocity. The plasma zones are investigated with a gated camera working in concert with a streak camera for Al, Nb, Cu, and W targets in Ar or Kr background gas. It is found that each plasma zone has a high density edge which is the origin of a plasma-generating electron jet leaving the target zone. Each region of strong azimuthal density gradient generates an azimuthal electric field which promotes the escape of magnetized electrons and the formation of electron jets and plasma flares. The phenomena are proposed to be caused by an ionization instability where each dense plasma zone exhibits a high stopping power for drifting high energy electrons, thereby enhancing itself.

  4. Infrastructure Assurance Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NGReal-time lets analysts see real-time utilization rates of natural-gas-fired electric power plants, natural gas processing plants, and other industrial customers, along with the changes in the utilization rates as disruptive events progress (Figure 2). The model also generates reports and graphics to help

  5. EIS-0201: Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project Morrow Count, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This environmental impact statement analyzes the protential impacts of the Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, a proposed natural gas-fired cogeneration power plant near Boardman, Oregon. The proposed power plant would be built on a 22-acre site in the Port of Morrow Industrial Park. The plant would have two combustion turbines that would generate 440 average megawatts of energy when completed.

  6. Easing the natural gas crisis: Reducing natural gas prices through increased deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matt

    2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Heightened natural gas prices have emerged as a key energy-policy challenge for at least the early part of the 21st century. With the recent run-up in gas prices and the expected continuation of volatile and high prices in the near future, a growing number of voices are calling for increased diversification of energy supplies. Proponents of renewable energy and energy efficiency identify these clean energy sources as an important part of the solution. Increased deployment of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) can hedge natural gas price risk in more than one way, but this paper touches on just one potential benefit: displacement of gas-fired electricity generation, which reduces natural gas demand and thus puts downward pressure on gas prices. Many recent modeling studies of increased RE and EE deployment have demonstrated that this ''secondary'' effect of lowering natural gas prices could be significant; as a result, this effect is increasingly cited as justification for policies promoting RE and EE. This paper summarizes recent studies that have evaluated the gas-price-reduction effect of RE and EE deployment, analyzes the results of these studies in light of economic theory and other research, reviews the reasonableness of the effect as portrayed in modeling studies, and develops a simple tool that can be used to evaluate the impact of RE and EE on gas prices without relying on a complex national energy model. Key findings are summarized.

  7. California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    peak demand are natural gas fired combustion turbines. Thesenatural gas plants to “follow load” as the more nimble, combustion

  8. Cornell's conversion of a coal fired heating plant to natural Gas -BACKGROUND: In December 2009, the Combined Heat and Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Cornell's conversion of a coal fired heating plant to natural Gas University began operating with natural gas, instead of the coal-fired generators of the coal that had been stockpiled, the Plant is running completely on natural gas

  9. Effect of Energy Efficiency Standards on Natural Gas Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carnall, Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a recently proposed water heater standard. The resultspurchases a new gas-fired water heater, she will maximizeefficiency standard for water heaters. 1.2 Overview of the

  10. SCENARIOS FOR DEEP CARBON EMISSION REDUCTIONS FROM ELECTRICITY BY 2050 IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICA USING THE SWITCH ELECTRIC POWER SECTOR PLANNING MODEL California's Carbon Challenge Phase II Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collaboration / University of California, Berkeley; Nelson, James; Mileva, Ana; Johnston, Josiah; Kammen, Daniel; Wei, Max; Greenblatt, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study used a state-of-the-art planning model called SWITCH for the electric power system to investigate the evolution of the power systems of California and western North America from present-day to 2050 in the context of deep decarbonization of the economy. Researchers concluded that drastic power system carbon emission reductions were feasible by 2050 under a wide range of possible futures. The average cost of power in 2050 would range between $149 to $232 per megawatt hour across scenarios, a 21 to 88 percent increase relative to a business-as-usual scenario, and a 38 to 115 percent increase relative to the present-day cost of power. The power system would need to undergo sweeping change to rapidly decarbonize. Between present-day and 2030 the evolution of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council power system was dominated by implementing aggressive energy efficiency measures, installing renewable energy and gas-fired generation facilities and retiring coal-fired generation. Deploying wind, solar and geothermal power in the 2040 timeframe reduced power system emissions by displacing gas-fired generation. This trend continued for wind and solar in the 2050 timeframe but was accompanied by large amounts of new storage and long-distance high-voltage transmission capacity. Electricity storage was used primarily to move solar energy from the daytime into the night to charge electric vehicles and meet demand from electrified heating. Transmission capacity over the California border increased by 40 - 220 percent by 2050, implying that transmission siting, permitting, and regional cooperation will become increasingly important. California remained a net electricity importer in all scenarios investigated. Wind and solar power were key elements in power system decarbonization in 2050 if no new nuclear capacity was built. The amount of installed gas capacity remained relatively constant between present-day and 2050, although carbon capture and sequestration was installed on some gas plants by 2050.

  11. Dampers for Natural Draft Heaters: Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, James D.; Biermayer, Peter; King, Derek

    2008-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy required for water heating accounts for approximately 40percent of national residential natural gas consumption in California. With water heating contributing such a substantial portion of natural gas consumption, it is important to pay attention to water heater efficiencies. This paper reports on an investigation of a patented, buoyancy-operated flue damper. It is an add-on design to a standard atmospherically vented natural-draft gas-fired storage water heater. The flue damper was expected to reduce off-cycle standby losses, which would lead to improvements in the efficiency of the water heater. The test results showed that the Energy Factor of the baseline water heater was 0.576. The recovery efficiency was 0.768. The standby heat loss coefficient was 10.619 (BTU/hr-oF). After the damper was installed, the test results show an Energy Factor for the baseline water heater of 0.605. The recovery efficiency was 0.786. The standby heat loss coefficient was 9.135 (BTU/hr-oF). The recovery efficiency increased 2.3percent and the standby heat loss coefficient decreased 14percent. When the burner was on, the baseline water heater caused 28.0 CFM of air to flow from the room. During standby, the flow was 12.4 CFM. The addition of the damper reduced the flow when the burner was on to 23.5 CFM. During standby, flow with the damper was reduced to 11.1 CFM. The flue damper reduced off-cycle standby losses, and improved the efficiency of the water heater. The flue damper also improved the recovery efficiency of the water heater by restricting on-cycle air flows through the flue.With or without the flue damper, off-cycle air flow upthe stack is nearly half the air flow rate as when the burner is firing.

  12. Phases I-C, I-D and I-E development of Kinematic Stirling/Rankine commercial gas-fired heat pump system. Final report, January 1986-September 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monahan, R.E.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kinematic Stirling/Rankine gas-heat-pump concept is based on the application of a Stirling engine under development for over a decade. The engine was converted to natural gas and is characterized with many thousand hours of operating experience. The goal of the project is to develop a commercial-size Stirling engine-driven gas heat pump with a cooling capacity of 10-tons, a COP (heating) of 1.8 and a COP (cooling) of 1.1. The project is a multi-phase development with commercialization planned for 1990. In these phases, an HVAC systems manufacturer (York International) has been working with SPS to develop a prototype gas-heat-pump system. To date, two generations of prototype GHP systems have been built and tested and have demonstrated significant operating cost savings over the conventional electric heat pump. Data are presented for environmental laboratory testing of both prototype gas heat pumps as well as durability, reliability, performance, and emission testing of the V160 Stirling engine. A number of design and manufacturing process changes were made to the engine to reduce costs and improve endurance and shaft efficiency and are described.

  13. Naturalness redux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Fabbrichesi; Alfredo Urbano

    2015-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea of naturalness, as originally conceived, refers only to the finite renormalization of the Higgs boson mass induced by the introduction of heavier states. In this respect, naturalness is still a powerful heuristic principle in model building beyond the standard model whenever new massive states are coupled to the Higgs field. The most compelling case is provided by the generation of neutrino masses. In this paper we confront this problem from a new perspective. The right-handed sector responsible for the seesaw mechanism---which introduces a large energy threshold above the electroweak scale---is made supersymmetric to comply with naturalness while the standard model is left unchanged and non-supersymmetric. Cancellations necessary to the naturalness requirement break down only at two loops, thus offering the possibility to increase the right-handed neutrino mass scale up to one order of magnitude above the usual values allowed by naturalness. If also the weak boson sector of the standard model is made supersymmetric, cancellations break down at three loops and the scale of new physics can be further raised. In the type-I seesaw, this implementation provides right-handed neutrino masses that are natural and at the same time large enough to give rise to baryogenesis (via leptogenesis). The model contains a dark matter candidate and distinctive new physics in the leptonic sector.

  14. Natural Gas Electric Power Price

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20Year Jan Feb Mar68 4.50 4.29

  15. Natural Gas Electric Power Price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough 1996) inthrough 1996) in4.93 5.27

  16. Natural Gas Electric Power Price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough 1996) inthrough 1996) in4.93 5.27

  17. Natural Gas Electric Power Price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough 1996) inthrough 1996) in4.93

  18. Natural Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergy InformationNatura Bio Fuels Ltdreturn

  19. Technology to play hand in future power market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balzhiser, R.E. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A revolution is coming to the electricity industry, and it`s coming fast. As deregulation proceeds apace, new technologies promise greater efficiencies in everything from the power plant to the transmission grid. {open_quotes}In fact, technologies emerging from two different industry segments, aerospace and gas, have fused over the last decade to create a potent new competitor, the gas-fired combustion turbine, which is reshaping the electricity business,{close_quotes} says Richard E. Balzhiser, president emeritus of the Electric Power Research Institute in Palo Alto, California. One machine, which uses technology borrowed from the jet engine, is inexpensive, portable, and highly efficient. In fact, {open_quotes}6-watt personal turbines are being developed for military personnel,{close_quotes} Balzhiser says. But new technologies will not likely force the early retirement of our coal-fired and nuclear power plants. {open_quotes}Despite the bad press these facilities have received, we should remain committed to today`s top-performing coal and nuclear units.{close_quotes} Innovations are also on the horizon in electronic information systems and new electrotechnologies - {open_quotes}We`ll be buying comfort, refrigerated space, RPMs and horsepower, portable power, and light in the years ahead, not just kilowatt-hours,{close_quotes} Balzhiser says.

  20. Betting on the Future: The authors compare natural gas forecaststo futures buys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 12, 2005, the reference case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO 2006) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market. The goal is better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. Below is a discussion of our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past five years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past five years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this article we update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2006. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic. As was the case in the past five AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2005), we once again find that the AEO 2006 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEX-AEO 2006 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$2.3/MMBtu levelized over five years--that we have seen over the last six years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $2.3/MMBtu more than the AEO 2006 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years. Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years

  1. Media Advisory Contact: Carri Ziegler August 8, 2012 916.341-0472 (office), 916.502-1131 (cell)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unveiling before touring the new facilities. Project Participants: The City of Azusa, Bay Area Rapid Transit.S. POWER PLANT OF ITS KIND TO BE DEDICATED IN LODI AUG. 10 Millions to Benefit from Lodi Energy Center-of-the-art Lodi Energy Center (LEC), a natural gas-fired combined-cycle plant that is one of the cleanest and most

  2. EIS-0415: Deer Creek Station Energy Facility Project, South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes WAPA's decision to approve the interconnection request made by Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin Electric) with the USDA Rural Utilities Service (RUS) proposing to provide financial assistance, for the Deer Creek Station Project, a proposed 300-megawatt (MW) natural gas-fired generation facility.

