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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

NREL: Energy Analysis - Natural Gas-Fired Generation Results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

assessments have shown wide-ranging results. To better understand the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from utility-scale, natural gas-fired electricity generation systems (based...

2

Post-Election Prospects for Natural-Gas-Fired Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The extraordinary growth of gas-fired generation during President Obama's first term has upended power markets across the country. But how will gas-fired power fare during the next four years? And how much will the outcome be impacted by the federal energy and environmental policies that the Administration and Congress can shape? This essay provides some preliminary answers to these questions.

Gregory C. Staple; Patrick Bean

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

A Natural-Gas-Fired Thermoelectric Power Generation System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a combustion-driven thermoelectric power generation system that uses PbSnTe-based thermoelectric modules. The modules were integrated into a gas-fired furnace with a special burner design. The...

K. Qiu; A.C.S. Hayden

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Thermophotovoltaic power generation systems using natural gas-fired radiant burners  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power generation in gas-fired furnaces is attracting technical attention. Considerable work has been done in the area of low bandgap GaSb cell-based TPV systems as well as silicon solar cell-based TPV systems. Previous investigations have shown that a radiant burner with a high conversion level of fuel to radiation energy must be developed to realize an efficient TPV system. In our work, we investigated different natural gas-fired radiant burners in order to raise the conversion of fuel energy to thermal radiation. These burners were used as radiation sources to establish and test two TPV prototype systems. It was found that for a non-surface combustion radiant burner, the radiation output can be enhanced using a thermal radiator with a porous structure. Also, we developed a cascaded radiant burner that generates two streams of radiation output. One stream illuminates silicon concentrator solar cells while the other drives low bandgap GaSb cells. In this way, useful radiation output and thus TPV system efficiency are significantly increased due to the cascaded utilization of combustion heat and optimized thermal management.

K. Qiu; A.C.S. Hayden

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Elevated Temperature Materials for Power Generation and Propulsion The energy industry is designing higher-efficiency land-based turbines for natural gas-fired  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

higher-efficiency land-based turbines for natural gas-fired power generation systems. The high inletElevated Temperature Materials for Power Generation and Propulsion The energy industry is designing of thermomechanical fatigue life of the next generation's Ni-base superalloys are being developed to enhance life

Li, Mo

6

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

SciTech Connect

Against the backdrop of increasingly volatile natural gas prices, renewable energy resources, which by their nature are immune to natural gas fuel price risk, provide a real economic benefit. Unlike many contracts for natural gas-fired generation, renewable generation is typically sold under fixed-price contracts. Assuming that electricity consumers value long-term price stability, a utility or other retail electricity supplier that is looking to expand its resource portfolio (or a policymaker interested in evaluating different resource options) should therefore compare the cost of fixed-price renewable generation to the hedged or guaranteed cost of new natural gas-fired generation, rather than to projected costs based on uncertain gas price forecasts. To do otherwise would be to compare apples to oranges: by their nature, renewable resources carry no natural gas fuel price risk, and if the market values that attribute, then the most appropriate comparison is to the hedged cost of natural gas-fired generation. Nonetheless, utilities and others often compare the costs of renewable to gas-fired generation using as their fuel price input long-term gas price forecasts that are inherently uncertain, rather than long-term natural gas forward prices that can actually be locked in. This practice raises the critical question of how these two price streams compare. If they are similar, then one might conclude that forecast-based modeling and planning exercises are in fact approximating an apples-to-apples comparison, and no further consideration is necessary. If, however, natural gas forward prices systematically differ from price forecasts, then the use of such forecasts in planning and modeling exercises will yield results that are biased in favor of either renewable (if forwards < forecasts) or natural gas-fired generation (if forwards > forecasts). In this report we compare the cost of hedging natural gas price risk through traditional gas-based hedging instruments (e.g., futures, swaps, and fixed-price physical supply contracts) to contemporaneous forecasts of spot natural gas prices, with the purpose of identifying any systematic differences between the two. Although our data set is quite limited, we find that over the past three years, forward gas prices for durations of 2-10 years have been considerably higher than most natural gas spot price forecasts, including the reference case forecasts developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This difference is striking, and implies that resource planning and modeling exercises based on these forecasts over the past three years have yielded results that are biased in favor of gas-fired generation (again, presuming that long-term stability is desirable). As discussed later, these findings have important ramifications for resource planners, energy modelers, and policy-makers.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

7

Possible Locations for Gas-Fired Power Generation in Southern Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas-fired power generation has not only grown continuously in Europe, ... . Significant transport capacities in a high pressure gas grid are required to guarantee stable generation of gas-fired electricity. The p...

Joachim Müller-Kirchenbauer…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Second law analysis of a natural gas-fired steam boiler and cogeneration plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A second law thermodynamic analysis of a natural gas-fired steam boiler and cogeneration plant at Rice University was conducted. The analysis included many components of… (more)

Conklin, Eric D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Capacity payment impact on gas-fired generation investments under rising renewable feed-in — A real options analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We assess the effect of capacity payments on investments in gas-fired power plants in the presence of different degrees of renewable energy technology (RET) penetration. Low variable cost renewables increasingly make investments in gas-fired generation unprofitable. At the same time, growing feed-in from intermittent \\{RETs\\} amplifies fluctuations in power generation, thus entailing the need for flexible buffer capacity—currently mostly gas-fired power plants. A real options approach is applied to evaluate investment decisions and timing of a single investor in gas-fired power generation. We investigate the necessity and effectiveness of capacity payments. Our model incorporates multiple uncertainties and assesses the effect of capacity payments under different degrees of RET penetration. In a numerical study, we implement stochastic processes for peak-load electricity prices and natural gas prices. We find that capacity payments are an effective measure to promote new gas-fired generation projects. Especially in times of high renewable feed-in, capacity payments are required to incentivize peak-load investments.

Daniel Hach; Stefan Spinler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Exergetic analysis of solar concentrator aided natural gas fired combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article deals with comparative energy and exergetic analysis for evaluation of natural gas fired combined cycle power plant and solar concentrator aided (feed water heating and low pressure steam generation options) natural gas fired combined cycle power plant. Heat Transfer analysis of Linear Fresnel reflecting solar concentrator (LFRSC) is used to predict the effect of focal distance and width of reflector upon the reflecting surface area. Performance analysis of LFRSC with energetic and exergetic methods and the effect, of concentration ratio and inlet temperature of the fluid is carried out to determine, overall heat loss coefficient of the circular evacuated tube absorber at different receiver temperatures. An instantaneous increase in power generation capacity of about 10% is observed by substituting solar thermal energy for feed water heater and low pressure steam generation. It is observed that the utilization of solar energy for feed water heating and low pressure steam generation is more effective based on exergetic analysis rather than energetic analysis. Furthermore, for a solar aided feed water heating and low pressure steam generation, it is found that the land area requirement is 7 ha/MW for large scale solar thermal storage system to run the plant for 24 h.

V. Siva Reddy; S.C. Kaushik; S.K. Tyagi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

A policy study examining the use of imported LNG for gas-fired power generation on the southeast coast of China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since China's energy demand is growing quickly, speeding up the development of natural gas is an important substitute and supplement for coal and oil. The development of the natural gas market in many developing countries has demonstrated that the success of the whole project hinges upon the success of gas-fired power generation. However, under the current energy pricing system in China, the advantages of gas-fired power plants, such as low investment costs and high efficiency, have not been able to offset the low price of coal. The gas-fired power plants, both at downstream of the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) industry and upstream of the power sector, are faced with a dilemma. In order to solve the problems facing gas-fired power projects while providing policy guidance for the future development of gas-fired power projects, the policy of gas-fired power generation using imported LNG on the southeastern coast of China was examined. This study aims to identify the position of the national energy strategy that China should import some LNG from the other countries, to guide the development of energy policy in this region, and to formulate some clear policy measures.

Yajun Li; Fangfang Bai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power, Pennsylvania Presentation to the Natural Gas CCS Forum Washington, DC November 4, 2011 E.S. Rubin, Carnegie Mellon MotivationMotivation · Electric utilities again looking to natural gas combined cycle (NGCC

13

Electric Power Generation Using Low Bandgap TPV Cells in a Gas?fired Heating Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low bandgap TPV cells are preferred for electric power generation in TPV cogeneration systems. Recently significant progress has been made in fabrication of low bandgap semiconductor TPV devices such as InGaAsSb and InGaAs cells. However it appears that only limited data are available in the literature with respect to the performance of these TPV cells in combustion?driven TPV systems. In the research presented in this paper power generation using recently?developed InGaAsSb TPV cells has been investigated in a gas?fired space heating appliance. The combustion performance of the gas burner associated with a broadband radiator was evaluated experimentally. The radiant power density and radiant efficiency of the gas?heated radiator were determined at different degrees of exhaust heat recuperation. Heat recuperation is shown to have a certain effect on the combustion operation and radiant power output. The electric output characteristics of the InGaAsSb TPV devices were investigated under various combustion conditions. It was found that the cell short circuit density was greater than 1 A/cm2 at a radiator temperature of 930°C when an optical filter was used. An electric power density of 0.54 W/cm2 was produced at a radiator temperature of 1190°C. Furthermore modeling calculations were carried out to reveal the influence of TPV cell bandgap and radiator temperature on power output and conversion efficiency. Finally the design aspects of combustion?driven TPV systems were analyzed showing that development of a special combustion device with high conversion level of fuel chemical energy to useful radiant energy is required to improve further the system efficiency.

K. Qiu; A. C. S. Hayden

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Exergetic analysis and evaluation of coal-fired supercritical thermal power plant and natural gas-fired combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present work has been undertaken for energetic and exergetic analysis of coal-fired supercritical thermal power plant and natural gas-fired combined cycle power plant. Comparative analysis has been conducted ...

V. Siva Reddy; S. C. Kaushik; S. K. Tyagi

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Chapter 4 - Natural Gas–fired Gas Turbines and Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gas turbines can burn a range of liquid and gaseous fuels but most burn natural gas. Power plants based on gas turbines are one of the cheapest types of plant to build, but the cost of their electricity depends heavily on the cost of their fuel. Two types of gas turbine are used for power generation: aero-derivative gas turbines and heavy-duty gas turbines. The former are used to provide power to the grid at times of peak demand. The latter are most often found in combined cycle power stations. These are capable of more than 60% efficiency. There are a number of ways of modifying the gas turbine cycle to improve efficiency, including reheating and intercooling. Micro-turbines have been developed for very small-scale generation of both electricity and heat. The main atmospheric emissions from gas turbines are carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide.

Paul Breeze

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Advanced Turbine Systems Program conceptual design and product development. Task 3.0, Selection of natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine System  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of Task 3 of the Westinghouse ATS Phase II program. Objective of Task 3 was to analyze and evaluate different cycles for the natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine Systems in order to select one that would achieve all ATS program goals. About 50 cycles (5 main types) were evaluated on basis of plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity, reliability-availability-maintainability (RAM), and program schedule requirements. The advanced combined cycle was selected for the ATS plant; it will incorporate an advanced gas turbine engine as well as improvements in the bottoming cycle and generator. Cost and RAM analyses were carried out on 6 selected cycle configurations and compared to the baseline plant. Issues critical to the Advanced Combined Cycle are discussed; achievement of plant efficiency and cost of electricity goals will require higher firing temperatures and minimized cooling of hot end components, necessitating new aloys/materials/coatings. Studies will be required in combustion, aerodynamic design, cooling design, leakage control, etc.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Revisiting the Long-Term Hedge Value of Wind Power in an Era of Low Natural Gas Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

terms. Unlike gas-fired generation, wind power can offerpower generation in 2005 to 42.2% in 2011, while natural gas-firedgases and other pollutants. The corresponding expansion of gas-fired generation in the power

Bolinger, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Not locked-in? The overlooked impact of new gas-fired generation investment on long-term decarbonisation in the UK  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper contrasts the potential increase in gas-fired power generation in the UK in the period to 2020 with the ambitious decarbonisation goals set forth for this sector. An increase in Combined Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) capacity, in particular, only represents a threat to long-term decarbonisation if some ‘lock-in’ exists. It is against this background, and in the interest of challenging the perception of no significant lock-in to gas-fired generation, that this paper identifies investment lock-in as phenomenon of relevance to policy-makers. The paper determines both direct and indirect ways in which investment in significant new CCGT capacity could negatively impact on the likelihood of meeting decarbonisation goals through ‘locking-in’ the existing technological system. It also identifies that the technical lifetime, and not just the capital repayment period, of CCGT assets is relevant in understanding the strength of the lock-in. Finally, a regulatory structure that aligns with the long-term targets in place is identified as providing a clear signal for investors and asset owners that may reduce the risk of ‘investment lock-in’.

Simon Chignell; Robert J.K. Gross

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Statkraft is Europe's largest generator of renewable energy and is the leading power company in Norway. The company owns, produces and develops hydropower, wind power, gas-fired power and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Norway. The company owns, produces and develops hydropower, wind power, gas-fired power and districtStatkraft is Europe's largest generator of renewable energy and is the leading power company countries. For our office in Düsseldorf we are currently looking to hire a System Manager Renewable Energy

Morik, Katharina

20

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 4:36pm Addthis A residential natural gas meter. A residential natural gas meter. What does this mean for me? Your gas boiler or furnace may be oversized, particularly if you've upgraded the energy efficiency of your home. Your gas boiler or furnace can be retrofitted to improve its energy efficiency. Gas boilers and furnaces can be fueled by either natural gas or propane with simple modifications accounting for the different characteristics of the fuels. Propane is usually more expensive as a fuel, but is available throughout the United States. Natural gas supplies depend on having a natural gas distribution system in your area, and areas at the end of the pipeline (such as the Northeast) tend to pay higher prices for natural gas.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces May 16, 2013 - 4:36pm Addthis A residential natural gas meter. A residential natural gas meter. What does this mean for me? Your gas boiler or furnace may be oversized, particularly if you've upgraded the energy efficiency of your home. Your gas boiler or furnace can be retrofitted to improve its energy efficiency. Gas boilers and furnaces can be fueled by either natural gas or propane with simple modifications accounting for the different characteristics of the fuels. Propane is usually more expensive as a fuel, but is available throughout the United States. Natural gas supplies depend on having a natural gas distribution system in your area, and areas at the end of the pipeline (such as the Northeast) tend to pay higher prices for natural gas.

22

Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Emerging Technologies » Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into carbon gas-fired absorption heat pump water heaters. This project will employ innovative techniques to increase water heating energy efficiency over conventional gas storage water heaters by 40%. Project Description This project seeks to develop a natural gas-fired water heater using an absorption heat. The development effort is targeting lithium bromide aqueous solutions as a working fluid in order to avoid the negative implications of using more toxic ammonia. Project Partners Research is being undertaken through a Cooperative Research and Development

23

Independent Validation and Verification of Process Design and Optimization Technology Diagnostic and Control of Natural Gas Fired Furnaces via Flame Image Analysis Technology  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program has invested in emerging Process Design and Optimizations Technologies (PDOT) to encourage the development of new initiatives that might result in energy savings in industrial processes. Gas fired furnaces present a harsh environment, often making accurate determination of correct air/fuel ratios a challenge. Operation with the correct air/fuel ratio and especially with balanced burners in multi-burner combustion equipment can result in improved system efficiency, yielding lower operating costs and reduced emissions. Flame Image Analysis offers a way to improve individual burner performance by identifying and correcting fuel-rich burners. The anticipated benefit of this technology is improved furnace thermal efficiency, and lower NOx emissions. Independent validation and verification (V&V) testing of the FIA technology was performed at Missouri Forge, Inc., in Doniphan, Missouri by Environ International Corporation (V&V contractor) and Enterprise Energy and Research (EE&R), the developer of the technology. The test site was selected by the technology developer and accepted by Environ after a meeting held at Missouri Forge. As stated in the solicitation for the V&V contractor, 'The objective of this activity is to provide independent verification and validation of the performance of this new technology when demonstrated in industrial applications. A primary goal for the V&V process will be to independently evaluate if this technology, when demonstrated in an industrial application, can be utilized to save a significant amount of the operating energy cost. The Seller will also independently evaluate the other benefits of the demonstrated technology that were previously identified by the developer, including those related to product quality, productivity, environmental impact, etc'. A test plan was provided by the technology developer and is included as an appendix to the summary report submitted by Environ (Appendix A). That plan required the V&V contractor to: (1) Establish the as-found furnace operating conditions; (2) Tune the furnace using currently available technology to establish baseline conditions; (3) Tune the furnace using the FIA technology; and (4) Document the improved performance that resulted from application of the FIA technology. It is important to note that the testing was not designed to be a competition or comparison between two different methodologies that could be used for furnace tuning. Rather, the intent was to quantify improvements in furnace performance that could not be achieved with existing technology. Therefore, the measure of success is improvement beyond the furnace efficiency obtainable using existing furnace optimization methods rather than improvement from the as found condition.

Cox, Daryl [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable togas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

SciTech Connect

Unlike natural gas-fired generation, renewable generation (e.g., from wind, solar, and geothermal power) is largely immune to fuel price risk. If ratepayers are rational and value long-term price stability, then--contrary to common practice--any comparison of the levelized cost of renewable to gas-fired generation should be based on a hedged gas price input, rather than an uncertain gas price forecast. This paper compares natural gas prices that can be locked in through futures, swaps, and physical supply contracts to contemporaneous long-term forecasts of spot gas prices. We find that from 2000-2003, forward gas prices for terms of 2-10 years have been considerably higher than most contemporaneous long-term gas price forecasts. This difference is striking, and implies that comparisons between renewable and gas-fired generation based on these forecasts over this period have arguably yielded results that are biased in favor of gas-fired generation.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

25

Stirling engines for gas fired micro-cogen and cooling  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design and performance of free-piston Stirling engine-alternators particularly suited for use as natural gas fired micro-cogen and cooling devices. Stirling based cogen systems offer significant potential advantages over internal combustion engines in efficiency, to maintain higher efficiencies at lower power levels than than combustion engines significantly expands the potential for micro-cogen. System cost reduction and electric prices higher than the U.S. national average will have a far greater effect on commercial success than any further increase in Stirling engine efficiency. There exist niche markets where Stirling engine efficiency. There exist niche markets where Stirling based cogen systems are competitive. Machines of this design are being considered for production in the near future as gas-fired units for combined heat and power in sufficiently large quantities to assure competitive prices for the final unit.

Lane, N.W.; Beale, W.T. [Sunpower, Inc., Athens, OH (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

EIS-0345: Plymouth Generating Facility Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to approve Plymouth Energy, L.L.C. proposed 307-megawatt (MW), natural gas-fired, combined cycle power generation facility to interconnect into BPA’s regional transmission system.

27

Natural Gas Year-in-Review  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

rose to 66.0 Bcf per day, with large increases coming from additional natural gas-fired power generation. Net imports decreased by 0.2 Bcf per day to 7.1 Bcf per day, the...

28

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003). Accounting for Fuel Price Risk: Using Forward Naturaldraft). Analyzing Fuel Price Risks Under CompetitiveAccounting for Fuel Price Risk When Comparing Renewable to

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Microsoft PowerPoint - Application of Stirling Cycle Generators...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cogen) a cogen) Direct Current System Direct Current System * BP trials based on existing natural gas-fired DC system: - 24 VDC, 800W generator with fully automated battery...

30

Gas-Fired Reciprocating Engines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The reciprocating, or piston-driven, engine is a widespread and well-known technology. Also called internal combustion engines, reciprocating engines require fuel, air, compression, and a combustion source to function. Depending on the ignition source, they generally fall into two categories: (1) spark-ignited engines, typically fueled by gasoline or natural gas, and (2) compression-ignited engines, typically fueled by diesel oil fuel.

31

Performance and Costs of CO2 Capture at Gas Fired Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarises the results from a study that assesses the performance and costs of natural gas fired combined cycle power plants with CCS. Information is provided on the designs of each of the plants, their power output, efficiency, greenhouse gas intensity, capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, levelised costs of electricity and costs of CO2 avoidance. Discussion and commentary on the key findings and recommendations is also included. The paper includes information on base load plant performance and costs, but part load performance and costs of operation at low annual capacity factors are also presented because operation at lower load factors may be necessary, particularly in future electricity systems that include high amounts of other low-CO2 generation plants.

Neil Smith; Geoff Miller; Indran Aandi; Richard Gadsden; John Davison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Gas fired Advanced Turbine System  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the first phase of the Advanced Gas Turbine System (ATS) program was the concept definition of an advanced engine system that meets efficiency and emission goals far exceeding those that can be provided with today`s equipment. The thermal efficiency goal for such an advanced industrial engine was set at 50% some 15 percentage points higher than current equipment levels. Exhaust emissions goals for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), and unburned hydrocarbons (UH) were fixed at 8 parts per million by volume (ppmv), 20 ppmv, and 20 ppmv respectively, corrected to 15% oxygen (O{sub 2}) levels. Other goals had to be addressed; these involved reducing the cost of power produced by 10 percent and improving or maintaining the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) at current levels. This advanced gas turbine was to be fueled with natural gas, and it had to embody features that would allow it bum coal or coal derived fuels.

LeCren, R.T.; White, D.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Natural Gas Supply in Denmark -A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and power generators of which most are natural gas fired, leads to the natural assumption that the future the consumption of natural gas for heat and power generation is emphasized. General results and threeNatural Gas Supply in Denmark - A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the Liberalized Gas Market

34

An experimental study of gas-fired infrared drying of paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of natural gas-fired IR emitters allow for immense potential benefits to the paper industry. A dedicated test facility was designed and built in the Drying Research Center laboratories at Texas A&M University. This facility allowed for the real-time mass...

Wirtz, Jefferson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is directing substantial programs in the development and encouragement of new energy technologies. Among them are renewable energy and distributed energy resource technologies. As part of its ongoing effort to document the status and potential of these technologies, DOE EERE directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to lead an effort to develop and publish Distributed Energy Technology Characterizations (TCs) that would provide both the department and energy community with a consistent and objective set of cost and performance data in prospective electric-power generation applications in the United States. Toward that goal, DOE/EERE - joined by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) - published the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations in December 1997.As a follow-up, DOE EERE - joined by the Gas Research Institute - is now publishing this document, Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations.

Goldstein, L.; Hedman, B.; Knowles, D.; Freedman, S. I.; Woods, R.; Schweizer, T.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energy. ” Proceedings of WINDPOWER 1992. Seattle,for the proceedings of WINDPOWER 2002 and ACEEE 2002 Summerseminar participants at WINDPOWER 2002, ACEEE 2002 Summer

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Journal, 16 (1), 71-83. Xcel Energy. 2001. FairnessCompliance Report For Xcel Energy 1998 Resource Plan, DocketSystem Operations Planning: Xcel Energy – North Case Study,

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

draft). Analyzing Fuel Price Risks Under CompetitiveCouncil (NWPPC). 2002. Fuel Price Forecasts for the DraftText Box 1: A Brief Survey of Past Literature on Fuel Price

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Natural ventilation generates building form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural ventilation is an efficient design strategy for thermal comfort in hot and humid climates. The building forms can generate different pressures and temperatures to induce natural ventilation. This thesis develops a ...

Chen, Shaw-Bing

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Linguistic Alignment in Natural Language Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that are instantiated at generation time. . . . . . . . .that are instantiated at generation time. . Illustration ofin Natural Language Generation by Gabrielle Halberg

Halberg, Gabrielle Manya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Interdependence of the Electricity Generation System and the Natural Gas System and Implications for Energy Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Lexington Massachusetts This page intentionally left blank. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Concern about energy security on domestic Department of Defense installations has led to the possibility of using natural gas-fired electricity generators to provide power in the event of electric grid failures. As natural gas is an increasingly base-load fuel for electricity generation in the United States, the electricity generation system has become increasingly dependent on the operation of the natural gas system. However, as the natural gas system is also partly dependent on electricity for its ability to deliver natural gas from the well-head to the consumer, the question arises of whether, in the event of an electric grid failure, the natural gas would continue to flow. As the natural gas transmission system largely uses natural gas from the pipelines as a source of power, once the gas has been extracted from the ground, the system is less dependent on the electric grid. However, some of the drilling rigs, processing units, and pipeline compressors do depend on electric power, making the vulnerability to the system to a disruption in the national electricity supply network vary depending on the cause, breadth, and geographic location of the disruption. This is due to the large numbers of players in the natural gas production and

N. Judson; N. Judson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas-Fired Absorption Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on AddThis.com...

43

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results from the second year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operation. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation tests results for a gas turbine, a process heater, and a commercial oil/gas fired boiler are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods. A series of pilot tests were conducted to identify the constraints to reduce the size of current research dilution sampler for future stack emission tests. Based on the test results, a bench prototype compact dilution sampler developed and characterized in GE EER in August 2002.

Glenn England; Oliver Chang; Stephanie Wien

2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

44

Reductions of NO{sub x} emissions on oil and gas firing at Bowline Unit 1  

SciTech Connect

In response to the NYSDEC, Part 227 regulations for the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), Orange and Rockland Utilities, Inc. (ORU) and Burns & Roe Company (BRC) evaluated the options available to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions at two oil and gas fired units at Bowline Point Generating Station. Replacement of all of the existing burners with new low NO{sub x} burners and possibly overfire air ports presents the most costly method of achieving this goal. Therefore, other methods of NO{sub x} reduction were considered including utilizing some form of off-stoichiometric, burners out of service (BOOS), firing. It was determined that the stringent emission limits could be met utilizing off-stoichiometric firing techniques. New oil gun atomizer tips allowing off-stoichiometric firing with mechanical atomization and swirlers of a new design are replacing the existing atomizers. The new hardware eliminates the problems of opacity while operating with off-stoichiometric firing.

