Sample records for natural gas reservoirs

  1. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Salt Cavern Storage Reservoir...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Source: PB Energy Storage Services Inc....

  2. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Depleted Reservoir Storage...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Depleted Production Reservoir Underground...

  3. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

  4. Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasproduction and carbon sequestration, Society of Petroleumfeasibiilty of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

  5. US production of natural gas from tight reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purposes of this report, tight gas reservoirs are defined as those that meet the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) definition of tight. They are generally characterized by an average reservoir rock permeability to gas of 0.1 millidarcy or less and, absent artificial stimulation of production, by production rates that do not exceed 5 barrels of oil per day and certain specified daily volumes of gas which increase with the depth of the reservoir. All of the statistics presented in this report pertain to wells that have been classified, from 1978 through 1991, as tight according to the FERC; i.e., they are ``legally tight`` reservoirs. Additional production from ``geologically tight`` reservoirs that have not been classified tight according to the FERC rules has been excluded. This category includes all producing wells drilled into legally designated tight gas reservoirs prior to 1978 and all producing wells drilled into physically tight gas reservoirs that have not been designated legally tight. Therefore, all gas production referenced herein is eligible for the Section 29 tax credit. Although the qualification period for the credit expired at the end of 1992, wells that were spudded (began to be drilled) between 1978 and May 1988, and from November 5, 1990, through year end 1992, are eligible for the tax credit for a subsequent period of 10 years. This report updates the EIA`s tight gas production information through 1991 and considers further the history and effect on tight gas production of the Federal Government`s regulatory and tax policy actions. It also provides some high points of the geologic background needed to understand the nature and location of low-permeability reservoirs.

  6. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE-funded research into seismic detection of natural fractures is one of six projects within the DOE`s Detection and Analysis of Naturally Fractured Gas Reservoirs Program, a multidisciplinary research initiative to develop technology for prediction, detection, and mapping of naturally fractured gas reservoirs. The demonstration of successful seismic techniques to locate subsurface zones of high fracture density and to guide drilling orientation for enhanced fracture permeability will enable better returns on investments in the development of the vast gas reserves held in tight formations beneath the Rocky Mountains. The seismic techniques used in this project were designed to capture the azimuthal anisotropy within the seismic response. This seismic anisotropy is the result of the symmetry in the rock fabric created by aligned fractures and/or unequal horizontal stresses. These results may be compared and related to other lines of evidence to provide cross-validation. The authors undertook investigations along the following lines: Characterization of the seismic anisotropy in three-dimensional, P-wave seismic data; Characterization of the seismic anisotropy in a nine-component (P- and S-sources, three-component receivers) vertical seismic profile; Characterization of the seismic anisotropy in three-dimensional, P-to-S converted wave seismic data (P-wave source, three-component receivers); and Description of geological and reservoir-engineering data that corroborate the anisotropy: natural fractures observed at the target level and at the surface, estimation of the maximum horizontal stress in situ, and examination of the flow characteristics of the reservoir.

  7. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Aquifer Underground Natural Gas Storage...

  8. Importance of Low Permeability Natural Gas Reservoirs (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40% of natural gas production and about 35% of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in darcies.)

  9. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

  10. OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

  11. Modeling effects of diffusion and gravity drainage on oil recovery in naturally fractured reservoirs under gas injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamili, Ahmad

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas injection in naturally fractured reservoirs maintains the reservoir pressure, and increases oil recovery primarily by gravity drainage and to a lesser extent by mass transfer between the flowing gas in the fracture and the porous matrix...

  12. Natural gas plays in Jurassic reservoirs of southwestern Alabama and the Florida panhandle area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA) Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA)); Mink, R.M.; Tew, B.H.; Bearden, B.L. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three Jurassic natural gas trends can be delineated in Alabama and the Florida panhandle area. They include a deep natural gas trend, a natural gas and condensate trend, and an oil and associated natural gas trend. These trends are recognized by hydrocarbon types, basinal position, and relationship to regional structural features. Within these natural gas trends, at least eight distinct natural gas plays can be identified. These plays are recognized by characteristic petroleum traps and reservoirs. The deep natural gas trend includes the Mobile Bay area play, which is characterized by faulted salt anticlines associated with the Lower Mobile Bay fault system and Norphlet eolian sandstone reservoirs exhibiting primary and secondary porosity at depths exceeding 20,000 ft. The natural gas and condensate trend includes the Mississippi Interior Salt basin play, Mobile graben play, Wiggins arch flank play, and the Pollard fault system play. The Mississippi Interior Salt basin play is typified by salt anticlines associated with salt tectonism in the Mississippi Interior Salt basin and Smackover dolomitized peloidal and pelmoldic grainstone and packstone reservoirs at depths of approximately 16,000 ft. The Mobile graben play is exemplified by faulted salt anticlines associated with the Mobile graben and Smackover dolostone reservoirs at depths of approximately 18,000 ft. The Wiggins arch flank play is characterized by structural traps consisting of salt anticlines associated with stratigraphic thinning and Smackover dolostone reservoirs at depths of approximately 18,000 ft. The Pollard fault system play is typified by combination petroleum traps. The structural component is associated with the Pollard fault system and reservoirs at depths of approximately 15,000 ft. These reservoirs are dominantly Smackover dolomitized oomoldic and pelmoldic grainstones and packstones and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones exhibiting primary and secondary porosity.

  13. Underground natural gas storage reservoir management: Phase 2. Final report, June 1, 1995--March 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage operators are facing increased and more complex responsibilities for managing storage operations under Order 636 which requires unbundling of storage from other pipeline services. Low cost methods that improve the accuracy of inventory verification are needed to optimally manage this stored natural gas. Migration of injected gas out of the storage reservoir has not been well documented by industry. The first portion of this study addressed the scope of unaccounted for gas which may have been due to migration. The volume range was estimated from available databases and reported on an aggregate basis. Information on working gas, base gas, operating capacity, injection and withdrawal volumes, current and non-current revenues, gas losses, storage field demographics and reservoir types is contained among the FERC Form 2, EIA Form 191, AGA and FERC Jurisdictional databases. The key elements of this study show that gas migration can result if reservoir limits have not been properly identified, gas migration can occur in formation with extremely low permeability (0.001 md), horizontal wellbores can reduce gas migration losses and over-pressuring (unintentionally) storage reservoirs by reinjecting working gas over a shorter time period may increase gas migration effects.

  14. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1, 1997--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the quarterly report dated January 1-March 31, 1997 for the Naturally Fractured Tight Gas Reservoir Detection Optimization project. Topics covered in this report include AVOA modeling using paraxial ray tracing, AVOA modeling for gas- and water-filled fractures, 3-D and 3-C processing, and technology transfer material. Several presentations from a Geophysical Applications Workshop workbook, workshop schedule, and list of workshop attendees are also included.

  15. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.; Nur, A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Reflection seismic methods are, and will continue to be, the key geophysical tool for imaging these heterogeneities in the subsurface of the earth. However, in spite of great advances in field acquisition techniques and computer processing power, the primary product of conventional seismic work is still only the spatial pattern of reflectivity, which is a measure of velocity variations. Most of the amplitude information goes unused. Although fracture zones may have a reflectivity signature, more often they will not, because of steeply dipping angles, limited offset range in the acquisition, a subtle impedance mismatch, or too thin a fractured zone relative to the wavelength. In fact, there is probably no single seismic attribute that will always tell us what we need to know about fracture zones. Our objective, in the project, is to integrate the principles of rock physics into a quantitative interpretation scheme that exploits the broader spectrum of fracture zone signatures: anomalous compressional and shear wave velocities; Q and velocity dispersion; increased velocity anisotropy amplitude variation with offset (AVO) response. Our goal is to incorporate four key elements: Acquisition and processing of seismic reflection field data. Theoretical studies of the anisotropic signatures of fractured rocks. Laboratory measurements of seismic velocity, velocity anisotropy, and attenuation in reservoir and cap rocks. Integration and interpretation of seismic, well log, and laboratory data, incorporating forward modeling.

  16. Potential hazards of compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a preliminary assessment of the ignition and explosion potential in a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir from air cycling associated with compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media. The study identifies issues associated with this phenomenon as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media has been proposed to help supplement renewable energy sources (e.g., wind and solar) by providing a means to store energy when excess energy is available, and to provide an energy source during non-productive or low productivity renewable energy time periods. Presently, salt caverns represent the only proven underground storage used for CAES. Depleted natural gas reservoirs represent another potential underground storage vessel for CAES because they have demonstrated their container function and may have the requisite porosity and permeability; however reservoirs have yet to be demonstrated as a functional/operational storage media for compressed air. Specifically, air introduced into a depleted natural gas reservoir presents a situation where an ignition and explosion potential may exist. This report presents the results of an initial study identifying issues associated with this phenomena as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered.

  17. Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Cooper; M. Ye; J. Chapman

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. The second project in the program, Project Rulison, was located in west-central Colorado. A 40-kiltoton nuclear device was detonated 2,568 m below the land surface in the Williams Fork Formation on September 10, 1969. The natural gas reservoirs in the Williams Fork Formation occur in low permeability, fractured sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. Radionuclides derived from residual fuel products, nuclear reactions, and activation products were generated as a result of the detonation. Most of the radionuclides are contained in a cooled, solidified melt glass phase created from vaporized and melted rock that re-condensed after the test. Of the mobile gas-phase radionuclides released, tritium ({sup 3}H or T) migration is of most concern. The other gas-phase radionuclides ({sup 85}Kr, {sup 14}C) were largely removed during production testing in 1969 and 1970 and are no longer present in appreciable amounts. Substantial tritium remained because it is part of the water molecule, which is present in both the gas and liquid (aqueous) phases. The objectives of this work are to calculate the nature and extent of tritium contamination in the subsurface from the Rulison test from the time of the test to present day (2007), and to evaluate tritium migration under natural-gas production conditions to a hypothetical gas production well in the most vulnerable location outside the DOE drilling restriction. The natural-gas production scenario involves a hypothetical production well located 258 m horizontally away from the detonation point, outside the edge of the current drilling exclusion area. The production interval in the hypothetical well is at the same elevation as the nuclear chimney created by the detonation, in order to evaluate the location most vulnerable to tritium migration.

  18. Natural and Induced Fracture Diagnostics from 4-D VSP Low Permeability Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark E. Willis; Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tight gas sand reservoirs generally contain thick gas-charged intervals that often have low porosity and very low permeability. Natural and induced fractures provide the only means of production. The objective of this work is to locate and characterize natural and induced fractures from analysis of scattered waves recorded on 4-D (time lapse) VSP data in order to optimize well placement and well spacing in these gas reservoirs. Using model data simulating the scattering of seismic energy from hydraulic fractures, we first show that it is possible to characterize the quality of fracturing based upon the amount of scattering. In addition, the picked arrival times of recorded microseismic events provide the velocity moveout for isolating the scattered energy on the 4-D VSP data. This concept is applied to a field dataset from the Jonah Field in Wyoming to characterize the quality of the induced hydraulic fractures. The time lapse (4D) VSP data from this field are imaged using a migration algorithm that utilizes shot travel time tables derived from the first breaks of the 3D VSPs and receiver travel time tables based on the microseismic arrival times and a regional velocity model. Four azimuthally varying shot tables are derived from picks of the first breaks of over 200 VSP records. We create images of the fracture planes through two of the hydraulically fractured wells in the field. The scattered energy shows correlation with the locations of the microseismic events. In addition, the azimuthal scattering is different from the azimuthal reflectivity of the reservoir, giving us more confidence that we have separated the scattered signal from simple formation reflectivity. Variation of the scattered energy along the image planes suggests variability in the quality of the fractures in three distinct zones.

  19. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes progress in the following five projects: (1) Geologic assessment of the Piceance Basin; (2) Regional stratigraphic studies, Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, southern Piceance Basin, Colorado; (3) Structurally controlled and aligned tight gas reservoir compartmentalization in the San Juan and Piceance Basins--Foundation for a new approach to exploration and resource assessments of continuous type deposits; (4) Delineation of Piceance Basin basement structures using multiple source data--Implications for fractured reservoir exploration; and (5) Gas and water-saturated conditions in the Piceance Basin, western Colorado--Implications for fractured reservoir detection in a gas-centered coal basin.

  20. Naturally fractured tight gas: Gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Economically viable natural gas production from the low permeability Mesaverde Formation in the Piceance Basin, Colorado requires the presence of an intense set of open natural fractures. Establishing the regional presence and specific location of such natural fractures is the highest priority exploration goal in the Piceance and other western US tight, gas-centered basins. Recently, Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) completed a field program at Rulison Field, Piceance Basin, to test and demonstrate the use of advanced seismic methods to locate and characterize natural fractures. This project began with a comprehensive review of the tectonic history, state of stress and fracture genesis of the basin. A high resolution aeromagnetic survey, interpreted satellite and SLAR imagery, and 400 line miles of 2-D seismic provided the foundation for the structural interpretation. The central feature of the program was the 4.5 square mile multi-azimuth 3-D seismic P-wave survey to locate natural fracture anomalies. The interpreted seismic attributes are being tested against a control data set of 27 wells. Additional wells are currently being drilled at Rulison, on close 40 acre spacings, to establish the productivity from the seismically observed fracture anomalies. A similar regional prospecting and seismic program is being considered for another part of the basin. The preliminary results indicate that detailed mapping of fault geometries and use of azimuthally defined seismic attributes exhibit close correlation with high productivity gas wells. The performance of the ten new wells, being drilled in the seismic grid in late 1996 and early 1997, will help demonstrate the reliability of this natural fracture detection and mapping technology.

  1. Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maria Cecilia Bravo

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. These dependencies are investigated by identifying the main transport mechanisms at the pore scale that should affect fluids flow at the reservoir scale. A critical review of commercial reservoir simulators, used to predict tight sand gas reservoir, revealed that many are poor when used to model fluid flow through tight reservoirs. Conventional simulators ignore altogether or model incorrectly certain phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization. We studied the effect of Knudsen's number in Klinkenberg's equation and evaluated the effect of different flow regimes on Klinkenberg's parameter b. We developed a model capable of explaining the pressure dependence of this parameter that has been experimentally observed, but not explained in the conventional formalisms. We demonstrated the relevance of this, so far ignored effect, in tight sands reservoir modeling. A 2-D numerical simulator based on equations that capture the above mentioned phenomena was developed. Dynamic implications of new equations are comprehensively discussed in our work and their relative contribution to the flow rate is evaluated. We performed several simulation sensitivity studies that evidenced that, in general terms, our formalism should be implemented in order to get more reliable tight sands gas reservoirs' predictions.

  2. Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maria Cecilia Bravo; Mariano Gurfinkel

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying possible relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. Based on a critical review of the available literature, a better understanding of the main weaknesses of the current state of the art of modeling and simulation for tight sand reservoirs has been reached. Progress has been made in the development and implementation of a simple reservoir simulator that is still able to overcome some of the deficiencies detected. The simulator will be used to quantify the impact of microscopic phenomena in the macroscopic behavior of tight sand gas reservoirs. Phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization are being considered as part of this study. To date, the adequate modeling of gas slippage in porous media has been determined to be of great relevance in order to explain unexpected fluid flow behavior in tight sand reservoirs.

  3. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Annual report, September 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an annual summarization of an ongoing research in the field of modeling and detecting naturally fractured gas reservoirs. The current research is in the Piceance basin of Western Colorado. The aim is to use existing information to determine the most optimal zone or area of fracturing using a unique reaction-transport-mechanical (RTM) numerical basin model. The RTM model will then subsequently help map subsurface lateral and vertical fracture geometries. The base collection techniques include in-situ fracture data, remote sensing, aeromagnetics, 2-D seismic, and regional geologic interpretations. Once identified, high resolution airborne and spaceborne imagery will be used to verify the RTM model by comparing surficial fractures. If this imagery agrees with the model data, then a further investigation using a three-dimensional seismic survey component will be added. This report presents an overview of the Piceance Creek basin and then reviews work in the Parachute and Rulison fields and the results of the RTM models in these fields.

  4. Preliminary formation analysis for compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, William Payton

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to develop an engineering and operational understanding of CAES performance for a depleted natural gas reservoir by evaluation of relative permeability effects of air, water and natural gas in depleted natural gas reservoirs as a reservoir is initially depleted, an air bubble is created, and as air is initially cycled. The composition of produced gases will be evaluated as the three phase flow of methane, nitrogen and brine are modeled. The effects of a methane gas phase on the relative permeability of air in a formation are investigated and the composition of the produced fluid, which consists primarily of the amount of natural gas in the produced air are determined. Simulations of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in depleted natural gas reservoirs were carried out to assess the effect of formation permeability on the design of a simple CAES system. The injection of N2 (as a proxy to air), and the extraction of the resulting gas mixture in a depleted natural gas reservoir were modeled using the TOUGH2 reservoir simulator with the EOS7c equation of state. The optimal borehole spacing was determined as a function of the formation scale intrinsic permeability. Natural gas reservoir results are similar to those for an aquifer. Borehole spacing is dependent upon the intrinsic permeability of the formation. Higher permeability allows increased injection and extraction rates which is equivalent to more power per borehole for a given screen length. The number of boreholes per 100 MW for a given intrinsic permeability in a depleted natural gas reservoir is essentially identical to that determined for a simple aquifer of identical properties. During bubble formation methane is displaced and a sharp N2methane boundary is formed with an almost pure N2 gas phase in the bubble near the borehole. During cycling mixing of methane and air occurs along the boundary as the air bubble boundary moves. The extracted gas mixture changes as a function of time and proximity of the bubble boundary to the well. For all simulations reported here, with a formation radius above 50 m the maximum methane composition in the produced gas phase was less than 0.5%. This report provides an initial investigation of CAES in a depleted natural gas reservoir, and the results will provide useful guidance in CAES system investigation and design in the future.

  5. Secondary natural gas recovery: Targeted applications for infield reserve growth in midcontinent reservoirs, Boonsville Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas. Topical report, May 1993--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Finley, R.J.; Tyler, N.; Lancaster, D.E.; Elphick, R.Y.; Ballard, J.R.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to define undrained or incompletely drained reservoir compartments controlled primarily by depositional heterogeneity in a low-accommodation, cratonic Midcontinent depositional setting, and, afterwards, to develop and transfer to producers strategies for infield reserve growth of natural gas. Integrated geologic, geophysical, reservoir engineering, and petrophysical evaluations are described in complex difficult-to-characterize fluvial and deltaic reservoirs in Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate Gas) field, a large, mature gas field located in the Fort Worth Basin of North Texas. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate approaches to overcoming the reservoir complexity, targeting the gas resource, and doing so using state-of-the-art technologies being applied by a large cross section of Midcontinent operators.

  6. A Handbook for the Application of Seismic Methods for Quantifying Naturally Fractured Gas Reservoirs in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resource in naturally fractured reservoirs? At the beginningheterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, such as the San JuanP-wave velocity when a fractured reservoir is present, can

  7. Joule-Thomson Cooling Due to CO2 Injection into Natural Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    include the freezing of residual water or the formation ofby the freezing of residual water, formation of hydrates,a depleted reservoir that residual water could freeze and/or

  8. Tight gas reservoirs: A visual depiction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future gas supplies in the US will depend on an increasing contribution from unconventional sources such as overpressured and tight gas reservoirs. Exploitation of these resources and their conversion to economically producible gas reserves represents a major challenge. Meeting this challenge will require not only the continuing development and application of new technologies, but also a detailed understanding of the complex nature of the reservoirs themselves. This report seeks to promote understanding of these reservoirs by providing examples. Examples of gas productive overpressured tight reservoirs in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming are presented. These examples show log data (raw and interpreted), well completion and stimulation information, and production decline curves. A sampling of wells from the Lewis and Mesaverde formations are included. Both poor and good wells have been chosen to illustrate the range of productivity that is observed. The second section of this document displays decline curves and completion details for 30 of the best wells in the Greater Green River Basin. These are included to illustrate the potential that is present when wells are fortuitously located with respect to local stratigraphy and natural fracturing, and are successfully hydraulically fractured.