  3. THEODORE R. KULONGOSKI November 19,2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the potential. The development of more wind resources would eliminate the need for new coal plants. Wind energyNary and John Day dams on the lower Columbia River. New Coal Plants Oregon opposes new coal plants already have a number of sites approved for natural gas-fired power plants that provide an inventory

  4. This thesis applies model order reduction (MOR) techniques to large modern power systems that preserve particular dynamic characteristics of the original system. Depending upon the nature of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, M. Jagadesh

    in power systems have been explored and compared ­ Balanced truncation (BT) and Krylov subspace between the wind velocity/system frequency and the power output. These linear models, validated using DigABSTRACT This thesis applies model order reduction (MOR) techniques to large modern power systems

  5. Energy & Environmental Benefits from Steam & Electricity Cogeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratheal, R.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    steam from two on-site powerhouses (one coal-fired and one natural gas-fired) and from gas-fired and waste heat boilers in its four hydrocarbon cracking plants. The challenge was to find a way to reduce costs and improve reliability of procuring and... the electricity required by TEX and sells excess power to wholesale customers in the region. It provides a large portion of TEX steam requirements, with sufficient reliability such that TEX decommissioned its coal-fired powerhouse and reduced operations...

  6. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    including natural gas, and competing renewable power resources such as solar photovoltaics. Figure 4-3. Wind turbine hub height trends in Germany from 2007 to 2014 Source:...

  7. System Definition and Analysis: Power Plant Design and Layout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Topical report for Task 6.0, Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The report describes work by Westinghouse and the subcontractor, Gilbert/Commonwealth, in the fulfillment of completing Task 6.0. A conceptual design for critical and noncritical components of the gas fired combustion turbine system was completed. The conceptual design included specifications for the flange to flange gas turbine, power plant components, and balance of plant equipment. The ATS engine used in the conceptual design is an advanced 300 MW class combustion turbine incorporating many design features and technologies required to achieve ATS Program goals. Design features of power plant equipment and balance of plant equipment are described. Performance parameters for these components are explained. A site arrangement and electrical single line diagrams were drafted for the conceptual plant. ATS advanced features include design refinements in the compressor, inlet casing and scroll, combustion system, airfoil cooling, secondary flow systems, rotor and exhaust diffuser. These improved features, integrated with prudent selection of power plant and balance of plant equipment, have provided the conceptual design of a system that meets or exceeds ATS program emissions, performance, reliability-availability-maintainability, and cost goals.

  8. Active Humidity Control Through Gas-Fired Desiccant Humidity Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novosel, D.; Griffiths, W. C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High equipment first cost and high operating costs, if electricity is used to drive such a system, have prohibited the application of active humidity control equipment in comfort conditioning in the past. Instead, passive techniques have been...

  9. Active Humidity Control Through Gas-Fired Desiccant Humidity Pump 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novosel, D.; Griffiths, W. C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    applied. A comparison of passive capacity control methods to control humidity shows that only the combined face and bypass and variable air volume system shows improved performance with respect to space humidity control, dew point depression, and response...

  10. Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy: Thomas P. D'Agostino, Undersecretary11-161-LNGGary M. Mignogna -GasA

  11. Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FY 2011Talley,GENII Code GENII CodeDepartment

  12. Power Factor Reactive Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    motor power: 117.7 V x 5.1 A = 600 W? = 0.6 kW? NOT the power measured by meter #12;Page 9 PSERC: displacement power factor: angle between voltage and current = 0 degrees pf = cos(0 degrees) = 1.0 true powerPage 1 PSERC Power Factor and Reactive Power Ward Jewell Wichita State University Power Systems

  13. Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of...

  14. Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of Elliot E....

  15. Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of Mark A....

  16. Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Energy and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Energy and Natural Resources Committee Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Energy and Natural Resources Committee...

  17. The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of...

  18. ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS DATA COLLECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION HISTORICAL ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS DATA COLLECTION Formsand of Power Plants Semi-Annual Report ..................................... 44 CEC-1306D UDC Natural Gas Tolling Agreement Quarterly Report.......................... 46 i #12;Natural Gas Utilities and Retailers

  19. Pollutant Emission Factors from Residential Natural Gas Appliances: A Literature Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traynor, G.W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Furnace (2) Heater (35) Water Heater (32) ~ Space u.. c:Emissionsfrom Gas-fired Water Heaters, Report No. 1507,gas furnaces and water heaters," JAPCA 31:1268 (1981). Table

  20. Flashback Detection Sensor for Hydrogen Augmented Natural Gas Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, J.D.; Chorpening, B.T.; Sidwell, T.; Strakey, P.A.; Huckaby, E.D.; Benson, K.J. (Woodward)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of hydrogen augmented fuel is being investigated by various researchers as a method to extend the lean operating limit, and potentially reduce thermal NOx formation in natural gas fired lean premixed (LPM) combustion systems. The resulting increase in flame speed during hydrogen augmentation, however, increases the propensity for flashback in LPM systems. Real-time in-situ monitoring of flashback is important for the development of control strategies for use of hydrogen augmented fuel in state-of-the-art combustion systems, and for the development of advanced hydrogen combustion systems. The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Woodward Industrial Controls are developing a combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS), which has already been demonstrated as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff. Since CCADS is a flame ionization sensor technique, the low ion concentration produced in pure hydrogen combustion raises concerns of whether CCADS can be used to monitor flashback in hydrogen augmented combustion. This paper discusses CCADS tests conducted at 0.2-0.6 MPa (2-6 atm), demonstrating flashback detection with fuel compositions up to 80% hydrogen (by volume) mixed with natural gas. NETL’s Simulation Validation (SimVal) combustor offers full optical access to pressurized combustion during these tests. The CCADS data and high-speed video show the reaction zone moves upstream into the nozzle as the hydrogen fuel concentration increases, as is expected with the increased flame speed of the mixture. The CCADS data and video also demonstrate the opportunity for using CCADS to provide the necessary in-situ monitor to control flashback and lean blowoff in hydrogen augmented combustion applications.

  1. Development of an efficient, low cost, small-scale natural gas fuel reformer for residential scale electric power generation. Final report for the period October 1, 1998 - December 31, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreutz, Thomas G.; Ogden, Joan M.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the final report, we present results from a technical and economic assessment of residential scale PEM fuel cell power systems. The objectives of our study are to conceptually design an inexpensive, small-scale PEMFC-based stationary power system that converts natural gas to both electricity and heat, and then to analyze the prospective performance and economics of various system configurations. We developed computer models for residential scale PEMFC cogeneration systems to compare various system designs (e.g., steam reforming vs. partial oxidation, compressed vs. atmospheric pressure, etc.) and determine the most technically and economically attractive system configurations at various scales (e.g., single family, residential, multi-dwelling, neighborhood).

  2. A review of "Profit and Principle. Hugo Grotius, Natural Rights Theories and the Rise of Dutch Power in the East Indies (1595-1615)" by Martine Julia van Ittersum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basista, Jakub

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and current commentary on the vicissitudes of these women?s writing will appeal to specialists in the field. Martine Julia van Ittersum. Profit and Principle. Hugo Grotius, Natural Rughts Theories and the Rise of Dutch Power in the East Indies (1595...-European or non-Christian in- habitants. In her work Martine Julia van Ittersum presents Grotius as a theo- rist of rights and contract theories as well as a practitioner of those theories who acted as a negotiator and lawyer of Dutch colonialism and the VOC...

  3. --No Title--

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    divestitures, nonutilities own and operate a broad mix of nuclear, coal, natural- gas and renewable generation facilities that supply wholesale markets. Natural-gas-fired...

  4. Advanced Analytics | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oil field production. Power Generation - Combinations of hardware and software that boost wind turbine and gas-fired power plant output and efficiency. Rail - Cloud-based software...

  5. Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, T.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly technical progress report describes work performed under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-94MT94011 during the period September 1, 1996 to December 31, 1996 which covers the nineth quarter of the project. The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of a fan powered infrared burner (IR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. The fan powered infrared burner is a technology introduced more recently in the residential and commercial markets. It is a surface combustor that elevates the temperature of the burner head to a radiant condition. A variety of metallic and ceramic materials are used for the burner heads. It has been demonstrated that infrared burners produce low CO and NO{sub x} emissions in a controlled geometric space. As the environmental regulations become more stringent, infrared burners are receiving increasing interests.

  6. Reliability Evaluation of Electric Power Generation Systems with Solar Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samadi, Saeed

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional power generators are fueled by natural gas, steam, or water flow. These generators can respond to fluctuating load by varying the fuel input that is done by a valve control. Renewable power generators such as wind or solar, however...

  7. Power Plant Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

  8. A ROOFING TILE FOR NATURAL COOLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUNGUARD: A ROOFING TILE FOR NATURAL COOLING Prepared For: California Energy Commission Energy (FAR) SUNGUARD: A ROOFING TILE FOR NATURAL COOLING EISG AWARDEE PowerLight Corporation 2954 San Pablo://www.energy.ca.gov/research/index.html. #12;Page 1 Sunguard: A Roofing Tile For Natural Cooling EISG Grant # 99-07 Awardee: Power

  9. Fundamental Drivers of Pacific Northwest Power Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , utilities, power marketers, investors, and others on wholesale electricity and natural gas markets. Experts Load Transmission Thermal Hydro Wind (2005) #12;Natural Gas Capacity 6 5,000 MW of Natural Gas;Natural Gas Power Plant Production is Significantly Down 2010 to 2012 13 #12;Mid C Peak Heat Rates 14

  10. Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, T.; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared burner (PIR) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances in containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. During this period, experimental setup with optical and electronic instrumentation that is necessary for measuring the radiant heat output and the emission gas output of the burner has been established. The radiation measurement instrument, an FTIR, has been purchased and installed in the porous burner experimental system. The radiation measurement capability of the FTIR was tested and found to be satisfactory. A standard blackbody source, made by Graseby Infrared, was employed to calibrate the FTIR. A collection duct for emission gas measurement was fabricated and connected to the existing Horiba gas analyzer. Test runs are being conducted for flue gas analysis. A number of published research papers on modeling of porous burners were reviewed. The physical mechanism and theoretical analysis of the combustion process of the PIR burner was formulated. The numerical modeling, and implementation of a PIR burner code at CAU`s computing facility is in progress.

