Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Risk Estimation; Background Radiation (Natural and Artificial )  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-threshold mode estimate the response at lower doses. · The Committee on Biological Effects of Ionizing RadiationModule 9 Risk Estimation; Background Radiation (Natural and Artificial ) · sources of background radiation · various risk models. · estimating risk and on the sources of background radiation, both

Massey, Thomas N.

2

Is natural background or radiation from nuclear power plants leukemogenic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective in this review is to provide some facts about normal hemopoietic cell proliferation relevant to leukemogenesis, physical, chemical, and biological facts about radiation effects with the hope that each person will be able to decide for themselves whether background radiation or emissions from nuclear power plants and facilities significantly add to the spontaneous leukemia incidence. 23 refs., 1 tab.

Cronkite, E.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Doses and risks from uranium are not increased significantly by interactions with natural background photon radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......retained in the skeleton is associated with mineral bone and is not incorporated into living...Pattison J. E. , Hugtenberg R. P., Green S. Enhancement of natural background gamma-radiation...R. , Khoury H. J., Viera J. W., Lime V. J. M. MAX06 and FAX06: update of......

R. J. Tanner; J. S. Eakins; J. T. M. Jansen; J. D. Harrison

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of 222Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from casecontrol studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested casecontrol studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors.

Jolyon H Hendry; Steven L Simon; Andrzej Wojcik; Mehdi Sohrabi; Werner Burkart; Elisabeth Cardis; Dominique Laurier; Margot Tirmarche; Isamu Hayata

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Local microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

Domingos Soares

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

6

Developing a Methodology for Characterizing the Effects of Building Materials Natural Radiation Background on a Radiation Portal Monitoring System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the sponsors of this research, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). vi NOMENCLATURE EW Energy Windowing FWHM Full-Width at Half Maximum HEU Highly Enriched Uranium HPGe High-Purity Germanium ISOCS In-Situ Object Counting System MCA Multichannel... Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material ? Diameter ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory PMT Photomultiplier Tube PNNL Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PVT Polyvinyl Toluene RDD Radiological Dispersal Device vii RPM Radiation Portal Monitor...

Fitzmaurice, Matthew Blake 1988-

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

7

Enhancement of natural background gamma-radiation dose around uranium microparticles in the human body  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...photoelectrons. For most ionizing radiations, a large proportion...the absorbed dose is deposited...having a shorter range and being more strongly ionizing close to the...in high local doses, causing damage...enhancement of the radiation dose in volumes...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

DarkLight radiation backgrounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-on, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW CW beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, field emission inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation.

Kalantarians, N. [Department of Physics, Hampton University, Hampton VA 23668 (United States); Collaboration: DarkLight Collaboration

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

9

DarkLight radiation backgrounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-on, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW CW beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, field emission inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation.

Kalantarians, Narbe [University of Texas

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Radiation protection: Natural radiation risks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... radiation to which humans are exposed consists of four components - cosmic, gamma, internal, radon. The relative contribution that each makes to the sum is shown in the chart. ... but exposure of the whole body to terrestrial gamma rays and of the lungs to radon daughters are influenced by the nature and location of housing. Gamma rays are emitted ...

M. C. O'Riordan

1983-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

11

Properties of Natural Radiation and Radioactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ubiquitous natural sources of radiation and radioactive material (naturally occurring radioactive material, NORM) have exposed humans throughout history. To these natural sources have been added technologically-enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) sources and human-made (anthropogenic) sources. This chapter describes the ubiquitous radiation sources that we call background, including primordial radionuclides such as 40K, 87Rb, the 232Th series, the 238U series, and the 235U series; cosmogenic radionuclides such as 3H and 14C; anthropogenic radionuclides such as 3H, 14C, 137Cs, 90Sr, and 129I; radiation from space; and radiation from technologically-enhanced concentrations of natural radionuclides, particularly the short-lived decay products of 222Rn ("radon") and 220Rn ("thoron") in indoor air. These sources produce radiation doses to people principally via external irradiation or internal irradiation following intakes by inhalation or ingestion. The effective doses from each are given, with a total of 3.11 mSv y-1 (311 mrem y-1) to the average US resident. Over 2.5 million US residents receive over 20 mSv y-1 (2 rem y-1), primarily due to indoor radon. Exposure to radiation from NORM and TENORM produces the largest fraction of ubiquitous background exposure to US residents, on the order of 2.78 mSv (278 mrem) or about 89%. This is roughly 45% of the average annual effective dose to a US resident of 6.2 mSv y-1 (620 mrem y-1) that includes medical (48%), consumer products and air travel (2%), and occupational and industrial (0.1%). Much of this chapter is based on National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) Report No. 160, "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States," for which the author chaired the subcommittee that wrote Chapter 3 on "Ubiquitous Background Radiation."

Strom, Daniel J.

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

12

Natural and Radiation Carcinogenesis in Man. III. Radiation Carcinogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mice. NATURAL AND RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN MAN. 3. RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS. | Journal Article | Japan Neoplasms etiology Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced Radiation Genetics | JAPAN NEOPLASM ETIOLOGY NEOPLASMS, RADIATION-INDUCED RADIATION...

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Smoothing of the cosmic background radiation by multiple gravitational scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated the smoothing of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) ... rays increases exponentially through multiple scatterings. This exponential growth occurs if the distance is smaller...

Junichiro Making

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

ESnet supports Sandia and APNIC IPv6 Background Radiation research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

supports Sandia and APNIC IPv6 Background Radiation research Engineering Services The Network OSCARS Fasterdata IPv6 Network IPv6 Implementation Checklist ESnet IPv6 Mirror Servers...

15

An electronic radiation of blackbody: Cosmic electron background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Universe owns the electronic radiation of blackbody at temperature 2.725 K, which we call the cosmic electron background. We calculate its radiation spectrum. The energy distribution of number density of electrons in the cosmic electron background becomes zero as energy goes to both zero and infinity. It has one maximum peak near the energy level of 10**(-23) J.

Jian-Miin Liu

2008-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

16

Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results May 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office (575) 234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - New Mexico State University"s Low Background Radiation Experiment (LBRE), which takes place 2,150 feet below the earth"s surface at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, recently released some results about the project"s first two years of experimentation. The March 2011 edition of Health Physics printed an article titled "Exploring Biological Effects of Low Level Radiation from the Other Side of Background," summarizing some initial data taken from LBRE and from a sister experiment conducted at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute

17

Compressed Gas Cylinder Safety I. Background. Due to the nature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compressed Gas Cylinder Safety I. Background. Due to the nature of gas cylinders hazards of a ruptured cylinder. There are almost 200 different types of materials in gas cylinders, there are several general procedures to follow for safe storage and handling of a compressed gas cylinder: II

Suzuki, Masatsugu

18

Radiative emission of neutrino pair free of quantum electrodynamic backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A scheme of quantum electrodynamic (QED) background-free radiative emission of neutrino pair (RENP) is proposed in order to achieve precision determination of neutrino properties so far not accessible. The important point for the background rejection is the fact that the dispersion relation between wave vector along propagating direction in wave guide (and in a photonic-crystal type fiber) and frequency is modified by a discretized non-vanishing effective mass. This effective mass acts as a cutoff of allowed frequencies, and one may select the RENP photon energy region free of all macro-coherently amplified QED processes by choosing the cutoff larger than the mass of neutrinos.

Yoshimura, M; Tanaka, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Radiative emission of neutrino pair free of quantum electrodynamic backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A scheme of quantum electrodynamic (QED) background-free radiative emission of neutrino pair (RENP) is proposed in order to achieve precision determination of neutrino properties so far not accessible. The important point for the background rejection is the fact that the dispersion relation between wave vector along propagating direction in wave guide (and in a photonic-crystal type fiber) and frequency is modified by a discretized non-vanishing effective mass. This effective mass acts as a cutoff of allowed frequencies, and one may select the RENP photon energy region free of all macro-coherently amplified QED processes by choosing the cutoff larger than the mass of neutrinos.

M. Yoshimura; N. Sasao; M. Tanaka

2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

20

Cancer incidence in areas with elevated levels of natural radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been reported that on reaching a certain level of cell damage the production of repair enzymes is triggered which decreases the chromosome aberrations. If this happens, prolonged exposure to high levels of natural radiation in areas with elevated levels of background radiation could decrease the frequency of chromosome aberrations. Recent epidemiological studies indicated that there is an increased risk of cancer in healthy individuals with high levels of chromosomal aberrations. Studies performed in Nordic countries as well as Italy, showed that increased levels of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes can be used to predict cancer risk in humans. One may conclude that a dose of ionising radiation sufficient to produce a certain level of cell damage increases production of antioxidants and repair enzymes that decrease either the frequency of chromosome aberrations or the cancer risk. People in some areas of Ramsar, a city in northern Iran, receive an annual radiation dose from background radiation that is more than five times higher than the 20 mSv. Yr-1 that is permitted for radiation workers. Inhabitants of Ramsar have lived for many generations in these high background areas. If an annual radiation dose of a few hundred mSv is detrimental to health, causing genetic abnormalities or an increased risk of cancer, it should be evident in these people. The absorbed dose rate in some high background radiation areas of Ramsar is approximately 55-200 times higher than that of the average global dose rate. It has been reported that 3??8% of all cancers are caused by current levels of ionising radiation. If this estimation were true, all the inhabitants of such an area with extraordinary elevated levels of natural radiation would have died of cancer. Our cytogenetic studies show no significant differences between people in the high background area compared to people in normal background areas. As there was no increased level of chromosome aberrations, it may be predicted that the cancer incidence is not higher than in the neighbouring areas with a normal background radiation level. Although there is not yet solid epidemiological information, most local physicians in Ramsar report anecdotally that there is no increase in the incidence rates of cancer or leukemia in their area. There are no data to indicate a significant increase of cancer incidence in other high background radiation areas (HBRAs). Furthermore, several studies show a significant decrease of cancer death rates in areas with high backgrounds. It can be concluded that prolonged exposure to high levels of natural radiation possibly triggers processes such as the production of antioxidants and repair enzymes, which decreases the frequency of chromosome aberrations and the cancer incidence rate.

S.M.J. Mortazavi; M. Ghiassi-Nejad; P.A. Karam; T. Ikushima; A. Niroomand-Rad; J.R. Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Electromagnetic radiation in a time-varying background medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical solutions are presented for the electromagnetic radiation by an arbitrary pulsed source into a homogeneous time-varying background medium. In the constant-impedance case an explicit radiation formula is obtained for the synchronous permittivity and permeability described by any positive function of time. As might be expected, such a medium introduces significant spectral shifts and spatio-temporal modulation, which are analized here for the linear and exponential time-variations of the medium parameters. In the varying-impedance case the solution is obtained for the fourth-order polynomial time-dependence of the permittivity. In addition to the spectral shifts and modulation this spatially homogeneous medium scatters the field introducing causal echoes at the receiver location.

Budko, Neil V

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (.089 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup 1?}. The measurements how clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360{+ or -}50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2{+ or -}0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+ or -}8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypotheses of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

1980-05-00T23:59:59.000Z

23

Measurement of natural radioactivity and dose rate assessment of terrestrial gamma radiation in the soil of southern Punjab, Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......terrestrial background radiation mainly due to these...assess the population radiation doses(4-9). However...data are available on naturally occuring and artificial radionulides...order to assess the radiation doses for the general......

I. Fatima; J. H. Zaidi; M. Arif; M. Daud; S. A. Ahmad; S. N. A. Tahir

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Natural radiation environment III. [Lead Abstract  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. (KRM)

Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M. (eds.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

BACKGROUND  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BACKGROUND The safe and environmentally conscious performance of work is a fundamental core value of the Hanford Advisory Board. The Department of Energy (DOE) in seeking to move...

26

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Administration, January 14, 2011 Figure 2 - Natural Gas Rig Count U.S. Natural Gas Rotary Rigs in Operation (Count) 0 400 800 1200 1600 2000 J a n - 0 7 M a r - 0 7 M a y -...

27

BACKGROUND  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emergency Medical Coordination Emergency Medical Coordination Memorandum of Agreement at Brookhaven National Laboratory DOE/IG-0594 March 2003 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 March 3 1,2003 FROM: Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on Inspection of "Emergency Medical Coordination Memorandum of Agreement at Brookhaven National Laboratory" BACKGROUND Because of possible exposure to radioactive and hazardous materials and the potential for industrial accidents at Department of Energy (DOE) sites, the Department has established formalized agreements with local emergency medical providers. These arrangements are generally documented through memoranda of agreements (MOAs). These documents detail the m u

28

The nature of the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the current understanding of the diffuse gamma-ray background (DGRB). The DGRB is what remains of the total measured gamma-ray emission after the subtraction of the resolved sources and of the diffuse Galactic foregrounds. It is interpreted as the cumulative emission of sources that are not bright enough to be detected individually. Yet, its exact composition remains unveiled. Well-established astrophysical source populations (e.g. blazars, misaligned AGNs, star-forming galaxies and millisecond pulsars) all represent guaranteed contributors to the DGRB. More exotic scenarios, such as dark matter annihilation or decay, may contribute as well. In this review, we describe how these components have been modeled in the literature and how the DGRB can be used to provide valuable information on each of them. We summarize the observational information currently available on the DGRB, paying particular attention to the most recent measurement of its intensity energy spectrum by the Fermi LAT Collaboration. W...

Fornasa, Mattia

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Background  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

explains the potential health hazards associated with air quality related to the removal and storage of explains the potential health hazards associated with air quality related to the removal and storage of mill tailings and other contaminated materials. Background From 1942 to 1960, uranium ore was processed at the Monticello mill in southeast Utah. When the mill was closed, approximately 2.3 million cubic yards of low-level radioactive mill tailings, contaminated soil, and other miscellaneous debris remained on the site. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office, in conjunction with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Utah, is conducting the cleanup of the millsite and more than 400 area homes and businesses contaminated with mill tailings. The purpose of the cleanup is to minimize risks to the public and the

30

Background  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Format for the one pager: Report Statement/Recommendation Format for the one pager: Report Statement/Recommendation Background Pros/Cons discussion We would like to see good drafts by noon. 3/30/01. 11 circulate them as soon as I get them in. Any questions, give me a call. 456-7874 Charlie ___ ___ _8171 DOE015-1514 Martin, Adrienne ^ From: Anderson, Margot / / Sent: Thursday, March 29, 2001 723 PM To: 'Andrew D. Lundquisltovp.eop.gov%intemet' Subject: RE: 1 spoke with Charlie and we got it fixed. Thanksl -Original Message- From: Andrew D. Lundquist@ovp.eop.gov%intemet Imailto:Andrew D. Lundquistovp.eop.gov] Sent: Thursday March 29, 2001 7:18 PM To: Anderson. Margot Cc: Kelliher, Joseph; Kolevar, Kevin; Charles M. Smthovp.egov%htemet; Juleanna FR GOovsWeovp.eop.gov%intemet 'kmurphyiosec.doc.gov%intemet 'dina.eisOdo.treas.gov%intemer;

31

Background  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Patent Rights in the New Patent Rights in the New Independent States (NIS) of the Former Soviet Union for Inventions made by NIS institutes' employeess in the course of or under agreements entered into pursuant to the Fiscal Year 1994 Foreign Operations Appropriations Act (P.L. 103- 87). W(C) 94-001 Background The dissolution of the Soviet Union and the drastic reductions in defense spending by the NIS have created an extremely difficult situation for the scientists and engineers who are responsible for the former Soviet Union's defense technology base. It is estimated that there are several tens of thousands of such scientists and engineers; they possess critical technical knowledge about weapons of mass destruction and are underemployed and undercompensated, and consequently, could contribute to

32

Estimation of background radiation doses for the Peninsular Malaysias population by ESR dosimetry of tooth enamel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is worth mentioning that the background dose is required in evaluating a tooths excess dose of radiation workers or individuals accidentally exposed to radiation, by subtracting the background level of a give...

Mohd Rodzi; Kassym Zhumadilov; Megu Ohtaki

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the extragalactic far infrared background radiation using COBE FIRAS instrument data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the explicit form of the function to describe the average spectrum of the extragalactic far infrared background (FIRB) radiation measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 0.15 - 2.4 THz frequency interval, the radiative and thermodynamic properties, such as the total emissivity, total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, enthalpy density, and internal energy density are calculated. The calculated value of the total intensity received in the 0.15 - 2.4 THz frequency interval is 13.6 nW m^-2 sr^-1, and comprises about 19.4 % of the total intensity expected from the energy released by stellar nucleosynthesis over cosmic history. The radiative and thermodynamic functions of the extragalactic far infrared background (FIRB) radiation are calculated at redshift z = 1.5.

Fisenko, Anatoliy I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Thermal and non-thermal radiation of rotating polarizable particle moving in an equilibrium background of electromagnetic radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A theory of thermal and nonthermal radiation in a vacuum background of arbitrary temperature generated by relativistic polarizable particle with spin is proposed. When the particle rotates, radiation is produced by vacuum fluctuations even in the case of zero temperature of the system. In the ultrarelativistic case, the spectral-angular intensity of radiation is concentrated along the velocity of the particle. At finite temperatures of particle and vacuum, the particle temperature (in its rest frame) rather quickly acquires an equilibrium magnitude depending on the velocities of rotation and uniform motion and the background temperature. This equilibrium temperature determines the intensity of radiation. The dynamical slowing down takes a very long time until the kinetic energy of uniform motion and rotation is converted into radiation.

A. A. Kyasov; G. V Dedkov

2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

35

Radiation and Radon from Natural Stone May 7, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation and Radon from Natural Stone May 7, 2008 W.J. Llope Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 is "radiation" and the other is "radon." Radioactive elements, by their very nature, seek stability by decaying the outside and cause damage to cells and DNA, potentially causing cancer. Also, naturally occurring Uranium

Llope, William J.

36

On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation using COBE FIRAS instrument data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use formulas to describe the monopole and dipole spectra of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the exact expressions for the temperature dependences of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, enthalpy density, and internal energy density in the finite range of frequencies are obtained. Since the dependence of temperature upon the redshift z is known, the obtained expressions can be simply presented in z representation. Utilizing experimental data for the monopole and dipole spectra measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 60 - 600 GHz frequency interval at the temperature T = 2.728 K, the values of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, as well as the radiation density constant a and the Stefan-Boltzmann constant are calculated. In the case of the dipole spectrum, the constants a and the Stefan-Bol...

Fisenko, Anatoliy I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Background: Global Warming, 2009 1. Unequivocally, the climate is warming. Natural systems are affected.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Global Warming, 2009 1. Unequivocally, the climate is warming. Natural systems are affected. 2. Very likely (>90% certainty), humans are causing most of the warming. 3. No single technology are very likely to impose net annual costs, which will increase over time as global temperatures increase

Minnesota, University of

38

Embedded silicon detector to investigate the natural radiative environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A detector based on a silicon diode was developed to investigate the natural radiative environment. As the detector is embeddable, it has low power consumption and is lightweight and small. The instrument was tested under different neutron beams and used during stratospheric balloon flights. A comparison of the experimental results with Monte Carlo simulation results shows that the embeddable detector is a promising means of investigating the natural radiative environment.