Paschedag, A.E.; Martinsen, R.A.; O`Sullivan, R.C.; Schmidt, D.W. [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Laboratory Development of A High Capacity Gas-Fired paper Dryer  

SciTech Connect

Paper drying is the most energy-intensive and temperature-critical aspect of papermaking. It is estimated that about 67% of the total energy required in papermaking is used to dry paper. The conventional drying method uses a series of steam-heated metal cylinders that are required to meet ASME codes for pressure vessels, which limits the steam pressure to about 160 psig. Consequently, the shell temperature and the drying capacity are also limited. Gas Technology Institute together with Boise Paper Solutions, Groupe Laparrier and Verreault (GL&V) USA Inc., Flynn Burner Corporation and with funding support from the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. natural gas industry, and Gas Research Institute is developing a high efficiency gas-fired paper dryer based on a combination of a ribbon burner and advanced heat transfer enhancement technique. The Gas-Fired Paper Dryer (GFPD) is a high-efficiency alternative to conventional steam-heated drying drums that typically operate at surface temperatures in the 300���������������ºF range. The new approach was evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale testing at the Western Michigan University Paper Pilot Plant. Drum surface temperatures of more than 400���������������ºF were reached with linerboard (basis weight 126 lb/3000 ft2) production and resulted in a 4-5 times increase in drying rate over a conventional steam-heated drying drum. Successful GFPD development and commercialization will provide large energy savings to the paper industry and increase paper production rates from dryer-limited (space- or steam-limited) paper machines by an estimated 10 to 20%, resulting in significant capital costs savings for both retrofits and new capacity.

Yaroslav Chudnovsky; Aleksandr Kozlov; Lester Sherrow

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Final Report: Laboratory Development of a High Capacity Gas-Fired Paper Dryer  

SciTech Connect

Paper drying is the most energy-intensive and temperature-critical aspect of papermaking. It is estimated that about 67% of the total energy required in papermaking is used to dry paper. The conventional drying method uses a series of steam-heated metal cylinders that are required to meet ASME codes for pressure vessels, which limits the steam pressure to about 160 psig. Consequently, the shell temperature and the drying capacity are also limited. Gas Technology Institute together with Boise Paper Solutions, Groupe Laperrier and Verreault (GL&V) USA Inc., Flynn Burner Corporation and with funding support from the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. natural gas industry, and Gas Research Institute is developing a high efficiency gas-fired paper dryer based on a combination of a ribbon burner and advanced heat transfer enhancement technique. The Gas-Fired Paper Dryer (GFPD) is a high-efficiency alternative to conventional steam-heated drying drums that typically operate at surface temperatures in the 300 deg F range. The new approach was evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale testing at the Western Michigan University Paper Pilot Plant. Drum surface temperatures of more than 400 deg F were reached with linerboard (basis weight 126 lb/3000 ft2) production and resulted in a 4-5 times increase in drying rate over a conventional steam-heated drying drum. Successful GFPD development and commercialization will provide large energy savings to the paper industry and increase paper production rates from dryer-limited (space- or steam-limited) paper machines by an estimated 10 to 20%, resulting in significant capital costs savings for both retrofits and new capacity.

Yaroslav Chudnovsky; Aleksandr Kozlov; Lester Sherrow

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

Natural fourth generation of leptons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider implications of a fourth generation of leptons, allowing for the most general mass patterns for the fourth generation neutrino. We determine the constraints due to the precision electroweak measurements and outline the signatures to search for at the LHC experiments. As a concrete framework to apply these results we consider the minimal walking technicolor (MWTC) model where the matter content, regarding the electroweak quantum numbers, corresponds to a fourth generation.

Oleg Antipin; Matti Heikinheimo; Kimmo Tuominen

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

48

Dilution-based emissions sampling from stationary sources: part 2 - gas-fired combustors compared with other fuel-fired systems  

SciTech Connect

With the recent focus on fine particle matter (PM2.5), new, self- consistent data are needed to characterize emissions from combustion sources. Emissions data for gas-fired combustors are presented, using dilution sampling as the reference. The sampling and analysis of the collected particles in the presence of precursor gases, SO{sub 2}, nitrogen oxide, volatile organic compound, and NH{sub 3} is discussed; the results include data from eight gas fired units, including a dual- fuel institutional boiler and a diesel engine powered electricity generator. These data are compared with results in the literature for heavy-duty diesel vehicles and stationary sources using coal or wood as fuels. The results show that the gas-fired combustors have very low PM2.5 mass emission rates in the range of {approximately}10{sup -4} lb/million Btu (MMBTU) compared with the diesel backup generator with particle filter, with {approximately} 5 x 10{sup -3} lb/MMBTU. Even higher mass emission rates are found in coal-fired systems, with rates of {approximately} 0.07 lb/MMBTU for a bag-filter-controlled pilot unit burning eastern bituminous coal. The characterization of PM2.5 chemical composition from the gas-fired units indicates that much of the measured primary particle mass in PM2.5 samples is organic or elemental carbon and, to a much less extent, sulfate. Metal emissions are low compared with the diesel engines and the coal- or wood-fueled combustors. The metals found in the gas- fired combustor particles are low in concentration. The interpretation of the particulate carbon emissions is complicated by the fact that an approximately equal amount of particulate carbon is found on the particle collector and a backup filter. It is likely that measurement artifacts are positively biasing 'true' particulate carbon emissions results. 49 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

England, G.C.; Watson, J.G.; Chow, J.C.; Zielinska, B.; Chang, M.C.O.; Loos, K.R.; Hidy. G.M. [GE Energy, Santa Ana, CA (United States)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Northeast Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Northeast Region Northeast Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Northeast Region Overview | Domestic Gas | Canadian Imports | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Twenty interstate natural gas pipeline systems operate within the Northeast Region (Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, and West Virginia). These interstate pipelines deliver natural gas to several intrastate natural gas pipelines and at least 50 local distribution companies in the region. In addition, they also serve large industrial concerns and, increasingly, natural gas fired electric power generation facilities.

50

Direct thermal to electrical energy conversion using very low bandgap TPV cells in a gas-fired furnace system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, electricity generation using very low bandgap InGaAsSb thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells whose bandgap is 0.53 eV was investigated in a gas-fired furnace system where thermal radiation was emitted from a metal alloy emitter. The electric output of the InGaAsSb TPV cells was characterized under various operating conditions. The cell short circuit density was measured to be 3.01 A/cm2 at an emitter temperature of 1197 °C. At this emitter temperature, an electric power density of 0.65 W/cm2 was produced by the TPV cells. Experimental results show that direct thermal to electrical energy conversion was achieved in a gas-fired heating furnace system. Such a system could be employed to form a micro-combined heat and power (micro-CHP) process where exhaust heat is utilized for home heating needs. The TPV integrated energy system provides an effective means for primary energy savings.

K. Qiu; A.C.S. Hayden

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Low NOx burner retrofits and enhancements for a 518 MW oil and gas fired boiler  

SciTech Connect

Low NOx oil/gas burners originally supplied to Jacksonville Electric Authority, Northside No. 3 .500 MW unit, were based on a duplex air register design with lobed spray oil atomizers providing additional fuel staging. Although the burners could meet the targeted NOx levels of 0.3 and 0.2 lbs/10{sup 6} BTU on oil and gas respectively. There was insufficient margin on these NOx levels to enable continuous low NOx operation to be achieved. Further burner development was undertaken based on improved aerodynamic control within the burner design to give an approximate 25% improvement in NOx emission reduction thus providing an adequate operating margin. This `RoBTAS` (Round Burner with Tilted Air Supply) burner design based on techniques developed successfully for front wall coal firing applications achieved the required NOx reductions in full scale firing demonstrations on both heavy fuel oil and natural gas firing. The paper describes the development work and the subsequent application of the `RoBTAS` burners to the Northside No. 3 boiler. The burner will also be test fired on Orimulsion fuel and thus the comparison between heavy fuel oil firing and Orimulsion firing under ultra low NOx conditions will be made.

King, J.J. [Jacksonville Electric Authority, FL (United States); Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R. [International Combustion Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom). Rolls-Royce Industrial Power Group

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Medium-Term Risk Management for a Gas-Fired Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medium-Term Risk Management for a Gas-Fired Power Plant Medium-Term Risk Management for a Gas-Fired Power Plant Speaker(s): Afzal Siddiqui Date: October 11, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-1099 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Chris Marnay Electricity sectors in many countries have been deregulated with the aim of introducing competition. However, as a result, electricity prices have become highly volatile. Stochastic programming provides an appropriate method to characterise the uncertainty and to derive decisions while taking risk management into account. We consider the medium-term risk management problem of a UK gas-fired power plant that faces stochastic electricity and gas prices. In particular, the power plant makes daily decisions about electricity sales to and gas purchases from spot markets over a monthly

53

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KM. Distributed generation investment and upgrade underin gas fired power plant investments. Review of Financial13] Dixit AK, Pindyck RS. Investment under uncertainty.

Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas-fired power plant heat rates and generation,natural gas-fired power plant heat rates and generation,natural gas-fired power plants Total incremental generation

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Rankine/Rankine cycle gas-fired heat pump. Final report Mar 79-Mar 82  

SciTech Connect

A Rankine/Rankine cycle gas-fired heat pump was developed for residential application. The system consists of two rotating elements: a high-speed turbomachine core and a low-speed assembly, which includes a rotating vapor generator and heat exchangers. Inherent in the rotation of these components is the elimination of separate pumps, fans, reversing valves, and expansion valves. One Rankine cycle, the power cycle, drives the turbine and gives up its excess heat to the service air. The second Rankine cycle, the refrigerant cycle, is pressurized by a turbine-powered centrifugal compressor. The dual-cycle system uses two organic heat transfer fluids. The power cycle uses a developmental, moderate-temperature fluid (designated Fluid B), and the refrigeration cycle uses Freon R-113. These two fluids are compatible and missible in each other. Therefore, positive seals are not required. A laboratory prototype model was developed to the point of initiating proof-of-concept demonstration. A conceptual design study of an end-product model was conducted, and a product specification for a family of heat pump systems with various performance enhancement options was generated. The maximum realizable performance end-product heat pump system has a projected overall coefficient of performance (OCOP) of 0.79 at 37,500 Btu/hr cooling and an OCOP of 1.49 at 60,000 Btu/hr heating load. This end-product model has an estimated manufacturing cost of $1460 (in 1982 dollars) and could be available as a commercial product in the early 1990s.

Enbar, E.; Moriarty, R.

1982-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Measurement and analysis of heating of paper with gas-fired infrared burner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Gas-fired IR heaters produce combustion on the burner surface by ignition of a pre-mixed air and fuel streams. The combustion raises the surface temperature to ranges of 800-1,100°C to emit radiation, mainly in the medium IR range, which has a...

Husain, Abdullah Nadir

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the state’s natural gas-fired power generation facilities,the state’s natural gas-fired power generation facilities,

Sathaye, Jayant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Natural catalytic activity in a marine shale for generating natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...natural catalytic activity in marine shales. Gas is generated at ambient temperatures...differences are in degree. Mowry shale generates gas compositions that are quite different...probably a major source of natural gas. Mowry shale generates gas at thermodynamic...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A Case Study from Norway on Gas-Fired Power Plants, Carbon Sequestration, and Politics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Case Study from Norway on Case Study from Norway on Gas-Fired Power Plants, Carbon Sequestration, and Politics Guillaume Quiviger and Howard Herzog (hjherzog@mit.edu; +1-617-253-0688) Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Room E40-471 1 Amherst Street Cambridge, MA 02139 INTRODUCTION On Thursday March 9, 2000, Norwegian Prime Minister Kjell Magne Bondevik's minority government resigned over a disagreement with the opposition about a controversial proposal to build two gas-fired power plants. The government had been rejecting the building of the proposed plants for months. Bondevik and his coalition government wanted to hold off construction until new technology, such as carbon sequestration, allowed building more environmentally friendly plants. They argued that their position was supported by European

60

A Gas-Fired Heat Pipe Zone Heater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this table were obtained from the 1983 Qas Rel~earch Inrtitute Baseline Projection Data Book. 4verage Resldentlal Gas Prlces ($/Wtu) (1982 do1 lars) New England Middle Atlantlc South Atlantlc East North Central West North Central East South Central... West South Central kuntaln #I Mountaln I2 Paclflc #I Paclf lc 12 The conservation factor may be exprerred as lABLEm Gas Research lnstltute Fuel lnflatlon Estlmates natural Gas 1- ~2 1983-1990 1990-ZMO Nc* England 1.7 2.1 Mlddle Atlantlc 2.1 2...

Winn, C. B.; Burns, P.; Guire, J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.

Not Available

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.

Keyser, D.; Lantz, E.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Study of the Heating Load of a Manufactured Space with a Gas-fired Radiant Heating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermal balance mathematics model of a manufactured space with a gas-fired radiant heating system is established to calculate the heating load. Computer programs are used to solve the model. Envelope internal surface temperatures under different...

Zheng, X.; Dong, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Efficiently generate steam from cogeneration plants  

SciTech Connect

As cogeneration gets more popular, some plants have two choices of equipment for generating steam. Plant engineers need to have a decision chart to split the duty efficiently between (oil-fired or gas-fired) steam generators (SGs) and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) using the exhaust from gas turbines. Underlying the dilemma is that the load-versus-efficiency characteristics of both types of equipment are different. When the limitations of each type of equipment and its capability are considered, analysis can come up with several selection possibilities. It is almost always more efficient to generate steam in an HRSG (designed for firing) as compared with conventional steam generators. However, other aspects, such as maintenance, availability of personnel, equipment limitations and operating costs, should also be considered before making a final decision. Loading each type of equipment differently also affects the overall efficiency or the fuel consumption. This article describes the performance aspects of representative steam generators and gas turbine HRSGs and suggests how plant engineers can generate steam efficiently. It also illustrates how to construct a decision chart for a typical installation. The equipment was picked arbitrarily to show the method. The natural gas fired steam generator has a maximum capacity of 100,000 lb/h, 400-psig saturated steam, and the gas-turbine-exhaust HRSG has the same capacity. It is designed for supplementary firing with natural gas.

Ganapathy, V. [ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Assessment of gas-fired commercial refrigeration. Final report Mar-Aug 1982  

SciTech Connect

Gas-fired commercial refrigeration is not common today. However, today's and tomorrow's gas engines (internal combustion, Stirling, gas turbines) could power cost-effective refrigeration systems. One key is effectively utilizing the prime mover's reject heat to economic advantage. Another is the capacity control afforded by a variable-speed prime mover. The best example of such a system is comparatively near-term. It serves the large and steady supermarket refrigeration market with an industrial-grade internal combustion engine driving an open-shaft reciprocating compressor. The gas engine's exhaust enables a reciprocating steam engine to boost shaft power by 20%.

Hynek, S.J.; Krepchin, I.P.; Harvey, A.C.; Demler, R.L.; Borhanian, H.H.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Proceedings of the Eighth International Natural Language Generation Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INLG 2014 Proceedings of the Eighth International Natural Language Generation Conference Including 2014 Proceedings) ii #12;Introduction Welcome to the Eighth International Natural Language Generation Proceedings of the INLG and SIGDIAL 2014 Joint Session Organizers: Margaret Mitchell, Kathleen McCoy, David Mc

67

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural-gas- fired combined cycle generation, and the othernatural-gas-fired combined cycle plants. This assumptionplants were efficient combined cycle plants. The four

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Method and apparatus for generating a natural crack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for generating a measurable natural crack includes forming a primary notch in the surface of a solid material. A nonsustained single pressure pulse is then generated in the vicinity of the primary notch, reuslting in the formation of a shock wave which travels through the material. The shock wave creates a measurable natural crack within the material which extends from the primary notch. The natural crack formed possesses predictable geometry, location and orientation.

Fulton, F.J.; Honodel, C.A.; Holman, W.R.; Weingart, R.C.

1982-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

69

Generating natural language summaries for multimedia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce an automatic system that generates textual summaries of Internet-style video clips by first identifying suitable high-level descriptive features that have been detected in the video (e.g. visual concepts, recognized speech, ...

Duo Ding; Florian Metze; Shourabh Rawat; Peter F. Schulam; Susanne Burger

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Activity: Natural Gas Engine and Vehicle Research & Development (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the status of the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) activity, including goals, R&D progress, NGV implementation, and the transition to hydrogen.

Not Available

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown – Dataset  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Excel file with dataset for Fact #844: Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown

72

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) Program Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describing U. S. DOE and NREL's development of next generation natural gas vehicles (NGVs) as a key element in its strategy to reduce oil import and vehicle pollutants.

Walkowicz, K.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2013 | Release Date: February 28, 7, 2013 | Release Date: February 28, 2013 | Next Release: March 7, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Natural Gas Generation Rises 21 Percent. According to the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) recently released Electric Power Monthly, natural gas net generation rose by 21 percent from 2011 to 2012 (the biggest increase since an 11 percent rise in 1994) as low natural gas prices encouraged more natural gas consumption in the electric power sector. Natural gas generation displaced some coal generation, which fell about 12 percent from 2011 to 2012. During 2012, an extremely hot summer combined with low natural gas prices relative to coal led to record high gas-fired power generation. BENTEK

74

Numerical Simulation of a Natural Circulation Steam Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical Simulation of a Natural Circulation Steam Generator W. Linzer \\Lambda , K. Ponweiser circulation steam generator. We focus on a model with a simple geometry consisting of two vertical pipes properties of water and steam. We present a numerical algorithm based on an explicit upwind discretization

Weinmüller, Ewa B.

75

Losses and Costs Associated with Coal vs. Natural Gas Firing at Hanes Dye and Finishing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Due to decreasing production and rising coal prices, the engineering and management staff at Hanes Dye and Finishing in Winston Salem, NC have been investigating… (more)

Gibides, Justin Tyler

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced natural gas-fired Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Change Joint Program Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 45 The Price of Electricity from Private Power Producers Summary: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

77

Natural catalytic activity in a marine shale for generating natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in a marine shale for generating natural gas Frank D. Mango 1 * Daniel M...be the source of equilibrium in natural gas habitats and in marine shales...palaeoactivity|low-temperature gas|natural gas| 1. Introduction It is broadly...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

EIS-0349: Cherry Point Co-generation Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to support BP West Coast Products, LLC proposal to construct and operate a 720-megawatt, natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility on land adjacent to its BP Cherry Point Refinery.

79

NO, Reduction in a Gas Fired Utility Boiler by Combustion Modifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data on the effect of several combustion modifications on the for-math of nitrogen oxides and on boiler efficiency were acquired and analyzed for a 110 MW gas fired utility boiler. The results from the study showed that decreasing the oxygen in the flue gas from 2.2% to 0.6 % reduced the NO, formation by 33 % and also gave better boiler efficiencies. Flue gas recirculation through the bottom of the fire4mx WBS founb to be Ineffective. Staged combustion was found to reduce the NO, emlssions by as much as 55 % while decreasing the efficiency by about 5%. Adjustment of the burner air registers reduced the NO, formation by about 20 ppm. The lowest NO, emisdons of 42 ppm (at about 3 % 02) in the stack was obtained for air only to one top burner and 0.5 % oxygen in the flue gas. The reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO,) emissions from steam boilers has been under study for several years. The NO, from boilers consist almost entirely of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (N02) with NO2 usually only l or 2 % of the total. After leaving the stack, the NO eventually combines with atmospheric oxygen to form NOp. The Environmental Protection Agency has sponsored several studies1-I0 on reducing NO, emissions while maintaining thermal efficiency of boilers. Other studies have been sponsored by The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) " and Argonne National

Jerry A. Bullin; Dan Wilkerson

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Revisiting the Long-Term Hedge Value of Wind Power in an Era of Low Natural Gas Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wear and tear on gas-fired power plants from the increasedon natural gas and wholesale power prices has also made itcheap natural gas and wind power in the years ahead (Lee et

Bolinger, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Development of a small air?cooled ‘‘midnight sun’’ thermophotovoltaic electric generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A natural gas fired thermophotovoltaic generator using infrared?sensitive GaSb cells and a silicon carbide emitter is described. The emitter is designed to operate at 1400?°C. Twelve GaSb receivers surround the emitter. Each receiver contains a string of series connected cells. Special infrared filters are bonded to each cell. These filters transmit short wavelength useful IR to the cells while reflecting longer wavelength IR back to the emitter. Combustion air is supplied to the burner through a counterflow heat exchanger where the air is preheated by the exhaust from the burner. The unit is air cooled and designed to produce approximately 100 Watts of electric power.

Lewis M. Fraas; Huang Han Xiang; She Hui; Luke Ferguson; John Samaras; Russ Ballantyne; Michael Seal; Ed West

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 10: Resource Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................................ 7 Natural Gas-Fired Generation generation, and natural gas-fired generation. In addition, the region needs to better utilize, expandSixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 10: Resource Strategy Key Findings

83

Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of natural gas fired power generation, which will provideof natural gas fired power generation, which will providepower generation – for example Stalin’s “gasification” campaign that turned coal fired plants in European Russia into gas

Wengle, Susanne Alice

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Innovation under cap-and-trade programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...under Title IV. Generation replacement occurred...proportion of natural gas-fired generation in the electric power sector, which...the OTC/NBP. Generation replacement/demand...nuclear and natural gas-fired power plants, as well...

Margaret R. Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Techno-economic analysis of a coal-fired CHP based combined heating system with gas-fired boilers for peak load compensation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) plants dominate the heating market in China. With the ongoing energy structure reformation and increasing environmental concerns, we propose gas-fired boilers to be deployed in underperforming heating substations of heating networks for peak load compensation, in order to improve both energy efficiency and environmental sustainability. However, due to the relatively high price of gas, techno-economic analysis is required for evaluating different combined heating scenarios, characterized by basic heat load ratio (?). Therefore, we employ the dynamic economics and annual cost method to develop a techno-economic model for computing the net heating cost of the system, considering the current state of the art of cogeneration systems in China. The net heating cost is defined as the investment costs and operations costs of the system subtracted by revenues from power generation. We demonstrate the model in a real-life combined heating system of Daqing, China. The results show that the minimum net heating cost can be realized at ?=0.75 with a cost reduction of 16.8% compared to coal heating alone. Since fuel cost is the dominating factor, sensitivity analyses on coal and gas prices are discussed subsequently.

Hai-Chao Wang; Wen-Ling Jiao; Risto Lahdelma; Ping-Hua Zou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

October 11, 2011 Wind Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years. #12;Reading on ESRP 285 Website #12;The Competition: Gas-Fired Generation from a Combined CycleESRP 285 October 11, 2011 Wind Generation · Videos · Power Point Lecture #12;Wind Videos Wind (CC) Power Plant #12;Wind Investors Face These Costs #12;Fixed Costs #12;Variable Costs #12;Bottom

Ford, Andrew

87

Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

From 2002 to 2012, most states have reduced their reliance on coal for electricity generation. The figure below shows the percent change in electricity generated by coal and natural gas for each...

88

How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power generation will continue to come from coal, with growing shares in more efficient nuclear and natural gas fired

Aden, Nathaniel T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation, meaning the price the utility would have paid for electricity from a new natural gas-fired power

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Variability in natural gas fuel composition and its effects on the performance of catalytic combustion systems. Final report for period September 18, 1998 - September 17, 2000  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is composed primarily of methane with small amounts of higher hydrocarbons and diluents, which vary by region and over time. Compositions of natural gas from domestic and worldwide sources were surveyed with respect to content of higher hydrocarbons and diluents. The survey showed slight compositional variability between most of the gases, with a small fraction of them containing significantly larger contents of higher hydrocarbons than the mean. As gas-fired turbines will be used for power generation all over the world, they will need to tolerate operation with fuels with a wide variety of compositions, particularly with respect to the concentration of higher hydrocarbons and diluents. Subscale catalytic combustion modules typical of those used in gas turbine power generation with ultra low emissions of pollutants were tested in a subscale test system with natural gas alone and with added known levels of hydrocarbon compounds and diluents. The range of compositions tested contained the range observed in the survey. Test results were used to calculate the effect of composition on catalyst performance. The compositional variability is of little consequence to the catalyst for most of the gases in the survey, including nearly all of the gases delivered in the U.S. To accommodate the remaining gases, the catalyst inlet temperature must be lowered to maintain combustor durability. These results support commercial acceptance of catalytic combustion systems for use in natural gas fired turbines in distributed power generation with ultra low NO{sub x} emissions.