  11. Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Tiejun

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared (PIR) burner at various barometric pressures (operating altitude) and gas compositions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. In this program, the theoretical basis for the behavior of PIR burners will be established through analysis of the combustion, heat and mass transfer, and other related processes that determine the performance of PIR burners. Based on the results of this study, a burner performance model for radiant output will be developed. The model will be applied to predict the performance of the selected burner and will also be modified and improved through comparison with experimental results. During this period, laboratory facilities that are necessary for conducting this research are completed. The student research assistants have started working in the laboratory. The selection of the test burner has completed. The preparation and instrumentation of this test burner is underway. The theoretical analysis and modeling of the fundamental combustion process of the PIR burner is progressing well. A study of the existing models are being conducted, which will yield specific direction and recommendations for the new model to be developed.

  12. Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, September 1--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, T.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared(PIR) burner at various barometric pressures (operating altitude) and gas compositions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. In this program, the theoretical basis for the behavior of PIR burners will be established through analysis of the combustion, heat and mass transfer, and other related processes which determine the performance of PIR burners. Based on the results of this study, a first order model of the performance of the burner, including radiant output will be developed. The model will be applied to predict the performance of the selected burner and modified through comparison with test results. Concurrently, an experimental setup will be devised and built. This experimental rig will be a modified appliance, capable of measuring the heat and combustion product output, as well as providing a means by which the radiant heat output can be measured. The burner will be selected from an existing commercial appliance, a commercial deep fat fryer, and will be of a scale that will be compatible with the laboratory facilities in the Combustion Laboratory at Clark Atlanta University. Theoretical analysis and formulation of the PIR burner performance model has been started and the development of the test facilities and experimental setup has also been initiated. These are described.

  13. Quantifying the value that energy efficiency and renewable energy provide as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Bachrach, Devra; Golove, William

    2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advocates of energy efficiency and renewable energy have long argued that such technologies can mitigate fuel price risk within a resource portfolio. Such arguments--made with renewed vigor in the wake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during the winter of 2000/2001--have mostly been qualitative in nature, however, with few attempts to actually quantify the price stability benefit that these sources provide. In evaluating this benefit, it is important to recognize that alternative price hedging instruments are available--in particular, gas-based financial derivatives (futures and swaps) and physical, fixed-price gas contracts. Whether energy efficiency and renewable energy can provide price stability at lower cost than these alternative means is therefore a key question for resource acquisition planners. In this paper we evaluate the cost of hedging gas price risk through financial hedging instruments. To do this, we compare the price of a 10-year natural gas swap (i.e., what it costs to lock in prices over the next 10 years) to a 10-year natural gas price forecast (i.e., what the market is expecting spot natural gas prices to be over the next 10 years). We find that over the past two years natural gas users have had to pay a premium as high as $0.76/mmBtu (0.53/242/kWh at an aggressive 7,000 Btu/kWh heat rate) over expected spot prices to lock in natural gas prices for the next 10 years. This incremental cost to hedge gas price risk exposure is potentially large enough - particularly if incorporated by policymakers and regulators into decision-making practices - to tip the scales away from new investments in variable-price, natural gas-fired generation and in favor of fixed-price investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy.

  14. Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 5, 2006, the reference case projections from 'Annual Energy Outlook 2007' (AEO 2007) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past six years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past six years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable-price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are 'biased' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2007. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past six AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2006), we once again find that the AEO 2007 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. Specifically, the NYMEX-AEO 2007 premium is $0.73/MMBtu levelized over five years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $0.73/MMBtu more than the AEO 2007 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

  15. Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 12, 2005, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2006'' (AEO 2006) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past five years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past five years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2006. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past five AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2005), we once again find that the AEO 2006 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEX-AEO 2006 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$2.3/MMBtu levelized over five years--that we have seen over the last six years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $2.3/MMBtu more than the AEO 2006 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

  16. Maximum Entropy Method and Charge Flipping, a Powerful Combination to Visualize the True Nature of Structural Disorder from in situ X-ray Powder Diffraction Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samy, A.; Dinnebier, R; van Smaalen, S; Jansen, M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a systematic approach, the ability of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to reconstruct the most probable electron density of highly disordered crystal structures from X-ray powder diffraction data was evaluated. As a case study, the ambient temperature crystal structures of disordered {alpha}-Rb{sub 2}[C{sub 2}O{sub 4}] and {alpha}-Rb{sub 2}[CO{sub 3}] and ordered {delta}-K{sub 2}[C{sub 2}O{sub 4}] were investigated in detail with the aim of revealing the 'true' nature of the apparent disorder. Different combinations of F (based on phased structure factors) and G constraints (based on structure-factor amplitudes) from different sources were applied in MEM calculations. In particular, a new combination of the MEM with the recently developed charge-flipping algorithm with histogram matching for powder diffraction data (pCF) was successfully introduced to avoid the inevitable bias of the phases of the structure-factor amplitudes by the Rietveld model. Completely ab initio electron-density distributions have been obtained with the MEM applied to a combination of structure-factor amplitudes from Le Bail fits with phases derived from pCF. All features of the crystal structures, in particular the disorder of the oxalate and carbonate anions, and the displacements of the cations, are clearly obtained. This approach bears the potential of a fast method of electron-density determination, even for highly disordered materials. All the MEM maps obtained in this work were compared with the MEM map derived from the best Rietveld refined model. In general, the phased observed structure factors obtained from Rietveld refinement (applying F and G constraints) were found to give the closest description of the experimental data and thus lead to the most accurate image of the actual disorder.

  17. Northwest Energy Coalition Renewable Northwest Project Natural Resources Defense Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Energy Coalition Renewable Northwest Project Natural Resources Defense Council December 9 Coalition [Nancy Hirsh] Renewable Northwest Project[Rachel Shimshak] Natural Resources Defense Council Power Administration in Power Supply The Northwest Energy Coalition, Renewable Northwest Project, Sierra

  18. Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 9, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO 2005)'' were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. As some of you may be aware, we at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past four years, forward natural gas contracts (e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past four years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation (presuming that long-term price stability is valued). In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2005. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or, more recently (and briefly), http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past four AEO releases (AEO 2001-AE0 2004), we once again find that the AEO 2005 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEXAEO 2005 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$1.11/MMBtu levelized over six years--that we have seen over the last five years. In other words, on average, one would have to pay $1.11/MMBtu more than the AEO 2005 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming six years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation. Fixed-price renewables obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of six years.

  19. Harnessing Hydropower: The Earth's Natural Resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a layman's overview of hydroelectric power. It includes information on: History of Hydropower; Nature’s Water Cycle; Hydropower Plants; Turbines and Generators; Transmission Systems; power dispatching centers; and Substations. It goes on to discuss The Power Grid, Hydropower in the 21st Century; Energy and the Environment; and how hydropower is useful for Meeting Peak Demands. It briefly addresses how Western Area Power Administration is Responding to Environmental Concerns.

  20. letters to nature 70 NATURE |VOL 390 |6 NOVEMBER 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent, Gilles

    letters to nature 70 NATURE |VOL 390 |6 NOVEMBER 1997 Received 11 June; accepted 11 August 1997. 1 and energy cost of flight in the white-necked raven, Corvus cryptoleucus. J. Exp. Biol. 103, 121­130 (1983, W. & Nachtigall, W. Pigeon flight in a wind tunnel. II. Gas exchange and power requirements. J. Comp

  1. advanced combined cycle: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Background Primary Components Gas-fired combustion turbine (s) Heat recovery steam generator (s) - HRSG with or without duct firing Natural gas...

  2. Utility Energy Services Contracting (UESC) Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * Upgrade of Central Power Plants * Metering & Energy Information Systems * Gas-fired Infrared Heaters * PrimarySecondary Pumping Systems * Decentralization of Domestic Hot Water...

  3. Notices

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and gas-fired power plants near Great Falls could contribute greenhouse gases with global warming potential equivalent to more than 4 million tonsyear of carbon dioxide, equal...

  4. Convex Relaxations for Gas Expansion Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    major gas-fired power plants in the northeast of the U.S. were forced to shut .... mission system while minimizing investment, purchase, and transportation costs.

  5. POWER SYSTEMS STABILITY WITH LARGE-SCALE WIND POWER PENETRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    of offshore wind farms, wind power fluctuations may introduce several challenges to reliable power system behaviour due to natural wind fluctuations. The rapid power fluctuations from the large scale wind farms Generation Control (AGC) system which includes large- scale wind farms for long-term stability simulation

  6. Effect of Energy Efficiency Standards on Natural Gas Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnall, Michael; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

    2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary justification for the establishment of energy efficiency standards for home appliances is the existence of information deficiencies and externalities in the market for appliances. For example, when a long-term homeowner purchases a new gas-fired water heater, she will maximize the value of her purchase by comparing the life-cycle cost of ownership of available units, including both total installed cost - purchase price plus installation costs - and operating cost in the calculus. Choice of the appliance with the lowest life-cycle costs leads to the most economically efficient balance between capital cost and fuel cost. However, if the purchaser's expected period of ownership is shorter than the useful life of the appliance, or the purchaser does not pay for the fuel used by the appliance, as is often the case with rental property, fuel cost will be external to her costs, biasing her decision toward spending less on fuel efficiency and resulting in the purchase of an appliance with greater than optimal fuel usage. By imposing an efficiency standard on appliances, less efficient appliances are made unavailable, precluding less efficient purchases and reducing fuel usage. The reduction in fuel demanded by residential users affects the total demand for such fuels as natural gas, for example. Reduced demand implies that residential customers are willing to purchase less gas at each price level. That is, the demand curve, labeled D{sub 0} in Figure 1, shifts to the left to D{sub 1}. If there is no change in the supply function, the supply curve will intersect the demand curve at a lower price. Residential demand is only one component of the total demand for natural gas. It is possible that total demand will decline very little if demand in other sectors increases substantially in response to a decline in the price. If demand does decrease, modeling studies generally confirm the intuition that reductions in demand for natural gas will result in reductions in its price as seen at the wellhead (Wiser 2007). The magnitude of the effect on price relative to the demand reduction, and the mechanism through which it occurs, is less well established. This report attempts to quantify the potential effects of reduced demand for natural gas in the residential sector, in response to the implementation of an energy efficiency standard for water heaters.

  7. Power marketing and renewable energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.M.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power marketing refers to wholesale and retail transactions of electric power made by companies other than public power entities and the regulated utilities that own the generation and distribution lines. The growth in power marketing has been a major development in the electric power industry during the last few years, and power marketers are expected to realize even more market opportunities as electric industry deregulation proceeds from wholesale competition to retail competition. This Topical Issues Brief examines the nature of the power marketing business and its relationship with renewable power. The information presented is based on interviews conducted with nine power marketing companies, which accounted for almost 54% of total power sales by power marketers in 1995. These interviews provided information on various viewpoints of power marketers, their experience with renewables, and their respective outlooks for including renewables in their resource portfolios. Some basic differences exist between wholesale and retail competition that should be recognized when discussing power marketing and renewable power. At the wholesale level, the majority of power marketers stress the commodity nature of electricity. The primary criteria for developing resource portfolios are the same as those of their wholesale customers: the cost and reliability of power supplies. At the retail level, electricity may be viewed as a product that includes value-added characteristics or services determined by customer preferences.