D Pantel; J R Vaill; F Wrobel; L Dilillo; J M Gallire; J L Autran; P Cocquerez; P Chadoutaud; F Saign

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Low Frequency Measurement of the Spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

We have made measurements of the cosmic background radiation spectrum at 5 wavelengths (0.33, 0.9, 3, 6.3, and 12 cm) using radiometers with wavelength-scaled corrugated horn antennas having very low sidelobes. A single large-mouth (0.7 m diameter) liquid-helium-cooled absolute reference load was used for all five radiometers. The results of the observations are consistent with previous measurements and represent a significant improvement in accuracy.

Smoot, G. F.; De Amici, G.; Friedman, S. D.; Witebsky, C.; Mandolesi, N.; Partridge, R. B.; Sironi, G.; Danese, L.; De Zotti, G.

1983-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

40

Background in the context of land contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive material  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The financial implications of choosing a particular threshold for clearance of radioactively contaminated land are substantial, particularly when one considers the volume of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) created each year by the production and combustion of fossil fuels and the exploitation of industrial minerals. Inevitably, a compromise needs to be reached between the level of environmental protection sought and the finite resources available for remediation. In the case of natural series radionuclides, any anthropogenic input is always superimposed on the inventory already present in the soil; this 'background' inventory is conventionally disregarded when assessing remediation targets. Unfortunately, the term is not well defined and the concept of 'background dose' is open to alternative interpretations. In this paper, we address the issue of natural background from a geochemical rather than from a solely radiological perspective, illustrating this with an example from the china clay industry. We propose a simple procedure for decision making based on activity concentrations of primordial radionuclides and their progeny. Subsequent calculations of dose need to take into account the mineralogical and chemical characteristics of the contamination, which in the case of NORM are invariably reflected in uranium series disequilibrium.

D Read; G D Read; M C Thorne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Massive charged scalar field in the Kerr-Newman background II: Hawking radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform accurate calculations of the energy-, momentum-, and charge-emission rates of a charged scalar field in the background of the Kerr-Newman black hole at the range of parameters for which the effect is not negligibly small and, at the same time, the semiclassical regime is, at least marginally, valid. For black holes with charge below or not much higher than the charge accretion limit $Q \\sim \\mu M/e$ (where $e$ and $\\mu$ are the electron's mass and charge), the time between the consequent emitting of two charged particles is very large. For primordial black holes the transition between the increasing and decreasing of the ratio $Q/M$ occurs around the charge accretion limit. The rotation increases the intensity of radiation up to three orders, while the effect of the field's mass strongly suppresses the radiation.

R. A. Konoplya; A. Zhidenko

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

42

Background and radiation resistance tests of neutral particle analyzer detectors for ITER by using a fast neutron beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiation resistance and background sensitivity of scintillation (Hamamatsu H8500D photo-multiplier) and semiconductor (ORTEC BF-018-100-60 and BU-012-050-100) detectors to neutron and gamma radiation were investigated. Conclusions are drawn concerning the possibility of using such detectors in neutral particle analyzers that are being developed for ITER at the Ioffe Institute.

Afanasyev, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Kozlovskii, S. S.; Makar'in, D. V. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University (Russian Federation); Mel'nik, A. D.; Mironov, M. I.; Nesenevich, V. G.; Petrov, M. P.; Petrov, S. Ya.; Chernyshev, F. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Radiation: Facts, Risks and Realities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Radiation 3 Understanding Radiation Risks 6 Naturally Occurring (Background) Radiation 7 Man-Made Radiation, beta particles and gamma rays. Other types, such as x-rays, can occur naturally or be machine-produced. Scientists have also learned that radiation sources are naturally all around us. Radiation can come from

44

State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 ..mu..R/h, with an US average of 8.5 ..mu..R/h. The nationwide average concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively.

Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Microsoft PowerPoint - Powerpoint_Background.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

g g Radiation Radiation Radiation is everywhere Cosmic Inhaled Radon Inhaled Radon Bodies Plants Bodies Radioactive Elements We live in a sea of radiation... Rocks BACKGROUND RADIATION BACKGROUND RADIATION The average background radiation per person is 370 millirems per person is 370 millirems (mrem) per year. This varies widely depending on where someone lives and their someone lives, and their occupation, health and lifestyle. Background Radiation g Most background radiation is g natural. It is part of nat re It is part of nature. It has always been here. y People have always lived with it. Radiation comes from space- sun and cosmic rays Because this type of radiation is somewhat shielded by the atmosphere, y p the dose is higher at higher altitudes Background Radiation Exposure at Different Elevations

46

Determining the Impact of Concrete Roadways on Gamma Ray Background Readings for Radiation Portal Monitoring Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

locations have reported abnormally high gamma background count rates. The higher background data has been attributed, in part, to the concrete surrounding the portal monitors. Higher background can ultimately lead to more material passing through the RPMs...

Ryan, Christopher Michael

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

47

SEARCH F O R LINEAR POLARIZATION O F THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SEARCH F SEARCH F O R LINEAR POLARIZATION O F THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION P h i l M. Lubin and George F. Smoot Space Sciences L a b o r a t o r y and Lawrence Berkeley L a b o r a t o r y U n i v e r s i t y of C a l i f o r n i a Berkeley, C a l i f o r n i a 94720 Received ABSTRACT W e p r e s e n t p r e l i m i n a r y measurements of t h e l i n e a r p o l a r i z a t i o n of t h e cosmic microwave background ( 3 ° K blackbody) r a d i a t i o n . These ground-based measurements a r e made a t 9 mm wavelength. W e f i n d no e v i d e n c e f o r l i n e a r p o l a r i z a t i o n , and s e t a n upper l i m i t f o r a p o l a r i z e d component of 0.8 m°K with a 95% confidence l e v e l . T h i s i m p l i e s t h a t t h e p r e s e n t rate of e x p a n s i o n of t h e Universe i s i s o t r o p i c t o one p a r t i n 1 0 , assuming no r e - i o n i z a t i o n of t h e p r i m o r d i a l plasma a f t e r recombination. 6 The observed cosmic microwave background r

48

Assessment of occupational exposure to uranium by indirect methods needs information on natural background variations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......contamination is due to natural, depleted or enriched uranium. The exposure to natural...Gastrointestinal absorption of uranium in humans. Health Phys. (2002) 83...indicators for ingestion of uranium in drinking water. Health Phys. (2005) 88......

M. Muikku; T. Heikkinen; M. Puhakainen; T. Rahola; L. Salonen

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

ACCURATE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN A NATURALLY-ASPIRATED RADIATION SHIELD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments and calculations were conducted with a 0.13 mm fine wire thermocouple within a naturally-aspirated Gill radiation shield to assess and improve the accuracy of air temperature measurements without the use of mechanical aspiration, wind speed or radiation measurements. It was found that this thermocouple measured the air temperature with root-mean-square errors of 0.35 K within the Gill shield without correction. A linear temperature correction was evaluated based on the difference between the interior plate and thermocouple temperatures. This correction was found to be relatively insensitive to shield design and yielded an error of 0.16 K for combined day and night observations. The correction was reliable in the daytime when the wind speed usually exceeds 1 m s{sup -1} but occasionally performed poorly at night during very light winds. Inspection of the standard deviation in the thermocouple wire temperature identified these periods but did not unambiguously locate the most serious events. However, estimates of sensor accuracy during these periods is complicated by the much larger sampling volume of the mechanically-aspirated sensor compared with the naturally-aspirated sensor and the presence of significant near surface temperature gradients. The root-mean-square errors therefore are upper limits to the aspiration error since they include intrinsic sensor differences and intermittent volume sampling differences.

Kurzeja, R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

50

The similar effects of low-dose ionizing radiation and non-ionizing radiation from background environmental levels of exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The meltdown and release of radioactivity (ionizing radiation) from four damaged nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Nuclear Facility in Japan in March 2011 continues to contaminate air and ocean water even 1year ...

Cindy Sage

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Natural radioactivity and radiation exposure at the Minjingu phosphate mine in Tanzania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the results of studies on activity and ambient radiation background around the Minjingu phosphate mine in Tanzania are presented. The outdoor dose rate in air and the activity levels of samples from and outside the mine were determined by thermoluminiscent dosimeters and a gamma spectrometer system with a Hyper Pure germanium detector system respectively. The determination of activity was made for the 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K radionuclides. High concentrations of radium-226 were observed in phosphate rock (5760107 Bq kg-1 ), waste rock (425098 Bq kg-1 ), wild leaf vegetation (65011 Bq kg-1 ), edible leaf vegetation (3939 Bq kg-1 ), surface water (4.70.4 mBq l-1 ) and chicken feed (40.1 Bq kg-1 ) relative to selected control sites. These findings suggest a radiation health risk particularly when the samples are ingested, because the internal exposure may give rise to an effective dose exceeding 20 mSv which is the annual limit of intake of natural radionuclides recommended by the ICRP. On the other hand, the radiation dose from ambient air over five years at the phosphate mine ranges from 1375 to 1475 nGy h-1 with an average of 1415 nGy h-1 . The average is about 28 times that of the global average background radiation from terrestrial sources, and about 12 times the allowed average dose limit for public exposure over five consecutive years. Future investigations on the occupancy factor, external dose rate and radon and radon progeny exposure in drinking water, buildings and activity content in the locally grown foodstuffs are proposed, for the realistic quantification of the overall exposure of workers and public at Minjingu, and remedial measures for future radiation safety.

Firmi P Banzi; Leonard D Kifanga; Felician M Bundala

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Radiation.cdr  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An average American's exposure is about 620 millirems per year from naturally occurring and other sources. Other Factors Background radiation varies with location....

53

Borehole logging for uranium by measurement of natural ?-radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?-Ray measurements have been made in boreholes since 1939, for the purpose of detecting the radiation from naturally occuring radioelements in rocks. Logs of the ?-radiation in boreholes have evolved to their present acceptance as a quantitative measurement of uranium concentration for uranium exploration and mining development projects. Many factors influence these ?-ray measurements and consequently new methods of overcoming previous problems have had to be developed. Calibration facilities with model holes have been established in several countries to support quantitative borehole measurements. New high density detector materials have been evaluated and have shown to yield considerable improvements for operation in the restricted environment of the borehole. ?-Ray spectral logging has become available partially as a result of spin-off from parallel developments in surface and airborne ?-ray spectrometric survey equipment. The use of the high resolution solid state detector has proceeded through a series of developments to its present availability as a commercial borehole logging service in spite of the inherent detector cooling problems. Digital measurements are replacing the earlier analog measurements, and minicomputer- or micro processor-based logging systems have enabled new data processing techniques such as inverse filtering, to be implemented in real time at the site of the borehole.

P.G. Killeen

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Simulation of Radiation Backgrounds associated with the HEXRI Diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments resulting in a significant neutron yield are scheduled to start in 2010 at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A wide range of diagnostics will be used to measure several parameters of implosion such as the core and fuel shape, temperatures and densities, and neutron yield. Accurate evaluations of the neutron and gamma backgrounds are important for several diagnostics, such as the High Energy X-ray Imager (HEXRI). Several Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to identify the expected signal to background ratios at several potential locations for the HEXRI diagnostics. Gamma backgrounds were significantly reduced by using tungsten collimators. The collimators resulted in the reduction of the gamma background at the HEXRI scintillators by more than an order of magnitude during the first 40 ns following a THD shot.

Khater, H; Dauffy, L; Tommasini, R; Eckart, M; Eder, D

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

Natural convection and radiation in small enclosures with a non-attached obstruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical simulations were used to investigate natural convection and radiation interactions in small enclosures of both two and three-dimensional geometries. The objectives of the research were to (1) determine the relative importance of natural...

Lloyd, Jimmy Lynn

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Cornell's conversion of a coal fired heating plant to natural Gas -BACKGROUND: In December 2009, the Combined Heat and Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- BACKGROUND: In December 2009, the Combined Heat and Power Plant at Cornell Cornell's conversion of a coal fired heating plant to natural Gas the power plant #12;

Keinan, Alon

57

Childhood exposures to Rn-222 and background gamma radiation in the uranium provinces of south Kazakhstan and northern Kyrgyzstan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The project was undertaken in southern Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. It was speculated that the radiation doses in these areas would be sufficiently high and dispersed to facilitate a casecontrol study where the radiation doses to leukaemia subjects/their siblings could be compared with those received by control children. As a precursor a pilot project was undertaken to confirm radiation exposures in the region. This was undertaken in association with regional childhood cancer treatment centres. Children from families affected by childhood leukaemia were monitored for 1 month for external ?-radiation dose and for exposure to radon gas. 28 children from families in Kazakhstan and from 31 families in Kyrgyzstan were monitored. The median measured radon in air concentration recorded in Kazakhstan was 123Bqm?3 and in Kyrgyzstan was 177Bqm?3. These represent 24-h average indoor/outdoor values. In the case of the ?-doses the mean annual dose was 1.2mGy for Kazakhstan and 2.1mGy for Kyrgyzstan. Overall, the results suggest that the populations studied receive similar annual radiation doses to those received by populations living in other areas with enhanced natural radioactivity and that further study of Kazakh and Kyrgyz populations would not facilitate a successful casecontrol study for childhood leukaemia.

N.D. Priest; D. Hoel; B. Uralbekov; D.O. Baizakova; M. Burkitbayev

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

GammaSense: Infrastructureless Positioning Using Background Radioactivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce the harvesting of natural background radioactivity for positioning. Using a standard Geiger-Mller counter as sensor, we fingerprint the natural levels of gamma radiation with the aim of then roughly pinpointing the position of a client ...

Doina Bucur; Mikkel Baun Kjrgaard

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Mass without radiation: heavily obscured AGN, the X-ray Background and the Black Hole Mass Density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A recent revision of black hole scaling relations (Kormendy & Ho 2013), indicates that the local mass density in black holes should be increased by up to a factor of five with respect to previously determined values. The local black hole mass density is connected to the mean radiative efficiency of accretion through the time integral of the AGN volume density and a significant increase of the local black holes mass density would have interesting consequences on AGN accretion properties and demography. One possibility to explain a large black hole mass density is that most of the Black Hole growth is via radiatively inefficient channels such as super Eddington accretion, however, given the intrinsic degeneracies in the Soltan argument, this solution is not unique. Here we show how it is possible to accommodate a larger fraction of heavily buried, Compton thick AGN, without violating the limit imposed by the hard X-ray and mid-infrared backgrounds spectral energy density.

Comastri, A; Marconi, A; Risaliti, G; Salvati, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Radiation and Background Levels in a CLIC Detector due to Beam-Beam Effects Optimisation of Detector Geometries and Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high charge density---due to small beam sizes---and the high energy of the proposed CLIC concept for a linear electron--positron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of up to 3~TeV lead to the production of a large number of particles through beam-beam interactions at the interaction point during every bunch crossing (BX). A large fraction of these particles safely leaves the detector. A still significant amount of energy will be deposited in the forward region nonetheless, which will produce secondary particles able to cause background in the detector. Furthermore, some particles will be created with large polar angles and directly cause background in the tracking detectors and calorimeters. The main sources of background in the detector, either directly or indirectly, are the incoherent $mathrm{e}^{+}mathrm{e}^{-}$ pairs and the particles from $gammagamma ightarrow$ hadron events. The background and radiation levels in the detector have to be estimated, to study if a detector is feasible, that can han...

Sailer, Andr; Lohse, Thomas

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The application of expansion foam on liquefied natural gas (LNG) to suppress LNG vapor and LNG pool fire thermal radiation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) hazards include LNG flammable vapor dispersion and LNG pool fire thermal radiation. A large LNG pool fire emits high thermal radiation (more)

Suardin, Jaffee Arizon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Reduction of Radioactive Backgrounds in Electroformed Copper for Ultra-Sensitive Radiation Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract Ultra-pure construction materials are required for the next generation of neutrino physics, dark matter and environmental science applications. These new efforts require materials with purity levels at or below 1 uBq/kg 232Th and 238U. Yet radiometric analysis lacks sensitivity below ~10 uBq/kg for the U and Th decay chains. This limits both the selection of clean materials and the validation of purification processes. Copper is an important high-purity material for low-background experiments due to the ease with which it can be purified by electrochemical methods. Electroplating for purification into near-final shapes, known as electroforming, is one such method. Continued refinement of the copper electroforming process is underway, for the first time guided by an ICP-MS based assay method that can measure 232Th and 238U near the desired purity levels. An assay of electroformed copper at 10 uBq/kg for 232Th has been achieved and is described. The implications of electroformed copper at or better than this purity on next-generation low-background experiments are discussed.

Hoppe, Eric W.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Farmer, Orville T.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Liezers, Martin; Miley, Harry S.; Overman, Nicole R.; Reeves, James H.

2014-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

63

Doses and risks from uranium are not increased significantly by interactions with natural background photon radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of doses to members of the public, since all humans are exposed...22). For members of the public, ingestion could also be an...Physics Society First Annual Meeting 25-27 June 1956. 33-48...United States Uranium Registry/Hanford Environmental Health Foundation......

R. J. Tanner; J. S. Eakins; J. T. M. Jansen; J. D. Harrison

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Doses and risks from uranium are not increased significantly by interactions with natural background photon radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......higher fraction of depleted uranium (DU). These...in mandibular cancer patients following...Reprocessed uranium exposure and lung cancer risk. Health...and risks from uranium are not increased...The impact of depleted uranium (DU......

R. J. Tanner; J. S. Eakins; J. T. M. Jansen; J. D. Harrison

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Enhancement of natural background gamma-radiation dose around uranium microparticles in the human body  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...surrounded the adverse health effects of depleted uranium (DU) munitions...Society. 2001 The health hazards of depleted uranium munitions-Part 1...Society. 2002 The health effects of depleted uranium munitions-Part 2...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Doses and risks from uranium are not increased significantly by interactions with natural background photon radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......UK The impact of depleted uranium (DU) on human health has been the subject...977-985. 11 World Health Organization. Depleted uranium: sources, exposure...Royal Society. The health hazards of depleted uranium munitions-Part I......

R. J. Tanner; J. S. Eakins; J. T. M. Jansen; J. D. Harrison

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Pb-210 irradiation dose estimation for inhabitants living in high natural background areas on Pernambuco/Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work was designed to: (a) determine 210Pb concentration in human urine samples of inhabitants of two regions with high natural radiation in the state of Pernambuco - Brazil; (b) estimate radiation dose in bones as a result of this radionuclide incorporation. For this, urine samples of healthy and non-smoker subjects were studied. Pb-210 was separated by ion-exchange resin technique followed by beta counting, which were conducted in a Canberra Tennelec S5E detector. Concentrations of 210Pb in the urine samples of inhabitants from one region varied from 65 to 267 mBq.l?1, while the other ranged from 62 to 440 mBq.l?1. The maximum annual dose estimated in bones for individuals from the first region was about 0.81 nSv and about 1.33 nSv for inhabitants of the second one. In this report, the methodology employed, the results and the radiation-induced health effects are presented as well as discussed.