Ginter, David; Simchick, Chuck; Schlatter, Jim

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 18) 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 18) Natural gas spot prices exhibited increases in most locations this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, August 3 - 10) as demand responded to above average temperatures, high crude oil prices, and reduced coal deliveries, which added to demand for natural gas-fired power generation. The Henry Hub spot price increased 6 cents this week, or less than 1 percent, to $8.81 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery increased 72 cents since last Wednesday (August 3) to settle yesterday at $9.071 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, August 5, was 2,463 Bcf, which is 6.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil hit a record high yesterday of

92

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;5 Northwest Power and Conservation Council Natural Gas · Natural gas-fired generation is the most cost · Natural gas-fired generation · Building and preserving infrastructure · Developing new technologies- effective resource to provide additional energy and capacity after efficiency · Gas-fired generation may

93

Building new power plants in a CO2 constrained world: A Case Study from Norway on Gas-Fired Power Plants, Carbon Sequestration, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

including technologies for carbon sequestration. Norway's primary energy production is dominated by oilBuilding new power plants in a CO2 constrained world: A Case Study from Norway on Gas-Fired Power director. Most of the material used in this work are either courtesy of the persons I talked to in Norway

94

PROOF-OF-CONCEPT OF A DUAL-FIRED (SOLAR & NATURAL GAS) GENERATOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROOF-OF-CONCEPT OF A DUAL-FIRED (SOLAR & NATURAL GAS) GENERATOR FOR USE IN A SPACE-COOLING SYSTEM REPORT (FAR) PROOF-OF-CONCEPT OF A DUAL-FIRED (SOLAR & NATURAL GAS) GENERATOR FOR USE IN A SPACE COOLING Technologies · Environmentally-Preferred Advanced Generation · Energy-Related Environmental Research · Energy

95

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 18) 11 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 18) Natural gas spot prices exhibited increases in most locations this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, August 3 - 10) as demand responded to above average temperatures, high crude oil prices, and reduced coal deliveries, which added to demand for natural gas-fired power generation. The Henry Hub spot price increased 6 cents this week, or less than 1 percent, to $8.81 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery increased 72 cents since last Wednesday (August 3) to settle yesterday at $9.071 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, August 5, was 2,463 Bcf, which is 6.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil hit a record high yesterday of $64.80 per barrel ($11.17 per MMBtu) after increasing $4.04 per barrel (70 cents per MMBtu), or about 7 percent, on the week.

96

Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project October 31, 2013 - 11:30am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON -- As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to deploy every available source of American energy, the Energy Department today announced a new concentrating solar power (CSP) project led by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). The project will integrate utility-scale CSP technology with SMUD's 500-megawatt (MW) natural gas-fired Cosumnes Power Plant. Supported by a $10 million Energy Department investment, this project will help design, build and test cost-competitive CSP-fossil fuel power generating systems in the United

97

Thermodynamic and Energy Efficiency Analysis of Power Generation from Natural Salinity Gradients by Pressure Retarded Osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Gibbs free energy of mixing dissipated when fresh river water flows into the sea can be harnessed for sustainable power generation. Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is one of the methods proposed to generate power from natural salinity gradients. In ...

Ngai Yin Yip; Menachem Elimelech

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

98

Natural gas liquifier based on an EGD-generator-expander  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Versions are considered for preparing liquefied natural gas (LNG) in liquefiers with different cold producing units; with a throttle valve, a vortex tube, a turbo-expander. A short analysis is given for their ......

G. I. Bumagin; D. V. Borodin; A. G. Lapkova…

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Thermophotovoltaics for Combined Heat and Power Using Low NOx Gas Fired Radiant Tube Burners  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three new developments have now occurred making economical TPV systems possible. The first development is the diffused junction GaSb cell that responds out to 1.8 microns producing over 1 W/cm2 electric given a blackbody IR emitter temperature of 1250 C. This high power density along with a simple diffused junction cell makes an array cost of $0.50 per Watt possible. The second development is new IR emitters and filters that put 75% of the radiant energy in the cell convertible band. The third development is a set of commercially available ceramic radiant tube burners that operate at up to 1250 C. Herein we present near term and longer term spectral control designs leading to a 1.5 kW TPV generator / furnace incorporating these new features. This TPV generator / furnace is designed to replace the residential furnace for combined heat and power for the home.

Lewis Fraas; James Avery; Enrico Malfa; Joachim G. Wuenning; Gary Kovacik; Chris Astle

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

An investigation of the performance of a hybrid turboexpander-fuel cell system for power recovery at natural gas pressure reduction stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas is transported in pipelines at high pressures. To distribute the gas locally at locations along the pipeline the pressure must be reduced before the gas enters the local distribution system. Most pressure reduction stations in North America use expansion valves for this purpose. The expansion process produces a temperature decrease which can cause problems so the gas must be preheated before entering the expansion valve. Usually this is done using a natural gas-fired boiler. To reduce the energy consumption the pressure drop can be achieved by passing the gas through a turboexpander which generates electrical power. With a turboexpander system the gas must also be preheated, a gas-fired boiler again used. A new approach which uses a hybrid turboexpander-fuel cell system has been considered here. In such a system, a Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) utilizing natural gas is used to preheat the gas before it flows through the turboexpander and to provide low emission electrical power. The main objective of the present work was to investigate the factors affecting the performance of such a system. Data on natural gas usage in typical smaller Canadian city was used as an input to a simulation of a hybrid gas expansion station in the city.

Clifford Howard; Patrick Oosthuizen; Brant Peppley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Middle East fuel supply & gas exports for power generation  

SciTech Connect

The Middle East countries that border on, or are near, the Persian Gulf hold over 65% of the world`s estimated proven crude oil reserves and 32% of the world`s estimated proven natural gas reserves. In fact, approximately 5% of the world`s total proven gas reserves are located in Qatar`s offshore North Field. This large natural gas/condensate field is currently under development to supply three LNG export projects, as well as a sub-sea pipeline proposal to export gas to Pakistan. The Middle East will continue to be a major source of crude oil and oil products to world petroleum markets, including fuel for existing and future base load, intermediate cycling and peaking electric generation plants. In addition, as the Persian Gulf countries turn their attention to exploiting their natural gas resources, the fast-growing need for electricity in the Asia-Pacific and east Africa areas offers a potential market for both pipeline and LNG export opportunities to fuel high efficiency, gas-fired combustion turbine power plants. Mr. Mitchell`s portion of this paper will discuss the background, status and timing of several Middle Eastern gas export projects that have been proposed. These large gas export projects are difficult and costly to develop and finance. Consequently, any IPP developers that are considering gas-fired projects which require Mid-East LNG as a fuel source, should understand the numerous sources and timing to securing project debt, loan terms and conditions, and, restrictions/credit rating issues associated with securing financing for these gas export projects. Mr. Newendorp`s section of the paper will cover the financing aspects of these projects, providing IPP developers with additional considerations in selecting the primary fuel supply for an Asian-Pacific or east African electric generation project.

Mitchell, G.K. [Merrimack Energy Co., LTD, Lowell, MA (United States); Newendorp, T. [Taylor-DeJongh, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Hydrogen Generation in Fuel Cell Applications1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Hydrogen Generation in Fuel Cell Ghosh3 , Huei Peng2 Abstract A fuel processor that reforms natural gas to hydrogen-rich mixture to feed of the hydrogen in the fuel processor is based on catalytic partial oxidation of the methane in the natural gas

Peng, Huei

103

International Natural Gas Prices for Electricity Generation - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 U.S. Dollars per 107 Kilocalories - Gross Calorific Value2 Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Australia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Austria NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Barbados NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium C C C C C C C C C Bolivia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Canada 145.5 144.7 174.9 171.9 225.2 NA NA NA NA Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 244.7 252.1 258.6 281.0 326.2 348.5 400.8 499.3 NA

104

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2001 8, 2001 Prices ended the week up slightly from where they started as a brief heat wave in the eastern half of the country caused a rise in prices (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) that was somewhat undone by the return of moderate temperatures and the report of another hefty stock build. On a Friday-to-Friday basis, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased by $0.25 to $3.88 per MMBtu compared with an increase of $0.23 to $0.33 at other major supply points in the eastern half of the country. In the same time period, the near-month (July delivery) futures contract was up less than 6 cents to $3.979 per MMBtu as of Friday, June 15, 2001. Prices in California rose substantially last Monday after coming off high inventory flow orders (OFOs) but ended the week close to or lower than the previous week due to another round of OFOs. For the past 7 weeks, weekly storage injections neared or exceeded 100 Bcf, bringing stocks to within less than a 1 percent difference from average levels. The string of record-breaking stock builds appears attributable to moderate spring temperatures and reduced cooling demand by natural-gas-fired electricity generation.

105

Performance and emission characteristics of natural gas combined cycle power generation system with steam injection and oxyfuel combustion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Natural gas combined cycle power generation systems are gaining popularity due to their high power generation efficiency and reduced emission. In the present work, combined… (more)

Varia, Nitin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Record of Decision for the Electrical Interconnection of the Plymouth Generating Facility (DOE/EIS-0345)(10/14/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the Electrical Interconnection of the Plymouth Generating Facility October 2003 THE DECISION The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to implement the proposed action identified in the Plymouth Generating Facility (PGF) Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (DOE/EIS-0345, June 2003). The PGF, which has been proposed by Plymouth Energy, LLC (Plymouth Energy), involves construction and operation of a 307-megawatt (MW) natural gas-fired, combined-cycle power generation facility on a 44.5-acre site 2 miles west of Plymouth in Benton County, Washington. Under the proposed action, BPA will offer contract terms for interconnection of the PGF into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS) at BPA's proposed McNary-John Day 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line at a point approximately

107

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 8, 2014 | Release Date: January 9, January 8, 2014 | Release Date: January 9, 2014 | Next Release: January 16, 2014 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Power sector response to high natural gas prices varies by region Day-ahead spot prices for natural gas and electric generation rose this week in both the Midwest and eastern United States, as the polar vortex brought cold temperatures to those parts of the country. While cold temperatures affected all of these regions, both gas and power prices increased more in New England, New York and the Mid-Atlantic than they did in the Midwest. Gas-fired power plants in the East had to compete for an increasingly limited amount of available pipeline capacity from a system that was

108

Regional variations in the health, environmental, and climate benefits of wind and solar generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...400 fossil-fueled power plants, dollar-per-ton...hourly emissions and generation data to estimate...the Emissions and Generation Resource Integrated...Agency (EPA) using Power Control Areas as a guide...displaces coal-fired generators. Sites...beneficial because gas-fired plants...

Kyle Siler-Evans; Inês Lima Azevedo; M. Granger Morgan; Jay Apt

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Speaker to Address Impact of Natural Gas Production on Greenhouse Gas Emissions When used for power generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions, but questions have, that using natural gas for electricity generation is better than coal for the long-term healthSpeaker to Address Impact of Natural Gas Production on Greenhouse Gas Emissions When used for power

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

110

Changing Prospects for Natural Gas in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...doubling ofoil life to 4000 hours...application of gas-fired combined-cycle...gas-fueled combustion turbine combined with...generation from the gas turbine part ofa facility...38, 39) and life cycle cost advantages...Steam-injected gas turbines represent a...

W. M. BURNET; T S. D. BAN

1989-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

111

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Microsoft Word - SAG2_October222008_FinalMeetingMinutes Revision...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preheating PCHX Sulfuric Acid Slide 6 Westinghouse NGNP Team Natural Gas Waste gas andor Natural Gas firing Reference Steam Generator Configuration Considerations Slide 7...

113

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2011 Tohoku earthquake, accompanying tsunami and subsequent nuclear plant outages, have led to higher use of thermal generation, including natural gas fired generation. According...

114

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that support more load following and peaking generation withfor natural gas- fired load following and peaking generationneeded less load- following and peaking generation. Growth

Kahrl, Fredrich James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Future of Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs in the United States: Projected Spending and Savings to 2025  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas (as gas-fired generation is expected to offset the majority of the retired coal-fired generation); the capital

Barbose, Galen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

On a Rising Tide: The Future of U.S. Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas, as gas-fired generation is expected to offset the majority of the retired coal-fired generation The capital

Goldman, Charles

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Supply Chain Network Perspective for Electric Power Generation, Supply, Transmission, and Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the economics of power production. For example, new gas-fired combined cycle power plants are more effi- cientA Supply Chain Network Perspective for Electric Power Generation, Supply, Transmission the behavior of the various decision-makers, who operate in a decentralized manner and include power generators

Nagurney, Anna

118

Thermodynamic, Energy Efficiency, and Power Density Analysis of Reverse Electrodialysis Power Generation with Natural Salinity Gradients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic, Energy Efficiency, and Power Density Analysis of Reverse Electrodialysis Power Generation with Natural Salinity Gradients ... solns. of different salinities. ... River mouths are potentially abundant locations for the exploitation of the clean and renewable salinity gradient energy (SGE) as here perpetually fresh water mixes with saline seawater. ...

Ngai Yin Yip; David A. Vermaas; Kitty Nijmeijer; Menachem Elimelech

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

119

Final Environmental Impact Statement Plymouth Generating Facility Plymouth, Washington  

SciTech Connect

Plymouth Energy, L.L.C. (Plymouth Energy) proposes to construct and operate the Plymouth Generating Facility (PGF), which would be a 307-megawatt (MW) natural gas-fired, combined cycle power generation facility on a 44.5-acre site 2 miles west of the rural community of Plymouth in southern Benton County, Washington. Plymouth Energy has proposed that the PGF would be interconnected to the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) proposed McNary-John Day 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line at a point approximately 4.7 miles west of BPA's McNary Substation. This tie-in to the McNary-John Day line would be approximately 0.6 mile to the north of the project site. Natural gas would be supplied to the project by an 800-foot pipeline lateral from the Williams Northwest Gas Pipeline Company (Williams Co.) Plymouth Compressor Station, which is located adjacent to the plant site. Water for project use would be supplied from a groundwater well whose perfected rights have been transferred to the project. A small additional quantity of water to meet plant peak needs would be obtained by lease from the neighboring farm operation. Wastewater resulting from project operations would be supplied to the neighboring farm for blending with farm-supplied water, and then used for crop irrigation. Electricity generated by the PGF would be delivered to the BPA electric grid via a new transmission interconnection for transmission of energy to regional purchasers of electricity.

N /A

2003-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

120

Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variance Analysis of Wind and Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations Brian Bush, Thomas Jenkin, David Lipowicz, and Douglas J. Arent National Renewable Energy Laboratory Roger Cooke Resources for the Future Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-52790 January 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations Brian Bush, Thomas Jenkin, David Lipowicz,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Discriminating natural images and computer generated graphics based on the impact of CFA interpolation on the correlation of PRNU  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To discriminate natural images from computer generated graphics, a novel identification method based on the features of the impact of color filter array (CFA) interpolation on the local correlation of photo response non-uniformity noise (PRNU) is proposed. ... Keywords: CFA interpolation, Computer generated graphics, Digital image forensics, Natural images, PRNU

Fei Peng, Die-Lan Zhou

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Regional variations in the health, environmental, and climate benefits of wind and solar generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a 1-MW wind turbine will offset more...than a 1-MW solar installation...demand is high and gas is more often...resource, a wind turbine on the plains...emissions than a turbine in West Virginia...benefits when wind or solar displace coal...rather than gas-fired, generators...

Kyle Siler-Evans; Inês Lima Azevedo; M. Granger Morgan; Jay Apt

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Easing the natural gas crisis: Reducing natural gas prices through increased deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Heightened natural gas prices have emerged as a key energy-policy challenge for at least the early part of the 21st century. With the recent run-up in gas prices and the expected continuation of volatile and high prices in the near future, a growing number of voices are calling for increased diversification of energy supplies. Proponents of renewable energy and energy efficiency identify these clean energy sources as an important part of the solution. Increased deployment of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) can hedge natural gas price risk in more than one way, but this paper touches on just one potential benefit: displacement of gas-fired electricity generation, which reduces natural gas demand and thus puts downward pressure on gas prices. Many recent modeling studies of increased RE and EE deployment have demonstrated that this ''secondary'' effect of lowering natural gas prices could be significant; as a result, this effect is increasingly cited as justification for policies promoting RE and EE. This paper summarizes recent studies that have evaluated the gas-price-reduction effect of RE and EE deployment, analyzes the results of these studies in light of economic theory and other research, reviews the reasonableness of the effect as portrayed in modeling studies, and develops a simple tool that can be used to evaluate the impact of RE and EE on gas prices without relying on a complex national energy model. Key findings are summarized.

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matt

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

124

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation resources; difficulties siting new power plants and major transmission facilities; significant increases in fuel costs for natural gas-fired

Hopper, Nichole

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Radiological Dose Assessment Related to Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials Generated by the Petroleum Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tebes is affiliated with the University of Illinois. Tebes is affiliated with the University of Illinois. ANL/EAD-2 Radiological Dose Assessment Related to Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials Generated by the Petroleum Industry by K.P. Smith, D.L. Blunt, G.P. Williams, and C.L. Tebes * Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 September 1996 Work sponsored by the United States Department of Energy, Office of Policy iii CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii NOTATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

126

Generation risk assessment in volatile conditions with wind, hydro, and natural gas units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper studies a generating company (GENCO)’s midterm (a few months to a year) scheduling payoffs and risks in volatile operating conditions. The proposed algorithm considers the integration of intermittent wind units into a GENCO’s generation assets and coordinates the GENCO’s hourly wind generation schedule with that of natural gas (NG) units (with volatile gas prices) and hydro units (with water inflow forecast) for maximizing the GENCO’s payoff. The proposed midterm GENCO model applies market price forecasts to the risk-constrained stochastic price-based unit commitment (PBUC) for calculating the GENCO’s risk in energy and ancillary services markets. The proposed PBUC minimizes the cost of (a) NG contracts, storage, startup and shutdown, (b) startup and shutdown of cascaded hydro units, and (c) penalty for defaulting on the scheduled power delivery. Simulation results show that the diversification of generating assets including bilateral contracts (BCs) could enhance the GENCO’s midterm planning by increasing the expected payoff and decreasing the financial risk.

Cem Sahin; Mohammad Shahidehpour; Ismet Erkmen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation Small-Scale, Gas-Fired CHP Jump to: navigation, search Name Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation Small-Scale, Gas-Fired CHP Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics Background analysis Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/41 Country Poland Eastern Europe References http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/41763.pdf This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Polish energy markets have recently been restructured, opening the door to new players with access to new products and instruments. In response to this changed environment, the Government of Poland and the Polish Power Grid Company were interested in analyzing the competitiveness of

128

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the last decade, significant amounts of new natural gas-fired generating facilities have been developed of natural gas-fired generation, including increased supplies and low market prices for natural gas, Power Planning Division Director SUBJECT: Presentation on Regional Gas-Electric Coordination During

129

A residential micro tri-generation system based on a gas fired stirling engine CHP and thermo-chemical accumulator (TCA).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cooling production has application in a considerable number of fields in human life, such as: food processing, air-conditioning, pharmaceuticals, etc. The conventional refrigeration system driven… (more)

Hasib`, Zannatul, M (Author)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Participatory generation of sustainability indicators in a natural protected area of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the Rio Declaration in 1992, international institutions, governments and \\{NGOs\\} have promoted sustainability indicators as a tool for providing policy mechanisms that dictate development decision-making. The expert approach, also known as reductionist, has been the most used in the processes of sustainability evaluation; this approach has been criticized for its lack of holistic vision to evaluate a system. A participatory approach has been promoted in order to counteract this type of limitation. This paper presents a case study of a participatory assessment of sustainability in a local community inside a natural protected area; its objective is to attempt to answer if, from local knowledge, is it possible to generate a sustainability local assessment system. The process included the active participation of the inhabitants of Agua Blanca community, located within the Nevado de Toluca National Park (NTNP) in Mexico's central highlands. A framework was used to identify and select sustainability indicators, which was divided into four phases: the description of the system, the identification of the sustainability objectives, the selection of indicators, and the measurement of the progress toward the sustainability objectives. As a result, 64 indicators were identified, which were classified into three pillars of sustainability and its interactions. The participatory approach aided in the evaluation of diverse elements within the system, without limiting itself to one element or dimension of sustainability in particular. Most of the indicators corresponded to the environmental dimension of sustainability, which reflects the level of interaction the community has with its environment. The indicators proposed by villagers, as a whole, were not considered technically appropriate; therefore the need for a selection indicator process was reaffirmed. The process described here is an opportunity to strengthen the self-organization of the communities, reinforce local management, and contribute to the generation of mechanisms of cooperation and processes of co-management of the natural protected areas.

Nathalia Santana-Medina; Sergio Franco-Maass; Ernesto Sánchez-Vera; Jacques Imbernon; Gabino Nava-Bernal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

High efficiency electric power generation: The environmental role  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electric power generation system development is reviewed with special attention to plant efficiency. It is generally understood that efficiency improvement that is consistent with high plant reliability and low cost of electricity is economically beneficial, but its effect upon reduction of all plant emissions without installation of additional environmental equipment, is less well appreciated. As CO2 emission control is gaining increasing acceptance, efficiency improvement, as the only practical tool capable of reducing CO2 emission from fossil fuel plant in the short term, has become a key concept for the choice of technology for new plant and upgrades of existing plant. Efficiency is also important for longer-term solutions of reducing CO2 emission by carbon capture and sequestration (CCS); it is essential for the underlying plants to be highly efficient so as to mitigate the energy penalty of CCS technology application. Power generating options, including coal-fired Rankine cycle steam plants with advanced steam parameters, natural gas-fired gas turbine-steam, and coal gasification combined cycle plants are discussed and compared for their efficiency, cost and operational availability. Special attention is paid to the timeline of the various technologies for their development, demonstration and commercial availability for deployment.

János M. Beér

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

In 1997, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated new National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter, including for the first time particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers ({micro}m) referred to as PM2.5. PM2.5 in the atmosphere also contributes to reduced atmospheric visibility, which is the subject of existing rules for siting emission sources near Class 1 areas and new Regional Haze rules. There are few existing data regarding emissions and characteristics of fine aerosols from oil, gas and power generation industry combustion sources, and the information that is available is generally outdated and incomplete. Traditional stationary source air emission sampling methods tend to underestimate or overestimate the contribution of the source to ambient aerosols because they do not properly account for primary aerosol formation, which occurs after the gases leave the stack. Primary aerosol includes both filterable particles that are solid or liquid aerosols at stack temperature plus those that form as the stack gases cool through mixing and dilution processes in the plume downwind of the source. These deficiencies in the current methods can have significant impacts on regulatory decision-making. PM2.5 measurement issues were extensively reviewed by the American Petroleum Institute (API) (England et al., 1998), and it was concluded that dilution sampling techniques are more appropriate for obtaining a representative particulate matter sample from combustion systems for determining PM2.5 emission rate and chemical speciation. Dilution sampling is intended to collect aerosols including those that condense and/or react to form solid or liquid aerosols as the exhaust plume mixes and cools to near-ambient temperature immediately after the stack discharge. These techniques have been widely used in recent research studies. For example, Hildemann et al. (1994) and McDonald et al. (1998) used filtered ambient air to dilute the stack gas sample followed by 80-90 seconds residence time to allow aerosol formation and growth to stabilize prior to sample collection and analysis. More accurate and complete emissions data generated using the methods developed in this program will enable more accurate source-receptor and source apportionment analysis for PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) implementation and streamline the environmental assessment of oil, gas and power production facilities. The overall goals of this program were to: (1) Develop improved dilution sampling technology and test methods for PM2.5 mass emissions and speciation measurements, and compare results obtained with dilution and traditional stationary source sampling methods. (2) Develop emission factors and speciation profiles for emissions of fine particulate matter, especially organic aerosols, for use in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses. (3) Identify and characterize PM2.5 precursor compound emissions that can be used in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses.

Glenn C. England

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

133

NETL: News Release - First Commercial Application of Advanced Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 19, 2004 February 19, 2004 First Commercial Application of Advanced Natural Gas Turbine Announced Turbine Developed Through Department of Energy's Advanced Turbine Systems Program GE Energy has announced that the world's first application of their next-generation 7H gas turbine technology will be an 800-megawatt class, combined-cycle project with Hydro-Quebec Production. The new natural-gas-fired power plant, to be built at Beauharnois, Quebec, southwest of Montreal, will be based on two GE 107H combined-cycle systems. The plant is expected to enter commercial service in mid 2007. The 7H gas turbine is one of two H System gas turbines developed by GE Energy as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's advanced turbine systems program. The Hydro-Quebec plant will be the first commercial application of the 60-hertz 7H, the H System turbine suitable for use in the United States and Canada. The 50-hertz 9H, suitable for the overseas market, got its commercial start in 2003 at the Baglan Bay Power Station in Wales, UK. The Baglan Bay plant has received a number of prestigious industry awards for its use of the innovative H System turbine.

134

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Andrew Ford BWeb for Modeling the Environment 1 Resource Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the most important fuel for new power generation. Today's interest in gas-fired power generation is quite surprising since power companies were prohibited from investing in gas fired generation three decades ago for clean vehicles. Natural gas was also the most popular fuel for new power generation during

Ford, Andrew

136

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and natural gas-fired generation) and the value they bring to the strategy. There is a brief summary by natural gas-fired generation · Cost-effective, small-scale, local renewable and cogeneration opportunities SUBJECT: Draft Power Plan Presentation for Hearings The Council has typically opened its hearings

137

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2001 9, 2001 Prices headed up the middle of last week despite seasonal or cooler temperatures everywhere but California (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) and the July 4th holiday, regarded as one of the lowest natural gas consumption days. As expected, the resulting 10-cent-per-MMBtu gain at the Henry Hub on Thursday compared with the previous Friday was undone the following day. The futures price for August delivery was able to stay ahead of the previous week by 12.2 cents to settle at $3.218 on Friday. Spot natural gas prices for large packages in southern California increased as much as $2.71 per MMBtu as temperatures soared and gas-fired power plants endeavored to meet air conditioning demand. Prices started to recede as temperatures abated by the end of the week. Strong gas supplies across the country supported another hefty net addition to storage of 105 Bcf.

138

Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds  

SciTech Connect

Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Mulholland, P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Innovation under cap-and-trade programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...lower-sulfur coals (this low-capital and often cost-saving...1980s in the proportion of natural gas-fired generation in the...utilization of existing nuclear and natural gas-fired power plants...including heightened prices for natural gas that have often been...

