National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for natural gas-fired electric

  1. Economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas-fired fuel cell. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The final report provides a summary of results of the Cost of Ownership Model and the circumstances under which a distributed fuel cell is economically viable. The analysis is based on a series of micro computer models estimate the capital and operations cost of a fuel cell central utility plant configuration. Using a survey of thermal and electrical demand profiles, the study defines a series of energy user classes. The energy user class demand requirements are entered into the central utility plant model to define the required size the fuel cell capacity and all supporting equipment. The central plant model includes provisions that enables the analyst to select optional plant features that are most appropriate to a fuel cell application, and that are cost effective. The model permits the choice of system features that would be suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. Other applications are also practical; however, such applications have a higher relative demand for thermal energy, a characteristic that is well-suited to a fuel cell application with its free source of hot water or steam. The analysis combines the capital and operation from the preceding models into a Cost of Ownership Model to compute the plant capital and operating costs as a function of capacity and principal features and compares these estimates to the estimated operating cost of the same central plant configuration without a fuel cell.

  2. Selection of natural Gas Fired Advanced Turbine Systems (GFATS) program - Task 3. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-06-01

    Research continued on natural gas-fired turbines.The objective of Task 3 was to perform initial trade studies and select one engine system (Gas-Fired Advanced Turbine System [GFATS]) that the contractor could demonstrate, at full scale, in the 1998 to 2000 time frame. This report describes the results of the selection process. This task, including Allison internal management reviews of the selected system, has been completed. Allison`s approach to ATS is to offer an engine family that is based on the newest T406 high technology engine. This selection was based on a number of parameters including return on investment (ROI), internal rate of return (IRR) market size and potential sales into that market. This base engine family continues a history at Allison of converting flight engine products to industrial use.

  3. Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2003-08-13

    Against the backdrop of increasingly volatile natural gas prices, renewable energy resources, which by their nature are immune to natural gas fuel price risk, provide a real economic benefit. Unlike many contracts for natural gas-fired generation, renewable generation is typically sold under fixed-price contracts. Assuming that electricity consumers value long-term price stability, a utility or other retail electricity supplier that is looking to expand its resource portfolio (or a policymaker interested in evaluating different resource options) should therefore compare the cost of fixed-price renewable generation to the hedged or guaranteed cost of new natural gas-fired generation, rather than to projected costs based on uncertain gas price forecasts. To do otherwise would be to compare apples to oranges: by their nature, renewable resources carry no natural gas fuel price risk, and if the market values that attribute, then the most appropriate comparison is to the hedged cost of natural gas-fired generation. Nonetheless, utilities and others often compare the costs of renewable to gas-fired generation using as their fuel price input long-term gas price forecasts that are inherently uncertain, rather than long-term natural gas forward prices that can actually be locked in. This practice raises the critical question of how these two price streams compare. If they are similar, then one might conclude that forecast-based modeling and planning exercises are in fact approximating an apples-to-apples comparison, and no further consideration is necessary. If, however, natural gas forward prices systematically differ from price forecasts, then the use of such forecasts in planning and modeling exercises will yield results that are biased in favor of either renewable (if forwards < forecasts) or natural gas-fired generation (if forwards > forecasts). In this report we compare the cost of hedging natural gas price risk through traditional gas-based hedging instruments (e.g., futures, swaps, and fixed-price physical supply contracts) to contemporaneous forecasts of spot natural gas prices, with the purpose of identifying any systematic differences between the two. Although our data set is quite limited, we find that over the past three years, forward gas prices for durations of 2-10 years have been considerably higher than most natural gas spot price forecasts, including the reference case forecasts developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This difference is striking, and implies that resource planning and modeling exercises based on these forecasts over the past three years have yielded results that are biased in favor of gas-fired generation (again, presuming that long-term stability is desirable). As discussed later, these findings have important ramifications for resource planners, energy modelers, and policy-makers.

  4. Solutions for VOC and HAPS control on natural gas fired internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcus, J.Z.; Sleigh, S.; Cotherman, R.

    1996-12-31

    Natural gas fired stationary internal combustion engines (IC engines) emit volatile organic compounds (VOC) and hazardous air pollutants (HAP) as part of their normal operations. VOC and HAP emissions are coming under increased scrutiny with the advent of such Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 regulations as Title I`s Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT), Title III`s Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) and Title V`s Operating Permit Program (Title V). In addition, many states are imposing more stringent emission limits on these sources. These emissions may also contribute to the reportable chemicals from the total facility under SARA Title III. Numerous facilities nationwide are interested in reducing these emissions in order to comply with current requirements, to opt out of requirements or to reduce reportable chemicals. This paper will examine the source of these emissions, and discuss combustion control technologies and system operating flexibility, end-of-pipe control technologies, and system tuning opportunities which have the potential to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from IC engines. Data will be presented on potential emission reduction efficiencies achievable using the various control options. 7 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Diagnostics and Control of Natural Gas-Fired furnaces via Flame Image Analysis using Machine Vision & Artificial Intelligence Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahla Keyvan

    2005-12-01

    A new approach for the detection of real-time properties of flames is used in this project to develop improved diagnostics and controls for natural gas fired furnaces. The system utilizes video images along with advanced image analysis and artificial intelligence techniques to provide virtual sensors in a stand-alone expert shell environment. One of the sensors is a flame sensor encompassing a flame detector and a flame analyzer to provide combustion status. The flame detector can identify any burner that has not fired in a multi-burner furnace. Another sensor is a 3-D temperature profiler. One important aspect of combustion control is product quality. The 3-D temperature profiler of this on-line system is intended to provide a tool for a better temperature control in a furnace to improve product quality. In summary, this on-line diagnostic and control system offers great potential for improving furnace thermal efficiency, lowering NOx and carbon monoxide emissions, and improving product quality. The system is applicable in natural gas-fired furnaces in the glass industry and reheating furnaces used in steel and forging industries.

  6. On use of CO{sub 2} chemiluminescence for combustion metrics in natural gas fired reciprocating engines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, S. B.; Bihari, B.; Biruduganti, M.; Sekar, R.; Zigan, J.

    2011-01-01

    Flame chemiluminescence is widely acknowledged to be an indicator of heat release rate in premixed turbulent flames that are representative of gas turbine combustion. Though heat release rate is an important metric for evaluating combustion strategies in reciprocating engine systems, its correlation with flame chemiluminescence is not well studied. To address this gap an experimental study was carried out in a single-cylinder natural gas fired reciprocating engine that could simulate turbocharged conditions with exhaust gas recirculation. Crank angle resolved spectra (266-795 nm) of flame luminosity were measured for various operational conditions by varying the ignition timing for MBT conditions and by holding the speed at 1800 rpm and Brake Mean effective Pressure (BMEP) at 12 bar. The effect of dilution on CO*{sub 2}chemiluminescence intensities was studied, by varying the global equivalence ratio (0.6-1.0) and by varying the exhaust gas recirculation rate. It was attempted to relate the measured chemiluminescence intensities to thermodynamic metrics of importance to engine research -- in-cylinder bulk gas temperature and heat release rate (HRR) calculated from measured cylinder pressure signals. The peak of the measured CO*{sub 2} chemiluminescence intensities coincided with peak pressures within {+-}2 CAD for all test conditions. For each combustion cycle, the peaks of heat release rate, spectral intensity and temperature occurred in that sequence, well separated temporally. The peak heat release rates preceded the peak chemiluminescent emissions by 3.8-9.5 CAD, whereas the peak temperatures trailed by 5.8-15.6 CAD. Such a temporal separation precludes correlations on a crank-angle resolved basis. However, the peak cycle heat release rates and to a lesser extent the peak cycle temperatures correlated well with the chemiluminescent emission from CO*{sub 2}. Such observations point towards the potential use of flame chemiluminescence to monitor peak bulk gas temperatures as well as peak heat release rates in natural gas fired reciprocating engines.

  7. Advanced Turbine Systems Program conceptual design and product development. Task 3.0, Selection of natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    This report presents results of Task 3 of the Westinghouse ATS Phase II program. Objective of Task 3 was to analyze and evaluate different cycles for the natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine Systems in order to select one that would achieve all ATS program goals. About 50 cycles (5 main types) were evaluated on basis of plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity, reliability-availability-maintainability (RAM), and program schedule requirements. The advanced combined cycle was selected for the ATS plant; it will incorporate an advanced gas turbine engine as well as improvements in the bottoming cycle and generator. Cost and RAM analyses were carried out on 6 selected cycle configurations and compared to the baseline plant. Issues critical to the Advanced Combined Cycle are discussed; achievement of plant efficiency and cost of electricity goals will require higher firing temperatures and minimized cooling of hot end components, necessitating new aloys/materials/coatings. Studies will be required in combustion, aerodynamic design, cooling design, leakage control, etc.

  8. Estimated size and performance of a natural gas fired duplex Stirling for domestic refrigeration applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berchowitz, D.M. ); Shonder, J. )

    1991-01-01

    Calibrated calculations are used to size an integrated Stirling cooler and engine (Duplex configuration). Fuel for the engine is natural gas and the working fluid is helium. The potential exists for long life and low noise. Performance is shown to be very competitive when compared to standard vapor compression systems. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Stirling engines for gas fired micro-cogen and cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, N.W.; Beale, W.T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the design and performance of free-piston Stirling engine-alternators particularly suited for use as natural gas fired micro-cogen and cooling devices. Stirling based cogen systems offer significant potential advantages over internal combustion engines in efficiency, to maintain higher efficiencies at lower power levels than than combustion engines significantly expands the potential for micro-cogen. System cost reduction and electric prices higher than the U.S. national average will have a far greater effect on commercial success than any further increase in Stirling engine efficiency. There exist niche markets where Stirling engine efficiency. There exist niche markets where Stirling based cogen systems are competitive. Machines of this design are being considered for production in the near future as gas-fired units for combined heat and power in sufficiently large quantities to assure competitive prices for the final unit.

  10. Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces A residential natural gas meter. A residential natural gas meter. Gas boilers and furnaces can be fueled by either natural gas or propane with simple modifications accounting for the different characteristics of the fuels. Propane is usually more expensive as a fuel, but is available throughout the United States. Natural gas supplies depend on having a natural gas distribution system in your area, and areas at the end of the pipeline

  11. Implications of Lower Natural Gas Prices for Electric Generators in the Southeast, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This supplement to the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) May 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) focuses on changes in the utilization of coal- and natural-gas-fired generation capacity in the electric utility sector as the differential between delivered fuel prices narrows.

  12. Natural gas will account for biggest share of U.S. electricity for first time in 2016

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural gas will account for biggest share of U.S. electricity for first time in 2016 For the first time on an annual basis, the amount of U.S. electricity generated by natural gas- fired power plants is expected to exceed coal-fired generation. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said 33% of U.S. electricity will come from natural gas this year while 32% will come from coal. The electric power sector's use of coal this year is expected to decline by 29

  13. Gas-Fired Reciprocating Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The reciprocating, or piston-driven, engine is a widespread and well-known technology. Also called internal combustion engines, reciprocating engines require fuel, air, compression, and a combustion source to function. Depending on the ignition source, they generally fall into two categories: (1) spark-ignited engines, typically fueled by gasoline or natural gas, and (2) compression-ignited engines, typically fueled by diesel oil fuel.

  14. Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, L.; Hedman, B.; Knowles, D.; Freedman, S. I.; Woods, R.; Schweizer, T.

    2003-11-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is directing substantial programs in the development and encouragement of new energy technologies. Among them are renewable energy and distributed energy resource technologies. As part of its ongoing effort to document the status and potential of these technologies, DOE EERE directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to lead an effort to develop and publish Distributed Energy Technology Characterizations (TCs) that would provide both the department and energy community with a consistent and objective set of cost and performance data in prospective electric-power generation applications in the United States. Toward that goal, DOE/EERE - joined by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) - published the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations in December 1997.As a follow-up, DOE EERE - joined by the Gas Research Institute - is now publishing this document, Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations.

  15. Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure - EAC 2011 Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure -...

  16. Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water Heater Approaches to Combination Water and Space Heating Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  17. Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water Heater Approaches to Combination Water and Space Heating Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  18. The NuGas{sup TM} Concept - Combining a Nuclear Power Plant with a Gas-Fired Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willson, Paul; Smith, Alistair

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear power plants produce low carbon emissions and stable, low cost electricity. Combined cycle gas-fired power plants are cheap and quick to build and have very flexible operation. If you could combine these two technologies, you could have an ideal base-load power plant. (authors)

  19. NIPSCO Prescriptive Electric and Natural Gas Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIPSCO’s Commercial and Industrial Prescriptive Natural Gas & Electric Program offers rebates to NIPSCO's large commercial, industrial, non-profit, governmental and institutional customers, who...

  20. Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2003-12-18

    For better or worse, natural gas has become the fuel of choice for new power plants being built across the United States. According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), natural gas combined-cycle and combustion turbine power plants accounted for 96% of the total generating capacity added in the US between 1999 and 2002--138 GW out of a total of 144 GW. Looking ahead, the EIA expects that gas-fired technology will account for 61% of the 355 GW new generating capacity projected to come on-line in the US up to 2025, increasing the nationwide market share of gas-fired generation from 18% in 2002 to 22% in 2025. While the data are specific to the US, natural gas-fired generation is making similar advances in other countries as well. Regardless of the explanation for (or interpretation of) the empirical findings, however, the basic implications remain the same: one should not blindly rely on gas price forecasts when comparing fixed-price renewable with variable-price gas-fired generation contracts. If there is a cost to hedging, gas price forecasts do not capture and account for it. Alternatively, if the forecasts are at risk of being biased or out of tune with the market, then one certainly would not want to use them as the basis for resource comparisons or investment decisions if a more certain source of data (forwards) existed. Accordingly, assuming that long-term price stability is valued, the most appropriate way to compare the levelized cost of these resources in both cases would be to use forward natural gas price data--i.e. prices that can be locked in to create price certainty--as opposed to uncertain natural gas price forecasts. This article suggests that had utilities and analysts in the US done so over the sample period from November 2000 to November 2003, they would have found gas-fired generation to be at least 0.3-0.6 cents/kWh more expensive (on a levelized cost basis) than otherwise thought. With some renewable resources, in particular wind power, now largely competitive with gas-fired generation in the US (including the impact of the federal production tax credit and current high gas prices), a margin of 0.3-0.6 cents/kWh may in some cases be enough to sway resource decisions in favor of renewables.

  1. Natural Gas Electric Power Price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground

  2. Hawaii Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    312015 Next Release Date: 01292016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Hawaii Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Electric Power Consumption of...

  3. How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo...

  4. West Virginia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul...

  5. Wisconsin Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Wisconsin Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug...

  6. Kentucky Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug...

  7. Minnesota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug...

  8. Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Infrastructure - EAC 2011 | Department of Energy Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure - EAC 2011 Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure - EAC 2011 Recommendations from the Electricity Advisory Committee on actions to be taken by the Department of Energy given the interdependence of the Nation's electric infrastructure and natural gas infrastructure. PDF icon EAC - Interdependence of Electricity System

  9. Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water Heater

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Approaches to Combination Water and Space Heating (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water Heater Approaches to Combination Water and Space Heating Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water Heater Approaches to Combination Water and Space Heating Homebuilders are exploring more cost effective combined space and water heating systems (combo systems) with

  10. Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water Heater

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Approaches to Combination Water and Space Heating (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water Heater Approaches to Combination Water and Space Heating Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water Heater Approaches to Combination Water and Space Heating Homebuilders are exploring more cost-effective combined space and water heating systems (combo systems) with

  11. Vermont Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Vermont Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep...

  12. Alaska Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep...

  13. Maine Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep...

  14. Iowa Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep...

  15. Florida Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep...

  16. Appendix C: ELECTRICITY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the slow recovery from the 2007-2009 recession, as well as increases in distributed generation (particularly rooftop solar, but also natural gas-fired) in some parts of the...

  17. Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    University. This included installing new furnace insulation, implementing an electrical demand system, installing energy efficient equipment on its natural gas furnace...

  18. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  19. ,"Hawaii Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Hawaii Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  20. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  1. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  2. ,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  3. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  4. ,"New York Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  5. ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  6. ,"New Jersey Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Jersey Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  7. ,"New York Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  8. ,"Indiana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  9. ,"South Carolina Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Carolina Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  10. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  11. ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  12. ,"Idaho Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  13. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  14. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  15. ,"Colorado Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  16. ,"Maryland Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  17. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  18. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  19. ,"Alaska Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  20. ,"New Jersey Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Jersey Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  1. ,"South Carolina Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Carolina Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  2. ,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  3. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  4. Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    natural gas meter. Gas boilers and furnaces can be fueled by either natural gas or propane with simple modifications accounting for the different characteristics of the fuels....

  5. Gas Fired Test System For Stirling Engines. (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gas Fired Test System For Stirling Engines. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Gas Fired Test System For Stirling Engines. Abstract not provided. Authors: Lloyd, Jimmy ; John Lawler Publication Date: 2007-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 1148030 Report Number(s): SAND2007-6644C 522685 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Energy Sustainability 2007 held June 27-30, 2007 in Long Beach, CA.; Related Information: Proposed for presentation at

  6. Gas-Fired Boilers and Furnaces | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A residential natural gas meter. A residential natural gas meter. What does this mean for me? Your gas boiler or furnace may be oversized, particularly if you've upgraded the...

  7. Infrastructure Needs: Natural Gas/Electricity Transmission,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    miles of transmission lines, 72,000 miles of distribution lines, and 6,300 miles of natural gas pipelines. Our over 8,600 employees are committed to our mission to deliver...

  8. ,"Texas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1012015 10:57:50 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

  9. Table 7.3 Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Electricity Natural Gas Steam Electricity from Sources Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Electricity from Local Other than Natural Gas from Local Other than Steam from Local Other than

  10. Table 7.7 Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Electricity Natural Gas Steam Electricity from Sources Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Electricity from Local Other than Natural Gas from Local Other than Steam from Local Other than NAICS Total

  11. District of Columbia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2004 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2005 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2006 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2007 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2008

  12. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development task 5 -- market study of the gas fired ATS. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), in partnership with the Department of Energy, will develop a family of advanced gas turbine-based power systems (ATS) for widespread commercialization within the domestic and international industrial marketplace, and to the rapidly changing electric power generation industry. The objective of the jointly-funded Program is to introduce an ATS with high efficiency, and markedly reduced emissions levels, in high numbers as rapidly as possible following introduction. This Topical Report is submitted in response to the requirements outlined in Task 5 of the Department of Energy METC Contract on Advanced Combustion Systems, Contract No, DE AC21-93MC30246 (Contract), for a Market Study of the Gas Fired Advanced Turbine System. It presents a market study for the ATS proposed by Solar, and will examine both the economic and siting constraints of the ATS compared with competing systems in the various candidate markets. Also contained within this report is an examination and analysis of Solar`s ATS and its ability to compete in future utility and industrial markets, as well as factors affecting the marketability of the ATS.