C.E.O. Costa Júnior; E.B. Silva; A. Amaral; C.M. Silva; J.A. Santos Júnior

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Limits on the Polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation at Multipoles up to l~2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report upper limits on the polarization of the CMBR as measured with the Cosmic Background Imager, a 13 element interferometer that operates in the 26-36 GHz band and is sited on Llano de Chajnantor in northern Chile. The array consists of 90-cm Cassegrain antennas mounted on a steerable platform that can be rotated about the optical axis to facilitate polarization observations. The CBI employs single-mode circularly polarized receivers and it samples multipoles from l~400 to l~3500. The polarization data were calibrated on 3C279 and Tau A. The polarization observations consist of 278 hours of data on two fields taken in 2000, during the first CBI observing season. A joint likelihood analysis of the two fields yields three upper limits (95% c.l.) for \\mathcal{C}_l^{EE} = C^{EE}l(l+1)/(2pi) under the assumption that \\mathcal{C}_l^{BB}=0: 49.0 microK^2 (l=603); 164 microK^2 (l=1144); and 630 microK^2 (l=2048).

J. K. Cartwright; T. J. Pearson; A. C. S. Readhead; M. C. Shepherd; J. L. Sievers; G. B. Taylor

2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

69

On the ultra high energy cosmic rays and the origin of the cosmic microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some inconsistencies to the assumption of a cosmological origin of the cosmic microwave background CMB, such as the absence of gravitational lensing in the WMAP data, open the doors to some speculations such as a local origin to the CMB. We argue here that this assumption agrees with the absence of the GZK cutoff (at least according to AGASA data) in the energy spectrum of the cosmic ray due to the cosmic interaction with the CMB at $6\\times 10^{19} eV$ or above. Within 50 Mpc from Earth, the matter and light distributions are close to an anisotropic distribution, where the local cluster and local super-clusters of galaxies can be identified. In contrast, the ultra high energy comic rays data is consistent to an almost isotropic distribution, and there is no correlation between their arrival direction and astronomical sources within our local cluster. This means that the events above the GZK cutoff come from distances above 50 Mpc, without an apparent energy loss. This scenario is plausible under the assumption of the CMB concentrated only within 3-4 Mpc from Earth. In other words, the CMB has a local origin linked only to the local super-cluster of galaxies. In addition, the galactic and extragalactic energy spectra index within the energy equipartition theorem strongly constrains the dark matter and dark energy hypothesis, essential in the Big Bang cosmology.

C. E. Navia; C. R. A. Augusto; K. H. Tsui

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

70

Gravitational radiation from cosmic (super)strings: Bursts, stochastic background, and observational windows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gravitational wave (GW) signals emitted by a network of cosmic strings are reexamined in view of the possible formation of a network of cosmic superstrings at the end of brane inflation. The reconnection probability p of intersecting fundamental or Dirichlet strings might be much smaller than 1, and the properties of the resulting string network may differ significantly from those of ordinary strings (which have p=1). In addition, it has been recently suggested that the typical length of newly formed loops may differ by a factor {epsilon}<<1 from its standard estimate. Here, we analyze the effects of the two parameters p and {epsilon} on the GW signatures of strings. We consider both the GW bursts emitted from cusps of oscillating string loops, which have been suggested as candidate sources for the LIGO/VIRGO and LISA interferometers, and the stochastic GW background, which may be detectable by pulsar-timing observations. In both cases we find that previously obtained results are quite robust, at least when the loop sizes are not suppressed by many orders of magnitude relative to the standard scenario. We urge pulsar observers to reanalyze a recently obtained 17-yr combined data set to see whether the large scatter exhibited by a fraction of the data might be due to a transient GW burst activity of some sort, e.g., to a near cusp event.

Damour, Thibault [Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques, 91440 Bures-sur-Yvette (France); Vilenkin, Alexander [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (United States)

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Coherence length of cosmic background radiation enlarges the attenuation length of the ultra-high energy proton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is pointed out that an agreement of the one particle energy spectrum of the cosmic background radiation (CMBR) with Plank distribution of 2.725 [K] does not give a strong constraint on the coherence length of CMBR if the mean free path of CMBR is very long. The coherence length in this situation is estimated as a few times of $k_BT$. Due to this finite coherence length, the attenuation length of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) is reduced in the $\\Delta $ resonance region,i.e., around $10^{20}$ [eV]. The small attenuation length makes the suppression of the flux of cosmic rays in this energy region less prominent than the naive estimation

Kenzo Ishikawa; Yutaka Tobita

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

72

Chapter 5. Conclusion Uranium, a naturally occurring element, contributes to low levels of natural background radiation in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are extracted from the earth. Protore is mined uranium ore that is not rich enough to meet the market demand conventional open-pit and underground uranium mining include overburden (although most overburden is not necessarily enriched in uranium as is protore), unreclaimed protore, waste rock, evaporites from mine water

73

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

74

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidental radiation evaluation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

environmental contamination from decommissioning of the Summary: from the naturally occurring background radiation - both for routine releases and accidental releases......

75

E-Print Network 3.0 - arrbod acute radiation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 5 Summary: to years). Exposure to naturally occurring background radiation is an example of chronic exposure. Acute......

76

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute radiation effects Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 5 Summary: to years). Exposure to naturally occurring background radiation is an example of chronic exposure. Acute......

77

E-Print Network 3.0 - atm radiation exposure Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

O'Connell Summary: tissues) 12;Sources of Background Radiation Exposure Naturally occurring radioactive materials... . Cosmic radiation. Fall-out from nuclear weapons...

78

Radiation Damage Study in Natural Zircon Using Neutrons Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes of atomic displacements in crystalline structure of natural zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) can be studied by using neutron irradiation on the surface of zircon and compared the data from XRD measurements before and after irradiation. The results of neutron irradiation on natural zircon using Pneumatic Transfer System (PTS) at PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor in the Malaysian Nuclear Agency are discussed in this work. The reactor produces maximum thermal power output of 1 MWatt and the neutron flux of up to 1x10{sup 13} ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. From serial decay processes of uranium and thorium radionuclides in zircon crystalline structure, the emission of alpha particles can produce damage in terms of atomic displacements in zircon. Hence, zircon has been extensively studied as a possible candidate for immobilization of fission products and actinides.

Lwin, Maung Tin Moe; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Kassim, Hasan Abu [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Aziz [Materials Technology Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Karim, Julia Abdul [Reactor Physics Section, Nuclear Power Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

The application of expansion foam on liquefied natural gas (LNG) to suppress LNG vapor and LNG pool fire thermal radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) hazards include LNG flammable vapor dispersion and LNG pool fire thermal radiation. A large LNG pool fire emits high thermal radiation thus preventing fire fighters from approaching and extinguishing the fire. One...

Suardin, Jaffee Arizon

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

MARSAME Appendix B B. SOURCES OF BACKGROUND RADIOACTIVITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consideration is given to issues associated with technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive reports on Exposure of the Population in the United States and Canada from Natural Background Radiation.1 Terrestrial Radioactivity The naturally occurring forms of radioactive elements incorporated into the Earth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Blazar Duty-Cycle at gamma-ray Frequecies: Constraints from Extragalactic Background Radiation and Prospects for AGILE and GLAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We take into account the constraints from the observed extragalactic gamma-ray background to estimate the maximum duty cycle allowed for a selected sample of WMAP Blazars, in order to be detectable by AGILE and GLAST gamma-ray experiments. For the nominal sensitivity values of both instruments, we identify a subset of sources which can in principle be detectable also in a steady state without over-predicting the extragalactic background. This work is based on the results of a recently derived Blazar radio LogN-LogS obtained by combining several multi-frequency surveys.

Pittori, Carlotta; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Giommi, Paolo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Blazar Duty-Cycle at gamma-ray Frequecies: Constraints from Extragalactic Background Radiation and Prospects for AGILE and GLAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We take into account the constraints from the observed extragalactic gamma-ray background to estimate the maximum duty cycle allowed for a selected sample of WMAP Blazars, in order to be detectable by AGILE and GLAST gamma-ray experiments. For the nominal sensitivity values of both instruments, we identify a subset of sources which can in principle be detectable also in a steady state without over-predicting the extragalactic background. This work is based on the results of a recently derived Blazar radio LogN-LogS obtained by combining several multi-frequency surveys.

Carlotta Pittori; Elisabetta Cavazzuti; Sergio Colafrancesco; Paolo Giommi

2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

83

Response of five tropical plant species to natural solar ultraviolet-B radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tropical latitudes currently receive high solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280-320 nm) even without ozone depletion. Thus, the influence of natural, present-day UV-B irradiance was examined for three native rainforest tree species and two economically important species on Barro Colorado Island, Panama (9[degrees] N). Solar UV-B radiation conditions were obtained using a UV-B excluding plastic film or a near-ambient UV-B transmitting film over potted plants in a small clearing. Significant differences were often exhibited as increased foliar UV-B absorbing compounds, increased leaf mass pre area, and reduced leaf blade length for plants receiving solar UV-B radiation. Plant height was typically reduced under solar UV-B, but some variation among species in response was seen. Biomass and photosystem II function were generally unaffected. The results provide evidence that tropical vegetation responds to the present level of Solar UV-B radiation. This suggests even a small increase in UV-B radiation with ozone depletion may have biological implications.

Searles, P.S.; Caldwell, M.M. (Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)); Winter, K. (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Balboa (Panama))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Americans' Average Radiation Exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We live with radiation every day. We receive radiation exposures from cosmic rays, from outer space, from radon gas, and from other naturally radioactive elements in the earth. This is called natural background radiation. It includes the radiation we get from plants, animals, and from our own bodies. We also are exposed to man-made sources of radiation, including medical and dental treatments, television sets and emission from coal-fired power plants. Generally, radiation exposures from man-made sources are only a fraction of those received from natural sources. One exception is high exposures used by doctors to treat cancer patients. Each year in the United States, the average dose to people from natural and man-made radiation sources is about 360 millirem. A millirem is an extremely tiny amount of energy absorbed by tissues in the body.

NA

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

85

Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRIS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Jordan, David V.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

86

Radiation Safety Edward O'Connell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tissues) #12;Sources of Background Radiation Exposure · Naturally occurring radioactive materialsRadiation Safety Edward O'Connell Radiation Safety Officer Stony Brook University New York #12;STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY & U. HOSPITAL MEDICAL CENTER #12;Why Radiation Safety · Working with radioactive

87

New Limits to the IR Background: Bounds on Radiative Neutrino Decay and on VMO Contributions to the Dark Matter Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From considering the effect of gamma-gamma interactions on recently observed TeV gamma-ray spectra, improved limits are set to the density of extragalactic infrared (IR) photons which are robust and essentially model-independent. The resulting limits are up to two orders of magnitude more restrictive than direct observations in the 0.025-0.3eV regime. These limits are used to improve constraints on radiative neutrino decay in the mass range above 0.05eV and on Very Massive Objects (VMOs) as providing the dark matter needed to explain galaxy rotation curves.

S. D. Biller; J. Buckley; A. Burdett; J. Bussons Gordo; D. A. Carter-Lewis; D. J. Fegan; J. Findley; J. A. Gaidos; A. M. Hillas; F. Krennrich; R. C. Lamb; R. Lessard; J. E. McEnery; G. Mohanty; J. Quinn; A. J. Rodgers; H. J. Rose; F. Samuelson; G. Sembroski; P. Skelton; T. C. Weekes; J; Zweerink

1998-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

88

Response of the NCAR Community Climate Model to the Radiative Forcing by the Naturally Occurring Tropospheric Aerosol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We insert the effect of naturally occurring tropospheric aerosols on solar radiation into the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM). The effect of the aerosol depends on concentration and type (continental, maritime), surface albedo, solar zenith ...

James A. Coakley Jr.; Robert D. Cess

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Neutron inelastic scattering and reactions in natural Pb as a background in neutrinoless double-beta-decay experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inelastic neutron scattering and reactions on Pb isotopes can result in gamma rays near the signature endpoint energy in a number of double-beta decay isotopes. In particular, there are gamma-ray transitions in Pb-206,207,208 that might produce energy deposits at the 76-Ge Q value in Ge detectors used for double-beta decay searches. The levels that produce these gamma rays can be excited by (n,n'gamma) or (n,xngamma) reactions, but the cross sections are small and previously unmeasured. This work uses the pulsed neutron beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center to directly measure reactions of interest to double-beta decay experiments. The cross section on natural Pb to produce the 2041-keV gamma ray from Pb-206 is measured to be 3.6 +/- 0.7 (stat.) +/- 0.3 (syst.) mb at ~9.6 MeV. The cross section on natural Pb to produce the 3062-keV gamma ray from Pb-207 and Pb-208 is measured to be 3.9 +/- 0.8 (stat.) +/- 0.4 (syst.) mb at the same energy. We report cross sections or place upper limits on the cross sections for exciting some other levels in Pb that have transition energies corresponding to Q value in other double-beta decay isotopes.

V. E. Guiseppe; M. Devlin; S. R. Elliott; N. Fotiades; A. Hime; D. -M. Mei; R. O. Nelson; D. V. Perepelitsa

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

90

The BOOMERANG North America Instrument: A Balloon-borne Bolometric Radiometer Optimized for Measurements of Cosmic Background Radiation Anisotropies from 03 to 4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the BOOMERANG North America instrument, a balloon-borne bolometric radiometer designed to map the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation with 03 resolution over a significant portion of the sky. This receiver employs new technologies in bolometers, readout electronics, millimeter-wave optics and filters, cryogenics, scan, and attitude reconstruction. All these subsystems are described in detail in this paper. The system has been fully calibrated in flight using a variety of techniques, which are described and compared. Using this system, we have obtained a measurement of the first peak in the CMB angular power spectrum in a single, few hour long balloon flight. The instrument described here was a prototype of the BOOMERANG Long Duration Balloon experiment.

F. Piacentini; P. A. R. Ade; R. S. Bhatia; J. J. Bock; A. Boscaleri; P. Cardoni; B. P. Crill; P. de Bernardis; H. Del Castillo; G. De Troia; P. Farese; M. Giacometti; E. F. Hivon; V. V. Hristov; A. Iacoangeli; A. E. Lange; S. Masi; P. D. Mauskopf; L. Miglio; C. B. Netterfield; P. Palangio; E. Pascale; A. Raccanelli; S. Rao; G. Romeo; J. Ruhl; F. Scaramuzzi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Low Dose Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ancient Salt Beds Ancient Salt Beds Repository Science Renewable Energy The WIPP Underground may be ideal to study effects of Very Low Dose Rates on Biological Systems Low Background Radiation Experiment We're all bathing in it. It's in the food we eat, the water we drink, the soil we tread and even the air we breathe. It's background radiation, it's everywhere and we can't get away from it. But what would happen if you somehow "pulled the plug" on natural background radiation? Would organisms suffer or thrive if they grew up without their constant exposure to background radiation? That's what a consortium of scientists conducting an experiment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant aim to find out. Despite being an underground repository for transuranic radioactive waste,

92

Radiative Effects of Dust Aerosols, Natural Cirrus Clouds and Contrails: Broadband Optical Properties and Sensitivity Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation aims to study the broadband optical properties and radiative effects of dust aerosols and ice clouds. It covers three main topics: the uncertainty of dust optical properties and radiative effects from the dust particle shape...

Yi, Bingqi

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

93

Development of Generic Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Kentucky Guidance for Ambient Background Assessment Kentucky Guidance for Ambient Background Assessment January 8, 2004 Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet Introduction This guidance document is intended to assist in comparing site data and background data for sites undergoing environmental assessment. These procedures provide a simplified statistical procedure for determining if the site data is part of the background population. It also provides generic statewide background values for inorganic chemicals that may be used in lieu of collecting site-specific background samples. The statistical procedures may be used for site- specific data or the generic statewide values in Tables 1 and 2. This guidance does not preclude other appropriate statistical comparisons from being made, but rather a simplified screening

94

Legal Background  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Legal Background Legal Background Book 1 . . Project Rulison :.Contract: . . AEC, Austral Oil Company, and CER Geonuclear Corporation, . . . . , . . . . , . . February 1969 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. PROJECT RULISON CONTRACT NO. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA REPRESENTED BY THE ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION and THE DEPARTMENT. OF THE INTERIOR and AUSTRAL OIL COMPANY INCORPORATED and CER GEONUCLEAR CORPORATION Prepared by OFFICE OF THE CHIEF COUNSEL NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE FEBRUARY 1969 This page intentionally left blank UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION . NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE TABLE OF CONTENTS VII VIII XV XVI XVII SUBJECT - PAGE Definitions 2 Description of Project ~ulisdn 3

95

Transitional regimes of natural convection in a differentially heated cubical cavity under the effects of wall and molecular gas radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transition to unsteadiness and the dynamics of weakly turbulent natural convection, coupled to wall or gas radiation in a differentially heated cubical cavity with adiabatic lateral walls, are studied numerically. The working fluid is air with small contents of water vapor and carbon dioxide whose infrared spectral radiative properties are modelled by the absorption distribution function model. A pseudo spectral Chebyshev collocation method is used to solve the flow field equations and is coupled to a direct ray tracing method for radiation transport. Flow structures are identified by means of either the proper orthogonal decomposition or the dynamic mode decomposition methods. We first retrieve the classical mechanism of transition to unsteadiness without radiation, characterized by counter-rotating streamwise-oriented vortices generated at the exit of the vertical boundary layers. Wall radiation through a transparent medium leads to a homogenization of lateral wall temperatures and the resulting transition mechanism is similar to that obtained with perfectly conducting lateral walls. The transition is due to an unstable stratification upstream the vertical boundary layers and is characterized by periodically oscillating transverse rolls of axis perpendicular to the main flow. When molecular gas radiation is accounted for, no periodic solution is found and the transition to unsteadiness displays complex structures with chimneys-like rolls whose axes are again parallel to the main flow. The origin of this instability is probably due to centrifugal forces, as suggested previously for the case without radiation. Above the transition to unsteadiness, at Ra = 3 10{sup 8}, it is shown that both wall and gas radiation significantly intensify turbulent fluctuations, decrease the thermal stratification in the core of the cavity, and increase the global circulation.