  9. Florida Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.Gas ProvedCommercial Consumers by Local0 0 0

  10. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1994-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The study area is located at the southern end of the Powder River Basin in Converse County in east-central Wyoming. It is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. Reservoirs are highly compartmentalized due to the low permeabilities, and fractures provide the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara, a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock; and the Frontier, a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contact with it by an unconformity. This was the tenth quarter of the contract. During this quarter the investigators (1) continued processing the seismic data, and (2) continued modeling some of the P-wave amplitude anomalies that we see in the data.

  11. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was directed toward developing a systematic reservoir characterization methodology which can be used by the petroleum industry to implement infill drilling programs and/or enhanced oil recovery projects in naturally fractured reservoir systems in an environmentally safe and cost effective manner. It was anticipated that the results of this research program will provide geoscientists and engineers with a systematic procedure for properly characterizing a fractured reservoir system and a reservoir/horizontal wellbore simulator model which can be used to select well locations and an effective EOR process to optimize the recovery of the oil and gas reserves from such complex reservoir systems.

  12. Natural Gas Monthly, October 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The (NGM) Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This month`s feature articles are: US Production of Natural Gas from Tight Reservoirs: and Expanding Rule of Underground Storage.

  13. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only...

  14. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only...

  15. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nur, A.

    1993-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This was the fifth quarter of the contract. During this quarter we (1) got approval for the NEPA requirements related to the field work, (2) placed the subcontract for the field data acquisition, (3) completed the field work, and (4) began processing the seismic data. As already reported, the field data acquisition was at Acomo`s Powder River Basin site in southeast Wyoming. This is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. The reservoir is highly compartmentalized, due to the low permeability, with the fractures providing the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara: a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock. The Frontier: a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contact with it by an unconformity. The fractures are thought to lie in a roughly northwest-southeast trend, along the strike of a flexure, which forms one of the boundaries of the basin.

  16. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1993-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This was the seventh quarter of the contract. During this quarter we (1) continued the large task of processing the seismic data, (2) collected additional geological information to aid in the interpretation, (3) tied the well log data to the seismic via generation of synthetic seismograms, (4) began integrating regional structural information and fracture trends with our observations of structure in the study area, (5) began constructing a velocity model for time-to-depth conversion and subsequent AVO and raytrace modeling experiments, and (6) completed formulation of some theoretical tools for relating fracture density to observed elastic anisotropy. The study area is located at the southern end of the Powder River Basin in Converse County in east-central Wyoming. It is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. Reservoirs are highly compartmentalized due to the low permeabilities, and fractures provide the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara: a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock. The Frontier: a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contact with it by an unconformity. A basemap is presented with the seismic lines being analyzed for this project plus locations of 13 wells that we are using to supplement the analysis. The arrows point to two wells for which we have constructed synthetic seismograms.

  17. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1993-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    During this quarter we (1) received the last of the field tapes and survey information for the seismic field data acquisition which was finished at the very end of the previous quarter, (2) began the large task of processing the seismic data, (3) collected well logs and other informination to aid in the interpretation, and (4) initiated some seismic modeling studies. As already reported, the field data acquisition was at Amoco`s Powder River Basin site in southeast Wyoming. This is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. The reservoir is highly compartmentalized, due to the low permeability, with the fractures providing the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara: a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock. The Frontier: a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contact with it by an unconformity. The fractures are thought to lie in a roughly northwest-southeast trend, along the strike of a flexure, which forms one of the boundaries of the basin.

  18. RATE DECLINE ANALYSIS FOR NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    RATE DECLINE ANALYSIS FOR NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS A REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT analylsiis for constant pressure production in a naturally fractured reservoir is presented. The solution, the Warren and Root model which assumes fracturing is perfectly unifom, provides an upper bound of reservoir

  19. NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

  20. Evaluation of Devonian shale gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanorsdale, C.R.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evaluation of predominantly shale reservoirs presents a problem for engineers traditionally educated either to correct for or to ignore such lithologic zones. Currently accepted evaluation techniques and their applicability are discussed to determine the best way to forecast remaining recoverable gas reserves from the Devonian shales of the Appalachian basin. This study indicates that rate/time decline-curve analysis is the most reliable technique and presents typical decline curves based on production data gathered from 508 shale wells in a three-state study area. The resultant type curves illustrate a dual- (or multiple-) porosity mechanism that violates standard decline-curve analysis guidelines. The results, however, are typical not only for the Devonian shales but for all naturally fractured, multilayered, or similar shale reservoirs.

  1. Coarse scale simulation of tight gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Ahmady, Mohamed Hamed

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It is common for field models of tight gas reservoirs to include several wells with hydraulic fractures. These hydraulic fractures can be very long, extending for more than a thousand feet. A hydraulic fracture width is ...

  2. Berea Sandstone gas reservoirs in Portage County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coogan, A.H.; Heath, L.L.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippian Berea Sandstone is a reservoir for shallow gas in Randolph and Suffield townships of Portage County, Ohio. The Berea Sandstone is well known in Ohio from its outcrops at the outskirts of Cleveland. It is among the more productive formations in Ohio where it yields gas, oil, or gas and oil at moderate to very shallow depths. The great differences in reservoir quality, sandstone distribution, and producibility in Berea oil and gas fields are partly related to the use of the term Berea for several sandstone bodies that produce from different structural and stratigraphic settings. In Portage County, the Berea Sandstone is up to 60 ft (18 m) thick and has a porosity in the 15-25% range. The sand is white, medium to fine-grained quartz, poorly cemented, and without substantial shale interbeds. The reservoir lies below the Cap Berea, a gray, cemented thin bed at the base of the Sunbury Shale (driller's Coffee shale). In Portage County, the sand is currently interpreted as fluvial or deltaic. Within the field, thickness of the reservoir and hydrocarbon saturated zone varies little. Natural gas is produced from the top 30 ft (9 m) of the reservoir. The reservoir energy is water drive. The gas fields lie just updip from a steep structural terrace interpreted as a fault zone. The trap for the fields is anticlinal and the Sunbury Shale is the seal. New wells drilled into the reservoir at 400-500 ft (122-152 m) in depth produce gas without water. Initial open flow tested up to 1.0 MMCFGD at an initial reservoir pressure of about 80 psig (552 kPa).

  3. US Geological Survey publications on western tight gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupa, M.P.; Spencer, C.W.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography includes reports published from 1977 through August 1988. In 1977 the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the US Department of Energy's, (DOE), Western Gas Sands Research program, initiated a geological program to identify and characterize natural gas resources in low-permeability (tight) reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region. These reservoirs are present at depths of less than 2,000 ft (610 m) to greater than 20,000 ft (6,100 m). Only published reports readily available to the public are included in this report. Where appropriate, USGS researchers have incorporated administrative report information into later published studies. These studies cover a broad range of research from basic research on gas origin and migration to applied studies of production potential of reservoirs in individual wells. The early research included construction of regional well-log cross sections. These sections provide a basic stratigraphic framework for individual areas and basins. Most of these sections include drill-stem test and other well-test data so that the gas-bearing reservoirs can be seen in vertical and areal dimensions. For the convenience of the reader, the publications listed in this report have been indexed by general categories of (1) authors, (2) states, (3) geologic basins, (4) cross sections, (5) maps (6) studies of gas origin and migration, (7) reservoir or mineralogic studies, and (8) other reports of a regional or specific topical nature.

  4. Natural Gas Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue...

  5. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  6. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  7. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  8. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1994-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This was the ninth quarter of the contract. During this quarter we (1) continued processing the seismic data, (2) collected additional logs to aid in the interpretation, and (3)began modeling some of the P-wave amplitude anomalies that we see in the data. The study area is located at the southern end of the powder river Basin in Converse county in east-central Wyoming. It is a low permeability fractured site, with both has and oil present. Reservoirs are highly compartmentalized due tot he low permeabilities, and fractures provide the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara; a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock. The Frontier, a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contract with it by an unconformity.

  9. U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1997 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, John H.; Grape, Steven G.; Green, Rhonda S.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1997, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1997. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1997 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

  10. Supervisory Natural Gas Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energys Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply (FE) is responsible for regulating natural gas imports and exports...

  11. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the Natural Gas Monthly features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  12. Aligned vertical fractures, HTI reservoir symmetry, and Thomsen seismic anisotropy parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seismic parameters for fractured reservoirs when the crackin a naturally fractured gas reservoir, The Leading Edge,

  13. Naturally fractured reservoirs contain a significant amount of the world oil reserves. A number of these reservoirs contain several

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arbogast, Todd

    Summary Naturally fractured reservoirs contain a significant amount of the world oil reserves simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs is one of the most important, challenging, and computationally intensive problems in reservoir engineering. Parallel reservoir simulators developed for naturally fractured

  14. Natural Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    . Exploration and extraction of natural gas from the Marcellus shale is a potentially valuable economic stimulus for landowners. You might be wondering how the nation's economic situation is affecting the market for naturalNatural Gas Exploration: A Landowners Guide to Financial Management Natural Gas Exploration

  15. Coarse scale simulation of tight gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Ahmady, Mohamed Hamed

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It is common for field models of tight gas reservoirs to include several wells with hydraulic fractures. These hydraulic fractures can be very long, extending for more than a thousand feet. A hydraulic fracture width is usually no more than about 0...

  16. Natural gas dehydration apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Ng, Alvin; Mairal, Anurag P

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and corresponding apparatus for dehydrating gas, especially natural gas. The process includes an absorption step and a membrane pervaporation step to regenerate the liquid sorbent.

  17. ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to successfully produce low permeability gas reservoirs. My study links rock physics to well log and seismic data shales to reservoir sandstones. Typically, the presence of gas-saturated sandstones lowers the Vp/Vs evenELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AT RULISON FIELD

  18. Sequestration of CO2 in the Altmark natural gas field, Germany: Mobility control to extend enhanced gas recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebscher, D.; May, F.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE ALTMARK NATURAL GAS FIELD, GERMANY: MOBILITY CONTROL TOStilleweg 2 D-30655 Hannover Germany average 8 % (Schumachernatural gas reservoir, Germany. Our approach is numerical

  19. US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves, 1992 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1992, as well as production volumes for the United States, and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1992. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), its two major components (nonassociated and associated-dissolved gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, two components of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, have their reserves and production data presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1992 is provided.

  20. Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

  1. Natural gas annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

  2. Future of Natural Gas

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Natural Gas Bill Eisele, CEM SC Electric & Gas Co Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral. Florida Agenda * Gas Facts *...

  3. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  4. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  5. Fluid and heat flow in gas-rich geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Sullivan, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Blakeley, M.R.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical-simulation techniques are used to study the effects of noncondensible gases (CO/sub 2/) on geothermal reservoir behavior in the natural state and during exploitation. It is shown that the presence of CO/sub 2/ has large effects on the thermodynamic conditions of a reservoir in the natural state, especially on temperature distributions and phase compositions. The gas will expand two-phase zones and increase gas saturations to enable flow of CO/sub 2/ through the system. During exploitation, the early pressure drop is primarily due to degassing of the system. This process can cause a very rapid initial pressure drop, on the order of tens of bars, depending upon the initial partial pressure of CO/sub 2/. The following gas content from wells can provide information on in-place gas saturations and relative permeability curves that apply at a given geothermal resource. Site-specific studies are made for the gas-rich two-phase reservoir at the Ohaki geothermal field in New Zealand. A simple lumped-parameter model and a vertical column model are applied to the field data. The results obtained agree well with the natural thermodynamic state of the Ohaki field (pressure and temperature profiles) and a partial pressure of 15 to 25 bars is calculated in the primary reservoirs. The models also agree reasonably well with field data obtained during exploitation of the field. The treatment of thermophysical properties of H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ mixtures for different phase compositions is summarized.

  6. Natural gas monthly, November 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gross withdrawals of natural gas (wet, after lease separation) from gas and oil wells in the United States during November 1988, were estimated at 1755 billion cubic feet, 1.3 percent above withdrawals during November 1987. Of the total quantity, an estimated 215 billion cubic feet were returned to gas and oil reservoirs for repressuring, pressure maintenance, and cycling; 35 billion cubic feet of nonhydrocarbon gases were removed; and 13 billion cubic feet were vented or flared. The remaining wet marketed production totaled 1492 billion cubic feet. Dry gas production (wet marketed production minus 70 billion cubic feet of extraction loss) totaled an estimated 1422 billion cubic feet, similar to the November 1987 level. The total dry gas supply available for disposition in November 1988 was estimated at 1702 billion cubic feet, including 173 billion cubic feet withdrawn from storage, 12 billion cubic feet of supplemental supplies, and 95 billion cubic feet that were imported. In November 1987, dry gas available for disposition totaled 1684 billion cubic feet. Of the total dry gas supply available for disposition in November 1988, an estimated 1467 billion cubic feet were consumed, 148 billion cubic feet were injected into underground storage reservoirs, and 5 billion cubic feet were exported, leaving 82 billion cubic feet unaccounted for.

  7. Natural gas monthly, March 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Gross withdrawals of natural gas (wet, after lease separation) from gas and oil wells in the United States during March 1989, were estimated at 1777 billion cubic feet, 0.4 percent below withdrawals during March 1988. Of the total quantity, an estimated 211 billion cubic feet were returned to gas and oil reservoirs for repressuring, pressure maintenance, and cycling; 36 billion cubic feet of nonhydrocarbon gases were removed; and 12 billion cubic feet were vented or flared. The remaining wet marketed production totaled 1518 billion cubic feet. Dry gas production (wet marketed production minus 71 billion cubic feet of extraction loss) totaled an estimated 1447 billion cubic feet, similar to the March 1988 level. The total dry gas supply available for disposition in March 1989 was estimated at 1881 billion cubic feet, including 319 billion cubic feet withdrawn from storage, 14 billion cubic feet of supplemental supplies, and 101 billion cubic feet that were imported. In March 1988, dry gas available for disposition totaled 1841 billion cubic feet. Of the total dry gas supply available for disposition in March 1989, an estimated 1837 billion cubic feet were consumed, 93 billion cubic feet were injected into underground storage reservoirs and 8 billion cubic feet were exported, leaving 57 billion cubic feet unaccounted for.

  8. Analysis of condensate banking dynamics in a gas condensate reservoir under different injection schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandoval Rodriguez, Angelica Patricia

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    condensate reservoir under natural depletion, and injection of methane, injection of carbon dioxide, produced gas recycling and water injection. To monitor the condensate banking dynamics near the wellbore area, such as oil saturation and compositional...

  9. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report for the period: 7/1/93--9/31/93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1993-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The study area is located at the southern end of the Powder River Basin in Converse County in east-central Wyoming. It is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. Reservoirs are highly compartmentalized due to the low permeabilities, and fractures provide the only practical paths of production. During this eighth quarter of the seismic study of this area, work continued in processing seismic data, collecting additional geological information to aid in the interpretation, and integrating regional structural information and fracture trends with observations of structure in the study area.

  10. Optimizing Development Strategies to Increase Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turkarslan, Gulcan

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    in tight gas fields is challenging, not only because of the wide range of depositional environments and large variability in reservoir properties, but also because the evaluation often has to deal with a multitude of wells, limited reservoir information...

  11. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

  12. Natural gas annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

  13. Liquefied Natural Gas (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document adopts the standards promulgated by the National Fire Protection Association as rules for the transportation, storage, handling, and use of liquefied natural gas. The NFPA standards...

  14. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Interstate Pipelines Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural...

  15. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Corridors About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Major Natural...

  16. A Variable Cell Model for Simulating Gas Condensate Reservoir Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Majed, Abdulaziz Abdullah

    maturation profiles, which ie exhibitpd when gas pressure. Between this region near tha wellbore, SPE-~~~ SPE 21428 A Variable Cell Model for Simulating Gas Condensate Reservoir Performance A of depletion performance of gas condensate reservoirs report the existence of a A variable cell model

  17. A triple-continuum pressure-transient model for a naturally fractured vuggy reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs, Water Resour.model for fissured fractured reservoir, Soc. Pet. Eng. J. ,behavior of naturally fractured reservoirs, Soc. Pet. Eng.

  18. Feasibility of waterflooding Soku E7000 gas-condensate reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajayi, Arashi

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . To achieve this recovery, the reservoir should return to natural depletion after four years of water injection, before water invades the producing wells. Factors that affect the effectiveness of water injection in this reservoir include aquifer strength...

  19. Feasibility of waterflooding Soku E7000 gas-condensate reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajayi, Arashi

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . To achieve this recovery, the reservoir should return to natural depletion after four years of water injection, before water invades the producing wells. Factors that affect the effectiveness of water injection in this reservoir include aquifer strength...

  20. Welcome FUPWG- Natural Gas Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—provides an overview of natural gas, including emissions, compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, and landfill gas supplement for natural gas system.

  1. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir...

  2. MODELING OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY FORMAL HOMOGENIZATION TECHNIQUES*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Jr., Jim

    MODELING OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY FORMAL HOMOGENIZATION TECHNIQUES* Todd Arbogast,y Jim in naturally fractured reservoirs. A single component in a single phase and two-component mis- cible. porous medium, double porosity, fractured reservoir, homogenization. yDepartment of Mathematics, Purdue

  3. US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1996 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1996, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1996. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1996 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

  4. U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1995, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1995. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1995 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

  5. Reservoir Engineering for Unconventional Gas Reservoirs: What Do We Have to Consider?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarkson, Christopher R [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reservoir engineer involved in the development of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) is required to integrate a vast amount of data from disparate sources, and to be familiar with the data collection and assessment. There has been a rapid evolution of technology used to characterize UGR reservoir and hydraulic fracture properties, and there currently are few standardized procedures to be used as guidance. Therefore, more than ever, the reservoir engineer is required to question data sources and have an intimate knowledge of evaluation procedures. We propose a workflow for the optimization of UGR field development to guide discussion of the reservoir engineer's role in the process. Critical issues related to reservoir sample and log analysis, rate-transient and production data analysis, hydraulic and reservoir modeling and economic analysis are raised. Further, we have provided illustrations of each step of the workflow using tight gas examples. Our intent is to provide some guidance for best practices. In addition to reviewing existing methods for reservoir characterization, we introduce new methods for measuring pore size distribution (small-angle neutron scattering), evaluating core-scale heterogeneity, log-core calibration, evaluating core/log data trends to assist with scale-up of core data, and modeling flow-back of reservoir fluids immediately after well stimulation. Our focus in this manuscript is on tight and shale gas reservoirs; reservoir characterization methods for coalbed methane reservoirs have recently been discussed.

  6. 47 Natural Gas Market Trends NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    47 Natural Gas Market Trends Chapter 5 NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS INTRODUCTION Natural gas discusses current natural gas market conditions in California and the rest of North America, followed on the outlook for demand, supply, and price of natural gas for the forecasted 20-year horizon. It also addresses

  7. Analysis of the Development of Messoyakha Gas Field: A Commercial Gas Hydrate Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omelchenko, Roman 1987-

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    the presence of gas hydrates in the Messoyakha field was not a certainty, this current study determined the undeniable presence of gas hydrates in the reservoir. This study uses four models of the Messoyakha field structure and reservoir conditions...

  8. Impes modeling of volumetric dry gas reservoirs with mobile water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forghany, Saeed

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . For abnormally or geopressured reservoirs, pressure gradients often approach values equal to the overburden pressure gradient (i.e., ~1.0 psi/ft). 8, 9 Among these types of dry gas reservoirs, in this study we will focus on volumetric reservoir. 1... properties of a given reservoir?s gas and water can handle pressures starting from standard conditions up to 4,000 psi and the units for this table are tabulated in Table 3.1. Table 3.1- Units for the PVT properties used in the input file Pressure...

  9. Characterization and reservoir evaluation of a hydraulically fractured, shaly gas reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago Molina, Cesar Alfonso

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the possibility of replacing average reservoir pressures for short-term pressure data to evaluate gas reserves. Petrophysical properties derived from logs (shale content and porosity) were found to correlate very well. A correlation between average porosity..., Shaly Gas Reservoir. ( December 1991 ) Cesar Alfonso Santiago Molina, Ingeniero de Petroleos, Universidad Nacional de Colombia; Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Steven W. Poston Shale content in reservoir rocks affect their petrophysical properties...