Margaret R. Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Assessing "Dangerous Climate Change": Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young People, Future Generations and Nature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing "Dangerous Climate Change": Required Reduction of Carbon Emissions to Protect Young high and would subject young people, future generations and nature to irreparable harm. Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuel use must be reduced rapidly to avoid irreversible consequences

Hansen, James E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices  

SciTech Connect

On December 5, 2006, the reference case projections from 'Annual Energy Outlook 2007' (AEO 2007) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past six years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past six years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable-price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are 'biased' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2007. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past six AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2006), we once again find that the AEO 2007 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. Specifically, the NYMEX-AEO 2007 premium is $0.73/MMBtu levelized over five years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $0.73/MMBtu more than the AEO 2007 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

142

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices  

SciTech Connect

On December 12, 2005, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2006'' (AEO 2006) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past five years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past five years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2006. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past five AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2005), we once again find that the AEO 2006 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEX-AEO 2006 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$2.3/MMBtu levelized over five years--that we have seen over the last six years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $2.3/MMBtu more than the AEO 2006 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

143

Design of an electro-mechanical portable system using natural human body movements for electricity generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environment. The mechanical energy produced during human movement, along the same lines as heat emitted of energy management, ergonomics and mechatronic technology. 2. The human walk: A natural motion Although TDesign of an electro-mechanical portable system using natural human body movements for electricity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

144

A Path to the Formulation of New Generations of Synthetic Jet Fuel Derived from Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with industry and academia to study synthetic jet fuels derived from natural gas. These studies are being implemented at its Fuel Characterization Lab where the most advanced testing equipment is used and strict Quality Management and safety systems are followed...

Al-Nuaimi, Ibrahim Awni Omar Hassan

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

145

Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

How the active and diffusional nature of brain tissues can generate monopole signals at micrometer sized measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate mechanisms which could generate transient monopole signals in measuring current source density (CSD), as it had been indicated to occur in recent small volume experiments. A simple model is defined for this purpose. It is emphasized that the active nature of the neural biological activity, with its ability to generate ionic density imbalances, might be able to induce appreciable monopole signals in CSD detectors at micrometer scales. Thus, it follows that when both diffusive and ohmic transport are considered to be present in neural tissues, potential measures in micrometer regions can include appreciable electric monopole signals, for sufficiently small values of the ratio (\\sigma a^{2})/(\\epsilon D), where "\\sigma" is the conductivity, "\\epsilon" is the dielectric constant, "D" is the diffusion constant and "a" is the linear dimension of the ionic charge densities generated by the neural processes. Ranges of possible magnitudes for these parameters in the considered experimental studies are e...

Cabo, Alejandro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Next Generation Surfactants for Improved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology Last Reviewed 12/15/2012 Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology Last Reviewed 12/15/2012 DE-FE0003537 Goal The principle objective of the project is to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focusing on reservoirs in Pennsylvanian age (Penn) sands. Performer Oklahoma University Enhanced Oil Recovery Design Center, Norman, OK Background Primary and secondary methods have produced approximately one-third of the 401 billion barrels of original-oil-in-place in the United States. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods have shown potential to recover a fraction of the remaining oil. Surfactant EOR has seen an increase in activity in recent years due to increased energy demand and higher oil prices. In

148

Assessing the Potential of Natural Microbial Communities to Improve a Second-Generation Biofuels Platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Naturally occurring microbial communities from high-salt and/or high-temperature environments were collected from sites across the United States and Puerto Rico and screened for their efficacy in the MixAlco biofuel production platform. The Mix...

Hammett, Amy Jo Macbey

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

149

Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices  

SciTech Connect

On December 9, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO 2005)'' were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. As some of you may be aware, we at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past four years, forward natural gas contracts (e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past four years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation (presuming that long-term price stability is valued). In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2005. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or, more recently (and briefly), http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past four AEO releases (AEO 2001-AE0 2004), we once again find that the AEO 2005 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEXAEO 2005 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$1.11/MMBtu levelized over six years--that we have seen over the last five years. In other words, on average, one would have to pay $1.11/MMBtu more than the AEO 2005 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming six years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation. Fixed-price renewables obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of six years.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

150

Toward a less natural gas dependent energy mix in Spain: Crowding-out effects of shifting to biomass power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper estimates the impact of a hypothetical change in Spain's energy mix on a number of productive sectors. The change would be brought about by substituting power generation from natural gas with generation from biomass. The total amount of electricity supplied has been calculated to remain constant so that a crowding-out effect would be derived from the displacement of one technology with another. An input–output (IO) framework has been used to estimate the overall economic impact on 26 productive sectors included on Spain's 2007 IO Table. Based on the available literature, the consideration of net impact improves the analysis. The results show that the overall net impact across all productive sectors of this change in the energy mix would be positive and equal to about 0.5% for the period. Higher impacts were measured for the ‘Electricity power and Electricity Supply’ sector (15.4%) followed by the ‘Agriculture, Hunting, Forestry’ sector (7.1%). Only the ‘Gas generation and Gas supply’ sector showed a negative impact (–2.5%), which is consistent with the reduced use of natural gas. The overall calculated total impact for Spain's productive sector was equal to € 8074.95 million at the 2007-equivalent value.

María J. Colinet; José M. Cansino; José M. González-Limón; Manuel Ordóñez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Quantifying the value that energy efficiency and renewable energy provide as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices  

SciTech Connect

Advocates of energy efficiency and renewable energy have long argued that such technologies can mitigate fuel price risk within a resource portfolio. Such arguments--made with renewed vigor in the wake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during the winter of 2000/2001--have mostly been qualitative in nature, however, with few attempts to actually quantify the price stability benefit that these sources provide. In evaluating this benefit, it is important to recognize that alternative price hedging instruments are available--in particular, gas-based financial derivatives (futures and swaps) and physical, fixed-price gas contracts. Whether energy efficiency and renewable energy can provide price stability at lower cost than these alternative means is therefore a key question for resource acquisition planners. In this paper we evaluate the cost of hedging gas price risk through financial hedging instruments. To do this, we compare the price of a 10-year natural gas swap (i.e., what it costs to lock in prices over the next 10 years) to a 10-year natural gas price forecast (i.e., what the market is expecting spot natural gas prices to be over the next 10 years). We find that over the past two years natural gas users have had to pay a premium as high as $0.76/mmBtu (0.53/242/kWh at an aggressive 7,000 Btu/kWh heat rate) over expected spot prices to lock in natural gas prices for the next 10 years. This incremental cost to hedge gas price risk exposure is potentially large enough - particularly if incorporated by policymakers and regulators into decision-making practices - to tip the scales away from new investments in variable-price, natural gas-fired generation and in favor of fixed-price investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Bachrach, Devra; Golove, William

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

PV output smoothing using a battery and natural gas engine-generator.  

SciTech Connect

In some situations involving weak grids or high penetration scenarios, the variability of photovoltaic systems can affect the local electrical grid. In order to mitigate destabilizing effects of power fluctuations, an energy storage device or other controllable generation or load can be used. This paper describes the development of a controller for coordinated operation of a small gas engine-generator set (genset) and a battery for smoothing PV plant output. There are a number of benefits derived from using a traditional generation resource in combination with the battery; the variability of the photovoltaic system can be reduced to a specific level with a smaller battery and Power Conditioning System (PCS) and the lifetime of the battery can be extended. The controller was designed specifically for a PV/energy storage project (Prosperity) and a gas engine-generator (Mesa Del Sol) currently operating on the same feeder in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A number of smoothing simulations of the Prosperity PV were conducted using power data collected from the site. By adjusting the control parameters, tradeoffs between battery use and ramp rates could be tuned. A cost function was created to optimize the control in order to balance, in this example, the need to have low ramp rates with reducing battery size and operation. Simulations were performed for cases with only a genset or battery, and with and without coordinated control between the genset and battery, e.g., without the communication link between sites or during a communication failure. The degree of smoothing without coordinated control did not change significantly because the battery dominated the smoothing response. It is anticipated that this work will be followed by a field demonstration in the near future.

Johnson, Jay; Ellis, Abraham; Denda, Atsushi [Shimizu Corporation; Morino, Kimio [Shimizu Corporation; Shinji, Takao [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.; Ogata, Takao [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.; Tadokoro, Masayuki [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Competitiveness of Wind Power with the Conventional Thermal Power Plants Using Oil and Natural Gas as Fuel in Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The fossil fuels mainly imported oil and natural gas are major sources of electricity generation in Pakistan. The combustion of fossil fuels in thermal power plants has greater environmental impacts like air pollution and global warming. Additionally, the import of oil is a heavy burden on the poor economy of the country. Pakistan is a country with huge renewable sources; wind energy being the major one. This paper elucidate the cost-competitiveness of wind power with the conventional thermal power plants. In this regard, Levelized estimated cost of a 15MW wind power plant is compared with three types of conventional thermal power plants, namely (i) Oil-fired thermal power plant (ii) Natural gas-fire combine cycle power plant (iii) Diesel oil- fired gas turbine cycle 100MW each. The results show that the cost of wind energy is lowest with Rs. 3/kWh. It is concluded that the wind power is cost-competitive to the conventional thermal power plants in Pakistan. The cost estimation for wind energy is lowest of all others with Rs. 3/kWh.

A. Mengal; M.A. Uqaili; K. Harijan; Abdul Ghafoor Memon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Limited Electricity Generation Supply and Limited Natural Gas Supply Cases (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Development of U.S. energy resources and the permitting and construction of large energy facilities have become increasingly difficult over the past 20 years, and they could become even more difficult in the future. Growing public concern about global warming and CO2 emissions also casts doubt on future consumption of fossil fuels -- particularly coal, which releases the largest amount of CO2 per unit of energy produced. Even without regulations to limit greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, the investment community may already be limiting the future use of some energy options. In addition, there is considerable uncertainty about the future availability of, and access to, both domestic and foreign natural gas resources.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

SciTech Connect

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

156

Resource Limits and Conversion Efficiency with Implications for Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation. The efficiency of actual natural gas-fired combined cycle powergas-fired power plant efficiency of 48.5 percent. If gas and coal compete in power generation,

Croft, Gregory Donald

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Natural  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 2,094,387 2,266,751 2,566,049 2,816,408 2,883,277 Mexico .............................. 0 1,678 7,013 6,722 13,862 Total Pipeline Imports....... 2,094,387 2,268,429 2,573,061 2,823,130 2,897,138 LNG Algeria .............................. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 35,325 United Arab Emirates ....... 0 0 0 0 4,949 Total LNG Imports............. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 40,274 Total Imports......................... 2,137,504 2,350,115 2,623,839 2,841,048 2,937,413 Average Price (dollars per thousand cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 1.84 2.02 1.86 1.48 1.96 Mexico .............................. - 1.94 1.99 1.53 2.25 Total Pipeline Imports.......

158

Mitigating CO2 emissions by adjusting the power generation mix in Taiwan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we employ a multi-objective programming model to estimate the power generation mix trade-off between generation costs and CO2 emissions in Taiwan. Eight policy scenarios are simulated and compared to the reference and base cases. The empirical results show that, for the electricity sector, CO2 emissions in 2010 could be set at 120% of the 1990 level, by way of promoting cogeneration and gas-fired generation capacity. The estimated per unit mitigation cost of CO2 emission would be US$358/ton. The policy implications are discussed and limitation of this study is also presented.

George J.Y. Hsu; Tser-Yieth Chen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF)  

SciTech Connect

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluating the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and preparing an R D plan to develop the concept further. The power generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. Goals have been specified that relate to the efficiency, emissions, costs, and general operation of the system. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800[degrees]F in furnaces fired with coal-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor to about 2400[degrees]F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuel gas is relatively clean, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need to be a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

External costs: an attempt to make power generation a fair game (case study Croatia)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

External costs of electricity represent the monetary value of the environmental damage caused by electricity generation. They are here calculated applying the impact pathway methodology on Croatian specific conditions. This paper estimates the external costs of coal and gas fired power plants determined as main candidates for Croatian power system expansion till 2030. It is analyzed how the estimated external costs, when incorporated into total production costs, would affect the competitiveness of fossil-fired plants compared to other electricity generation options, i.e. how they influence the optimal expansion strategy of the Croatian power system.

Tea Kovacevic; Zeljko Tomsic; Nenad Debrecin

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation (Thousand MWh) 67,535 2.6% The use of natural gas fired internal combustion engines has increased significantly since 2002 Source: U.S. Energy Information...

162

Microsoft Word - Seattle Steam Draft EA for concurrence-6-16...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The exhaust gas from the turbine would be routed to a once-through (heat recovery) steam generator, which would be equipped with natural gas-fired duct burners to increase steam...

163

Microsoft Word - Sieminski HEC(EP) Testimony 3 6 14 _final_accepted...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by pipeline directly to customers; by truck to several dozen regional satellite storage tanks; and to an adjacent natural gas-fired electric generating plant, Exelon Corp.'s Mystic...

164

Energy Conservation through Effective Utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...quality natural gas-fired reciprocating 134 engine will provide as much as...the "top" overhaul of reciprocating en-gines). The engines cited above are typ-ical...reduction of power generation. Cost of maintenance is an especially...

Charles A. Berg

1973-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

165

EIS-0343: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corporation (PERC), proposes to construct a 1,160-megawatt (MW) natural gas-fired, combined-cycle electric generating plant in Klamath County, Oregon, near the city of...

166

EIS-0343: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Klamath County, Oregon Proposes to Construct a 1,160-megawatt (MW) Natural Gas-Fired and Combined-Cycle Electric Generating Plant, Right-of-Way Permit cross Federal Land under the...

167

EIS-0343: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resources Company (PERC), proposes to construct a 1,160-megawatt (MW) natural gas-fired, combined-cycle electric generating plant in Klamath County, Oregon near the city of...

168

Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG emissions, largely from coal and natural gas fired powermetal emissions from coal-fired power plants, includingAND CosTs oF MOVING FROM COAL GENERATION TO MODERN POWER

Kaswan, Alice

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Neural Network Technology as a Pollution Prevention Tool in the Electric Utility Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper documents efforts by the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) to pilot test the use of neural network technology as a pollution prevention tool for reducing stack emissions from a natural gas-fired power generating facility. The project...

Johnson, M. L.

170

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Quarterly progress report No. 4, October--December 1992  

SciTech Connect

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluating the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and preparing an R&D plan to develop the concept further. The power generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. Goals have been specified that relate to the efficiency, emissions, costs, and general operation of the system. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800{degrees}F in furnaces fired with coal-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor to about 2400{degrees}F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuel gas is relatively clean, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need to be a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF)  

SciTech Connect

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluate the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and prepare an R D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is leading a team ofcompanies involved in this effort. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800[degrees]F in furnaces fired with cool-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor up to about 2400[degrees]F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuelgas is a relatively clean fuel, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need tobe a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Constructal multi-scale package of vertical channels with natural convection and maximal heat transfer density. CONSTRUCTAL DESIGN: THE GENERATION OF MULTI-SCALE HEAT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transfer density. CONSTRUCTAL DESIGN: THE GENERATION OF MULTI-SCALE HEAT AND FLUID FLOW STRUCTURES-scale structures in natural convection with the objective of maximizing the heat transfer density, or the heat transfer rate per unit of volume§ . The flow volume is filled with vertical equidistant heated blades

Kihm, IconKenneth David

173

Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty Speaker(s): Afzal Siddiqui Karl Maribu Date: September 4, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Galen Barbose The ongoing deregulation of electricity industries worldwide is providing incentives for microgrids to use small-scale distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) applications via heat exchangers (HXs) to meet local energy loads. Although the electric-only effciency of DG is lower than that of central-station production, relatively high tariff rates and the potential for CHP applications increase the attractiveness of on-site generation. Nevertheless, a microgrid contemplating the installation of gas-fired DG has to be aware of the uncertainty in the

174

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Energy Retrofits for State Correctional Facilities - Mobile WCWR Facility Boiler Replace the existing natural gas fired boiler with a new, more efficient, gas fired...

175

NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 10 | MARCH 2014 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 173 It's an old joke, that the ability to generate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deposited in the fusion fuel to kick-start the process. NIF, located at the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) published in Nature last month hints that perhaps a few years might now be shaved off that pessimistic schedule. NIF has at last achieved, not ignition, but a fuel gain greater than

Loss, Daniel

176

Development of a dry low-NOx gas turbine combustor for a natural-gas fueled 2MW co-generation system  

SciTech Connect

A dry low-NOx gas turbine combustor has been developed for natural-gas fueled co-generation systems in the power range of 1--4MW. The combustor. called the Double Swirler Combustor, uses the lean premixed combustion to reduce NOx emission. The combustor is characterized by two staged lean premixed combustion with two coaxial annular burners and a simple fuel control system without the complex variable geometry. Substantially low NOx level has been achieved to meet the strict NOx regulation to co-generation systems in Japan. High combustion efficiency has been obtained for a wide operating range. In 1994, Tokyo Gas and Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries initiated a collaborative program to develop a natural-gas fueled low NOx gas turbine engine for new 2MW class co-generation system, named IM270. The Double Swirler Combustor, originally developed by Tokyo Gas, was introduced into the natural gas fueled version of the IM270. Engine test of the first production unit was successfully conducted to confirm substantially low NOx level of less than 15 ppm (O{sub 2} = 16%) with the output power of more than 2MW. Test for the durability and the reliability of the system is being conducted at Tokyo Gas Negishi LNG Terminal in Kanagawa, Japan and successful results have been so far obtained.

Mori, Masaaki; Sato, Hiroshi

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Quarterly progress report No. 3, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluate the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and prepare an R & D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is leading a team ofcompanies involved in this effort. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800{degrees}F in furnaces fired with cool-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor up to about 2400{degrees}F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuelgas is a relatively clean fuel, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need tobe a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Generation of acoustic-gravity waves in ionospheric HF heating experiments : simulating large-scale natural heat sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we investigate the potential role played by large-scale anomalous heat sources (e.g. prolonged heat wave events) in generating acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) that might trigger widespread plasma turbulence ...

Pradipta, Rezy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

CO2 emission reduction from natural gas power stations using a precipitating solvent absorption process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There has been a rapid increase in the use of natural gas for power generation based on gas turbine technology which elevates the importance of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technology to reduce CO2 emissions from gas turbine based power stations. The low content of CO2 in the gas turbine exhaust results in low rates of CO2 absorption and larger absorption equipment when compared to studies done on coal fired power stations. Furthermore the high oxygen (O2) content in the exhaust gas adversely affects the solvent stability, particularly for the traditional amine based solvents. This paper describes how exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) along with CO2CRC's low cost “UNO MK 3” precipitating potassium carbonate (K2CO3) process can overcome the challenges of CO2 capture from gas turbine power stations. To further bring down the energy requirements of the capture process, heat integration of the UNO MK 3 process with power generation process is carried out. An economic analysis of the various retrofit options is performed. The current study shows that in the case of retrofitting the UNO MK 3 process to a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC), the use of EGR can reduce the energy penalty of CO2 capture by 15%, whilst a reduction of up to 25% can be achieved with the heat integration strategies described. Significantly the study shows that converting an existing open cycle gas turbine (OCGT) to a combined cycle with steam generation along with retrofitting CO2 capture presents a different steam cycle design for the maximum power output from the combined cycle with CO2 capture. Such a conversion actually produces more power and offers an alternative low emission retrofit pathway for gas fired power. Cost analysis shows that inclusion of the UNO MK 3 CO2 capture process with EGR to an existing NGCC is expected to increase the cost of electricity (COE) by 20%. However, retrofit/repowering of an underutilised or peaking OCGT station with the inclusion of CO2 capture can reduce the COE as well as produce low emission power. This is achieved by increasing the load factor and incorporating a purpose built steam generation cycle.

Jai Kant Pandit; Trent Harkin; Clare Anderson; Minh Ho; Dianne Wiley; Barry Hooper

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 9, 2001 July 9, 2001 Prices headed up the middle of last week despite seasonal or cooler temperatures everywhere but California (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) and the July 4th holiday, regarded as one of the lowest natural gas consumption days. As expected, the resulting 10-cent-per-MMBtu gain at the Henry Hub on Thursday compared with the previous Friday was undone the following day. The futures price for August delivery was able to stay ahead of the previous week by 12.2 cents to settle at $3.218 on Friday. Spot natural gas prices for large packages in southern California increased as much as $2.71 per MMBtu as temperatures soared and gas-fired power plants endeavored to meet air conditioning demand. Prices started to recede as temperatures abated by the end of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

System Study of Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL) Catalytic Combustion for Natural Gas and Coal-Derived Syngas Combustion Turbines  

SciTech Connect

Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL{reg_sign}) technology has been successfully developed to provide improvement in Dry Low Emission gas turbine technology for coal derived syngas and natural gas delivering near zero NOx emissions, improved efficiency, extending component lifetime and the ability to have fuel flexibility. The present report shows substantial net cost saving using RCL{reg_sign} technology as compared to other technologies both for new and retrofit applications, thus eliminating the need for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) in combined or simple cycle for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and natural gas fired combustion turbines.

Shahrokh Etemad; Lance Smith; Kevin Burns

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

A dynamic process model of a natural gas combined cycle -- Model development with startup and shutdown simulations  

SciTech Connect

Research in dynamic process simulation for integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC) with carbon capture has been ongoing at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), culminating in a full operator training simulator (OTS) and immersive training simulator (ITS) for use in both operator training and research. A derivative work of the IGCC dynamic simulator has been a modification of the combined cycle section to more closely represent a typical natural gas fired combined cycle (NGCC). This paper describes the NGCC dynamic process model and highlights some of the simulator’s current capabilities through a particular startup and shutdown scenario.

Liese, Eric [U.S. DOE; Zitney, Stephen E. [U.S. DOE

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Analysis of Entropy Generation Due to Natural Convection for Hot and Cold Materials Confined within Two Entrapped Triangular Cavities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thus, hot inclined walls with cold horizontal walls (case 1) and cold inclined walls with hot horizontal walls (case 2) are considered as boundary conditions during convection (Ra = 103 to 105) for various fluids (Pr = 0.015, 0.7, and 1000) within/surrounded by the tubes. ... The various fields of application of indirect heat exchanger involve material processing, geophysical processes, pollution control, food processing, solar collectors, and solar stills etc.(12-18) Also, indirect contact heat exchangers play a vital role in energy conversion and energy conservation operations in various chemical processes such as in power transportation, cooling towers, desalination, air-conditioning, and refrigeration, heat recovery, alternate fuels, etc.(19-28) ... A numerical investigation to solve the laminar flow and convective problems was performed by Jan et al.(32) The performance of a prism-shaped solar collector with a right angled triangular enclosure was numerically investigated by Joudi et al.(33) Kamiyo et al.(34) presented a comprehensive review on natural convection inside triangular cavity with various boundary conditions using pitch angle and Ra as major parameters. ...

Tanmay Basak; R. Anandalakshmi; T. P. Akshaya Sruthi

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

184

Docket Number: 12-AFC-03 Project Title: Redondo Beach Energy Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beach Generating Station, an operating power plant. RBEP is a proposed natural-gas fired, combined the existing and still operational AES Redondo Beach Generating Station. RBEP will consist of one power block composed of three natural gas combustion turbine generators (CTG), three supplemental-fired heat recovery

185

REQUEST BY WESTINGHOUSE POWER GENERATION, A FORMER DIVISION OF CBS CORPORATION, FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GRANT NO. GRANT NO. DE-FG21-94MC32071; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-98-005 [ORO-736] Westinghouse Power Generation, a former division of CBS Corporation (hereinafter referred to as "the Grantee"), has requested an advance waiver of worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under Department of Energy (DOE) Grant No. DE-FG21-94MC32071. The goal of the grant was to perform system analysis, selection and optimization to develop the next generation of gas-fired advanced turbine systems (ATS's) for green field and repowered electricity generation applications. The goal of the ATS program is to develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive gas turbine systems for base- load applications in the utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. This work

186

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Quarterly progress report No. 7, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluating the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and preparing an R&D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC) is leading a team of companies involved in this effort. The power generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. Goals have been specified that relate to the efficiency, emissions, costs, and general operation of the system. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800{degrees}F in furnaces fired with coal-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor to about 2400{degrees}F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuel gas is relatively clean, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need to be a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown in Figure 1.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Natural gas from shale formation – The evolution, evidences and challenges of shale gas revolution in United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extraction of natural gas from shale rock in the United States (US) is one of the landmark events in the 21st century. The combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing can extract huge quantities of natural gas from impermeable shale formations, which were previously thought to be either impossible or uneconomic to produce. This review offers a comprehensive insight into US shale gas opportunities, appraising the evolution, evidence and the challenges of shale gas production in the US. The history of US shale gas in this article is divided into three periods and based on the change of oil price (i.e., the period before the 1970s oil crisis, the period from 1970s to 2000, and the period since 2000), the US has moved from being one of the world's biggest importers of gas to being self-sufficient in less than a decade, with the shale gas production increasing 12-fold (from 2000 to 2010). The US domestic natural gas price hit a 10-year low in 2012. The US domestic natural gas price in the first half of 2012 was about $2 per million British Thermal Unit (BTU), compared with Brent crude, the world benchmark price for oil, now about $ 80–100/barrel, or $14–17 per million BTU. Partly due to an increase in gas-fired power generation in response to low gas prices, US carbon emissions from fossil-fuel combustion fell by 430 million ton CO2 – more than any other country – between 2006 and 2011. Shale gas also stimulated economic growth, creating 600,000 new jobs in the US by 2010. However, the US shale gas revolution would be curbed, if the environmental risks posed by hydraulic fracturing are not managed effectively. The hydraulic fracturing is water intensive, and can cause pollution in the marine environment, with implications for long-term environmental sustainability in several ways. Also, large amounts of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, can be emitted during the shale gas exploration and production. Hydraulic fracturing also may induce earthquakes. These environmental risks need to be managed by good practices which is not being applied by all the producers in all the locations. Enforcing stronger regulations are necessary to minimize risk to the environment and on human health. Robust regulatory oversight can however increase the cost of extraction, but stringent regulations can foster an historic opportunity to provide cheaper and cleaner gas to meet the consumer demand, as well as to usher in the future growth of the industry.