Soucasse, L.; Rivire, Ph.; Soufiani, A., E-mail: anouar.soufiani@ecp.fr [CNRS, UPR 288, Laboratoire EM2C, 92290 Chtenay-Malabry (France); cole Centrale Paris, 92290 Chtenay-Malabry (France)] [France; Xin, S. [CNRS/INSA-Lyon, UMR 5008, CETHIL, 69621 Villeurbanne (France)] [CNRS/INSA-Lyon, UMR 5008, CETHIL, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); Le Qur, P. [CNRS, UPR 3251, LIMSI, 91403 Orsay Cedex (France)] [CNRS, UPR 3251, LIMSI, 91403 Orsay Cedex (France)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

CMVRTC: Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

newsletters newsletters contacts tools latest news 12.05.2013 Next Quarterly meeting scheduled for February 19, 2014 (10 a.m. - 12 p.m. ET). read more ... More information CMVRTC Showcase Events CMVRTC Poster Sessions Related Projects Heavy Truck Duty Cycle Medium Truck Duty Cycle Fuel Tax Evasion Other technical director For more information, please contact Gary Capps, Technical Director, at cappsgj@ornl.gov or (865) 946-1285. Background Introduction Vision cmvrtc poster Benefits Technology Transfer Introduction The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) launched the Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor (CMVRTC) on August 7, 2007, in partnership with the Tennessee Departments of Safety and Transportation, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the

97

Brightness distribution of synchrotron radiation in the field of a magnetic dipole and the nature of double radio sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model of double radio sources is proposed. In it, the radio radiation is produced by the motion of relativistic particles in a dipole magnetic field whose source is the optical galaxy. Calculations of the apparent brightness distribution of the synchroton radiation of electrons in such a field make it possible to explain some observed features of radio sources: a) the double nature of structure, b) the disposition of the components of the double source on a single straight line with the parent galaxy, c) the dependence of the size of the components on the frequency, d) the preferential direction of the field along the principal axis of the source, e) the similarity of the structures of radio sources in wide ranges of linear and angular sizes. Some other features can also be explained.

Zyskin, Y.L.; Stepanyan, A.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Task 23 - background report on subsurface environmental issues relating to natural gas sweetening and dehydration operations. Topical report, February 1, 1994--February 28, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes information pertaining to environmental issues, toxicity, environmental transport, and fate of alkanolamines and glycols associated with natural gas sweetening and dehydration operations. Waste management associated with the operations is also discussed.

Sorensen, J.A.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and humanAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about

Pennycook, Steve

100

Hubble diagrams of soft and hard radiation sources in the graviton background: to an apparent contradiction between supernova 1a and gamma-ray burst observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the sea of super-strong interacting gravitons, non-forehead collisions with gravitons deflect photons, and this deflection may differ for soft and hard radiations. As a result, the Hubble diagram would not be a universal function and it will have a different view for such sources as supernovae in visible light and gamma-ray bursts. Observations of these two kinds are compared here with the limit cases of the Hubble diagram.

Michael A. Ivanov

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A natural Little Hierarchy for SUSY from radiative breaking of PQ symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While LHC8 Higgs mass and sparticle search constraints favor a multi-TeV value of gravitino mass m_{3/2}, electroweak naturalness favors a superpotential higgsino mass \\mu ~100-200 GeV: the mis-match results in an apparent Little Hierarchy characterized by \\mu 2m({\\rm higgsino}).

Kyu Jung Bae; Howard Baer; Hasan Serce

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

102

Natural radioactivity and external gamma radiation exposure at the coastal Red Sea in Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......0.5 - 151 39 1.08 0.27 - (25) Sudan 29.6 6.02 158.4 4.09...Natural radioactivity in sand used in thermal therapy at the Red Sea Coast. J. Environ...in the Red Sea coastal environment of Sudan. Mar. Pollut. Bull. (1998) 36......

S. Harb

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Internal and External Radioactive Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.6 Table 3.1: Naturally occurring radioactive isotopes [89]. The elemental abundance is the total amount words the signal to noise ratio should be greater than one, S/N > 1. Naturally, the larger S/N is to be distinguished from beta particles or gamma radiation. The big challenge for the Borexino experiment is to deal

104

Earth X-ray albedo for cosmic X-ray background radiation in the 1--1000 keV band  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present calculations of the reflection of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) by the Earth's atmosphere in the 1--1000 keV energy range. The calculations include Compton scattering and X-ray fluorescent emission and are based on a realistic chemical composition of the atmosphere. Such calculations are relevant for CXB studies using the Earth as an obscuring screen (as was recently done by INTEGRAL). The Earth's reflectivity is further compared with that of the Sun and the Moon -- the two other objects in the Solar system subtending a large solid angle on the sky, as needed for CXB studies.

E. Churazov; S. Sazonov; R. Sunyaev; M. Revnivtsev

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

105

Neutrino and Cosmic-Ray Emission and Cumulative Background from Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows in Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study high-energy neutrino and cosmic-ray (CR) emission from the cores of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGN). In LLAGN, the thermalization of particles is expected to be incomplete in radiatively inefficient accretion flows (RIAFs), allowing the existence of non-thermal particles. In this work, assuming stochastic particle acceleration due to turbulence in RIAFs, we solve the Fokker-Planck equation and calculate spectra of escaping neutrinos and CRs. The RIAF in LLAGN can emit CR protons with $\\gtrsim10$ PeV energies and TeV-PeV neutrinos generated via $pp$ and/or $p\\gamma$ reactions. We find that, if $\\sim1$% of the accretion luminosity is carried away by non-thermal ions, the diffuse neutrino intensity from the cores of LLAGN may be as high as $E_\

Shigeo S. Kimura; Kohta Murase; Kenji Toma

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

106

Natural radioactivity in various water samples and radiation dose estimations in Bolu province, Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The level of natural radioactivity for Bolu province of north-western Turkey was assessed in this study. There is no information about radioactivity measurement reported in water samples in the Bolu province so far. For this reason, gross ? and ? activities of 55 different water samples collected from tap, spring, mineral, river and lake waters in Bolu were determined. The mean activity concentrations were 68.11mBqL?1, 169.44mBqL?1 for gross ? and ? in tap water. For all samples the gross ? activity is always higher than the gross ? activity. All value of the gross ? were lower than the limit value of 500mBqL?1 while two spring and one mineral water samples were found to have gross ? activity concentrations of greater than 1000mBqL?1. The associated age-dependent dose from all water ingestion in Bolu was estimated. The total dose for adults had an average value exceeds the WHO recommended limit value. The risk levels from the direct ingestion of the natural radionuclides in tap and mineral water in Bolu were determinated. The mean 210Po and 228Ra risk the value of tap and mineral waters slightly exceeds what some consider on acceptable risk of 10?4 or less.

F. Korkmaz Gorur; H. Camgoz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

QCD background for the UA1 W?tb signal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ccX and bbX background affecting the W?tb e/?+2 jets signal reported by the UA1 Collaboration is discussed. Calculations are based on an O(?s 2)+leading-pole approximation scheme, which includes jet radiation in the initial and final states of the hard binary parton process, and include the heavy-flavor excitation contribution, the stability of which has been checked. The main conclusions are the following. (i) Selection cuts naturally induce a topological event structure on the surviving background mimicking that expected for a W?tb signal. (ii) The background rates for ?+2 jets events, on which we concentrate, are compatible within theoretical uncertainties with the number of events experimentally observed. The importance of purely leptonic decay modes, which survive the lepton-isolation cuts, and the bias induced by lepton-isolation cuts on background event topologies are also clarified.

A. Grosso and R. Odorico

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Natural  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 2,094,387 2,266,751 2,566,049 2,816,408 2,883,277 Mexico .............................. 0 1,678 7,013 6,722 13,862 Total Pipeline Imports....... 2,094,387 2,268,429 2,573,061 2,823,130 2,897,138 LNG Algeria .............................. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 35,325 United Arab Emirates ....... 0 0 0 0 4,949 Total LNG Imports............. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 40,274 Total Imports......................... 2,137,504 2,350,115 2,623,839 2,841,048 2,937,413 Average Price (dollars per thousand cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 1.84 2.02 1.86 1.48 1.96 Mexico .............................. - 1.94 1.99 1.53 2.25 Total Pipeline Imports.......

109

CONTRIBUTION OF GAMMA-RAY-LOUD RADIO GALAXIES' CORE EMISSIONS TO THE COSMIC MeV AND GeV GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND RADIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fermi gamma-ray satellite has recently detected gamma-ray emissions from radio galaxy cores. From these samples, we first examine the correlation between the luminosities at 5 GHz, L{sub 5GHz}, and at 0.1-10 GeV, L{sub {gamma}}, of gamma-ray-loud radio galaxies. We find that the correlation is significant with L{sub {gamma}}{proportional_to}L{sup 1.16}{sub 5GHz} based on a partial correlation analysis. Using this correlation and the radio luminosity function (RLF) of radio galaxies, we explore the contribution of gamma-ray-loud radio galaxies to the unresolved extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB). The gamma-ray luminosity function is obtained by normalizing the RLF to reproduce the source-count distribution of the Fermi gamma-ray-loud radio galaxies. We find that gamma-ray-loud radio galaxies can explain {approx}25% of the unresolved Fermi EGRB flux above 100 MeV and will also make a significant contribution to the EGRB in the 1-30 MeV energy band. Since blazars explain 22% of the EGRB above 100 MeV, radio-loud active galactic nucleus populations explain {approx}47% of the unresolved EGRB. We further make an interpretation on the origin of the EGRB. The observed EGRB spectrum at 0.2-100 GeV does not show an absorption signature by the extragalactic background light. Thus, the dominant population of the origin of EGRB at very high energy (>30 GeV) might be either nearby gamma-ray-emitting sources or sources with very hard gamma-ray spectra.

Inoue, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: yinoue@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

110

Minimizing the background radiation in the new neutron time-of-flight facility at CERN FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations for the optimization of the n_TOF second experimental line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At the particle physics laboratory CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, the Neutron Time-of-Flight facility has recently started the construction of a second experimental line. The new neutron beam line will unavoidably induce radiation in both the experimental area and in nearby accessible areas. Computer simulations for the minimization of the background were carried out using the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation package. The background radiation in the new experimental area needs to be kept to a minimum during measurements. This was studied with focus on the contributions from backscattering in the beam dump. The beam dump was originally designed for shielding the outside area using a block of iron covered in concrete. However, the backscattering was never studied in detail. In this thesis, the fluences (i.e. the flux integrated over time) of neutrons and photons were studied in the experimental area while the beam dump design was modified. An optimized design was obtained by stopping the fast neutrons in a high Z mat...

Bergstrm, Ida; Elfgren, Erik

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

111

Track-etched detectors for the dosimetry of the radiation of cosmic origin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......neutron dose equivalent component of the natural background using electrochemically etched polycarbonate detector and boron-10 radiator. Nucl. Tracks 20 , 573-576 (1986). 13. Lindborg, L., McAulay, I., Bartlett, T. D., Beck......

F. Spurny; K. Turek

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

JOURNALDE PHYSIQUE Colloque C2, supplkment au nO 3, Tome 40, mars 1979, page C2-462 ESTIMATION OF NATURAL RADIATION DOSE AND OF THE AGE OF ANCIENT POTTERY BY MOSSBAUER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF NATURAL RADIATION DOSE AND OF THE AGE OF ANCIENT POTTERY BY MOSSBAUER EFFECT 3E N.A. Eissa, H.A. Sallams was estimated to be 2960 + 90 years, assuming the 1 same annual dose. 3. Discussion and conclusion.- The obtained values / for the natural radiation dose are in agreement with those (0.3 to 0.4 radslyear) given

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

113

About Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

114

The Cosmic Background Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) is an instrument designed to make images of the cosmic microwave background radiation and to measure its statistical properties on angular scales from about 3 arc minutes to one degree (spherical harmonic scales from l ~ 4250 down to l ~ 400). The CBI is a 13-element interferometer mounted on a 6 meter platform operating in ten 1-GHz frequency bands from 26 GHz to 36 GHz. The instantaneous field of view of the instrument is 45 arcmin (FWHM) and its resolution ranges from 3 to 10 arcmin; larger fields can be imaged by mosaicing. At this frequency and resolution, the primary foreground is due to discrete extragalactic sources, which are monitored at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory and subtracted from the CBI visibility measurements. The instrument has been making observations since late 1999 of both primordial CMB fluctuations and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect in clusters of galaxies from its site at an altitude of 5080 meters near San Pedro de Atacama, in northern Chile. Observations will continue until August 2001 or later. We present preliminary results from the first few months of observations.

T. J. Pearson; B. S. Mason; S. Padin; A. C. S. Readhead; M. C. Shepherd; J. Sievers; P. S. Udomprasert; J. K. Cartwright

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Cosmic Background Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design and performance details are given for the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI), an interferometer array that is measuring the power spectrum of fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) for multipoles in the range 400 < l < 3500. The CBI is located at an altitude of 5000 m in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile. It is a planar synthesis array with 13 0.9-m diameter antennas on a 6-m diameter tracking platform. Each antenna has a cooled, low-noise receiver operating in the 26-36 GHz band. Signals are cross-correlated in an analog filterbank correlator with ten 1 GHz bands. This allows spectral index measurements which can be used to distinguish CMBR signals from diffuse galactic foregrounds. A 1.2 kHz 180-deg phase switching scheme is used to reject cross-talk and low-frequency pick-up in the signal processing system. The CBI has a 3-axis mount which allows the tracking platform to be rotated about the optical axis, providing improved (u,v) coverage and a powerful discriminant against false signals generated in the receiving electronics. Rotating the tracking platform also permits polarization measurements when some of the antennas are configured for the orthogonal polarization.

S. Padin; M. C. Shepherd; J. K. Cartwright; R. G. Keeney; B. S. Mason; T. J. Pearson; A. C. S. Readhead; W. L. Schaal; J. Sievers; P. S. Udomprasert; J. K. Yamasaki; W. L. Holzapfel; J. E. Carlstrom; M. Joy; S. T. Myers; A. Otarola

2001-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

116

ARM - Campaign Backgrounders  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Annual Reports Program Fact Sheets Campaign Backgrounders Education and Outreach Posters Brochures Research Highlights Summaries Campaign Backgrounders Please contact...

117

Cosmic Background Radiation Mini-Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a complete re-write of the mini-review for the Review of Particle Physics (a.k.a the Partcicle Data Book), which includes an assessment of the CMB anisotropy results and their interpretation up until the end of 2003. It forms a compact overview of the field at this time. Sections headings are: Introduction; Description of CMB Anisotropies; Cosmological Parameters; Physics of Anisotropies; Current Anisotropy Data; CMB Polarization; Complications; Constraints on Cosmologies; Particle Physics Constraints; Fundamental Lessons; and Future Directions.

Douglas Scott; George Smoot

2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

118

Aluminum as a source of background in low background experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrinoless double beta decay would be a key to understanding the nature of neutrino masses. The next generation of High Purity Germanium experiments will have to be operated with a background rate of better than 10^-5 counts/(kg y keV) in the region of interest around the Q value of the decay. Therefore, so far irrelevant sources of background have to be considered. The metalization of the surface of germanium detectors is in general done with aluminum. The background from the decays of 22Na, 26Al, 226Ra and 228Th introduced by this metalization is discussed. It is shown that only a special selection of aluminum can keep these background contributions acceptable.

B. Majorovits; I. Abt; M. Laubenstein; O. Volynets

2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

119

Response of natural phytoplankton assemblages to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV-B) in the coastal water, Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variability in the effect of solar ultraviolet radiation (UV-B) on primary productivity of ... water off Manazuru Harbor, Sagami Bay, central Japan for two full years during the period...13C method. Size distribu...

Takashi Sugawara; K. Hamasaki; T. Toda; T. Kikuchi; Satoru Taguchi

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Sources Of Average Individual Radiation Exposure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Of Average Individual Radiation Exposure Of Average Individual Radiation Exposure Natural background Medical Consumer products Industrial, security, educational and research Occupational 0.311 rem 0.300 rem 0.013 rem 0.0003 rem 0.0005 rem Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, provides radiological protection services and oversight at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These services include radiation dose measurements for persons who enter areas where they may be exposed to radiation or radioactive material. The results are periodically reported to monitored individuals. The results listed are based on a radiation dose system developed by the International Commission on Radiation Protection. The system uses the terms "effective dose," "equivalent dose" and units of rem. You may be more familiar with the term "millirem" (mrem), which is 1/1000 of a rem.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Radiation defects and energy storage in natural polycrystalline rock salt. Results of an in-situ test in the Permian rock salt of the Asse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation damage development and the corresponding energy storage in pure undeformed single crystals have frequently been studied in laboratory experiments, however little is known of irradiation experiments on natural rock salt (polycrystalline, deformed and impure) under geological conditions. The relevance of these parameters to the defect formation was revealed by a joint United States/Federal Republic of Germany in-situ test in the Asse Mine. Natural rock salt was heated and irradiated using Co-60 sources. Calculations of the amount of halite expected to be decomposed by radiolysis during the experiment were performed using the 1985 version of the Jain-Lidiard model. Qualitative agreement between theory and analyses was found for all the performed analyses. Quantitative and qualitative deviations of the natural samples behaviour from that of single undeformed crystals were observed and attributed to the influence of sulfatic admixtures, polycrystallinity and strain on radiation damage development and anneal. Special chemical methods, such as iodometric titration and uv-visible spectroscopy were applied in order to measure the hypochlorite ion, which forms in irradiated salt. Composite samples located closet to the Co-60 source averaged 0,4 micromoles neutral chlorine atoms per gram salt, a factor of two more than from other positions. Uv-vis analyses revealed more than a factor of ten greater neutral chlorine concentrations in coloured halite. Similarly, optical absorption measurements indicated a factor of ten difference in sodium metal colloid concentrations.

Gies, H.; Rothfuchs, T. [Institut fuer Tieflagerung, Braunschweig (Germany); Celma, A.G.; Haas, J.B.M. de [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands); Pederson, L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for understanding

Pennycook, Steve

123

Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix F: Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F: Radiation F-3 P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM

Pennycook, Steve

124

Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon in air; potassium in food on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sources. People are exposedAppendix F: Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F: Radiation F-3 Fig. F.1. The hydrogen atom and its

Pennycook, Steve

125

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation G-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation G-3 Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding

Pennycook, Steve

126

Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding

Pennycook, Steve

127

ARM - Radar Backgrounder  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News Field Notes Blog feed Events feed Employment Research Highlights Data Announcements Education News Archive What's this? Social Media Guidance Radar Backgrounder ARM Scanning...

128

Integrated Global Background Monitoring Network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the more significant problems when trying to determine what impact is having on global cycles is not knowing what ''natural'' levels should be for both abiotic (gases, trace elements) and biotic (ecosystem functions) processes. The authors believe that a well designed, coordinated network of baseline stations in remote areas around the world can provide a data base will allow best current estimates to be made of biotic and abiotic baseline conditions. These baseline conditions will then help us make better comparisons with more impacted areas, and thus help us more fully understand the impact man is having on his world. This paper examines the history of background pollution monitoring at the international level, describes current activities in the field of ''integrated'' background monitoring, and proposes criteria for the development of a global network of baseline stations to coordinate background monitoring for the presence, accumulation and behavior of pollutants in remote ecosystems. In this paper, this network is called the Integrated Global Background Monitoring Network.