  10. Incremental natural gas resources through infield reserve growth/secondary natural gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finley, R.J.; Levey, R.A.; Hardage, B.A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the Infield Reserve Growth/Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR) project is to develop, test, and verify technologies and methodologies with near- to midterm potential for maximizing the recovery of natural gasfrom conventional reservoirs in known fields. Additional technical and technology transfer objectives of the SGR project include: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities in reservoirs of conventional permeability cause reservoir compartmentalization and, hence, incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas gulf coast basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications to find secondary gas. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields. To transfer project results to a wide array of natural gas producers, not just as field case studies, but as conceptual models of how heterogeneities determine natural gas flow units and how to recognize the geologic and engineering clues that operators can use in a cost-effective manner to identify incremental, or secondary, gas.

  11. Selection of fracture fluid for stimulating tight gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malpani, Rajgopal Vijaykumar

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    , surveys from fracturing experts, and statistical analysis of production data, this research provides guidelines for selection of the appropriate stimulation treatment fluid in most gas shale and tight gas reservoirs. This study takes into account various...

  12. AN ADVISORY SYSTEM FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF UNCONVENTIONAL GAS RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Yunan

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    With the rapidly increasing demand for energy and the increasing prices for oil and gas, the role of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) as energy sources is becoming more important throughout the world. Because of high risks and uncertainties...

  13. New inflow performance relationships for gas condensate reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Castillo Maravi, Yanil

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we propose two new Vogel-type Inflow Performance Relations (or IPR) correlations for gas-condensate reservoir systems. One correlation predicts dry gas production the other predicts condensate (liquid) production. These correlations...

  14. New inflow performance relationships for gas condensate reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Castillo Maravi, Yanil

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we propose two new Vogel-type Inflow Performance Relations (or IPR) correlations for gas-condensate reservoir systems. One correlation predicts dry gas production the other predicts condensate (liquid) ...

  15. A Handbook for the Application of Seismic Methods for Quantifying Naturally Fractured Gas Reservoirs in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    data in the Mesaverde was to perform the analysis on the reservoir rock (lithology): sand, not shale.reservoir and in the formations above the Lewis shale the datadata could not be explained without the fracture-induced anisotropy in the reservoir and above the Lewis shale.

  16. Simulation of paraffin damage due to natural cooling in reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peddibhotla, Sriram

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and phases at reservoir conditions Fig. 4 - Solid-liquid phase equilibrium Fig. 5 - Paraffin plugging pore spaces 12 15 Fig. 6 - Simulated oil rates for a well in a reservoir without gas . . . . . . . . . Fig. 7 - Paraffin deposition profile... of paraffin removal with cyclic ERH heating for Case 1 Fig. 15 - Simulated oil rates for a well in a reservoir with gas. . . . , . . . . . Fig. 16 - Paraffin deposition profile for an initial solid concentration 3. 5/o Fig. 17 - Production ratio as a...

  17. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Data presented include volume and price, production, consumption, underground storage, and interstate pipeline activities.

  18. Natural Gas Regulations (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation title 805 promulgates the rules and regulations pertaining to natural gas production in Kentucky. In addition to KAR title 405, chapter 30, which pertains to any...

  19. ESTIMATION OF MATRIX BLOCK SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ESTIMATION OF MATRIX BLOCK SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS A Report Submitted;2 ABSTRACT Interporosity flow in a naturslly fractured reservoir is modelled by a new formulation of the distribution. Thus, observed pressure response from fractured reservoirs can be analysed to obtain the matrix

  20. Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silin, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamentals of fractured reservoir engineering, Elsevierof naturally fractured reservoirs, SPEJ (1963), 106. J. D.37]. In a fractured conventional reservoir, the accumulating

  1. Natural Gas | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fossil Natural Gas Natural Gas September 15, 2014 NETL Releases Hydraulic Fracturing Study The National Energy Technology Laboratory has released a technical report on the...

  2. Historical Natural Gas Annual 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1999 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  3. Analytical solution for Joule-Thomson cooling during CO2 geo-sequestration in depleted oil and gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathias, S.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sequestration in depleted oil and gas reservoirs Simon A.1. Introduction Depleted oil and gas reservoirs (DOGRs)

  4. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    for consolidated reservoir cases while synthetic data (generated by the model using known parameters) was used for unconsolidated reservoir cases. In both cases, the Compartmentalized Depletion Model was used to analyze data, and estimate the OGIP and Jg of each...

  5. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    for consolidated reservoir cases while synthetic data (generated by the model using known parameters) was used for unconsolidated reservoir cases. In both cases, the Compartmentalized Depletion Model was used to analyze data, and estimate the OGIP and Jg of each...

  6. Analyzing aquifers associated with gas reservoirs using aquifer influence functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Targac, Gary Wayne

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - teristics of the associated aquifer are vital to proper management of the reservoir. Typically, the reservoir and associated aquifer are located in a geologic setting which is highly faulted. Limited geologic and seismic knowledge exists about...ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  7. Natural gas repowering experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bautista, P.J.; Fay, J.M. [Gas Research Institute, Chicago, IL (United States); Gerber, F.B. [BENTEK Energy Research, DeSoto, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Research Institute has led a variety of projects in the past two years with respect to repowering with natural gas. These activities, including workshops, technology evaluations, and market assessments, have indicated that a significant opportunity for repowering exists. It is obvious that the electric power industry`s restructuring and the actual implementation of environmental regulations from the Clean Air Act Amendments will have significant impact on repowering with respect to timing and ultimate size of the market. This paper summarizes the results and implications of these activities in repowering with natural gas. It first addresses the size of the potential market and discusses some of the significant issues with respect to this market potential. It then provides a perspective on technical options for repowering which are likely to be competitive in the current environment. Finally, it addresses possible actions by the gas industry and GRI to facilitate development of the repowering market.

  8. Analysis of Water Flowback Data in Gas Shale Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldaif, Hussain

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    it at different reservoir conditions. For this purpose, several simulation cases were run. The results of the simulation runs were compared with the production data from several Fayetteville gas wells. Different conclusions were obtained from these comparisons...

  9. Stress-dependent permeability on tight gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Cesar Alexander

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    People in the oil and gas industry sometimes do not consider pressure-dependent permeability in reservoir performance calculations. It basically happens due to lack of lab data to determine level of dependency. This thesis ...

  10. Analysis of Water Flowback Data in Gas Shale Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldaif, Hussain

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of both shale gas reservoirs and hydraulic fractures are usually estimated by analyzing hydrocarbon production data while water data is typically ignored. This study introduces a new method to estimate the effective fracture volume...

  11. An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Marine Areas Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An Integrated Study Method For...

  12. Natural Gas Purchasing Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, G.

    As a result of economic and regulatory changes, the natural gas marketplace now offers multiple options for purchasers. The purpose of this panel is to discuss short-term purchasing options and how to take advantage of these options both to lower...

  13. Natural Gas Purchasing Options 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, G.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of economic and regulatory changes, the natural gas marketplace now offers multiple options for purchasers. The purpose of this panel is to discuss short-term purchasing options and how to take advantage of these options both to lower...

  14. Recovery of oil from fractured reservoirs by gas displacement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unneberg, Arild

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNE BE RG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNEBERG Approved as, to style and content by: . ( y (Chairman of Cornrnittee) (Head of Depar nt) / (Membe r) (Member) M b...

  15. Recovery of oil from fractured reservoirs by gas displacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unneberg, Arild

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNE BE RG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNEBERG Approved as, to style and content by: . ( y (Chairman of Cornrnittee) (Head of Depar nt) / (Membe r) (Member) M b...

  16. Analyzing aquifers associated with gas reservoirs using aquifer influence functions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Targac, Gary Wayne

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE V z May 1988 z V z z I- Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Approved as to style and content by: (Chair of Committ R...

  17. Using multi-layer models to forecast gas flow rates in tight gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerez Vera, Sergio Armando

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    , and (2) to use the single-layer match to demonstrate the error that can occur when forecasting long-term gas production for such complex gas reservoirs. A finite-difference reservoir simulator was used to simulate gas production from various layered tight...

  18. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

  19. Natural gas monthly, April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. There are two feature articles in this issue: Natural gas 1998: Issues and trends, Executive summary; and Special report: Natural gas 1998: A preliminary summary. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  20. Type curve analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs (infinite-acting reservoir case): a new approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angel Restrepo, Juan Alejandro

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The objectives of this work are as follows: First, we generated new type curves for the analysis of pressure drawdown and buildup tests performed in naturally fractured reservoirs. Next, we develop a systematic approach for the analysis and interpretation...

  1. Type curve analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs (infinite-acting reservoir case): a new approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angel Restrepo, Juan Alejandro

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work introduces new type curve solutions for an unfractured well in an infinite-acting naturally fractured reservoir, including wellbore storage and skin effects. Both pseudosteady-state¹ and transient²?³ interporosity flow models are studied...

  2. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiggins, Michael L; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    During this reporting period, research was continued on characterizing and modeling the behavior of naturally fractured reservoir systems. This report proposed a model to relate the seismic response to production data to determine crack spacing and aperture, provided details of tests of proposed models to obtain fracture properties from conventional well logs with actual field data, and verification of the naturally fractured reservoir simulator developed in this project.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES AND PRODUCTION MODELS FOR EXPLOITING NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Wiggins; Raymon L. Brown; Faruk Civan; Richard G. Hughes

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For many years, geoscientists and engineers have undertaken research to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Geoscientists have focused on understanding the process of fracturing and the subsequent measurement and description of fracture characteristics. Engineers have concentrated on the fluid flow behavior in the fracture-porous media system and the development of models to predict the hydrocarbon production from these complex systems. This research attempts to integrate these two complementary views to develop a quantitative reservoir characterization methodology and flow performance model for naturally fractured reservoirs. The research has focused on estimating naturally fractured reservoir properties from seismic data, predicting fracture characteristics from well logs, and developing a naturally fractured reservoir simulator. It is important to develop techniques that can be applied to estimate the important parameters in predicting the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. This project proposes a method to relate seismic properties to the elastic compliance and permeability of the reservoir based upon a sugar cube model. In addition, methods are presented to use conventional well logs to estimate localized fracture information for reservoir characterization purposes. The ability to estimate fracture information from conventional well logs is very important in older wells where data are often limited. Finally, a desktop naturally fractured reservoir simulator has been developed for the purpose of predicting the performance of these complex reservoirs. The simulator incorporates vertical and horizontal wellbore models, methods to handle matrix to fracture fluid transfer, and fracture permeability tensors. This research project has developed methods to characterize and study the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs that integrate geoscience and engineering data. This is an important step in developing exploitation strategies for optimizing the recovery from naturally fractured reservoir systems. The next logical extension of this work is to apply the proposed methods to an actual field case study to provide information for verification and modification of the techniques and simulator. This report provides the details of the proposed techniques and summarizes the activities undertaken during the course of this project. Technology transfer activities were highlighted by a two-day technical conference held in Oklahoma City in June 2002. This conference attracted over 90 participants and included the presentation of seventeen technical papers from researchers throughout the United States.

  4. Natural gas monthly, December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information of interest to organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Data are presented on natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also included.

  5. Natural Gas Exports from Iran

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Iran’s natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

  6. Natural gas monthly, October 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  7. Natural gas monthly, March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  8. Natural gas monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highhghts activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  9. Natural gas monthly, September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  10. Natural gas monthly, July 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is entitled ``Intricate puzzle of oil and gas reserves growth.`` A special report is included on revisions to monthly natural gas data. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

  11. NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Shahab D. Mohaghegh Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Keywords: Gas Storage, Natural Gas, Storage, Deliverability, Inventory

  12. Natural gas monthly, May 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  13. Natural gas monthly, July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents information pertaining to the natural gas industry. Data are included on production, consumption, distribution, and pipeline activities.

  14. Natural gas monthly, August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  15. Natural gas monthly, October 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  16. Natural gas monthly, June 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

  17. Natural gas monthly: December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. Articles are included which are designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  18. Natural gas monthly, June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  19. Natural gas monthly, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  20. Natural gas monthly, November 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground state data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  1. Natural gas monthly, July 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

  2. Natural gas monthly, April 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 31 tabs.

  3. Natural Gas Monthly, March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  4. Natural gas monthly, June 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  5. The production characteristics of a solution gas-drive reservoir as measured on a centrifugal model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodwin, Robert Jennings

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixtures and Cetus Oil - Natural Gas Mixtures Reservoir Pez&ormance Characteristics for Test Number 17 Through Well Number Three with Fluid Number One Reservoir Perfozmanco Characteristics for Test Number 32 Through Well Number One with Fluid Number... data to show that recovery 8?9, . 10 is a function of well spacing for the soluti on gas drive producing mecha- 12 nism while Kaveler has countered the proposition with other data. Tomlinson and Craze and 77uckley have interprei, ed the same API 11...

  6. Simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs using empirical transfer function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tellapaneni, Prasanna Kumar

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research utilizes the imbibition experiments and X-ray tomography results for modeling fluid flow in naturally fractured reservoirs. Conventional dual porosity simulation requires large number of runs to quantify transfer function parameters...

  7. Streamline-based production data integration in naturally fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Harbi, Mishal H.

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Streamline-based models have shown great potential in reconciling high resolution geologic models to production data. In this work we extend the streamline-based production data integration technique to naturally fractured reservoirs. We use a...

  8. Natural gas monthly, January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  9. Natural gas monthly, November 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  10. Natural gas monthly, February 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  11. Natural gas production from hydrate dissociation: An axisymmetric model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmadi, G. (Clarkson Univ., Pottsdam, NY); Ji, Chuang (Clarkson Univ., Pottsdam, NY); Smith, D.H.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an axisymmetric model for natural gas production from the dissociation of methane hydrate in a confined reservoir by a depressurizing well. During the hydrate dissociation, heat and mass transfer in the reservoir are analyzed. The system of governing equations is solved by a finite difference scheme. For different well pressures and reservoir temperatures, distributions of temperature and pressure in the reservoir, as well as the natural gas production from the well are evaluated. The numerical results are compared with those obtained by a linearization method. It is shown that the gas production rate is a sensitive function of well pressure. The simulation results are compared with the linearization approach and the shortcomings of the earlier approach are discussed.

  12. Accounting for Adsorbed gas and its effect on production bahavior of Shale Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mengal, Salman Akram

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    pressures )( p by conventional well tests due to very low permeabilities. Decline curves for conventional gas, when applied on shale gas reservoirs, can not be validated by material balance due to unavailability of average reservoir pressure. However...* variable rate gas BDF including adsorbed gas exhibiting exponential decline (b = 1)................. 25 4.6 Plot of [m(pi )? m(pwf )] / qg(t) vs material balance pseudo time tca*, xii FIGURE...

  13. Natural gas monthly, May 1988. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Gross withdrawals of natural gas (wet, after lease separation) from gas and oil wells in the United States during May 1988, were estimated at 1632 billion cubic feet, 1.3 percent above withdrawals during May 1987. Of the total quantity, an estimated 179 billion cubic feet were returned to gas and oil reservoirs for repressuring, pressure maintenance, and cycling; 10 billion cubic feet were vented or flared; and 33 billion cubic feet of nonhydrocarbon gases were removed. The remaining wet marketed production totaled 1410 billion cubic feet. Dry gas production (wet marketed production minus 67 billion cubic feet of extraction loss) totaled an estimated 1343 billion cubic feet, 1.7 percent above the May 1987 level. The total dry gas supply available for disposition in May 1988 was estimated at 1490 billion cubic feet, including 35 billion cubic feet withdrawn from storage, 11 billion cubic feet of supplemental supplies, and 101 billion cubic feet that were imported. In May 1987, dry gas available for disposition totaled 1419 billion cubic feet. Of the total dry gas supply available for disposition in May 1988, an estimated 1259 billion cubic feet were consumed, 294 billion cubic feet were injected into underground storage reservoirs, and 5 billion cubic feet were exported, leaving 68 billion cubic feet unaccounted for.

  14. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the cooperative research program is to characterize Alaskan reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration and structure, and the development potential. The tasks completed during this period include: (1) geologic reservoir description of Endicott Field; (2) petrographic characterization of core samples taken from selected stratigraphic horizons of the West Sak and Ugnu (Brookian) wells; (3) development of a polydispersed thermodynamic model for predicting asphaltene equilibria and asphaltene precipitation from crude oil-solvent mixtures, and (4) preliminary geologic description of the Milne Point Unit.

  15. Natural Gas Reforming | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen Production Natural Gas Reforming Natural Gas Reforming Photo of Petroleum Refinery Natural gas reforming is an advanced and mature production process that builds upon...

  16. Integrated Hydraulic Fracture Placement and Design Optimization in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Xiaodan

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Unconventional reservoir such as tight and shale gas reservoirs has the potential of becoming the main source of cleaner energy in the 21th century. Production from these reservoirs is mainly accomplished through engineered hydraulic fracturing...

  17. Integrated Hydraulic Fracture Placement and Design Optimization in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Xiaodan

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Unconventional reservoir such as tight and shale gas reservoirs has the potential of becoming the main source of cleaner energy in the 21th century. Production from these reservoirs is mainly accomplished through engineered hydraulic fracturing...

  18. Natural gas monthly, October 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article in this issue is a special report, ``Comparison of Natural Gas Storage Estimates from the EIA and AGA.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  19. Natural gas monthly, June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The natural gas monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article for this month is Natural Gas Industry Restructuring and EIA Data Collection.

  20. Natural gas monthly, April 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are present3ed each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article is entitled ``Natural gas pipeline and system expansions.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  1. Natural gas monthly, May 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is ``Restructuring energy industries: Lessons from natural gas.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  2. Natural gas monthly, December 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The article this month is entitled ``Recent Trends in Natural Gas Spot Prices.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  3. EIA - Natural Gas Publications

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469DecadeOrigin State Glossary HomeCapacityNatural Gas

  4. Natural Gas Transportation Resiliency

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancyNationalNatural GasImports byTransportation

  5. Natural gas monthly, April 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Estimates extend through April 1998 for many data series. The report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, feature articles are presented designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This issue contains the special report, ``Natural Gas 1997: A Preliminary Summary.`` This report provides information on natural gas supply and disposition for the year 1997, based on monthly data through December from EIA surveys. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  6. Natural gas monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  7. Natural gas monthly, September 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  8. Analysis of a geopressured gas reservoir using solution plot method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussain, Syed Muqeedul

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reservoir to estimate OGIP, c~ and W~. The only input parameters required are the pressure-production data. 2. It is important to recognize that all the energy sources i. e. expansion of gas, rock and water, and water influx may be active at any time... geopressured gas reservoir has been observed to deviate from the theoretical straight line of the Solution plot. These deviations have been designated as Tail 1 and Tail 2. Tail 1, exhibiting increasing effective compressibility is a response to rock...

  9. NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

  10. Horizontal wells enhance development of thin offshore gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gidman, B. [Chevron USA, Lafayette, LA (United States); Hammons, L.R.B.; Paulk, M.D. [Baker Hughes INTEQ, Lafayette, LA (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal wells in clastic rocks can reduce water coning problems and increase production rates as much as six-fold. They are now practical to drill for developing Gulf of Mexico gas reservoirs that may be less than 10 ft thick. In 1991, Chevron USA began exploring the feasibility of developing thin gas reservoirs in western Gulf of Mexico (GOM) fields. A critical element that needed to be addressed was the minimum target thickness that is geologically and operationally practical to drill with current horizontal well technology. Chevron`s first GOM horizontal well spudded in February 1992. The target was 31 ft of net effective gas on water in a massive Pleistocene sand at 1,700 ft TVD. Chevron spudded a second horizontal well in the same field during June 1993. This well was geosteered into a 19-ft gas sand with no immediate water contact at 1,650 ft TVD. The entire 1,000-ft horizontal section was interpreted as gas from the MWD tool response. A spinner survey was not run in this hole. At 19 MMcfd of gas, this well also proved to be a major economic success because of its low cost. After the second completion, Chevron`s next proposed well targeted a gas reservoir with a maximum thickness of only 7 ft.