  13. Table 7.10 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam; Unit: Million U.S. Dollars. Electricity Components Natural Gas Electricity Electricity from Sources Natural Gas NAICS Electricity from Local Other than Natural Gas from Local Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Utility(b) Local Utility(c) Total Utility(b) Total United States 311 Food 5,328 4,635

  14. Development and Validation of a Gas-Fired Residential Heat Pump Water Heater - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Garrabrant; Roger Stout; Paul Glanville; Janice Fitzgerald; Chris Keinath

    2013-01-21

    For gas-fired residential water heating, the U.S. and Canada is predominantly supplied by minimum efficiency storage water heaters with Energy Factors (EF) in the range of 0.59 to 0.62. Higher efficiency and higher cost ($700 - $2,000) options serve about 15% of the market, but still have EFs below 1.0, ranging from 0.65 to 0.95. To develop a new class of water heating products that exceeds the traditional limit of thermal efficiency, the project team designed and demonstrated a packaged water heater driven by a gas-fired ammonia-water absorption heat pump. This gas-fired heat pump water heater can achieve EFs of 1.3 or higher, at a consumer cost of $2,000 or less. Led by Stone Mountain Technologies Inc. (SMTI), with support from A.O. Smith, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), and Georgia Tech, the cross-functional team completed research and development tasks including cycle modeling, breadboard evaluation of two cycles and two heat exchanger classes, heat pump/storage tank integration, compact solution pump development, combustion system specification, and evaluation of packaged prototype GHPWHs. The heat pump system extracts low grade heat from the ambient air and produces high grade heat suitable for heating water in a storage tank for domestic use. Product features that include conventional installation practices, standard footprint and reasonable economic payback, position the technology to gain significant market penetration, resulting in a large reduction of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from domestic hot water production.

  15. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-352 NaturEner...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-352 NaturEner Tie Line, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-352 NaturEner Tie Line, LLC Application...

  16. Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0.17 0.13 0.23 0.23 0.29 0.60 0.53 2000's 0.81 1.29 1.98 1.68 2.14 1.79 2.34 2.57 2.46 3.30 2010's 3.81 4.53 4.40 4.08 4.23 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016

  17. Louisiana Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feet) Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 14,443 11,997 14,142 21,746 20,692 21,707 32,832 38,346 25,901 19,391 10,270 11,549 2002 20,006 19,396 24,864 27,662 28,456 34,039 40,542 41,790 32,420 23,674 16,204 14,750 2003 19,955 15,360 14,860 18,716 20,153 22,791 26,663 28,685 20,590 18,689 15,461 14,484 2004 17,038 17,344 19,280

  18. Kansas Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feet) Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 754 698 1,011 922 1,178 1,864 7,234 5,034 1,476 1,137 1,096 863 2002 883 776 1,531 957 755 2,829 5,491 4,045 1,984 683 781 672 2003 801 700 976 716 791 1,107 2,804 3,758 738 533 775 789 2004 406 361 533 787 636 1,212 902 1,827 2,267 662 440 442 2005 707 621 682 865 1,011 1,814 2,632 2,083

  19. Missouri Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feet) Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 485 658 1,414 2,191 2,151 3,045 6,959 7,272 2,925 2,000 1,841 1,864 2002 1,904 1,622 2,117 2,584 1,530 3,437 6,710 5,248 3,221 543 576 418 2003 1,631 669 810 2,434 1,315 1,287 5,317 6,247 809 112 476 671 2004 1,676 1,666 936 1,570 3,470 2,644 3,916 2,985 3,072 1,133 592 914 2005 1,600 1,015

  20. Montana Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feet) Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 2 1 5 2 9 20 62 48 5 3 2 2 2002 2 1 1 1 12 35 29 20 10 1 1 4 2003 7 20 21 2 11 37 26 63 11 15 11 34 2004 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 2005 13 11 14 14 13 24 32 32 19 14 12 15 2006 7 8 12 8 11 68 114 101 59 68 44 44 2007 73 60 49 58 83 99 119 118 102 87 73 79 2008 65 38 26 43 46 48 27

  1. Maryland Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feet) Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 369 496 1,321 862 1,062 1,330 2,607 4,377 2,319 1,555 525 698 2002 573 490 607 1,253 843 1,972 4,207 6,572 2,957 1,098 769 932 2003 811 691 439 732 630 1,740 1,851 1,639 680 548 609 624 2004 691 523 490 770 1,891 1,669 1,400 1,334 1,184 579 718 796 2005 813 673 731 693 827 2,767 3,162 4,809

  2. Massachusetts Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Feet) Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 5,015 4,464 6,921 4,553 6,846 8,389 8,716 11,433 11,686 10,562 8,428 9,281 2002 10,482 6,633 9,702 6,925 10,459 10,846 13,254 14,505 13,386 11,693 9,628 11,339 2003 8,619 8,909 9,871 13,235 11,504 15,307 19,958 19,177 16,909 18,511 14,243 13,008 2004 11,387 10,037 13,270 17,193

  3. Electricity Shortage in California: Issues for Petroleum and Natural Gas Supply

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    This report addresses the potential impact of rotating electrical outages on petroleum product and natural gas supply in California.

  4. Table 7.10 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Million U.S. Dollars." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural

  5. Table 7.7 Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural

  6. Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report examines the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive increased electric power sector natural gas use.

  7. Colorado Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feet) Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 6,024 6,704 8,509 7,506 6,875 7,181 8,212 7,998 6,696 8,071 5,554 6,624 2002 5,071 4,419 7,141 6,739 5,962 7,198 8,964 7,515 6,242 7,059 5,672 6,190 2003 6,527 6,160 5,955 4,403 5,813 4,759 9,648 10,010 6,344 5,751 6,145 6,380 2004 6,382 5,235 4,767 5,363 6,967 6,707 9,675 7,902 6,481 7,046

  8. Connecticut Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Feet) Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 1,038 1,552 2,452 614 1,179 1,891 2,476 4,089 5,913 4,880 2,279 3,798 2002 4,423 3,978 4,703 3,922 5,828 5,560 7,982 8,302 7,282 4,687 4,165 4,227 2003 2,459 2,060 4,165 3,486 3,226 2,869 3,891 4,415 4,211 3,757 4,363 3,666 2004 2,696 3,977 3,888 4,214 5,821 5,783 6,418 6,918 6,399

  9. Massachusetts Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 2.91 2.62 3.09 3.32 3.51 3.41 3.43 3.44 3.72 3.86 4.23 5.03 2003 5.35 6.65 6.64 5.48 W 5.83 5.46 5.02 4.99 5.04 4.89 6.22 2004 10.06 6.26 6.02 6.05 6.51 6.66 6.44 6.04 5.39 6.39 6.69 7.46 2005 8.70 6.99 7.70 7.82 7.33 7.83 8.31 10.00 12.87

  10. Golden Valley Electric Association- Sustainable Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Golden Valley Electric Association's (GVEA) SNAP program encourages members to install renewable energy generators and connect them to the utility's electrical distribution system by offering an...

  11. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-352 NaturEner Tie

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Line, LLC | Department of Energy LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-352 NaturEner Tie Line, LLC Application from NaturEner Tie Line, LLC to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-352 NaturEner Tie Line, LLC More Documents & Publications EA-352 NaturEner Tie Line, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-352 NaturEner Tie Line, LLC: Federal Register Notice Volume 74, No. 98 - May 22, 2009

  12. Electricity Shortage in California: Issues for Petroleum and Natural Gas Supply

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Shortage in California: Issues for Petroleum and Natural Gas Supply 1. Summary 2. Electricity Reliability Issues in California 3. Petroleum Refineries 4. Constraints Outside the Refinery Gate 5. Petroleum Product Prices and Supply Disruptions 6. Natural Gas 7. End Notes 8. Contacts 1. Summary Industry electric reliability organizations, the California Energy Commission, and the California Independent System Operator, expect California to be subject to rotating electricity outages in

  13. Results from the OECD report on international projections of electricity generating costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paffenbarger, J.A.; Bertel, E.

    1998-07-01

    The International Energy Agency and Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD have periodically undertaken a joint study on electricity generating costs in OECD Member countries and selected non-Member countries. This paper presents key results from the 1998 update of this study. Experts from 19 countries drawn from electric utility companies and government provided data on capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, and fuel costs from which levelized electricity generating costs (US cents/kWh) for baseload power plants were estimated in each country using a common set of economic assumptions. Light water nuclear power plants, pulverized coal plants, and natural gas-fired combined cycle gas turbines were the principal options evaluated. five and 10% discount rates, 40-year operating lifetime, and 75% annual load factor were the base assumptions, with sensitivity analyses on operating lifetime and load factor. Fuel costs and fuel escalation were provided individually by country, with a sensitivity case to evaluate costs assuming no real fuel price escalation over plant lifetimes. Of the three principal fuel/technology options, none is predominantly the cheapest option for all economic assumptions. However, fossil-fueled options are generally estimated to be the least expensive option. The study confirms that gas-fired combined cycles have improved their economic performance in most countries in recent years and are strong competitors to nuclear and coal-fired plants. Eleven out of the 18 countries with two or more options show gas-fired plants to be the cheapest option at 10% discount rate. Coal remains a strong competitor to gas when lower discount rates are used. Nuclear is the least expensive at both 5 and 10% discount rate in only two countries. Generally, with gas prices above 5 US$/GJ, nuclear plants constructed at overnight capital costs below 1 650 $/kWe have the potential to be competitive only at lower discount rates.

  14. Table 7.3 Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 20

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " ","

  15. Table N11.4. Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 19

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 1998;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Million U.S. Dollars." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " ","

  16. Table N8.3. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " ","

  17. How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/epantha An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/epantha A digital electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nbehmans A digital electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of

  18. Major Fuels","Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)","Total of Major Fuels","Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings ...",4657,67338,81552,66424,10...

  19. Major Fuels","Electricity",,"Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspace (million square feet)","Sum of Major Fuels","Electricity",,"Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" ,,,,"Primary","Site" "All Buildings...

  20. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-352 NaturEner...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LLC More Documents & Publications EA-352 NaturEner Tie Line, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-352 NaturEner Tie Line, LLC Chevron U.S.A. Inc. - 14-119-LNG...

  1. Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals-Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond Hobbs

    2007-05-31

    The Advanced Hydrogasification Process (AHP)--conversion of coal to methane--is being developed through NETL with a DOE Grant and has successfully completed its first phase of development. The results so far are encouraging and have led to commitment by DOE/NETL to begin a second phase--bench scale reactor vessel testing, expanded engineering analysis and economic perspective review. During the next decade new means of generating electricity, and other forms of energy, will be introduced. The members of the AHP Team envision a need for expanded sources of natural gas or substitutes for natural gas, to fuel power generating plants. The initial work the team has completed on a process to use hydrogen to convert coal to methane (pipeline ready gas) shows promising potential. The Team has intentionally slanted its efforts toward the needs of US electric utilities, particularly on fuels that can be used near urban centers where the greatest need for new electric generation is found. The process, as it has evolved, would produce methane from coal by adding hydrogen. The process appears to be efficient using western coals for conversion to a highly sought after fuel with significantly reduced CO{sub 2} emissions. Utilities have a natural interest in the preservation of their industry, which will require a dramatic reduction in stack emissions and an increase in sustainable technologies. Utilities tend to rank long-term stable supplies of fuel higher than most industries and are willing to trade some ratio of cost for stability. The need for sustainability, stability and environmentally compatible production are key drivers in the formation and progression of the AHP development. In Phase II, the team will add a focus on water conservation to determine how the basic gasification process can be best integrated with all the plant components to minimize water consumption during SNG production. The process allows for several CO{sub 2} reduction options including consumption of the CO{sub 2} in the original process as converted to methane. The process could under another option avoid emissions following the conversion to SNG through an adjunct algae conversion process. The algae would then be converted to fuels or other products. An additional application of the algae process at the end use natural gas fired plant could further reduce emissions. The APS team fully recognizes the competition facing the process from natural gas and imported liquid natural gas. While we expect those resources to set the price for methane in the near-term, the team's work to date indicates that the AHP process can be commercially competitive, with the added benefit of assuring long-term energy supplies from North American resources. Conversion of coal to a more readily transportable fuel that can be employed near load centers with an overall reduction of greenhouses gases is edging closer to reality.

  2. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report examines the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive increased electric power sector natural gas use. To perform this analysis, the U.S. Department of Energy commissioned Deloitte MarketPoint to examine scenarios in its North American Integrated Model (NAIM), which simultaneously models the electric power and the natural gas sectors. This study concludes that, under scenarios in which natural gas demand from the electric power sector increases, the incremental increase in interstate natural gas pipeline expansion is modest, relative to historical capacity additions. Similarly, capital expenditures on new interstate pipelines in the scenarios considered here are projected to be significantly less than the capital expenditures associated with infrastructure expansion over the last 15 years.

  3. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Electric Power Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12292015 2:58:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Electric Power Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3045US3"...

  4. Executive Summary - Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2012, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) released a new report, 'Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity.' The study provides a new methodological approach to estimate natural gas related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, tracks trends in regulatory and voluntary industry practices, and explores various electricity futures. The Executive Summary provides key findings, insights, data, and figures from this major study.

  5. "Table A48. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural" " Gas by Type of Supplier, Census Region, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ,"-","-----------","-","-----------","-","------------","-----------","RSE" "

  6. "Table A49. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Dollars per Physical Units)" ," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ," (Million kWh)",," (Billion Btu)",," (1000 cu ft)"

  7. Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings | Department of Energy Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings This case study describes how Mid-South Metallurgical implemented several recommendations resulting from a plant-wide energy assessment from DOE's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at

  8. Table A23. Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type" " of Supplier, Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ,," (Million kWh)",," (Billion Btu)",," (Billion cu ft)" ,," -------------------------",," -------------------------",,"

  9. Table A27. Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type" " of Supplier, Census Region, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1991 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ," (Million (kWh)",," (Billion Btu)",," (Billion cu ft)" ," -----------------------",," -----------------------",,"

  10. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector U.S. Department of Energy Page i Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector U.S. Department of Energy Page iii Table of Contents Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................................... v 1. Introduction

  11. District of Columbia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2003 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2004 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2005 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2006 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2007 -- -- -- -- -- -- --

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn C. England; Stephanie Wien; Mingchih O. Chang

    2002-08-01

    This report provides results from the first year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operations. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation test results for a refinery gas-fired process heater and plans for cogeneration gas turbine tests and pilot-scale tests are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods to compare PM2.5 mass and chemical speciation. Test plans are presented for a gas turbine facility that will be tested in the fourth quarter of 2002. A preliminary approach for pilot-scale tests is presented that will help define design constraints for a new dilution sampler design that is smaller, lighter, and less costly to use.

  13. Derivatives and Risk Management in the Petroleum, Natural Gas, and Electricity Industries

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    In February 2002 the Secretary of Energy directed the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to prepare a report on the nature and use of derivative contracts in the petroleum, natural gas, and electricity industries. Derivatives are contracts ('financial instruments') that are used to manage risk, especially price risk.

  14. Don`t overlook natural gas cooling equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzel, J.

    1997-03-01

    If one thought the confusion surrounding chiller specification and operation ended with the availability of CFC-free refrigerant alternatives, think again. Plant engineers involved in the selection and installation of cooling equipment are facing yet another complicated task, this time thanks to deregulation of the electric utility industry. Still in its early stages, deregulation is a process that could take up to a decade. However, deregulation is also bringing about changing pricing structures. Electric power costs may not always be low for everyone. For plants paying $0.02/kwh for electricity, an electric-powered chiller is a must. But those paying $0.35 or $0.40/kwh, even for a few hours, cannot afford NOT to consider something besides an electric-motor-driven chiller. Among the most viable, yet often overlooked, options available is natural gas cooling. Gas cooling equipment gives industrial users the flexibility to choose either gas or electricity to drive their cooling systems. Natural gas cooling is defined here as the use of absorption cooling systems and engine-driven chillers, as alternatives to electric-driven equipment, to deliver chilled water in a conventional manner. Desiccant systems can also be gas fired and are used primarily for providing dry air for process control. Because of their specialized applications, desiccant cooling is not covered in this article.

  15. Carbon pricing, nuclear power and electricity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, R.; Keppler, J. H. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 12, boulevard des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2012-07-01

    In 2010, the NEA in conjunction with the International Energy Agency produced an analysis of the Projected Costs of Electricity for almost 200 power plants, covering nuclear, fossil fuel and renewable electricity generation. That analysis used lifetime costs to consider the merits of each technology. However, the lifetime cost analysis is less applicable in liberalised markets and does not look specifically at the viewpoint of the private investor. A follow-up NEA assessment of the competitiveness of nuclear energy against coal- and gas-fired generation under carbon pricing has considered just this question. The economic competition in electricity markets is today between nuclear energy and gas-fired power generation, with coal-fired power generation not being competitive as soon as even modest carbon pricing is introduced. Whether nuclear energy or natural gas comes out ahead in their competition depends on a number of assumptions, which, while all entirely reasonable, yield very different outcomes. The analysis in this study has been developed on the basis of daily data from European power markets over the last five-year period. Three different methodologies, a Profit Analysis looking at historic returns over the past five years, an Investment Analysis projecting the conditions of the past five years over the lifetime of plants and a Carbon Tax Analysis (differentiating the Investment Analysis for different carbon prices) look at the issue of competitiveness from different angles. They show that the competitiveness of nuclear energy depends on a number of variables which in different configurations determine whether electricity produced from nuclear power or from CCGTs generates higher profits for its investors. These are overnight costs, financing costs, gas prices, carbon prices, profit margins (or mark-ups), the amount of coal with carbon capture and electricity prices. This paper will present the outcomes of the analysis in the context of a liberalised electricity market, looking at the impact of the seven key variables and provide conclusions on the portfolio that a utility would be advised to maintain, given the need to limit risks but also to move to low carbon power generation. Such portfolio diversification would not only limit financial investor risk, but also a number of non-financial risks (climate change, security of supply, accidents). (authors)

  16. Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From 2002 to 2012, most states have reduced their reliance on coal for electricity generation. The figure below shows the percent change in electricity generated by coal and natural gas for each...

  17. Chapter 3 - Enabling Modernization of the Electric Power System |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy 3 - Enabling Modernization of the Electric Power System Chapter 3 - Enabling Modernization of the Electric Power System Chapter 3 - Enabling Modernization of the Electric Power System The electric power system is facing increasing stress due to fundamental changes in both supply and demand technologies. On the supply side, there is a shift from large synchronous generators to lighter-weight generators (e.g., gas-fired turbines) and variable resources (renewables). On the

  18. Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

    2012-11-01

    The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) designed this study to address four related key questions, which are a subset of the wider dialogue on natural gas: 1. What are the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas compared to conventional natural gas and other fuels used to generate electricity?; 2. What are the existing legal and regulatory frameworks governing unconventional gas development at federal, state, and local levels, and how are they changing in response to the rapid industry growth and public concerns?; 3. How are natural gas production companies changing their water-related practices?; and 4. How might demand for natural gas in the electric sector respond to a variety of policy and technology developments over the next 20 to 40 years?

  19. Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

    2012-12-01

    Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

  20. " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1.3. Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components"

  1. " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components"

  2. " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components"

  3. Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Fact #844: Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown

  4. "Table 7b. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO

  5. DOE Report to Congress„Energy Efficient Electric and Natural Gas Utilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AND REGIONAL POLICIES THAT PROMOTE ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS CARRIED OUT BY ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITIES A REPORT TO THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS PURSUANT TO SECTION 139 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 MARCH 2007 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Sec. 139. Energy Efficient Electric and Natural Gas Utilities Study. a) IN GENERAL.-Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary, in consultation with the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commis- sioners and the National

  6. Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Domestic natural gas production was largely stagnant from the mid-1970s until about 2005. However, beginning in the late 1990s, advances linking horizontal drilling techniques with hydraulic fracturing allowed drilling to proceed in shale and other formations at much lower cost. The result was a slow, steady increase in unconventional gas production. The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) designed this study to address four related key questions, which are a subset from the wider dialogue on natural gas; regarding the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas compared to conventional natural gas and other fuels used to generate electricity; existing legal and regulatory frameworks governing unconventional gas development at federal, state, and local levels, and changes in response to the rapid industry growth and public concerns; natural gas production companies changing their water-related practices; and demand for natural gas in the electric sector respond to a variety of policy and technology developments over the next 20 to 40 years.