Wiersma, G.B.; Franklin, J.F.; Kohler, A.; Croze, H.; Boelcke, C.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Low-Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer Bobby R. Scott, Ph.D. and Jennifer D. Di Palma Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, 2425 Ridgecrest Drive SE Albuquerque, NM 87108 USA Life on earth evolved in a low-level ionizing radiation environment comprised of terrestrial radiation and cosmic rays. Today we all reside in an ionizing radiation environment comprised of both natural background radiation and radiation from human activities (e.g., Chernobyl accident). An evolutionary benefit of the interaction of low-level, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) ionizing radiation with mammalian life forms on earth is adapted protection. Adapted protection involves low-dose/dose-rate, low-LET radiation induced high-fidelity DNA repair in cooperation with normal apoptosis (presumed p53

130

Nature of oxygen containing radicals in radiation chemistry and photochemistry of aqueous solutions. Annual progress report, September 1979-July 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this year, emphasis will be given on the properties of HO/sub 2/ and O/sub 2//sup -/ and OH, mainly in their role in biological systems. We will continue to study and elucidate how O/sub 2//sup -/ reacts in biological systems. The toxicity of O/sub 2//sup -/ is quite well established but the mechanism is still obscure. One way O/sub 2//sup -/ is toxic is that OH is formed from O/sub 2//sup -/ through reduction of Fe/sup 3 +/, and subsequently the reaction of Fe/sup 2 +/ with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ (Fenton reaction). This mechanism is sometimes called the Haber Weiss Reaction. We will study if reduction of Fe/sup 3 +/ complexes by O/sub 2//sup -/ in biological systems does catalyze the Haber Weiss reaction and if OH is formed in this mechanism. The role of oxygen, radiosensitizers in radiation damage of bacteriophages and cells will be further studied, as well as on E. coli and enzymes. Use of different mutants, such as ones with repair deficiencies, or others which are deficient in glutathione will help to elucidate the role of O/sub 2//sup -/ and O/sub 2/ toxicity. We will try to elucidate the formation and role of OH, O/sub 2//sup -/ and O/sub 2/ in these systems as well as the relative contribution of endogenous and exogenous damage, and the role of direct and indirect radiation damage to cells. As there is some doubt how and if SOD protects cells from irradiation as literature results show lots of conflict, we will try to clear this point, in studies with E. coli mutants, and adding SOD endogenously and exogenously. We also intend to study if SOD (super oxide dismutase) does react only with O/sub 2//sup -/ or also with biological peroxides (RO/sub 2/) and hydroperoxides (RO/sub 2/H). Further studies of O/sub 2//sup -/ and O/sub 2/ with various cytochromes, and hemoglobins is planned.

Czapski, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Appendix G: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix G: Radiation #12;#12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

132

Appendix A: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix A: Radiation #12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

133

EBSD Images Theoretical Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivation EBSD Images Theoretical Background Defects in the Weld Grain Growth Low Speed Welding High Speed Welding Conclusion Heat-Affected Zone Observations Welding Experiments The low density in the transportation industries. Reproducibility and the low cost make welding a major large scale assembly process

Candea, George

134

David Smith Academic background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

David Smith Academic background Ph.D. in Mathematics (Algebra), Université de Sherbrooke, Canada project program (I. Assem, F. Bergeron, C. Reutenauer, D. Smith) $132,000 ($44,000 per year for 3 years. Schiffler and D. Smith, Friezes, strings and cluster variables, to appear in Glasgow Mathematcal Journal. 2

135

Gauging the cosmic microwave background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide a new derivation of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and find an exact expression that can be readily expanded perturbatively. Close attention is paid to gauge issues, with the motivation to examine the effect of super-Hubble modes on the CMB. We calculate a transfer function that encodes the behaviour of the dipole, and examine its long-wavelength behaviour. We show that contributions to the dipole from adiabatic super-Hubble modes are strongly suppressed, even in the presence of a cosmological constant, contrary to claims in the literature. We also introduce a naturally defined CMB monopole, which exhibits closely analogous long-wavelength behaviour. We discuss the geometrical origin of this super-Hubble suppression, pointing out that it is a simple reflection of adiabaticity, and hence argue that it will occur regardless of the matter content.

J. P. Zibin; Douglas Scott

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

Appendix F. Radiation Annual Site Environmental Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;Annual Site Environmental Report Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis

Pennycook, Steve

137

II. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND Since 1977 the University of Oregon Solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of utilities headed by the Eugene Water and Electric Board initiated the Re- gional Solar Radiation Monitoring2 II. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND Since 1977 the University of Oregon Solar Monitoring Laboratory has operated a solar radiation monitoring network in the Pacific Northwest. The number of stations participat

Oregon, University of

138

Radiation risk in the structure of overall risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Theoretical, methodological, and methodic aspects of the problem of radiation risk analysis are considered. It was shown that the potential risk caused by technogenic exposure cannot be selected practically for certain on the overall risk background relative to exposure of factors of non-radiation nature. The structure of the overall risk, both assessment and of its radiation component is given. The main factors limiting validity of radiation component of overall risk finding are discussed. An actual importance of problems for an estimation of radiation safety of both individual and society as a whole is systematised. Some aspects of acceptable risk assessment are considered. Volume and influence of risk technogenic sources on health are compared. Some general theses characterised the modern state of the problem.

V. Semenov

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Cosmological origin of anomalous radio background  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARCADE 2 collaboration has reported a significant excess in the isotropic radio background, whose homogeneity cannot be reconciled with clustered sources. This suggests a cosmological origin prior to structure formation. We investigate several potential mechanisms and show that injection of relativistic electrons through late decays of a metastable particle can give rise to the observed excess radio spectrum through synchrotron emission. However, constraints from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy, on injection of charged particles and on the primordial magnetic field, present a challenge. The simplest scenario is with a ?>9 GeV particle decaying into e{sup +}e{sup ?} at a redshift of z ? 5, in a magnetic field of ? 5?G, which exceeds the CMB B-field constraints, unless the field was generated after decoupling. Decays into exotic millicharged particles can alleviate this tension, if they emit synchroton radiation in conjunction with a sufficiently large background magnetic field of a dark U(1)' gauge field.

Cline, James M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montral, Qubec, H3A 2T8 Canada (Canada); Vincent, Aaron C., E-mail: jcline@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: vincent@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Fsica Corpuscular, Universitat de Valncia - CSIC, 46071, Valencia (Spain)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Paducah Background Factsheet | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Background Factsheet Paducah Background Factsheet Background Fact Sheet Transfer of Depleted Uranium and Subsequent Transactions, May 15, 2012 Paducah Background...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the Avy Mouse  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the A Ionizing Radiation Alters the Epigenome of the A vy Mouse Autumn Bernal 1,2,3 , Dale Huang 1 , Yue Li 4 , Dana Dolinoy 5 , and Randy Jirtle 1 Department of Radiation Oncology 1 , University Program in Genetics and Genomic 2 , Integrated Toxicology & Environmental Health Program 3 , Department of Community and Family Medicine 4 , Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA, Department of Environmental and Health Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA 4 Background: Humans have evolved and thrived amidst constant low-dose (0-10 cGy) background radiation exposure from natural sources. Currently, however, the frequency of exposures to low doses of radiation is increasing due to man-made sources such as diagnostic imaging and nuclear power. This increased exposure has led to concerns amongst the general public and the government about the

142

Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes. Revision 1, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The determination of soil background is one of the most important activities supporting environmental restoration and waste management on the Hanford Site. Background compositions serve as the basis for identifying soil contamination, and also as a baseline in risk assessment processes used to determine soil cleanup and treatment levels. These uses of soil background require an understanding of the extent to which analytes of concern occur naturally in the soils. This report documents the results of sampling and analysis activities designed to characterize the composition of soil background at the Hanford Site, and to evaluate the feasibility for use as Sitewide background. The compositions of naturally occurring soils in the vadose Zone have been-determined for-nonradioactive inorganic and organic analytes and related physical properties. These results confirm that a Sitewide approach to the characterization of soil background is technically sound and is a viable alternative to the determination and use of numerous local or area backgrounds that yield inconsistent definitions of contamination. Sitewide soil background consists of several types of data and is appropriate for use in identifying contamination in all soils in the vadose zone on the Hanford Site. The natural concentrations of nearly every inorganic analyte extend to levels that exceed calculated health-based cleanup limits. The levels of most inorganic analytes, however, are well below these health-based limits. The highest measured background concentrations occur in three volumetrically minor soil types, the most important of which are topsoils adjacent to the Columbia River that are rich in organic carbon. No organic analyte levels above detection were found in any of the soil samples.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Sakhalin tender background detailed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that on Jan. 27, 1992, the committee constituted by order of the Russian government of Dec. 23, 1991, and headed by V.I. Danilov-Danilyan, the Russian Federation's Minister for Ecology and Natural Resources, assessed the results of a tender announced in May 1991. The tender was for foreign companies to submit feasibility studies for exploration and development of oil and gas on the continental shelf off Sakhalin Island. The announced winner was the MMM group consisting of McDermott International Inc., Marathon Oil Co., and Mitsui and Co. Ltd. In its decision the governmental tender committee (GTC) begged to differ from V. Fedorov, governor of the Territory of Sakhalin, in whose opinion the U.S.-Japanese combine of Exxon Corp.-Sakhalin Oil Development Co. (Sodeco) should have been pronounced winner at the bidding's end. GTC's decision also ran counter to the verdict by a panel of experts constituted by decision of the Examining Council under the Chairman of the Russian Government on Dec. 3, 1991, and headed by F. Salmanov, first deputy Minister of Geology of the U.S.S.R.

Konoplyanik, A. (Russian Federation Ministry for Fuels and Energy (SU))

1992-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

144

Possible generation of $?$-ray laser by electrons wiggling in a background laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possibility of $\\gamma-$ray laser generation by the radiation of wiggling electrons in an usual background laser is discussed.

Qi-Ren Zhang

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

145

Measurement of natural radioactivity and assessment of associated radiation hazards in soil around Baoji second coal-fired thermal power plant, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......10001 g) were sealed in gas-tight, radon-impermeable...concentrations of the natural radionuclides 226Ra...Comparative study of natural radioactivity levels...radioactive samples from Cyprus characteristic geological...Mechanisms of enrichment of natural radioactivity along the......

Xinwei Lu; Xiaoxue Li; Pujun Yun; Dacheng Luo; Lijun Wang; Chunhui Ren; Cancan Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Space radiation shielding analysis and dosimetry for the space shuttle program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Active and passive radiation dosimeters have been flown on every Space Shuttle mission to measure the naturally?occurring background Van Allen and galactic cosmic radiation doses that astronauts and radiation?sensitive experiments and payloads receive. A review of the various models utilized at the NASA/Johnson Space Center Radiation Analysis and Dosimetry is presented. An analytical shielding model of the Shuttle was developed as an engineering tool to aid in making premission radiation dose calculations and is discussed in detail. The anatomical man models are also discussed. A comparison between the onboard dosimeter measurements for the 24 Shuttle missions to date and the dose calculations using the radiation environment and shielding models is presented.

William Atwell; E. R. Beever; A. C. Hardy; R. G. Richmond; B. L. Cash

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Linking Molecular Events to Cellular  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Linking Molecular Events to Cellular Responses at Low Dose Exposures Linking Molecular Events to Cellular Responses at Low Dose Exposures Thomas Weber Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why This Project It currently costs billions of dollars to protect workers and the public from exposure to man-made radiation, despite exposure levels lower than the natural background levels of radiation. If it could be demonstrated that there is no increased cancer risk associated with these low dose exposures, these resources could be directed toward more critical societal issues. Defining low dose radiation cancer risks is limited by our ability to measure and directly correlate relevant cellular and molecular responses occurring at the low radiation dose and dose rate with tumor formation. This deficiency has led to conservative risk assessments based on low dose

148

Radioactivity and Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

149

Influence of Extraterrestrial Radiation on Radiation Portal Monitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cosmic radiation and solar flares can be a major source of background radiation at the Earths surface. This paper examines the relationship between extraterrestrial radiation and the detectable background in radiation portal monitors used for homeland security applications. Background radiation data from 13 radiation portal monitor facilities are examined and compared against external sources of data related to extraterrestrial radiation, including measurements at neutron monitors located at 53 cosmic-ray observatories around the Earth, four polar orbiting satellites, three geostationary satellites, ground-based geomagnetic field data from observatories around the Earth, a solar magnetic index, solar radio flux data, and sunspot activity data. Four-years (January 2003 through December 2006) of data are used in this study, which include the latter part of Solar Cycle 23 as solar activity was on the decline. The analysis shows a significant relationship between some extraterrestrial radiation and the background detected in the radiation portal monitors. A demonstrable decline is shown in the average gamma ray and neutron background at the radiation portal monitors as solar activity declined over the period of the study.

Keller, Paul E.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Background and Aims The need to manage the world's natural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Room). Norbert Zanga (Kevin Bishop supervisor) presented his PhD research in Congo. Student Seminar her research in Congo. Next Student Seminar! Our next Student Seminar will be held on August 27th, 11

151

MAR Background Report MAR Background Report: Indigenous Protest in Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAR Background Report MAR Background Report: Indigenous Protest in Brazil Hundreds of indigenous people demonstrated at the National Congress in Brasilia, capital of Brazil, following the announcement in the 1990s in the midst of extensive protests in Brazil and around the world. On February 8, an indigenous

Milchberg, Howard

152

Simulation of PEP-II Accelerator Backgrounds Using TURTLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present studies of accelerator-induced backgrounds in the BaBar detector at the SLAC B-Factory, carried out using LPTURTLE, a modified version of the DECAY TURTLE simulation package. Lost-particle backgrounds in PEP-II are dominated by a combination of beam-gas bremstrahlung, beam-gas Coulomb scattering, radiative-Bhabha events and beam-beam blow-up. The radiation damage and detector occupancy caused by the associated electromagnetic shower debris can limit the usable luminosity. In order to understand and mitigate such backgrounds, we have performed a full program of beam-gas and luminosity-background simulations, that include the effects of the detector solenoidal field, detailed modeling of limiting apertures in both collider rings, and optimization of the betatron collimation scheme in the presence of large transverse tails.

Barlow, R.J.; Fieguth, T.; /SLAC; Kozanecki, W.; /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay; Majewski, S.A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; /Orsay, LAL

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solar panels are designed as a photovoltaic module. The energy producing aspect of the photovoltaic module has two primary steps. The first is a semiconducting material such as...

154

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and the Bureau of Reclamation signed 10-year agreements - known as the Columbia Basin Fish Accords - with four Northwest tribes and two states on May 2, 2008. These historic...

155

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

maintenance personnel, and film crews use small, portable lighting systems known as "mobile lighting." Traditionally, mobile lighting units are powered by diesel fuel generators...

156

Background  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Onondaga Lake is located (lat. 4306?54?; long. 7614?34?) immediately north of the City of Syracuse, in Onondaga County, in the middle of the most urbanized ... River. The Seneca River combines with the Oneida R...

Steven W. Effler; Gena Harnett

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bonneville Power Administration is considering building a new office building on its Ross Complex in Vancouver, Wash., to meet long-standing work space needs. BPA is inviting...

158

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renewable energy sources are critical to the nation's future, and hydrogen-powered fuel cells offer an attractive alternative to current technologies. However, fuel cell...

159

Background  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting) Semi-annual report For the period of October 2003 to April 2004 Authored...

160

Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

build a facility in the Sandia Science & Technology Park (SS&TP) in 1998 for their Photovoltaics Division, which builds solar cells for the space industry. This division is built...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Cosmic string, hydrodynamics and microanisotropies in the cosmic background radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... R/c, and in the region r ^ R, the metric will be approximately Schwarzschild. For these reasons I shall take the ... . For these reasons I shall take the Schwarzschild metric for r^ R, and 'cut out' the sphere r < R which ...

S.T. Chase

1986-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

162

Estimation of radiation doses associated with natural radioactivity in sand samples of the north western areas of Pakistan using Monte Carlo simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides, i.e., 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, were measured in sand samples of north western areas of Pakistan using gamma-spectrometry. The measured ranges of activity...

Khalid Khan; P. Akhter; S. D. Orfi

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

ACS WFC CCD Radiation Test: The Radiation Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of external surfaces by naturally occurring atomic oxygen. CCD detectors are particularly vulnerable to damage damage. A comprehensive discussion of the types of radiation damage known to occur in CCDs is beyond1 ACS WFC CCD Radiation Test: The Radiation Environment Michael R. Jones Space Telescope Science

Sirianni, Marco

164

Appendix E. Radiation Annual Site Environmental Report--2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon in air; potassium in food and waterAppendix E. Radiation #12;#12;Annual Site Environmental Report--2011 Appendix E. Radiation E-3

Pennycook, Steve

165

The estimation of radiation doses in human organs due to natural and artificial radioactivity in surface waters of the Ebro river basin (Northeast Spain)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the estimation of the radiation doses in the human body in the Ebro river basin (Northeast Spain), following drinking water ingestion by measuring 40K, 226Ra, 90Sr and 3H. The equivalent dose in ten different organs was estimated. Dose calculations were performed by means of the GENII computer program. The lowest equivalent dose calculated through ingesting drinking water was in the small intestine whereas the highest was in the bone surface.

Feda Oner; Nazmi T. Okumusoglu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Low background techniques in XMASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The XMASS project aims to detect pp and {sup 7}Be solar neutrinos, neutrino-less double beta decay, and dark matter searches using ultra-pure liquid xenon. The first stage of XMASS project is concentrated on dark matter searches using 800 kg liquid xenon detector which requires low background and low threshold. Several techniques applied to XMASS detector for low background will be presented.

Takeda, Atsushi [Kamioka Observatory, ICRR, University of Tokyo, 456 Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka-cho, Hida, Gifu, 506-1205 (Japan)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

167

Overcoming High Energy Backgrounds at Pulsed Spallation Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instrument backgrounds at neutron scattering facilities directly affect the quality and the efficiency of the scientific measurements that users perform. Part of the background at pulsed spallation neutron sources is caused by, and time-correlated with, the emission of high energy particles when the proton beam strikes the spallation target. This prompt pulse ultimately produces a signal, which can be highly problematic for a subset of instruments and measurements due to the time-correlated properties, and different to that from reactor sources. Measurements of this background have been made at both SNS (ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN, USA) and SINQ (PSI, Villigen, Switzerland). The background levels were generally found to be low compared to natural background. However, very low intensities of high-energy particles have been found to be detrimental to instrument performance in some conditions. Given that instrument performance is typically characterised by S/N, improvements in backgrounds can both improve instrument pe...