  8. The Sixth Power Plan: Toward a Clean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    efficiency is about a third of the cost of building new power plants fueled by natural gas, coal or wind of the cost of building new power plants fueled by natural gas, coal, or wind, and the region has a proven-fired power plants will need to be built to back up the wind turbines. The Council also encourages developing

  9. Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Scotto

    2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NO{sub x} emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of high-flammable content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions. The actual NO{sub x} reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammable content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NO{sub x} reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NO{sub x} emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

  10. Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark V. Scotto; Mark A. Perna

    2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NOx emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of highflammables content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NOx emissions. The actual NOx reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammables content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NOx reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NOx emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NOx emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

  11. NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE Name Affiliation Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2011-2013 Name Affiliation Sector Dernovsek, David Bonneville Power Defenbach, Byron Intermountain Gas Distribution Dragoon, Ken NWPCC Council Friedman, Randy NW Natural Gas Distribution Gopal, Jairam Southern CA Edison Electric Utility Hamilton, Linda Shell Trading Gas & Power

  12. Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877SouthwestWisconsinStatementA. Summer net601,343

  13. Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469DecadeOrigin State1,237

  14. Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Jan Feb(Million(Million(MillionVehicle

  16. Gas Powered Air Conditioning Absorption vs. Engine-Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, J. N.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It used to be that the only alternative to costly electric air conditioning was the double-effect gas-fired absorption chiller/heaters. Beginning in the 1980's, they were the "star" equipment promoted by gas companies throughout the nation. Although...

  17. Texas' Natural Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Texas A&M?s Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, said the summary report synthesizes the ?state of knowl- edge? about the geography, hydrology, ecology and environmental impacts affecting Caddo Lake and Big Cypress Creek. At the second...; and heavy metals, including mercury found in the lignite coal used to power electricity-generating plants, are accumulating in fish tissues. Texas? Natural Lake tx H2O | pg. 2 Research to help restore environmental flows to Caddo Lake Scientists...

  18. Advanced Turbine Systems scoping and feasibility studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannister, R.L.; Little, D.A.; Wiant, B.C. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)); Archer, D.H. (Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) study was to investigate innovative natural gas fired cycle developments to determine the feasibility of achieving 60% (LHV) efficiency within a 10-year time frame. The potential ATS was to be environmentally superior, cost competitive and adaptable to coal-derived fuels. The National Energy Strategy (NES) calls for a balanced program of greater energy efficiency, use of alternative fuels, and the environmentally responsible development of all US energy resources> Consistent with the NES, a Department of Energy (DOE) program has been created to develop Advanced Turbine Systems. The objective of this 10-year program is to develop natural gas fired base load power plants that will have cycle efficiencies greater than 60% (LHV), be environmentally superior to current technology, and also be cost competitive.

  19. Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, M.

    applications of heat recovery power generation can be found in Industry (e.g. steel, glass, cement, lime, pulp and paper, refining and petrochemicals), Power Generation (CHP, biomass, biofuel, traditional fuels, gasifiers, diesel engines) and Natural Gas...

  20. Beacon Power Corporation Business Case Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MW Flywheel vs. Traditional Technologies for Regulation * Emissions Comparison between: - Coal Power Plant - Baseload and "Peaker" Mode - Natural Gas Plant - Baseload and "Peaker"...

  1. Mimicking Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into lakes and rivers, and the impact different water management decisions could have. ?We?re trying to mimic nature,? said Dr. Jeff Arnold, research leader and agricultural engineer for the Grassland Soil and Water Research Laboratory in Temple, part..., director of Texas A&M University?s Spatial Sciences Laboratory and professor in the Departments of Ecosystem Science and MIMICKING NATURE Computer model helps manage nation?s, world?s waters #2; Management, and Biological and Agricultural Engineering...

  2. Resource Contingency Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1990, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) embarked upon the Resource Contingency Program (RCP) to fulfill its statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. Instead of buying or building generating plants now, BPA has purchased options to acquire power later if needed. Three option development agreements were signed in September 1993 with three proposed natural gas-fired, combined cycle combustion turbine CT projects near Chehalis and Satsop Washington and near Hermiston, Oregon. This environmental impact statement addresses the environmental consequences of purchasing power from these options. This environmental impact statement addresses the environmental consequences of purchasing power from these options.

  3. Generalizing power transitions as a cause of war

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fogg, Erik (Erik D.)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I ask three questions about the nature of power transition theory. First, I ask whether power transition theory can be generalized beyond identification of great powers or regional hierarchies. Lemke and ...

  4. Natural Predator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 10 Natural Predator Story by Kathy Wythe Natural Predator Foreign beetle shows promise for controlling saltcedar In the northern part of the Texas Panhandle andalong the West Texas banks of the Colorado andPecos rivers, Texas... scientists are successfully intro- ducing a foreign beetle to help control an invasive and exotic water-thirsty plant. Saltcedar, or Tamarix, was introduced to the western United States in the 1800s from central Asia as an ornamental tree and planted...

  5. "Ecological Values amid Local Interests: Natural Resource Conservation, Social Differentiation, and Human Survival in Honduras"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gareau, Brian J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power to declare natural areas protected and to enforce thenatural resource degrada- tion in inhabited protected areasprotected areas often have a different understanding about their natural

  6. New configurations of a heat recovery absorption heat pump integrated with a natural gas boiler for boiler efficiency improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Ming [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Yin, Hongxi [Southeast University, Nanjing, China

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional natural gas-fired boilers exhaust flue gas direct to the atmosphere at 150 200 C, which, at such temperatures, contains large amount of energy and results in relatively low thermal efficiency ranging from 70% to 80%. Although condensing boilers for recovering the heat in the flue gas have been developed over the past 40 years, their present market share is still less than 25%. The major reason for this relatively slow acceptance is the limited improvement in the thermal efficiency of condensing boilers. In the condensing boiler, the temperature of the hot water return at the range of 50 60 C, which is used to cool the flue gas, is very close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas. Therefore, the latent heat, the majority of the waste heat in the flue gas, which is contained in the water vapor, cannot be recovered. This paper presents a new approach to improve boiler thermal efficiency by integrating absorption heat pumps with natural gas boilers for waste heat recovery (HRAHP). Three configurations of HRAHPs are introduced and discussed. The three configurations are modeled in detail to illustrate the significant thermal efficiency improvement they attain. Further, for conceptual proof and validation, an existing hot water-driven absorption chiller is operated as a heat pump at operating conditions similar to one of the devised configurations. An overall system performance and economic analysis are provided for decision-making and as evidence of the potential benefits. These three configurations of HRAHP provide a pathway to achieving realistic high-efficiency natural gas boilers for applications with process fluid return temperatures higher than or close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas.

  7. Natural gas repowering experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bautista, P.J.; Fay, J.M. [Gas Research Institute, Chicago, IL (United States); Gerber, F.B. [BENTEK Energy Research, DeSoto, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Research Institute has led a variety of projects in the past two years with respect to repowering with natural gas. These activities, including workshops, technology evaluations, and market assessments, have indicated that a significant opportunity for repowering exists. It is obvious that the electric power industry`s restructuring and the actual implementation of environmental regulations from the Clean Air Act Amendments will have significant impact on repowering with respect to timing and ultimate size of the market. This paper summarizes the results and implications of these activities in repowering with natural gas. It first addresses the size of the potential market and discusses some of the significant issues with respect to this market potential. It then provides a perspective on technical options for repowering which are likely to be competitive in the current environment. Finally, it addresses possible actions by the gas industry and GRI to facilitate development of the repowering market.

  8. Electrical Power Quality and Utilisation, Journal Vol. XIII, No. 2, 2007 Quasi-Instantaneous Generation of Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czarnecki, Leszek S.

    that by their very nature operate with high power variation. Spot welding devices, industrial robots, pulse

  9. STATE OF CALIFORNIA -NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    all four of the combustion gas turbines units in an extended start-up period for the purpose of tuning Pollutant emissions from each combustion turbine shall not exceed the following limits except during times of startup.l 9f-shutdown or tuning startup periods as defined in Condition AQ-17: Gas Fired Case

  10. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program 2014 Large Storage Water Heaters Test Laboratory Application Note: Completed Sample Test Report-mail (Address) Company Website (URL) Appliance Type(s): Gas-fired Large Storage Water Heaters Oil-fired Large Storage Water Heater Electric Large Storage Water Heater Test method(s): ANSI Z21.10.3­2011, Exhibits G1

  11. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program 2013 Large Storage Water Heaters Test Laboratory Application Note: Completed Sample Test Report-mail (Address) Company Website (URL) Appliance Type(s): Gas-fired Large Storage Water Heaters Oil-fired Large Storage Water Heater Electric Large Storage Water Heater Test method(s): ANSI Z21.10.3­1998, §2.9 and 2

  12. Economics of natural gas upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source in meeting some of the market demand presently met by liquid products from crude oil. This study was initiated to analyze three energy markets to determine if greater use could be made of natural gas or natural gas derived products and if those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The three markets targeted for possible increases in gas use were motor fuels, power generation, and the chemical feedstocks market. The economics of processes to convert natural gas to transportation fuels, chemical products, and power were analyzed. The economic analysis was accomplished by drawing on a variety of detailed economic studies, updating them and bringing the results to a common basis. The processes analyzed included production of methanol, MTBE, higher alcohols, gasoline, CNG, and LNG for the transportation market. Production and use of methanol and ammonia in the chemical feedstock market and use of natural gas for power generation were also assessed. Use of both high and low quality gas as a process feed stream was evaluated. The analysis also explored the impact of various gas price growth rates and process facility locations, including remote gas areas. In assessing the transportation fuels market the analysis examined production and use of both conventional and new alternative motor fuels.

  13. Blackout 2003: Energy Secretary Bodman and Minister of Natural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Secretary Bodman and Minister of Natural Resources for Canada Lunn Release the 2003 Power Outage Final Report. In accordance with the mandate of the U.S.-Canada Power Outage...

  14. Energy Secretary Bodman and Minister of Natural Resources for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman and Minister of Natural Resources for Canada Gary Lunn, today released the final report on the power outage that affected 50...