  11. Regulation of Natural Gas (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation provides for the protection of public and private interests with regards to natural gas production, prohibits waste, and compels ratable production to enable owners of gas in a...

  12. Natural Gas Rules (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules apply to any gas utility operating within the State of North Carolina under the jurisdiction of the North Carolina Utilities Commission and also to interstate natural gas companies...

  13. Natural gas monthly, March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The March 1998 edition of the Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. This report also features an article on the correction of errors in the drilling activity estimates series, and in-depth drilling activity data. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  14. Natural gas monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The NGM also features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  15. Natural gas monthly, May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  16. STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS FROM STATIC AND DYNAMIC IMBIBITION EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS FROM STATIC AND DYNAMIC IMBIBITION experiments, followed by waterflooding, were performed at reservoir conditions to investigate rock wettability Berea and Spraberry cores at reservoir conditions to illustrate the actual process of waterflooding

  17. A triple-continuum pressure-transient model for a naturally fractured vuggy reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    well test data from a fractured-vuggy reservoir in Westernwell test data from a fractured-vuggy reservoir in Westerndata for two wells from a naturally fractured vuggy oil reservoir,

  18. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field number 1, onshore gulf coast over-pressured, high yield condensate reservoir. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop improved completion and reservoir management strategies for water-drive gas reservoirs, the study conducted on an overpressured high yield gas condensate reservoir is reported. The base recovery factor for the field was projected to be only 47.8%, due to high residual gas saturation and a relatively strong aquifer which maintained reservoir pressure.

  19. Natural gas monthly, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The featured article for this month is on US coalbed methane production.

  20. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","12015","1151989" ,"Release Date:","331...

  1. Natural gas monthly, August 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information on natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

  2. Natural Gas Pipeline Safety (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article states minimum safety standards for the transportation of natural gas by pipeline and reporting requirements for operators of pipelines.

  3. Natural Gas Pipeline Utilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to entities seeking to develop and operate natural gas pipelines and provide construction requirements for such pipelines. The regulations describe the authority of the...

  4. Renewable Natural Gas- Developer Perspective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3-C: Renewable Gaseous FuelsRenewable Natural Gas - Developer PerspectiveDavid Ross, Managing Director, MultiGen International, LLC

  5. 3D multi-scale imaging of experimental fracture generation in shale gas reservoirs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    in research and shale unconventional reservoirs that will provide you with the skills to enter the oil and gas3D multi-scale imaging of experimental fracture generation in shale gas reservoirs. Supervisory-grained organic carbon-rich rocks (shales) are increasingly being targeted as shale gas "reservoirs". Due

  6. Natural gas monthly, October 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia. 16 figs., 33 tabs.

  7. Natural gas pipeline technology overview.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

  8. Underground Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lays out guidelines for the conditions under which coal mining operations must notify state authorities of intentions to mine where underground gas is stored as well as map and data requirements,...

  9. Niobrara gas play: exploration and development of a low pressure, low permeability gas reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.A.; Crafton, J.W.; Golson, J.G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Niobrara Gas Play in eastern Colorado, northwestern Kansas and western Nebraska is an exemplary model for developing an integrated interdisciplinary exploration and exploitation strategy. This paper demonstrates a method to incorporate all types of analyses including geology and gas origin, petrology, drilling and completion, log interpretation, fracture stimulation and producing methods. Together these analyses are integrated into a rigorous reservoir study using mathematical simulation to evaluate well productivity and reservoir performance. 9 refs.

  10. Natural gas monthly, February 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration. Estimates extend through February 1998 for many data series, and through November 1997 for most natural gas prices. Highlights of the natural gas data contained in this issue are: Preliminary estimates for January and February 1998 show that dry natural gas production, net imports, and consumption are all within 1 percent of their levels in 1997. Warmer-than-normal weather in recent months has resulted in lower consumption of natural gas by the residential sector and lower net withdrawals of gas from under round storage facilities compared with a year ago. This has resulted in an estimate of the amount of working gas in storage at the end of February 1998 that is 18 percent higher than in February 1997. The national average natural gas wellhead price is estimated to be $3.05 per thousand cubic feet in November 1997, 7 percent higher than in October. The cumulative average wellhead price for January through November 1997 is estimated to be $2.42 per thousand cubic feet, 17 percent above that of the same period in 1996. This price increase is far less than 36-percent rise that occurred between 1995 and 1996. 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  11. Natural gas monthly, December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights activities, events, and analysis of interest to the public and private sector associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also included.

  12. Natural gas monthly, August 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector oganizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 33 tabs.

  13. ,"New York Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    50NY3","N3010NY3","N3020NY3","N3035NY3","N3045NY3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in New York (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","New York Price of Natural Gas Delivered to...

  14. Natural gas monthly, July 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. A glossary is included. 7 figs., 33 tabs.

  15. Dealing with natural gas uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, J.; Graeber, D. (J.R. Clements and Associates (US))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fuel of choice for generating new power is and will continue over the next two decades to be natural gas. It is the fuel of choice because it is plentiful, environmentally acceptable, and relatively inexpensive. This paper reports that gas reserves on the North American continent continue to be discovered in amounts that may keep the gas bubble inflated far longer than currently estimated. New gas transportation capacity is actively being developed to overcome the capacity bottlenecks and deliverability shortfalls. Natural gas prices will probably remain stable (with expected CPI-related increases) for the short run (2-4 years), and probably will be higher than CPI increases thereafter.

  16. Niobrara gas play: exploration and development of a low-pressure, low-permeability gas reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.A.; Crafton, J.W.; Golson, J.G.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated interdisciplinary exploration/exploitation strategy contributed to the successful economic development of the Niobrara gas play, located in eastern Colorado, northwestern Kansas, and western Nebraska. The exploration, development, production, and evaluation data suggest that (1) Niobrara chalk reservoirs have exceptionally high porosities but very low permeabilities, (2) individual reservoirs are low-relief, highly faulted structural traps characterized consistently by extensive water-transition zones, (3) the reservoirs contain biogenic gas (the Niobrara acts as its own source rock,) (4) an exploration fairway can be defined if porosity, permeability, and pressure are correlated with paleodepth, (5) optimal logging, completion, stimulation, and producing methods are readily definable, (6) reservoir performance is predicted adequately by numerical simulation, and (7) infill drilling on 160-acre spacing will allow better reservoir drainage.

  17. Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification -- Testimony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NANGAS (North American Natural Gas Analysis System), E2020 (Modeling Forum (EMF). 2003. Natural Gas, Fuel Diversity and2003. Increasing U.S. Natural Gas Supplies: A Discussion

  18. Natural gas leak mapper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  19. A Parallelizable Method for Two-Phase Flows in Naturally-Fractured Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Jr., Jim

    A Parallelizable Method for Two-Phase Flows in Naturally-Fractured Reservoirs Jim Douglas, Jr. #3 is proposed for the study of naturally- fractured reservoir systems. It has proved to be computationally e- ooding a naturally-fractured petroleum reservoir or to unsaturated groundwater ow again in a naturally-fractured

  20. Natural gas monthly, August 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis presents the most recent data on natural gas prices, supply, and consumption from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The presentation of the latest monthly data is followed by an update on natural gas markets. The markets section examines the behavior of daily spot and futures prices based on information from trade press, as well as regional, weekly data on natural gas storage from the American Gas Association (AGA). This {open_quotes}Highlights{close_quotes} closes with a special section comparing and contrasting EIA and AGA storage data on a monthly and regional basis. The regions used are those defined by the AGA for their weekly data collection effort: the Producing Region, the Consuming Region East, and the Consuming Region West. While data on working gas levels have tracked fairly closely between the two data sources, differences have developed recently. The largest difference is in estimates of working gas levels in the East consuming region during the heating season.

  1. Economics of natural gas upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source in meeting some of the market demand presently met by liquid products from crude oil. This study was initiated to analyze three energy markets to determine if greater use could be made of natural gas or natural gas derived products and if those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The three markets targeted for possible increases in gas use were motor fuels, power generation, and the chemical feedstocks market. The economics of processes to convert natural gas to transportation fuels, chemical products, and power were analyzed. The economic analysis was accomplished by drawing on a variety of detailed economic studies, updating them and bringing the results to a common basis. The processes analyzed included production of methanol, MTBE, higher alcohols, gasoline, CNG, and LNG for the transportation market. Production and use of methanol and ammonia in the chemical feedstock market and use of natural gas for power generation were also assessed. Use of both high and low quality gas as a process feed stream was evaluated. The analysis also explored the impact of various gas price growth rates and process facility locations, including remote gas areas. In assessing the transportation fuels market the analysis examined production and use of both conventional and new alternative motor fuels.

  2. Geomechanical Development of Fractured Reservoirs During Gas Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jian

    2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    GEOMECHANICAL DEVELOPMENT OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS DURING GAS PRODUCTION A Dissertation by JIAN HUANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... this research work. I would also want to extend my appreciation to my friends and colleagues, Jun Ge, Chakra Rawal, Reza Safari, Sonia Wang, Vahid Serajian, Wenxu Xue and other members in the geomechanics group, who were always willing to help and offer...

  3. Low permeability gas reservoir production using large hydraulic fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holditch, Stephen A

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    extending up to three thousand feet from the producing well. Also, a model simulating a nuclear cavity was designed. This model simulated a well containing an eighty foot radius cavity with a fractured zone of one hundred times the reservoir permeability... of each system was prepared. The results of this study showed that all fractures of greater than one thousand foot radius had greater productivity and greater cumu- lative gas produced than did the nuclear cavity. It appears that large hydraulic...

  4. North American Natural Gas Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  5. North American Natural Gas Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report sunnnarizes the research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  6. Illinois Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2014...

  7. Montana Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2014...

  8. Production management teachniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 3. Offshore gulf coast normally pressured, dry gas reservoir. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Uttley, S.J.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop improved completion and reservoir management strategies for water-drive gas reservoir, the study conducted on an offshore, normally pressured, dry gas reservoir is reported. The strategies that were particularly effective in increasing both the ultimate recovery and the net present value of the field are high volume water production from strategically located downdip wells and the recompletion of an upstructure well to recover trapped attic gas. High volume water production lowered the average reservoir pressure, which liberated residual gas trapped in the invaded region. Recompleting a new well into the reservoir also lowered the pressure and improved the volumetric displacement efficiency by recovering trapped attic gas. Ultimate recovery is predicted to increase 5-12% of the original gas-in-place.

  9. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collett, T.S. , 1993. Natural gas hydrates of the Prudhoe2008. Mechanical Properties of Natural Gas Hydrate Bearinggas hydrate reservoir. Natural Gas Hydrate: In Oceanic and

  10. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 2, offshore gulf coast over-pressured, dry gas reservoirs. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.E.; Jirik, L.A.; Hower, T.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of reservoir management strategies for optimization of ultimate hydrocarbon recovery and net present value from an overpressured, high yield gas condensate reservoir with water influx is reported. This field evaluation was based on a reservoir simulation. Volumetric and performance-derived original gas-in-place estimates did not agree: the performance-derived values were significantly lower than those predicted from volumetric analysis. Predicted field gas recovery was improved significantly by methods which accelerated gas withdrawals. Recovery was also influenced by well location. Accelerated withdrawals from wells near the aquifer tended to reduce sweep by cusping and coning water. This offset any benefits of increased gas rates.

  11. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this report was on preparing data and modules for Piceance Basin-wide fracture prediction. A review of the geological data input and automated history reconstruction approach was made. Fluid pressure data analysis and preliminary basin simulations were carried out. These activities are summarized briefly below and reviewed in more detail in Appendices A-E. Appendix D is a review of the fluid pressure data and its implications for compartmentation. Preliminary fracture prediction computations on generic basins are presented in Appendix E; these were carried out as part of our code testing activities. The results of these two Appendices are the beginning of what will be the basis of the model testing; fluid pressures are directly comparable with the model predictions and are a key element of fracture nucleation and presentation. We summarize the tectonic and sedimentary history of the Piceance Basin based on our automated history reconstruction and published interpretations. The narrative and figures provide the basic material we have quantified for our CIRF.B basin simulator input. This data supplements our existing well data interpretation approach. It provides an independent check of the automated sedimentary/subsidence history reconstruction module. Fluid pressure data was gathered and analyzed. This data serves two functions. Fluid pressure distribution across the basin provides a quantitative test as it is a direct prediction of CIRF.B. Furthermore, fluid pressure modifies effective stress. It thereby enters fracture nucleation criteria and fracture extension rate and aperture laws. The pressure data is presented in Appendix Din terms of overpressure maps and isosurfaces.

  12. Control of water coning in gas reservoirs by injecting gas into the aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haugen, Sigurd Arild

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONTROL O' NATEP, CONING IN GAS RESERVOIRS BY INJECTII4G CAS INTO THE AQUIFER A Thesis by SIGURD ARILD HAUGEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... Member May 1980 I~SGi9". p ABSTRACT Control of Water Coninc ir, Gas Reservoirs by Injecting Gas into the Aquifer (May 1980) Sigurd Arild Haugen, Dis. Ing. , Roga)and Regional College Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. R. A. Morse The production...

  13. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

  14. Natural Gas Ethanol Flex-Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Gas Propane Electric Ethanol Flex-Fuel Biodiesel Vehicle Buyer's Guide Clean Cities 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 About This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Compressed Natural Gas and emissions. Alternative fueling infrastructure is expanding in many regions, making natural gas, propane

  15. ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS DATA COLLECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION HISTORICAL ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS DATA COLLECTION Formsand of Power Plants Semi-Annual Report ..................................... 44 CEC-1306D UDC Natural Gas Tolling Agreement Quarterly Report.......................... 46 i #12;Natural Gas Utilities and Retailers

  16. Fracture Modeling and Flow Behavior in Shale Gas Reservoirs Using Discrete Fracture Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogbechie, Joachim Nwabunwanne

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gen and NFflow) for fracture modeling of a shale gas reservoir and also studies the interaction of the different fracture properties on reservoir response. The most important results of the study are that a uniform fracture network distribution and fracture...

  17. A Novel Approach For the Simulation of Multiple Flow Mechanisms and Porosities in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Bicheng

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of the art of modeling fluid flow in shale gas reservoirs is dominated by dual porosity models that divide the reservoirs into matrix blocks that significantly contribute to fluid storage and fracture networks which principally control...

  18. Natural Gas Monthly August 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. Explanatory notes supplement the information found in tables of the report. A description of the data collection surveys that support the NGM is provided. A glossary of the terms used in this report is also provided to assist readers in understanding the data presented in this publication.

  19. LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    more on imported supplies, including liquefied natural gas (LNG). Currently, the U.S. has four LNG have proposed to site LNG import facilities in California, in other locations in the U.S, and in Baja California, Mexico. In the early 1970s, California's gas utilities were planning to build an LNG import

  20. The outlook for natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The proceedings of the Institute of Gas Technology`s Houston Conference on the Outlook for Natural Gas held October 5, 1993 are presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  1. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a ``heterogeneity matrix`` based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

  2. Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Siting Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes a centralized and coordinated permitting process for the location of natural gas transmission pipeline corridors and the construction and maintenance of natural gas...

  3. Natural Gas Demand Markets in the Northeast

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Providing a Significant Opportunity for New and Expanding Natural Gas Demand Markets in the Northeast Prepared for: America's Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA) Prepared by: Bentek...

  4. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cummins, Inc., June 2011 Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation by Cummins, Inc., June 2011 Presentation on Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines...

  5. Agenda: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution Agenda: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution A Public Meeting on the Quadrennial Energy Review, Hosted by the...

  6. Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review Panel Report Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review Panel Report Independent...

  7. Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Report Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report Data Files Methodology and Analysis Form and Instructions Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report with data for February 2015...

  8. Historical Natural Gas Annual - 1930 Through 2000

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2000 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  9. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dresser Waukesha, June 2011 Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation by Dresser Waukesha, June 2011 Presentation on Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating...

  10. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities: Markets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities: Markets and Barriers to Growth Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities: Markets and Barriers to Growth Presentation by Matt Most, Encana Natural Gas,...

  11. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities Workshop Agenda Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop Agenda Agenda for the Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop...

  12. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Caterpillar, Inc., June 2011 Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) - Presentation by Caterpillar, Inc., June 2011 Presentation on Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating...

  13. Piedmont Natural Gas- Commercial Equipment Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Piedmont Natural Gas offers rebates to commercial customers for purchasing and installing high-efficiency natural gas tankless water heaters. Customers on the 202-Small General Service Standard...

  14. Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality regulates the underground storage of natural gas or liquid hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide. Prior to the use of any underground reservoir for the...

  15. Homeowners: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Natural Gas Disruptions Homeowners: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions Homeowners: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions Because natural gas is distributed through underground...

  16. Local Leaders: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Natural Gas Disruptions Local Leaders: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions Local Leaders: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions Because natural gas is distributed through underground...

  17. Coal-bed methane - An unconventional but viable source of natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallinger, D.E. (Southern California Gas Co., Los Angeles (United States))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As of December 31, 1988, the potential Gas Committee, a group of industry experts, estimates that the remaining undiscovered potential supplies of natural gas amounted to 795.6 trillion cubic feet (TCF) in the United States, including the offshore areas. Besides the conventional sources, the sandstone and carbonate reservoirs that geologists have been looking for since Drake, there are a number of unconventional sources of natural gas. One of these, coal-bed methane (CBM) is being actively developed today and promises to provide significant additions to the proved reserves of this nation in the next ten years. The potential supplies of CBM are variously estimates to be between 400 to 1,000 tcf, or equal to the remaining undiscovered conventional supplies of natural gas. If these estimates are real, they will have a profound effect on forecasts of future prices and availability of natural gas. How valid are these estimates At what rate will this new source of natural gas come on stream The answers to these questions are dependent in part upon the uniqueness of the coal reservoir. Coal can contain more natural gas than a comparable size conventional reservoir. A coal reservoir exhibits positive production decline instead of the negative decline of conventional reservoirs. There are legal and economic considerations that will affect the development of this relatively new and exciting source of natural gas. All of these questions are discussed by the author.

  18. Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL a reservoir for shale-gas and oil. We examined organic-rich black shale, known as Macasty shale, of Upper SHALE-GAS AND OIL in THE SUBSURFACE OF ANTICOSTI ISLAND, CANADA Key Words: Provenance, Anticosti Island

  19. Natural gas monthly, March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly contains estimates for March 1999 for many natural gas data series at the national level. Estimates of national natural gas prices are available through December 1998 for most series. Highlights of the data contained in this issue are listed below. Preliminary data indicate that the national average wellhead price for 1998 declined to 16% from the previous year ($1.96 compared to $2.32 per thousand cubic feet). At the end of March, the end of the 1998--1999 heating season, the level of working gas in underground natural gas storage facilities is estimated to be 1,354 billion cubic feet, 169 billion cubic feet higher than at the end of March 1998. Gas consumption during the first 3 months of 1999 is estimated to have been 179 billion cubic feet higher than in the same period in 1998. Most of this increase (133 billion cubic feet) occurred in the residential sector due to the cooler temperatures in January and February compared to the same months last year. According to the National Weather Service, heating degree days in January 1999 were 15% greater than the previous year while February recorded a 5% increase.

  20. Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute declares underground storage of natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas to be in the public interest if it promotes the conservation of natural gas and permits the accumulation of...