Cherkashyna, Nataliia; DiJulio, Douglas D; Khaplanov, Anton; Pfeiffer, Dorothea; Scherzinger, Julius; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P; Fissum, Kevin G; Ansell, Stuart; Iverson, Erik B; Ehlers, Georg; Gallmeier, Franz X; Panzner, Tobias; Rantsiou, Emmanouela; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Filges, Uwe; Kittelmann, Thomas; Extegarai, Maddi; Santoro, Valentina; Kirstein, Oliver; Bentley, Phillip M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Biomedical aspects of natural and manufactured environmental radioactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While weapons testing has altered natural radioactivity background, manufactured radioactivity in most parts of the world constitutes but a very small fraction of the total alpha, beta, and gamma radioactivity in soil, air, water, and the biota. For example, in the early 1970s, we found what appeared to be the highest natural concentration of radioactivity ever reported in fish while attempting to measure the manufactured plutonium ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu) in organs of oceanic tuna. The natural alpha emitter polonium ({sup 210}Po) was discovered in the same organs at orders of magnitude higher concentrations. In particular, the caecum, which is a digestive organ composed of many small closed-ended sacs, contained concentrations of polonium as high as 79 pCi/g of wet tissue and lesser amounts of two manufactured isotopes: 0.0001 pCi/g of plutonium and 0.01 pCi/g of radiocesium ({sup 137}Cs). This equates to {approximately}80 rem/yr of radiation dose to this organ, overwhelmingly from the natural polonium, or {approximately}5000 times higher than is found in the human liver, the highest polonium concentration in man. The average background radiation for humans, for comparison, is {approximately}0.2 rem/yr, but the dose for Japanese, whose diet is high in seafood, is {approximately}15 rem/yr. The question arose: {open_quotes}Are these high concentrations of natural polonium limited to oceanic fish?{close_quotes} To answer this question, polonium was determined in the organs of striped bass and catfish from Lake Mead. In a related study, the plutonium and radiocesium ({sup 137}Cs) distributions in soils were determined to ascertain the impact of weapons testing on the natural background radioactivity of soils.

Hodge, V. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Solar Background Document 3 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

3 Solar Background Document 3 A list of private sector investment in Solyndra. Solar Background Document 3.pdf More Documents & Publications Solar Background Document 2 GridWise...

170

Integrated global background monitoring network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the background and elucidates the need for an integrated global background monitoring network. This network should: establish reference levels for pollutants that have potential for global contaminatin, serve as an early warning site for detecting global spread of pollutants, and establish baseline levels for selected ecosystem parameters against which data from more impacted areas can be compared. This paper proposes the following: (1) establish an integrated global background monitoring network for pollutants and ecosystem parameters; (2) pollutant measurements be multi-media; (3) carry out ecosystem parameter studies in conjunction with pollutant measurements; (4) the network be maintained for an indefinite period of time; (5) the network be established using the international biosphere reserve system as the universe from which a subset of monitoring sites are drawn; and (6) that the project be under the overall direction of the Global Environmental Monitoring System. 43 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

Wiersma, G.B.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Low Dose Radiation Exposure: Exploring Bystander Effects In Vivo.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exposure: Exploring Bystander Effects Exposure: Exploring Bystander Effects In Vivo. 1 Blyth, B.J., 1 Sykes, P.J. 1 Department of Haematology and Genetic Pathology, Flinders University and Medical Centre, Bedford Park, South Australia, 5042, The general population is daily exposed to chronic, low doses of ionizing radiation from both natural and artificial sources. The shape of the radiation dose-response curve at these low doses is currently linearly extrapolated from data obtained after high dose exposure due to the low sensitivity of traditional biological assays after near-background exposures. At odds with this Linear No-Threshold model, are the phenomena collectively referred to as the radiation-induced bystander effect. The bystander effect describes a collection of in vitro

172

REFERENCE AND BACKGROUND CHECK PROCESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REFERENCE AND BACKGROUND CHECK PROCESS Workforce Planning | 408-924-2250 classcomp process. Workforce Planning will arrange this directly with the finalist(s) once the hiring manager has provided the finalist(s) name(s) to Workforce Planning. An exception to this process is for any candidates

Su, Xiao

173

Alpha Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

174

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

175

Emergent Supersymmetry in Warped Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that quantum mechanical supersymmetries are emerged in Kaluza-Klein spectrum of linearized gravity in several warped backgrounds as a consequence of higher-dimensional general coordinate invariance. These emergent supersymmetries play an essential role for the spectral structure of braneworld gravity. We show that for the case of braneworld models with two codimension-1 branes the spectral pattern is completely determined only through the supersymmetries.

Nagasawa, Tomoaki; Sakamoto, Kazuki; Sakamoto, Makoto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Emergent Supersymmetry in Warped Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that quantum mechanical supersymmetries are emerged in Kaluza-Klein spectrum of linearized gravity in several warped backgrounds as a consequence of higher-dimensional general coordinate invariance. These emergent supersymmetries play an essential role for the spectral structure of braneworld gravity. We show that for the case of braneworld models with two codimension-1 branes the spectral pattern is completely determined only through the supersymmetries.

Tomoaki Nagasawa; Satoshi Ohya; Kazuki Sakamoto; Makoto Sakamoto

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

177

Lowering the Light Speed Isotropy Limit: European Synchrotron Radiation Facility Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurement of the Compton edge of the scattered electrons in GRAAL facility in European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background dipole reveals up to 10 sigma variations larger than the statistical errors. We now show that the variations are not due to the frequency variations of the accelerator. The nature of Compton edge variations remains unclear, thus outlining the imperative of dedicated studies of light speed anisotropy.

V. G. Gurzadyan; J. -P. Bocquet; A. Kashin; A. Margarian; O. Bartalini; V. Bellini; M. Castoldi; A. D'Angelo; J. -P. Didelez; R. Di Salvo; A. Fantini; G. Gervino; F. Ghio; B. Girolami; A. Giusa; M. Guidal; E. Hourany; S. Knyazyan; V. Kouznetsov; R. Kunne; A. Lapik; P. Levi Sandri; A. Lleres; S. Mehrabyan; D. Moricciani; V. Nedorezov; C. Perrin; D. Rebreyend; G. Russo; N. Rudnev; C. Schaerf; M. -L. Sperduto; M. -C. Sutera; A. Turinge

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

178

Amelioration of radiation-induced hematopoietic and gastrointestinal damage by Ex-RAD in mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......subsyndrome [5, 6]. Other radiation-countermeasure drugs...gamma-tocotrienol, a naturally occurring vitamin E analog, protected mice from radiation-induced pancytopenia...that protect against radiation-induced hematopoietic...30] in mouse model. Naturally occurring vitamin E......

Sanchita P. Ghosh; Shilpa Kulkarni; Michael W. Perkins; Kevin Hieber; Roli L. Pessu; Kristen Gambles; Manoj Maniar; Tzu-Cheg Kao; Thomas M. Seed; K. Sree Kumar

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

THE COSMIC NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND. II. FLUCTUATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The near-infrared background (NIRB) is one of a few methods that can be used to observe the redshifted light from early stars at a redshift of 6 and above, and thus it is imperative to understand the significance of any detection or nondetection of the NIRB. Fluctuations of the NIRB can provide information on the first structures, such as halos and their surrounding ionized regions in the intergalactic medium (IGM). We combine, for the first time, N-body simulations, radiative transfer code, and analytic calculations of luminosity of early structures to predict the angular power spectrum (C{sub l} ) of fluctuations in the NIRB. We study in detail the effects of various assumptions about the stellar mass, the initial mass spectrum of stars, the metallicity, the star formation efficiency (f{sub *}), the escape fraction of ionizing photons (f{sub esc}), and the star formation timescale (t{sub SF}), on the amplitude as well as the shape of C{sub l} . The power spectrum of NIRB fluctuations is maximized when f{sub *} is the largest (as C{sub l} {proportional_to} f {sup 2}{sub *}) and f{sub esc} is the smallest (as more nebular emission is produced within halos). A significant uncertainty in the predicted amplitude of C{sub l} exists due to our lack of knowledge of t{sub SF} of these early populations of galaxies, which is equivalent to our lack of knowledge of the mass-to-light ratio of these sources. We do not see a turnover in the NIRB angular power spectrum of the halo contribution, which was claimed to exist in the literature, and explain this as the effect of high levels of nonlinear bias that was ignored in the previous calculations. This is partly due to our choice of the minimum mass of halos contributing to NIRB ({approx}2 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}), and a smaller minimum mass, which has a smaller nonlinear bias, may still exhibit a turnover. Therefore, our results suggest that both the amplitude and shape of the NIRB power spectrum provide important information regarding the nature of sources contributing to the cosmic reionization. The angular power spectrum of the IGM, in most cases, is much smaller than the halo angular power spectrum, except when f{sub esc} is close to unity, t{sub SF} is longer, or the minimum redshift at which the star formation is occurring is high. In addition, low levels of the observed mean background intensity tend to rule out high values of f{sub *} {approx}> 0.2.

Fernandez, Elizabeth R. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Komatsu, Eiichiro; Shapiro, Paul R. [Texas Cosmology Center and the Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Iliev, Ilian T., E-mail: elizabeth.fernandez@colorado.ed [Astronomy Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Pevensey II Building, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

180

Coherence in Spontaneous Radiation Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By considering a radiating gas as a single quantum-mechanical system, energy levels corresponding to certain correlations between individual molecules are described. Spontaneous emission of radiation in a transition between two such levels leads to the emission of coherent radiation. The discussion is limited first to a gas of dimension small compared with a wavelength. Spontaneous radiation rates and natural line breadths are calculated. For a gas of large extent the effect of photon recoil momentum on coherence is calculated. The effect of a radiation pulse in exciting "super-radiant" states is discussed. The angular correlation between successive photons spontaneously emitted by a gas initially in thermal equilibrium is calculated.

R. H. Dicke

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Measurement of natural radioactivity and radon exhalation rate in fly ash samples from a thermal power plant and estimation of radiation doses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fly ash produced by coal-burning in thermal power station has become a subject of world wide interest in recent years because of its diverse uses in construction activities and considerable economic and environmental importance. Fly ash is used in the production of bricks, sheets, cement and also in land filling etc. Indian coals used in thermal power plants are found to have high ash contents, resulting in the production of large amount of fly ash. Coal contains radionuclides including uranium (the source of inert gas radon), Th and K. Thus coal combustion results in enhanced concentration of natural radionuclides 226Ra, 232Th and 40K. Since these radionuclides concentration in fly ash plays an important role in health physics it is important to measure radionuclides concentration in fly ash. In the present work enhanced radioactivity and radon exhalation rate from fly ash samples collected from a thermal power plant of NTPC (National Thermal Power Corporation), Dadri (U.P.) India, have been measured. A high resolution gamma ray spectroscopic system has been used for the measurement of natural radioactivity (226Ra, 232Th and 40K). Gamma spectrometric measurements were carried out at Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi using a coaxial n-type \\{HPGe\\} detector (EG&G, ORTEC, Oak Ridge, USA). Activity concentration of 226Ra varies from 81.82.2 to 177.310.0Bqkg?1 with an average value of 118.67.4Bqkg?1 and of 232Th from 111.63.2 to 178.53.9Bqkg?1 with an average value of 147.03.4Bqkg?1. 40K activity was found to be below detection limit in some samples while other samples have shown potassium activity to vary from 365.94.8 to 495.96.2Bqkg?1 with an average value of 352.04.5Bqkg?1. Surface radon exhalation rates (EA) and Mass exhalation rates (EM) in these samples were measured by Sealed can technique using LR-115 type II track detectors. EA is found to vary from 80.19.3 to 242.716.3mBqm?2h?1 with an average value 155.512.8mBqm?2h?1, while EM varies from 3.10.4 to 9.30.6mBqkg?1h?1 with an average value of 6.00.5mBqkg?1h?1. Radium equivalent activity (Raeq), related to the external gamma dose and internal dose due to radon and its daughters range from 283.2 to 422.4Bqkg?1 with an average value of 353.9Bqkg?1. The calculated values of external hazard index (Hex) vary from 0.77 to 1.87 with an average value of 1.03. Most of the samples show the value of Raeq close to the allowed upper limit of 370Bqkg?1 and Hex close to unity respectively except in two samples. Annual effective dose varies from 0.15 to 0.23mSvy?1 with an average value 0.19mSvy?1.

Mamta Gupta; Ajay Kumar Mahur; Rati Varshney; R.G. Sonkawade; K.D. Verma; Rajendra Prasad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Solar Background Document 6 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Background Document 6 Graph illustrating solar cell production in the United States and China from 2002 to 2010. Solar Background Document 6.pdf More Documents & Publications Solar...

183

Solar Background Document 1 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Solar Background Document 1 Solar Background Document 1 A timeline outlining the Energy Department's extensive review of the Solyndra Solar loan guarantee application from 2006 to...

184

Solar Background Document 5 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

5 Solar Background Document 5 Graph illustrating Chinese Development Bank financing to Chinese solar companies. Solar Background Document 5.pdf More Documents & Publications Solar...

185

Solar Background Document 6 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

6 Solar Background Document 6 Graph illustrating solar cell production in the United States and China from 2002 to 2010. Solar Background Document 6.pdf More Documents &...

186

Solar Background Document 2 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

2 Solar Background Document 2 Media reports and other independent analysts which pointed to Solyndra as a very promising, innovative company. Solar Background Document 2.pdf More...

187

Solar Background Document 4 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

4 Solar Background Document 4 Graph illustrating global distribution of solar manufacturing market share from 1990 to 2010. Solar Background Document 4.pdf More Documents &...

188

Project Background General Project DescriPtion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Damage Assessment Trustee CouncilDeepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment Trustee CouncilDeepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment Trustee CouncilDeepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment Trustee CouncilDeepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment Trustee Council

189

APS USER TRAINING HISTORY Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

USER TRAINING HISTORY USER TRAINING HISTORY Background The User Program Division Director has delegated to the CATs the authority to authorize the conduct of experiments because the CATs have accepted responsibility for: * identifying and evaluating the hazards posed by the experiment, * specifying controls appropriate to the hazards, and * verifying that controls are in place. One form of hazard control frequently made mandatory by law and laboratory policy is worker knowledge. The accepted means of verifying that a worker has the required knowledge is ensuring that the worker has completed appropriate training. With CAT input, the APS has developed the APS User Training History. This web-based tool enables designated CAT personnel to examine data characterizing ES&H training courses

190

No increase in background, manmade radioactivity for Los Alamos area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

March » March » Man-Made Radioactivity For Los Alamos area No increase in background, manmade radioactivity for Los Alamos area Two aerial flyovers found that radioisotopes and their associated exposure rates are consistent with those expected from normal background radiation. March 19, 2013 High southwest aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory (left) and Los Alamos townsite (middle and right). High southwest aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory (left) and Los Alamos townsite (middle and right). The results are good news and the information will benefit the Lab and the community for years to come as we work toward cleanup and sustainability. Two aerial flyovers of the Los Alamos area to determine the presence of background and manmade radioactivity found that radioisotopes and their

191

Natural England Forestry Commission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Briefing Natural England Forestry Commission Environment Agency Slowing the Flow in Pickering - Flood Storage Option Background Following work by the Environment Agency, investigating the feasibility) reservoir, however, as the design progressed the Reservoir Panel Engineer assessed the design as being high

192

Radiation Minimum Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Frost resulting from cooling of vegetation by nocturnal radiation is a serious agricultural problem. Because of the number of variables involved attacks on this problem from a purely theoretical point of view have met with only moderate success. It seems logical to suppose that an instrument might be devised which would speed up the natural radiation processes and enable an observer to obtain in a few hours a measure of the cooling which occurs naturally over a period of 12 to 14 hr. Such an instrument could serve as a frost warning device. This paper describes the construction of a radiation device and presents experimental evidence to show that it can be used as a predictor of freezing temperatures at vegetation level.

Francis K. Davis Jr.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Anisotropy of the Microwave Background to l = 3500: Deep Field Observations with the Cosmic Background Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report measurements of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation over the multipole range l ~ 200 - 3500 with the Cosmic Background Imager based on deep observations of three fields. These results confirm the drop in power with increasing l first reported in earlier measurements with this instrument, and extend the observations of this decline in power out to l \\~ 2000. The decline in power is consistent with the predicted damping of primary anisotropies. At larger multipoles, l = 2000 - 3500, the power is 3.1 sigma greater than standard models for intrinsic microwave background anisotropy in this multipole range, and 3.5 sigma greater than zero. This excess power is not consistent with expected levels of residual radio source contamination but, for sigma_8 >~ 1, is consistent with predicted levels due to a secondary Sunyaev-Zeldovich anisotropy. Further observations are necessary to confirm the level of this excess and, if confirmed, determine its origin.

B. S. Mason; T. J. Pearson; A. C. S. Readhead; M. C. Shepherd; J. L. Sievers; P. S. Udomprasert; J. K. Cartwright; A. J. Farmer; S. Padin; S. T. Myers; J. R. Bond; C. R. Contaldi; U. -L. Pen; S. Prunet; D. Pogosyan; J. E. Carlstrom; J. Kovac; E. M. Leitch; C. Pryke; N. W. Halverson; W. L. Holzapfel; P. Altamirano; L. Bronfman; S. Casassus; J. May; M. Joy

2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

194

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Radiation effects on humans  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

196

Radiation Sensitivity of Leukemic Progenitor Cells in Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Foundation, Hiroshima, Japan; 2Hiroshima University...Dentistry, Hiroshima, Japan. Background: Epidemiological...A-bomb) survivors by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation...distal colorectum to radiation exposure. Citation Format...atomic bomb survivors in Japan. [abstract]. In...

Keiya Ozawa; Yasusada Miura; Toshio Suda; Kazuo Motoyoshi; and Fumimaro Takaku

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Cavern background measurement with the ATLAS RPC system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurement of cavern background has been carried out systematically since the beginning of LHC, as soon as the luminosity produced a detectable signal, from L = 10^28 cm^2s^1 of the early 2010 operation up to L=10^28 cm^2s^1 at the end of 2011 proton-proton run, which is just 1/3 of the nominal LHC luminosity. The reason for this is to early foresee the running condition for the detector for the nominal LHC luminosity and beyond, in view of the super-LHC upgrade. Background Montecarlo calculations have been validated against data and the background map analysis pointed out hotspots due to localized cracks in the radiation shielding. The RPCs participated to this effort since the earliest stages providing an accurate correlation between luminosity and background, a 3D background map in the barrel region and a direct measurement of the cavern activation. Moreover due to the high sensitivity and very good signal to noise ratio of the proposed method, based on the gap current, the measurement was provided in...

Aielli, G; The ATLAS collaboration

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

How hot is radiation? Christopher Essexa)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Thus radiation is a natural context in which to introduce nonequilibrium temperature. A properly as they exchange a heat flux JQ(12). Subsystem temperatures occur naturally in expres- sions for entropy productionHow hot is radiation? Christopher Essexa) Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western

Berry, R. Stephen

199

Danger radiations  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Le confrencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrle des zones et les prcautions prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

200

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... CHOOSING an awkward moment, Phillips Petroleum Exploration have announced a new find of natural ...naturalgas ...

1967-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Gravitational clustering in Static and Expanding Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A brief summary of several topics in the study of gravitational many body problem is given. The discussion covers both static backgrounds (applicable to astrophysical systems) as well as clustering in an expanding background (relevant for cosmology)

T. Padmanabhan

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha-radiation construction calibration...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alpha Radiation - An alpha particle is identical... of only an inch or so. Naturally occurring radioactive elements such as radon emit alpha radiation... to Construct PE Plant...

203

Network Requirements Workshop - Documents and Background Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Requirements Reviews Network Requirements Reviews Documents and Background Materials Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science...