  15. Wind Power Price Trends in the United States: Struggling to Remain Competitive in the Face of Strong Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    installed cost of both natural gas and coal power plants incosts and liabilities of natural gas- and coal-fired power plants.costs of building coal, gas, wind, and nuclear power plants

  16. Simulation of the Visual Effects of Power Plant Plumes1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    -fired power plant with six 500 MW coal-fired power plants located at hypothetical sites in southeastern Utah coal-fired power plants are greater than those from oil or natural gas. If we must use more coal, how in a comparison of large and small coal-fired power plants in the West. Using hypothetical power plants

  17. Power Grid Vulnerability to Geographically Correlated Failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepard, Kenneth

    Power Grid Vulnerability to Geographically Correlated Failures ­ Analysis and Control Implications such as telecommunications networks [14]. The power grid is vulnerable to natural disasters, such as earthquakes, hurricanes [17], [34]. Thus, we focus on the vulnerability of the power grid to an outage of several lines

  18. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208 about the amount and nature of cost-sharing offered. As a result, Bonneville Power Administration, Chairman Northwest Power and Conservation Council 851 S.W. Sixth Ave., Suite 1100 Portland, OR 97204

  19. The Value of Renewable Energy as a Hedge Against Fuel Price Risk: Analytic Contributions from Economic and Finance Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    placed on any one forecast of future natural gas prices, andreference case forecast of spot natural gas prices deliveredPrice Forecasts to Compare Renewable to Natural Gas- Fired

  20. PSNC Energy (Gas)- Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PSNC offers rebates to customers who purchase energy-efficient natural gas water heaters or natural gas furnaces. The rebate is available only when existing natural gas-fired water heating or...

  1. Delivery of Hydrogen Produced from Natural Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for transportation and stationary power. DOE Milestone #12;Hydrogen Delivery Options · Gaseous hydrogen - Pipelines, corrosion Gaseous hydrogen pipeline delivery program would share similar technology R&D areasDelivery of Hydrogen Produced from Natural Gas Christopher Freitas Office of Natural Gas

  2. Wind Power Outlook 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The brochure, expected to be updated annually, provides the American Wind Energy Association's (AWAE's) up-to-date assessment of the wind industry. It provides a summary of the state of wind power in the U.S., including the challenges and opportunities facing the industry. It provides summary information on the growth of the industry, policy-related factors such as the federal wind energy production tax credit status, comparisons with natural gas, and public views on wind energy.

  3. Carbon Capture by Fossil Fuel Power Plants: An Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    working paper "CO2 Regulations and Electricity Prices: Cost Estimates for Coal-Fired Power Plants." We capabilities at new coal-fired power plants. The corresponding break-even values for natural gas plants source of CO2 emissions. For the U.S. alone, coal-fired and natural gas power plants contributed more

  4. BrownMap: Enforcing Power Budget in Shared Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    with outages that reduce the avail- able power or with surges in workload. BrownMap uses automatic VM resizing. 1 Introduction The inevitability of power outages in a power grid due to the complex nature of the grid is slowly being realized [2]. Overloads on the electrical system or natural calamities like storms

  5. NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

  6. Nuclear Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilhena and Bardo E.J. Bodmann Carbon-#1;? in Terrestrial and Aquatic Environment of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant: Sources of Production, Releases and Dose Estimates #3;?? Jonas Mazeika Impact of radionuclide discharges from Temel?n Nuclear Power... (chapter 5), ? Instrumentation and control (chapter 6), ? Diagnostics (chapter 7), ? Safety evaluation methods (chapters 6, 8, 9 and 10), ? Environment and nuclear power plants (chapters 11 - 15), ? Human factors (chapter 16), ? Software development...

  7. Dealing with natural gas uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, J.; Graeber, D. (J.R. Clements and Associates (US))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fuel of choice for generating new power is and will continue over the next two decades to be natural gas. It is the fuel of choice because it is plentiful, environmentally acceptable, and relatively inexpensive. This paper reports that gas reserves on the North American continent continue to be discovered in amounts that may keep the gas bubble inflated far longer than currently estimated. New gas transportation capacity is actively being developed to overcome the capacity bottlenecks and deliverability shortfalls. Natural gas prices will probably remain stable (with expected CPI-related increases) for the short run (2-4 years), and probably will be higher than CPI increases thereafter.

  8. Power LCAT

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Drennen, Thomas

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    POWER LCAT is a software tool used to compare elements of efficiency, cost, and environmental effects between different sources of energy.

  9. Power LCAT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drennen, Thomas

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    POWER LCAT is a software tool used to compare elements of efficiency, cost, and environmental effects between different sources of energy.

  10. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  11. Viability of an expanded United States nuclear power program and its effects on energy markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Tanzeer S

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The four biggest energy sources in the United States are coal, crude oil, natural gas, and nuclear power. While coal and nuclear power are produced domestically, more than 70% of crude oil and 20% of natural gas is imported. ...

  12. Power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hickam, Christopher Dale (Glasford, IL)

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A power system includes a prime mover, a transmission, and a fluid coupler having a selectively engageable lockup clutch. The fluid coupler may be drivingly connected between the prime mover and the transmission. Additionally, the power system may include a motor/generator drivingly connected to at least one of the prime mover and the transmission. The power-system may also include power-system controls configured to execute a control method. The control method may include selecting one of a plurality of modes of operation of the power system. Additionally, the control method may include controlling the operating state of the lockup clutch dependent upon the mode of operation selected. The control method may also include controlling the operating state of the motor/generator dependent upon the mode of operation selected.

  13. An experimental study of gas-fired infrared drying of paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirtz, Jefferson

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as the exposure time increased. The final investigation focused on the effects of varying emitter parameters. Flame temperature, sample mass, and internal temperature measurements were made for various air/fuel ratios and overall fuel consumption rates. Peak flame...

  14. Performance of Gas-fired Water Heaters in a 10-home Field Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question "Are high-efficiency hot water heating systems worth the cost?"

  15. An experimental study of gas-fired infrared drying of paper 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirtz, Jefferson

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exchanger assembly with top plate removed. . . 39 40 14 Schematic of TAPPI 159 mm diameter handsheet machine (Asensio, 1992) 47 15 Barrel of TAPPI handsheet machine in the closed position with the agitator shown on the right and couch roll on the left...

  16. Improving Gas-Fired Heat Pump Capacity and Performance by Adding a Desiccant Dehumidification Subsystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons, B. K.; Pesaran, A. A.; Bharathan, D.; Shelpuk, B. C.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of absorption and desiccant solar cooling systems." Berkeley, CA: Lawrence Berkeley La- boratory. Kinast, J. A,; Wurm. J.; Zawacki, T. S.: and . Macriss, R. A. 1982. SOLAR-MEC~ development program report. COO-4495-53. Chicago, IL: Institute of Gas...

  17. Strathclyde powerS ahead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Strathclyde powerS ahead the future of renewable energy SHARING AND ENHANCING RESEARCH Discover the vision of Principal Professor Jim McDonald THE FUTURE OF ENERGY Strathclyde pioneers renewableEdicinE Snapshot the reSearcher Following a decade of environmental research in her native egypt, nabila saleem

  18. Are natural microcosms useful model systems for ecology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Diane

    , but as complex and biologically realistic as other natural systems. Research to date combined with inherent of the power of model systems, and that natural MICROCOSMS (see Glossary) are worth considering as such modelsAre natural microcosms useful model systems for ecology? Diane S. Srivastava1 , Jurek Kolasa2 , Jan

  19. Improving the Performance and Power Efficiency of Shared Helpers in CMPs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherwood, Tim

    coal or nuclear power plants typically supply the ma- jority of power needs, during periods of peak power demand, auxiliary power plants (often powered by natural gas) are used to meet temporary loadImproving the Performance and Power Efficiency of Shared Helpers in CMPs Anahita Shayesteh Comp

  20. Power combiner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Mobius; Ives, Robert Lawrence

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A power combiner for the combining of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy comprises a feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for reflecting launched wave energy, and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of launched wave energy. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which comprises a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which comprises a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

  1. Northwest public utilities, BPA top five-year energy savings...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    less than the cost of power from a new gas-fired plant. So without energy efficiency, the region would need to generate enough additional electricity to power 3.6 million Northwest...

  2. FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Project Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity/emergency generators, lead acid batteries/UPS system, and gas-fired furnaces System and Manufacturer Primary power to four rotary UPS units provided by four UTC Power PC25C phosphoric acid fuel cells

  3. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  4. STATE OF CALIFORNIA -NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    power delivery obligations under its power purchase agreement regardless of the pressure of the natural under its power purchase agreement, and · There has been a substantial change in circumstances since pressure for Crockett Cogeneration to meet its power delivery obligations under its power purchase

  5. FOURFOUR--QUADRANT POWER SUPPLIESQUADRANT POWER SUPPLIES FOR STEERING ELECTROMAGNETSFOR STEERING ELECTROMAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    FOURFOUR--QUADRANT POWER SUPPLIESQUADRANT POWER SUPPLIES FOR STEERING ELECTROMAGNETSFOR STEERING-3 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - DIPOLE CORRECTORS MULTI-POLE CORRECTORS W500P kW2P Cooling: Air Natural IUP = V100U,A6I V100U,A25I.V.Belikov@inp.nsk.su Bulk Power Supply R S C I FOUR- QUADRANT POWER SUPPLIES RECUPERATION VCC H-BI #12;O. Belikov, Ru

  6. Cleco Power- Power Miser New Home Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Louisiana's Cleco Power offers energy efficiency incentives to eligible customers. Cleco Power offers a rate discount for residential customers building homes that meet the Power Miser Program...

  7. Natural Gas Supply SBIR Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoemaker, H.D.; Gwilliam, W.J.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was created in 1982 by Public Law 97-219 and reauthorized in 1992 until the year 2000 by Public Law 102-564. The purposes of the new law are to (1) expand and improve the SBIR program, 2) emphasize the program`s goal of increasing private sector commercialization of technology developed through Federal R&D, (3) increase small business participation in Federal R&D, and (4) improve the Federal Government`s dissemination of information concerning the SBIR program. DOE`s SBIR pro-ram has two features that are unique. In the 1995 DOE SBIR solicitation, the DOE Fossil Energy topics were: environmental technology for natural gas, oil, and coal; advanced recovery of oil; natural gas supply; natural gas utilization; advanced coal-based power systems; and advanced fossil fuels research. The subtopics for this solicitation`s Natural Gas Supply topic are (1) drilling, completion, and stimulation; (2) low-permeability Formations; (3) delivery and storage; and (4) natural gas upgrading.

  8. Abstract--South America has emerged in recent years as one of the most dynamic regions for natural gas and electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    for natural gas and electricity development. The continent boasts natural gas reserves and high- growth energy countries to promote the use of natural gas, especially for power generation. On the other hand, challenges-country natural gas agreements, competition between natural gas and other resources for power generation

  9. Regulation of natural monopolies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter provides a comprehensive overview of the theoretical and empirical literature on the regulation of natural monopolies. It covers alternative definitions of natural monopoly, regulatory goals, alternative ...

  10. Natural Gas Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue...

  11. Borrowing Nature's Polymers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Borrowing Nature's Polymers 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:January 2015 All Issues submit Borrowing Nature's Polymers Los Alamos scientists are...

  12. Natural Resources Districts (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes Natural Resources District, encompassing all of the area of the state, to conserve, protect, develop, and manage Nebraska's natural resources. These districts replace and...