Qiang Wang; Xi Chen; Awadhesh N. Jha; Howard Rogers

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline of 145 MW Combined Cycle Power Plant for KawasakiGas Firing Gas Turbine Combined Cycle Plant,” Journal ofgasifier/gas turbine combined cycle technology and its

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Policy Brief www.purdue.edu/globalpolicy Global Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Of these, the power generation sector offers immediate potential for expansion through natural gas-fired consumption is essentially used for power generation, industrial, commercial and residential consumption-6788 Fax: (765) 463-1837 www.purdue.edu/globalpolicy Role of Natural Gas in America's Energy Future: Focus

Holland, Jeffrey

190

Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

generator's fuel source-Backup generators are typically powered by either diesel fuel or natural gas, and both have associated advantages and disadvantages. Speak with your...

191

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the interplay between the natural gas and electricity demand as more gas-fired generation enters the picture The Sixth Power Plan called for improving natural gas forecasting to better include the interplay fired TO: Power Committee FROM: Massoud Jourabchi SUBJECT: Enhancing Natural Gas Demand Forecasting

192

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NewNGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

· The increase in natural gas consumption in the electric power sector over the past few years has resulted from building new gas-fired electric genera- tors across the country. In 2001 alone, more than 40,000 megawatts of efficient, gas-fired electric power generation was placed into service. Gas-fired turbines have become the favored new source of elec- tricity for their capability to start up quickly during peak demand periods. · Total natural gas consumed in the electric power sector is now roughly 26 percent of total deliveries to consumers in the country, compared to approxi- mately 20 percent in 1997. In terms of volumes con- sumed by sector, natural gas consumption for electric power generation is second only to industrial consumption. · End use consumer prices increased in each sector of the natural gas market in 2001 (Figure 5). Prices climbed 24 percent in the residential

193

Subsurface Sequestration of CO2 in the U.S: Is it Money Best Spent?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

absorb only 1% of that volume. KEY WORDS: Electrical power generation, coal, natural gas, generation sludge. COAL-FIRED AND GAS-FIRED POWERPLANTS IN THE U.S. AND EUROPE The basic unit of electrical power.1007/s11053-010-9111-3 #12;power is generated by a single large modern coal- fired powerplant. We define

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

194

Feasibility study for renovation of north Bangkok Power Plant. Volume 1. Study report. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The report addresses the life extension and cycling operation of the three North Bangkok generating units and the technical and economic feasibility of converting the three units to natural gas firing. The report is divided into five sections: Introduction (purpose of study); Summary and Recommendations (findings of study, recommended modifications); Cycling and Life Extension Assessment (describes general considerations for life extension and cycling operation and identifies major obstacles); Conversion to Gas Firing (performance of existing boilers when fired by natural gas and recommended modifications to steam generators); and Cost Estimates and Performance (expected performance changes; estimates, and analyses).

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2013 | Release Date: September 19, 8, 2013 | Release Date: September 19, 2013 | Next Release: September 26, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/29/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Marcellus gas pipe capacity seen rising 0.5 Bcf/d by month's end; additional expansions expected this winter Initial service could begin by the end of September for two projects that would increase natural gas takeaway capacity from the Marcellus Shale formation by a combined 0.5 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d). These two projects are a 7.9 mile, 0.23 Bcf/d looping pipeline added to Kinder Morgan's Tennessee Gas Pipeline (TGP) (known as the MPP Project's "313 Loop") and a 2.5 mile, 0.22 Bcf/d pipeline connecting NiSource's Columbia Gas Transmission (TCO) pipeline to a 1,329-megawatt gas-fired

196

Fuel saving, carbon dioxide emission avoidance, and syngas production by tri-reforming of flue gases from coal- and gas-fired power stations, and by the carbothermic reduction of iron oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flue gases from coal, gas, or oil-fired power stations, as well as from several heavy industries, such as the production of iron, lime and cement, are major anthropogenic sources of global CO2 emissions. The newly proposed process for syngas production based on the tri-reforming of such flue gases with natural gas could be an important route for CO2 emission avoidance. In addition, by combining the carbothermic reduction of iron oxide with the partial oxidation of the carbon source, an overall thermoneutral process can be designed for the co-production of iron and syngas rich in CO. Water-gas shift (WGS) of CO to H2 enables the production of useful syngas. The reaction process heat, or the conditions for thermoneutrality, are derived by thermochemical equilibrium calculations. The thermodynamic constraints are determined for the production of syngas suitable for methanol, hydrogen, or ammonia synthesis. The environmental and economic consequences are assessed for large-scale commercial production of these chemical commodities. Preliminary evaluations with natural gas, coke, or coal as carbon source indicate that such combined processes should be economically competitive, as well as promising significant fuel saving and CO2 emission avoidance. The production of ammonia in the above processes seems particularly attractive, as it consumes the nitrogen in the flue gases.

M. Halmann; A. Steinfeld

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

REQUEST BY WESTINGHOUSE POWER GENERATION, A FORMER DIVISION OF CBS CORPORATION, FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COOPERATIVE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC21-95MC32267; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-96-002 [ORO-620] Westinghouse Power Generation, a former division of CBS Corporation (hereinafter referred to as "the Participant"), has made a timely request for an advance waiver of worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-95MC32267. The goal of this project is to continue development of the advance turbine system (ATS) technology and address the key barrier issues to its commercialization. In particular, the Participant will demonstrate (at an appropriate scale) the technology readiness of parts and subsystems critical to its gas-fired ATS. The work is sponsored by the Office of Fossil Energy. This cooperative agreement is Phase 3 of DOE's ATS

198

Cascading of Fluctuations in Interdependent Energy Infrastructures: Gas-Grid Coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The revolution of hydraulic fracturing has dramatically increased the supply and lowered the cost of natural gas in the United States driving an expansion of natural gas-fired generation capacity in many electrical grids. Unrelated to the natural gas expansion, lower capital costs and renewable portfolio standards are driving an expansion of intermittent renewable generation capacity such as wind and photovoltaic generation. These two changes may potentially combine to create new threats to the reliability of these interdependent energy infrastructures. Natural gas-fired generators are often used to balance the fluctuating output of wind generation. However, the time-varying output of these generators results in time-varying natural gas burn rates that impact the pressure in interstate transmission pipelines. Fluctuating pressure impacts the reliability of natural gas deliveries to those same generators and the safety of pipeline operations. We adopt a partial differential equation model of natural gas pipeli...

Chertkov, Michael; Backhaus, Scott

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Schrepel, Eric From: Jenkins, Kris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to capture the true costs of energy when choosing to buy their first wind generation plant, noting that wind, the utility estimates wind energy to be 25% cheaper than natural gas fired power and 5% cheaper than coal-fired power." With these numbers, it only seems reasonable to develop the wind infrastructure and generation

200

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) requirements; additional energy, capacity, and flexibility needs provided by natural gas-fired generation power system operation and the ability to integrate wind generation. It also seeks to demonstrate 12th . All members were present. Reports from Fish and Wildlife, Power and Public Affairs committee

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

300-04-001R 2003CALIFORNIAPOWERMIX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lead to changes in gas-fired generation in the opposite direction and corresponding changes the Gross Power Mix Fuel Type Net System Power Coal 18% Large Hydroelectric 20% Natural Gas 42% Nuclear 12." Net system power refers to the percentage of annual generation produced for consumption in California

202

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Conservation · Renewable generation · Natural gas-fired generation Action plan 8 #12;2. Situation Scan, Power Planning Division Director SUBJECT: Update on Mid-Term Assessment for the Sixth Power Plan Staff scope and specific topics to be addressed in the Mid-Term Assessment for the Sixth Power Plan

203

Directed evolution of an ultrastable carbonic anhydrase for highly efficient carbon capture from flue gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...library generation, and high-throughput...year, coal-fired power plants are...natural-gas–fired power...1. Flue gas from a coal-fired power plant is piped...depleted flue gas is released into...strategy for the generation of very large...

Oscar Alvizo; Luan J. Nguyen; Christopher K. Savile; Jamie A. Bresson; Satish L. Lakhapatri; Earl O. P. Solis; Richard J. Fox; James M. Broering; Michael R. Benoit; Sabrina A. Zimmerman; Scott J. Novick; Jack Liang; James J. Lalonde

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

BERKELEY CATALYSIS CENTER Distinguished Lecture Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

® combustion module in Sonoma marks the first commercial application of a natural gas-fired catalytic combustion device for power generation after almost 30 years of R&D world-wide. The module in the 9.5-atm KHI of a lean pre-burner and highly efficient fuel/air mixer. PdO catalysts under operation for power generation

Iglesia, Enrique

205

GENERATING TEXT DESCRIPTIONS FOR GEOGRAPHICALLY DISTRIBUTED SENSORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GENERATING TEXT DESCRIPTIONS FOR GEOGRAPHICALLY DISTRIBUTED SENSORS Martin Molina and Javier generation of geographic descriptions in natural language for geographically distributed sensors. We describe generation of geographic descriptions in natural language for geographically distributed sensors. We describe

Molina, Martín

206

Record of Decision for the Electrical Interconnection of TransAlta Centralia Generation LLC Big Hanaford Project (DOE/EIS-0183)(10/19/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the for the Electrical Interconnection of TransAlta Centralia Generation LLC Big Hanaford Project INTRODUCTION The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to offer contract terms for integrating power from the TransAlta Centralia Generation LLC Big Hanaford Project, a 248-megawatt (MW) gas-fired, combined-cycle combustion turbine (CCCT) power generation project (Project), into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). The Project is located within an industrial area adjacent to TransAlta's existing Centralia Steam Plant in Lewis County, Washington. The West Coast is experiencing a shortfall in electric energy supply, as well as a volatile wholesale power market in which prices have reached record highs. The Project is one of

207

Off-Design Performance of Power Plants: An Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that of a normal natural gas-fired combined-cycle...for operation in the natural gas-fired combined-cycle...inlet flow around the high-pressure section of the turbine...when converting from natural gas firing to IGCC opera-tion...

M. R. ERBES; J. N. PHILLIPS; M. S. JOHNSON; J. PAFFENBARGER; M. GLUCKMAN; R. H. EUSTIS

1987-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

208

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost of Natural Gas Generation, p Figure 6. Normalised NetCost of Natural Gas Generation, p Figure 7. Wait InvestCost of Natural Gas Generation (US$/kWh e ), C Figure 8.

Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Carnoules mine. Generation of As-rich acid mine drainage, natural attenuation processes and solutions for passive in-situ remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and solutions for passive in-situ remediation F.ELBAZ-POULICHET, UMR Hydrosciences, CNRS-University Montpellier-Zn mine (Department of Gard, France) has produced 1.5 Mt of solid waste containing pyrite and associated oxidation they generate acid (pH3) water containing up to 350mg/l of arsenic, 750 to 2700mg/L of iron

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

210

Solar aided power generation of a 300 MW lignite fired power plant combined with line-focus parabolic trough collectors field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nowadays, conventional coal or gas fired power plants are the dominant way to generate electricity in the world. In recent years there is a growth in the field of renewable energy sources in order to avoid the threat of climate change from fossil fuel combustion. Solar energy, as an environmental friendly energy source, may be the answer to the reduction of global CO2 emissions. This paper presents the concept of Solar Aided Power Generation (SAPG), a combination of renewable and conventional energy sources technologies. The operation of the 300 MW lignite fired power plant of Ptolemais integrated with a solar field of parabolic trough collectors was simulated using TRNSYS software in both power boosting and fuel saving modes. The power plant performance, power output variation, fuel consumption and CO2 emissions were calculated. Furthermore, an economic analysis was carried out for both power boosting and fuel saving modes of operation and optimum solar contribution was estimated.

G.C. Bakos; Ch. Tsechelidou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Edmund G. Brown Jr. HIGH EFFICIENCY GAS-FIRED DRUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plaines, Illinois 60018 Commission Contract No. 500-05-019 Prepared For: Public Interest Energy Research PIERFINALPROJECTREPORT Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program California Energy Commission Michael Lozano, P.E. Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office

212

Active Humidity Control Through Gas-Fired Desiccant Humidity Pump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to regenerate the desiccant. Field experiments of two humidity pumps on existing commercial buildings have been initiated. Each system dehumidifies 5000 scfm of make-up air to meet all the latent loads, which is then fed to conventional, electric-driven HVAC...

Novosel, D.; Griffiths, W. C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

EIS-0201: Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project Morrow Count, Oregon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This environmental impact statement analyzes the protential impacts of the Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, a proposed natural gas-fired cogeneration power plant near Boardman, Oregon. The proposed power plant would be built on a 22-acre site in the Port of Morrow Industrial Park. The plant would have two combustion turbines that would generate 440 average megawatts of energy when completed.

214

DATE SEP 13 2010 RECD. SEP 16 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an operational 115 megawatt (MW) (net) natural gas-fired power plant.1 CGc, LP is a wholly-owned indirect Oxide (DLN) combustor unit on the Project's 5-100 GE Frame 7 Gas Turbine Generator (5-100 gas turbine Regulation 9 Rule 9 for gas turbines. The district is almostcomplete with theirreview and the draft

215

EIS-0415: Deer Creek Station Energy Facility Project, South Dakota  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes WAPA's decision to approve the interconnection request made by Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin Electric) with the USDA Rural Utilities Service (RUS) proposing to provide financial assistance, for the Deer Creek Station Project, a proposed 300-megawatt (MW) natural gas-fired generation facility.

216

QuarterlyCouncilNorthwest Power and Conservation Council > Spring 2013 STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of natural gas-fired generation, as well as an emphasis on energy efficiency and development of renewableQuarterlyCouncilNorthwest Power and Conservation Council > Spring 2013 STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN In March, the Northwest Power and Conservation

217

Tracking Progress Last updated 12/3/2013 Resource Flexibility 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flexible capabilities.1 Furthermore, because of expected changes in the natural gas-fired dispatchable of intermittent renewable generation to meet the state's 33 percent Renewables Portfolio Standard (RPS) by 2020 capacity has to address variability in load and power production in three time scales: (1) minute

218

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be more reliance on natural gas-fired generation in the intermediate period. Dick Wallace has suggested SUBJECT: Discussion of a Vision for the Northwest Power System Following discussion of the idea of a vision for the Power Plan at the April meeting, public affairs staff has developed a statement

219

Project Sponsors: Department of Energy Clean Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of natural gas fired plants and pre-combustion carbon capture in the case of coal gasification based power Colloquium on Environmentally Preferred Advanced Power Generation - ICEPAG 2008, Newport Beach, California of this approach of producing electric power with near zero emissions. GAS TURBINE BASED COAL FUELED OXY COMBUSTION

Mease, Kenneth D.

220

Robert H. Williams (United States) CONTRIBUTING AUTHORS: Matthew Bunn (United States), Stefano Consonni (Italy),  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-term goal. The technological revolution under way in power generation-- where advanced systems are replacing steam turbine tech- nologies--supports this long-term goal. Natural-gas-fired combined cycles offering towards the long-term goal of near-zero air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions--without complicated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hydrogen Generator Appliance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Generator Appliance Hydrogen Generator Appliance Presentation by Gus Block, Nuvera Fuel Cells, at the Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop held...

222

Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

4: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown Fact 844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has...

223

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

option on natural gas generation, which increases in valueL ABORATORY Distributed Generation Investment by a MicrogridORMMES’06 Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Diophantine Generation,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diophantine Generation, Horizontal and Vertical Problems, and the Weak Vertical Method Alexandra Shlapentokh Diophantine Sets, Definitions and Generation Diophantine Sets Diophantine Generation Properties of Diophantine Generation Diophantine Family of Z Diophantine Family of a Polynomial Ring Going Down Horizontal

Shlapentokh, Alexandra

225

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Authors: Mohamed Toema (speaker), Sarah Nuss-Warren, and Kirby S. Chapman, Kansas State University National Gas Machinery Laboratory; James McCarthy and Thomas McGrath, Innovative Environmental Solutions Inc. Venue: ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division 2009 Spring Technical Conference, May 3–6, Milwaukee, WI. http://www.asmeconferences.org/ICES09/index.cfm [external site]. Abstract: The researchers are conducting a project to characterize pollutant emissions performance of field gas-fired four-stroke cycle rich burn engines equipped with non-selective catalytic reduction (NSCR) technology. Engine emissions and operating parameters are being monitored on three engines over an extended period. In addition, a mapping study was conducted on one engine. The NSCR was operated at various controlled air-to-fuel (AF) ratios while emission measurements were conducted and engine operating parameters monitored. NOx, CO, and oxygen were measured using both EPA reference method technology and the portable analyzer used in the long-term study. In the mapping study, ammonia, formaldehyde, CO, NOx, and speciated hydrocarbon emissions were recorded in real-time using an extractive FTIR system. This paper focuses on the engine mapping phase. The mapping tests demonstrated a trade-off between NOx emissions and CO, ammonia, and hydrocarbon emissions. Richer engine operation (lower AF) decreases NOx emissions at the expense of higher CO, ammonia, and hydrocarbons. Leaner operation has the opposite effect. The results to date of the semi-continuous monitoring are presented in a separate paper.

226

Flashback Detection Sensor for Hydrogen Augmented Natural Gas Combustion  

SciTech Connect

The use of hydrogen augmented fuel is being investigated by various researchers as a method to extend the lean operating limit, and potentially reduce thermal NOx formation in natural gas fired lean premixed (LPM) combustion systems. The resulting increase in flame speed during hydrogen augmentation, however, increases the propensity for flashback in LPM systems. Real-time in-situ monitoring of flashback is important for the development of control strategies for use of hydrogen augmented fuel in state-of-the-art combustion systems, and for the development of advanced hydrogen combustion systems. The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Woodward Industrial Controls are developing a combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS), which has already been demonstrated as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff. Since CCADS is a flame ionization sensor technique, the low ion concentration produced in pure hydrogen combustion raises concerns of whether CCADS can be used to monitor flashback in hydrogen augmented combustion. This paper discusses CCADS tests conducted at 0.2-0.6 MPa (2-6 atm), demonstrating flashback detection with fuel compositions up to 80% hydrogen (by volume) mixed with natural gas. NETL’s Simulation Validation (SimVal) combustor offers full optical access to pressurized combustion during these tests. The CCADS data and high-speed video show the reaction zone moves upstream into the nozzle as the hydrogen fuel concentration increases, as is expected with the increased flame speed of the mixture. The CCADS data and video also demonstrate the opportunity for using CCADS to provide the necessary in-situ monitor to control flashback and lean blowoff in hydrogen augmented combustion applications.

Thornton, J.D.; Chorpening, B.T.; Sidwell, T.; Strakey, P.A.; Huckaby, E.D.; Benson, K.J. (Woodward)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

TPV Power Generation System Using a High Temperature Metal Radiant Burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Interest has grown in micro?combined heat and power (micro?CHP). Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generation of electricity in fuel?fired furnaces is one of the micro?CHP technologies that are attracting technical attention. Previous investigations have shown that a radiant burner that can efficiently convert fuel chemical energy into radiation energy is crucial to realize a practical TPV power system. In this work we developed a TPV power generation system using a gas?fired metal radiant burner. The burner consists of a high temperature alloy emitter which could have an increased emissivity at short wavelengths and low emissivity at long wavelengths. The metal emitter is capable of bearing high temperatures of interest to fuel?fired TPV power conversion. GaSb TPV cells were tested in the combustion?driven radiant source. Electric output characteristics of the TPV cells were investigated at various operating conditions. The electric power output of the TPV cells was demonstrated to be promising. At an emitter temperature of 1185°C an electric power density of 0.476 W/cm2 was generated by the GaSb cells. It is shown that the metal emitter is attractive and could be applied to practical fuel?fired TPV power systems.

K. Qiu; A. C. S. Hayden; E. Entchev

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Interactions between Electric-drive Vehicles and the Power Sector in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

average peaking natural gas power plant (NGCT) supplies the13 categories. Natural gas- fired power plants comprise over= Combined heat and power; GHG = Greenhouse gas emissions;

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a natural gas-fired combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT).integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) generationrate exceeding that of a combined-cycle natural gas unit.

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

1. Generation 1 1. Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Generation 1 _________________________________________________________________________ 1. Generation Sound and vibrations or, in more general terms, oscillations of matter (solids or fluids) are generated in many different dynamic processes. The basic mechanisms which underlie these oscillations

Berlin,Technische Universität

232

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... CHOOSING an awkward moment, Phillips Petroleum Exploration have announced a new find of natural ...naturalgas ...

1967-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

233

Microsoft Word - STEO Supplement.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

09 09 1 May 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: The Implications of Lower Natural Gas Prices for the Electric Generation Mix in the Southeast 1 Highlights * This supplement to the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) May 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) focuses on changes in the utilization of coal- and natural-gas-fired generation capacity in the electric utility sector as the differential between delivered fuel prices narrows. * Over the last year the price of natural gas delivered to electric generators has fallen dramatically. Current natural gas prices now present increased potential for displacing coal-fired electricity generation with natural-gas-

234

The Natural Gas Advantage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental think-tank leaders and the new energy secretary are singing the praises of the ever-expanding U.S. natural gas bonanza, but at the same time, they worry about permanent dependence on this fossil fuel. ... This flood of shale-based natural gas finds has been great for U.S. chemical companies because it is a cheap feedstock and fuel source. ... Equally important, it is also revising the greenhouse gas-climate change equation because, when burned to generate electricity, natural gas produces the same electrical output as coal but emits half the amount of carbon dioxide. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

235

Distributed Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Untapped Value of Backup Generation Untapped Value of Backup Generation While new guidelines and regulations such as IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) 1547 have come a long way in addressing interconnection standards for distributed generation, utilities have largely overlooked the untapped potential of these resources. Under certain conditions, these units (primarily backup generators) represent a significant source of power that can deliver utility services at lower costs than traditional centralized solutions. These backup generators exist today in large numbers and provide utilities with another option to reduce peak load, relieve transmission congestion, and improve power reliability. Backup generation is widely deployed across the United States. Carnegie Mellon's Electricity

236

Geoff Brumfiel NATURE | NEWS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geoff Brumfiel NATURE | NEWS Laser lab shifts focus to warheads US ignition facility will devote at the US National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been working flat out to focus 192 laser beams on a gold name: `ignition', in which the fusion reaction generates as much energy as the lasers supply. Success

237

Generation Planning (pbl/generation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation Hydro Power Wind Power Monthly GSP BPA White Book Dry Year Tools Firstgov Generation Planning Thumbnail image of BPA White Book BPA White Book (1998 - 2011) Draft Dry...

238

Design metaphysics of a nature conservatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The program for a proposed nature research and education center is developed and used to generate a 3000 sq. ft. wilderness complex. Issues of inhabitation, scale, and publicness in a natural landscape are presented. The ...

Livingstone, Donald B

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Impact of Tight Energy Markets on Industrial Energy Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-fired electric power generation, fueled in part by the low cost of gas for much of the 1990s, the low cost to build new natural gas fuel generation, the relative cleanliness of natural gas generation, and the prospects for continued plentiful supplies of low...-cost gas projected for the future. This resulted in the construction of over 250,000 megawatts of new natural gas fired generation in the 2000-2005 period – an unprecedented addition of new generation to the power base (EIA 2006). While some...

Elliott, R. N.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",25548,15 "..Electric Utilities",16661,18 "..IPP & CHP",8887,13 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",103407706,15...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",15404,29 "..Electric Utilities",12691,21 "..IPP & CHP",2713,33 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",54584295,28...

242

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",10,51 "Electric Utilities",, "IPP & CHP",10,51 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",71787,51 "Electric...

243

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",4491,43 "..Electric Utilities",19,49 "..IPP & CHP",4472,22 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",14428596,44...