204

Direct Imaging of Exoplanets Without Background Subtraction: Implications for ELTs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ultra-high contrast capability required to form images of other solar systems is arguably the highest-profile challenge in astronomy today. The current high-contrast imaging efforts all require background subtraction to separate the planetary image from the image of the host star. Background estimation is difficult due to the presence of non-common path aberrations (NCPAs) that change with time. The only major source of information that is not being utilized by current efforts is the random encoding of the planetary image and the NCPAs by the atmosphere on millisecond time-scales. Here, a method that utilizes this information in order to avoid background subtraction altogether is proposed. This new paradigm will allow simultaneous estimation of the time-dependent NCPAs and the planetary image via rigorous statistical inference procedures. These procedures are fully compatible with other information sources, such as diurnal field rotation and spectral diversity. Given the open-ended nature of the backgroun...

Frazin, Richard A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. We are also bathed in a sea of natural radiation coming from the sun and deep space. Living systems have adapted to these levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Other activities, such as flying at high altitudes, expose us to elevated levels of NORM. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose-based standards. So when is TENORM a problem? Where is it a problem? That depends on when, where, and whom you talk to! We will start by reviewing background radioactivity, then we will proceed to the geology, mobility, and variability of these radionuclides. We will then review some of the industrial sectors affected by TENORM, followed by a brief discussion on regulatory aspects of the issue.

Egidi, P.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Influence of heavy natural radioactive nuclides introduced in soil with labelled fertilizers and ameliorants on cytogenetic effects in plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of heavy natural radioactive nuclides (STYU, STSTh, SSWRa, S Po, and S Pb) in labeled fertilizers and ameliorants on the number of meiotic chromosome aberrations was studied in field experiments on the major crop plants, wheat, barley and corn. The mining and use of coal and oil and the processing of raw materials in the production of rare and nonferrous metals produce high quantities of wastes with an elevated content of natural radionuclides. One possible way for technogenically altering the natural radiation background of soil is the active utilization of phosphorus fertilizers in agriculture, and also the use, as fertilizers and ameliorants of wastes from nonferrous metallurgy, of the ash from heat and power plants and various intermediates from the chemical industry. The authors conclude that the introduction of labeled ammophos, nitrophos and phosphogypsum, which raised the soil background concentration of the specified elements, produced an increase in the number of cells with meiotic chromosome aberrations.

Arkhipov, N.P.; Bazylev, V.V.; Bobrikova, E.T.; Fevraleva, L.T.; Kal'chenko, VA.; Shevchenko, V.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Radiative Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform analytic linear stability analyses of an interface separating two stratified media threaded by a radiation flux, a configuration relevant in several astrophysical contexts. We develop a general framework for analyzing such systems, and obtain exact stability conditions in several limiting cases. In the optically thin, isothermal regime, where the discontinuity is chemical in nature (e.g.\\ at the boundary of a radiation pressure-driven H \\textsc{ii} region), radiation acts as part of an effective gravitational field, and instability arises if the effective gravity per unit volume toward the interface overcomes that away from it. In the optically thick "adiabatic" regime where the total (gas plus radiation) specific entropy of a Lagrangian fluid element is conserved,for example at the edge of radiation pressure-driven bubble around a young massive star, we show that radiation acts like a modified equation of state, and we derive a generalized version of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor stability conditi...

Jacquet, Emmanuel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

How radiation and its effect were explained?: Scientific communication after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we examine eight popular books published immediately after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. Our aim is to clarify the characteristics, problems in the scientific communication related to the health effects of radiation. The eight books are compared from the aspects of: 1) how units such as Bq, Gy and Sv are defined; 2) how the dose limits are explained; 3) how deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation are differentiated; 4) how LNT model is explained and evaluated; 5) how the fact that we evolved in the midst of natural background radiation is treated. The main finding of our survey is that although the authors of the examined texts start from the same 'scientific facts', in trying to make these facts easily understandable, they adopt different rhetorical strategies and eventually they end up delivering quite different and conflicting messages to the people.

Kazuhisa Todayama; Kaori Karasawa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Predicted X-ray backgrounds for the International X-ray Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The background that will be observed by IXO's X-ray detectors naturally separates into two components: (1) a Cosmic X-ray Background (CXB), primarily due to unresolved point sources at high energies (E>2 keV), along with ...

Bautz, Marshall W.

210

Consequences of the Chernobyl accident for the natural and human environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the ten years since the Chernobyl accident, an enormous amount of work has been done to assess the consequences to the natural and human environment. Although it is difficult to summarize such a large and varied field, some general conclusions can be drawn. This background paper includes the main findings concerning the direct impacts of radiation on the flora and fauna; the general advances of knowledge in the cycling of radionuclides in natural, seminatural and agricultural environments; some evaluation of countermeasures that were used; and a summary of the human radiation doses resulting from the environmental contamination. although open questions still remain, it can be concluded that: (1) at high radiation levels, the natural environment has shown short term impacts but any significant long term impacts remain to be seen; (2) effective countermeasures can be taken to reduce the transfer of contamination from the environment to humans but these are highly site specific and must be evaluated in terms of practicality as well as population does reduction; (3) the majority of the doses have already been received by the human population. If agricultural countermeasures are appropriately taken, the main source of future doses will be the gathering of food and recreational activities in natural and seminatural ecosystems.

Dreicer, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Aarkog, A. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Alexakhin, R. [Russian Inst. of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology (Russian Federation); Anspaugh, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Arkhipov, N.P. [Scientific and Technical Centre of the RIA `Pripyat` (Ukraine); Johansson, K.-J. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

EPA's Radiation Protection Standards Protecting the Environment from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cancer. EPA does not regulate naturally occurring radiation or the non-ionizing radiation that is emittedEPA's Radiation Protection Standards Protecting the Environment from Radioactive Materials EPA materials. These radioactive materials emit ionizing radiation, which can damage living tissue and cause

212

Neutron Energy Response and Background of Electrochemically Etched Nuclear Track Detectors: Study of Various CR-39 Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radiation Protection Dosimetry Article Neutron Energy Response and Background of Electrochemically Etched Nuclear Track Detectors: Study of Various CR-39...experiments. Results are presented for the energy dependence of the response of the various......

M. Luszik-Bhadra; W.G. Alberts; E. Piesch

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

TEC Working Group Background | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TEC Working Group Background TEC Working Group Background TEC Working Group Background Through the TEC/WG, DOE interacted with representatives of organizations at the state, tribal, and local levels to obtain input for program needs assessment, development and management, and to enhance their capability to carry out transportation emergency preparedness and safety activities specifically related to radioactive materials shipments. TEC membership included representatives from national, state, tribal and local government organizations, labor, industry and professional groups. Members meet semiannually to participate in plenary sessions, breakout work sessions, and in more specialized Topic Groups. To learn more about the history and background of TEC, please see the following documents:

214

TEC Working Group Background | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Background Background TEC Working Group Background Through the TEC/WG, DOE interacted with representatives of organizations at the state, tribal, and local levels to obtain input for program needs assessment, development and management, and to enhance their capability to carry out transportation emergency preparedness and safety activities specifically related to radioactive materials shipments. TEC membership included representatives from national, state, tribal and local government organizations, labor, industry and professional groups. Members meet semiannually to participate in plenary sessions, breakout work sessions, and in more specialized Topic Groups. To learn more about the history and background of TEC, please see the following documents: TEC Charter TEC Work Plan

215

LOW INCOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM OVERVIEW Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

314 LOW INCOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM OVERVIEW Background BPA's low income program began in 1980, serving the states of Oregon, Montana, Idaho, and Washington. Over time the...

216

Lighting Choices - White Background | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

the new energy standards that take effect from 2012-2014. allbulbshiresweb.eps More Documents & Publications Lighting Choices - White Background Lighting Choices...

217

Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

218

THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND EXPERIMENT (CIBER): THE LOW RESOLUTION SPECTROMETER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Absolute spectrophotometric measurements of diffuse radiation at 1 {mu}m to 2 {mu}m are crucial to our understanding of the radiative content of the universe from nucleosynthesis since the epoch of reionization, the composition and structure of the zodiacal dust cloud in our solar system, and the diffuse galactic light arising from starlight scattered by interstellar dust. The Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS) on the rocket-borne Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment is a {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx} 15-30 absolute spectrophotometer designed to make precision measurements of the absolute near-infrared sky brightness between 0.75 {mu}m <{lambda} < 2.1 {mu}m. This paper presents the optical, mechanical, and electronic design of the LRS, as well as the ground testing, characterization, and calibration measurements undertaken before flight to verify its performance. The LRS is shown to work to specifications, achieving the necessary optical and sensitivity performance. We describe our understanding and control of sources of systematic error for absolute photometry of the near-infrared extragalactic background light.

Tsumura, K.; Arai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Murata, K. [Department of Space Astronomy and Astrophysics, Institute of Space and Astronoutical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Battle, J.; Bock, J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Brown, S.; Lykke, K.; Smith, A. [Optical Technology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Cooray, A. [Center for Cosmology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Hristov, V.; Levenson, L. R.; Mason, P. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Keating, B.; Renbarger, T. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Kim, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D. H.; Nam, U. W. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Sullivan, I., E-mail: tsumura@ir.isas.jaxa.jp [Department of Physics, The University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); and others

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

22.01 Introduction to Ionizing Radiation, Fall 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to basic properties of ionizing radiations and their uses in medicine, industry, science, and environmental studies. Discusses natural and man-made radiation sources, energy deposition and dose calculations, ...

Coderre, Jeffrey A.

220

A STATIONARY STATE APPROACH TO RADIATIONLESS TRANSITIONS: RADIATION BANDWIDTH EFFECT ON EXCITATION PROCESSES IN POLYATOMIC MOLECULES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bandwidth of the incident radiation. The conditions of...sufficiently narrow radiation bandwidths, it is demonstrated...should be regarded as occuring to molecular stationary...RADIATIONLESS TRANSITIONS: RADIATION BANDWIDTH EFFECT ON...usual approach, are naturally taken into account...

William Rhodes; Bryan R. Henry; Michael Kasha

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Vinflunine (VFL) versus vinorelbine (VRL) and their interaction with radiation in vitro, preliminary results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...their interaction with radiation in vitro, preliminary...but differs from the naturally occuring compounds in its chemical...between VRL/VFL and radiation, cells were incubated...24h immediately before radiation (Co-60gamma rays...

Cindy Simoens; Filip Lardon; Christel M. De Pooter; Fabienne Breillout; and Jan B. Vermorken

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Plasma Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... JUST over ten years ago the first book on plasma physics as a subject in its own right appeared; in a gradually swelling stream ... been surprisingly few monographs. One topic which has had scant coverage in any form is plasma radiation (except for spectral-line radiation which has been dealt with very fully in ...

T. J. M. BOYD

1967-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Atmospheric muon background in the ANTARES detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An evaluation of the background due to atmospheric muons in the ANTARES high energy neutrino telescope is presented. Two different codes for atmospheric shower simulation have been used. Results from comparisons between these codes at sea level and detector level are presented. The first results on the capability of ANTARES to reject this class of background are given.

S. Cecchini; E. Korolkova; A. Margiotta; L. Thompson

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

224

Reducing Radiation Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

Blankenbecler, Richard

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

225

Appendix E. Radiation Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report--2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix E. Radiation #12;#12;Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report--2012 Appendix

Pennycook, Steve

226

Appendix E. Radiation Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report--2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix E. Radiation #12;#12;Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report--2013 Appendix

Pennycook, Steve

227

Thermodynamics of Radiative Emission Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A basic assumption implicit in the application of thermodynamics to the electromagnetic field is that the laws of thermodynamics are locally valid for radiative emission and absorption processes. This means that a certain minimum amount of entropy must be created by the radiative process itself. It is shown, by considering the extreme case in which the spontaneous emission of a natural spectral line is the only process taking place, that this assumption is correct, and that its validity is essentially a consequence of the uncertainty principle as expressed by the reciprocal relationship between natural line breadth and lifetime.

M. A. Weinstein

1960-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

7 - Estimation of Radiation Doses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Radiation doses to the Japanese population from inhalation of contaminated air, external irradiation, terrestrial and marine food contamination are estimated and compared with other sources of anthropogenic (global fallout, Chernobyl accident), natural (radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation) and medical applications (X-ray tests, CT-tests, etc.) of ionizing radiation. The estimated doses from inhalation, ingestion of terrestrial and marine food, and radiation exposure from radioactive clouds and deposited radionuclides were generally below the levels which could cause health damage of the Japanese population, as well as of the world population. The estimated total radiation doses to fish and shellfish in coastal waters during the largest radionuclide releases were by a factor of 10 lower than the baseline safe level postulated for the marine organisms, therefore no harmful effects are expected for the marine ecosystem as well.

Pavel P. Povinec; Katsumi Hirose; Michio Aoyama

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Radiation at FUSRAP Sites U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Building Strong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) The Nature of Radiation Radiation is a naturally occurring type of energy. It is released by unstable forms of atoms, the basic units of matter year from the ground surface. Food accounts for about 20 mrem of our annual radiation exposure. Natural

US Army Corps of Engineers

230

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey over Joint...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of naturally occurring radiation to establish baseline levels is a normal part of security and emergency preparedness. This assessment is not in response to an incident or...

233

NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 9 | JUNE 2013 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 325 news & views  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of emission can be envisaged, and have even been observed to occur naturally in outer space and in planetaryNATURE PHYSICS | VOL 9 | JUNE 2013 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 325 news & views LASERS Amplified atmospheres1,2 . For instance, stellar gases are known to emit surprisingly strong radiation on certain

Loss, Daniel

234

772 NATURE NANOTECHNOLOGY | VOL 7 | DECEMBER 2012 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology research highlights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with laser radiation is an optoelectronic process that occurs in most semiconductors. The laser excitation fraction of naturally occurring hydrogen and is used in a variety of applications from nuclear fusion772 NATURE NANOTECHNOLOGY | VOL 7 | DECEMBER 2012 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology research

Wu, Junqiao

235

Background field method as a canonical transformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We construct explicitly the canonical transformation which controls the full dependence (local and nonlocal) of the vertex functional of a Yang-Mills theory on a background field. After showing that the canonical transformation found is nothing but a direct field-theoretic generalization of the Lie transform of classical analytical mechanics, we comment on a number of possible applications, and, in particular, the nonperturbative implementation of the background field method on the lattice, the background field formulation of the two-particle irreducible formalism, and, finally, the formulation of the Schwinger-Dyson series in the presence of topologically nontrivial configurations.

D. Binosi and A. Quadri

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

236

Background considerations for SuperCDMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rejection and protection from background is a key issue for the next generation SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment that will have a cross-section sensitivity of better than 8 10{sup ?46} cm{sup 2} for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interactions. This paper presents the details of the methods used to reject electromagnetic backgrounds using the new iZIP detectors that are currently operated in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, MN and the methods the collaboration is investigating to protect against neutron background in the next generation SuperCDMS experiment.

Cooley, J. [Department of Physics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275 (United States); Collaboration: SuperCDMS Collaboration

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

237

Renormalization ambiguities and conformal anomaly in metric-scalar backgrounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the problem of the existing ambiguities in the conformal anomaly in theories with an external scalar field in curved backgrounds. In particular, we consider the anomaly of a self-interacting massive scalar field theory and of a Yukawa model in the massless conformal limit. In all cases the ambiguities are related to finite renormalizations of local nonminimal terms in the effective action. We point out the generic nature of this phenomenon and provide a general method to identify the theories where such an ambiguity can arise.

Asorey, M.; Berredo-Peixoto, G. de; Shapiro, I. L. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009, Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Fisica - ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, 36036-330, MG (Brazil)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

LOW INCOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM OVERVIEW Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LOW INCOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM OVERVIEW Background BPA's low income program began in in the mid-80s, serving the states of Oregon, Montana, Idaho, and Washington. Over time...

239

Environmental Permit Application Background Statement (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of Chapter 79 of Delaware Title 7 is to ensure that the State has adequate information about the background of applicants or regulated parties for the purposes of processing permits and...

240

Background Knowledge, Category Labels, and Similarity Judgment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are more special than shared physical features. The goal of this dissertation is to provide evidence that complements these conflicting views. I suggest that the role of labels varies depending on the background knowledge: types of categories (living things...

Yu, Na-Yung

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Microsoft Word - Appendix A_Background.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Background Information, Remedial Action Histories, Background Information, Remedial Action Histories, Present Site Conditions U.S. Department of Energy Weldon Spring Site LTS&M Plan July 2005 Doc. No. S0079000 Page A-iii Contents A1.1 Location and Property Ownership ................................................................................1 A1.2 Physiography and Topography.....................................................................................4 A1.3 Hydrogeology ...............................................................................................................5 A1.3.1 Regional ...........................................................................................................5 A1.3.2 Chemical Plant .................................................................................................5

242

Preliminary Results from the Cosmic Background Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) is a 13-element interferometer designed to image intrinsic anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on arcminute scales. A review of the capabilities of the instrument is presented, together with a discussion of observations which have been taken over the past 9 months from the Atacama desert of Chile. We present preliminary high-resolution mosaiced images of the CMB obtained from recent CBI data and discuss topics which the CBI will address in the near future.

B. S. Mason; J. K. Cartwright; S. Padin; T. J. Pearson; A. C. S. Readhead; M. Shepherd; J. Sievers; P. Udomprasert

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

243

Fractal generation of textures and backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRACTAL GENERATION OF TEXTURES AND BACKGROUNDS A Thesis by KEVIN DUANE REUTER Subtnitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfilhnent of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1999... Major Subject; Visualization Sciences FRACTAL GENERATION OF TEXTURES AND BACKGROUNDS A Thesis by KEVIN DUANE REUTER Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfilhnent of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved...

Reuter, Kevin Duane

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

244

Ris National Laboratory DTU Radiation Research Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-life of 2.13?105 yeas. Although 99 Tc is a naturally occurring radionuclide, the main sources of 99 TcRisø National Laboratory DTU Postprint Radiation Research Department Year 2007 Paper: www

245

Method to Improve Total Dose Radiation Hardness in a CMOS dc-dc Boost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a wide range of radiation environment, with increasing total dose radiation, The efticieney also greatlyMethod to Improve Total Dose Radiation Hardness in a CMOS dc-dc Boost Converter Huadian Pan to natural radiation in space. Among the effects of ionizing radiation are shiftsin threshold voltageand

Wilamowski, Bogdan Maciej

246

Gamma-Ray Bursts, Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays, and Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We argue that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may be the origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation observed in GeV range. It has theoretically been discussed that protons may carry a much larger amount of energy than electrons in GRBs, and this large energy can be radiated in TeV range by synchrotron radiation of ultra-high-energy protons (\\sim 10^{20} eV). The possible detection of GRBs above 10 TeV suggested by the Tibet and HEGRA groups also supports this idea. If this is the case, most of TeV gamma-rays from GRBs are absorbed in intergalactic fields and eventually form GeV gamma-ray background, whose flux is in good agreement with the recent observation.