  13. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  14. Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

  15. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  16. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  17. Design and development of Stirling Engines for stationary power generation applications in the 500 to 3000 hp range. Subtask 1A report: state-of-the-art conceptual design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first portion of the Conceptual Design Study of Stirling Engines for Stationary Power Application in the 500 to 3000 hp range which was aimed at state-of-the-art stationary Stirling engines for a 1985 hardware demonstration is summarized. The main goals of this effort were to obtain reliable cost data for a stationary Stirling engine capable of meeting future needs for total energy/cogeneration sysems and to establish a pragmatic and conservative base design for a first generation hardware. Starting with an extensive screening effort, 4 engine types, i.e., V-type crank engine, radial engine, swashplate engine, and rhombic drive engine, and 3 heat transport systems, i.e., heat pipe, pressurized gas heat transport loop, and direct gas fired system, were selected. After a preliminary layout cycle, the rhombic drive engine was eliminated due to intolerable maintenance difficulties on the push rod seals. V, radial and swashplate engines were taken through a detailed design/layout cycle, to establish all important design features and reliable engine weights. After comparing engine layouts and analyzing qualitative and quantitative evaluation criteria, the V-crank engine was chosen as the candidate for a 1985 hardware demonstration.

  18. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would reduce system losses, increase circuit capacity, increase reliability, and improve efficiency. Reactive power is theoretically available from any inverter-based equipment such as photovoltaic (PV) systems, fuel cells, microturbines, and adjustable-speed drives. However, the installation is usually only economical if reactive power supply is considered during the design and construction phase. In this report, we find that if the inverters of PV systems or the generators of combined heat and power (CHP) systems were designed with capability to supply dynamic reactive power, they could do this quite economically. In fact, on an annualized basis, these inverters and generators may be able to supply dynamic reactive power for about $5 or $6 per kVAR. The savings from the local supply of dynamic reactive power would be in reduced losses, increased capacity, and decreased transmission congestion. The net savings are estimated to be about $7 per kVAR on an annualized basis for a hypothetical circuit. Thus the distribution company could economically purchase a dynamic reactive power service from customers for perhaps $6/kVAR. This practice would provide for better voltage regulation in the distribution system and would provide an alternate revenue source to help amortize the cost of PV and CHP installations. As distribution and transmission systems are operated under rising levels of stress, the value of local dynamic reactive supply is expected to grow. Also, large power inverters, in the range of 500 kW to 1 MW, are expected to decrease in cost as they become mass produced. This report provides one data point which shows that the local supply of dynamic reactive power is marginally profitable at present for a hypothetical circuit. We expect that the trends of growing power flow on the existing system and mass production of inverters for distributed energy devices will make the dynamic supply of reactive power from customers an integral component of economical and reliable system operation in the future.

  19. Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation The power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between the active power and the apparent power of a system. If the current and voltage are periodic with period , and [ ), then the active power is defined by ( ) ( ) (their inner product

  20. Star Power

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  1. Star Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  2. Irrigation Districts: Establishment of Electric Light and Power Systems: Powers (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Irrigation districts, created in section 46-1xx, are encouraged to appropriate water in order to generate electric light and power. The Department of Natural Resources has the authority to approve...

  3. Natural Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    . Exploration and extraction of natural gas from the Marcellus shale is a potentially valuable economic stimulus for landowners. You might be wondering how the nation's economic situation is affecting the market for naturalNatural Gas Exploration: A Landowners Guide to Financial Management Natural Gas Exploration

  4. Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Markus

    © 2009 APS Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology Published online: 17 July 2009 | doi:10 perfect fluid. Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 025301 (2009). | Article |1. Nature Nanotechnology ISSN 1748 : Nature Nanotechnology http://www.nature.com/nnano/reshigh/2009/0709/full/nnano.2009.222.html 1 of 1 18

  5. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen P. (Cambridge, GB)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  6. Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AC power that you get from your electric company into the DC power consumed by most electronics, including your computer. We expect our power supplies to be safe, reliable, and...

  7. Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win 2014 Public Power Wind Awards Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win 2014 Public Power Wind...

  8. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the Natural Gas Monthly features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  9. Tidal power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammons, T.J. (Glasgow Univ., Scotland (United Kingdom))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the physics of tidal power considering gravitational effects of moon and sun; semidiurnal, diurnal, and mixed tides; and major periodic components that affect the tidal range. Shelving, funneling, reflection, and resonance phenomena that have a significant effect on tidal range are also discussed. The paper then examines tidal energy resource for principal developments estimated from parametric modeling in Europe and worldwide. Basic parameters that govern the design of tidal power schemes in terms of mean tidal range and surface area of the enclosed basin are identified. While energy extracted is proportional to the tidal amplitude squared, requisite sluicing are is proportional to the square root of the tidal amplitude. Sites with large tidal amplitudes are therefore best suited for tidal power developments, whereas sites with low tidal amplitudes have sluicing that may be prohibitive. It is shown that 48% of the European tidal resource is in the United Kingdom, 42% in France and 8% in Ireland, other countries having negligible potential. Worldwide tidal resource is identified. Tidal barrage design and construction using caissons is examined, as are alternative operating modes (single-action generation, outflow generation, flood generation, two-way generation, twin basin generation, pumping, etc), development trends and possibilities, generation cost at the barrage boundary, sensitivity to discount rates, general economics, and markets. Environmental effects, and institutional constraints to the development of tidal barrage schemes are also discussed.

  10. Condensate Water Collection for an Institutional Building in Doha, Qatar: An Opportunity for Water Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, J. A.; Ahmed, T.

    . Currently, the predominant means of water production is through the desalination of seawater as a by-product of energy production. As of summer of 2008, there are approximately 7,000 MW of natural gas fired electrical generating plants in Qatar (EIA...://www.arabianbusiness.com/514775-qatar-power-and-water-project-awarded ASHRAE. 2001. ASHRAE fundamentals handbook. Atlanta: American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air- Conditioning Engineers, Inc. EIA, 2007, http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/cabs/Qatar/pdf.pdf Frechette...

  11. Phase I --system scoping and feasibility studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Strategy (NES) calls for a balanced program of greater energy efficiency, use of alternative fuels, and the environmentally responsible development of all the U.S. energy resources. Consistent with the NES, a Department of Energy (DOE) program has been created to develop Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS). The objective of this 10-year program is to develop natural gas-fired base load power plants that will have cycle efficiencies greater than 60% (LHV), be environmentally superior to current technology, and also be cost competitive.

  12. Repowering of the Midland Nuclear Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gatlin, C. E. Jr.; Vellender, G. C.; Mooney, J. A.

    natural gas-fired cx:rnbined~cle plant ~~on utilized the original Midland Unit 1 steam turb~ am 12 gas t:w:bine heat recovery trains to prov de 1,165 MW of generatin;J capacity. 'Ihi.s ~ on included a staged approach to stagger availability of the ad... the largest cogeneration facility in the United States. The paper describes the project and the converted facility. 'Ibe Midland Cogeneration Plant started as a 2-unit nuclear-powered electric generating station supplyin;J cogenerated steam to an adjacent...

  13. CNG a Natural for Tulsa Public Schools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 2-page Clean Cities fact sheet describes the use of natural gas power for Tulsa Public Schools' fleet of buses and cars. It includes information on the history of the program, along with contact information for the local Clean Cities Coordinator and Tulsa Public Schools.

  14. 1999 Macmillan Magazines Ltd letters to nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Feng Sheng

    ., Canning, D., Meyer, M. & Stanley, H. E. Universal features in the growth dynamics of complex organizations). 13. Stanley, M. H. R. et al. Scaling behaviour in the growth of companies. Nature 379, 804±806 (1996. A. & Stanley, H. E. Power law scaling for a system of interacting units with complex internal

  15. Biogeography-Based Optimization and the Solution of the Power Flow Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Dan

    engineer Jules Carpentier [7]. A power utility may own power generating plants fueled by coal, natural gas. It is important to adjust the power output levels among the various generating plants in the system at any given, the Law of Conservation of Energy requires that the power generated by the plants must equal the power

  16. Associated Shale Gas- From Flares to Rig Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Elizabeth Michelle

    2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    , compressed natural gas (CNG), or liquefied natural gas (LNG) (Soares 2008). Another option that can be considered to use natural gas and meet power load requirements is to convert diesel generators to a dual-fuel engines. Using both diesel and natural gas...-scale gas process could provide the solution to variable gas quality from different locations for use in power sources using natural gas. This micro-scale process is comparable to full scale LNG and CNG processing, first separating the liquids...

  17. Demonstration of a Low-NOx Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle engine research project: A Caterpillar C-12 natural gas engine with Clean Air Power Dual-Fuel technology and exhaust gas recirculation demonstrated low NOx and PM emissions.

  18. POWER-TO-GAS PROCESS WITH HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    · Transportation of energy from production areas to consumption areas Substitute Natural Gas (methane) Myriam DeP · Use of existing natural gas network · Mid or long term storage · Transportation · Production. Energy background 2. Power-to-Substitute Natural Gas process with high temperature steam electrolysis

  19. adsorbed natural gas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SNG for Electricity below, show the life-cycle stages on natural gas used by electric power generators, including the stages from the LNG life-cycle. Notice that local...

  20. Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Global Coal Fired Power Generation Market Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog...

  1. Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Intrastate Regulatory Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The regulation of natural gas intrastate transportation and sale is deemed to be an exercise of the police power of the state for the protection of the public welfare. The Public Service Commission...

  2. Experimental Characterization and Molecular Study of Natural Gas Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristancho Blanco, Diego Edison

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    ) 5, advanced gas turbine 5 and coal-based zero emissions power plant 6 are some of the technological advances recently reported. It is important to note that these technologies are adaptable to natural gas feedstock. However, until clean coal...

  3. Wind power and Wind power and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power and the CDM #12; Wind power and the CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power 2005 Jyoti P. Painuly, Niels-Erik Clausen, Jørgen Fenhann, Sami Kamel and Romeo Pacudan #12; WIND POWER AND THE CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power projects for the Clean Development Mechanism Energy

  4. Power Systems Integration Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Power Systems Integration Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Power Systems Integration Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on developing and testing large-scale distributed energy systems for grid-connected, stand-alone, and microgrid applications. The laboratory can accommodate large power system components such as inverters for photovoltaic (PV) and wind systems, diesel and natural gas generators, battery packs, microgrid interconnection switchgear, and vehicles. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at the ESIF, the Power Systems Integration Laboratory will offer power testing capability of megawatt-scale DC and AC power systems, as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Thermal heating and cooling loops and fuel also allow testing of combined heating/cooling and power systems (CHP).