  1. Florida Natural Gas Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May2009 2010 2011 2012

  2. Florida Natural Gas Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May2009 2010 2011

  3. Georgia Natural Gas Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear JanPriceIndustrial Consumers48 4.95

  4. Hawaii Natural Gas Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOW TO OBTAINCommercialPipeline22.38

  5. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year in6 The

  6. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year in6 The7

  7. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year in6 The78

  8. Idaho Natural Gas Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-MonthExportsLeaseThousand4.37

  9. Washington Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197Cubic Feet) Gas, WetCubicYearYear

  10. Natural Gas Supply SBIR Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoemaker, H.D.; Gwilliam, W.J.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was created in 1982 by Public Law 97-219 and reauthorized in 1992 until the year 2000 by Public Law 102-564. The purposes of the new law are to (1) expand and improve the SBIR program, 2) emphasize the program`s goal of increasing private sector commercialization of technology developed through Federal R&D, (3) increase small business participation in Federal R&D, and (4) improve the Federal Government`s dissemination of information concerning the SBIR program. DOE`s SBIR pro-ram has two features that are unique. In the 1995 DOE SBIR solicitation, the DOE Fossil Energy topics were: environmental technology for natural gas, oil, and coal; advanced recovery of oil; natural gas supply; natural gas utilization; advanced coal-based power systems; and advanced fossil fuels research. The subtopics for this solicitation`s Natural Gas Supply topic are (1) drilling, completion, and stimulation; (2) low-permeability Formations; (3) delivery and storage; and (4) natural gas upgrading.

  11. THE ROLE OF CAPILLARY FORCES IN THE NATURAL STATE OF FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    THE ROLE OF CAPILLARY FORCES IN THE NATURAL STATE OF FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS A REPORT model is adequate in describing the natural state of a fractured geothermal reservoir. Because of this a fractured geothermal reservoir. The numerical simulations were carried to steady state with the use

  12. Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with application to energy-efficient windows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas-reservoir MnNiMg electrochromic mirror devices have beencontrast to conventional electrochromic approaches, hydrogenThe application of electrochromic devices based on tungsten

  13. Selection of best drilling, completion and stimulation method for coalbed methane reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaswamy, Sunil

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    reservoirs, coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs, gas shales, oil shales, tar sands, heavy oil and gas hydrates. 1 All natural resources, such as gold, zinc, oil, gas, etc., are distributed log normally in nature. John Masters introduced the concept for oil...

  14. Selection of best drilling, completion and stimulation method for coalbed methane reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaswamy, Sunil

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    reservoirs, coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs, gas shales, oil shales, tar sands, heavy oil and gas hydrates. 1 All natural resources, such as gold, zinc, oil, gas, etc., are distributed log normally in nature. John Masters introduced the concept for oil...

  15. Evaluating metalorganic frameworks for natural gas storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    suited for light-duty passenger vehicles. For instance, compressed natural gas (CNG) requires expensive

  16. Natural gas prices: Rhyme or reason

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, L.L.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Problems in the establishment of natural gas prices are outlined. The tropics discussed include: US average natural gas prices; US average natural gas prices; US average fuel oil prices; and US average electric utility natural gas T and D margin in dollars Mcf.

  17. Mathematical models of natural gas consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scitovski, Rudolf

    Mathematical models of natural gas consumption Kristian Sabo, Rudolf Scitovski, Ivan of natural gas consumption Kristian Sabo, Rudolf Scitovski, Ivan Vazler , Marijana Zeki-Susac ksabo of natural gas consumption hourly fore- cast on the basis of hourly movement of temperature and natural gas

  18. Sandia Energy - Natural Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratory Fellows Jerry SimmonsModels &Natural

  19. Natural Gas Processed

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400,Information Administration22)May£661.DataNov-14LiquidsNatural

  20. Production-management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Annual Report, August 1990-December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Abbott, W.A.; Arsenault, J.W.; Jones, R.E.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project was designed to investigate production management strategies through a field study approach. The initial task was to prepare a summary of industry experience with water-drive gas and water-drive gas storage reservoirs. This activity was necessary to define the variety of reservoir situations in which water influx occurs, to identify those cases where alternative production practices will increase ultimate recovery, and to develop techniques to better characterize these reservoirs for further analysis. Four fields were selected for study: 1 onshore Gulf Coast gas reservoir, 2 offshore Gulf Coast reservoirs, and 1 mid-continent aquifier gas storage field. A modified material balance technique was developed and validated which predicts the pressure and production performance of water-drive gas reservoirs. This method yields more accurate results than conventional water influx techniques.

  1. Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. [Jurassic Smackover Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

  2. Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. Appendix 1, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

  3. Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document comprises the Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan, and is a follow-up to the `Natural Gas Strategic Plan and Program Crosscut Plans,` dated July 1995. DOE`s natural gas programs are aimed at simultaneously meeting our national energy needs, reducing oil imports, protecting our environment, and improving our economy. The Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan represents a Department-wide effort on expanded development and use of natural gas and defines Federal government and US industry roles in partnering to accomplish defined strategic goals. The four overarching goals of the Natural Gas Program are to: (1) foster development of advanced natural gas technologies, (2) encourage adoption of advanced natural gas technologies in new and existing markets, (3) support removal of policy impediments to natural gas use in new and existing markets, and (4) foster technologies and policies to maximize environmental benefits of natural gas use.

  4. A triple-continuum pressure-transient model for a naturally fractured vuggy reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reservoir. The fraction of oil reserves in a vuggy fracturedcontribute to oil and gas reserves and production [Kossackreserves estimation. Field Examples Pressure transient data from two oil-

  5. Large Releases from CO2 Storage Reservoirs: A Discussion of Natural Analogs, FEPS, and Modeling Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.; Pruess, K.; Lewicki, J.L.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.; Karimjee, A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    abandoned wells is a major concern for geological storage of CO 2 in depleted or near-depleted oil and gas reservoirs [

  6. Characterization of Tight Gas Reservoir Pore Structure Using USANS/SANS and Gas Adsorption Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarkson, Christopher R [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Agamalian, Michael [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Mastalerz, Maria [Indiana Geological Survey; Bustin, Mark [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell [ORNL; Blach, Tomasz P [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-angle and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS) measurements were performed on samples from the Triassic Montney tight gas reservoir in Western Canada in order to determine the applicability of these techniques for characterizing the full pore size spectrum and to gain insight into the nature of the pore structure and its control on permeability. The subject tight gas reservoir consists of a finely laminated siltstone sequence; extensive cementation and moderate clay content are the primary causes of low permeability. SANS/USANS experiments run at ambient pressure and temperature conditions on lithologically-diverse sub-samples of three core plugs demonstrated that a broad pore size distribution could be interpreted from the data. Two interpretation methods were used to evaluate total porosity, pore size distribution and surface area and the results were compared to independent estimates derived from helium porosimetry (connected porosity) and low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption (accessible surface area and pore size distribution). The pore structure of the three samples as interpreted from SANS/USANS is fairly uniform, with small differences in the small-pore range (< 2000 {angstrom}), possibly related to differences in degree of cementation, and mineralogy, in particular clay content. Total porosity interpreted from USANS/SANS is similar to (but systematically higher than) helium porosities measured on the whole core plug. Both methods were used to estimate the percentage of open porosity expressed here as a ratio of connected porosity, as established from helium adsorption, to the total porosity, as estimated from SANS/USANS techniques. Open porosity appears to control permeability (determined using pressure and pulse-decay techniques), with the highest permeability sample also having the highest percentage of open porosity. Surface area, as calculated from low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption, is significantly less than surface area estimates from SANS/USANS, which is due in part to limited accessibility of the gases to all pores. The similarity between N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-accessible surface area suggests an absence of microporosity in these samples, which is in agreement with SANS analysis. A core gamma ray profile run on the same core from which the core plug samples were taken correlates to profile permeability measurements run on the slabbed core. This correlation is related to clay content, which possibly controls the percentage of open porosity. Continued study of these effects will prove useful in log-core calibration efforts for tight gas.

  7. Atlas of Northern Gulf of Mexico Gas and Oil Reservoirs: Procedures and examples of resource distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seni, S.J.; Finley, R.J.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the program is to produce a reservoir atlas series of the Gulf of Mexico that (1) classifies and groups offshore oil and gas reservoirs into a series of geologically defined reservoir plays, (2) compiles comprehensive reservoir play information that includes descriptive and quantitative summaries of play characteristics, cumulative production, reserves, original oil and gas in place, and various other engineering and geologic data, (3) provides detailed summaries of representative type reservoirs for each play, and (4) organizes computerized tables of reservoir engineering data into a geographic information system (GIS). The primary product of the program will be an oil and gas atlas series of the offshore Northern Gulf of Mexico and a computerized geographical information system of geologic and engineering data linked to reservoir location.

  8. Altering Wettability in Gas Condensate Sandstone Reservoirs for Gas Mobillity Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez Martinez, Ruth Gabriela

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ). ...................................................................... 7 Fig. 6-Productivity Index (PI) vs. reservoir pressure of the Arun Field, showing a sharp drop with decreasing pressure. (Afidick et al. 1994). ................................... 8 Fig. 7-BX1 pressure drop vs. time in Britannia Field, where... for untreated Berea sandstone cores. ................................... 30 Fig. 16-Gas relative permeability of untreated rocks at the endpoints. ............................ 31 Fig. 17-BR1 Liquid Imbibitions...

  9. Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural permeability controls on fluid flow in oil and gas reservoirs. Fault zones are composed of many deformation elements will receive 20 weeks bespoke, residential training of broad relevance to the oil and gas industry: 10 weeks

  10. Natural gas monthly, January 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication, the Natural Gas Monthly, presents the most recent data on natural gas supply, consumption, and prices from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Of special interest in this issue are two articles summarizing reports recently published by EIA. The articles are {open_quotes}Natural Gas Productive Capacity{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Outlook for Natural Gas Through 2015,{close_quotes} both of which precede the {open_quotes}Highlights{close_quotes} section. With this issue, January 1997, changes have been made to the format of the Highlights section and to several of the tabular and graphical presentations throughout the publication. The changes to the Highlights affect the discussion of developments in the industry and the presentation of weekly storage data. An overview of the developments in the industry is now presented in a brief summary followed by specific discussions of supply, end-use consumption, and prices. Spot and futures prices are discussed as appropriate in the Price section, together with wellhead and consumer prices.

  11. REVISED NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    natural gas (LNG) imports into North America increase up to 14 billion cubic feet per day by 2017. Regasified LNG imports from Mexico into San Diego begin in 2009. This LNG displaces domestic production from pipeline reverses and expands to allow the flow of regasified LNG from the Costa Azul LNG terminal in Baja

  12. Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical issues in tight gas fracturing, in particular the roles of gel damage, polymer loading (water-frac versus gel frac), and proppant concentration on the created fracture conductivity. To achieve this objective, we have designed the experimental apparatus to conduct the dynamic fracture conductivity tests. The experimental apparatus has been built and some preliminary tests have been conducted to test the apparatus.

  13. The construction and use of aquifer influence functions in determining original gas in place for water-drive gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajdica, Ronald Joseph

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR WATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH GAJDICA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR MATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH...

  14. Development of a natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godec, M.; Haas, M.; Pepper, W.; Rose, J.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent dramatic changes in natural gas markets have significant implications for the scope and direction of DOE`s upstream as well as downstream natural gas R&D. Open access transportation changes the way gas is bought and sold. The end of the gas deliverability surplus requires increased reserve development above recent levels. Increased gas demand for power generation and other new uses changes the overall demand picture in terms of volumes, locations and seasonality. DOE`s Natural Gas Strategic Plan requires that its R&D activities be evaluated for their ability to provide adequate supplies of reasonably priced gas. Potential R&D projects are to be evaluated using a full fuel cycle, benefit-cost approach to estimate likely market impact as well as technical success. To assure R&D projects are evaluated on a comparable basis, METC has undertaken the development of a comprehensive natural gas technology evaluation framework. Existing energy systems models lack the level of detail required to estimate the impact of specific upstream natural gas technologies across the known range of geological settings and likely market conditions. Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM) research during FY 1993 developed and implemented this comprehensive, consistent natural gas system evaluation framework. Rather than a isolated research activity, however, GSAM represents the integration of many prior and ongoing natural gas research efforts. When complete, it will incorporate the most current resource base description, reservoir modeling, technology characterization and other geologic and engineering aspects developed through recent METC and industry gas R&D programs.

  15. Unconventional gas sources. Executive summary. [Coal seams, Devonian shale, geopressured brines, tight gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long lead time required for conversion from oil or gas to coal and for development of a synthetic fuel industry dictates that oil and gas must continue to supply the United States with the majority of its energy requirements over the near term. In the interim period, the nation must seek a resource that can be developed quickly, incrementally, and with as few environmental concerns as possible. One option which could potentially fit these requirements is to explore for, drill, and produce unconventional gas: Devonian Shale gas, coal seam gas, gas dissolved in geopressured brines, and gas from tight reservoirs. This report addresses the significance of these sources and the economic and technical conditions under which they could be developed.

  16. ,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:43:21 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"...

  17. natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy...

  18. 3 , LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) -165oC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    , , . . . , . , LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) -165oC , . (Piped Natural Gas, PNG) , , . PNG, LNG ( 2-3 ), . (Natural Gas Hydrate, NGH) / . -20oC / . LNG > Natural Gas Hydrate (NGH) Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Modes of Transport and Storage

  19. Production of natural gas from methane hydrate by a constant downhole pressure well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmadi, G. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY); Ji, C. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY); Smith, D.H.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas production from the dissociation of methane hydrate in a confined reservoir by a depressurizing downhole well was studied. The case that the well pressure was kept constant was treated, and two different linearization schemes in an axisymmetric configuration were used in the analysis. For different fixed well pressures and reservoir temperatures, approximate self similar solutions were obtained. Distributions of temperature, pressure and gas velocity field across the reservoir were evaluated. The distance of the decomposition front from the well and the natural gas production rate as functions of time were also computed. Time evolutions of the resulting profiles were presented in graphical forms, and their differences with the constant well output results were studied. It was shown that the gas production rate was a sensitive function of well pressure and reservoir temperature. The sensitivity of the results to the linearization scheme used was also studied.

  20. Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Natural Gas Liquids

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a evie _ =_ In thisProduct: Natural Gas LiquidsNatural

  1. Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of two methods to forecast natural gas prices: using theof two methods to forecast natural gas prices is performed:accurate average forecast of natural gas prices than the

  2. Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 1.1 History of Natural Gas8 4.1 U.S. Wellhead and AEO Natural Gas8 4.2 U.S. Wellhead and Henry Hub Natural Gas

  3. Natural Gas Procurement Plan Rules (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Natural Gas Procurement Plan Rules are promulgated under the authority of the Arkansas Public Service Commission. These rules require that utilities develop and maintain a diversified gas...

  4. Natural gas dehydration process and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Ng, Alvin; Mairal, Anurag P.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and corresponding apparatus for dehydrating gas, especially natural gas. The process includes an absorption step and a membrane pervaporation step to regenerate the liquid sorbent.

  5. Natural and industrial analogues for release of CO2 from storage reservoirs: Identification of features, events, and processes and lessons learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at sites with depleted oil or gas reservoirs where wells areat sites with depleted oil or gas reservoirs where wells areparticularly in depleted oil or gas reservoir systems, where

  6. STRUCTURE OF THE LOW PERMEABLE NATURALLY FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Chrystel Dezayes*, Albert Genter** & Benot Valley ***

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 STRUCTURE OF THE LOW PERMEABLE NATURALLY FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR AT SOULTZ Chrystel cluster appears as a fractured reservoir developed within a low permeable matrix. Fracture zones represent) where reservoir development involved the reactivation of the pre- existing fractures in the granite [16

  7. 3 RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS 3.1 ANALYSIS OF IMBIBITION MECHANISM IN THE NATURALLY FRACTURED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    recovery mechanism in the West Texas Spraberry reservoir is evaluated. Waterflood recovery in the Spraberry waterflooding is performed in this type of reservoir, the intent is to fill the fractures with water to initiate89 3 RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS 3.1 ANALYSIS OF IMBIBITION MECHANISM IN THE NATURALLY FRACTURED

  8. Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves 2009 November 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics U.S. Department or other Federal agencies. #12;#12;1 U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves

  9. Natural Gas Supply in Denmark -A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the economic structure of the Danish natural gas market is formulated mathematically giving a descriptionNatural Gas Supply in Denmark - A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the Liberalized Gas Market of the markets of natural gas and electricity and the existence of an abundance of de-centralized combined heat

  10. Case history of pressure maintenance by gas injection in the 26R gravity drainage reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, M.H.; Yu, J.P.; Moore, D.M.; Ezekwe, N. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); Querin, M.E. (USDOE Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, Tupman, CA (United States)); Williams, L.L. (Chevron U.S.A., Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a field case history on the performance of the 26R Reservoir. This is a gravity drainage reservoir under pressure maintenance by crestal gas injection. The 26R Reservoir is a highly layered Stevens turbidite sandstone. The reservoir is located in the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR{number sign}1) in Elk Hills, Kern County, California. The 26R Reservoir is contained within the steeply dipping southwestern limb of the 31S Anticline. The reservoir had an initial oil column of 1800 feet. Original oil-in-place (OOIP) was estimated at 424 million barrels. Pressure maintenance by crestal gas injection was initiated immediately after production began in October 1976. The total volume of gas injected is about 586 BCF. This exceeds one reservoir pore volume. Reservoir pressure has declined from 3030 psi to 2461 psi. This pressure decline believe to be due to migration of injected gas into the overlaying shale reservoirs. Under the gas injection pressure maintenance strategy, reserves are estimated to be approximately 212 million barrels. Reservoir studies have concluded that the aquifer at the base of the reservoir has been relatively inactive. Well recompletions, deepenings, and horizontal wells are used to improve oil recovery. An aggressive program of controlling gas production began in the mid 1980's by the installation of multiple packers and sleeves. As the gas-oil contact (GOC) has dropped, sand intervals have subsequently been isolated behind packers. A cased hole logging program was recently undertaken to identify possible remaining reserves in the gas cap. 15 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Case history of pressure maintenance by gas injection in the 26R gravity drainage reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, M.H.; Yu, J.P.; Moore, D.M.; Ezekwe, N. [Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States); Querin, M.E. [USDOE Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, Tupman, CA (United States); Williams, L.L. [Chevron U.S.A., Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a field case history on the performance of the 26R Reservoir. This is a gravity drainage reservoir under pressure maintenance by crestal gas injection. The 26R Reservoir is a highly layered Stevens turbidite sandstone. The reservoir is located in the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR{number_sign}1) in Elk Hills, Kern County, California. The 26R Reservoir is contained within the steeply dipping southwestern limb of the 31S Anticline. The reservoir had an initial oil column of 1800 feet. Original oil-in-place (OOIP) was estimated at 424 million barrels. Pressure maintenance by crestal gas injection was initiated immediately after production began in October 1976. The total volume of gas injected is about 586 BCF. This exceeds one reservoir pore volume. Reservoir pressure has declined from 3030 psi to 2461 psi. This pressure decline believe to be due to migration of injected gas into the overlaying shale reservoirs. Under the gas injection pressure maintenance strategy, reserves are estimated to be approximately 212 million barrels. Reservoir studies have concluded that the aquifer at the base of the reservoir has been relatively inactive. Well recompletions, deepenings, and horizontal wells are used to improve oil recovery. An aggressive program of controlling gas production began in the mid 1980`s by the installation of multiple packers and sleeves. As the gas-oil contact (GOC) has dropped, sand intervals have subsequently been isolated behind packers. A cased hole logging program was recently undertaken to identify possible remaining reserves in the gas cap. 15 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Methods of natural gas liquefaction and natural gas liquefaction plants utilizing multiple and varying gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilding, Bruce M; Turner, Terry D

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of natural gas liquefaction may include cooling a gaseous NG process stream to form a liquid NG process stream. The method may further include directing the first tail gas stream out of a plant at a first pressure and directing a second tail gas stream out of the plant at a second pressure. An additional method of natural gas liquefaction may include separating CO.sub.2 from a liquid NG process stream and processing the CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 product stream. Another method of natural gas liquefaction may include combining a marginal gaseous NG process stream with a secondary substantially pure NG stream to provide an improved gaseous NG process stream. Additionally, a NG liquefaction plant may include a first tail gas outlet, and at least a second tail gas outlet, the at least a second tail gas outlet separate from the first tail gas outlet.

  13. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 4; mid-continent aquifer gas storage reservoir. Volume 1. Topical report, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Obernyer, S.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed reservoir characterization and numerical simulation study is presented for a mid-continent aquifer gas storage field. It is demonstrated that rate optimization during both injection and withdrawal cycles can significantly improve the performance of the storage reservoir. Performance improvements are realized in the form of a larger working volume of gas, a reduced cushion volume of gas, and decrease in field water production. By utilizing these reservoir management techniques gas storage operators will be able to minimize their base gas requirements, improve their economics, and determine whether the best use for a particular storage field is base loading or meeting peak day requirements. Volume I of this two-volume set contains a detailed technical discussion.