244

The generation of HCl in the system NaCl-KCl-H{sub 2}O-quartz at 600{degrees}C: Implications regarding HCl in natural systems at lower temperatures  

SciTech Connect

In experiments at 600°C in the system NaCI-KCI-H2O, within the analytical uncertainty, stoichiometric quantities of Cl and total alkali metals (Na+K) appear to dissolve in steam coexisting with chloride-rich brine at high pressures in the absence of solid salt. In contrast, at lower pressures, where steam coexists with precipitated salts, significant excess chloride as associated hydrogen chloride (HCI°) dissolves in steam. The HCI° appears to be generated by the reaction of solid NaCl(s) (halite) with steam, producing solid NaOH(s) that diffuses into halite, forming a solid solution. Where HCI° is present highly associated NaOH° as well as associated NaCI° appear to dissolve in steam, and the solubility of each is increased as the mole fraction of NaOH(s) in halite increases. In our quasi-static experiments, compared to dynamic flow-through experiments of others, higher initial ratios of H2O/NaCI have resulted in higher mole fractions of NaOH(s) in solid solution in halite and, accordingly, higher solubilities of NaCI" and NaOH" dissolved in steam. Addition of quartz to the system NaCI-KCI-H2O results in the formation of sodium disilicate by reaction of silica with NaOH(s) and an order of magnitude increase in the concentration of HCl° dissolved in steam. In natural hydrothermal systems at lower temperatures where brine or brine plus steam are present in the absence of precipitated salt, the pH of the brine is controlled mainly by base exchange reactions involving a variety of silicates that fix Na+/H+ and K+/H+ activity ratios. Where feldspars are present pH values generally are near neutral. Where mica, but no feldspar is present pH values may become only moderately acid. High acidity in salt-absent brine systems occurs only where all feldspars and mica have been altered to other minerals (generally pyrophyllite/ kaolinite or alunite). The situation changes significantly when salt precipitates. Hydrolysis produces HCI° by the reaction of water with NaCl when halite is present. The NaOH(s) that is produced as a byproduct is likely to react with quartz plus various alumino-silicates, producing a variety of alteration products and allowing steam to become greatly enriched in HCl° compared to the composition of steam that is attained in the simple system NaCI-KCI-H2O with halite present. Also, when a natural high-temperature hydrothermal system changes from one in which the pore fluid is brine to one in which the pore fluid is dry steam there is a drastic change in Na+/H+ and K+/H+ activity ratios in the pore fluid because the hydrogen ions that were predominantly dissociated species in the brine become predominantly associated species in steam. The net result is the stabilization of alkali feldspars in contact with steam that may contain appreciable HCI° that is produced by the reaction of precipitated salt with the steam.

Fournier, Robert O.; Thompson, J. Michael

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fuel-cell technology: Running on natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... electrochemically oxidize a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, which is generated internally from the natural ...naturalgas ...

Brian C. H. Steele

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

246

Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S. Title Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S. Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59745 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lekov, Alexander B., Victor H. Franco, Stephen Meyers, James E. McMahon, Michael A. McNeil, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-59745 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract This paper presents analysis of the life-cycle costs for individual households and the aggregate energy and economic impacts from potential energy efficiency improvements in U.S. residential furnaces. Most homes in the US are heated by a central furnace attached to ducts for distributing heated air and fueled by natural gas. Electricity consumption by a furnace blower is significant, comparable to the annual electricity consumption of a major appliance. Since the same blower unit is also used during the summer to circulate cooled air in centrally air conditioned homes, electricity savings occur year round. Estimates are provided of the potential electricity savings from more efficient fans and motors. Current regulations require new residential gas-fired furnaces (not including mobile home furnaces) to meet or exceed 78% annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE), but in fact nearly all furnaces sold are at 80% AFUE or higher. The possibilities for higher fuel efficiency fall into two groups: more efficient non-condensing furnaces (81% AFUE) and condensing furnaces (90-96% AFUE). There are also options to increase the efficiency of the furnace blower. This paper reports the projected national energy and economic impacts of requiring higher efficiency furnaces in the future. Energy savings vary with climate, with the result that condensing furnaces offer larger energy savings in colder climates. The range of impacts for a statistical sample of households and the percent of households with net savings in life cycle cost are shown. Gas furnaces are somewhat unusual in that the technology does not easily permit incremental change to the AFUE above 80%. Achieving significant energy savings requires use of condensing technology, which yields a large efficiency gain (to 90% or higher AFUE), but has a higher cost. With respect to electricity efficiency design options, the ECM has a negative effect on the average LCC. The current extra cost of this technology more than offsets the sizable electricity savings.

247

Inland Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Product: Providing consultancy services to the planning permission of the 500MW natural gas-fired combined cycle, plus 50MW solar thermal, Victorville 2 power plant....

248

Energy Incentive Programs, Minnesota | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

CenterPoint Energy offers rebates for efficient natural gas-fired equipment, including heating systems and components (new and retrofit), boiler tune-ups, water heaters, steam...

249

EIS-0415: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and alternative sites. Basin Electric proposes to construct a proposed natural gas-fired combined-cycle facility near White, South Dakota. DOEEIS-0415: Final Environmental Impact...

250

Resource Limits and Conversion Efficiency with Implications for Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants.Natural gas-fired combined cycle plants can be converted toand more efficient combined-cycle plants. Combined cycle

Croft, Gregory Donald

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Siemens Power Generation, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2005 Pittsburgh Coal Conference 2005 Pittsburgh Coal Conference Siemens Power Generation, Inc. Page 1 of 10 © Siemens Power Generation, Inc., All Rights Reserved Development of a Catalytic Combustor for Fuel Flexible Turbines W. R. Laster Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation Abstract Siemens has been working on a catalytic combustor for natural gas operation for several years using the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCL TM ) design. The design has been shown to produce low NOx emissions on natural gas operation. By operating the catalyst section fuel rich, the design shows considerable promise for robust operation over a wide range of fuel compositions including syngas. Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy' s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse is conducting a three year

252

Advanced Analytics | GE Global Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oil field production. Power Generation - Combinations of hardware and software that boost wind turbine and gas-fired power plant output and efficiency. Rail - Cloud-based software...

253

EIS-0354: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Mitsubishi Corporation proposes to construct and operate a 500 Megawatt (MW) gas-fired electric power generating station in southern Clark County, Nevada. The facility...

254

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty++++ Afzal Siddiqui  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty++++ Afzal Siddiqui University's decision to invest in a distributed generation (DG) unit fuelled by natural gas. While the long. KEYWORDS. OR in Energy; Distributed Generation; Real Options; Optimal Investment. 1. INTRODUCTION

Guillas, Serge

255

Thermoelectric Generators 1. Thermoelectric generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Cold Hot I - -- - - - - -- Figure 1 Electron concentration in a thermoelectric material. #12;2 A large1 Thermoelectric Generators HoSung Lee 1. Thermoelectric generator 1.1 Basic Equations In 1821 on the direction of current and material [3]. This is called the Thomson effect (or Thomson heat). These three

Lee, Ho Sung

256

EIS-0343: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0343: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement COB Energy Facility, Proposes to Construct a 1,160-megawatt (MW) Natural Gas-Fired and Combined- Cycle Electric Generating Plant, Right- of-Way Permit across Federal Land under the Jurisdiction of BLM, Klamath Basin, Klamath County, OR DOE/EIS-0343, EPA Notice of Availability, COB Energy Facility, Proposes to Construct a 1,160-megawatt (MW) Natural Gas-Fired and Combined-Cycle Electric Generating Plant, Right-of-Way Permit cross Federal Land under the Jurisdiction of BLM, Klamath Basin, Klamath County, Oregon, 68 FR 66825 (November 2003) More Documents & Publications EIS-0359: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact

257

Quasiseparable Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is clear from the preceding chapter that any matrix has quasiseparable representations. By padding given quasiseparable generators with zero matrices of large sizes one ... large orders. However, one is lookin...

Yuli Eidelman; Israel Gohberg…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

How to quantify uncertainty and variability in life cycle assessment: the case of greenhouse gas emissions of gas power generation in the US  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study quantified the contributions of uncertainty and variability to the range of life-cycle greenhouse gas (LCGHG) emissions associated with conventional gas-fired electricity generation in the US. Whereas uncertainty is defined as lack of knowledge and can potentially be reduced by additional research, variability is an inherent characteristic of supply chains and cannot be reduced without physically modifying the system. The life-cycle included four stages: production, processing, transmission and power generation, and utilized a functional unit of 1 kWh of electricity generated at plant. Technological variability requires analyses of life cycles of individual power plants, e.g. combined cycle plants or boilers. Parameter uncertainty was modeled via Monte Carlo simulation. Our approach reveals that technological differences are the predominant cause for the range of LCGHG emissions associated with gas power, primarily due to variability in plant efficiencies. Uncertainties in model parameters played a minor role for 100 year time horizon. Variability in LCGHG emissions was a factor of 1.4 for combined cycle plants, and a factor of 1.3 for simple cycle plants (95% CI, 100 year horizon). The results can be used to assist decision-makers in assessing factors that contribute to LCGHG emissions despite uncertainties in parameters employed to estimate those emissions.

M Hauck; Z J N Steinmann; I J Laurenzi; R Karuppiah; M A J Huijbregts

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Eucalyptus plantations for electricity generation: the cost of carbon dioxide abatement in Thailand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Short-rotation plantations are expected to play an important role in the transition towards renewable energy, in particular in many developing countries. At present, developing countries do not have any carbon dioxide (CO2 ) abatement targets under the Kyoto Protocol, but CO2 mitigating projects might nevertheless be carried out through the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). The purpose of this paper is to analyse: i) the economics of eucalyptus production in the east and northeast of Thailand and ii) the cost of substituting eucalyptus wood for fossil fuels for electricity production. The productivity of eucalyptus plantations is estimated at 7â??11 dry ton/hectare(ha)/year over a rotation period of 3 to 5 years. The levelised cost of eucalyptus wood delivered to the factory gate is estimated at 13â??18 USD/fresh ton (1.2â??1.7 USD/GJ). If eucalyptus wood is used for electricity generation, the cost of electricity generation would be 6.2 US cents/kWh, and consequently the cost of substituting a wood-fired plant for a coal-fired plant and a gas-fired plant would be 107 and 196 USD/ton-C, respectively. The extent to which eucalyptus plantations could offer economically attractive options for electricity generation and CO2 abatement depends, among other things, on the cost of reducing CO2 emissions in the Annex 1 countries and CO2 mitigation options in developing countries. In addition, it depends on the economics of eucalyptus production as seen by farmers. There are also several other factors that affect an increased establishment of eucalyptus plantations in Thailand. The potential land-use change impact as well as the social and environmental impact associated with establishing mono-culture eucalyptus plantations as a CO2 abatement strategy are, however, not analysed in this paper and should be further investigated.

Wathanyu Amatayakul; Christian Azar

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

natural gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

natural gasoline, condensate, distillate [Liquid hydrocarbons, generally clear or pale straw-coloured and of high API gravity (above 6o°), that are produced with wet gas] ? Gasbenzin n, Gasolin n ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Performance and economic evaluation of the seahorse natural gas hot water heater conversion at Fort Stewart. Interim report, 1994 Summer  

SciTech Connect

The federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is one of four DOE laboratories that participate in the New Technologies Demonstration Program, providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied under that program. This interim report provides the results of a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology-a hot water heater conversion system to convert electrically heated hot water tanks to natural gas fuel. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Stewart, a US Army base in Georgia, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were Gas Fired Products, developers of the technology; the Public Service Company of North Carolina; Atlanta Gas Light Company; the Army Corps of Engineers; Fort Stewart; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

Winiarski, D.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Performance and economic evaluation of the seahorse natural gas hot water heater conversion at Fort Stewart. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States with consumption of nearly 1.5 quads/year of energy (10{sup 15} quad = 1015 Btu) and cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP) seeks to evaluate new energy -- saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is one of four DOE laboratories that participate in the New Technologies Demonstration Program, providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied under that program. This report provides the results of a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP with funding support from the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of 4 candidate energy-saving technology-a water heater conversion system to convert electrically powered water heaters to natural gas fuel. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Stewart, a US Army base in Georgia, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were Gas Fired Products, developers of the technology; the Public Service Company of North Carolina; Atlanta Gas Light Company; the Army Corps of Engineers; Fort Stewart; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

Winiarski, D.W.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Microwave generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Natural System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural System Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development - FY11 Progress Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Program Yifeng Wang (SNL) Michael Simpson (INL) Scott Painter (LANL) Hui-Hai Liu (LBNL) Annie B. Kersting (LLNL) July 15, 2011 FCRD-USED-2011-000223 UFD Natural System Evaluation - FY11 Year-End Report July 15, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

265

How regulators should use natural gas price forecasts  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas prices are critical to a range of regulatory decisions covering both electric and gas utilities. Natural gas prices are often a crucial variable in electric generation capacity planning and in the benefit-cost relationship for energy-efficiency programs. High natural gas prices can make coal generation the most economical new source, while low prices can make natural gas generation the most economical. (author)

Costello, Ken

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

NATURE STUDY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...last two numbers of SCIENCE have appeared articles by Drs. Wheeler and Chapman on the abuses of nature writing as exemplified...imprint of Rand, IeNally and Co., 1903, and its author is Katherine E. Dopp, of the Extension Division of the Chicago University...

E. C. CASE

1904-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Marketing Mother Nature’s Molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marketing Mother Nature’s Molecules ... Yet molecules made by Mother Nature, or derivatives thereof, still account for nearly half of the drugs on the market. ...

LISA JARVIS

2012-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

268

Magnetocumulative generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing providing a housing chamber with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber, from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

Pettibone, J.S.; Wheeler, P.C.

1981-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

269

Monthly Generation System Peak (pbl/generation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation > Generation Hydro Power Wind Power Monthly GSP BPA White Book Dry Year Tools Firstgov Monthly Generation System Peak (GSP) This site is no longer maintained. Page last...

270

Photon generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni (Shoreham, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

272

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

273

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 6, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 28, 2011) Natural gas spot prices at most market locations across the country this past week initially declined and then began to creep upwards as natural gas use for power generation increased. The upward trend was halted yesterday, as prices at nearly all points retreated, possibly due to forecasts for considerably colder weather. After declining from $3.78 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) last Wednesday to $3.72 per MMbtu on Thursday, the Henry Hub spot price increased to $3.92 per MMBtu on Tuesday and closed at $3.88 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the October 2011

274

Generation Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many local governments are using green power in their facilities and providing assistance to local businesses and residents to do the same. Green power is a subset of renewable energy that is produced with no GHG emissions, typically from solar, wind, geothermal, biogas, biomass, or low-impact small hydroelectric sources, includes three types of products: utility products (i.e., green power purchased from the utility through the electricity grid), renewable energy certificates (RECs), and on-site generation. Opportunities to purchase these products are increasing significantly, with annual green power market growth rates

Green Power

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

New configurations of a heat recovery absorption heat pump integrated with a natural gas boiler for boiler efficiency improvement  

SciTech Connect

Conventional natural gas-fired boilers exhaust flue gas direct to the atmosphere at 150 200 C, which, at such temperatures, contains large amount of energy and results in relatively low thermal efficiency ranging from 70% to 80%. Although condensing boilers for recovering the heat in the flue gas have been developed over the past 40 years, their present market share is still less than 25%. The major reason for this relatively slow acceptance is the limited improvement in the thermal efficiency of condensing boilers. In the condensing boiler, the temperature of the hot water return at the range of 50 60 C, which is used to cool the flue gas, is very close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas. Therefore, the latent heat, the majority of the waste heat in the flue gas, which is contained in the water vapor, cannot be recovered. This paper presents a new approach to improve boiler thermal efficiency by integrating absorption heat pumps with natural gas boilers for waste heat recovery (HRAHP). Three configurations of HRAHPs are introduced and discussed. The three configurations are modeled in detail to illustrate the significant thermal efficiency improvement they attain. Further, for conceptual proof and validation, an existing hot water-driven absorption chiller is operated as a heat pump at operating conditions similar to one of the devised configurations. An overall system performance and economic analysis are provided for decision-making and as evidence of the potential benefits. These three configurations of HRAHP provide a pathway to achieving realistic high-efficiency natural gas boilers for applications with process fluid return temperatures higher than or close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas.

Qu, Ming [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Yin, Hongxi [Southeast University, Nanjing, China

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Magnetocumulative generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing (100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105) providing a housing chamber (106) with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber (106) forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber (106), from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers (107, 108) disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber (106) which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

Pettibone, Joseph S. (Livermore, CA); Wheeler, Paul C. (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel price forecast Coal prices follow AEO 2007 referencecoal- and natural gas-based electricity generation analyzed here include decreased natural gas prices,

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Biogass Generator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Another internet tool by: Another internet tool by: Build Your Own Page 1 of 5 Teach...build...learn...renewable energy! Biogas Generator A Renewable Energy Project Kit The Pembina Institute What Is Biogas? Biogas is actually a mixture of gases, usually carbon dioxide and methane. It is produced by a few kinds of microorganisms, usually when air or oxygen is absent. (The absence of oxygen is called "anaerobic conditions.") Animals that eat a lot of plant material, particularly grazing animals such as cattle, produce large amounts of biogas. The biogas is produced not by the cow or elephant, but by billions of microor- ganisms living in its digestive system. Biogas also develops in bogs and at the bottom of lakes, where decaying organic matter builds up under wet and

279

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced generation inter-cross Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials for ARES Engines Phil Maziasz ORNL April 17, 2003 12;UT... Generation Waukesha Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine - Electric Generator Sets 12;UT-BATTELLE Oak ... Source:...

280

Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 400 megawatts of new gas-fired generation in the most extreme future. However, in most other futures, little or no gas-fired generation is needed. The 2019 resource adequacy assessment, however, shows a need 3, 2014 MEMORANDUM TO: Power Committee Members FROM: John Fazio, Senior Systems Analyst SUBJECT

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, with roughly equal amounts of gas-fired generation, wind and efficiency Needs Assessment: Shows a shift-planned resources shows plans to cover the peaking gap are mostly gas-fired generation and efficiency, with about 50 Oregon Tom Karier Washington Phil Rockefeller Washington April 26, 2012 MEMORANDUM TO: Power Committee

282

October 18, 2007 Mark Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) conservation and renewable energy resources and 3) gas-fired generation. The first two options have been retirement of older coal-fired plants. Because the analysis of gas-fired replacement of generation by SnakeOctober 18, 2007 Mark Walker Director of Public Affairs Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851

283

A multi-level simulation platform of natural gas internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell–gas turbine hybrid generation system – Part II. Balancing units model library and system simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following our integrated hierarchical modeling framework of natural gas internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell (IRSOFC), this paper firstly introduces the model libraries of main balancing units, including some state-of-the-art achievements and our specific work. Based on gPROMS programming code, flexible configuration and modular design are fully realized by specifying graphically all unit models in each level. Via comparison with the steady-state experimental data of Siemens–Westinghouse demonstration system, the in-house multi-level SOFC–gas turbine (GT) simulation platform is validated to be more accurate than the advanced power system analysis tool (APSAT). Moreover, some units of the demonstration system are designed reversely for analysis of a typically part-load transient process. The framework of distributed and dynamic modeling in most of units is significant for the development of control strategies in the future.

Cheng Bao; Ningsheng Cai; Eric Croiset

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Power generation method including membrane separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

286

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

287

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

288

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

289

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

290

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

291

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

292

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

293

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

294

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

295

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

296

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

297

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

298

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

299

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

300

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Pune, India GTA8.3SLB QSV91 6 Measure of Success CO2 Production and Comparison of Natural Gas and Diesel Power Generation Applications The combination of high...

302

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",2119,48 "Electric Utilities",1946,39 "IPP & CHP",172,50 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",6946419,49 "Electric...

303

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",23485,17 "Electric Utilities",17148,17 "IPP & CHP",6337,17 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",77896588,19 "Electric...

304

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",14321,31 "Electric Utilities",991,42 "IPP & CHP",13330,7 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",36198121,36 "Electric...

305

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",38488,7 "Electric Utilities",29293,3 "IPP & CHP",9195,10 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",122306364,9 "Electric...

306

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",1781,49 "Electric Utilities",8,50 "IPP & CHP",1773,38 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",8309036,48 "Electric...

307

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",32547,9 "Electric Utilities",23615,7 "IPP & CHP",8933,11 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",152878688,6 "Electric...

308

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",39520,6 "Electric Utilities",10739,26 "IPP & CHP",28781,5 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",135768251,7 "Electric...

309

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",10476,34 "Electric Utilities",7807,30 "IPP & CHP",2669,34 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",35173263,39 "Electric...

310

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",59139,3 "Electric Utilities",51373,1 "IPP & CHP",7766,15 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",221096136,3 "Electric...

311

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",71329,2 "Electric Utilities",30294,2 "IPP & CHP",41035,3 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",199518567,4 "Electric...

312

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",3357,46 "Electric Utilities",98,47 "IPP & CHP",3259,29 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",8633694,47 "Electric...

313

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",109568,1 "Electric Utilities",28463,4 "IPP & CHP",81106,1 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",429812510,1 "Electric...

314

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission...  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Summer Net Winter Plant Fuel Type Generators Capacity Capacity Capacity Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Wind Solar Thermal and...

315

Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation...  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming Introduction Wyoming is a significant energy exporter, producing nearly 40% of the nation's coal and 10% of the nation's natural...

316

Natural gas strategic plan and program crosscut plans  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas strategic plan recognizes the challenges and opportunities facing increased U.S. natural gas use. Focus areas of research include natural gas supply, delivery, and storage, power generation, industrial, residential and commercial, natural gas vehicles, and the environment. Historical aspects, mission, situation analysis, technology trends, strategic issues, performance indicators, technology program overviews, and forecasting in the above areas are described.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant ... A natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with capacity of about 430 MW integrated to a chemical solvent absorber/stripping capture plant is investigated. ... The natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) is an advanced power generation technology that improves the fuel efficiency of natural gas. ...

Mehdi Karimi; Magne Hillestad; Hallvard F. Svendsen

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

318

Thermoelectric generator  

SciTech Connect

A thermoelectric generator unit is described comprising: a hot side heat exchanger including a plate having extruded retention posts projecting from one surface of the plate, and fins adapted for contact with a heating source. The fins are positioned between two of the retention posts. Retention rods are inserted between the retention posts and the base of the fins to retain the fin in thermal contact with the plate surface upon insertion of the retention rod between the engaging surface of the post and the corresponding fin. Thermoelectric semi-conductor modules are in thermal contact with the opposite side of the hot side heat exchanger plate from the contact with the fins. The modules are arranged in a grid pattern so that heat flow is directed into each of the modules from the hot side heat exchanger. The modules are connected electrically so as to combine their electrical output; and a cold side heat exchanger is in thermal contact with the modules acting as a heat sink on the opposite side of the module from the hot side heat exchanger plate so as to produce a thermal gradient across the modules.

Shakun, W.; Bearden, J.H.; Henderson, D.R.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

319

Chapter 1 - Natural Gas Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas is the most energy-efficient fossil fuel; it offers important energy-saving benefits when it is used instead of oil or coal. Although the primary use of natural gas is as a fuel, it is also a source of hydrocarbons for petrochemical feedstocks and a major source of elemental sulfur, an important industrial chemical. Its popularity as an energy source is expected to grow substantially in the future because natural gas can help achieve two important energy goals for the twenty-first century: providing the sustainable energy supplies and services needed for social and economic development and reducing adverse impacts on global climate and the environment in general. Natural gas consumption and trade have been growing steadily over the past two decades, and natural gas has strengthened its position in the world energy mix. Although natural gas demand declined in 2009, as a result of the economic slowdown, it is expected to resume growth in both emerging and traditional markets in the coming decades. Such increase in the near future will be driven because of additional demand in current uses, primarily power generation. There is yet little overlap between the use of natural gas and oil in all large markets. However, there are certain moves in the horizon, including the electrifying of transportation, that will push natural gas use to ever higher levels. This book gives the reader an introduction to natural gas by describing the origin and composition of natural gas, gas sources, phase behavior and properties, and transportation methods. Keywords: Absolute Open Flow, bulk modulus of elasticity, coal-bed methane, cricondenbar, cricondentherm, Expected Ultimate Recovery, gas deviation factor, higher heating value, Inflow Performance Relationship, kerogen, laminar flow, liquefied natural gas, primary thermogenic gas, pyrobitumen, secondary thermogenic gas, super-compressibility factor, thiol, Tubing Performance Curve, turbulent flow, unconventional gas resources, Wobbe Index, Wobbe Number.

Saeid Mokhatab; William A. Poe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Reform of Natural Gas Market in Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Another issue is the interdependence of natural gas and electricity markets. About 62% of gas was sold to power generators in the early 2000s. This amount is ... disruptions. In order to overcome this issue, generators

Izak Atiyas; Tamer Çetin; Gürcan Gülen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

generation has increased substantially in Mexico, while the national petroleum company PEMEX has reported declines in natural gas production. Spot Prices NYMEX price declines were...

322

Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine (s) Heat recovery steam generator (s) - HRSG with or without duct firing Natural gas supply11/17/2014 1 Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Utility Scale Solar PV Steven doing recently around two key supply-side resource technologies 1. Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine

323

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

324

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

325

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

326

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

327

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

328

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

329

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

330

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

331

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

332

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

333

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

334

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

335

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

336

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

337

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

338

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

339

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

340

STAFF REPORT 2012 NATURAL GAS RESEARCH,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STAFF REPORT 2012 NATURAL GAS RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION REPORT CALIFORNIA Public Utilities Commission to impose a surcharge on all natural gas consumed in California to fund Technologies and Advanced Generation · EnergyRelated Transportation For more information about the Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Introduction Minimal generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Minimal generation Random generation Minimal and probabilistic generation of finite generation of finite groups #12;Introduction Minimal generation Random generation Some motivation Let x1 random elements of G = x1, . . . , xk . (G is the group generated by x1, . . . , xk : all possible

St Andrews, University of

342

Safe Operation of Backup Power Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E-395 04/06 Portable generators are useful when temporary or remote electric power is needed, but they can also be deadly. The primary hazards to avoid when us- ing a generator are carbon monoxide (CO) poison- ing from generator exhaust fumes..., electrocution and fire. Carbon monoxide danger Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas byproduct of incomplete combustion of fuels, such as natural gas, heating oil and diesel. This toxic gas interferes with the blood?s ability to carry oxygen...