  5. Probabilistic Power Flow Simulation allowing Temporary Current Overloading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Jason

    flow model subject to connection temperature constraints. Renewable power generation is included model. This substantially influences the choice of model for the renewable power source, as we explain realistically. Using such a constraint is justified the more by the intermittent nature of the renewable power

  6. Geographically Correlated Failures in Power Networks Survivability Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hay, David

    systems such as telecommunications networks [14]. The power grid is vulnerable to natural disasters Pulse (EMP) attack [17], [33]. Thus, we focus on the vulnerability of the power grid to an outage the most vulnerable areas in the power grid and to characterize the properties of the cascade. Detection

  7. Sizing Storage and Wind Generation Capacities in Remote Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Sizing Storage and Wind Generation Capacities in Remote Power Systems by Andy Gassner B Capacities in Remote Power Systems by Andy Gassner B.Sc., University of Wisconsin ­ Madison, 2003 Supervisory and small power systems. However, the variability due to the stochastic nature of the wind resource

  8. Impact of Natural Gas Appliances on Pollutant Levels in California Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullen, Nasim A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used to power your water heater? a. Natural Gas b. Propaneranges, furnaces and water heaters. The most common gasof gas heaters or water heaters within the home (indicating

  9. Power Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, F.

    , will be the use of the ASTM Theoretical Steam Rate Tables. In addition, the author's experience regarding the minimum size for power recovery units that are economic in a Culf Coast plant will be presented. INTROD\\Jr.'rION When surveying an operation... will be discussed in detail. Each term in the equation will be considered in English units. Secondly, the use of Mollier diagrams to estimate the enthalphy change between the initial and final conditions will be considered. The last method, specific to steam...

  10. Yakama Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhatY-12 recognized for ...BER/NERSCYakama Power May

  11. Fusion Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding Opportunity fromFusion Links Fusion

  12. Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapp, Vi H.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    roll-out study for gas fired water heaters, NBSIR 88-3724.Fired Furnaces And Water Heaters, Technical Report 96/0266.an Orphaned Natural Draft Water Heater Converted to a Stand-

  13. CX-011121: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ThermoLift - The Natural Gas Fired Air Conditioner & Heat Pump CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/28/2013 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  14. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    types of generators. Gas-fired combined-cycle units tend to be more efficient than coal-fired steam units. The second tab shows coal and natural gas prices on an equivalent...

  15. EIS-0349: Cherry Point Co-generation Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to support BP West Coast Products, LLC proposal to construct and operate a 720-megawatt, natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility on land adjacent to its BP Cherry Point Refinery.

  16. chemeng_lic.enl Page 1 Ahlstrm, A. F. "Katalysatorer Fr Frbrnning Av Dieselsot." 1989.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Bernstad, Anna. "Environmental Evaluation of Solid Household Waste Management - the Augustenborg Ecocity Processes." 1994. Christensson, Rolf. "Aspects on Decentralized Natural Gas Fired Liquid Heating." 1991. "Nox Modelling of a Complete Diesel Engine/Scr System." 2007. Eriksson, Katarina. "Absorption Heat

  17. EIS-0343: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    COB Energy Facility, Proposes to Construct a 1,160-megawatt (MW) Natural Gas-Fired and Combined- Cycle Electric Generating Plant, Right- of-Way Permit across Federal Land under the Jurisdiction of BLM, Klamath Basin, Klamath County, OR

  18. CO2-Brine Surface Dissolution and Injection: CO2 Storage Enhancement Paul Emeka Eke, SPE, Mark Naylor, Stuart Haszeldine and Andrew Curtis, Scottish Centre for Carbon Storage,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) is capable of reducing atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases from coal or gas fired power plants or supercritical phase, as water-alternating gas cycles, or as carbonated brine. These result in different

  19. Lonsdale testimony to BPA Hearings, September 30, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to concerns for Oregon's clean air and water supplies. Gas- fired power plants, although relatively clean when compared to coal plants, pump significant amounts of pollution into our environment, global warming gasses

  20. Model Order Reduction Techniques Problem Set 5 Parabolic Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and hot water for industrial process and elec- trical energy generation. They transmit heat by combustion. It is a dual fuel (oil/gas) fired unit used for heating and generating electric power. The plant has 4 inputs

  1. EIS-0354: Ivanpah Energy Center, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ivanpah Energy Center, L.P., a Diamond Generating Corporation Company, a subsidiary of Mitsubishi Corporation proposes to construct and operate a 500 Megawatt (MW) gas-fired electric power generating station in southern Clark County, Nevada.

  2. Modelling advanced adsorption processes for postcombustion capture. **FULLY FUNDED PROJECT UK/EU ONLY**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Christopher

    for case studies (as in 1 above) including both coal and gas fired power plants. While most current identified this area as having the potential of achieving a cost of electricity for a pulverised coal plant

  3. IEA Bioenergy task 40 Country report for the Netherlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is used to almost 100% in Dutch power plants (mainly coal and two gas-fired plants), and can be roughly are avoided by the use of (largely imported biomass), mainly by co-firing of biomass and waste combustion

  4. Power management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

  5. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008, uses concentrated solar power to split water. Figurethe main reason the potential for solar power is boundless.a clean energy source, solar power is inexhaustible, fairly

  6. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electric power generating plant, and the distributionrequired on the power-generating plant and not on the vehi-in either power-generating plants or combustion engines,

  7. Southwestern Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Courses Instructors NERC Continuing Education Power Operations Training Center You'll find the "Power" of learning at Southwestern's Power Operations Training Center (POTC). POTC's...

  8. Natural gas annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

  9. Nature/Culture/Seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmreich, Stefan

    This essay considers seawater as a substance and symbol in anthropological and social theory. Seawater has occupied an ambiguous place with respect to anthropological categories of nature and culture. Seawater as nature ...

  10. Supervisory Natural Gas Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energys Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply (FE) is responsible for regulating natural gas imports and exports...

  11. The Value of Renewable Energy as a Hedge Against Fuel Price Risk: Analytic Contributions from Economic and Finance Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A; Wiser, Ryan

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For better or worse, natural gas has become the fuel of choice for new power plants being built across the United States. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), natural gas-fired units account for nearly 90% of the total generating capacity added in the U.S. between 1999 and 2005 (EIA 2006b), bringing the nationwide market share of gas-fired generation to 19%. Looking ahead over the next decade, the EIA expects this trend to continue, increasing the market share of gas-fired generation to 22% by 2015 (EIA 2007a). Though these numbers are specific to the US, natural gas-fired generation is making similar advances in many other countries as well. A large percentage of the total cost of gas-fired generation is attributable to fuel costs--i.e., natural gas prices. For example, at current spot prices of around $7/MMBtu, fuel costs account for more than 75% of the levelized cost of energy from a new combined cycle gas turbine, and more than 90% of its operating costs (EIA 2007a). Furthermore, given that gas-fired plants are often the marginal supply units that set the market-clearing price for all generators in a competitive wholesale market, there is a direct link between natural gas prices and wholesale electricity prices. In this light, the dramatic increase in natural gas prices since the 1990s should be a cause for ratepayer concern. Figure 1 shows the daily price history of the 'first-nearby' (i.e., closest to expiration) NYMEX natural gas futures contract (black line) at Henry Hub, along with the futures strip (i.e., the full series of futures contracts) from August 22, 2007 (red line). First, nearby prices, which closely track spot prices, have recently been trading within a $7-9/MMBtu range in the United States and, as shown by the futures strip, are expected to remain there through 2012. These price levels are $6/MMBtu higher than the $1-3/MMBtu range seen throughout most of the 1990s, demonstrating significant price escalation for natural gas in the United States over a relatively brief period. Perhaps of most concern is that this dramatic price increase was largely unforeseen. Figure 2 compares the EIA's natural gas wellhead price forecast from each year's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) going back to 1985 against the average US wellhead price that actually transpired. As shown, our forecasting abilities have proven rather dismal over time, as over-forecasts made in the late 1980's eventually yielded to under-forecasts that have persisted to this day. This historical experience demonstrates that little weight should be placed on any one forecast of future natural gas prices, and that a broad range of future price conditions ought to be considered in planning and investment decisions. Against this backdrop of high, volatile, and unpredictable natural gas prices, increasing the market penetration of renewable generation such as wind, solar, and geothermal power may provide economic benefits to ratepayers by displacing gas-fired generation. These benefits may manifest themselves in several ways. First, the displacement of natural gas-fired generation by increased renewable generation reduces ratepayer exposure to natural gas price risk--i.e., the risk that future gas prices (and by extension future electricity prices) may end up markedly different than expected. Second, this displacement reduces demand for natural gas among gas-fired generators, which, all else equal, will put downward pressure on natural gas prices. Lower natural gas prices in turn benefit both electric ratepayers and other end-users of natural gas. Using analytic approaches that build upon, yet differ from, the past work of others, including Awerbuch (1993, 1994, 2003), Kahn and Stoft (1993), and Humphreys and McClain (1998), this chapter explores each of these two potential 'hedging' benefits of renewable electricity. Though we do not seek to judge whether these two specific benefits outweigh any incremental cost of renewable energy (relative to conventional fuels), we do seek to quantify the magnitude of these two individual benefit

  12. POWER PURCHASE AGREEMENT DELMARVA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    POWER PURCHASE AGREEMENT between DELMARVA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY ("Buyer") and BLUEWATER WIND 3.5 Energy Forecasts, Scheduling and Balancing.......................................... 39 3

  13. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  14. Natural Resources Research Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    /Loll ThermoWood Hybrid Poplars Peat A boost for the peat industry Value in Minnesota peat deposits Natural che

  15. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  16. Independent review of SCDAP/RELAP5 natural circulation calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, G.M.; Gross, R.J.; Martinez, M.J.; Rightley, G.S.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review and assessment of the uncertainties in the calculated response of reactor coolant system natural circulation using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code were completed. The SCDAP/RELAP5 calculation modeled a station blackout transient in the Surry nuclear power plant and concluded that primary system depressurization from natural circulation induced primary system failure is more likely than previously thought.