  14. Adjusted Estimates of Texas Natural Gas Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Energy Information Administration Adjusted Estimates of Texas Natural Gas Production Background The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is adjusting its estimates of natural...

  15. Gas supplies of interstate/natural gas pipeline companies 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides information on the interstate pipeline companies' supply of natural gas during calendar year 1989, for use by the FERC for regulatory purposes. It also provides information to other Government agencies, the natural gas industry, as well as policy makers, analysts, and consumers interested in current levels of interstate supplies of natural gas and trends over recent years. 5 figs., 18 tabs.

  16. Natural gas 1995: Issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural Gas 1995: Issues and Trends addresses current issues affecting the natural gas industry and markets. Highlights of recent trends include: Natural gas wellhead prices generally declined throughout 1994 and for 1995 averages 22% below the year-earlier level; Seasonal patterns of natural gas production and wellhead prices have been significantly reduced during the past three year; Natural gas production rose 15% from 1985 through 1994, reaching 18.8 trillion cubic feet; Increasing amounts of natural gas have been imported; Since 1985, lower costs of producing and transporting natural gas have benefitted consumers; Consumers may see additional benefits as States examine regulatory changes aimed at increasing efficiency; and, The electric industry is being restructured in a fashion similar to the recent restructuring of the natural gas industry.

  17. Natural Gas Utility Conservation Programs (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Chapter describes how natural gas utilities serving more than 5,000 residential customers must implement natural gas energy conservation programs. The regulations describe criteria and terms...

  18. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities: Markets...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    h presentation slides: Natural Gas and hydrogen Infrastructure opportunities: markets and Barriers to Growth Matt Most, Encana Natural Gas 1 OctOber 2011 | ArgOnne nAtiOnAl...

  19. Oklahoma Natural Gas- Residential Efficiency Rebates (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To encourage customers to install high-efficiency natural gas equipment in homes, Oklahoma Natural Gas offers rebates to residential customers and builders for furnace, water heating, or space...

  20. State Natural Gas Regulation Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act gives the Nebraska Public Service Commission authority to regulate natural gas utilities and pipelines within the state, except as provided for in the Nebraska Natural Gas Pipeline Safety...

  1. Underground Storage of Natural Gas (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any natural gas public utility may appropriate for its use for the underground storage of natural gas any subsurface stratum or formation in any land which the commission shall have found to be...

  2. Optimizing Natural Gas Use: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkatesan, V. V.; Schweikert, P.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimization of Steam & Energy systems in any continuously operating process plant results in substantial reduction in Natural gas purchases. During periods of natural gas price hikes, this would benefit the plant to control their fuel budget...

  3. Piedmont Natural Gas- Residential Equipment Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Piedmont Natural Gas offers rebates on high-efficiency natural gas tankless water heaters, tank water heaters and furnaces. Customers on the 101-Residential Service rate are eligible for these...

  4. Piedmont Natural Gas- Commercial Equipment Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Piedmont Natural Gas offers rebates to commercial customers for purchasing and installing high-efficiency natural gas tankless water heaters. Customers on the 102-Small General Service and 152...

  5. Piedmont Natural Gas- Residential Equipment Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Piedmont Natural Gas offers rebates on high-efficiency natural gas tankless water heaters, tank water heaters and furnaces. Customers on the 201-Residential Service Rate or 221-Residential Service...

  6. NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE Name Affiliation Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2011-2013 Name Affiliation Sector Dernovsek, David Bonneville Power Defenbach, Byron Intermountain Gas Distribution Dragoon, Ken NWPCC Council Friedman, Randy NW Natural Gas Distribution Gopal, Jairam Southern CA Edison Electric Utility Hamilton, Linda Shell Trading Gas & Power

  7. Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

  8. Natural Gas Advisory Committee 1 June 6, 2014 Natural Gas Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Gas Advisory Committee 1 June 6, 2014 Natural Gas Advisory Committee Draft Meeting Minutes June 6, 2013 Meeting Facilitator: Chair Massoud Jourabchi. Participants list attached Natural Gas, Finklea agreed. So where is natural gas demand going? he continued. Finklea provided statistics on U

  9. The 'Supply-of-Storage' for Natural Gas in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uria, Rocio; Williams, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Hedging Effectiveness of Natural Gas Futures. ” EnergyCommission. (2002). “Natural Gas Supply and Infrastructureand Price Dynamics in Natural Gas City Gate Markets. ”

  10. The effect of reservoir heterogeneity on gas production from hydrate accumulations in the permafrost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, M. T.; Kowalsky, M B.; Moridis, G. J.; Silpngarmlert, S.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantity of hydrocarbon gases trapped in natural hydrate accumulations is enormous, leading to significant interest in the evaluation of their potential as an energy source. Large volumes of gas can be readily produced at high rates for long times from methane hydrate accumulations in the permafrost by means of depressurization-induced dissociation combined with conventional technologies and horizontal or vertical well configurations. Initial studies on the possibility of natural gas production from permafrost hydrates assumed homogeneity in intrinsic reservoir properties and in the initial condition of the hydrate-bearing layers (either due to the coarseness of the model or due to simplifications in the definition of the system). These results showed great promise for gas recovery from Class 1, 2, and 3 systems in the permafrost. This work examines the consequences of inevitable heterogeneity in intrinsic properties, such as in the porosity of the hydrate-bearing formation, or heterogeneity in the initial state of hydrate saturation. Heterogeneous configurations are generated through multiple methods: (1) through defining heterogeneous layers via existing well-log data, (2) through randomized initialization of reservoir properties and initial conditions, and (3) through the use of geostatistical methods to create heterogeneous fields that extrapolate from the limited data available from cores and well-log data. These extrapolations use available information and established geophysical methods to capture a range of deposit properties and hydrate configurations. The results show that some forms of heterogeneity, such as horizontal stratification, can assist in production of hydrate-derived gas. However, more heterogeneous structures can lead to complex physical behavior within the deposit and near the wellbore that may obstruct the flow of fluids to the well, necessitating revised production strategies. The need for fine discretization is crucial in all cases to capture dynamic behavior during production.

  11. Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Summary: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves 2009 November 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply...

  12. Natural Gas and Other Petroleum

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancyNationalNatural GasImports3 Annual Plan

  13. New Mexico Natural Gas Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural GasCubic2008 20092009

  14. New Mexico Natural Gas Prices

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural GasCubic2008

  15. Natural Gas | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEW HAMPSHIRE BUILDSEnergy|Natural Gas Production and

  16. Effects of non-Darcy flow on pressure buildup analysis of hydraulically fractured gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez Vera, Cesar

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Darcy flow in the hydraulic fracture and its effects on pressure buildup analysis of hydraulically fractured gas reservoirs. A reservoir simulator was used to generate pressure drawdown and buildup data both with and without the effects of non-Darcy flow...

  17. Shale we look for gas?............................................................................. 1 The Marcellus shale--An old "new" gas reservoir in Pennsylvania ............ 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    #12;CONTENTS Shale we look for gas?............................................................................. 1 The Marcellus shale--An old "new" gas reservoir in Pennsylvania ............ 2 Meet the staff, the contour interval should be 6 inches. #12;STATE GEOLOGIST'S EDITORIAL Shale We Look For Gas? Recently, you

  18. The Research Path to Determining the Natural Gas Supply Potential of Marine Gas Hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, R.M.; Rose, K.K.; Baker, R.C.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary goal of the U.S. National Interagency Gas Hydrates R&D program is to determine the natural gas production potential of marine gas hydrates. In pursuing this goal, four primary areas of effort are being conducted in parallel. First, are wide-ranging basic scientific investigations in both the laboratory and in the field designed to advance the understanding of the nature and behavior of gas hydrate bearing sediments (GHBS). This multi-disciplinary work has wide-ranging direct applications to resource recovery, including assisting the development of exploration and production technologies through better rock physics models for GHBS and also in providing key data for numerical simulations of productivity, reservoir geomechanical response, and other phenomena. In addition, fundamental science efforts are essential to developing a fuller understanding of the role gas hydrates play in the natural environment and the potential environmental implications of gas hydrate production, a critical precursor to commercial extraction. A second area of effort is the confirmation of resource presence and viability via a series of multi-well marine drilling expeditions. The collection of data in the field is essential to further clarifying what proportion of the likely immense in-place marine gas hydrate resource exists in accumulations of sufficient quality to represent potential commercial production prospects. A third research focus area is the integration of geologic, geophysical, and geochemical field data into an effective suite of exploration tools that can support the delineation and characterization commercial gas hydrate prospects prior to drilling. The fourth primary research focus is the development and testing of well-based extraction technologies (including drilling, completion, stimulation and production) that can safely deliver commercial gas production rates from gas hydrate reservoirs in a variety of settings. Initial efforts will take advantage of the relatively favorable economics of conducting production tests in Arctic gas-hydrate bearing sandstones with the intent of translating the knowledge gained to later testing in marine sandstone reservoirs. The full and concurrent pusuit of each of these research topics is essential to the determining the future production potential of naturally-occuring gas hydrates.

  19. Experimental and simulation studies of sequestration of supercritical carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Jeong Gyu

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    he feasibility of sequestering supercritical CO2 in depleted gas reservoirs. The experimental runs involved the following steps. First, the 1 ft long by 1 in. diameter carbonate core is inserted into a viton Hassler sleeve and placed inside...

  20. Experimental and simulation studies of sequestration of supercritical carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Jeong Gyu

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    he feasibility of sequestering supercritical CO2 in depleted gas reservoirs. The experimental runs involved the following steps. First, the 1 ft long by 1 in. diameter carbonate core is inserted into a viton Hassler sleeve and placed inside...

  1. Comparison of Various Deterministic Forecasting Techniques in Shale Gas Reservoirs with Emphasis on the Duong Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Krunal Jaykant

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a huge demand in the industry to forecast production in shale gas reservoirs accurately. There are many methods including volumetric, Decline Curve Analysis (DCA), analytical simulation and numerical simulation. Each one of these methods...

  2. cleanenergyfuels.com Natural Gas Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Gas As a Transportation Fuel About Clean Energy Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Port Trucking LNG Station LNG Tanker Trailer Largest Natural Gas Fuel Provider in North America 660+ Fleet Customers 400 and Construction LNG #12;7 cleanenergyfuels.com CNG Station Reality ...the majority are not "Truck Friendly" #12

  3. 2014 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas Applications 2014 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas...

  4. Global Natural Gas Market Trends, 2. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides an overview of major trends occurring in the natural gas industry and includes a concise look at the drivers behind recent rapid growth in gas usage and the challenges faced in meeting that growth. Topics covered include: an overview of Natural Gas including its history, the current market environment, and its future market potential; an analysis of the overarching trends that are driving a need for change in the Natural Gas industry; a description of new technologies being developed to increase production of Natural Gas; an evaluation of the potential of unconventional Natural Gas sources to supply the market; a review of new transportation methods to get Natural Gas from producing to consuming countries; a description of new storage technologies to support the increasing demand for peak gas; an analysis of the coming changes in global Natural Gas flows; an evaluation of new applications for Natural Gas and their impact on market sectors; and, an overview of Natural Gas trading concepts and recent changes in financial markets.

  5. Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with application to energy-efficient windows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concentration) in the gas volume between glass panes of the insulated glass units (IGUs). The elimination is an option but it requires well controlled gas exchange processes. Alternatively, and from many pointsElectrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with application to energy

  6. Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

  7. The effects of production rate and gravitational segregation on gas injection performance of oil reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Ed Martin

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATE AND GRAVITATIONAL SEGREGATION ON GAS INJECTION PERFORMANCE OF OIL RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ED MARTIN FERGUSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1972 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATE AND GRAVITATIONAL SEGREGATION ON GAS INJECTION PERFORMANCE OF OIL RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ED MARTIN FERGUSON Approved as. to style...

  8. The performance of a volatile oil reservoir overlain by a gas cap 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Joseph Ralph, Jr

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE PERFORMANCE OF A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR OVERLAIN BY A GAS CAP A Thesis By J. RALPH ELLIS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1960 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE PERFORMANCE OF A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR OVERLAIN BY A GAS CAP A Thesis By J. RALPH ELLIS, JR. Approved as to style and content by: hairxnan of Coxnxnittee) (Head...

  9. The performance of a volatile oil reservoir overlain by a gas cap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Joseph Ralph, Jr

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE PERFORMANCE OF A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR OVERLAIN BY A GAS CAP A Thesis By J. RALPH ELLIS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1960 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE PERFORMANCE OF A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR OVERLAIN BY A GAS CAP A Thesis By J. RALPH ELLIS, JR. Approved as to style and content by: hairxnan of Coxnxnittee) (Head...

  10. Natural gas hydrates - issues for gas production and geomechanical stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Tarun

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    NATURAL GAS HYDRATES – ISSUES FOR GAS PRODUCTION AND GEOMECHANICAL STABILITY A Dissertation by TARUN GROVER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2008 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering NATURAL GAS HYDRATES – ISSUES FOR GAS PRODUCTION AND GEOMECHANICAL STABILITY A Dissertation by TARUN GROVER Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  11. INVESTIGATION OF EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS DURING CO2 INJECTION IN HYDRAULICALLY AND NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Schechter

    2004-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work performed during the third year of the project, ''Investigating of Efficiency Improvements during CO{sub 2} Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs.'' The objective of this project is to perform unique laboratory experiments with artificial fractured cores (AFCs) and X-ray CT to examine the physical mechanisms of bypassing in HFR and NFR that eventually result in more efficient CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous or fracture-dominated reservoirs. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on modeling fluid flow through rough fractures and investigating the grid orientation effect in rectangular grid blocks particularly at high mobility ratio as our precursor to use a compositional simulator. We are developing a robust simulator using Voronoi grids to accurately represent natural and induced fractures. We are also verifying the accuracy of the simulation using scaled laboratory experiments to provide a benchmark for our simulation technique. No such simulator currently exists so this capability will represent a major breakthrough in simulation of gas injection in fractured systems. The following sections outline the results that appear in this report.

  12. A New Type Curve Analysis for Shale Gas/Oil Reservoir Production Performance with Dual Porosity Linear System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdulal, Haider Jaffar

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    With increase of interest in exploiting shale gas/oil reservoirs with multiple stage fractured horizontal wells, complexity of production analysis and reservoir description have also increased. Different methods and models were used throughout...

  13. Post Doctoral Research Fellowship Simulating the greenhouse gas emission from boreal region reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of greenhouse gases from northern boreal reservoirs as part of a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research modified the DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) model to simulate the exchange of CO2 between boreal by the creation of reservoirs for the production of hydro-electricity. We have recently developed a water column

  14. Natural Gas Regulatory Policy: Current Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, G.

    NATURAL GAS REGULATORY roLICY: CURRENT ISSUES G. GAIL WATKINS Railroad Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Many changes have occurred in recent months in both federal and state natural gas regulation. Those changes have increased... the options of industrial energy consumers for purchasing and moving natural gas. This panel viII discuss important developments in federal and state regulatory arenas and their impacts on purchasing options. Among the issues discussed viII be: 1...

  15. Analysis of the Development of Messoyakha Gas Field: A Commercial Gas Hydrate Reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omelchenko, Roman 1987-

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Natural gas from methane hydrate has the potential to play a major role in ensuring adequate future energy supplies in the US. The worldwide volume of gas in the hydrate state has been estimated to be approximately 1.5 x 10^16 m^3 (Makogon 1984). More than...

  16. Natural Gas Processing Plant- Sulfur (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This regulation establishes sulfur emission standards for natural gas processing plants. Standards are stated for both existing and new plants. There are also rules for stack height requirements,...

  17. Virginia Natural Gas's Hampton Roads Pipeline Crossing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—covers Virginia Natural Gas's (VNG's) pipeline project at Hampton Roads Crossing (HRX).

  18. ,"Tennessee Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  19. ,"Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  20. ,"Montana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  1. ,"Iowa Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  2. ,"Pennsylvania Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  3. ,"Oregon Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  4. ,"Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  5. ,"Indiana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  6. ,"Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  7. ,"Kansas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  8. ,"Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  9. ,"Alaska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  10. ,"Nebraska Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  11. ,"Mississippi Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  12. ,"Utah Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  13. ,"Illinois Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  14. ,"Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  15. ,"Arkansas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  16. ,"Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  17. ,"California Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  18. ,"Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  19. ,"Kentucky Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  20. ,"Ohio Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  1. ,"Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  2. ,"Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  3. ,"Washington Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  4. ,"Alabama Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  5. ,"Louisiana Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  6. NIPSCO Prescriptive Electric and Natural Gas Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIPSCO’s Commercial and Industrial Prescriptive Natural Gas & Electric Program offers rebates to NIPSCO's large commercial, industrial, non-profit, governmental and institutional customers, who...

  7. Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * Convene industry and other stakeholders to share current statusstate-of-the art for natural gas and hydrogen infrastructure. * Identify key challenges (both technical and...

  8. Natural Gas Year-in-Review

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    December 9, 2011 | Next Release Date: December 2012 Previous editions of Natural Gas Year-in-Review Year: 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Highlights Growing domestic production, rising...

  9. Natural Gas Pipe Line Companies (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations list standards and considerations for the design, construction, compression, metering, operation, and maintenance of natural gas pipelines, along with procedures for records,...

  10. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","331...

  11. Natural gas 1998: Issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends provides a summary of the latest data and information relating to the US natural gas industry, including prices, production, transmission, consumption, and the financial and environmental aspects of the industry. The report consists of seven chapters and five appendices. Chapter 1 presents a summary of various data trends and key issues in today`s natural gas industry and examines some of the emerging trends. Chapters 2 through 7 focus on specific areas or segments of the industry, highlighting some of the issues associated with the impact of natural gas operations on the environment. 57 figs., 18 tabs.

  12. ,"New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","2272015"...

  13. Optimization Problems in Natural Gas Transportation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roger Z. Ríos-Mercado

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Abstract: This paper provides a review on the most relevant research works conducted to solve natural gas transportation problems via pipeline ...

  14. Natural gas treatment process using PTMSP membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toy, L.G.; Pinnau, I.

    1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for separating C{sub 3}+ hydrocarbons, particularly propane and butane, from natural gas. The process uses a poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) membrane. 6 figs.

  15. Natural gas treatment process using PTMSP membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for separating C.sub.3 + hydrocarbons, particularly propane and butane, from natural gas. The process uses a poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) membrane.

  16. Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report - EIA

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Careers Feedback Contact Us Sources & Uses Petroleum Coal Natural Gas Renewable Nuclear Electricity Consumption Total Energy Topics Analysis & Projections Environment Markets &...

  17. Colorado Natural Gas- Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Colorado Natural Gas offers the Excess is Out Program for residential and commercial customers in Colorado. Incentives are available for purchasing and installing energy efficient furnaces, boilers...

  18. Integrated Multi-Well Reservoir and Decision Model to Determine Optimal Well Spacing in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz Prada, Rubiel Paul

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of Gething D Formation for the study area in UGR?s integrated reservoir study, meters sstvd (subsea true vertical depth). N ? S yellow dashed line indicates a section in the North to South direction shown on Figure 10. ................................ 31... curve analysis performed on simulated production. The figure represents a typical gas production rate vs. time. The figure shows to, the transition point from hyperbolic to exponential decline. . 78 Figure 50 Schematic decision tree...

  19. How secure is CO2 storage? Leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How secure is CO2 storage? Leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs Johannes Miocic, Stuart. The goal of CCS is to store carbon dioxide (CO2) in the subsurface for a long period of time (>10,000 yr).1 It is important that the stored CO2 does not leak from the reservoir to the surface . 3. Faults as leakage

  20. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    natural gas prices, the combination of favorable economics and the lower conventional air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions associated with natural gas relative to other...

  1. Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from Syngas: A Novel Process Combining CO Methanation, Water-Gas Shift, Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG)...