  7. Delaware Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2003 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2004 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2005 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2006 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2007 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2008 W W W 11.01 W W W W W W W W 2009 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2010 W W W W W W

  8. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (BTU per Cubic Foot) Electric Power Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,025 1,027 1,028 1,028 1,027 1,027 1,025 2010's 1,022 1,021 1,022 1,025 1,029 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  9. Kentucky Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 W W W W W W W W W 4.91 4.91 5.24 2003 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2004 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2005 W W W 9.04 W W W W W W W W 2006 W 9.57 W W W W W 8.62 W W W W 2007 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2008 9.16 9.60 W W W W W W W W W W 2009 W W W 6.74 11.32 W W W

  10. Idaho Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2003 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2004 W W W -- W W W W W W W W 2005 W W W W W -- W W W W W W 2006 W W W -- W W W W W W W W 2007 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2008 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2009 W 4.87 W 3.77 W W W W W W W W 2010 W W W W W W

  11. Minnesota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2003 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2004 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2005 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2006 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2007 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2008 8.10 W W W W W W W W W W W 2009 W W W W 6.88 W W W 4.13 4.80 6.65 6.41 2010

  12. Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2003 W W W W W W W W W 4.73 W W 2004 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2005 W 5.46 W W W W W W W 10.83 8.54 12.69 2006 11.67 7.98 W W W W W W W W W W 2007 W 8.30 W W W W W W W W W 7.13 2008 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2009 W W W W W W W W W

  13. White House Council of Economic Advisers and Energy Department Release New Report on Resiliency of Electric Grid During Natural Disasters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The White House Council of Economic Advisers and the U.S. Department of Energy today released a new report that assesses how to best protect the nation’s electric grid from power outages that occur during natural disasters.

  14. -South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings After receiving an energy assessment from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at Tennessee Technological University, Mid-South Metallurgical implemented several resulting recommendations, which included installing new furnace insulation, implementing an electrical demand system, installing energy efficient equipment on its natural gas furnace

  15. Table 7a. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    a. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO $ Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 1992 2.44 2.48 2.57 2.66 2.70 2.79 2.84 2.92 3.04 3.16 3.25 3.36 3.51 3.60 3.77 3.91 3.97 4.08 AEO 1995 1993 2.39 2.48 2.42 2.45 2.45 2.53 2.59 2.78 2.91 3.10 3.24 3.38 3.47 3.53 3.61 3.68

  16. "Table 7a. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per million Btu in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ,"AEO $ Year",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",1992,2.44,2.48,2.57,2.66,2.7,2.79,2.84,2.92,3.04,3.16,3.25,3.36,3.51,3.6,3.77,3.91,3.97,4.08 "AEO

  17. Georgia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 3.16 2.97 3.50 3.86 4.07 3.68 3.40 3.48 3.84 4.47 4.10 5.07 2003 5.56 7.58 7.56 5.87 W 6.28 5.68 5.64 5.24 5.77 5.28 6.66 2004 6.66 5.83 W 6.27 7.03 7.25 6.78 6.10 5.53 6.44 7.46 7.77 2005 7.19 W 7.48 7.75 7.03 7.62 8.56 10.70 15.82 15.24 11.35 15.31

  18. Colorado Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 2.86 2.56 2.92 2.91 2.71 2.11 1.91 2.22 2.06 2.36 3.01 3.25 2003 3.30 3.80 5.12 3.46 W 5.13 4.64 4.56 4.49 4.52 3.97 5.08 2004 5.73 5.49 4.59 4.67 5.59 5.85 5.66 6.16 4.82 5.05 6.80 6.45 2005 W W 5.70 W W W 6.43 6.77 8.46 10.31 10.13 9.77 2006 8.93

  19. Florida Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 3.44 3.29 3.61 4.17 4.21 4.05 3.95 3.88 4.12 4.79 4.55 5.57 2003 5.25 6.33 6.59 5.77 W 6.71 6.16 5.88 5.83 5.67 5.55 5.90 2004 6.28 6.04 6.01 6.11 6.59 6.65 6.56 6.33 6.53 6.88 6.76 6.86 2005 7.28 7.29 7.39 7.77 7.28 7.41 8.14 9.01 12.20 11.69 9.80

  20. Connecticut Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 2.89 2.75 3.66 4.17 4.05 4.07 3.71 3.59 4.02 4.49 W W 2003 W W 9.01 6.12 W W W W W W 5.21 W 2004 W W W W 6.80 6.82 6.51 6.37 5.72 W W W 2005 W 7.08 7.91 7.77 6.95 7.66 8.17 9.89 W 13.87 10.21 13.64 2006 9.41 8.68 7.72 7.71 6.84 6.94 7.02 7.97 5.56

  1. Iowa Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 3.44 2.91 3.18 4.34 4.20 3.89 3.73 3.28 3.78 4.52 5.15 4.89 2003 5.79 6.22 6.25 5.97 W 6.79 6.18 5.80 6.24 4.40 5.77 6.30 2004 7.52 8.03 6.76 6.95 7.79 7.51 7.03 6.59 6.21 6.95 5.44 7.75 2005 7.42 10.29 7.31 7.67 8.12 7.80 8.16 9.14 10.75 4.53 12.65

  2. Louisiana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 W W W W W 3.61 3.49 3.34 W W W W 2003 5.86 7.31 7.89 5.81 W 6.47 5.74 5.45 5.29 5.20 4.92 W 2004 6.74 6.22 5.99 6.14 6.81 6.91 6.51 6.17 5.49 6.77 7.11 7.48 2005 6.74 6.70 7.20 7.78 7.15 7.46 7.96 9.15 13.07 W 12.25 13.64 2006 11.64 8.69 8.11 7.77

  3. Kansas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 2.26 2.27 2.94 3.45 3.39 3.24 3.04 2.97 3.09 3.38 4.17 4.22 2003 4.93 6.50 8.26 4.96 W 5.78 5.30 5.00 4.94 4.51 4.28 5.04 2004 5.84 5.54 5.00 5.54 5.91 6.15 5.88 5.49 4.73 5.39 6.68 6.49 2005 6.14 6.03 6.37 6.95 6.27 6.71 7.10 7.97 9.61 10.98 9.63

  4. Illinois Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 2.81 2.69 3.45 3.36 3.86 3.62 3.23 3.44 3.81 4.05 4.76 5.64 2003 5.72 6.71 7.56 6.68 W 6.48 5.82 5.65 6.24 4.99 5.04 5.92 2004 6.60 6.20 6.02 6.26 6.62 7.06 6.74 6.37 6.18 6.35 7.57 7.84 2005 6.88 6.88 7.47 7.45 7.26 7.54 8.36 9.16 11.79 12.99 11.13

  5. Indiana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 W W 3.18 3.53 3.82 3.38 3.23 3.22 3.46 W W W 2003 5.61 W W W W 7.74 8.08 5.79 W W W W 2004 W W W W 6.40 W 6.41 6.20 5.63 5.67 W W 2005 W 6.70 7.32 7.50 6.79 7.72 7.52 9.64 11.99 13.88 11.30 13.08 2006 9.29 8.93 7.37 7.04 6.64 6.99 7.21 8.65 7.67 6.47

  6. Mississippi Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 2.61 2.39 2.92 W W 3.53 3.33 3.32 3.71 4.25 W W 2003 6.02 W 6.44 5.69 W W 5.48 5.39 5.06 5.16 4.79 W 2004 6.48 5.74 5.67 W 6.71 6.11 6.14 5.77 5.21 6.74 6.38 7.20 2005 6.90 6.62 7.32 7.64 6.87 7.54 7.94 9.49 13.23 W 10.65 W 2006 9.46 8.57 7.68

  7. Montana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 W 4.69 4.82 W W W W W W 3.84 5.21 6.12 2003 5.60 6.12 5.71 W W W W W 6.41 W W 8.96 2004 W W W W W W W W 8.14 6.87 11.65 10.69 2005 9.68 W W 9.50 8.70 W W W W 11.90 12.94 W 2006 14.19 W W W 8.24 W W W 7.74 W W 9.70 2007 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2008 W W

  8. Maine Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 3.19 3.07 3.81 3.89 4.05 3.78 3.46 3.69 4.21 4.71 4.87 6.42 2003 7.81 8.43 7.30 5.96 W 6.05 5.50 5.45 5.46 5.39 5.12 6.54 2004 8.33 7.56 5.88 6.25 W W W W W 6.58 6.76 7.74 2005 9.24 7.35 W W W W W W 12.96 W W W 2006 W W W W W W W W W W W W 2007 W W W W

  9. Maryland Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 3.39 3.45 3.59 4.11 4.16 4.11 3.81 3.97 3.93 4.72 4.52 5.75 2003 5.77 7.47 6.88 5.45 W 5.98 5.74 5.41 W W W W 2004 W 5.13 W W 6.40 6.24 5.78 5.43 4.81 5.53 5.38 5.68 2005 5.84 7.22 7.91 8.32 7.23 8.31 8.50 9.82 14.33 14.85 12.48 14.62 2006 10.80 9.15

  10. Michigan Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 3.43 3.29 3.48 3.60 3.49 3.67 3.49 3.42 3.68 3.65 3.69 3.74 2003 3.97 3.56 W W W 4.02 4.24 4.43 3.55 3.35 W W 2004 4.28 W 4.11 4.09 4.57 4.71 4.75 4.62 4.73 W 4.25 W 2005 W 3.65 4.15 4.28 4.73 5.87 6.32 6.39 5.29 6.57 5.16 6.92 2006 6.17 5.75 5.86

  11. Restoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Heightened natural gas prices have emerged as a key energy-policy challenge for at least the early part of the 21st century. With the recent run-up in gas prices and the expected continuation of volatile and high prices in the near future, a growing number of voices are calling for increased diversification of energy supplies. Proponents of renewable energy technologies identify these clean energy sources as an important part of the solution. Increased deployment of renewable energy (RE) can hedge natural gas price risk in more than one way, but a recent report by Berkeley Lab evaluates one such benefit in detail: by displacing gas-fired electricity generation, RE reduces natural gas demand and thus puts downward pressure on gas prices. Many recent modeling studies of increased RE deployment have demonstrated that this ''secondary'' effect of lowering natural gas prices could be significant; as a result, this effect is increasingly cited as justification for policies promoting RE. The Berkeley Lab report summarizes recent modeling studies that have evaluated the impact of RE deployment on gas prices, reviews the reasonableness of the results of these studies in light of economic theory and other research, and develops a simple tool that can be used to evaluate the impact of RE on gas prices without relying on a complex national energy model.

  12. Easing the natural gas crisis: Reducing natural gas prices through increased deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matt

    2004-12-21

    Heightened natural gas prices have emerged as a key energy-policy challenge for at least the early part of the 21st century. With the recent run-up in gas prices and the expected continuation of volatile and high prices in the near future, a growing number of voices are calling for increased diversification of energy supplies. Proponents of renewable energy and energy efficiency identify these clean energy sources as an important part of the solution. Increased deployment of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) can hedge natural gas price risk in more than one way, but this paper touches on just one potential benefit: displacement of gas-fired electricity generation, which reduces natural gas demand and thus puts downward pressure on gas prices. Many recent modeling studies of increased RE and EE deployment have demonstrated that this ''secondary'' effect of lowering natural gas prices could be significant; as a result, this effect is increasingly cited as justification for policies promoting RE and EE. This paper summarizes recent studies that have evaluated the gas-price-reduction effect of RE and EE deployment, analyzes the results of these studies in light of economic theory and other research, reviews the reasonableness of the effect as portrayed in modeling studies, and develops a simple tool that can be used to evaluate the impact of RE and EE on gas prices without relying on a complex national energy model. Key findings are summarized.

  13. How and why Tampa Electric Company selected IGCC for its next generating capacity addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pless, D.E. )

    1992-01-01

    As the title indicates, the purpose of this paper is to relate how and why Tampa Electric Company decided to select the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) for their next capacity addition at Polk Power Station, Polk Unit No. 1. For a complete understanding of this process, it is necessary to review the history related to the initial formulation of the IGCC concept as it was proposed to the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Initiative Round Three. Further, it is important to understand the relationship between Tampa Electric Company and TECO Pay Services Corporation (TPS). TECO Energy, Inc. is an energy related holding company with headquarters in Tampa, Florida. Tampa Electric Company is the principal, wholly-owned subsidiary of TECO Energy, Inc. Tampa Electric Company is an investor-owned electric utility with about 3200 MW of generation capacity of which 97% is coal fired. Tampa Electric Company serves about 2,000 square miles and approximately 470,000 customers, in west central Florida, primarily in and around Hillsborough County and Tampa, Florida. Tampa Electric Company generating units consist of coal fired units ranging in size from a 110 MW coal fired cyclone unit installed in 1957 to a 450 MW pulverized coal unit with wet limestone flue gas desulfurization installed in 1985. In addition, Tampa Electric Company has six (6) No. 6 oil fired steam units totaling approximately 220 MW. Five (5) of these units, located at the Hookers Point Station, were installed in the late 1940's and early 1950's. Tampa Electric also has about 150 MW of No. 2 oil fired start-up and peaking combustion turbines. The company also owns a 1966 vintage 12 MW natural gas fired steam plant (Dinner Lake) and two nO. 6 oil fired diesel units with heat recovery equipment built in 1983 (Phillips Plant).

  14. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-352 NaturEner Tie Line, LLC: Federal Register Notice Volume 74, No. 98- May 22, 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Application from NaturEner Tie Line, LLC to export electric energy to Canada. Federal Register Notice Vol 74 No 98

  15. Table 7b. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    b. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 2.49 2.60 2.76 2.93 3.05 3.24 3.39 3.60 3.86 4.15 4.40 4.70 5.08 5.39 5.85 6.27 6.59 7.01 AEO 1995 2.44 2.61 2.61 2.70 2.78 2.95 3.11 3.44 3.72 4.10 4.43 4.78 5.07 5.33 5.64 5.95 6.23 AEO 1996 2.08 2.19 2.20 2.39 2.47 2.54 2.64 2.74 2.84 2.95 3.09

  16. Stratified charge and homogeneous charge flowfields in natural gas fueled rotary engines. Interim report on task 2. 1. 7 combustion/stratification studies'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J.

    1988-12-09

    Natural gas stratification and combustion in a rotary engine are studied with a three-dimensional model. The validated model could be employed as a useful tool in selection of optimum spark plug locations, number of spark plugs, spark timings, pocket geometry, and optimization studies of natural gas fired rotary engines.

  17. Major Fuels","Site Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel, 1999" ,"All Buildings",,"Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Primary Electricity (trillion Btu)" ,"Number of Buildings...

  18. ,,,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam" ,,,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" ,,"Electricity","from Local","Other

  19. Application of the Huang-Hilbert transform and natural time to the analysis of seismic electric signal activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papadopoulou, K. A.; Skordas, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Huang method is applied to Seismic Electric Signal (SES) activities in order to decompose them into their components, named Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs). We study which of these components contribute to the basic characteristics of the signal. The Hilbert transform is then applied to the IMFs in order to determine their instantaneous amplitudes. The results are compared with those obtained from the analysis in a new time domain termed natural time, after having subtracted the magnetotelluric background from the original signal. It is shown that these instantaneous amplitudes, when combined with the natural time analysis, can be used for the distinction of SES from artificial noises.

  20. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A

  1. Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews

    2007-09-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Hawaii Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2003 -- -- -- -- W -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2004 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2005 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2006 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2007 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2008 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2009 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2010 -- -- -- -- -- --

  3. Overview of the Safety Issues Associated with the Compressed Natural Gas Fuel System and Electric Drive System in a Heavy Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, S.C.

    2002-11-14

    This report evaluates the hazards that are unique to a compressed-natural-gas (CNG)-fueled heavy hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) design compared with a conventional heavy vehicle. The unique design features of the heavy HEV are the CNG fuel system for the internal-combustion engine (ICE) and the electric drive system. This report addresses safety issues with the CNG fuel system and the electric drive system. Vehicles on U. S. highways have been propelled by ICEs for several decades. Heavy-duty vehicles have typically been fueled by diesel fuel, and light-duty vehicles have been fueled by gasoline. The hazards and risks posed by ICE vehicles are well understood and have been generally accepted by the public. The economy, durability, and safety of ICE vehicles have established a standard for other types of vehicles. Heavy-duty (i.e., heavy) HEVs have recently been introduced to U. S. roadways, and the hazards posed by these heavy HEVs can be compared with the hazards posed by ICE vehicles. The benefits of heavy HEV technology are based on their potential for reduced fuel consumption and lower exhaust emissions, while the disadvantages are the higher acquisition cost and the expected higher maintenance costs (i.e., battery packs). The heavy HEV is more suited for an urban drive cycle with stop-and-go driving conditions than for steady expressway speeds. With increasing highway congestion and the resulting increased idle time, the fuel consumption advantage for heavy HEVs (compared with conventional heavy vehicles) is enhanced by the HEVs' ability to shut down. Any increase in fuel cost obviously improves the economics of a heavy HEV. The propulsion system for a heavy HEV is more complex than the propulsion system for a conventional heavy vehicle. The heavy HEV evaluated in this study has in effect two propulsion systems: an ICE fueled by CNG and an electric drive system with additional complexity and failure modes. This additional equipment will result in a less reliable vehicle with a lower availability than a conventional heavy vehicle. Experience with heavy HEVs to date supports this observation. The key safety concern for the electric drive system is the higher voltages and currents that are required in the electric drive system. Faults that could expose personnel to these electric hazards must be considered, addressed, and minimized. The key issue for the CNG-fueled ICE is containment of the high-pressure natural gas. Events that can result in a release of natural gas with the possibility of subsequent ignition are of concern. These safety issues are discussed. The heavy HEV has the potential to have a safety record that is comparable to that of the conventional vehicle, but adequate attention to detail will be required.

  4. EIS-0164: Pacific Gas Transmission/Pacific Gas and Electric and Altamont Natural Gas Pipeline Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has prepared the PGT/PG&E and Altamont Natural Gas Pipeline Projects Environmental Impact Statement to satisfy the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act. This project addresses the need to expand the capacity of the pipeline transmission system to better transfer Canadian natural gas to Southern California and the Pacific Northwest. The U.S. Department of Energy cooperated in the preparation of this statement because Section 19(c) of the Natural Gas Act applies to the Department’s action of authorizing import/export of natural gas, and adopted this statement by the spring of 1992. "

  5. Hydrogen-or-Fossil-Combustion Nuclear Combined-Cycle Systems for Base- and Peak-Load Electricity Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, Charles W; Conklin, Jim

    2007-09-01

    A combined-cycle power plant is described that uses (1) heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor to meet base-load electrical demands and (2) heat from the same high-temperature reactor and burning natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen to meet peak-load electrical demands. For base-load electricity production, fresh air is compressed; then flows through a heat exchanger, where it is heated to between 700 and 900 C by heat provided by a high-temperature nuclear reactor via an intermediate heat-transport loop; and finally exits through a high-temperature gas turbine to produce electricity. The hot exhaust from the Brayton-cycle gas turbine is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. To meet peak electricity demand, the air is first compressed and then heated with the heat from a high-temperature reactor. Natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen is then injected into the hot air in a combustion chamber, combusts, and heats the air to 1300 C-the operating conditions for a standard natural-gas-fired combined-cycle plant. The hot gas then flows through a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator before being sent to the exhaust stack. The higher temperatures increase the plant efficiency and power output. If hydrogen is used, it can be produced at night using energy from the nuclear reactor and stored until needed. With hydrogen serving as the auxiliary fuel for peak power production, the electricity output to the electric grid can vary from zero (i.e., when hydrogen is being produced) to the maximum peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant load. Because nuclear heat raises air temperatures above the auto-ignition temperatures of the various fuels and powers the air compressor, the power output can be varied rapidly (compared with the capabilities of fossil-fired turbines) to meet spinning reserve requirements and stabilize the electric grid. This combined cycle uses the unique characteristics of high-temperature reactors (T>700 C) to produce electricity for premium electric markets whose demands can not be met by other types of nuclear reactors. It may also make the use of nuclear reactors economically feasible in smaller electrical grids, such as those found in many developing countries. The ability to rapidly vary power output can be used to stabilize electric grid performance-a particularly important need in small electrical grids.