  17. Power oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gitsevich, Aleksandr (Montgomery Village, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  18. NATURAL CONVECTION OF SUBCOOLED LIQUID NITROGEN IN A VERTICAL CAVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    temperature superconductor) power devices, such as HTS transformers, fault current limiters, and terminals power transformer cooled by natural convection of subcooled liquid nitrogen. A liquid nitrogen bath of subcooled liquid nitrogen system for an HTS transformer, operating at around 65 K. This system consists

  19. SMART POWER TURBINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nirm V. Nirmalan

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas turbines are the choice technology for high-performance power generation and are employed in both simple and combined cycle configurations around the world. The Smart Power Turbine (SPT) program has developed new technologies that are needed to further extend the performance and economic attractiveness of gas turbines for power generation. Today's power generation gas turbines control firing temperatures indirectly, by measuring the exhaust gas temperature and then mathematically calculating the peak combustor temperatures. But temperatures in the turbine hot gas path vary a great deal, making it difficult to control firing temperatures precisely enough to achieve optimal performance. Similarly, there is no current way to assess deterioration of turbine hot-gas-path components without shutting down the turbine. Consequently, maintenance and component replacements are often scheduled according to conservative design practices based on historical fleet-averaged data. Since fuel heating values vary with the prevalent natural gas fuel, the inability to measure heating value directly, with sufficient accuracy and timeliness, can lead to maintenance and operational decisions that are less than optimal. GE Global Research Center, under this Smart Power Turbine program, has developed a suite of novel sensors that would measure combustor flame temperature, online fuel lower heating value (LHV), and hot-gas-path component life directly. The feasibility of using the ratio of the integrated intensities of portions of the OH emission band to determine the specific average temperature of a premixed methane or natural-gas-fueled combustion flame was demonstrated. The temperature determined is the temperature of the plasma included in the field of view of the sensor. Two sensor types were investigated: the first used a low-resolution fiber optic spectrometer; the second was a SiC dual photodiode chip. Both methods worked. Sensitivity to flame temperature changes was remarkably high, that is a 1-2.5% change in ratio for an 11.1 C (20 F) change in temperature at flame temperatures between 1482.2 C (2700 F) and 1760 C (3200 F). Sensor ratio calibration was performed using flame temperatures determined by calculations using the amount of unburned oxygen in the exhaust and by the fuel/air ratio of the combustible gas mixture. The agreement between the results of these two methods was excellent. The sensor methods characterized are simple and viable. Experiments are underway to validate the GE Flame Temperature Sensor as a practical tool for use with multiburner gas turbine combustors. The lower heating value (LHV) Fuel Quality Sensor consists of a catalytic film deposited on the surface of a microhotplate. This micromachined design has low heat capacity and thermal conductivity, making it ideal for heating catalysts placed on its surface. Several methods of catalyst deposition were investigated, including micropen deposition and other proprietary methods, which permit precise and repeatable placement of the materials. The use of catalysts on the LHV sensor expands the limits of flammability (LoF) of combustion fuels as compared with conventional flames; an unoptimized LoF of 1-32% for natural gas (NG) in air was demonstrated with the microcombustor, whereas conventionally 4 to 16% is observed. The primary goal of this work was to measure the LHV of NG fuels. The secondary goal was to determine the relative quantities of the various components of NG mixes. This determination was made successfully by using an array of different catalysts operating at different temperatures. The combustion parameters for methane were shown to be dependent on whether Pt or Pd catalysts were used. In this project, significant effort was expended on making the LHV platform more robust by the addition of high-temperature stable materials, such as tantalum, and the use of passivation overcoats to protect the resistive heater/sensor materials from degradation in the combustion environment. Modeling and simulation were used to predict improved sensor designs.

  20. Power calibrations for TRIGA reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, W.L.; Razvi, J.; Shoptaugh, J.R. Jr. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to establish a framework for the calorimetric power calibration of TRIGA reactors so that reliable results can be obtained with a precision better than {+-} 5%. Careful application of the same procedures has produced power calibration results that have been reproducible to {+-} 1.5%. The procedures are equally applicable to the Mark I, Mark II and Mark III reactors as well as to reactors having much larger reactor tanks and to TRIGA reactors capable of forced cooling up to 3 MW in some cases and 15 MW in another case. In the case of forced cooled TRIGA reactors, the calorimetric power calibration is applicable in the natural convection mode for these reactors using exactly the same procedures as are discussed below for the smaller TRIGA reactors (< 2 MW)

  1. Natural and industrial analogues for release of CO2 from storage reservoirs: Identification of features, events, and processes and lessons learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flue Flue Fuel oil Natural gas Natural gas Gas turbine Gasturbine Gas turbine Coal IGCC Flue Flue Flue Flue Fuel IEA,oil, natural gas, and gas turbine power plants. As shown,

  2. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Interstate Pipelines Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural...

  3. NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 8 | FEBRUARY 2012 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 101 The hands of the Doomsday Clock have

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    of the power plant. (Brighter news, as Nature Physics goes to press, is that the Main Ring of J of global threat, notably that of climate change. In 1947, the clock was set initially at seven minutes the issues of both nuclear materials and the environment -- that is, the safety of nuclear power

  4. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The subMW hybrid DFC/T power plant facility was upgraded with a Capstone C60 microturbine and a state-of-the-art full size fuel cell stack. The integration of the larger microturbine extended the capability of the hybrid power plant to operate at high power ratings with a single gas turbine without the need for supplementary air. The objectives of this phase of subMW hybrid power plant tests are to support the development of process and control and to provide the insight for the design of the packaged subMW hybrid demonstration units. The development of the ultra high efficiency multi-MW power plants was focused on the design of 40 MW power plants with efficiencies approaching 75% (LHV of natural gas). The design efforts included thermodynamic cycle analysis of key gas turbine parameters such as compression ratio.

  5. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. The operation of sub-MW hybrid Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant test facility with a Capstone C60 microturbine was initiated in March 2003. The inclusion of the C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in previous tests using a 30kW microturbine. The design of multi-MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, was initiated. A new concept was developed based on clusters of One-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. System analyses were performed, including systems for near-term deployment and power plants with long-term ultra high efficiency objectives. Preliminary assessment of the fuel cell cluster concept, including power plant layout for a 14MW power plant, was performed.

  6. Following Nature's Current HYDROELECTRIC POWER IN THE NORTHWEST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Environmental Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement at Hydroelectric Projects ----10 Fish Passage Tour ---...

  7. Golden Valley Electric Association- Sustainable Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Golden Valley Electric Association's (GVEA) SNAP program encourages members to install renewable energy generators and connect them to the utility's electrical distribution system by offering an...

  8. Iowa Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-20 0 0 0 0

  9. Kansas Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0Decade Year-0Base7 3Increases20096NA0

  10. Kentucky Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AKExtensionsNov-14Feet) Decade

  11. Louisiana Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1569 0 0 0Sales (Billion99Year0

  12. Maine Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 07,755,432 7,466,375:Decade0 1 1 0 0

  13. Maryland Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

  14. Massachusetts Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.04,0009,929 19,183 18,324

  15. Massachusetts Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0Feet) (Million Cubicper Thousand

  16. Michigan Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3

  17. Minnesota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3Exportspercontinues, withFeet) Decade

  18. Mississippi Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)CommercialperSales

  19. Missouri Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic Feet)Same 2011 2012 2013 View20090 0

  20. Montana Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic32,876 10,889 11,5022009 2010 201130 34

  1. Before House Subcommittee on Water and Power - Committee on Natural

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteries from Brine Batteriesand Investigations

  2. Before Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteries from Brine BatteriesandResources | Department

  3. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteries from BrineBudget CommitteeResources |Department

  4. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteries from BrineBudget CommitteeResources

  5. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteries from BrineBudget CommitteeResourcesDepartment

  6. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteries from BrineBudget

  7. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteries from BrineBudgetDepartment of Energy Jon

  8. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteries from BrineBudgetDepartment of Energy

  9. Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteries from BrineBudgetDepartment of

  10. Rhode Island Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara3,663 3,430 4,062 4,669

  11. South Carolina Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndia (Million2,116Cubic Feet) Decade

  12. South Dakota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6 0.6 0.7 0.6Cubic Feet)

  13. Tennessee Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S. VehicleNov-14 Dec-14YearFeet)

  14. Texas Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubicSeparation 7,559Nov-14 Dec-14Feet) Decade

  15. Nevada Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthroughwww.eia.govN E B R A S K A2009Feet)

  16. New Hampshire Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthroughwww.eia.govN E B R A SNevadaCubicCubic

  17. New Jersey Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthroughwww.eia.govN E B RCubic Feet) Year

  18. New Mexico Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthroughwww.eia.govN ECoalbedCubic Feet) Year

  19. North Carolina Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65 2013 Next1.878 2.358

  20. North Dakota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65 2013A4.

  1. Ohio Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0 1 2 3+Foot)

  2. Oklahoma Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0ProvedExpectedFeet)

  3. Oregon Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9YearperFeet) Year Jan

  4. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21Year JanCubic Feet) Year Jan

  5. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21Year JanCubicper Thousand Cubic

  6. Rhode Island Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors forA2. For9,250 14,609403,972Cubic

  7. South Carolina Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard ErrorsSeptember 24, 2014EconomicsEnergyCubic

  8. South Dakota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard ErrorsSeptember 24,Feet) YearCubic

  9. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:WhetherNovember 13, 2009OakDepartment of Energy| Department

  10. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:WhetherNovember 13, 2009OakDepartment of Energy|

  11. Alabama Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o f l dIncreases4

  12. Alaska Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B uYear JanSales (Billion0 0

  13. California Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReserves (MillionExpectedSeparation,% ofCubic

  14. Colorado Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear JanDecade

  15. Connecticut Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21Company Level ImportsYearCubic

  16. Delaware Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21CompanySFoot) Year Jan

  17. District of Columbia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127 1,710,513June 2008 1Account

  18. Florida Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May

  19. Georgia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot) Year Jan2009SamplingSee%

  20. Hawaii Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200Decade Year-0

  1. Idaho Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200DecadeCubic1.IV.% of

  2. Illinois Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess thanThousand Cubic Feet)% ofFeet)

  3. Indiana Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015 IndependentFoot)%

  4. Iowa Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015Year JanFoot) Year

  5. Kansas Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015YearYearFoot) Year

  6. Kentucky Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0Foot)%

  7. Arizona Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14 Dec-14Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-221,6350

  8. Arkansas Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)Feet) Decade

  9. California Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321 2,590 1,550Increases (Billion1 -5 2

  10. Colorado Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million CubicSales (Billion 044,0860

  11. Connecticut Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain,606,602andDecade Year-0207 164967

  12. Delaware Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0 Year-1Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1

  13. District of Columbia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0CubicCubic Feet) Year3,132

  14. Nebraska Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough, 2002

  15. Alabama Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 NProvedResidentialFeet) Year

  16. Alaska Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessedDecade Year-0Surveying

  17. Arizona Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May

  18. Arkansas Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year% of Total

  19. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Natural Gas and Power Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14

  20. Washington Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810 0Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0

  1. West Virginia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810YearDecade Year-0 Year-11 1 1 1 0

  2. Wisconsin Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58(MillionYear Jan 201151 -18 -290 0 0

  3. Wyoming Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (MillionAdjustments (Billion Cubic2009 20103,015

  4. Utah Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreases (Billion Cubic Feet)

  5. Vermont Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreases (BillionThousand27,262Feet) Decade

  6. Virginia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercialFeet) New2009Feet)

  7. Massachusetts Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May

  8. Massachusetts Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubic Feet) Year Jan Febper Thousand

  9. Michigan Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubic

  10. Minnesota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department2

  11. Mississippi Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale% of Total

  12. Missouri Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale%73Thousand% of

  13. Montana Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of FossilFoot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May

  14. Tennessee Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"FullWestQuantityReporting

  15. Texas Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"Year JanExpected Future Production (BillionFeet)

  16. Florida Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.Gas ProvedCommercialNov-14

  17. Georgia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear JanPrice Data59.2Year Jan FebFeet)

  18. Hawaii Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOW TO OBTAIN EIACubicDecade227

  19. Idaho Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week2009Feet)

  20. Illinois Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal Consumption (Million381 -260 74