Smith, David

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

343

Preliminary Assumptions for Natural Gas Peaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preliminary Assumptions for Natural Gas Peaking Technologies Gillian Charles and Steve Simmons GRAC, Reciprocating Engines Next steps 2 #12;Definitions Baseload Energy: power generated (or conserved) across a period of time to serve system demands for electricity Peaking Capacity: capability of power generating

344

Preliminary Assumptions for Natural Gas Peaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preliminary Assumptions for Natural Gas Peaking Technologies Gillian Charles GRAC 2/27/14 #12;Today Vernon, WA PSE Klamath Generation Peakers June 2002 (2) 54 MW P&W FT8 Twin- pac 95 MW Klamath, OR IPP; winter-only PPA w/ PSE Dave Gates Generating Station Jan 2011 (3) P&W SWIFTPAC 150 MW Anaconda, MT North

345

electricity generating capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generating capacity generating capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual operational electricity generation capacity by plant type (1975 - 2009); estimated generating capacity by fuel type for North Island, South Island and New Zealand (2009); and information on generating plants (plant type, name, owner, commissioned date, and capacity), as of December 2009. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords biomass coal Electric Capacity electricity generating capacity geothermal Hydro Natural Gas wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Operational Electricity Generation Capacity by Plant Type (xls, 42.5 KiB)

346

A Simplified Self-Help Approach to Sizing of Small-Scale Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications for buildings are best served by small-scale systems such as a combustion turbine or engine coupled with a generator and a waste heat boiler. Natural gas and light fuel oils are the fuels best suited to these systems. Gas-fired Cogeneration systems... Cogeneration systems, which use a wide range of conventional fuels (natural gas, diesel fuel, gasoline or propane) and well-developed engines and generator sets. The packaged units are skid-mounted with appropriate controls and electrical switchgear included...

Somasundaram, S.; Turner, W. D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Dubuque generation station, Dubuque, Iowa  

SciTech Connect

Alliant Energy's Dubuque generation station is a fine example of why small does not mean insignificant in the power generation industry. This winner of the EUCG best performer award in the small plant category shows that its operating excellence towers over that of many larger and much newer coal-fired power plants. The plant has three operating units with boilers originally designed for Illinois basin coal but now Powder River Basin coal makes up 75% of the coal consumed. The boilers can also burn natural gas. 4 photos.

Peltier, R.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Economics of natural gas upgrading  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source in meeting some of the market demand presently met by liquid products from crude oil. This study was initiated to analyze three energy markets to determine if greater use could be made of natural gas or natural gas derived products and if those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The three markets targeted for possible increases in gas use were motor fuels, power generation, and the chemical feedstocks market. The economics of processes to convert natural gas to transportation fuels, chemical products, and power were analyzed. The economic analysis was accomplished by drawing on a variety of detailed economic studies, updating them and bringing the results to a common basis. The processes analyzed included production of methanol, MTBE, higher alcohols, gasoline, CNG, and LNG for the transportation market. Production and use of methanol and ammonia in the chemical feedstock market and use of natural gas for power generation were also assessed. Use of both high and low quality gas as a process feed stream was evaluated. The analysis also explored the impact of various gas price growth rates and process facility locations, including remote gas areas. In assessing the transportation fuels market the analysis examined production and use of both conventional and new alternative motor fuels.

Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants,natural gas plants, and combined cycle natural gas plants.generated largely from combined-cycle Capacity (GW) yd r as

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

THE ROLE OF AGING AND ONCE-THROUGH-COOLED POWER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................B-1 List of Figures Page Figure 1: Annual Generation of Aging and New Once-Through-Cooled Gas-Fired....................................................................................................................................43 Gas-Fired OTC Plants Not in Local Reliability AreasCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION THE ROLE OF AGING AND ONCE-THROUGH-COOLED POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA

352

NL Generation for Virtual Humans in a Complex Social Environment David Traum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NL Generation for Virtual Humans in a Complex Social Environment David Traum University of Southern Natural language generation is a broad field, given the wide variety of different applications for text generation. Perhaps one of the most challenging of these applications is natural language generation

Hovy, Eduard

353

Industrial Interruptible Power: An Economical Alternative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and natural gas-fired combustion turbines. In operat ing its power system, TVA brings on the least ex penSive base load generation first and uses the more costly generating plants last. Nuclear and lower-cost fossil generation currently provide the base... load, with hydro and more costly fossil gene ration being adjusted to meet fluc?tuations in de mands. Since TVA's highest cost increment of gene ration exceeds the system average rates charged to customers, it is to a utility's advantage to re duce...

Reynolds, S. D.; Gardner, J. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Concentrated solar power in the future of electricity generation: a synthesis of reasons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...electricity generation. Experience...steam-Rankine coal-fired power plants, nuclear...defaults in generation units. Large...need to have a generation system with...the unitary power will have to...and natural gas. Evidently...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 19) 2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 19) Moderate temperatures across the country except in the Southwest contributed to natural gas spot prices easing 25 to 50 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, June 4. On the week (Wednesday, June 4-Wednesday, June 11), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 35 cents per MMBtu to $6.06. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub fell about 16 cents per MMBtu to $6.213. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 6, increased to 1,324 Bcf, which is 25.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $2.36 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (June 11) closing price of $32.17 per barrel, or $5.55 per MMBtu. Prices: Natural gas spot prices at many market locations in the Lower 48 States have declined for three consecutive trading days from Friday peaks as key market areas in the Midwest and the Eastern seaboard have experienced unseasonably cool weather. Although prices remain elevated, the slackened demand for natural gas for electric generation has contributed to prices generally softening across the board. For the week, the spot price at the Henry Hub dropped about 6 percent to $6.06 per MMBtu, while other pricing points on the Gulf Coast showed slightly greater declines and fell below the $6-mark. The overall easing of prices may reflect also the slightly improving storage picture as injections in 7 of the past 8 weeks have exceeded the 5-year average with a record net addition reported last Thursday. Although the storage refill season started slowly, injections have increased considerably, with at least one major interstate pipeline serving the Northeast, Tennessee Gas Pipeline, announcing restrictions to shippers due to injection nominations exceeding capacity. The spot price at Tennessee Gas Pipeline's Zone 6, which serves major citygates in New York and other Northeastern states, this week fell 47 cents per MMBtu to $6.30. In contrast to the East, prices in the West moved higher early in the week, as maintenance on El Paso Natural Gas in the San Juan Basin restricted deliveries from the region and a heat wave sparked buying at pricing locations in California and New Mexico. The spot price at the Southern California border surged 61 cents per MMBtu on Monday to $5.78, but has since dropped to $5.51, which is a net decline of 51 cents since Wednesday, June 4.

356

Performance of Gas-fired Water Heaters in a 10-home Field Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question "Are high-efficiency hot water heating systems worth the cost?"

357

System definition and analysis gas-fired industrial advanced turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to define and analyze an engine system based on the gas fuel Advanced Turbine from Task 3. Using the cycle results of Task 3, a technical effort was started for Task 6 which would establish the definition of the engine flowpath and the key engine component systems. The key engine systems are: gas turbine engine overall flowpath; booster (low pressure compressor); intercooler; high pressure compressor; combustor; high pressure turbine; low pressure turbine and materials; engine system packaging; and power plant configurations. The design objective is to use the GE90 engine as the platform for the GE Industrial Advanced Turbine System. This objective sets the bounds for the engine flowpath and component systems.

Holloway, G.M.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Applied modelling for bio and lean gas fired micro gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This contribution presents the outcome of applied Computational Fluid Dynamics for analysis of combustion technologies to find an efficient firing mode for use of bio and low calorific gaseous fuels in micro gas turbine combustors. The combustion technologies considered are based on the new concepts of Flameless Oxidation and Continued Staged Air. To optimise these concepts to burn low calorific gaseous fuels manifold numerical simulations were carried out using the CFD code FLUENT. The results achieved showed the influence of the fuel compositions on the flow behaviour inside the combustion chamber, reaction zone, flame structure and pollutant emissions.

A. Al-Halbouni; A. Giese; M. Flamme; K. Goerner

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Operation Synopsis of Gas-Fired Double-Effect Absorption Chillers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Absorption refrigeration systems are one of the oldest systems available. The fundamentals of absorption refrigeration were formulated about 1777, and the first successful absorption machine was developed in 1850. The first U.S. patent...

Phillips, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

A Case Study from Norway on Gas-Fired Power Plants, Carbon Sequestration, and Politics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

these questions, we must first understand the production and consumption of energy in Norway, along in Norway involving climate change mitigation policies. 1 Source CNN & Reuters. #12;2 NORWAY'S ENERGY SECTOR in Norway3 In addition to energy purposes, domestic oil is used as feedstock for the petrochemical industry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Improving Gas-Fired Heat Pump Capacity and Performance by Adding a Desiccant Dehumidification Subsystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacity 50%. Increased initial manufacturing costs are estimated at around $500/ton ($142/kW) for volume production. This cost Level is expected to reduce the total initial cost per ton compared to a system without the desiccant subsystem....

Parsons, B. K.; Pesaran, A. A.; Bharathan, D.; Shelpuk, B. C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Understanding and Managing Generation Y  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are four generations in the workplace today; they consist of the Silent Generation, Baby Boom Generation, Generation X, and Generation Y. Generation Y, being the newest generation, is the least understood generation although marketers...

Wallace, Kevin

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 14) July 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 14) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, June 29-July 6), as two tropical storms have disrupted production in the Gulf of Mexico and power generation demand to meet air-conditioning load has remained strong. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $0.61 per MMBtu to $7.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub moved approximately 60 cents per MMBtu higher to settle yesterday (Wednesday, July 6) at $7.688. Natural gas in storage was 2,186 Bcf as of Friday, July 1, which is 12.4 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $4.01 per barrel or about 7 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at an all-time high of $61.24 per barrel or $10.56 per MMBtu.

364

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 10, 2006) August 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 10, 2006) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 26 - August 2), as demand for power generation remained high in order to meet air-conditioning load and crude oil continued to trade near record-high prices. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $1.94 per MMBtu, or about 29 percent, to $8.65. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the August contract expired last Thursday, July 27, at $7.042 per MMBtu, about $1.16 more than the previous month's settlement. The price of the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 83 cents per MMBtu higher on the week to settle yesterday (Wednesday, August 2) at $7.799. Natural gas in storage was 2,775 Bcf as of Friday, July 28, which is 19.2 percent higher than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.34 per barrel or about 3 percent, since last Wednesday (July 26) to trade yesterday at $76.16 per barrel or $13.13 per MMBtu.

365

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 11) August 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 11) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 27 - August 3), as demand for power generation remained high in order to meet air-conditioning load and crude oil continued to trade near record-high prices. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $1.25 per MMBtu, or about 17 percent, to $8.75. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 76 cents per MMBtu higher to settle yesterday (Wednesday, August 3) at $8.351. Natural gas in storage was 2,420 Bcf as of Friday, July 29, which is 7.6 percent higher than the 5-year average. However, the hot temperatures throughout the Lower 48 States have slowed net injections in the past several weeks. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.64 per barrel or about 3 percent, since last Wednesday (July 27) to trade yesterday at $60.76 per barrel or $10.48 per MMBtu.

366

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 16) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 16) Higher demand for natural gas from power generators meeting air-conditioning needs likely contributed to natural gas spot prices climbing $0.38 to $1.28 per MMBtu at most trading locations since Wednesday, June 1. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, June 1-8), the Henry Hub spot price rose 86 cents per MMBtu to $7.22. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery gained 21.1 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement price of $7.00 on Wednesday, June 8. Working gas in storage as of Friday, June 3, increased to 1,890 Bcf, which is 20.2 percent above the 5-year (2000-2004) average inventory for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.89 per barrel on the week to $52.51, or $9.05 per MMBtu.

367

Power Generation and Human Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions from power generation are associated with adverse health and ecological effects. Fossil fuel-based power plants (such as coal, oil, and to a lesser extent, natural gas) are associated with emissions of particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and a variety of organic contaminants such as mercury and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Exposure to emissions from power plants has been associated with a variety of respiratory symptoms, typically based on short-term (e.g., from 5–10 min to 24 h) increases in ambient concentrations. In addition, exposure to constituents from emissions generated by fossil fuels has been associated with increases in premature mortality, particularly in the elderly, and a variety of respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses. Fossil fuels, particularly coal-fired power plants, are responsible for generating the majority of emissions to which humans are exposed.

K. von Stackelberg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 26, 2007) 9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 26, 2007) Since Wednesday, July 11, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub declined 41 cents per MMBtu, or 6 percent, since Wednesday, July 11, to $6.24 per MMBtu. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (July 18) at $6.528 per MMBtu, falling 7 cents per MMBtu, or 1 percent since last Wednesday, July 11. Natural gas in storage was 2,692 Bcf as of July 13, which is 15.7 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $2.45 per barrel on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $75.03 per barrel or $12.94 per MMBtu. Prices: Natural gas prices fell at virtually all market locations since last Wednesday, July 11, with declines of 25 to 50 cents per MMBtu or about 4 to 12 percent. Moderating temperatures in most areas of the Lower 48 States likely accounted for the widespread declines, as cooler temperatures mitigated cooling demand for natural gas. On a regional basis, price declines averaged between 18 and 58 cents per MMBtu, or 3 and 13 percent, since last Wednesday, July 11. The largest price decreases since last Wednesday, July 11, occurred principally in the Rocky Mountain region, where prices fell by more than 57 cents per MMBtu, or 13 percent on average. By far, the smallest decreases occurred in the Arizona/Nevada and Florida regions, where prices fell by 18 and 24 cents per MMBtu on average, respectively, with the Florida citygate posting the highest price in the Lower 48 States at $8.00 per MMBtu. Elsewhere, average price decreases by region ranged between 30 and 43 cents per MMBtu. Despite these declines and lower electric generation demand relative to last year, prices generally exceeded levels reported last year at this time, with prices at the Henry Hub $0.22 per MMBtu or 4 percent above last year's level. The principal exception to the year-over-year price increases occurred in the Rocky Mountain region, where prices at selected markets were between $1.87 and $2.28 per MMBtu or about 35 and 43 percent below last year's level.

369

International Natural Gas Prices for Electricity Generation - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industry for Selected Countries1 Industry for Selected Countries1 U.S. Dollars per 107 Kilocalories - Gross Calorific Value2 Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Australia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Austria NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium C C C C C C NA 559.8 417.4 354.9 Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Bulgaria NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 381.2 396.6 381.7 Canada 108.8 125.3 210.1 223.7 291.1 272.0 216.1 352.3 172.6 160.1 Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 288.5 271.6 302.1 336.9 387.4 413.8 475.6 648.5 525.6 600.9 Croatia 235.5 281.4 330.6 386.2 391.4 400.8 436.7 388.7 420.0 520.4 Czech Republic 155.9 173.6 203.5 217.4 292.5 402.3 391.7 614.1 528.0 530.5

370

International Natural Gas Prices for Electricity Generation - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Households for Selected Countries1 Households for Selected Countries1 U.S. Dollars per 107 Kilocalories - Gross Calorific Value2 Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Austria 368.5 379.3 590.6 686.2 729.6 785.0 936.5 1,024.3 1,060.3 Barbados NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Bolivia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Canada 294.1 236.2 339.8 361.4 429.6 481.6 487.0 512.7 NA Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 372.5 253.2 278.6 310.3 360.1 385.7 435.7 538.5 NA Colombia NA NA NA NA NA NA 361.2 437.8 NA Croatia 235.5 281.4 332.3 386.2 391.4 400.8 436.7 NA NA Cuba NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

371

Natural Oils - The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aftertreatment with a Oil Conditioning Filter Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Diesel Engine Oil - Impact on Wear Development of High Performance Heavy Duty Engine Oils...

372

Electrical Generation Using Non-Salable Low BTU Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

High operating costs are a significant problem for independent operators throughout the U.S. Often, decisions to temporarily idle or abandon a well or lease are dictated by these cost considerations, which are often seen as unavoidable. Options for continuing operations on a marginal basis are limited, but must include non-conventional approaches to problem solving, such as the use of alternative sources of lease power, and scrupulous reduction of non-productive operating techniques and costs. The loss of access to marginal oil and gas productive reservoirs is of major concern to the DOE. The twin difficulties of high operating costs and low or marginal hydrocarbon production often force independent operators to temporarily or permanently abandon existing lease facilities, including producing wells. Producing well preservation, through continued economical operation of marginal wells, must be maintained. Reduced well and lease operating costs are expected to improve oil recovery of the Schaben field, in Ness County, Kansas, by several hundred thousands of barrels of oil. Appropriate technology demonstrated by American Warrior, allows the extension of producing well life and has application for many operators throughout the area.

Scott Corsair

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

DRAFT DRAFT Electricity and Natural Gas Sector Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DRAFT DRAFT Electricity and Natural Gas Sector Description For Public Distribution AB 32 Scoping of electricity and natural gas; including electricity generation, combined heat and power, and electricity and natural gas end uses for residential and commercial purposes. Use of electricity and/or gas for industrial

374

Greater focus needed on methane leakage from natural gas infrastructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Fort Worth Natural Gas Air Quality Study...Fort Worth Natural Gas Air Quality Study...of SO2 from coal-fired power plants in the United...the U.S. natural gas industry. Chemosphere...SNG for Electricity Generation. Environ Sci Technol...

Ramón A. Alvarez; Stephen W. Pacala; James J. Winebrake; William L. Chameides; Steven P. Hamburg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Next Generation Radioisotope Generators | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

» Next Generation Radioisotope Generators » Next Generation Radioisotope Generators Next Generation Radioisotope Generators Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) - The ASRG is currently being developed as a high-efficiency RPS technology to support future space missions on the Martian surface or in the vacuum of space. This system uses Stirling convertors, which have moving parts to mechanically convert heat to electricity. This power conversion system, if successfully deployed, will reduce the weight of each RPS and the amount of Pu-238 needed per mission. A HISTORY OF MISSION SUCCESSES For over fifty years, the Department of Energy has enabled space exploration on 27 missions by providing safe reliable radioistope power systems and radioisotope heater units for NASA, Navy and Air Force.

376

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Inductively generated formal topologies Thierry Coquand y , Giovanni Sambin z ,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inductively generated formal topologies Thierry Coquand y , Giovanni Sambin z , Jan Smith y topology: inductive generation. In fact, many formal topologies can be presented in a predicative way by an inductive generation and thus their properties can be proved inductively. We show however that some natural

Coquand, Thierry

378

Generation gaps in engineering?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is much enthusiastic debate on the topic of generation gaps in the workplace today; what the generational differences are, how to address the apparent challenges, and if the generations themselves are even real. ...

Kim, David J. (David Jinwoo)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Definition: Natural gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Natural gas Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Natural gas A hydrocarbon gas obtained from underground sources, often in association with petroleum and coal deposits.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Natural gas is a naturally occurring hydrocarbon gas mixture consisting primarily of methane, but commonly includes varying amounts of other higher alkanes and even a lesser percentage of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and hydrogen sulfide. Natural gas is an energy source often used for heating, cooking, and electricity generation. It is also used as fuel for vehicles and as a chemical feedstock in the manufacture of plastics and other commercially important organic chemicals. Natural gas is found in

380

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis of Natural Gas Extraction & Delivery in the United Statesy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

delivery to large end-users? 6. How does natural gas power generation compare to coal-fired powerLife Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis of Natural Gas Extraction & Delivery in the United Statesy of natural gas in the United States? 3. Who uses natural gas in the U.S.? 4 Wh d t l f ?4. Where does natural

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Last Updated: 05.30.2013 Part I: California Uses for Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Last Updated: 05.30.2013 Part I: California Uses for Natural Gas Natural gas is the second most shares of natural gas consumed by end-use sectors and in-state electricity generation. Table 1: Natural and Energy Reports. * Does not include out-of-state natural gas used to produce electricity that is imported

382

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

383

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

384

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

385

Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

386

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

387

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

388

Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Engineered Solutions. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop 2 Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  Intro to Teledyne Energy Systems  H 2 Generator Basics & Major Subsystems  H 2 Generating & Storage System Overview  Electrolysis System Efficiency & Economics  Focus for Attaining DOE H 2 Production Cost Goals 3 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Hunt Valley, Maryland  State-of-the-art thermoelectric,

389

Technical review of Westinghouse`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program  

SciTech Connect

US DOE`s ATS program has the goals of increased efficiency of natural gas-fired power generation plants, decreased cost of electricity, and a decrease in harmful emissions. The Westinghouse ATS plant is based on an advanced gas turbine design combined with an advanced steam turbine and a high efficiency generator. Objectives of the ATS Program Phase 2 are to select the ATS cycle and to develop technologies required to achieve ATS Program goals: combustion, cooling, aerodynamics, leakage control, coatings, materials. This paper describes progress on each.

Diakunchak, I.S.; Bannister, R.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Harnessing Hydropower: The Earth's Natural Resource  

SciTech Connect

This document is a layman's overview of hydroelectric power. It includes information on: History of Hydropower; Nature’s Water Cycle; Hydropower Plants; Turbines and Generators; Transmission Systems; power dispatching centers; and Substations. It goes on to discuss The Power Grid, Hydropower in the 21st Century; Energy and the Environment; and how hydropower is useful for Meeting Peak Demands. It briefly addresses how Western Area Power Administration is Responding to Environmental Concerns.

none,

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 31, 2006) 24 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 31, 2006) Since Wednesday, August 16, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations with the exception of a few locations in the Northeast. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 17 cents to $7.19 per MMBtu. Yesterday (August 23), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery settled at $6.875 per MMBtu, increasing about 11 cents or about 2 percent since Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,857 Bcf as of August 18, which is 13.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 19 cents per barrel, or about 0.3 percent, on the week to $71.45 per barrel, or $12.32 per MMBtu. Prices: Despite the lower cooling load across much of the Lower 48 States and a diminished threat from Tropical Storm Debby, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations on the week. The increases, however, were moderate, as they were mostly limited to less than 15 cents per MMBtu. With the exception of the southern United States, power loads have been steadily diminishing in the past couple of weeks. Gas demand for electric power generation was much lower compared with the week ending August 5, when the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) reported record-high weekly electricity demand, leading to the 12 Bcf net withdrawal for the storage week ended August 4, 2006. On a regional basis, market locations in East Texas recorded the largest increases since Wednesday, August 16, averaging 18 cents per MMBtu, followed by Louisiana (16 cents per MMBtu). Most locations along the Gulf Coast recorded increases between 3 and 18 cents, while major consuming areas in the Midwest recorded an average increase of 14 cents per MMBtu. Despite the general increases this week, a few market locations in the Northeast recorded decreases since last Wednesday, the largest one of which was the 10-cent decrease at the Dracut, MA, trading point. Even with the overall increases in recent weeks, as of August 23, 2006, spot prices at market locations in the Lower 48 States are 17 to 30 percent lower than last year's levels.

392

Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© 2009 APS Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology Published online: 17 July 2009 | doi:10 perfect fluid. Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 025301 (2009). | Article |1. Nature Nanotechnology ISSN 1748 : Nature Nanotechnology http://www.nature.com/nnano/reshigh/2009/0709/full/nnano.2009.222.html 1 of 1 18

Müller, Markus

393

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Value of Renewable Energy as a Hedge Against Fuel Price Risk: Analytic Contributions from Economic and Finance Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation such as wind, solar, and geothermal power may provide economic benefits to ratepayers by displacing gas-firedpower prices as low-operating-cost renewable generation displaces high-operating-cost gas-fired

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

STEO December 2012 - natural gas production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2012 natural gas production seen at record 69 billion cubic feet per 2012 natural gas production seen at record 69 billion cubic feet per day U.S. natural gas production is expected to increase 4.5 percent this year to a record 69 billion cubic feet per day, according to the new monthly energy forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. A big portion of that natural gas is going to the U.S. electric power sector, which is generating more electricity from gas in place of coal. Consumption of natural gas for power generation this year is forecast to jump by more than 21 percent. The growth in gas production is expected to slow in 2013. And while gas use by the electric power sector is expected to decline by about 10 percent next year, it will remain high by historical standards. These trends reflect a structural shift toward using more natural gas for U.S. power generation.

396

ENERGY GENERATION RESEARCH PIER Energy Generation Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY GENERATION RESEARCH PIER Energy Generation Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ renewable/ November 2010 Sonoma County RESCO A Local Level Approach to Renewable Energy Portfolios. The Issue To address energy usage that contributes to climate change, California has enacted legislation to guide

397

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 5) 9, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 5) Spot and futures prices trended down for the second consecutive week, as cool, rainy weather continued to dominate much of the nation, with the few pockets of summer-like temperatures generating swing demand and higher prices only in limited areas. At the Henry Hub, prices declined by nearly 6 percent for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 22-29), falling 36 cents to $5.71 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for June delivery declined by $0.253 per MMBtu on the week, expiring yesterday (Wednesday, May 28) at the closing price of $5.945 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that natural gas inventories reached 1,085 Bcf as of Friday, May 23, which is 31.9 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil declined by just over $1 from the previous Wednesday (May 21), falling $1.05 per barrel to $28.46, or $4.91 per MMBtu.