  6. Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable togas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2004-07-17

    Unlike natural gas-fired generation, renewable generation (e.g., from wind, solar, and geothermal power) is largely immune to fuel price risk. If ratepayers are rational and value long-term price stability, then--contrary to common practice--any comparison of the levelized cost of renewable to gas-fired generation should be based on a hedged gas price input, rather than an uncertain gas price forecast. This paper compares natural gas prices that can be locked in through futures, swaps, and physical supply contracts to contemporaneous long-term forecasts of spot gas prices. We find that from 2000-2003, forward gas prices for terms of 2-10 years have been considerably higher than most contemporaneous long-term gas price forecasts. This difference is striking, and implies that comparisons between renewable and gas-fired generation based on these forecasts over this period have arguably yielded results that are biased in favor of gas-fired generation.

  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    planning information that will assist in maintaining the operational integrity and reliability of pipeline service, as well as providing gas-fired power plant operators with...

  8. Deployment of CCS Technologies across the Load Curve for a Competitive Electricity Market as a Function of CO2 Emissions Permit Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.

    2011-04-18

    Consistent with other published studies, the modelling presented here reveals that baseload power plants are the first aspects of the electricity sector to decarbonize and are essentially decarbonized once CO2 permit prices exceed a certain threshold ($90/ton CO2 in this study). The decarbonization of baseload electricity is met by significant expansions of nuclear power and renewable energy generation technologies as well as the application of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies applied to both coal and natural gas fired power plants. Relatively little attention has been paid thus far to whether intermediate and peaking units would respond the same way to a climate policy given the very different operational and economic context that these kinds of electricity generation units operate under. In this paper, the authors discuss key aspects of the load segmentation methodology used to imbed a varying electricity demand within the GCAM (a state-of-the-art Integrated Assessment Model) energy and economic modelling framework and present key results on the role CCS technologies could play in decarbonizng subpeak and peak generation (encompassing only the top 10% of the load) and under what conditions. To do this, the authors have modelled two hypothetical climate policies that require 50% and 80% reductions in US emissions from business as usual by the middle of this century. Intermediate electricity generation is virtually decarbonized once carbon prices exceed approximately $150/tonCO2. When CO2 permit prices exceed $160/tonCO2, natural gas power plants with CCS have roughly the same marketshare as conventional gas plants in serving subpeak loads. The penetration of CCS into peak load (upper 6% here) is minimal under the scenarios modeled here suggesting that CO2 emissions from this aspect of the U.S. electricity sector would persist well into the future even with stringent CO2 emission control policies in place.

  9. Limited Electricity Generation Supply and Limited Natural Gas Supply Cases (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    Development of U.S. energy resources and the permitting and construction of large energy facilities have become increasingly difficult over the past 20 years, and they could become even more difficult in the future. Growing public concern about global warming and CO2 emissions also casts doubt on future consumption of fossil fuels -- particularly coal, which releases the largest amount of CO2 per unit of energy produced. Even without regulations to limit greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, the investment community may already be limiting the future use of some energy options. In addition, there is considerable uncertainty about the future availability of, and access to, both domestic and foreign natural gas resources.

  10. Comparison of AEO 2009 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2009-01-28

    On December 17, 2008, the reference-case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO 2009) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables can play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. Note that this memo pertains only to natural gas fuel price risk (i.e., the risk that natural gas prices might differ over the life of a gas-fired generation asset from what was expected when the decision to build the gas-fired unit was made). We do not take into consideration any of the other distinct attributes of gas-fired and renewable generation, such as dispatchability (or lack thereof), differences in capital costs and O&M expenses, or environmental externalities. A comprehensive comparison of different resource types--which is well beyond the scope of this memo--would need to account for differences in all such attributes, including fuel price risk. Furthermore, our analysis focuses solely on natural-gas-fired generation (as opposed to coal-fired or nuclear generation, for example), for several reasons: (1) price volatility has been more of a concern for natural gas than for other fuels used to generate power; (2) for environmental and other reasons, natural gas has, in recent years, been the fuel of choice among power plant developers; and (3) natural gas-fired generators often set the market clearing price in competitive wholesale power markets throughout the United States. That said, a more-complete analysis of how renewables mitigate fuel price risk would also need to consider coal, uranium, and other fuel prices. Finally, we caution readers about drawing inferences or conclusions based solely on this memo in isolation: to place the information contained herein within its proper context, we strongly encourage readers interested in this issue to read through our previous, more-detailed studies, available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf.

  11. Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-07

    On December 12, 2007, the reference-case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO 2008) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference-case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables can play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO reference-case gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. Note that this memo pertains only to natural gas fuel price risk (i.e., the risk that natural gas prices might differ over the life of a gas-fired generation asset from what was expected when the decision to build the gas-fired unit was made). We do not take into consideration any of the other distinct attributes of gas-fired and renewable generation, such as dispatchability (or lack thereof) or environmental externalities. A comprehensive comparison of different resource types--which is well beyond the scope of this memo--would need to account for differences in all such attributes, including fuel price risk. Furthermore, our analysis focuses solely on natural-gas-fired generation (as opposed to coal-fired generation, for example), for several reasons: (1) price volatility has been more of a concern for natural gas than for other fuels used to generate power; (2) for environmental and other reasons, natural gas has, in recent years, been the fuel of choice among power plant developers (though its appeal has diminished somewhat as prices have increased); and (3) natural gas-fired generators often set the market clearing price in competitive wholesale power markets throughout the United States. That said, a more-complete analysis of how renewables mitigate fuel price risk would also need to consider coal and other fuel prices. Finally, we caution readers about drawing inferences or conclusions based solely on this memo in isolation: to place the information contained herein within its proper context, we strongly encourage readers interested in this issue to read through our previous, more-detailed studies, available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf.

  12. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Update November 28, 2012 Map of Electric System Selected for Daily Peak Demand was replaced with the correct map showing Selected Wholesale Electricity and Natural Gas Locations....

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,652 34 Electric...

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 39,918 6 Electric...

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Texas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 109,584 1 Electric...

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Alaska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,384 48 Electric...

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 23,300 17 Electric...

  18. ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," ","

  19. ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," ","

  20. EIS-0343: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    COB Energy Facility, Proposes to Construct a 1,160-megawatt (MW) Natural Gas-Fired and Combined- Cycle Electric Generating Plant, Right- of-Way Permit across Federal Land under the Jurisdiction of BLM, Klamath Basin, Klamath County, OR

  1. Impacts of Increasing Natural Gas Fueled CHP from 20 to 35 Percent of Total Electricity Production in Texas, April 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Paper proposing that the Legislature adopt an aggressive goal to stimulate additional development of natural gas fueled combined heat and power (CHP) in industries and buildings across Texas

  2. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  3. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  4. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    . Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 . Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels |...

  6. Utilization of coal mine ventilation exhaust as combustion air in gas-fired turbines for electric and/or mechanical power generation. Semi-annual topical report, June 1995--August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    Methane emitted during underground coal mining operations is a hazard that is dealt with by diluting the methane with fresh air and exhausting the contaminated air to the atmosphere. Unfortunately this waste stream may contain more than 60% of the methane resource from the coal, and in the atmosphere the methane acts as a greenhouse gas with an effect about 24.5 times greater than CO{sub 2}. Though the waste stream is too dilute for normal recovery processes, it can be used as combustion air for a turbine-generator, thereby reducing the turbine fuel requirements while reducing emissions. Preliminary analysis indicates that such a system, built using standard equipment, is economically and environmentally attractive, and has potential for worldwide application.

  7. Environmental consequences of postulated plutonium releases from General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California, as a result of severe natural phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

    1980-11-01

    Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Maximum plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the earthquakes, and the 180-mph and 230-mph tornadoes are above the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The deposition values following the 135-mph tornado are below the EPA proposed guidelines.

  8. Automating Natural Disaster Impact Analysis: An Open Resource to Visually Estimate a Hurricane s Impact on the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Alan M; Freer, Eva B; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Fernandez, Steven J; Chinthavali, Supriya; Kodysh, Jeffrey B

    2013-01-01

    An ORNL team working on the Energy Awareness and Resiliency Standardized Services (EARSS) project developed a fully automated procedure to take wind speed and location estimates provided by hurricane forecasters and provide a geospatial estimate on the impact to the electric grid in terms of outage areas and projected duration of outages. Hurricane Sandy was one of the worst US storms ever, with reported injuries and deaths, millions of people without power for several days, and billions of dollars in economic impact. Hurricane advisories were released for Sandy from October 22 through 31, 2012. The fact that the geoprocessing was automated was significant there were 64 advisories for Sandy. Manual analysis typically takes about one hour for each advisory. During a storm event, advisories are released every two to three hours around the clock, and an analyst capable of performing the manual analysis has other tasks they would like to focus on. Initial predictions of a big impact and landfall usually occur three days in advance, so time is of the essence to prepare for utility repair. Automated processing developed at ORNL allowed this analysis to be completed and made publicly available within minutes of each new advisory being released.

  9. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    cheap price of natural gas reduced coals share of electricity production. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power...

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Georgia) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 38,210 7 Electric...

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,499 43 Electric...

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 58,781 3 Electric...

  13. Turkey opens electricity markets as demand grows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeigue, J.; Da Cunha, A.; Severino, D. [Global Business Reports (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Turkey's growing power market has attracted investors and project developers for over a decade, yet their plans have been dashed by unexpected political or financial crises or, worse, obstructed by a lengthy bureaucratic approval process. Now, with a more transparent retail electricity market, government regulators and investors are bullish on Turkey. Is Turkey ready to turn the power on? This report closely examine Turkey's plans to create a power infrastructure capable of providing the reliable electricity supplies necessary for sustained economic growth. It was compiled with on-the-ground research and extensive interview with key industrial and political figures. Today, hard coal and lignite account for 21% of Turkey's electricity generation and gas-fired plants account for 50%. The Alfin Elbistan-B lignite-fired plant has attracted criticism for its lack of desulfurization units and ash dam facilities that have tarnished the industry's image. A 1,100 MW hard-coal fired plant using supercritical technology is under construction. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Mississippi) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,561 28...

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,678 32...

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,809 49...

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity...

  18. Resilient Electric Infrastructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Weather-related and other natural disasters, which cause the bulk of power outages, ... As a consequence, our nation faces significant risk from prolonged electrical outages, which, ...

  19. Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiaolei; Rink, Nancy

    2011-04-30

    This report presents the results of the research and development conducted on an Advanced Hydrogasification Process (AHP) conceived and developed by Arizona Public Service Company (APS) under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract: DE-FC26-06NT42759 for Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) production from western coal. A double-wall (i.e., a hydrogasification contained within a pressure shell) down-flow hydrogasification reactor was designed, engineered, constructed, commissioned and operated by APS, Phoenix, AZ. The reactor is ASME-certified under Section VIII with a rating of 1150 pounds per square inch gage (psig) maximum allowable working pressure at 1950 degrees Fahrenheit ({degrees}F). The reaction zone had a 1.75 inch inner diameter and 13 feet length. The initial testing of a sub-bituminous coal demonstrated ~ 50% carbon conversion and ~10% methane yield in the product gas under 1625{degrees}F, 1000 psig pressure, with a 11 seconds (s) residence time, and 0.4 hydrogen-to-coal mass ratio. Liquid by-products mainly contained Benzene, Toluene, Xylene (BTX) and tar. Char collected from the bottom of the reactor had 9000-British thermal units per pound (Btu/lb) heating value. A three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic model simulation of the hydrodynamics around the reactor head was utilized to design the nozzles for injecting the hydrogen into the gasifier to optimize gas-solid mixing to achieve improved carbon conversion. The report also presents the evaluation of using algae for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) management and biofuel production. Nannochloropsis, Selenastrum and Scenedesmus were determined to be the best algae strains for the project purpose and were studied in an outdoor system which included a 6-meter (6M) radius cultivator with a total surface area of 113 square meters (m{sup 2}) and a total culture volume between 10,000 to 15,000 liters (L); a CO{sub 2} on-demand feeding system; an on-line data collection system for temperature, pH, Photosynthetically Activate Radiation (PAR) and dissolved oxygen (DO); and a ~2 gallons per minute (gpm) algae culture dewatering system. Among the three algae strains, Scenedesmus showed the most tolerance to temperature and irradiance conditions in Phoenix and the best self-settling characteristics. Experimental findings and operational strategies determined through these tests guided the operation of the algae cultivation system for the scale-up study. Effect of power plant flue gas, especially heavy metals, on algae growth and biomass adsorption were evaluated as well.

  20. Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric...

  1. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  2. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  3. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  4. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    planning information that will assist in maintaining the operational integrity and reliability of pipeline service, as well as providing gas-fired power plant operators with...

  5. Electric chiller handbook. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    Electric chillers have dominated the market for large commercial cooling systems due to their history of reliable, economical operation. The phaseout of CFCs and deregulation of the utility industry are two factors that significantly impact the chiller market. The CFC phaseout is resulting in the upgrading or replacement of thousands of electric chillers nationwide. In a deregulated environment, utilities are finding increasing need to provide services that can win and retain new customers. Utility representatives need current information on applying and selecting cost-effective chiller systems. The objective of this report was to develop a comprehensive handbook that helps utility technical and marketing staff, their customers, and design professionals evaluate and select the best options for chilled-water systems in commercial buildings. Investigators used a variety of industry data sources to develop market-share information for electric and gas chiller systems and to determine applications according to building age, type, and region. Discussions with chiller manufacturers provided information on product availability, performance, and ownership cost. Using EPRI`s COMTECH software, investigators performed comprehensive cost analyses for placement of large and small chillers in three representative cities. Case studies of actual installations support these analyses. Electric Chiller Handbook provides a single source of current information on all major issues associated with chiller selection and application. Key issues include chiller availability and markets, rated performance, future viability of various refrigerant options, the cost-effectiveness of alternative chillers, and chilled-water system optimization. The Handbook also describes available hardware, outlines the features and costs of gas-fired competitive systems, and provides methods and comparisons of life-cycle costing of various chiller system options. Analyses of chiller features and economics show that electric chillers are preferable to gas chillers in the large majority of applications, consistent with current market trends. Furthermore, today`s chillers offer a wide range of efficiencies and refrigerant options to serve cooling system needs for the 20-year lifetime of the chiller. Finally, new higher-efficiency models of electric chillers offer very attractive paybacks.

  6. System Study of Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL) Catalytic Combustion for Natural Gas and Coal-Derived Syngas Combustion Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahrokh Etemad; Lance Smith; Kevin Burns

    2004-12-01

    Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL{reg_sign}) technology has been successfully developed to provide improvement in Dry Low Emission gas turbine technology for coal derived syngas and natural gas delivering near zero NOx emissions, improved efficiency, extending component lifetime and the ability to have fuel flexibility. The present report shows substantial net cost saving using RCL{reg_sign} technology as compared to other technologies both for new and retrofit applications, thus eliminating the need for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) in combined or simple cycle for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and natural gas fired combustion turbines.

  7. Interim Data Changes in the Short-term Energy Outlook Data Systems Related to Electric Power Sector and Natural Gas Demand Data Revisions (Released in the STEO December 2002)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    Beginning with the December 2002 issue of the Energy Information Administration's Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), electricity generation and related fuel consumption totals will be presented on a basis that is consistent with the definitions and aggregates used in the 2001 edition of EIA's Annual Energy Review (AER). Particularly affected by these changes are the demand and balancing item totals for natural

  8. A dynamic process model of a natural gas combined cycle -- Model development with startup and shutdown simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liese, Eric; Zitney, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    Research in dynamic process simulation for integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC) with carbon capture has been ongoing at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), culminating in a full operator training simulator (OTS) and immersive training simulator (ITS) for use in both operator training and research. A derivative work of the IGCC dynamic simulator has been a modification of the combined cycle section to more closely represent a typical natural gas fired combined cycle (NGCC). This paper describes the NGCC dynamic process model and highlights some of the simulators current capabilities through a particular startup and shutdown scenario.

  9. Natural Gas Electric Power Price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 5.27 4.89 3.54 4.49 5.19 3.37 1997-2015 Alabama 4.85 W 3.09 4.14 4.74 3.06 1997-2015 Alaska W 5.04 4.32 4.73 5.06 5.40 1997-2015 Arizona 4.84 W 3.51 4.60 5.30 3.43 1997-2015 Arkansas 5.11 W 3.19 4.32 W W 1997-2015 California 4.99 4.71 3.68 4.53 5.23 3.39 1997-2015 Colorado 5.16 4.98 W 4.91

  10. Natural Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    undertaking research and development projects with a view to operating industrial plants that run on new energy. Coordinates: 40.5452, -3.643099 Show Map Loading map......

  11. Natural Gas Electric Power Price

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.93 5.27 4.89 3.54 4.49 5.19 1997-2014 Alabama 4.30 4.85 W 3.09 4.14 4.74 1997-2014 Alaska W W 5.04 4.32 4.73 5.06 1997-2014 Arizona 4.16 4.84 W 3.51 4.60 5.30 1997-2014 Arkansas...

  12. Natural Gas Electric Power Price

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    24 3.23 3.22 3.19 3.03 2.76 2002-2015 Alabama 3.17 3.25 3.13 3.07 2.78 W 2002-2015 Alaska 5.14 5.19 5.21 5.48 5.45 5.48 2002-2015 Arizona 3.47 3.54 3.42 W W W 2002-2015 Arkansas W...

  13. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Accounting Standards Board. The changes will allow FERC an understanding of the nature and extent to which hedging activities are used by electric utilities and gas...

  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    which summarizes the likely demand, supply, and prices for natural gas, heating oil, propane, and electricity during the upcoming winter (October 2004 - March 2005). According to...

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the technology that drove Enron's North American wholesale electricity and natural gas trading unit. That technology, together with reportedly over 600 former Enron...