  2. Evalutation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evalutation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure for HydrogenMixed Gas Service Evalutation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure for HydrogenMixed...

  3. Natural gas annual 1993 supplement: Company profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, the Natural Gas Annual 1993 Supplement: Company Profiles, presents a detailed profile of 45 selected companies in the natural gas industry. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the companies profiled. The companies in this report are interstate pipeline companies or local distribution companies (LDC`s). Interstate pipeline companies acquire gas supplies from company owned production, purchases from producers, and receipts for transportation for account of others. Pipeline systems, service area maps, company supply and disposition data are presented.

  4. Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Reeves

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

  5. The effects of production rate and gravitational segregation on gas injection performance of oil reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Ed Martin

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    models as com- pletely as possible prior to making the gas injection simulations. One validation test involved simulating a horizontal gas drive ex- cluding gravity effects by using the same densities for gas and oil. Shown in Figure 6 is the GOR...THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATE AND GRAVITATIONAL SEGREGATION ON GAS INJECTION PERFORMANCE OF OIL RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ED MARTIN FERGUSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  6. Effect of Energy Efficiency Standards on Natural Gas Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carnall, Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Conservation on the Natural Gas Price,? memo to RichardTheroux, OMB. EIA 2009a. Natural Gas Year in Review (2009),at. http://www.eia.gov/pub/oil_gas/natural_gas/feature_

  7. Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of EnergyFocus Group HSS/UnionGlossary Shale GasShale gas

  8. Natural gas: available today and tomorrow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingram, C.C. Jr.

    1980-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas energy is becoming the centerpiece in the future-energy strategies for the US as policymakers recognize that (1) up to 60 years of recoverable conventional gas supplies remain to be discovered and produced in the US and (2) supplemental sources promise to offset an anticipated decline in Lower-48 production, resulting in a net increase in the total gas supply. The US gas industry expects to provide 23-33 trillion CF/yr of gas for domestic consumption by the year 2000, with supplemental sources (SNG, pipeline and LNG imports, Alaskan gas, and natural gas from unconventional sources) contributing 40-60%.

  9. Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vs. AEO 2001 Price Forecast Natural Gas Price (nominal $/if forwards forecasts) or natural gas-fired generation (ifs reference case forecast of natural gas prices delivered to

  10. Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Associates, citing NYMEX natural gas bid-offer spreadAnalysis of the Market for Natural Gas Futures. ” The Energyas a Physical Hedge Against Natural Gas Price Movements. ”

  11. Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, D.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Nico, P.

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tight gas sands are unconventional hydrocarbon energy resource storing large volume of natural gas. Microscopy and 3D imaging of reservoir samples at different scales and resolutions provide insights into the coaredo not significantly smaller in size than conventional sandstones, the extremely dense grain packing makes the pore space tortuous, and the porosity is small. In some cases the inter-granular void space is presented by micron-scale slits, whose geometry requires imaging at submicron resolutions. Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations simulate different scenarios of capillary-equilibrium two-phase fluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predict an unusually low wetting fluid saturation threshold, at which the non-wetting phase becomes disconnected. Flow simulations in combination with Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations evaluate relative permeability curves. The computations show that at the threshold saturation, when the nonwetting fluid becomes disconnected, the flow of both fluids is practically blocked. The nonwetting phase is immobile due to the disconnectedness, while the permeability to the wetting phase remains essentially equal to zero due to the pore space geometry. This observation explains the Permeability Jail, which was defined earlier by others. The gas is trapped by capillarity, and the brine is immobile due to the dynamic effects. At the same time, in drainage, simulations predict that the mobility of at least one of the fluids is greater than zero at all saturations. A pore-scale model of gas condensate dropout predicts the rate to be proportional to the scalar product of the fluid velocity and pressure gradient. The narrowest constriction in the flow path is subject to the highest rate of condensation. The pore-scale model naturally upscales to the Panfilov's Darcy-scale model, which implies that the condensate dropout rate is proportional to the pressure gradient squared. Pressure gradient is the greatest near the matrix-fracture interface. The distinctive two-phase flow properties of tight sand imply that a small amount of gas condensate can seriously affect the recovery rate by blocking gas flow. Dry gas injection, pressure maintenance, or heating can help to preserve the mobility of gas phase. A small amount of water can increase the mobility of gas condensate.

  12. Natural gas monthly, October 1990. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 7 figs., 34 tabs.

  13. Delivery of Hydrogen Produced from Natural Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for transportation and stationary power. DOE Milestone #12;Hydrogen Delivery Options · Gaseous hydrogen - Pipelines, corrosion Gaseous hydrogen pipeline delivery program would share similar technology R&D areasDelivery of Hydrogen Produced from Natural Gas Christopher Freitas Office of Natural Gas

  14. Pipeline Politics: Natural Gas in Eurasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landrum, William W.; Llewellyn, Benjamin B.; Limesand, Craig M.; Miller, Dante J.; Morris, James P.; Nowell, Kathleen S.; Sherman, Charlotte L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eurasia is a major source of oil and natural gas, and events in the region have a great potential to destabilize global security patterns. Supplies of natural gas and oil from Eurasia are vital for the functioning of European economies, and also...

  15. Natural gas monthly, September 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 7 figs., 33 tabs.

  16. Calais, ME Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    13,425 2,694 2007-2014 Pipeline Prices 5.62 4.53 4.46 4.30 8.45 6.22 2007-2014 Compressed Natural Gas Volumes 0 115 217 2012-2014 Compressed Natural Gas Prices -- 6.20 12.40 2012...

  17. Natural gas annual 1994: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, Volume 2, presents historical data fro the Nation from 1930 to 1994, and by State from 1967 to 1994.

  18. Natural gas 1994: Issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of the natural gas industry in 1993 and early 1994 (Chapter 1), focusing on the overall ability to deliver gas under the new regulatory mandates of Order 636. In addition, the report highlights a range of issues affecting the industry, including: restructuring under Order 636 (Chapter 2); adjustments in natural gas contracting (Chapter 3); increased use of underground storage (Chapter 4); effects of the new market on the financial performance of the industry (Chapter 5); continued impacts of major regulatory and legislative changes on the natural gas market (Appendix A).

  19. An Advisory System For Selecting Drilling Technologies and Methods in Tight Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilisi, Nicolas

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The supply and demand situation is crucial for the oil and gas industry during the first half of the 21st century. For the future, we will see two trends going in opposite directions: a decline in discoveries of conventional oil and gas reservoirs...

  20. General screening criteria for shale gas reservoirs and production data analysis of Barnett shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshpande, Vaibhav Prakashrao

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Shale gas reservoirs are gaining importance in United States as conventional oil and gas resources are dwindling at a very fast pace. The purpose of this study is twofold. First aim is to help operators with simple screening criteria which can help...

  1. Evaluation and Effect of Fracturing Fluids on Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correa Castro, Juan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION AND EFFECT OF FRACTURING FLUIDS ON FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS USING DYNAMIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY TEST A Thesis by JUAN CARLOS CORREA CASTRO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test Copyright 2011 Juan Carlos Correa Castro EVALUATION AND EFFECT OF FRACTURING FLUIDS ON FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS USING DYNAMIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY TEST A...

  2. Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Composite Cylinder A China Paper on Type 4;Industrial Computed Tomography (CT) Examination of Composite Gas Cylinder #12;CT of 01-01 Layer at 4.8MPa during the gas compressing and releasing processes are the direct causes for liner defect - Since

  3. Natural gas monthly, September 1991. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production distribution consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

  4. Natural gas exports and macroeconomic performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naini, A. [Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Economics and Policy Development

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alberta, in volumetric terms, is Canada`s leading exporter of natural gas, crude oil, bitumen, and coal. Alberta natural gas shipments to other Canadian provinces and exports to the United States have developed into an increasingly important component of Alberta economy. This article attempts to measure the impact of gas production and exports on different sectors of the Alberta economy as the energy producing province of Canada.

  5. IGNITION IMPROVEMENT OF LEAN NATURAL GAS MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason M. Keith

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed during a thirty month project which involves the production of dimethyl ether (DME) on-site for use as an ignition-improving additive in a compression-ignition natural gas engine. A single cylinder spark ignition engine was converted to compression ignition operation. The engine was then fully instrumented with a cylinder pressure transducer, crank shaft position sensor, airflow meter, natural gas mass flow sensor, and an exhaust temperature sensor. Finally, the engine was interfaced with a control system for pilot injection of DME. The engine testing is currently in progress. In addition, a one-pass process to form DME from natural gas was simulated with chemical processing software. Natural gas is reformed to synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), converted into methanol, and finally to DME in three steps. Of additional benefit to the internal combustion engine, the offgas from the pilot process can be mixed with the main natural gas charge and is expected to improve engine performance. Furthermore, a one-pass pilot facility was constructed to produce 3.7 liters/hour (0.98 gallons/hour) DME from methanol in order to characterize the effluent DME solution and determine suitability for engine use. Successful production of DME led to an economic estimate of completing a full natural gas-to-DME pilot process. Additional experimental work in constructing a synthesis gas to methanol reactor is in progress. The overall recommendation from this work is that natural gas to DME is not a suitable pathway to improved natural gas engine performance. The major reasons are difficulties in handling DME for pilot injection and the large capital costs associated with DME production from natural gas.

  6. Dry gas zone, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study: Engineering data, effective August 1, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This reservoir study of the dry gas zone of Elk Hills Field is a data compilation with information relating to well: completion; production; pressure; and back pressure. (JF)

  7. Natural gas vehicles : Status, barriers, and opportunities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood Werpy, M.; Santini, D.; Burnham, A.; Mintz, M.; Energy Systems

    2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, recent shale gas discoveries have generated renewed interest in using natural gas as a vehicular fuel, primarily in fleet applications, while outside the United States, natural gas vehicle use has expanded significantly in the past decade. In this report for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities Program - a public-private partnership that advances the energy, economic, and environmental security of the U.S. by supporting local decisions that reduce petroleum use in the transportation sector - we have examined the state of natural gas vehicle technology, current market status, energy and environmental benefits, implications regarding advancements in European natural gas vehicle technologies, research and development efforts, and current market barriers and opportunities for greater market penetration. The authors contend that commercial intracity trucks are a prime area for advancement of this fuel. Therefore, we examined an aggressive future market penetration of natural gas heavy-duty vehicles that could be seen as a long-term goal. Under this scenario using Energy Information Administration projections and GREET life-cycle modeling of U.S. on-road heavy-duty use, natural gas vehicles would reduce petroleum consumption by approximately 1.2 million barrels of oil per day, while another 400,000 barrels of oil per day reduction could be achieved with significant use of natural gas off-road vehicles. This scenario would reduce daily oil consumption in the United States by about 8%.

  8. Liquefied Natural Gas for Trucks and Buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Wegrzyn; Michael Gurevich

    2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is being developed as a heavy vehicle fuel. The reason for developing LNG is to reduce our dependency on imported oil by eliminating technical and costs barriers associated with its usage. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a program, currently in its third year, to develop and advance cost-effective technologies for operating and refueling natural gas-fueled heavy vehicles (Class 7-8 trucks). The objectives of the DOE Natural Gas Vehicle Systems Program are to achieve market penetration by reducing vehicle conversion and fuel costs, to increase consumer acceptance by improving the reliability and efficiency, and to improve air quality by reducing tailpipe emissions. One way to reduce fuel costs is to develop new supplies of cheap natural gas. Significant progress is being made towards developing more energy-efficient, low-cost, small-scale natural gas liquefiers for exploiting alternative sources of natural gas such as from landfill and remote gas sites. In particular, the DOE program provides funds for research and development in the areas of; natural gas clean up, LNG production, advanced vehicle onboard storage tanks, improved fuel delivery systems and LNG market strategies. In general, the program seeks to integrate the individual components being developed into complete systems, and then demonstrate the technology to establish technical and economic feasibility. The paper also reviews the importance of cryogenics in designing LNG fuel delivery systems.

  9. Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska's North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

  10. Effect of connate water on miscible displacement of reservoir oil by flue gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, H. D.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Au gus t, 19 60 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING EFFECT OF CONNATE WATER ON MISCIBLE DISPLACEMENT OF RESERVOIR OIL BY FLUE GAS A Thesis H. D. MAXWELL, JR. Approved as to style and content by: haxrman of ommitte... of the petroleum industry there has been a continually increasing search for more economical and more efficient methods for increasing the primary recovery from an oil reservoir. Better production practices, including pressure maintenance programs using both...

  11. SEAPORT LIQUID NATURAL GAS STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COOK,Z.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seaport Liquid Natural Gas Study has attempted to evaluate the potential for using LNG in a variety of heavy-duty vehicle and equipment applications at the Ports of Los Angeles and Oakland. Specifically, this analysis has focused on the handling and transport of containerized cargo to, from and within these two facilities. In terms of containerized cargo throughput, Los Angeles and Oakland are the second and sixth busiest ports in the US, respectively, and together handle nearly 4.5 million TEUs per year. At present, the landside handling and transportation of containerized cargo is heavily dependent on diesel-powered, heavy-duty vehicles and equipment, the utilization of which contributes significantly to the overall emissions impact of port-related activities. Emissions from diesel units have been the subject of increasing scrutiny and regulatory action, particularly in California. In the past two years alone, particulate matter from diesel exhaust has been listed as a toxic air contaminant by CAM, and major lawsuits have been filed against several of California's largest supermarket chains, alleging violation of Proposition 65 statutes in connection with diesel emissions from their distribution facilities. CARE3 has also indicated that it may take further regulatory action relating to the TAC listing. In spite of these developments and the very large diesel emissions associated with port operations, there has been little AFV penetration in these applications. Nearly all port operators interviewed by CALSTART expressed an awareness of the issues surrounding diesel use; however, none appeared to be taking proactive steps to address them. Furthermore, while a less controversial issue than emissions, the dominance of diesel fuel use in heavy-duty vehicles contributes to a continued reliance on imported fuels. The increasing concern regarding diesel use, and the concurrent lack of alternative fuel use and vigorous emissions reduction activity at the Ports provide both the backdrop and the impetus for this study.

  12. Understanding the use of natural gas storage for generators of electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckman, K.L. [International Gas Consulting, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground natural gas storage is aggressively used by a handful of utility electric generators in the United States. While storage facilities are often utilized by the natural gas pipeline industry and the local distribution companies (LDCs), regional electric generators have taken advantgage of abundant storage and pipeline capacity to develop very cost efficient gas fired electric generating capacity, especially for peaking demand. Most types of natural gas storage facilities are located underground, with a few based above-ground. These facilities have served two basic types of natural gas storage service requirements: seasonal baseload and needle peakshaving. Baseload services are typically developed in depleted oil and gas reservoirs and aquifers while mined caverns and LNG facilities (also Propane-air facilities) typically provide needle peakshaving services. Reengineering of the natural gas infrastructure will alter the historical use patterns, and will provide the electric industry with new gas supply management tools. Electric generators, as consumers of natural gas, were among the first open access shippers and, as a result of FERC Order 636, are now attempting to reposition themselves in the {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} gas industry. Stated in terms of historical consumption, the five largest gas burning utilities consume 40% of all the gas burned for electric generation, and the top twenty accounted for approximately 70%. Slightly more than 100 utilities, including municipals, have any gas fired generating capacity, a rather limited number. These five are all active consumers of storage services.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  14. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  15. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  16. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2005-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  17. Natural gas contracts in efficient portfolios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, R.J.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the {open_quotes}contracts portfolio{close_quotes} issue of natural gas contracts in support of the Domestic Natural Gas and Oil Initiative (DGOI) published by the U.S. Department of Energy in 1994. The analysis is a result of a collaborative effort with the Public Service Commission of the State of Maryland to consider {open_quotes}reforms that enhance the industry`s competitiveness{close_quotes}. The initial focus of our collaborative effort was on gas purchasing and contract portfolios; however, it became apparent that efficient contracting to purchase and use gas requires a broader consideration of regulatory reform. Efficient portfolios are obtained when the holder of the portfolio is affected by and is responsible for the performance of the portfolio. Natural gas distribution companies may prefer a diversity of contracts, but the efficient use of gas requires that the local distribution company be held accountable for its own purchases. Ultimate customers are affected by their own portfolios, which they manage efficiently by making their own choices. The objectives of the DGOI, particularly the efficient use of gas, can be achieved when customers have access to suppliers of gas and energy services under an improved regulatory framework. The evolution of the natural gas market during the last 15 years is described to account for the changing preferences toward gas contracts. Long-term contracts for natural gas were prevalent before the early 1980s, primarily because gas producers had few options other than to sell to a single pipeline company, and this pipeline company, in turn, was the only seller to a gas distribution company.

  18. North American Natural Gas Markets. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report sunnnarizes the research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group`s findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  19. North American Natural Gas Markets. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group`s findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.

  20. Natural Gas Engine Development Gaps (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zigler, B.T.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of current natural gas vehicle offerings is presented for both light-duty and medium- and heavy-duty applications. Recent gaps in the marketplace are discussed, along with how they have been or may be addressed. The stakeholder input process for guiding research and development needs via the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum (NGVTF) to the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission is reviewed. Current high-level natural gas engine development gap areas are highlighted, including efficiency, emissions, and the certification process.

  1. Natural gas annual 1992: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and education institutions. The 1992 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production top its end use. Tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1988 to 1992 are given for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. Volume 2 of this report presents State-level historical data.

  2. Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silin, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential e?ects of gas hydrate on human welfare, Proc Natlproduction from natural gas hydrates, Energy Economics 31 (Global estimates of hydrate-bound gas in marine sediments:

  3. Natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai-Quoc (San Jose, CA); Wallman, P. Henrik (Berkeley, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient method of producing hydrogen by high temperature steam electrolysis that will lower the electricity consumption to an estimated 65 percent lower than has been achievable with previous steam electrolyzer systems. This is accomplished with a natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer, which significantly reduces the electricity consumption. Since this natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer replaces one unit of electrical energy by one unit of energy content in natural gas at one-quarter the cost, the hydrogen production cost will be significantly reduced. Also, it is possible to vary the ratio between the electricity and the natural gas supplied to the system in response to fluctuations in relative prices for these two energy sources. In one approach an appropriate catalyst on the anode side of the electrolyzer will promote the partial oxidation of natural gas to CO and hydrogen, called Syn-Gas, and the CO can also be shifted to CO.sub.2 to give additional hydrogen. In another approach the natural gas is used in the anode side of the electrolyzer to burn out the oxygen resulting from electrolysis, thus reducing or eliminating the potential difference across the electrolyzer membrane.

  4. Effect of connate water on miscible displacement of reservoir oil by flue gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, H. D.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF CONNATE WATER ON MISCIBLE DISPLACEMENT OF RESERVOIR OIL BY FLUE GAS A Thesis By H. D. MAXWELL, JR. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Au gus t, 19 60 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING EFFECT OF CONNATE WATER ON MISCIBLE DISPLACEMENT OF RESERVOIR OIL BY FLUE GAS A Thesis H. D. MAXWELL, JR. Approved as to style and content by: haxrman of ommitte...

  5. Continuous Model Updating and Forecasting for a Naturally Fractured Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almohammadi, Hisham

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    . Such capabilities allow for a paradigm change in which reservoir management can be looked at as a strategy that enables a semi-continuous process of model updates and decision optimizations instead of being periodic or reactive. This is referred to as closed...

  6. Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogatchev, Kirill Y.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy...

  7. Effect of Energy Efficiency Standards on Natural Gas Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carnall, Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    local natural gas sector or the local economy in general.natural gas by residential customers will have effects throughout the economy,Natural Gas Supply Policy, Fueling the Demands of a Growing Economy",

  8. Climate change: A crack in the natural-gas bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, SJ; Shearer, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. D. & Wirth, T. E. Natural Gas: A Bridge Fuel for the 21stexpanding supplies of natural gas will not help us to avoidLIM ATE CHANGE A crack in the natural-gas bridge Integrated

  9. A crack in the natural-gas bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, SJ; Shearer, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. D. & Wirth, T. E. Natural Gas: A Bridge Fuel for the 21stexpanding supplies of natural gas will not help us to avoidLIM ATE CHANGE A crack in the natural-gas bridge Integrated

  10. Natural Gas as a Boiler Fuel of Choice in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kmetz, W. J.

    Natural gas is abundant, clean burning, and cost competitive with other fuels. In addition to superior economic fundamentals, the expanded use of natural gas will be enhanced by political and industry leaders. Natural gas therefore will continue...