398

Natural Gas Combined Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The “Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program ” is being conducted by B&W at Reliant Energy’s Niles plant in Niles, Ohio. The total estimated cost of $1,864,603 is co-funded by DOE contributing 37.5%, OCDO providing 33.3 % and B&W providing 17%. The remaining 12 % is in-kind contributions by Reliant Energy and tubing suppliers. Materials development is important to the power industry, and to the use of coal. Figure 1 compares the cost of electricity for subcritical and supercritical coal-fired plants with a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plant based on an 85 % capacity factor. This shows that at $1.20/MBtu for fuel, coal is competitive with NGCC when gas is at $3.40/MBtu or higher. An 85 % capacity factor is realistic for a coal-fired plant, but NGCC plants are currently only achieving about 60%. This gives coal an advantage if compared on the basis of cost per kW generated per year. When subcritical and supercritical plants are compared,

Dennis K. Mcdonald; Subcritical Coal Plant; Supercritical Coal Plant

399

Nature of eclipsing pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a model for pulsar radio eclipses in some binary systems, and test this model for PSRs B1957+20 and J2051-0827. We suggest that in these binaries the companion stars are degenerate dwarfs with strong surface magnetic fields. The magnetospheres of these stars are permanently infused by the relativistic particles of the pulsar wind. We argue that the radio waves emitted by the pulsar split into the eigenmodes of the electron-positron plasma as they enter the companion's magnetosphere and are then strongly damped due to cyclotron resonance with the ambient plasma particles. Our model explains in a natural way the anomalous duration and behavior of radio eclipses observed in such systems. In particular, it provides stable, continuous, and frequency-dependent eclipses, in agreement with the observations. We predict a significant variation of linear polarization both at eclipse ingress and egress. In this paper we also suggest several possible mechanisms of generation of the optical and $X$-ray emission ...

Khechinashvili, D; Gil, J; Khechinashvili, David; Melikidze, George; Gil, Janusz

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Nature of eclipsing pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a model for pulsar radio eclipses in some binary systems, and test this model for PSRs B1957+20 and J2051-0827. We suggest that in these binaries the companion stars are degenerate dwarfs with strong surface magnetic fields. The magnetospheres of these stars are permanently infused by the relativistic particles of the pulsar wind. We argue that the radio waves emitted by the pulsar split into the eigenmodes of the electron-positron plasma as they enter the companion's magnetosphere and are then strongly damped due to cyclotron resonance with the ambient plasma particles. Our model explains in a natural way the anomalous duration and behavior of radio eclipses observed in such systems. In particular, it provides stable, continuous, and frequency-dependent eclipses, in agreement with the observations. We predict a significant variation of linear polarization both at eclipse ingress and egress. In this paper we also suggest several possible mechanisms of generation of the optical and $X$-ray emission observed from these binary systems.

David Khechinashvili; George Melikidze; Janusz Gil

2000-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Dynamical generation of pseudoscalar resonances  

SciTech Connect

We study the interactions between the f{sub 0}(980) and a{sub 0}(980) scalar resonances and the lightest pseudoscalar mesons. We first obtain the elementary interaction amplitudes, or interacting kernels, without including any ad hoc free parameter. This is achieved by using previous results on the nature of the lightest scalar resonances as dynamically generated from the rescattering of S-wave two-meson pairs. Afterwards, the interaction kernels are unitarized and the final S-wave amplitudes result. We find that these interactions are very rich and generate a large amount of pseudoscalar resonances that could be associated with the K(1460), {pi}(1300), {pi}(1800), {eta}(1475), and X(1835). We also consider the exotic channels with isospin 3/2 and 1, the latter having positive G-parity. The former could also be resonant in agreement with a previous prediction.

Albaladejo, M.; Oller, J. A.; Roca, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Gamma ray generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

403

Generation to Generation: The Heart of Family Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ageism in the Workplace. Generations Spring, 5. Westman,of caring for multiple generations simultaneously. StronglyGeneration to Generation: The Heart of Family Medicine

Winter, Robin O

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 31, 2012 August 31, 2012 Department of Energy Advance Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects Descriptions for Energy Department Methane Hydrates Science and Technology Projects, August 31, 2012 August 23, 2012 Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study The nation's large resource base of natural gas can be used for cost-effective power generation, with environmental burdens coming primarily from fuel combustion, not resource extraction, according to a new Department of Energy study. August 15, 2012 Alex-andra "Ale" Hakala is an award-winning geoscientist at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory. | Photo from the National Energy Technology Laboratory. Energy Department Lab Researcher Wins HENAAC Award for Outstanding

405

Function-based, biologically inspired concept generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The natural world provides numerous cases for inspiration in engineering design. Biological organisms, phenomena, and strategies, which we refer to as biological systems, provide a rich set of analogies. These systems provide insight into sustainable ... Keywords: Biologically Inspired, Concept Generation, Engineering Design, Function-Based Design

Jacquelyn k. s. Nagel; Robert l. Nagel; Robert b. Stone; Daniel a. Mcadams

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 29) 2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 29) Since Wednesday, July 14, natural gas spot prices have increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub remained at $5.91 per MMBtu. Yesterday (July 21), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.931 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 5 cents or less than 1 percent since last Wednesday (July 14). Natural gas in storage was at 2,227 Bcf as of July 16, which is 2.6 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell 35 cents per barrel or less than 1 percent on the week to $40.63 per barrel or $7.005 per MMBtu. Prices: Strengthening weather fundamentals and increasing power generation loads since Monday, July 19, contributed to rebounding gas prices at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. The growing potential for a supply-side disturbance also contributed to rising prices on Wednesday, July 21, as the first tropical depression of the Atlantic hurricane season may be gathering south of Hispaniola. The largest gains in spot prices since last Wednesday, July 14, principally occurred west of the Rockies as increases in the California and Rocky Mountains regions averaged 21 and 19 cents per MMBtu, respectively. Prices in the Northeast gained 11 cents per MMBtu on average with prices at the Algonquin and New York City citygates climbing 19 and 17 cents per MMBtu, respectively. Gains elsewhere were less pronounced with prices in the Midcontinent, Midwest, and Texas regions increasing less than a dime on average. In contrast to the general pattern of rising prices in the Lower 48 States, prices in Florida fell on average 8 cents per MMBtu. Prices continue to exceed last year's levels by almost a dollar. As of July 21, 2004, prices at the Henry Hub are 90 cents or 17 percent above last year's level.

407

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

408

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"N3050MS3","N3010MS3","N3020MS3","N3035MS3","NA1570SMS3","N3045MS3" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

409

Nature/Culture/Seawater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This essay considers seawater as a substance and symbol in anthropological and social theory. Seawater has occupied an ambiguous place with respect to anthropological categories of nature and culture. Seawater as nature ...

Helmreich, Stefan

410

Natural Gas Monthly  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Natural gas annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3010CT3","N3020CT3","N3035CT3","N3045CT3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Connecticut (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to...

413

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Rotary Rig Count Rises to Highest Level since February 2009. The natural gas rotary rig count was 992 as of Friday, August 13, according to data released by Baker...

414

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Boston forum is open to the public. Additional information is available at http:www.energy.govnews3197.htm. Natural Gas Rig Count: The number of rigs drilling for natural...

415

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions from Executive Summary Emissions from Executive Summary Coal's share of electric power generation falls over the projection period figure data Although coal is expected to continue its important role in U.S. electricity generation, there are many uncertainties that could affect future outcomes. Chief among them are the relationship between coal and natural gas prices and the potential for policies aimed at reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In 2012, natural gas prices were low enough for a few months for power companies to run natural gas-fired generation plants more economically than coal plants in many areas. During those months, coal and natural gas were nearly tied in providing the largest share of total electricity generation, something that had never happened before. In the Reference case, existing coal plants recapture some of the

416

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity from Executive Summary Electricity from Executive Summary Coal's share of electric power generation falls over the projection period figure data Although coal is expected to continue its important role in U.S. electricity generation, there are many uncertainties that could affect future outcomes. Chief among them are the relationship between coal and natural gas prices and the potential for policies aimed at reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In 2012, natural gas prices were low enough for a few months for power companies to run natural gas-fired generation plants more economically than coal plants in many areas. During those months, coal and natural gas were nearly tied in providing the largest share of total electricity generation, something that had never happened before. In the Reference case, existing coal plants recapture some of the

417

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal from Executive Summary Coal from Executive Summary Coal's share of electric power generation falls over the projection period figure data Although coal is expected to continue its important role in U.S. electricity generation, there are many uncertainties that could affect future outcomes. Chief among them are the relationship between coal and natural gas prices and the potential for policies aimed at reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In 2012, natural gas prices were low enough for a few months for power companies to run natural gas-fired generation plants more economically than coal plants in many areas. During those months, coal and natural gas were nearly tied in providing the largest share of total electricity generation, something that had never happened before. In the Reference case, existing coal plants recapture some of the

418

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity from Executive Summary Electricity from Executive Summary Coal's share of electric power generation falls over the projection period figure data Although coal is expected to continue its important role in U.S. electricity generation, there are many uncertainties that could affect future outcomes. Chief among them are the relationship between coal and natural gas prices and the potential for policies aimed at reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In 2012, natural gas prices were low enough for a few months for power companies to run natural gas-fired generation plants more economically than coal plants in many areas. During those months, coal and natural gas were nearly tied in providing the largest share of total electricity generation, something that had never happened before. In the Reference case, existing coal plants recapture some of the

419

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions from Executive Summary Emissions from Executive Summary Coal's share of electric power generation falls over the projection period figure data Although coal is expected to continue its important role in U.S. electricity generation, there are many uncertainties that could affect future outcomes. Chief among them are the relationship between coal and natural gas prices and the potential for policies aimed at reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In 2012, natural gas prices were low enough for a few months for power companies to run natural gas-fired generation plants more economically than coal plants in many areas. During those months, coal and natural gas were nearly tied in providing the largest share of total electricity generation, something that had never happened before. In the Reference case, existing coal plants recapture some of the

420

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal from Executive Summary Coal from Executive Summary Coal's share of electric power generation falls over the projection period figure data Although coal is expected to continue its important role in U.S. electricity generation, there are many uncertainties that could affect future outcomes. Chief among them are the relationship between coal and natural gas prices and the potential for policies aimed at reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In 2012, natural gas prices were low enough for a few months for power companies to run natural gas-fired generation plants more economically than coal plants in many areas. During those months, coal and natural gas were nearly tied in providing the largest share of total electricity generation, something that had never happened before. In the Reference case, existing coal plants recapture some of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 1. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Fuel-Switchable Part of Total Producer Type Total Net Summer Capacity of All Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel Net Summer Capacity of Natural Gas-Fired Generators Reporting the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Fuel Switchable Capacity as Percent of Total Maximum Achievable Net Summer Capacity Using Petroleum Liquids Fuel Switchable Net Summer Capacity Reported to Have No Factors that Limit the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Electric Utilities 206,774 78,346 37.9 74,835 23,624 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 170,654 42,509 24.9 40,788 12,216

422

Contaminant-Generation Mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the last chapter, the areas where contaminants are generated were discussed. Knowing the location of contaminant generation is helpful in controlling that contamination, but understanding the mechanisms is ...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Using Backup Generators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Power outages are commonplace during disasters, and they may last for several days. You can reduce losses and speed the recovery process by installing an emergency generator. Portable generators...

424

X-Ray Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are many types of X-ray generators sold commercially. The following are some of ... that should be considered when selecting a particular generator for a particular purpose. All the companies listed below s...

Reuben Rudman

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Geothermal Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an overview of the renewed market interest in using geothermal for power generation including a concise look at what's driving interest in geothermal power generation, the current status of geothermal power generation, and plans for the future. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of geothermal power generation including its history, the current market environment, and its future prospects; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving renewed interest in geothermal power generation; an analysis of the challenges that are hindering the implementation of geothermal power generation projects; a description of geothermal power generation technologies; a review of the economic drivers of geothermal power generation project success; profiles of the major geothermal power producing countries; and, profiles of the major geothermal power project developers.

NONE

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

427

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

428

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

FR Cnc Nature Revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of FR Cnc reported a tricky nature. We carried out...

M. C. Gálvez; A. Golovin; M. Hernán-Obispo…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Natural Gas: More Gasbuggies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... first US experiment in the use of underground nuclear explosions to increase the recovery of natural ...naturalgas ...

1969-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

431

Geology of Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to an accepted plan have produced a most comprehensive geological account of the occurrence of natural ...naturalgas ...

E. F. A.

1936-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

432

Smart Grids Operation with Distributed Generation and Demand Side Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The integration of Distributed Generation (DG) based on renewable sources in the Smart Grids (SGs) is considered a challenging task because of the problems arising for the intermittent nature of the sources (e.g....

C. Cecati; C. Citro; A. Piccolo; P. Siano

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Near infrared frequency dependence of high-order sideband generation  

SciTech Connect

The near infrared frequency dependence of high order sideband generation in InGaAs quantum wells is discussed. The NIR frequency dependence of the sidebands indicates that the HSG phenomenon is excitonic in nature.

Zaks, Benjamin; Banks, Hunter; Sherwin, Mark [Physics Department and the Institute for Terahertz Science and Technology, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Liu, Ren-Bao [Physics Department and Centre of Optical Sciences, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

434

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...resources. However, the technology has not been demonstrated...nonrenewable natural gas), although various measures...energy. Outlook Nuclear technology is at a crossroads. The...International Forum, “A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

435

Natural Gas Reforming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas reforming is an advanced and mature production process that builds upon the existing natural gas pipeline delivery infrastructure. Today, 95% of the hydrogen produced in the United States is made by natural gas reforming in large central plants. This technology is an important pathway for near-term hydrogen production.

436

A Generative Dependency Grammar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a new kind of grammar: the Generative Dependency Grammar (GDG) based on dependency trees (DT) and a generative process. By generating a surface text using these GDG, the DT of the text is obtained too. GDG formalism is starting to be used ...

Stefan Diaconescu

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Forecast of Advanced Technology Adoption for Coal Fired Power Generation Towards the Year of 2050  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The considered systems of coal fired power generation are Supercritical Unit, Ultra Supercritical Unit, ... . In order to compare with the natural gas case, Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) is included. Evaluati...

Keiji Makino

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty Speaker(s): Afzal Siddiqui Date: July 24, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 This study examines a California-based microgrid's decision to invest in a distributed generation (DG) unit that operates on natural gas. While the long-term natural gas generation cost is stochastc, we initially assume that the microgrid may purchase electricity at a fixed retail rate from its utility. Using the real options approach, we find natural gas generation cost thresholds that trigger DG investment. Furthermore, the consideration of operational flexibility by the microgrid accelerates DG investment, while the option to disconnect entirely from the utility is not attractive. By allowing the electricity price to be stochastic, we next determine an

439

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

consumption in 2008, but according to EIA, natural gas could expand as a share of the energy mix in coming years due to efforts to diversify power generation. In the beginning...

440

Natural Gas Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of a power plant is to generate electric power. Therefore, the key performance metric of an electric power generator is the net thermal efficiency, which is the ratio of the electric power measured...

Raub W. Smith; Dr. S. Can Gülen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Demonstration of a Low-NOx Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Engine  

SciTech Connect

Results of a Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle engine research project: A Caterpillar C-12 natural gas engine with Clean Air Power Dual-Fuel technology and exhaust gas recirculation demonstrated low NOx and PM emissions.

Not Available

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

443

Supersymmetry generators of arbitrary spin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The infinitesimal generators of supersymmetry and translation form a solvable invariant subalgebra of the full graded Lie algebra. In O'Raifeartaigh's classification scheme this belongs to Case (iii). In general we may define the degree-n supersymmetry generators by requiring their nth derived algebra to be equal to translations. In this paper we study degree-1 supersymmetries for which [Si,Sj]=c(??C)ijP?, where a graded commutator is used. Supposing that Si belongs to some representation of the Lorentz group we study the conditions on ?? and C which result from Jacobi identities and Hermitian conjugation. For the three-dimensional case the conditions are satisfied if (?kC)ij is chosen to be a Clebsch-Gordan coefficient. This allows S to have any spin ? 0 and also gives the correct spin-statistics connection (grading). In the four-dimensional case we show how the problem is related to that of finding Lagrangian densities Lk=i?¯????? and Lm=?¯?, which are Hermitian scalars. There are an infinite number of possible representations to which Si can belong, including those of Bhabha type, for which the spin-statistics connection comes naturally from the representation. At the same time there can be supersymmetry generators of several different spins. The Volkov-Akulov nonlinear realization works in all cases and a supersymmetry-invariant Lagrangian can be constructed. Anticommutators seem to be important only in the sense that then we can have finite-dimensional linear realizations.

Jarmo Hietarinta

1976-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

445

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation 10.1073/pnas.1309334111...of unconventional natural gas, particularly shale gas...best-performing coal-fired generation under certain...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Variable-Speed Wind Generator System with Maximum Output Power Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To achieve maximum output power from wind generator systems, the rotational speed of wind generators should be adjusted in real time according to natural wind speed. This chapter pays attention to an optimum rota...

Yoko Amano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

World's First Tri-Generation Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Fueling Station...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to heat and electricity-in Fountain Valley. The system runs on natural gas and biogas generated by the Orange County Sanitation District's wastewater treatment facility....

448

Resource Contingency Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect

In 1990, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) embarked upon the Resource Contingency Program (RCP) to fulfill its statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. Instead of buying or building generating plants now, BPA has purchased options to acquire power later if needed. Three option development agreements were signed in September 1993 with three proposed natural gas-fired, combined cycle combustion turbine CT projects near Chehalis and Satsop Washington and near Hermiston, Oregon. This environmental impact statement addresses the environmental consequences of purchasing power from these options. This environmental impact statement addresses the environmental consequences of purchasing power from these options.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Axion Landscape and Natural Inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiple axions form a landscape in the presence of various shift symmetry breaking terms. Eternal inflation populates the axion landscape, continuously creating new universes by bubble nucleation. Slow-roll inflation naturally takes place after the tunneling event, because a very flat direction with a super-Planckian decay constant arises due to the alignment mechanism. We study the vacuum structure as well as possible inflationary dynamics in the axion landscape scenario, and find that the inflaton dynamics is given by either natural or multi-natural inflation. In the limit of large decay constant, it is approximated by the quadratic chaotic inflation, which however is disfavored if there is a pressure toward shorter duration of inflation. If the spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio turn out to be different from the quadratic chaotic inflation, there might be observable traces of the bubble nucleation. Also, the existence of small modulations to the inflaton potential is a common feature in the axion landscape, which generates a sizable and almost constant running of the scalar spectral index over CMB scales.

Tetsutaro Higaki; Fuminobu Takahashi

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

450

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Interstate Pipelines Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural...

451

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Compressor Stations Illustration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline...

452

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

453

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

454

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

455

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

456

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

457

Steam Plant Replaces Outdated Coal-Fired System | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Steam Plant Replaces Outdated Coal-Fired System September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A new natural gas-fired steam plant will replace an older coal-fired steam plant shown here. The...

458

BFC Emergency Plan  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

at the BFC with only two of its four boilers. The West Powerhouse boilers are primarily natural gas- fired, with No. 2 fuel oil used under emergency, training, and testing...

459

NNSA NSC KCP Emergency Plan  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

water, compressed air, and reverse osmosis water to the entire campus. The boilers are natural gas fired with the capability of burning No. 2 diesel fuel as a backup in the...

460

CX-011121: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-011121: Categorical Exclusion Determination ThermoLift - The Natural Gas Fired Air Conditioner & Heat Pump CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08282013...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temporally-dependent renewable energy production profiles,renewable energy offsets natural gas-fired electricity production.renewable energy to be more labor-intensive than conventional forms of electricity production (

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

EIS-0349: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coast Products, LLC proposes to construct and operate a 720-megawatt, natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility on land adjacent to its BP Cherry Point Refinery....

463

Option valuation of flexible investments : the case of a coal gasifier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the use of contingent claim analysis to evaluate the option of retrofitting a coal gasifier on an existing gas-fired power plant in order to take advantage of changes in the relative prices of natural ...

Herbelot, Olivier

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Imagine Homes, San Antonio...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

every house they build. KEY ENERGY-EFFICIENCY MEASURES HVAC: * 92% AFUE natural gas-fired furnace; 15 SEER split-system AC unit * Sheet metal trunk and R-6 flex duct branches...

465

North Dakota: EERE-Funded Project Recycles Energy, Generates Electricity  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This SEP-funded project in Williston, North Dakota, places generators at oil production well sites to transform wellhead flare gas into high-quality, three-phase electricity,which is then sold to the local rural electric cooperatives. The modern, natural gas-fueled generators burn cleanly with “ultra-low” emissions ratings that exceed state and federal emissions standards.

466

Generating the Option of a Two-Stage Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...inhomogeneously distributed fission gas bubbles and oxides, and noble metal precipitates...conventional “island” (the turbine and generator). At the end of its...coproduct of nonrenewable natural gas), although various measures such as cooling...International Forum, “A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy...

Robin W. Grimes; William J. Nuttall

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

467

Costs of Generating Electrical Energy 1.0 Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

period for coal, petroleum, and natural gas are by factors of 1.72, 7.27, and 1 "Conversion" here does1 Costs of Generating Electrical Energy 1.0 Overview The costs of electrical energy generation can of electric energy out of the power plant. 2.0 Fuels Fuel costs dominate the operating costs necessary

McCalley, James D.

468

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond ... The column summarizes research articles from Nature that report on anthropogenic activities and natural phenomena that influence the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere. ...

Sabine Heinhorst; Gordon Cannon

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Public acceptance of natural gas infrastructure development in the UK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i Public acceptance of natural gas infrastructure development in the UK (2000-2011) Final case........................................................................................................5 2.2.1 Underground Natural Gas Storage ......................................................5 2 in the Technology Strategy Board's Knowledge Transfer Network (KTN) for Energy Generation and Supply

470

Natural and Cultural Resources 6 2009 Site environmental report6-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mapping An understanding of an environmental baseline is the foundation of natural resource management planning. BNL uses that there are no Laboratory-generated radionuclides in produce. The overriding goal of the Cultural Resource ManagementNatural and Cultural Resources 6 2009 Site environmental report6- DRAFT 6.1 Naturalresource

471

Wavelets, vision and the statistics of natural scenes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...vision and the statistics of natural scenes...probably obvious that probability of generating anything...features have the same probability of occurring in...another. When the statistics of an image set...there is a higher probability of Phil. Trans...vision and the statistics of natural scenes...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Steam generator support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances.

Moldenhauer, James E. (Simi Valley, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Steam generator support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source is disclosed. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances. 4 figs.

Moldenhauer, J.E.

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

474

generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generation generation Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 16, and contains only the reference case. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO generation renewable energy renewable energy generating capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generating Capacity and Generation- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

475

Evaluation of wave energy generation from buoy heave response based on linear generator concepts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous studies of linear generator power extraction from ocean waves have usually ignored the buoy heave dynamics and taken the linear generator movement to coincide with the wave motion. Here the actual buoy motion is first determined and then used to solve the coupled hydrodynamic and electromagnetic problem of electrical power generation for both regular and irregular waves. Several buoy sizes are modeled to exploit the buoys' natural frequency in an attempt to create a greater heave response for a given sea state. Power output ranging from 75 to 375?W is predicted for the dimensions chosen.

M. A. Stelzer; R. P. Joshi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

477

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 21, 2010) Natural gas prices rose across market locations in the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose 31 cents, or 7 percent, during the week, averaging $4.70 per million Btu (MMBtu) yesterday, July 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the August 2010 natural gas futures contract for delivery at the Henry Hub rose about 21 cents, or 5 percent, ending the report week at $4.513 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,891 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 16, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

478

NLO Partonic Event Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Merging the benefits of an NLO calculation with event generators is a topic of current interest. Among other things, it is advantageous to be able to generate unweighted events according to NLO matrix elements. I report on an algorithm which generates a sequence of unweighted momentum configurations, each configuration containing either n or n+1 four-vectors, such that for any infrared safe observable the average over these configurations coincides with the NLO calculation up to errors of a resolution variable.

Stefan Weinzierl

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

479

Generation adequacy: Who decides?  

SciTech Connect

As part of a project for the Edison Electric Institute, the authors examined the commercial and reliability aspects of investments in new generation. This article reviews historical data and projections on new generating capacity, discusses the pros and cons of alternative ways to maintain adequacy, and quantifies the effects of mandating minimum planning-reserve margins versus reliance on market prices to stimulate investments in new generation.

Hirst, E.; Hadley, S.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Annual Report Generator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This report analyzes the needs to build an annual report generator which has the properties of Modularity, Simplicity in use and Maintainability based on… (more)

Lin, Yingwei

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural gas-fired generators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Hydrogen Generator Appliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lAbOrAtOry NG Workshop summary report - appeNDIX J slide presentation: hydrogen Generator appliance Gus Block, Nuvera Fuel Cells...

482

Biomass: Biogas Generator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIOGAS GENERATOR Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, chemicalcarbon cycles, plants, energy resourcestransformations) Grade Level: Middle School (6-8) Small groups (3 to...

483

Isolated trigger pulse generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A trigger pulse generation system capable of delivering a multiplicity of isolated 100 kV trigger pulses with picosecond simultaneity. 2 figs.

Aaland, K.

1980-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

484

Generation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

scheduling, dispatching, and accounting for capacity and energy generated at the 22 hydroelectric projects in the agencys 11-state marketing area. Southeastern has Certified...

485

EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010...

486

SNE TRAFIC GENERATOR  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003027MLTPL00 Network Traffic Generator for Low-rate Small Network Equipment Software  http://eln.lbl.gov/sne_traffic_gen.html 

487

,"Colorado Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release Date:","1302015"...

488

,"California Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

489

,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1999" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

490

,"Georgia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1999" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

491

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

492

,"Oregon Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1979" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

493

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",1,"Annual",2013,"6302012" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

494

,"Washington Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

495

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

496

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

497

,"Alaska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",6,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301969" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

498

,"Maine Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2013,"6301982" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301981" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

499

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

500

,"Idaho Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301981" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...