  16. SCENARIOS FOR DEEP CARBON EMISSION REDUCTIONS FROM ELECTRICITY BY 2050 IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICA USING THE SWITCH ELECTRIC POWER SECTOR PLANNING MODEL California's Carbon Challenge Phase II Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, James; Mileva, Ana; Johnston, Josiah; Kammen, Daniel; Wei, Max; Greenblatt, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    This study used a state-of-the-art planning model called SWITCH for the electric power system to investigate the evolution of the power systems of California and western North America from present-day to 2050 in the context of deep decarbonization of the economy. Researchers concluded that drastic power system carbon emission reductions were feasible by 2050 under a wide range of possible futures. The average cost of power in 2050 would range between $149 to $232 per megawatt hour across scenarios, a 21 to 88 percent increase relative to a business-as-usual scenario, and a 38 to 115 percent increase relative to the present-day cost of power. The power system would need to undergo sweeping change to rapidly decarbonize. Between present-day and 2030 the evolution of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council power system was dominated by implementing aggressive energy efficiency measures, installing renewable energy and gas-fired generation facilities and retiring coal-fired generation. Deploying wind, solar and geothermal power in the 2040 timeframe reduced power system emissions by displacing gas-fired generation. This trend continued for wind and solar in the 2050 timeframe but was accompanied by large amounts of new storage and long-distance high-voltage transmission capacity. Electricity storage was used primarily to move solar energy from the daytime into the night to charge electric vehicles and meet demand from electrified heating. Transmission capacity over the California border increased by 40 - 220 percent by 2050, implying that transmission siting, permitting, and regional cooperation will become increasingly important. California remained a net electricity importer in all scenarios investigated. Wind and solar power were key elements in power system decarbonization in 2050 if no new nuclear capacity was built. The amount of installed gas capacity remained relatively constant between present-day and 2050, although carbon capture and sequestration was installed on some gas plants by 2050.

  17. "Characteristic(a)","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.5;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," "," ",," "," " "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and" "Characteristic(a)","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal

  18. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California (CAISO) due to very low natural gas prices. Hawaii's retail electricity revenue per kilowatthour fell the most of any state for the fifth month in a row, down 24%...

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,228 15...

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,246 46...

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 73,772 2...

  2. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Sector Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Sector This...

  3. (Electric and Gas) Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energize CT in coordination with participating utilities offers various rebates for energy efficient electric and natural gas equipment.  

  4. EIS-0415: Deer Creek Station Energy Facility Project, South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes WAPA's decision to approve the interconnection request made by Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin Electric) with the USDA Rural Utilities Service (RUS) proposing to provide financial assistance, for the Deer Creek Station Project, a proposed 300-megawatt (MW) natural gas-fired generation facility.

  5. "Economic","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.4;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," "," ",," "," " ,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and" "Economic","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal" "Characteristic(a)","(kWh)","(gallons)","(gallons)","(1000 cu

  6. Absorption Heat Pump Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Absorption heat pumps are essentially air-source heat pumps driven not by electricity, but by a heat source such as natural gas, propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Because natural gas is the most common heat source for absorption heat pumps, they are also referred to as gas-fired heat pumps.

  7. Review of Sector and Regional Trends in U.S. Electricity Markets. Focus on Natural Gas. Natural Gas and the Evolving U.S. Power Sector Monograph Series. Number 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, Jeffrey; Medlock, III, Kenneth B.; Boyd, William C.

    2015-10-15

    This study explores dynamics related to natural gas use at the national, sectoral, and regional levels, with an emphasis on the power sector. It relies on a data set from SNL Financial to analyze recent trends in the U.S. power sector at the regional level. The research aims to provide decision and policy makers with objective and credible information, data, and analysis that informs their discussions of a rapidly changing energy system landscape. This study also summarizes regional changes in natural gas demand within the power sector. The transition from coal to natural gas is occurring rapidly along the entire eastern portion of the country, but is relatively stagnant in the central and western regions. This uneven shift is occurring due to differences in fuel price costs, renewable energy targets, infrastructure constraints, historical approach to regulation, and other factors across states.

  8. Spark Spread

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Spark Spread Figure 1 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, based on SNL Energy. The spark spread is a common metric for estimating the profitability of natural gas-fired electric generators. The spark spread is the difference between the price received by a generator for electricity produced and the cost of the natural gas needed to produce that electricity. It is typically calculated using daily spot prices for natural gas and power at various regional trading points. The chart above

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    part of a 65 billion project to supply the United States with oil, natural gas, and electricity from Siberia. The tunnel, which would be the world's longest, would take 10 to 15...

  10. Demonstrating Electric Vehicles in Canada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Demonstrating Electric Vehicles in Canada Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Demonstrating Electric Vehicles in Canada AgencyCompany Organization: Natural...

  11. Electric System Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Regional Electric Power Cooperation The nation's electricity system is regional in nature, because of the operation of the interconnected grids and the markets defined by them. ...

  12. Resilient Electric Distribution Grid R&D Workshop - June 11,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for enhancing the resilience of electric distribution grids to natural disasters. ... PDF icon Electric Power Distribution System Resilience: Federal Government and National ...

  13. Requirements for Petitions to Construct Electric and Gas Facilities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    requirements for petitions to construct electric generation, electric transmission, and natural gas facilities pursuant to 30 V.S.A. 248. In addition, the rule clarifies...

  14. Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown Fact 844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while ...

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Alaska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,384 48 Electric utilities 2,205 39 IPP & CHP 179 50 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,496,822 49 Electric utilities 5,851,727 39 IPP & CHP 645,095 49 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 4,202 43 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 18,043 37 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,768 44 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Nitrogen oxide

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 73,772 2 Electric utilities 28,165 4 IPP & CHP 45,607 2 Net generation (megawatthours) 200,077,115 5 Electric utilities 78,407,643 14 IPP & CHP 121,669,472 4 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 2,109 48 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 96,842 5 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,323 13 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 49

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,246 46 Electric utilities 102 47 IPP & CHP 3,144 32 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,760,861 47 Electric utilities 25,986 47 IPP & CHP 7,734,875 34 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 2,241 47 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 2,585 48 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 4,722 43 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 40 Nitrogen oxide

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 9 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 9 51 Net generation (megawatthours) 65,852 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 65,852 51 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 0 51 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 148 51 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 49 50 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 51 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.5 3

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 58,781 3 Electric utilities 50,967 1 IPP & CHP 7,813 15 Net generation (megawatthours) 222,398,924 3 Electric utilities 202,527,297 1 IPP & CHP 19,871,627 18 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 117,797 12 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 88,345 6 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 108,431 3 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 34

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Georgia) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 38,210 7 Electric utilities 28,875 2 IPP & CHP 9,335 10 Net generation (megawatthours) 120,953,734 10 Electric utilities 107,082,884 4 IPP & CHP 13,870,850 26 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 123,735 10 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 55,462 20 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 56,812 15 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 20

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,228 15 Electric utilities 17,297 17 IPP & CHP 8,931 12 Net generation (megawatthours) 102,010,177 15 Electric utilities 56,226,016 17 IPP & CHP 45,784,161 8 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 122,578 11 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 82,286 9 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 58,274 12 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 16

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,499 43 Electric utilities 14 49 IPP & CHP 4,485 21 Net generation (megawatthours) 14,030,038 44 Electric utilities 597 49 IPP & CHP 14,029,441 25 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 13,365 38 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 9,607 44 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,675 45 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 23 Nitrogen oxide

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,678 32 Electric utilities 969 42 IPP & CHP 12,709 7 Net generation (megawatthours) 32,885,021 40 Electric utilities 611,320 44 IPP & CHP 32,273,700 12 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 12,339 40 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 15,150 41 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 14,735 38 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 38

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Mississippi) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,561 28 Electric utilities 12,842 20 IPP & CHP 2,719 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 52,810,264 29 Electric utilities 45,413,403 23 IPP & CHP 7,396,861 35 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 87,718 17 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 24,490 32 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 22,633 33 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 9

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,652 34 Electric utilities 7,915 29 IPP & CHP 2,737 34 Net generation (megawatthours) 36,443,874 35 Electric utilities 27,888,008 34 IPP & CHP 8,555,866 33 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 7,436 41 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 16,438 39 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 15,690 37 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 43 Nitrogen

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 39,918 6 Electric utilities 10,736 26 IPP & CHP 29,182 5 Net generation (megawatthours) 136,116,830 8 Electric utilities 33,860,490 31 IPP & CHP 102,256,340 5 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 30,947 29 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 44,824 24 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,456 26 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 41 Nitrogen

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 23,300 17 Electric utilities 16,951 18 IPP & CHP 6,349 17 Net generation (megawatthours) 73,673,680 22 Electric utilities 53,348,841 18 IPP & CHP 20,324,839 17 Emissions Sulfur dioxide 80,418 19 Nitrogen oxide 57,024 17 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 46,268 19 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 18 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 19

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,809 49 Electric utilities 8 50 IPP & CHP 1,802 38 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,246,807 50 Electric utilities 10,659 48 IPP & CHP 6,236,148 36 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 1,271 49 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 1,161 49 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,838 48 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 44 Nitrogen

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Texas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 109,584 1 Electric utilities 28,705 3 IPP & CHP 80,879 1 Net generation (megawatthours) 433,380,166 1 Electric utilities 96,131,888 6 IPP & CHP 337,248,278 1 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 383,728 1 Nitrogen Oxide short tons) 228,695 1 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 257,465 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 25 Nitrogen Oxide

  10. Absorption Heat Pumps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat & Cool » Heat Pump Systems » Absorption Heat Pumps Absorption Heat Pumps Absorption heat pumps are essentially air-source heat pumps driven not by electricity, but by a heat source such as natural gas, propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Because natural gas is the most common heat source for absorption heat pumps, they are also referred to as gas-fired heat pumps. There are also absorption (or gas-fired) coolers available that work on the same principle. Unlike

  11. 2012 National Electricity Forum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshop - December 8, 2011 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshop - December 8, 2011 Hilton St. Louis Airport, 10330 Natural Bridge Road, St. Louis, Missouri 63134 Hilton St. Louis Airport, 10330 Natural Bridge Road, St. Louis, Missouri 63134 Agenda Agenda 8:00 am - 9:00 am Registration 9:00 am - 9:20 am DOE Welcome and Presentation David Meyer, US Department of Energy,

  12. Fossil-fuel power plants and power generation: Economic analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic analyses and evaluations of utility and industrial fossil-fuel power generation. Coal-fired, oil-fired, and natural gas-fired electric power generating systems are discussed. Specific technologies, experiences, and locations are also considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  13. Fossil-fuel power plants and power generation: Economic analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic analyses and evaluations of utility and industrial fossil-fuel power generation. Coal-fired, oil-fired, and natural gas-fired electric power generating systems are discussed. Specific technologies, experiences, and locations are also considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  14. Fossil-fuel power plants and power generation: Economic analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic analyses and evaluations of utility and industrial fossil-fuel power generation. Coal-fired, oil-fired, and natural gas-fired electric power generating systems are discussed. Specific technologies, experiences, and locations are also considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Fossil-fuel power plants and power generation: Economic analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic analyses and evaluations of utility and industrial fossil-fuel power generation. Coal-fired, oil-fired, and natural gas-fired electric power generating systems are discussed. Specific technologies, experiences, and locations are also considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Fossil-fuel power plants and power generation: Economic analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic analyses and evaluations of utility and industrial fossil-fuel power generation. Coal-fired, oil-fired, and natural gas-fired electric power generating systems are discussed. Specific technologies, experiences, and locations are also considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Fossil-fuel power plants and power generation: Economic analysis. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic analyses and evaluations of utility and industrial fossil-fuel power generation. Coal-fired, oil-fired, and natural gas-fired electric power generating systems are discussed. Specific technologies, experiences, and locations are also considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  18. EIS-0343: COB Energy Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to support the COB Energy Facility, a subsidiary of Peoples Energy Resources Corporation (PERC), to construct a 1,160-megawatt (MW) natural gas-fired, combined-cycle electric generating plant in Klamath County, Oregon, near the city of Bonanza.

  19. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (BGE) offers Natural Gas Connection program to residential customers to switch from electric to natural gas for heat. The program waives connection charge (...

  20. Microsoft Word - STEO Supplement.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09 1 May 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: The Implications of Lower Natural Gas Prices for the Electric Generation Mix in the Southeast 1 Highlights * This supplement to the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) May 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) focuses on changes in the utilization of coal- and natural-gas-fired generation capacity in the electric utility sector as the differential between delivered fuel prices narrows. * Over the last year the price of natural gas

  1. The Natural gas Heat Pump and Air Conditioner

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Distinctive Characteristics: * Single natural gas-driven device * Minimal electricity ... HVAC * 30-50% reduction in energy used * Minimal electricity Grid Independent * No ...

  2. Tempe Transportation Division: LNG Turbine Hybrid Electric Buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-02-01

    Fact sheet describes the performance of liquefied natural gas (LNG) turbine hybrid electric buses used in Tempe's Transportation Division.

  3. Betting on the Future: The authors compare natural gas forecaststo futures buys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-20

    On December 12, 2005, the reference case projections from Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO 2006) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market. The goal is better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. Below is a discussion of our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past five years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past five years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this article we update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2006. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic. As was the case in the past five AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2005), we once again find that the AEO 2006 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEX-AEO 2006 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$2.3/MMBtu levelized over five years--that we have seen over the last six years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $2.3/MMBtu more than the AEO 2006 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years. Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years

  4. Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-07-23

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  5. Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-05-02

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  6. Development of a gas-fired absorption heat pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohuchi, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A new absorbent-refrigerant pair suitable for heat pump heating and air-cooled cooling has been developed. Water has been selected as the refrigerant, mainly from the viewpoint of high cycle efficiency and safety, while a 1:1 mixture of lithium bromide (LiBr) and zinc chloride (ZnCl/sub 2/) by weight has been chosen as the absorbent in view of its higher solubility and affinity for water. Based on thermodynamic analysis with experimental data on properties, the new absorbent solution will give a heating COP of 1.57 and a cooling COP of 1.00 as gross values of double-effect absorption cycles, including a boiler efficiency of 80%. As a result of an experimental investigation on corrosiveness and corrosion inhibitors, promising equipment materials and inhibitors have been discovered. Prototypical units of 3.5kw (1-ton) and 35kw (10-ton) have been installed and are undergoing demonstration testing in the laboratory.

  7. Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technologies Program Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION COMBINED SPACE AND WATER HEATING...

  8. Roles of electricity: Electric steelmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burwell, C.C.

    1986-07-01

    Electric steel production from scrap metal continues to grow both in total quantity and in market share. The economics of electric-steel production in general, and of electric minimills in particular, seem clearly established. The trend towards electric steelmaking provides significant economic and competitive advantages for producers and important overall economic, environmental, and energy advantages for the United States at large. Conversion to electric steelmaking offers up to a 4-to-1 advantage in terms of the overall energy used to produce a ton of steel, and s similar savings in energy cost for the producer. The amount of old scrap used to produce a ton of steel has doubled since 1967 because of the use of electric furnaces.

  9. Electric machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi (Niskayuna, NY); Reddy, Patel Bhageerath (Madison, WI)

    2012-07-17

    An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

  10. Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ,053,747 1,034,595 901,839 797,631 737,310 771,355 2001-2015 Alabama 39,373 37,742 33,356 31,534 31,034 33,249 2001-2015 Alaska 2,365 2,116 1,863 2,096 2,164 2,336 2001-2015 Arizona 33,842 38,244 31,091 24,561 17,672 17,515 2001-2015 Arkansas 12,805 12,523 8,552 4,130 5,434 6,754 2001-2015 California 86,319 91,733 89,295 84,917 59,484 63,111 2001-2015 Colorado 9,620 10,114 9,582 8,172 9,658 8,346 2001-2015 Connecticut 11,619 12,188 10,504 10,291 9,814 11,119 2001-2015 Delaware 5,710 5,119 4,903

  11. Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    053,747 1,034,595 901,839 797,631 737,310 771,355 2001-2015 Alabama 39,373 37,742 33,356 31,534 31,034 33,249 2001-2015 Alaska 2,365 2,116 1,863 2,096 2,164 2,336 2001-2015 Arizona 33,842 38,244 31,091 24,561 17,672 17,515 2001-2015 Arkansas 12,805 12,523 8,552 4,130 5,434 6,754 2001-2015 California 86,319 91,733 89,295 84,917 59,484 63,111 2001-2015 Colorado 9,620 10,114 9,582 8,172 9,658 8,346 2001-2015 Connecticut 11,619 12,188 10,504 10,291 9,814 11,119 2001-2015 Delaware 5,710 5,119 4,903

  12. Golden Valley Electric Association - Sustainable Natural Alternative...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the distance to the nearest GVEA facilities. SNAP producers are paid once a year around Earth Day. SNAP is not for members who want to install renewable energy sources as a...

  13. Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6,872,533 7,387,184 7,573,863 9,110,793 8,190,756 8,149,111 1997-2014 Alabama 227,015 281,722 342,841 401,306 333,897 345,102 1997-2014 Alaska 38,078 39,732 41,738 39,758 33,944...

  14. Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6,872,533 7,387,184 7,573,863 9,110,793 8,190,756 8,149,111 1997-2014 Alabama 227,015 281,722 342,841 401,306 333,897 345,102 1997-2014 Alaska 38,078 39,732 41,738 39,758 33,944...

  15. Electrical connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dilliner, Jennifer L.; Baker, Thomas M.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2006-11-21

    An electrical connector includes a female component having one or more receptacles, a first test receptacle, and a second test receptacle. The electrical connector also includes a male component having one or more terminals configured to engage the one or more receptacles, a first test pin configured to engage the first test receptacle, and a second test pin configured to engage the second test receptacle. The first test receptacle is electrically connected to the second test receptacle, and at least one of the first test pin and the second test pin is shorter in length than the one or more terminals.

  16. Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    December 20, 2012 Electricity Advisory Committee 2012 Membership Roster Richard Cowart Regulatory Assistance Project CHAIR Irwin Popowsky Pennsylvania Consumer Advocate (Ret.) VICE CHAIR William Ball Southern Company Linda Blair ITC Holdings Corporation Rick Bowen Alcoa Merwin Brown California Institute for Energy and Environment Ralph Cavanagh Natural Resources Defense Council Paul Centolella Analysis Group The Honorable Robert Curry New York State Public Service Commission Clark Gellings

  17. Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 5, 2012 Electricity Advisory Committee 2012 Membership Roster Richard Cowart Regulatory Assistance Project CHAIR Irwin Popowsky Pennsylvania Consumer Advocate VICE CHAIR William Ball Southern Company Guido Bartels IBM Rick Bowen Alcoa Merwin Brown California Institute for Energy and Environment Ralph Cavanagh Natural Resources Defense Council The Honorable Paul Centolella Public Utilities Commission of Ohio David Crane NRG Energy, Inc. The Honorable Robert Curry New York State Public

  18. Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    08 Membership Roster Linda Stuntz, Esquire Chair of the Electricity Advisory Committee Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. Paul J. Allen Constellation Energy Guido Bartels IBM Gerry Cauley SERC Reliability Corporation Ralph Cavanagh Natural Defense Resources Council Jose Delgado American Transmission Company The Honorable Jeanne Fox New Jersey Board of Public Utilities Joseph Garcia National Congress of American Indians Robert Gramlich American Wind Energy Association The Honorable Dian Grueneich

  19. Electric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foster, Jr., John S. (Pleasanton, CA); Wilson, James R. (Livermore, CA); McDonald, Jr., Charles A. (Danville, CA)

    1983-01-01

    1. In an electrical energy generator, the combination comprising a first elongated annular electrical current conductor having at least one bare surface extending longitudinally and facing radially inwards therein, a second elongated annular electrical current conductor disposed coaxially within said first conductor and having an outer bare surface area extending longitudinally and facing said bare surface of said first conductor, the contiguous coaxial areas of said first and second conductors defining an inductive element, means for applying an electrical current to at least one of said conductors for generating a magnetic field encompassing said inductive element, and explosive charge means disposed concentrically with respect to said conductors including at least the area of said inductive element, said explosive charge means including means disposed to initiate an explosive wave front in said explosive advancing longitudinally along said inductive element, said wave front being effective to progressively deform at least one of said conductors to bring said bare surfaces thereof into electrically conductive contact to progressively reduce the inductance of the inductive element defined by said conductors and transferring explosive energy to said magnetic field effective to generate an electrical potential between undeformed portions of said conductors ahead of said explosive wave front.