  11. The role of natural gas as a vehicle transportation fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Paul Jarod

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis analyzes pathways to directly use natural gas, as compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied natural gas (LNG), in the transportation sector. The thesis focuses on identifying opportunities to reduce market ...

  12. Competition in a Network of Markets: The Natural Gas Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walls, W. David

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth in Unbundled Natural Gas Transportation Services:Purchasesby Interstate Natural Gas Pipelines Companies,1987.U.S. GPO, 1988. . Natural Gas Monthly. WashingtonD.C. : U.S.

  13. Restoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AC03- 76SF00098. The report “Easing the Natural Gas Crisis:Reducing Natural Gas Prices through Increased Deployment ofRestoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable

  14. Natural Gas as a Boiler Fuel of Choice in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kmetz, W. J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas is abundant, clean burning, and cost competitive with other fuels. In addition to superior economic fundamentals, the expanded use of natural gas will be enhanced by political and industry leaders. Natural gas therefore will continue...

  15. The Performance of Fractured Horizontal Well in Tight Gas Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiajing

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ?, including tight gas, gas/oil shale, oil sands, and coal-bed methane. North America has a substantial growth in its unconventional oil and gas market over the last two decades. The primary reason for that growth is because North America, being a mature...

  16. INVESTIGATION OF EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS DURING CO2 INJECTION IN HYDRAULICALLY AND NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Schechter

    2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work performed during the fourth year of the project, ''Investigating of Efficiency Improvements during CO{sub 2} Injection in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs.'' The objective of this project is to perform unique laboratory experiments with artificially fractured cores (AFCs) and X-ray CT scanner to examine the physical mechanisms of bypassing in hydraulically fractured reservoirs (HFR) and naturally fractured reservoirs (NFR) that eventually result in more efficient CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous or fracture-dominated reservoirs. In Chapter 1, we worked with DOE-RMOTC to investigate fracture properties in the Tensleep Formation at Teapot Dome Naval Reserve as part of their CO{sub 2} sequestration project. In Chapter 2, we continue our investigation to determine the primary oil recovery mechanism in a short vertically fractured core. Finally in Chapter 3, we report our numerical modeling efforts to develop compositional simulator with irregular grid blocks.

  17. Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to prevent waste and to avoid the drilling of unnecessary wells and to encourage the development of coal seam natural gas producing areas in Louisiana, the commissioner of conservation is...

  18. KRS Chapter 278: Natural Gas (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Public Service Commission may, by rule or order, authorize and require the transportation of natural gas in intrastate commerce by intrastate pipelines, or by local distribution companies with...

  19. Synergies in Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    F presentation slides: synergies in Natural Gas and hydrogen Fuels Brian Bonner, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. 1 OctOber 2011 | ArgOnne nAtiOnAl lAbOrAtOry NG Workshop summary...

  20. Natural gas 1996 - issues and trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents a summary of the latest data and information relating to the U.S. natural gas industry, including prices, production, transmission, consumption, and financial aspects of the industry.

  1. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3292015 10:04:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3035NM2" "Date","New...

  2. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3292015 10:01:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010NM2" "Date","New...

  3. Natural gas annual 1992: Supplement: Company profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The data for the Natural Gas Annual 1991 Supplement : Company Profiles are taken from Form EIA-176, (open quotes) Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition (close quotes). Other sources include industry literature and corporate annual reports to shareholders. The companies appearing in this report are major interstate natural gas pipeline companies, large distribution companies, or combination companies with both pipeline and distribution operations. The report contains profiles of 45 corporate families. The profiles describe briefly each company, where it operates, and any important issues that the company faces. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the 45 large companies profiled.

  4. Financing of Substitute Natural Gas Costs (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute encourages the development of local coal gasification facilities to produce substitute natural gas, calls on state energy utilities to enter into long-term contracts for the purchase...

  5. ,"New York Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:12:03 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3035NY2" "Date","New York...

  6. ,"New York Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:08:45 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010NY2" "Date","New...

  7. Infrastructure Needs: Natural Gas/Electricity Transmission,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4,200 miles of transmission lines, 72,000 miles of distribution lines, and 6,300 miles of natural gas pipelines. Our over 8,600 employees are committed to our mission to deliver...

  8. Natural Gas 2007 Year-In-Review

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 This report provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2007 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2007 from the...

  9. Natural Gas 2006 Year-In-Review

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 This report provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2006 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2006 from the...

  10. Volatility in natural gas and oil markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using daily futures price data, I examine the behavior of natural gas and crude oil price volatility since 1990. I test whether there has been a significant trend in volatility, whether there was a short-term increase in ...

  11. Predicting horizontal well performance in solution-gas drive reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plahn, Sheldon Von

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 48 reservoir simulation runs Tl". e simulation runs encompassed a wide rar ge of PVT properties, relative perrnieability characteristics, roc} properties, and well configui ations These type curves can be used to estimate future production..., and formation thickness to drainage radius were constants of 500 and 0. 067 respectively Landrum et al, presented a diagram which could be used to deter mine the ratio of pi oductivities between horizontal and vei tical wells for the specific conditions mer...

  12. The Extraction of Gasoline from Natural Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, J. P.

    1914-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    for the quantitative estimation of the condensable gasoline consti- tuents of so-called rtwetn natural gas» Three general lines of experimentation suggested themselves after a preliminary study of the problem. These were the separation of a liqui- fied sample... fractionation of a mixture of natural gases are, however, not available in the ordinary laboratory, so this method altho successful and accurate is hardly practical. Even after the fractionation of the gas has ^lebeau and Damiens in Chen. Abstr. 7, 1356...

  13. About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This information product provides the interested reader with a broad and non-technical overview of how the U.S. natural gas pipeline network operates, along with some insights into the many individual pipeline systems that make up the network. While the focus of the presentation is the transportation of natural gas over the interstate and intrastate pipeline systems, information on subjects related to pipeline development, such as system design and pipeline expansion, are also included.

  14. Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

  15. New Report Describes Joint Opportunities for Natural Gas and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    New Report Describes Joint Opportunities for Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Markets New Report Describes Joint Opportunities for Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuel Cell...

  16. Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ALTERNATIVE. EVERY Advanced Natural Gas Engine Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Dr. Mostafa M Kamel Dr. Mostafa M...

  17. Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas...

  18. Natural Gas Vehicle Webinar: Technology, Best Strategies, and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Vehicle Webinar: Technology, Best Strategies, and Lessons Learned Natural Gas Vehicle Webinar: Technology, Best Strategies, and Lessons Learned November 20, 2014...

  19. Ultra Clean and Efficient Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ultra Clean and Efficient Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine for CHP - Presentation by Dresser Waukesha, June 2011 Ultra Clean and Efficient Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine for CHP...

  20. Natural Gas Regulation- Delaware Public Service Commission (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware Public Service Commission regulates only the distribution of natural gas to Delaware consumers. The delivery and administrative costs associated with natural gas distribution are...

  1. Regulated Emissions from Diesel and Compressed Natural Gas Transit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions from Diesel and Compressed Natural Gas Transit Buses Regulated Emissions from Diesel and Compressed Natural Gas Transit Buses Poster presentaiton at the 2007 Diesel...

  2. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive increased...

  3. Natural Gas Vehicle Cylinder Safety, Training and Inspection...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    any proprietary or confidential information 22808 Purpose of Work Assure the safety of natural gas vehicle fuel systems in order to... Help encourage the use of natural gas...

  4. Factsheet: An Initiative to Help Modernize Natural Gas Transmission...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    An Initiative to Help Modernize Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure Factsheet: An Initiative to Help Modernize Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution...

  5. DOE Launches Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D Program Enhancing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Launches Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D Program Enhancing Pipeline and Distribution System Operational Efficiency, Reducing Methane Emissions DOE Launches Natural Gas...

  6. Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop The Advanced Manufacturing Office...

  7. Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the...

  8. Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) Oil and Natural Gas Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) The Oil...

  9. QER Public Meeting in Pittsburgh, PA: Natural Gas: Transmission...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pittsburgh, PA: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution QER Public Meeting in Pittsburgh, PA: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution Meeting Date and...

  10. DOE Announces Webinars on Compressed Natural Gas Infrastructure...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Compressed Natural Gas Infrastructure, an Advanced Rooftop Unit Campaign, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Compressed Natural Gas Infrastructure, an Advanced Rooftop Unit...

  11. PROGRAM OPPORTUNITY NOTICE Building Natural Gas Technology (BNGT) Grant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROGRAM OPPORTUNITY NOTICE Building Natural Gas Technology (BNGT) Grant Program PON-13-503 http ............................................................................................................................5 PIER NATURAL GAS RESEARCH PROGRAM

  12. Evaluation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials for Hydrogen Science...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials for Hydrogen Science Evaluation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials for Hydrogen Science Presentation by 04-Adams to DOE Hydrogen...

  13. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Regional Overview and Links

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Overview and Links About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Regional Overviews and Links to Pipeline...

  14. DOE Announces Webinars on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies, Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Natural Gas for Biomass Technologies, Additive Manufacturing for...

  15. Workshop Agenda: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels, Lesssons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agenda: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels, Lesssons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles Workshop Agenda: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels, Lesssons Learned...

  16. Easing the natural gas crisis: Reducing natural gas prices through increased deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matt

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10% Figure A-3. Annual Natural Gas Heat Rates, by Study UCSBarret, C. 1992. “U.S. Natural Gas Market: A DisequilibriumCalifornia’s Reliance on Natural Gas. Santa Monica, Calif. :

  17. Impacts of Imported Liquefied Natural Gas on Residential Appliance Components: Literature Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009. American Gas Assocation. Natural Gas Glossary. http://River, NJ. White Paper on Natural Gas Interchangeability Andof Vaporized LNG and Natural Gas. Des Plaines, IL, Gas

  18. Effects of reservoir geometry and permeability anisotropy on ultimate gas recovery in Devonian Shale reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starnes, Lee McKennon

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , k, =0. 1 md 68 69 70 71 72 73 75 62 Comparison of cumulative gas production as a function of time with different drainage patterns, 160-acre well spacing, k, =0. 1 md, k?=9k L, =50 feet, fracture parallel to k ?. . . . . . . . . . 77 LIST... OF FIGURES (continued) Figure Page 63 65 66 67 Comparison of improvement in gas recovery with different drainage patterns, 160-acre well spacing, k, =0. 1 md, k?=9k L~ =50 feet, fracture parallel to ~ . 78 Comparison of cumulative gas production...

  19. Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Activity: Natural Gas Engine and Vehicle Research & Development (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the status of the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) activity, including goals, R&D progress, NGV implementation, and the transition to hydrogen.

  20. TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Reservoir Geophysics Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    includes applications to clastic reservoirs, heavy oil reservoirs, gas/oil shale, gas hydrates. Basic

  1. Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Week 2

  2. A placement model for matrix acidizing of vertically extensive, multilayer gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nozaki, Manabu

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................. 16 3. ACID PLACEMENT MODEL IN GAS WELLS .............................................. 17 3.1 Introduction .......................................................................................... 17 3.2 Wellbore Flow Model... .......................................................................... 18 3.2.1 Wellbore Material Balance........................................................ 18 3.2.2 Wellbore Pressure Drop ............................................................ 19 3.3 Reservoir Outflow Model...

  3. 3-DIMENSIONAL GEOMECHANICAL MODELING OF A TIGHT GAS RESERVOIR, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3-DIMENSIONAL GEOMECHANICAL MODELING OF A TIGHT GAS RESERVOIR, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO by Kurtis R. Wikel #12;ii #12;iii ABSTRACT An integrated 3-dimensional geomechanical model have used the predictive geomechanical model to compare production and effective stress change

  4. A quadratic cumulative production model for the material balance of an abnormally pressured gas reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Felix Eduardo

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    for the case of an abnormally-pressured gas reservoir. The primary assumption in this derivation is that WGp <1 or Ce(p)(pi-p)<1. Further, we can proceed by assuming that W is either constant or some arbitrary function. If we assume W...

  5. Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural Gas Price Forecast Although natural gas prices areof AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futurescase long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO

  6. Characterization of gas condensate reservoirs using pressure transient and production data - Santa Barbara Field, Monagas, Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medina Tarrazzi, Trina Mercedes

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Test Date: 09O1-2001j. . . . . . IV INTEGRATION OF ANALYSIS RESULTS. Maps of Reservoir Properdes. Origimd Gas-in-Place (OGIP) and Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) . . . . . . Flow Properiies (k, tt, s) . Well Interference Effects . . . . . 13... . . . . . . . . . ?. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . ?. .. . . . . . . . . 52 4. 2 4. 4 4. 5 4. 6 4. 7 4. 8 Computed Estimated Ultimate Recovery versus Well Completion Date ? Block A, Santa Barbara Field. . Comparison of Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) versus Computed Origmal Gas- in-Place (OIGP) ? Block A, Santa...

  7. EIA-914 Monthly Natural Gas Production Report Data Analysis...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EIA-914: Monthly Natural Gas Production Report Data Analysis October 2006 Page 1 of 38 EIA-914 Monthly Natural...

  8. Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse GasCalifornia State Fire

  9. Natural and industrial analogues for leakage of CO2 from storage reservoirs: identification of features, events, and processes and lessons learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    abandoned wells at storage sites to transport CO 2 to the surface, particularly in depleted oil or gas reservoir

  10. GHG Emissions from Hydropower Reservoirs The role of hydropower reservoirs in contributing to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is poorly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GHG Emissions from Hydropower Reservoirs The role of hydropower reservoirs in contributing from tropical and boreal reservoirs are significant. In light of hydropower's potential role as a green to characterize carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions from hydropower reservoirs in the US Southeast

  11. Geological characterization and 3D visualizations of the gas storage reservoir at Hillsboro field, Montgomery County, IL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Udegbunam, E.O.; Huff, B.G. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological characterizations, modeling and 3-D computer-generated visualizations of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone at the Hillsboro Gas Storage field in Montgomery County, Illinois, are discussed. Petrophysical analyses reveal four distinct hydraulic flow units in six cored wells. Furthermore, four lithologies, identified by thin section petrography, are associated with the various hydraulic units. Fieldwide visualizations of 3-D distributions of petrophysically-derived attributes reservoir quality index (RQI) and flow zone indicator (FZI) -- show considerable vertical variability but lateral continuity. This finding explains why it is easier to expand the gas bubble laterally than vertically. Advantages of the 3-D reservoir description of Hillsboro Gas Storage field include (1) improved definition of the spatial porosity distribution which leads to better estimation of reservoir volumetrics; (2) improved definition of reservoir hydraulic flow zones; and (3) development of realistic reservoir model(s) for the simulation and management of the gas storage field.

  12. The efficient use of natural gas in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.J.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns over air quality and greenhouse gas emissions have prompted discussion as well as action on alternative fuels and energy efficiency. Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels and fuel additives are prime alternative fuel candidates for the transportation sector. In this study, we reexamine and add to past work on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas fuels for transportation (DeLuchi 1991, Santini et a. 1989, Ho and Renner 1990, Unnasch et al. 1989). We add to past work by looking at Methyl tertiary butyl ether (from natural gas and butane component of natural gas), alkylate (from natural gas butanes), and gasoline from natural gas. We also reexamine compressed natural gas, liquified natural gas, liquified petroleum gas, and methanol based on our analysis of vehicle efficiency potential. We compare the results against nonoxygenated gasoline.

  13. The efficient use of natural gas in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns over air quality and greenhouse gas emissions have prompted discussion as well as action on alternative fuels and energy efficiency. Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels and fuel additives are prime alternative fuel candidates for the transportation sector. In this study, we reexamine and add to past work on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas fuels for transportation (DeLuchi 1991, Santini et a. 1989, Ho and Renner 1990, Unnasch et al. 1989). We add to past work by looking at Methyl tertiary butyl ether (from natural gas and butane component of natural gas), alkylate (from natural gas butanes), and gasoline from natural gas. We also reexamine compressed natural gas, liquified natural gas, liquified petroleum gas, and methanol based on our analysis of vehicle efficiency potential. We compare the results against nonoxygenated gasoline.

  14. Historical Natural Gas Annual 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year in61999 The

  15. Reservoir and stimulation analysis of a Devonian Shale gas field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, James Stanley

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The Gas Research Institute (GRI) which sponsored this work under GRI Contract No. 5084-213-0980, "Analysis of Eastern Devonian Gas Shales Production Data;" 2. Doug Terry and Joe Petty with Union Drilling, Inc. who showed great interest in this study... and enhance productivity. ~St h The Devonian Shales in the Mason County Field study area can be subdivided using gamma ray logs as follows (in descending order): Upper Devonian Undivided, Huron Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, Java Formation, Angola Shale...

  16. Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, R.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

  17. Effect of flue gas impurities on the process of injection and storage of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nogueira de Mago, Marjorie Carolina

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sequestration. In this thesis, I report my findings on the effect of flue gas ??impurities?? on the displacement of natural gas during CO2 sequestration, and results on unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests to carbonate samples. In displacement experiments...

  18. Natural Gas Prices Forecast Comparison--AEO vs. Natural Gas Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Lekov, Alex; Dale, Larry

    2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper evaluates the accuracy of two methods to forecast natural gas prices: using the Energy Information Administration's ''Annual Energy Outlook'' forecasted price (AEO) and the ''Henry Hub'' compared to U.S. Wellhead futures price. A statistical analysis is performed to determine the relative accuracy of the two measures in the recent past. A statistical analysis suggests that the Henry Hub futures price provides a more accurate average forecast of natural gas prices than the AEO. For example, the Henry Hub futures price underestimated the natural gas price by 35 cents per thousand cubic feet (11.5 percent) between 1996 and 2003 and the AEO underestimated by 71 cents per thousand cubic feet (23.4 percent). Upon closer inspection, a liner regression analysis reveals that two distinct time periods exist, the period between 1996 to 1999 and the period between 2000 to 2003. For the time period between 1996 to 1999, AEO showed a weak negative correlation (R-square = 0.19) between forecast price by actual U.S. Wellhead natural gas price versus the Henry Hub with a weak positive correlation (R-square = 0.20) between forecasted price and U.S. Wellhead natural gas price. During the time period between 2000 to 2003, AEO shows a moderate positive correlation (R-square = 0.37) between forecasted natural gas price and U.S. Wellhead natural gas price versus the Henry Hub that show a moderate positive correlation (R-square = 0.36) between forecast price and U.S. Wellhead natural gas price. These results suggest that agencies forecasting natural gas prices should consider incorporating the Henry Hub natural gas futures price into their forecasting models along with the AEO forecast. Our analysis is very preliminary and is based on a very small data set. Naturally the results of the analysis may change, as more data is made available.

  19. Utilization of low-quality natural gas: A current assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acheson, W.P.; Hackworth, J.H.; Kasper, S.; McIlvried, H.G.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to evaluate the low quality natural gas (LQNG) resource base, current utilization of LQNG, and environmental issues relative to its use, to review processes for upgrading LQNG to pipeline quality, and to make recommendations of research needs to improve the potential for LQNG utilization. LQNG is gas from any reservoir which contains amounts of nonhydrocarbon gases sufficient to lower the heating value or other properties of the gas below commercial, pipeline standards. For the purposes of this study, LQNG is defined as natural gas that contains more than 2% carbon dioxide, more than 4% nitrogen, or more than 4% combined CO{sub 2} plus N{sub 2}. The other contaminant of concern is hydrogen sulfide. A minor contaminant in some natural gases is helium, but this inert gas usually presents no problems.

  20. International Trade in Natural Gas: Golden Age of LNG?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrieli, John

    International Trade in Natural Gas: Golden Age of LNG? Yichen Du and Sergey Paltsev Report No. 271;1 International Trade in Natural Gas: Golden Age of LNG? Yichen Du* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract The introduction of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as an option for international trade has created a market for natural gas where