  20. Future of Natural Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Natural Gas Bill Eisele, CEM SC Electric & Gas Co Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral. Florida Agenda * Gas Facts * Supply vs. Capacity * Sources * Consumption * Pipeline system * Gas Interruptions - Operational Flow Orders * Pricing Federal Utility Partnership Working Group November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, FL Sources of Natural Gas * Mine * Import * Remove from storage Federal Utility Partnership Working Group November 5-6,

  1. Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) - Energy Information Administration...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy ... Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel ... Natural Gas Monthly Data for December 2015 | Release Date: ...

  2. Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric ...

  3. Electrically powered hand tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Kurt S.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2007-01-16

    An electrically powered hand tool is described and which includes a three phase electrical motor having a plurality of poles; an electrical motor drive electrically coupled with the three phase electrical motor; and a source of electrical power which is converted to greater than about 208 volts three-phase and which is electrically coupled with the electrical motor drive.

  4. Electrical Load Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassin, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Electricity consumer demand response and load control are playing an increasingly important role in the development of a smart grid. Smart grid load management technologies such as Grid FriendlyTM controls and real-time pricing are making their way into the conventional model of grid planning and operations. However, the behavior of load both affects, and is affected by load control strategies that are designed to support electric grid planning and operations. This chapter discussed the natural behavior of electric loads, how it interacts with various load control and demand response strategies, what the consequences are for new grid operation concepts and the computing issues these new technologies raise.

  5. Flashback Detection Sensor for Hydrogen Augmented Natural Gas Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, J.D.; Chorpening, B.T.; Sidwell, T.; Strakey, P.A.; Huckaby, E.D.; Benson, K.J.

    2007-05-01

    The use of hydrogen augmented fuel is being investigated by various researchers as a method to extend the lean operating limit, and potentially reduce thermal NOx formation in natural gas fired lean premixed (LPM) combustion systems. The resulting increase in flame speed during hydrogen augmentation, however, increases the propensity for flashback in LPM systems. Real-time in-situ monitoring of flashback is important for the development of control strategies for use of hydrogen augmented fuel in state-of-the-art combustion systems, and for the development of advanced hydrogen combustion systems. The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Woodward Industrial Controls are developing a combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS), which has already been demonstrated as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff. Since CCADS is a flame ionization sensor technique, the low ion concentration produced in pure hydrogen combustion raises concerns of whether CCADS can be used to monitor flashback in hydrogen augmented combustion. This paper discusses CCADS tests conducted at 0.2-0.6 MPa (2-6 atm), demonstrating flashback detection with fuel compositions up to 80% hydrogen (by volume) mixed with natural gas. NETLs Simulation Validation (SimVal) combustor offers full optical access to pressurized combustion during these tests. The CCADS data and high-speed video show the reaction zone moves upstream into the nozzle as the hydrogen fuel concentration increases, as is expected with the increased flame speed of the mixture. The CCADS data and video also demonstrate the opportunity for using CCADS to provide the necessary in-situ monitor to control flashback and lean blowoff in hydrogen augmented combustion applications.

  6. Thermoacoustic natural gas liquefier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.; Gardner, D.; Hayden, M.; Radebaugh, R.; Wollan, J.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop a natural-gas-powered natural-gas liquefier that has absolutely no moving parts and requires no electrical power. It should have high efficiency, remarkable reliability, and low cost. The thermoacoustic natural-gas liquefier (TANGL) is based on our recent invention of the first no-moving-parts cryogenic refrigerator. In short, our invention uses acoustic phenomena to produce refrigeration from heat, with no moving parts. The required apparatus comprises nothing more than heat exchangers and pipes, made of common materials, without exacting tolerances. Its initial experimental success in a small size lead us to propose a more ambitious application: large-energy liquefaction of natural gas, using combustion of natural gas as the energy source. TANGL was designed to be maintenance-free, inexpensive, portable, and environmentally benign.

  7. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics,...

  8. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Information and Staff The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S....

  9. Hydrogen Turbines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines The Turbines of Tomorrow Combustion (gas) turbines are key components of advanced systems designed for new electric power plants in the United States. With gas turbines, power plants will supply clean, increasingly fuel-efficient, and relatively low-cost energy. Typically, a natural gas-fired combustion turbine-generator operating in a "simple cycle" converts between 25 and 35 percent of the natural gas heating value to useable

  10. Electricity Capacity Expansion Modeling, Analysis, and Visualization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and includes more sectors than ReEDS. For example, it includes modeling of the natural gas and coal supply markets, and a model of electricity load. The ReEDS model...

  11. Electrical receptacle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leong, R.

    1993-06-22

    The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

  12. Electrical Safety

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 July 2013 Superseding DOE-HDBK-1092-2004 December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C.20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Handbook is

  13. Electrical Safety

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 July 2013 Superseding DOE-HDBK-1092-2004 December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C.20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Handbook is

  14. Guide to Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... which regulate or monitor retail sales of electricity and the nature of such regulation or monitoring. E) Statute or Public Law granting Federal agency with regulatory authority. ...

  15. DTE Energy (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Efficiency Program for Business offers prescriptive incentives for both electric and natural gas energy efficient improvements in areas of lighting, HVAC, processes, compressed air,...

  16. Electric Power Generation Systems | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Power Generation Systems Coal gasification-based power plants Coal combustion-based power plants Natural gas-fueled power plants Turbines Fuel cells Existing power plants...

  17. Texas - PUC Substantive Rule 25.174 - Electric Service Providers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    74 - Electric Service Providers-Renewable Energy Resources and Use of Natural Gas Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  18. List of Geothermal Electric Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coal with CCS Concentrating Solar Power Energy Storage Fuel Cells Geothermal Electric Natural Gas Nuclear Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy BiomassBiogas Hydroelectric...

  19. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the Senate Committee Energy and Natural Resources, May 5, 2011 Statement of Patricia Hoffman, ...

  20. NIPSCO Custom Commercial and Industrial Gas and Electric Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIPSCO’s Commercial and Industrial Custom Electric and Natural Gas Incentive Program offers financial incentives to qualifying large commercial, industrial, non-profit, governmental and...

  1. Electric System Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary Analysis

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Prepared for Western Interstate Energy Board Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation | Department of Energy System Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary Analysis Prepared for Western Interstate Energy Board Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation Electric System Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary Analysis Prepared for Western Interstate Energy Board Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation The nation's electricity system is regional in nature,

  2. Electricity - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural gas expected to surpass coal in mix of fuel used for U.S. power generation in 2016 natural gasgenerationcoal Total electricity sales fell in 2015 for 5th time in past 8 ...

  3. Direct participation of electrical loads in the California independent system operator markets during the Summer of 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Khavkin, Mark; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2001-04-01

    California's restructured electricity markets opened on 1 April 1998. The former investor-owned utilities were functionally divided into generation, transmission, and distribution activities, all of their gas-fired generating capacity was divested, and the retail market was opened to competition. To ensure that small customers shared in the expected benefit of lower prices, the enabling legislation mandated a 10% rate cut for all customers, which was implemented in a simplistic way that fossilized 1996 tariff structures. Rising fuel and environmental compliance costs, together with a reduced ability to import electricity, numerous plant outages, and exercise of market power by generators drove up wholesale electricity prices steeply in 2000, while retail tariffs remained unchanged. One of the distribution/supply companies entered bankruptcy in April 2001, and another was insolvent. During this period, two sets of interruptible load programs were in place, longstanding ones organized as special tariffs by the distribution/supply companies and hastily established ones run directly by the California Independent System Operator (CAISO). The distribution/supply company programs were effective at reducing load during the summer of 2000, but because of the high frequency of outages required by a system on the brink of failure, customer response declined and many left the tariff. The CAISO programs failed to attract enough participation to make a significant difference to the California supply demand imbalance. The poor performance of direct load participation in California's markets reinforces the argument for accurate pricing of electricity as a stimulus to energy efficiency investment and as a constraint on market volatility.

  4. Infinia Corporation formerly Stirling Technology Company | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CHP systems, residential gas-fired CHP systems and for parabolic dish solar thermal electricity generation systems (STEGS). Coordinates: 46.20804, -119.116984 Show Map...

  5. Slide 0

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Definitions 5 Market Transformation 6 Historical Shipment Data 7 Residential Gas-Fired Water Heaters 8 Residential Oil Water Heaters 11 Residential Electric Resistance Water...

  6. Energy Incentive Programs, Maine | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maine suspended its electricity savings rebates in ... Incentives are offered for gas-fired boilers, furnaces, unit ... These auctions take place annually for commitment periods ...

  7. EIS-0354: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Center, L.P., a Diamond Generating Corporation Company, a subsidiary of Mitsubishi Corporation proposes to construct and operate a 500 Megawatt (MW) gas-fired electric...

  8. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Energy Reliability, before the Senate Committee Energy and Natural Resources, May 5, 2011 | Department of Energy before the Senate Committee Energy and Natural Resources, May 5, 2011 Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the Senate Committee Energy and Natural Resources, May 5, 2011 Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the Committee Energy and Natural

  9. "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.4;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Any",,,,,,,,,"Shipments" "NAICS",,"Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and",,"of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural

  10. Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-12-19

    On December 12, 2005, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2006'' (AEO 2006) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past five years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past five years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2006. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past five AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2005), we once again find that the AEO 2006 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEX-AEO 2006 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$2.3/MMBtu levelized over five years--that we have seen over the last six years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $2.3/MMBtu more than the AEO 2006 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

  11. Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-12-06

    On December 5, 2006, the reference case projections from 'Annual Energy Outlook 2007' (AEO 2007) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have, in the past, compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past six years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past six years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable-price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are 'biased' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2007. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past six AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2006), we once again find that the AEO 2007 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. Specifically, the NYMEX-AEO 2007 premium is $0.73/MMBtu levelized over five years. In other words, on average, one would have had to pay $0.73/MMBtu more than the AEO 2007 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming five years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation (or other forms of generation whose costs are not tied to the price of natural gas). Fixed-price generation (like certain forms of renewable generation) obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of five years.

  12. Quantifying the value that energy efficiency and renewable energy provide as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Bachrach, Devra; Golove, William

    2002-05-15

    Advocates of energy efficiency and renewable energy have long argued that such technologies can mitigate fuel price risk within a resource portfolio. Such arguments--made with renewed vigor in the wake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during the winter of 2000/2001--have mostly been qualitative in nature, however, with few attempts to actually quantify the price stability benefit that these sources provide. In evaluating this benefit, it is important to recognize that alternative price hedging instruments are available--in particular, gas-based financial derivatives (futures and swaps) and physical, fixed-price gas contracts. Whether energy efficiency and renewable energy can provide price stability at lower cost than these alternative means is therefore a key question for resource acquisition planners. In this paper we evaluate the cost of hedging gas price risk through financial hedging instruments. To do this, we compare the price of a 10-year natural gas swap (i.e., what it costs to lock in prices over the next 10 years) to a 10-year natural gas price forecast (i.e., what the market is expecting spot natural gas prices to be over the next 10 years). We find that over the past two years natural gas users have had to pay a premium as high as $0.76/mmBtu (0.53/242/kWh at an aggressive 7,000 Btu/kWh heat rate) over expected spot prices to lock in natural gas prices for the next 10 years. This incremental cost to hedge gas price risk exposure is potentially large enough - particularly if incorporated by policymakers and regulators into decision-making practices - to tip the scales away from new investments in variable-price, natural gas-fired generation and in favor of fixed-price investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy.

  13. Integrating The Non-Electrical Worker Into The Electrical Safety Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, T. David; McAlhaney, John H.

    2012-08-17

    The intent of this paper is to demonstrate an electrical safety program that incorporates all workers into the program, not just the electrical workers. It is largely in response to a paper presented at the 2012 ESW by Lanny Floyd entitled "Facilitating Application of Electrical Safety Best Practices to "Other" Workers" which requested all attendees to review their electrical safety program to assure that non-electrical workers were protected as well as electrical workers. The referenced paper indicated that roughly 50% of electrical incidents involve workers whose primary function is not electrical in nature. It also encouraged all to "address electrical safety for all workers and not just workers whose job responsibilities involve working on or near energized electrical circuits." In this paper, a program which includes specific briefings to non-electrical workers as well as to workers who may need to perform their normal activities in proximity to energized electrical conductors is presented. The program uses a targeted approach to specific areas such as welding, excavating, rigging, chart reading, switching, cord and plug equipment and several other general areas to point out hazards that may exist and how to avoid them. NFPA 70E-2004 was incorporated into the program several years ago and with it the need to include the "other" workers became apparent. The site experience over the years supports the assertion that about half of the electrical incidents involve non-electrical workers and this prompted us to develop specific briefings to enhance the knowledge of the non-electrical worker regarding safe electrical practices. The promotion of "May is Electrical Safety Month" and the development of informative presentations which are delivered to the general site population as well as electrical workers have greatly improved the hazards awareness status of the general worker on site.

  14. Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Testimony of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee More Documents & Publications Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee U.S. Department of Energy Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Agenda, March 10, 2011 Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Director for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the Committee on Energy and Natural

  15. electricity supplied by Hickam's solar-powered electric grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    supplied by Hickam's solar-powered electric grid - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  16. Comparison of AEO 2005 natural gas price forecast to NYMEX futures prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2004-12-13

    On December 9, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO 2005)'' were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. As some of you may be aware, we at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk. As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past four years, forward natural gas contracts (e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past four years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation (presuming that long-term price stability is valued). In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2005. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or, more recently (and briefly), http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past four AEO releases (AEO 2001-AE0 2004), we once again find that the AEO 2005 reference case gas price forecast falls well below where NYMEX natural gas futures contracts were trading at the time the EIA finalized its gas price forecast. In fact, the NYMEXAEO 2005 reference case comparison yields by far the largest premium--$1.11/MMBtu levelized over six years--that we have seen over the last five years. In other words, on average, one would have to pay $1.11/MMBtu more than the AEO 2005 reference case natural gas price forecast in order to lock in natural gas prices over the coming six years and thereby replicate the price stability provided intrinsically by fixed-price renewable generation. Fixed-price renewables obviously need not bear this added cost, and moreover can provide price stability for terms well in excess of six years.

  17. Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 Sales data for various models of electric and hybrid electric vehicles from December 2010 through June 2013. File Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 (Excel) File Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 (CSV) Image icon Chart of Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle

  18. Absorption Cooling Basics | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Absorption coolers use heat rather than electricity as their energy source. Because natural gas is the most common heat source for absorption cooling, it is also referred to as gas-fired cooling. Other potential heat sources include propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Although mainly used in industrial or commercial settings, absorption coolers are commercially available for large residential homes. How Absorption Cooling Works An absorption cooling cycle relies on three

  19. Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, D.; Lantz, E.

    2013-03-01

    This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.

  20. Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.

  1. EIS-0201: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0201: Final Environmental Impact Statement Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project and Portland General Electric Company's Request for Transmission Service The Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project is a proposed natural gas-fired cogeneration power plant near Boardman, Oregon. The proposed power plant would be built on a g-hectare (22-acre) site in the Port of Morrow Industrial Park. The plant would have two combustion turbines that would generate 440

  2. Local Leaders: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Because natural gas is distributed through underground pipelines, delivery disruptions occur less often than electrical outages. Severe storms, flooding, and earthquakes can expose ...

  3. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Accounting Standards Board. The changes will allow FERC an understanding of the nature and extent to which hedging activities are used by electric utilities and gas...

  4. Oil & Natural Gas Technology Temporal Characterization of Hydrates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil & Natural Gas Technology Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor Mounds: Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ...

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    which summarizes the likely demand, supply, and prices for natural gas, heating oil, propane, and electricity during the upcoming winter (October 2004 - March 2005). According to...

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    to the technology that drove Enron's North American wholesale electricity and natural gas trading unit. That technology, together with reportedly over 600 former Enron...

  7. Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric...

  8. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells This study, completed by...

  9. Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management

  10. Electrical safety guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  11. DOE handbook electrical safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  12. STEO December 2012 - natural gas production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2012 natural gas production seen at record 69 billion cubic feet per day U.S. natural gas production is expected to increase 4.5 percent this year to a record 69 billion cubic feet per day, according to the new monthly energy forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. A big portion of that natural gas is going to the U.S. electric power sector, which is generating more electricity from gas in place of coal. Consumption of natural gas for power generation this year is forecast to

  13. Edison Electric Institute Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentationgiven at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meetingdiscusses the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and the current electricity landscape.

  14. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Electric Power Sector comprises electricity-only and combined heat and power (CHP) plants within the North American Industrial Classification System 22 category whose...

  15. DOE Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Advisory Committee March 2015 1 MEMORANDUM TO: Honorable Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of ...

  16. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See all Electricity Reports Electricity Monthly Update With Data for November 2014 | Release Date: Jan. 26, 2015 | Next Release Date: Feb. 24, 2015 Previous Issues Issue:...

  17. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general...

  18. Annual Power Electric

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, Actual Table 8.6.B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability ...

  19. Integrating Electricity Subsector

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrating Electricity Subsector Failure Scenarios into a Risk Assessment Methodology ... Executive, Cyber Security Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) For more information on ...

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Minnesota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,758 26 Electric...

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Vermont) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,255 50 Electric...

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,413 44 Electric...

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Montana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,329 41 Electric utilities...

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 24,828 16 Electric...

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,801 19 Electric...

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value Rank Primary Energy Source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 17,342 23 Electric...

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Michigan) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,128 11 Electric...

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Jersey) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 18,997 22 Electric...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 43,040 5 Electric...

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nebraska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,449 36 Electric utilities...

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,566 40 Electric...

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Maryland) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 12,339 33 Electric...

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (South Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 23,017 18 Electric...

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Tennessee) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,326 20 Electric...

  15. Electricity | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sources Electricity Electricity March 17, 2016 Dr. Imre Gyuk -- pictured speaking at a Green Mountain Power energy storage event -- was recently recognized for his game-changing ...

  16. Effect of Energy Efficiency Standards on Natural Gas Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnall, Michael; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

    2011-07-26

    A primary justification for the establishment of energy efficiency standards for home appliances is the existence of information deficiencies and externalities in the market for appliances. For example, when a long-term homeowner purchases a new gas-fired water heater, she will maximize the value of her purchase by comparing the life-cycle cost of ownership of available units, including both total installed cost - purchase price plus installation costs - and operating cost in the calculus. Choice of the appliance with the lowest life-cycle costs leads to the most economically efficient balance between capital cost and fuel cost. However, if the purchaser's expected period of ownership is shorter than the useful life of the appliance, or the purchaser does not pay for the fuel used by the appliance, as is often the case with rental property, fuel cost will be external to her costs, biasing her decision toward spending less on fuel efficiency and resulting in the purchase of an appliance with greater than optimal fuel usage. By imposing an efficiency standard on appliances, less efficient appliances are made unavailable, precluding less efficient purchases and reducing fuel usage. The reduction in fuel demanded by residential users affects the total demand for such fuels as natural gas, for example. Reduced demand implies that residential customers are willing to purchase less gas at each price level. That is, the demand curve, labeled D{sub 0} in Figure 1, shifts to the left to D{sub 1}. If there is no change in the supply function, the supply curve will intersect the demand curve at a lower price. Residential demand is only one component of the total demand for natural gas. It is possible that total demand will decline very little if demand in other sectors increases substantially in response to a decline in the price. If demand does decrease, modeling studies generally confirm the intuition that reductions in demand for natural gas will result in reductions in its price as seen at the wellhead (Wiser 2007). The magnitude of the effect on price relative to the demand reduction, and the mechanism through which it occurs, is less well established. This report attempts to quantify the potential effects of reduced demand for natural gas in the residential sector, in response to the implementation of an energy efficiency standard for water heaters.

  17. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judkins, R.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1999-06-15

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided. 5 figs.

  18. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided.

  19. New Electricity Advisory Committee Reports Delivered to the Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy | Department of Energy Electricity Advisory Committee Reports Delivered to the Department of Energy New Electricity Advisory Committee Reports Delivered to the Department of Energy November 1, 2011 - 9:50am Addthis The Electricity Advisory Committee approved three new reports at their meeting on October 20, 2011. These reports include recommendations on cyber security, storage, and the interdependence of electricity and natural gas. Recommendations on U. S. Grid Security The

  20. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Director for Electricity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources U.S. Senate, April 22, 2009. | Department of Energy Director for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources U.S. Senate, April 22, 2009. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Director for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources U.S. Senate, April 22, 2009. Statement of Patricia Hoffman,

  1. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Secretary for Electricity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, U.S. Senate, May 7, 2009. | Department of Energy before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, U.S. Senate, May 7, 2009. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, U.S. Senate, May 7, 2009. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy

  2. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Secretary for Electricity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivery and Energy Reliabilty before Subcommittees of the House Committee on Natural Resources, November 5, 2009 | Department of Energy Reliabilty before Subcommittees of the House Committee on Natural Resources, November 5, 2009 Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliabilty before Subcommittees of the House Committee on Natural Resources, November 5, 2009 Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Secretary for Electricity

  3. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Energy Reliability, Before the US Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, April 26, 2012 | Department of Energy Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, April 26, 2012 Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Before the US Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, April 26, 2012 Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the US Senate

  4. EA-1836: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to facilitiate installation and operations of a high-efficiency natural-gas-fired cogeneration facility - would result in no significant adverse impacts. Finding of No...

  5. Nuclear | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    High construction costs for nuclear plants, especially relative to natural-gas-fired plants, make other options for new nuclear capacity uneconomical even in the alternative...

  6. Ultraclean Low Swirl Combustion - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oilers, and HVAC systems. Parallel consumer applications include gas-fired home water heaters, heating systems, and clothes dryers. Natural gas is more efficient and less...

  7. U.S. Manufacturer Going Above and Beyond with Superior Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Furnace is a natural gas-fired rotary hearth furnace used to heat steel before forging. ... internationally-recognized energy management implementation and certification process. ...

  8. How regulators should use natural gas price forecasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, Ken

    2010-08-15

    Natural gas prices are critical to a range of regulatory decisions covering both electric and gas utilities. Natural gas prices are often a crucial variable in electric generation capacity planning and in the benefit-cost relationship for energy-efficiency programs. High natural gas prices can make coal generation the most economical new source, while low prices can make natural gas generation the most economical. (author)

  9. CASL - Westinghouse Electric Company

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Westinghouse Electric Company Cranberry Township, PA Westinghouse Electric Company provides fuel, services, technology, plant design and equipment for the commercial nuclear electric power industry. Westinghouse nuclear technology is helping to provide future generations with safe, clean and reliable electricity. Key Contributions Definition of CASL challenge problems Existing codes and expertise Data for validation Computatinoal fluid dynamics modeling and analysis Development of test stand for

  10. Lesson 2- Electricity Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It’s difficult to imagine life without convenient electricity. You just flip a switch or plug in an appliance, and it’s there. But how did it get there? Many steps go into providing the reliable electricity we take for granted. This lesson takes a closer look at electricity. It follows the path of electricity from the fuel source to the home, including the power plant and the electric power grid. It also covers the role of electric utilities in the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity.

  11. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  12. Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Scotto

    2010-05-30

    Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NO{sub x} emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of high-flammable content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions. The actual NO{sub x} reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammable content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NO{sub x} reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NO{sub x} emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

  13. Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark V. Scotto; Mark A. Perna

    2010-05-30

    Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NOx emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of highflammables content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NOx emissions. The actual NOx reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammables content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NOx reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NOx emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NOx emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

  14. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy

  15. Electricity Transmission, A Primer

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transmission A Primer National Council on Electricity Policy National Council on Electricity Policy i Electricity Transmission A Primer By Matthew H. Brown, National Conference of State Legislatures Richard P. Sedano, The Regulatory Assistance Project National Council on Electric Policy The National Council on Electricity Policy is a joint venture among the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and the National

  16. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric) - Residential Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AC: 30 Recycling RefrigeratorFreezer: 50 ACDehumidifier: 25 Summary The Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (BGE) offers rebates for residential customers to improve the...

  17. Natural gas monthly, October 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-05

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia. 16 figs., 33 tabs.

  18. Renewable Electricity: Insights for the Coming Decade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, C.; Pless, J.; Logan, J.; Zhou, E.; Arent, D. J.

    2015-02-01

    A sophisticated set of renewable electricity (RE) generation technologies is now commercially available. Globally, RE captured approximately half of all capacity additions since 2011. The cost of RE is already competitive with fossil fuels in some areas around the world, and prices are anticipated to continue to decline over the next decade. RE options, led by wind and solar, are part of a suite of technologies and business solutions that are transforming electricity sectors around the world. Renewable deployment is expected to continue due to: increasingly competitive economics; favorable environmental characteristics such as low water use, and minimal local air pollution and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; complementary risk profiles when paired with natural gas generators; strong support from stakeholders. Despite this positive outlook for renewables, the collapse in global oil prices since mid-2014 and continued growth in natural gas supply in the United States--due to the development of low-cost shale gas--raise questions about the potential impacts of fossil fuel prices on RE. Today, oil plays a very minor role in the electricity sectors of most countries, so direct impacts on RE are likely to be minimal (except where natural gas prices are indexed on oil). Natural gas and RE generating options appear to be more serious competitors than oil and renewables. Low gas prices raise the hurdle for RE to be cost competitive. Additionally, although RE emits far less GHG than natural gas, both natural gas and RE offer the benefits of reducing carbon relative to coal and oil (see Section 4.1 for more detail on the GHG intensity of electricity technologies). However, many investors and decision makers are becoming aware of the complementary benefits of pairing natural gas and renewables to minimize risk of unstable fuel prices and maintain the reliability of electricity to the grid.

  19. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deichelbohrer, Paul R [Richland, WA

    1986-01-01

    A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

  20. Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Cyber Security and Electricity Infrastructure PDF icon 5-7-09_Final_Testimony_(Hoffman).pdf More Documents & Publications Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, U.S. Senate, May 7, 2009. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, before the Senate Committee Energy and Natural Resources, May 5, 2011

  1. Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2006-05-01

    Report comparing the impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal.

  2. Infographic: The Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) FCEVs are available now in southern California and coming soon to a neighborhood near you. as fuel cells can be added to the stack to increase power Scales Up Easily Gasoline H₂ from natural gas H₂ from Wind even at highway speeds, since there are no mechanical gears or combustion Runs Quietly from the tailpipe Emits Only Water * natural gas * water (electrolysis) * biomass * waste products Uses Domestic Fuel Reduces Greenhouse Gas Emissions 50% 90%

  3. Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Subset of Table 8.4a; Billion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other ...

  4. Table 8.4a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric ...

  5. Electric Efficiency Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December 2009, the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission's (IURC) ordered utilities to establish demand-side management (DSM) electric savings goals leading to 2.0% reduction of electricity sa...

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  8. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-11-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  10. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End Use: August 2015 Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based...

  11. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by state Percent Change Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent...

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,910 13 Electric...

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Utah) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 7,698 39 Electric utilities 6,669...

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Petroleum Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,757 47 Electric...

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,004 21 Electric...

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,196 14 Electric...

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,769 30 Electric...

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Ohio) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 32,482 8 Electric utilities 20,779...

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,929 25 Electric utilities...

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 44,950 4 Electric...

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 7,938 38 Electric...

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,093 32 Electric...

  3. Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    research and development for electricity storage technologies and applications. PDF icon EAC - Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets Oct ...

  4. Panasonic Electric Works Ltd formerly Matsushita Electric Works...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Works Ltd (formerly Matsushita Electric Works) Place: Kadoma-shi, Osaka, Japan Zip: 571-8686 Product: Japanese manufacturer of mainly electric appliances including...

  5. Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity...

  6. Florida's electric industry and solar electric technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camejo, N.

    1983-12-01

    The Florida Electric Industry is in a process of diversifying its generation technology and its fuel mix. This is being done in an effort to reduce oil consumption, which in 1981 accounted for 46.5% of the electric generation by fuel type. This does not compare well with the rest of the nation where oil use is lower. New coal and nuclear units are coming on line, and probably more will be built in the near future. However, eventhough conservation efforts may delay their construction, new power plants will have to be built to accomodate the growing demand for electricity. Other alternatives being considered are renewable energy resources. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a research project in which 10 electric utilities in Florida and the Florida Electric Power Coordinating Group rated six Solar Electric options. The Solar Electric options considered are: 1) Wind, 2) P.V., 3) Solar thermal-electric, 4) OTEC, 5) Ocean current, and 6) Biomass. The questionaire involved rating the economic and technical feasibility, as well as, the potential environmental impact of these options in Florida. It also involved rating the difficulty in overcoming institutional barriers and assessing the status of each option. A copy of the questionaire is included after the references. The combined capacity of the participating utilities represent over 90% of the total generating capacity in Florida. A list of the participating utilities is also included. This research was done in partial fulfillment for the Mater's of Science Degree in Coastal Zone Management. This paper is complementary to another paper (in these condensed conference proceedings) titled COASTAL ZONE ENERGY MANAGEMENT: A multidisciplinary approach for the integration of Solar Electric Systems with Florida's power generation system, which present a summary of the Master's thesis.

  7. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1983-08-08

    A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

  8. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End Use: December 2015 Retail rates/prices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on

  9. EIA Electric Power Forms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EIA Electric Power Forms EIA Electric Power Forms Listing of Publicly Available and Confidential Data EIA's statistical surveys encompass each significant electric supply and demand activity in the United States. Most of the electric power survey forms resulting data elements are published, but respondent confidentiality is required. The chart below shows the data elements for each survey form and how each data element is treated in regard to confidentiality. Data Categories Data collection

  10. Electrical utilities relay settings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HACHE, J.M.

    1999-02-24

    This document contains the Hanford transmission and distribution system relay settings that are under the control of Electrical Utilities.

  11. Natural Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  12. Integrating Electricity Subsector

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Integrating Electricity Subsector Failure Scenarios into a Risk Assessment Methodology 3002001181 | DEC 2013 Program Leads Jason D. Christopher Technical Lead, Cyber Security Capabilities & Risk Management Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) Annabelle Lee Senior Technical Executive, Cyber Security Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) For more information on the DOE's cyber security risk management programs, please contact

  13. DOE Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electricity Advisory Committee March 2015 1 MEMORANDUM TO: Honorable Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy FROM: Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) Richard Cowart, Chair DATE: March 27, 2015 RE: Recommendations on Smart Grid Research and Development Needs _________________________________________________________________________ Overview The Smart Grid is envisioned to provide the enhancements to ensure higher levels of

  14. EWEB- Solar Electric Program (Rebate)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eugene Water & Electric Board's (EWEB) Solar Electric Program offers financial incentives for residential, nonprofit, and government customers that generate electricity solar photovoltaic...

  15. Lincoln Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Lincoln Electric Developer Lincoln Electric Energy Purchaser Lincoln...

  16. Epcot Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Epcot Electric Jump to: navigation, search Name: Epcot Electric Place: Texas Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesEpcot-Electric108882552477023 References: EIA Form EIA-861...

  17. North American Natural Gas Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  18. BigHorn Home Improvement Center Energy Performance: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2006-04-01

    This is one of the nation's first commercial building projects to integrate extensive high-performance design into a retail space. The extensive use of natural light, combined with energy-efficient electrical lighting design, provides good illumination and excellent energy savings. The reduced lighting loads, management of solar gains, and cool climate allow natural ventilation to meet the cooling loads. A hydronic radiant floor system, gas-fired radiant heaters, and a transpired solar collector deliver heat. An 8.9-kW roof-integrated photovoltaic (PV) system offsets a portion of the electricity.

  19. Natural gas 1995: Issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    Natural Gas 1995: Issues and Trends addresses current issues affecting the natural gas industry and markets. Highlights of recent trends include: Natural gas wellhead prices generally declined throughout 1994 and for 1995 averages 22% below the year-earlier level; Seasonal patterns of natural gas production and wellhead prices have been significantly reduced during the past three year; Natural gas production rose 15% from 1985 through 1994, reaching 18.8 trillion cubic feet; Increasing amounts of natural gas have been imported; Since 1985, lower costs of producing and transporting natural gas have benefitted consumers; Consumers may see additional benefits as States examine regulatory changes aimed at increasing efficiency; and, The electric industry is being restructured in a fashion similar to the recent restructuring of the natural gas industry.

  20. Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

    2013-03-20

    Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

  1. Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

    2013-06-07

    Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

  2. Midwest Energy (Gas and Electric)- How$mart Energy Efficiency Finance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midwest Energy offers its residential and small commercial electricity and natural gas customers in good standing a way to finance energy efficiency improvements on eligible properties. Under the...

  3. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology | Department of Energy 4 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Caterpillar/U.S. Department of Energy PDF icon 2004_deer_hopmann.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation by Caterpillar, Inc., June 2011

  4. Connecticut Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    67-2005 Citygate 6.58 5.92 5.12 5.42 5.61 4.07 1984-2015 Residential 14.93 13.83 14.17 13.32 14.13 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 9.55 8.48 8.40 9.20 10.24 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 9.60 9.16 8.83 6.85 8.07 6.37 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 16.31 18.59 13.70 1992-2012 Electric Power 5.70 5.09 3.99 6.23 6.82 4.73 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1996 Withdrawals 1973-1996 Net Withdrawals 1973-1996 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 651 655 743 558

  5. Delaware Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    78-2005 Citygate 5.67 9.03 7.19 5.67 5.54 NA 1984-2015 Residential 15.12 15.38 15.24 13.65 13.21 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 13.26 13.58 13.31 11.78 11.42 10.70 1967-2015 Industrial 10.18 11.69 11.61 11.24 10.95 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 24.55 28.76 30.97 1995-2012 Electric Power W W -- -- W -- 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1967-1975 Withdrawals 1967-1975 Net Withdrawals 1967-1975 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions 73 64 117 63 157 1980-2014

  6. Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use 1967-2005 Citygate 6.14 5.65 4.88 4.88 6.96 4.71 1984-2015 Residential 10.34 9.77 9.27 8.65 10.52 NA 1967-2015 Commercial 8.53 8.03 7.34 6.94 8.74 NA 1967-2015 Industrial 7.56 7.05 5.81 6.02 8.08 NA 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 7.84 6.10 5.71 1989-2012 Electric Power 5.43 4.91 3.27 4.47 5.47 W 1997-2015 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1973-1973 Withdrawals 1974-1975 Net Withdrawals 1973-1975 Liquefied Natural Gas Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Additions

  7. Thermoacoustic natural gas liquefier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W.

    1997-05-01

    Cryenco and Los Alamos are collaborating to develop a natural-gas-powered natural-gas liquefier that will have no moving parts and require no electrical power. It will have useful efficiency, remarkable reliability, and low cost. The liquefaction of natural gas, which occurs at only 115 Kelvin at atmospheric pressure, has previously required rather sophisticated refrigeration machinery. The 1990 invention of the thermoacoustically driven orifice pulse-tube refrigerator (TA-DOPTR) provides cryogenic refrigeration with no moving parts for the first time. In short, this invention uses acoustic phenomena to produce refrigeration from heat. The required apparatus consists of nothing more than helium-filled heat exchangers and pipes, made of common materials, without exacting tolerances. In the Cryenco-Los Alamos collaboration, the authors are developing a version of this invention suitable for use in the natural-gas industry. The project is known as acoustic liquefier for short. The present program plans call for a two-phase development. Phase 1, with capacity of 500 gallon per day (i.e., approximately 40,000 scfd, requiring a refrigeration power of about 7 kW), is large enough to illuminate all the issues of large-scale acoustic liquefaction without undue cost, and to demonstrate the liquefaction of 60--70% of input gas, while burning 30--40%. Phase 2 will target versions of approximately 10{sup 6} scfd = 10,000 gallon per day capacity. In parallel with both, they continue fundamental research on the technology, directed toward increased efficiency, to build scientific foundations and a patent portfolio for future acoustic liquefiers.

  8. Natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai-Quoc (San Jose, CA); Wallman, P. Henrik (Berkeley, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    An efficient method of producing hydrogen by high temperature steam electrolysis that will lower the electricity consumption to an estimated 65 percent lower than has been achievable with previous steam electrolyzer systems. This is accomplished with a natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer, which significantly reduces the electricity consumption. Since this natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer replaces one unit of electrical energy by one unit of energy content in natural gas at one-quarter the cost, the hydrogen production cost will be significantly reduced. Also, it is possible to vary the ratio between the electricity and the natural gas supplied to the system in response to fluctuations in relative prices for these two energy sources. In one approach an appropriate catalyst on the anode side of the electrolyzer will promote the partial oxidation of natural gas to CO and hydrogen, called Syn-Gas, and the CO can also be shifted to CO.sub.2 to give additional hydrogen. In another approach the natural gas is used in the anode side of the electrolyzer to burn out the oxygen resulting from electrolysis, thus reducing or eliminating the potential difference across the electrolyzer membrane.

  9. Electricity 101 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources » Electricity 101 Electricity 101 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: Why do other countries use different shaped plugs? Why do outlets have three holes? Why do we have AC electricity? Can we harness lightning as an energy source? Can we have wireless transmission of electricity? SYSTEM: What is electricity? Where does electricity come from? What is the "grid"? How much electricity does a typical household use? How did the electric system evolve? What does the future look like?

  10. New configurations of a heat recovery absorption heat pump integrated with a natural gas boiler for boiler efficiency improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Ming; Abdelaziz, Omar; Yin, Hongxi

    2014-11-01

    Conventional natural gas-fired boilers exhaust flue gas direct to the atmosphere at 150 200 C, which, at such temperatures, contains large amount of energy and results in relatively low thermal efficiency ranging from 70% to 80%. Although condensing boilers for recovering the heat in the flue gas have been developed over the past 40 years, their present market share is still less than 25%. The major reason for this relatively slow acceptance is the limited improvement in the thermal efficiency of condensing boilers. In the condensing boiler, the temperature of the hot water return at the range of 50 60 C, which is used to cool the flue gas, is very close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas. Therefore, the latent heat, the majority of the waste heat in the flue gas, which is contained in the water vapor, cannot be recovered. This paper presents a new approach to improve boiler thermal efficiency by integrating absorption heat pumps with natural gas boilers for waste heat recovery (HRAHP). Three configurations of HRAHPs are introduced and discussed. The three configurations are modeled in detail to illustrate the significant thermal efficiency improvement they attain. Further, for conceptual proof and validation, an existing hot water-driven absorption chiller is operated as a heat pump at operating conditions similar to one of the devised configurations. An overall system performance and economic analysis are provided for decision-making and as evidence of the potential benefits. These three configurations of HRAHP provide a pathway to achieving realistic high-efficiency natural gas boilers for applications with process fluid return temperatures higher than or close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas.

  11. Review of Sector and Regional Trends in U.S. Electricity Markets...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Review of Sector and Regional Trends in U.S. Electricity Markets: Focus on Natural Gas Natural Gas and the Evolving U.S. Power Sector Monograph Series: Number 1 of 3...

  12. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

    1986-01-01

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1,000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  13. Electrical system architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

    2008-07-15

    An electrical system for a vehicle includes a first power source generating a first voltage level, the first power source being in electrical communication with a first bus. A second power source generates a second voltage level greater than the first voltage level, the second power source being in electrical communication with a second bus. A starter generator may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus, and at least one additional power source may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus. The electrical system also includes at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the first bus and at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the second bus.

  14. Integrated electrical connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William J.; Ackler, Harold D.

    2005-05-24

    An electrical connector is formed from a sheet of electrically conductive material that lies in between the two layers of nonconducting material that comprise the casing of an electrical chip. The connector is electrically connected to an electrical element embedded within the chip. An opening in the sheet is concentrically aligned with a pair of larger holes respectively bored through the nonconducting layers. The opening is also smaller than the diameter of an electrically conductive contact pin. However, the sheet is composed flexible material so that the opening adapts to the diameter of the pin when the pin is inserted therethrough. The periphery of the opening applies force to the sides of the pin when the pin is inserted, and thus holds the pin within the opening and in contact with the sheet, by friction. The pin can be withdrawn from the connector by applying sufficient axial force.

  15. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  16. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-11-16

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  17. Renewable Electricity Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Renewable Electricity Overview Bobi Garrett Associate Director, Renewable Electricity Science & Technology 12 August 2008 State Energy Advisory Board 2 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Transforming Our Electricity System Create Smart Grid Two-Way Power Flow Higher Capacity High Reliability/Self Healing

  18. Electric Power Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electric Power Monthly > Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Monthly Excel files zipped 2010 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2009 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2008 January February March March Supplement April May June July August September October November December 2007 January February March April May June July August September October November

  19. Electric Power Research Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -000 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Workshop on High Performance Computing and Modeling Simulation Heather Feldman, Brenden Mervin Electric Power Research Insititute (EPRI) October 15-16, 2014 CASL-U-2015-0200-000 1 AGENDA WORKSHOP ON HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING AND MODELING & SIMULATION "Overcoming Barriers to Enable the Electric Power Industry to Realize the Benefits of High Performance Computing and Modeling & Simulation" October 15-16, 2014 * EPRI Charlotte

  20. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Information and Staff The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Editorial Lead: Chris Cassar (christopher.cassar@eia.gov) Senior Adviser: Bill Booth Core Team: Paul McCardle, Glenn McGrath, Stephen Scott, Tim Shear, April Lee

  1. Office of Electricity Delivery

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 DOE Resilient Electric Distribution Grid R&D Workshop June 11, 2014 Upton, New York 2014 DOE Resilient Electric Distribution Grid R&D Workshop Report Page i June 24, 2014 Acknowledgment The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) acknowledges the support provided by the organizations represented at the Resilient Electric Distribution Grid R&D Workshop. The report content is based on the workshop session discussions, with session summary descriptions taken from the report-out presentations

  2. Natural Gas Fuel Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuels » Natural Gas Fuel Basics Natural Gas Fuel Basics July 30, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis Only about one-tenth of 1% of all the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation fuel. About one-third goes to residential and commercial uses, one-third to industrial uses, and one-third to electric power production. Natural gas has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic, non-corrosive, and non-carcinogenic. It

  3. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wholesale Markets: February 2014 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

  4. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy),...

  5. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below, electricity generation output by fuel type and generator type. Since the generatorfuel...

  6. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Wholesale Markets: May 2015 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

  7. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wholesale Markets: August 2015 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

  8. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and fuel consumption In this section, we look at the resources used to produce electricity. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which...

  9. 2013 Electricity Form Proposals

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Survey Form Changes in 2013 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) proposed changes to its electricity data collection in 2013. These changes involve three forms: Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report" The addition of a new form, the Form EIA-861S, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (Short Form)" Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." The proposals were initially announced to the public via a Federal Register Notice

  10. Perforation patterned electrical interconnects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frey, Jonathan

    2014-01-28

    This disclosure describes systems and methods for increasing the usable surface area of electrical contacts within a device, such as a thin film solid state device, through the implementation of electrically conductive interconnects. Embodiments described herein include the use of a plurality of electrically conductive interconnects that penetrate through a top contact layer, through one or more multiple layers, and into a bottom contact layer. The plurality of conductive interconnects may form horizontal and vertical cross-sectional patterns. The use of lasers to form the plurality of electrically conductive interconnects from reflowed layer material further aids in the manufacturing process of a device.

  11. Electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2010-05-04

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  12. Electric Storage Water Heaters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  13. Renewable Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

  14. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also...

  15. Department of Energy - Electricity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    opportunities and challenges that lie ahead. Secretary Moniz headed down to Florida to talk about Grid Modernization. Learn more about our nation's electric grid in this fact...

  16. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... All states from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Ocean, except for Montana and Wyoming, ... Therefore, one can often explain current wholesale electricity prices by looking at what ...

  17. Electric Power Annual 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2001-2011 Actual, 2012-2016 Projected megawatts ...

  18. Electric power annual 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

  19. 2015 Electricity Form Proposals

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proposed Changes to Electricity and Renewable (Photovoltaic) Survey Forms November 19, 2015 In early 2016 the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) will formally propose ...

  20. 2015 Electricity Form Proposals

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Quarterly Electricity Imports and Exports Report (EIA-111) OMB Clearance Renewal in 2015 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has received approval from the Office of ...

  1. Electrical Circuit Tester

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Love, Frank (Amarillo, TX)

    2006-04-18

    An electrical circuit testing device is provided, comprising a case, a digital voltage level testing circuit with a display means, a switch to initiate measurement using the device, a non-shorting switching means for selecting pre-determined electrical wiring configurations to be tested in an outlet, a terminal block, a five-pole electrical plug mounted on the case surface and a set of adapters that can be used for various multiple-pronged electrical outlet configurations for voltages from 100 600 VAC from 50 100 Hz.

  2. EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010...

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,769 35...

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,048 12...

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (West Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,282 24...

  6. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains...

  7. Electric Power Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... In 1997, the SIC Manual name was changed to North American ... Education services 622 Health services 624 Social ... | Electric Power Monthly Public Administration 92 Multiple ...

  8. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentationgiven at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meetingcovers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  9. Electricity Generation, Transmission ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generation, Transmission and Energy Storage Systems Utilities and other electricity and transmission providers and regulators often require that equipment be proven safe and ...

  10. electric energy storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electric energy storage - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power ...

  11. Thermoacoustic natural gas liquefier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W.

    1995-06-01

    In collaboration with Cryenco Inc. and NIST-Boulder, we intend to develop a natural gas-powered natural-gas liquefier which has absolutely no moving parts and requires no electrical power. It will have high efficiency, remarkable reliability, and low cost. Progress on the liquefier to be constructed at Cryenco continues satisfactorily. The thermoacoustic driver is still ahead of the pulse tube refrigerator, because of NIST`s schedule. We completed the thermoacoustics design in the fall of 1994, with Los Alamos providing physics input and checks of all aspects, and Cryenco providing engineering to ASME code, drafting, etc. Completion of this design represents a significant amount of work, especially in view of the many unexpected problems encountered. Meanwhile, Cryenco and NIST have almost completed the design of the pulse tube refrigerator. At Los Alamos, we have assembled a half-size scale model of the thermoacoustic portion of the 500 gal/day TANGL. This scale model will enable easy experimentation in harmonic suppression techniques, new stack geometries, new heat-exchanger geometries, resonator coiling, and other areas. As of March 1995, the scale model is complete and we are performing routine debugging tests and modifications.

  12. Average U.S. household to spend $710 less on gasoline during 2015

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    natural gas inventories at end of winter higher than last year Despite recent cold temperatures in some parts of the country, U.S. natural gas inventories ended the winter heating season in better shape than last year. In its new forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said natural gas inventories near the end of March were 75% higher compared with the same period in 2014. That sets up adequate supplies for gas-fired power plants this summer to meet electric cooling needs of

  13. EA-352 NaturEner Tie Line, LLC | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 NaturEner Tie Line, LLC EA-352 NaturEner Tie Line, LLC Order authorizing NaturEner Tie Line, LLC to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon EA-352 NaturEner Tie Line, LLC More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-352 NaturEner Tie Line, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-352 NaturEner Tie Line, LLC: Federal Register Notice Volume 74, No. 98 - May 22, 2009 EA-344 Twin Cities Power-Canada, LLC

  14. NIPSCO Small Business Direct Install Electric and Natural Gas Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIPSCO's Small Business Direct Install Program is designed to help small businesses minimize energy costs, and provides energy-saving CFL lighting, showerheads and faucet aerators at no added cost.

  15. Maine Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 43 53 517 2000's 27,180 80,044 90,769 60,666 63,245 48,647 40,341 33,872 36,594 36,746 2010's...

  16. Maine Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 4.09 6.22 6.66 W W W W W 2010's...

  17. Nebraska Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 60 81 270 310 302 422 1,201 701 185 252 250 256 2002 220 89 93 269 283 618 1,251 842 548 413 175 145 2003 97 141 104 236 263 447 1,371 1,264 164 197 218 92 2004 145 159 179 176 606 603 487 314 231 150 152 138 2005 344 303 355 389 496 1,268 1,606 1,316 818 440 329 403 2006 123 185 298 379 503 742 2,463 1,465 314 564 334 417 2007 1,508 847 476 279 880 667 2,503 2,583 491 314 99 260 2008 532 171 428 129 109 657 1,664 1,537 288 371

  18. New Hampshire Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 185 292 0 29 2002 18 12 1 11 39 108 79 311 219 194 0 103 2003 1,716 1,389 2,422 1,544 1,569 1,137 3,107 4,815 3,408 3,512 1,935 2,072 2004 1,775 3,764 4,070 3,928 1,257 3,457 3,174 3,285 3,673 1,920 3,935 3,495 2005 3,291 4,138 3,611 3,493 4,424 4,604 4,821 5,093 3,592 2,879 3,338 2,641 2006 4,661 3,994 4,874 2,310 1,105 1,614 3,077 4,265 4,450 4,758 2,245 3,985 2007 3,644 1,727 1,761 2,984 2,409 3,259

  19. New Jersey Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 5,662 6,141 9,997 8,697 9,177 13,768 13,532 18,799 11,986 12,925 9,013 8,681 2002 10,379 9,313 10,547 11,159 9,236 16,110 22,580 22,412 15,609 10,334 11,207 11,476 2003 9,174 7,854 9,919 9,975 10,237 11,330 15,780 16,693 11,122 9,833 8,868 9,346 2004 6,357 7,934 7,977 10,275 15,451 13,500 15,358 16,351 12,208 7,784 15,033 12,435 2005 6,605 7,737 7,825 8,304 6,523 13,737 18,344 19,903 11,807 7,982 7,055 9,277 2006 7,842

  20. New Mexico Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 2,734 3,646 4,436 5,084 4,877 5,258 5,860 5,171 3,897 3,303 2,839 1,876 2002 1,836 2,405 2,855 3,043 2,494 4,335 5,431 4,209 2,989 2,866 2,430 2,431 2003 2,156 2,670 2,777 2,335 3,256 3,554 4,777 5,227 3,182 2,564 2,454 2,897 2004 2,589 2,356 1,998 1,782 3,001 3,221 3,879 3,130 2,403 2,279 2,053 2,125 2005 2,789 2,383 2,307 2,967 3,557 4,545 5,373 4,695 3,966 3,341 2,791 2,493 2006 2,588 2,467 2,877 4,029 5,047 5,678 7,310

  1. North Dakota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 -- -- -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- 0 2012 0 -- 0 -- 0 0 0 0 -- -- 0 -- 2013 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 66 34 95 142 2014 -- -- -- -- -- 0 1 0 16 6

  2. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 3.38 3.14 3.47 3.88 4.33 3.84 3.68 3.71 4.06 4.75 5.01 5.92 2003 6.97 8.53 8.26 6.96 W 6.63 5.93 6.05 5.17 6.25 6.38 8.56 2004 9.86 7.01 7.02 7.32 7.63 7.69 7.19 6.60 6.25 W 7.82 9.46 2005 8.79 7.77 8.27 8.45 7.63 8.26 8.62 10.36 13.74 15.56 10.96 15.65 2006 11.34 9.74 8.35 8.06 7.31 7.55 7.26 8.55 5.45 5.93 7.99 8.34 2007 8.29 10.63 9.00 9.18 9.16 8.40 7.06 7.19 6.67 7.51 8.42 9.38 2008 12.61 10.98 10.75

  3. Arizona Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7,206 10,178 10,723 11,729 14,944 12,611 13,636 12,373 10,115 9,808 6,853 8,910 2002 6,386 7,902 9,125 7,964 9,245 12,579 19,305 17,996 16,847 14,354 11,510 12,131 2003 8,033 9,177 11,951 9,660 8,750 12,182 24,698 26,821 21,367 19,806 10,442 7,253 2004 11,922 16,931 17,044 17,528 21,411 24,959 31,355 28,859 23,051 18,066 15,540 13,656 2005 11,557 11,589 8,394 13,303 17,038 18,875 30,885 30,523 22,218 19,430 16,475 17,199 2006

  4. California Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 90,070 78,688 82,936 80,724 83,703 84,253 92,713 100,006 83,677 75,445 59,350 61,761 2002 53,569 46,030 62,953 44,074 44,768 64,112 88,478 80,441 75,298 57,204 52,006 57,695 2003 52,963 51,480 52,364 43,190 40,837 48,698 87,492 81,851 74,232 68,666 51,327 52,244 2004 52,770 53,789 60,295 56,992 56,398 56,402 84,330 81,551 77,112 65,163 63,338 62,377 2005 52,729 45,266 47,897 44,239 46,818 48,797 86,224 86,927 61,079 54,455

  5. Rhode Island Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3,422 3,534 4,521 3,613 5,102 4,790 5,482 6,056 5,945 5,793 4,362 5,797 2002 5,753 4,458 3,904 3,575 3,920 4,095 4,617 4,444 4,282 3,985 5,812 5,121 2003 3,879 4,020 4,001 1,997 1,848 3,167 4,808 4,397 3,931 3,356 3,882 2,724 2004 3,264 2,652 1,896 2,316 3,763 3,842 3,174 3,864 2,516 2,312 3,179 3,181 2005 2,862 2,953 2,483 3,586 3,821 4,611 4,807 4,964 3,729 3,765 3,101 3,231 2006 3,153 2,496 2,376 1,840 3,537 3,934 5,664

  6. South Carolina Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 357 252 321 362 371 1,430 1,906 2,993 602 1,337 477 534 2002 2,954 2,014 1,160 2,915 4,535 4,924 7,032 6,603 2,795 1,101 396 279 2003 986 514 290 980 738 1,354 2,706 4,278 651 304 235 445 2004 2,187 2,171 595 1,052 4,032 2,908 4,599 5,291 3,150 1,431 1,083 2,768 2005 3,544 1,827 3,077 1,949 2,681 4,328 9,079 11,146 4,526 695 278 1,881 2006 844 1,836 2,046 2,299 2,545 5,577 10,531 11,785 3,011 3,616 3,683 1,942 2007 3,733

  7. South Dakota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 107 302 600 632 652 455 711 666 211 61 29 70 2002 9 145 61 62 58 182 480 55 148 27 12 25 2003 157 173 135 122 39 232 569 423 175 95 90 54 2004 115 24 31 10 26 160 447 246 293 95 78 151 2005 94 36 163 495 293 616 686 567 247 66 181 124 2006 20 36 45 21 126 454 1,244 759 152 133 112 242 2007 142 204 104 190 146 493 966 832 241 262 392 265 2008 115 17 12 13 16 247 1,050 846 134 8 56 118 2009 27 7 29 24 49 337 1 175 69 67 117

  8. Tennessee Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 0 0 2 68 169 313 1,011 868 48 0 0 0 2002 0 34 172 233 58 277 739 651 74 1 77 281 2003 1,704 256 239 866 29 350 357 1,324 177 75 104 140 2004 564 139 40 77 618 160 239 206 52 47 12 107 2005 80 68 82 23 117 432 1,014 2,879 446 248 170 68 2006 42 111 167 563 216 629 2,341 1,839 164 99 104 416 2007 292 362 68 99 249 114 398 4,034 776 606 44 248 2008 936 123 128 28 68 874 774 423 568 57 223 209 2009 256 352 291 109 125 969 276 479

  9. New Mexico Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 40,256 45,534 43,018 2000's 46,885 48,981 37,324 37,849 30,817 41,207 55,506 61,050 68,742...

  10. New Mexico Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.64 2.22 2.31 2000's 3.94 4.22 3.03 W W W W W 8.18 W 2010's W W W 4.35 4.93...

  11. Washington Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3.44 2000's 4.03 3.25 4.17 4.63 6.64 5.81 6.15 8.56 5.29 2010's 5.52 W...

  12. Washington Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 27,725 40,373 32,639 2000's 74,400 86,184 39,552 57,880 66,068 65,809 58,800 57,294 74,580...

  13. Maine Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 43 53 517 2000's 27,180 80,044 90,769 60,666 63,245 48,647 40,341 33,872 36,594 36,746 2010's 40,392 33,555 28,456 20,904 23,853 17,44

  14. Massachusetts Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 117,259 101,682 93,126 2000's 88,089 96,294 128,852 169,252 157,400 152,429 168,970 183,231 154,984 150,161 2010's 185,842 185,903 179,598 154,217 133,164 156,492

  15. Massachusetts Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3.11 2.78 2.72 2000's 4.60 3.58 3.60 5.51 6.61 9.63 7.45 8.11 10.43 4.93 2010's 5.44 5.07 3.68 5.96 6.66 4.38

  16. Mississippi Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 73,170 76,447 106,302 2000's 100,643 149,432 163,664 96,081 107,432 135,562 139,918 182,996 167,345 183,344 2010's 235,250 244,051 291,341 234,274 221,910 331,496

  17. Montana Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 420 522 291 2000's 192 161 116 259 195 213 544 1,000 513 656 2010's 705 4,681 5,370 4,906 6,421 7,84

  18. Nebraska Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,687 5,080 4,582 2000's 5,522 4,290 4,947 4,593 3,340 8,066 7,787 10,908 7,230 3,331 2010's 3,949 4,223 7,696 5,080 4,132 4,634

  19. Nevada Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 75,656 84,093 89,954 2000's 121,054 108,510 109,605 115,960 136,945 147,743 166,867 171,473 180,668 192,049 2010's 175,837 162,778 189,291 181,326 167,916 207,14

  20. New Hampshire Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 564 151 572 2000's 783 527 1,096 28,627 37,732 45,926 41,339 39,013 48,688 38,070 2010's 38,937 46,812 50,408 29,644 31,240 42,673