Tomonori Totani

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

247

natural gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

natural gasoline, condensate, distillate [Liquid hydrocarbons, generally clear or pale straw-coloured and of high API gravity (above 6o), that are produced with wet gas] ? Gasbenzin n, Gasolin n ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Non-thermal Cosmic Backgrounds from Blazars: the contribution to the CMB, X-ray and gamma-ray Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new assessment of the contribution of Blazars to the extragalactic background radiation across the e.m. spectrum. Our calculations rely on deep Blazar radio counts that we derived combining several multifrequency surveys. The integrated Blazar emission yields a broad-band non-thermal background that in some parts of the e.m. spectrum dominates the extragalactic brightness. Blazars are the main point-like contributors to the CMB. Their integrated emission causes an apparent T increase of 5-50 muK in the 50-250 GHz range. The CMB fluctuation spectrum is sensibly contaminated at l>300, for a Poissonian source distribution, or at lower l values if spatial clustering is present. We estimate that well over 100,000 Blazars will produce a significant signal in the PLANCK CMB anisotropy maps. Because of the microwave-Xray flux correlation, these sources are expected to have flux > a few 10^{-15} erg/s in the soft X-ray band. Thus, a large fraction of the foreground sources in CMB anisotropy maps could be identified and removed using a multi frequency approach, provided that a sufficiently deep all sky X-ray survey will be available. We further show that Blazars are a major constituent of all high-E extragalactic backgrounds. Their contribution is 11-12% at X-ray frequencies and possibly 100% in the 0.5-50 MeV band. At E>100 MeV, the Blazar collective emission, obtained extrapolating their integrated micro-wave flux to the gamma-ray band using the SED of EGRET detected sources, over-predicts the extragalactic background by a large factor, implying that Blazars not only dominate the gamma-ray sky but also that their average duty cycle at these frequencies must be rather low. We also find that Blazars of the HBL type may produce a significant amount of flux at TeV energies.

P. Giommi; S. Colafrancesco; E. Cavazzuti; M. Perri; C. Pittori

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Design of a novel Cherenkov detectors system for machine induced background monitoring in the CMS cavern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel detector system has been designed for an efficient online measurement of the machineinduced background in the CMS experimental cavern. The suppression of the CMS cavern background originating from pp collision products and the 25 ns bunch spacing have set the requirements for the detector design. Each detector unit will be a radiation hard, cylindrical Cherenkov radiator optically coupled to an ultra-fast UV-sensitive photomultiplier tube, providing a prompt, directionally sensitive measurement. Simulation and test beam measurements have shown the achievability of the goals that have driven the baseline design. The system will consist of 20 azimuthally distributed detectors per end, installed at a radius of r ~ 180 cm and a distance 20.6 m away from the CMS interaction region. The detector units will enable a measurement of the transverse distribution of the bunchby- bunch machine induced background flux. This will provide important feedback from the CMS on the beam conditions during the LHC machine s...

Orfanelli, Styliani; Giunta, Marina; Stickland, David P; Ambrose, Mitchell J; Rusack, Roger; Finkel, Alexey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Background-reducing X-ray multilayer mirror  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Background-reducing x-ray multilayer mirror. A multiple-layer "wavetrap" deposited over the surface of a layered, synthetic-microstructure soft x-ray mirror optimized for reflectivity at chosen wavelengths is disclosed for reducing the reflectivity of undesired, longer wavelength incident radiation incident thereon. In three separate mirror designs employing an alternating molybdenum and silicon layered, mirrored structure overlaid by two layers of a molybdenum/silicon pair anti-reflection coating, reflectivities of near normal incidence 133, 171, and 186 .ANG. wavelengths have been optimized, while that at 304 .ANG. has been minimized. The optimization process involves the choice of materials, the composition of the layer/pairs as well as the number thereof, and the distance therebetween for the mirror, and the simultaneous choice of materials, the composition of the layer/pairs, and their number and distance for the "wavetrap."

Bloch, Jeffrey J. (Los Alamos, NM); Roussel-Dupre', Diane (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, Barham W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Applications of Noble Gas Radiation Detectors to Counter?terrorism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiation detectors are essential tools in the detection analysis and disposition of potential terrorist devices containing hazardous radioactive and/or fissionable materials. For applications where stand?off distance and source shielding are limiting factors large detectors have advantages over small ones. The ability to distinguish between Special Nuclear Materials and false?positive signals from natural or man?made benign sources is also important. Ionization chambers containing compressed noble gases notably xenon and helium?3 can be scaled up to very large sizes improving the solid angle for acceptance of radiation from a distant source. Gamma spectrometers using Xe have a factor of three better energy resolution than NaI scintillators allowing better discrimination between radioisotopes. Xenon detectors can be constructed so as to have extremely low leakage currents enabling them to operate for long periods of time on batteries or solar cells. They are not sensitive to fluctuations in ambient temperature and are therefore suitable for deployment in outdoor locations. Position?sensitive 3He chambers have been built as large as 3000 cm2 and with spatial resolution of less than 1 mm. Combined with coded apertures made of cadmium they can be used to create images of thermal neutron sources. The natural background of spallation neutrons from cosmic rays generates a very low count rate so this instrument could be quite effective at identifying a man?made source such as a spontaneous fission source (Pu) in contact with a moderator (high explosive).

Peter E. Vanier; Leon Forman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mission and Goals Mission and Goals Organization Chart and Contacts Background U.S. DRIVE Partnership Budget Timeline Program Activities Advisory Panels External Coordination U.S. Department of Energy Search help Home > About > Background Printable Version Background In the early 1970s, concern over our growing dependence on imported petroleum, coupled with concerns about our deteriorating air quality due to emissions from combustion of fossil fuels, spurred the Federal government to act. The timeline below provides policy and programmatic highlights for federally supported hydrogen and fuel cell R&D over the last three decades. Federal Support for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell R&D Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader.

254

National Climate Assessment: Background and Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Background and Process Print E-mail Background and Process Print E-mail Please view the links below to find out more about the background and process of the National Climate Assessment: National Climate Assessment Development & Advisory Committee Charter ( PDF) National Climate Assessment Proposed 2013 Report Outline [updated on 12/08/2011] (PDF) Strategy On May 20th, 2011 the National Climate Assessment released the following two strategy documents: National Climate Assessment Strategy Summary National Climate Assessment Engagement Strategy Federal Register Notices November 18, 2013 National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC) Notice of Open Meeting pdf | html A Notice by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on 10/29/2013 This notice sets forth the schedule of a forthcoming meeting of the DoC NOAA National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC).

255

Monitored Retrievable Storage Background | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Monitored Retrievable Storage Background Monitored Retrievable Storage Background Monitored Retrievable Storage Background `The U.S. Government is seeking a site for a monitored retrievable storage facility (MRS). Employing proven technologies used in this country and abroad, the MRS will be an Integral part of the Federal system for safe and permanent disposal of the nation's high-level radioactive wastes. The MRS will accept shipments of spent fuel from commercial nuclear power plants, temporarily store the spent fuel above ground, and stage shipments of it to a geologic repository for permanent disposal. The law authorizing the MRS provides an opportunity for a State or an Indian Tribe to volunteer to host the MRS. The law establishes the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator, who Is 10 seek a State or an Indian Tribe

256

Cosmic Microwave Background Tests of Inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inflation provides a unified paradigm for understanding the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the flatness problem, and the origin of large-scale structure. Although the physics responsible for inflation is not yet well understood, slow-roll inflation generically makes several predictions: a flat Universe, primordial adiabatic density perturbations, and a stochastic gravity-wave background. Inflation further predicts specific relations between the amplitudes and shapes of the spectrum of density perturbations and gravity waves. There are now excellent prospects for testing precisely these predictions with forthcoming CMB temperature and polarization maps. Here I discuss these new CMB tests of inflation.

Marc Kamionkowski

1998-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

257

Coalbed Natural Gas Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Publications Environmental Science Division Argonne National Laboratory Observations on a Montana Water Quality Proposal argonne_comments.pdf 585 KB Comments from James A. Slutz Deputy Assistant Secretary Oil and Natural Gas To the Secretary, Board of Environmental Review Montana Department of Environmental Quality BER_Comments_letter.pdf 308 KB ALL Consulting Coalbed Methane Primer: New Source of Natural Gas–Environmental Implications Background and Development in the Rocky Mountain West CBMPrimerFinal.pdf 18,223 KB ALL Consulting Montana Board of Oil & Gas Conservation Handbook on Best Management Practices and Mitigation Strategies for Coal Bed Methane in the Montana Portion of the Powder River Basin April 2002 CBM.pdf 107,140 KB ALL Consulting Montana Board of Oil & Gas Conservation

258

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

259

Hidden Variables and Quantum Statistics Nature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that the nature of quantum statistics can be clarified by assuming the existence of a background of random gravitational fields and waves, distributed isotropically in the space. This background is responsible for correlating phases of oscillations of identical microobjects. If such a background of random gravitational fields and waves is considered as hidden variables then taking it into account leads to the Bell-type inequalities that are fairly consistent with the experimental data.

T. F. Kamalov

2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

260

Effect of scattered radiation on sub-Doppler cooling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss the effect of scattered radiation generated by a gas of cold atoms on the temperature of the gas. We show that by treating the reradiated field of the atoms as a fluctuating background field we can derive a master equation for a single atom where the effect of the surrounding medium is included in an effective relaxation operator. This relaxation operator is of second order in the interaction with the medium and in the binary-collision approximation can be written as the sum of two-body interactions with a correlation time equal to the natural lifetime of the atomic transition. The effect of the medium on the two most important sub-Doppler cooling mechanisms, Sisyphus and motion-induced orientation cooling, is investigated analytically in a one-dimensional model. In this we restrict ourselves to the limit of low saturation, weak background field and take the rate-equation limit for the collision operator. We find that both mechanisms are very sensitive to such a background field and that the temperature increases approximately as the number of atoms to the one-third power.

G. Hillenbrand; K. Burnett; C. J. Foot

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

First Intrinsic Anisotropy Observations with the Cosmic Background Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first results of observations of the intrinsic anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation with the Cosmic Background Imager from a site at 5080 m altitude in northern Chile. Our observations show a sharp decrease in C_l in the range l=400 - 1500. The broadband amplitudes we have measured are deltaT(band) = 58.7 (-6.3, +7.7) microK for l = 603 (-166, +180) and 29.7 (-4.2, +4.8) microK for l = 1190 (-224, +261), where these are half-power widths in l. Such a decrease in power at high l is one of the fundamental predictions of the standard cosmological model, and these are the first observations which cover a broad enough l range to show this decrease in a single experiment. The C_l we have measured enable us to place limits on the density parameter, Omega(tot) = 0.7 (90% confidence).

S. Padin; J. K. Cartwright; B. S. Mason; T. J. Pearson; A. C. S. Readhead; M. C. Shepherd; J. Sievers; P. S. Udomprasert; W. L. Holzapfel; S. T. Myers; J. E. Carlstrom; E. M. Leitch; M. Joy; L. Bronfman; J. May

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

262

RESOLVING THE RADIO SOURCE BACKGROUND: DEEPER UNDERSTANDING THROUGH CONFUSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to image one primary beam area at 3 GHz with 8'' FWHM resolution and 1.0 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} rms noise near the pointing center. The P(D) distribution from the central 10 arcmin of this confusion-limited image constrains the count of discrete sources in the 1 < S({mu}Jy) < 10 range. At this level, the brightness-weighted differential count S {sup 2} n(S) is converging rapidly, as predicted by evolutionary models in which the faintest radio sources are star-forming galaxies; and Almost-Equal-To 96% of the background originating in galaxies has been resolved into discrete sources. About 63% of the radio background is produced by active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the remaining 37% comes from star-forming galaxies that obey the far-infrared (FIR)/radio correlation and account for most of the FIR background at {lambda} Almost-Equal-To 160 {mu}m. Our new data confirm that radio sources powered by AGNs and star formation evolve at about the same rate, a result consistent with AGN feedback and the rough correlation of black hole and stellar masses. The confusion at centimeter wavelengths is low enough that neither the planned Square Kilometre Array nor its pathfinder ASKAP EMU survey should be confusion limited, and the ultimate source detection limit imposed by 'natural' confusion is {<=}0.01 {mu}Jy at {nu} = 1.4 GHz. If discrete sources dominate the bright extragalactic background reported by ARCADE 2 at 3.3 GHz, they cannot be located in or near galaxies and most are {<=}0.03 {mu}Jy at 1.4 GHz.

Condon, J. J.; Cotton, W. D.; Fomalont, E. B.; Kellermann, K. I. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Miller, N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Perley, R. A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Scott, D.; Vernstrom, T.; Wall, J. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1C1 (Canada)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

263

Natural System  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural System Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development - FY11 Progress Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Program Yifeng Wang (SNL) Michael Simpson (INL) Scott Painter (LANL) Hui-Hai Liu (LBNL) Annie B. Kersting (LLNL) July 15, 2011 FCRD-USED-2011-000223 UFD Natural System Evaluation - FY11 Year-End Report July 15, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

264

Survey Background and Technical Information on CBECS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background The commercial sector encompasses a vast range of building types- service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as certain buildings that would not be considered "commercial" in a traditional economic sense, such as public and private schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with different types of buildings is the clearest way to evaluate commercial sector energy use. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national-level sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted quadrennially (previously triennially) by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The 2003 CBECS was the eighth survey in the series begun in 1979. From 1979 to 1986, the survey was known as the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey, or NBECS.

265

Background Simulations for the International Linear Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on superconducting technology to collide bunches of electrons and positrons. The baseline configuration (about 31 km in a clean experimental environment with low backgrounds. The LHC will likely discover the Higgs boson accelerator directly. DESY FLC, 22603 Hamburg, Germany, adrian.vogel@desy.de 1 #12;Figure 1: Overall view

266

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background This thesis describes a multi-agent based architecture of the research and an outline plan for the rest of this thesis complete the chapter. 1.2 Software Project and monitor progress to check the development is on time and within budget. #12;3 1.3 Software Project

O'Connor, Rory

267

1 Introduction 1.1 Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;3 1 Introduction 1.1 Background Research method is a relevant topic to anybody performing. 1.2 Classical Research, Technology and Technology Research The term research is defined in several different ways. According to Merriam-Webster [1], research is "investigation or experimentation aimed

Stølen, Ketil

268

Internships at VSTEP BV Background VSTEP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the effect of the current on the ship's manoeuvring characteristics needs to be implemented. 5. A damage (www.quest3d.com) and C++. Background Ship Simulator 2006 One of VSTEP's more recent products is a PC game called Ship Simulator 2006 (www.shipsim.com), in store in many countries since June 2006

Vuik, Kees

269

Carbon Management and Implementation Plan 1. Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the College's energy efficiency and use of resources by integrating sustainability with corporate strategiesCarbon Management and Implementation Plan 1. Background Energy security and the increasing concentration of greenhouse gases which contribute to climate change are one of the biggest challenges facing us

Chittka, Lars

270

Background estimation using a robust Bayesian analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel method for the estimation of the background in a powder diffraction pattern has been developed using a robust Bayesian analysis. The underlying probability theory is discussed in terms of going beyond the Gaussian approximation normally associated with counting statistics and least-squares analysis, and various examples are presented that illustrate the general applicability of the approach.

David, W.I.F.

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

271

UCHC Lockout/Tagout Policy Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UCHC Lockout/Tagout Policy (4/09) Background: This safety policy is applicable to all Health Center: Lockout will be utilized for equipment which is designed with a lockout capability. A valve that can be locked out with a chain is considered as having a lockout capability. Only the Office of Research Safety

Kim, Duck O.

272

Cosmic IR Backgrounds Ned Wright (UCLA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmic IR Backgrounds by Ned Wright (UCLA) http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/intro.html See: · http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cosmolog.htm · http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/DIRBE · http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/CIBR · http

Wright, Edward L. "Ned"

273

Background Material Important Questions about Magnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background Material Important Questions about Magnetism: 1) What is Magnetism?Magnetism is a force or repulsion due to charge is called the electric force. But what about magnetism, is there a fundamental property of some matter that makes things magnetic? The answer is: "sort of." Electric current

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

274

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: About  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About About Background. Extensive research on the health effects of radiation using standard epidemiological and toxicological approaches has been done for decades to characterize responses of populations and individuals to high radiation doses, and to set exposure standards to protect both the public and the workforce. These standards were set using models that extrapolated from the cancers observed following exposure to high doses of radiation to predicted, but not measurable, changes in cancer frequency at low radiation doses. The use of models was necessary because of our inability to detect changes in cancer incidence following low doses of radiation. Historically, the predominant approach has been the Linear-no-Threshold model (see Wikipedia entry) and collective dose concept that assumes each unit of radiation, no

275

74Exploring Nuclear Decay and Radiation Dose The devastating earthquake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

74Exploring Nuclear Decay and Radiation Dose The devastating earthquake that struck northern Japan vent radioactive gas and dust clouds into the environment. Although the initial radiation levels were extremely high, the natural decay of the radioactive compounds will cause the radiation levels at any given

276

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

277

Non-thermal Cosmic Backgrounds from Blazars: the contribution to the CMB, X-ray and gamma-ray Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new assessment of the contribution of Blazars to the extragalactic background radiation across the e.m. spectrum. Our calculations rely on deep Blazar radio counts that we derived combining several multifrequency surveys. The integrated Blazar emission yields a broad-band non-thermal background that in some parts of the e.m. spectrum dominates the extragalactic brightness. Blazars are the main point-like contributors to the CMB. Their integrated emission causes an apparent T increase of 5-50 muK in the 50-250 GHz range. The CMB fluctuation spectrum is sensibly contaminated at l>300, for a Poissonian source distribution, or at lower l values if spatial clustering is present. We estimate that well over 100,000 Blazars will produce a significant signal in the PLANCK CMB anisotropy maps. Because of the microwave-Xray flux correlation, these sources are expected to have flux > a few 10^{-15} erg/s in the soft X-ray band. Thus, a large fraction of the foreground sources in CMB anisotropy maps could be ...

Giommi, P; Cavazzuti, E; Perri, M; Pittori, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

NATURE STUDY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...last two numbers of SCIENCE have appeared articles by Drs. Wheeler and Chapman on the abuses of nature writing as exemplified...imprint of Rand, IeNally and Co., 1903, and its author is Katherine E. Dopp, of the Extension Division of the Chicago University...

E. C. CASE

1904-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Marketing Mother Natures Molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marketing Mother Natures Molecules ... Yet molecules made by Mother Nature, or derivatives thereof, still account for nearly half of the drugs on the market. ...

LISA JARVIS

2012-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

280

Office of Radiation & Indoor Air EPA 402-R-05-009 Radiation Protection Division (6608J) August 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Radiation Protection Division works to address hazards posed by technologically enhanced naturally occurringOffice of Radiation & Indoor Air EPA 402-R-05-009 Radiation Protection Division (6608J) August 2006 of potential radiological and chemical hazards. In order to help us identify where potential problems may occur

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

An upper bound from helioseismology on the stochastic background of gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The universe is expected to be permeated by a stochastic background of gravitational radiation of astrophysical and cosmological origin. This background is capable of exciting oscillations in solar-like stars. Here we show that solar-like oscillators can be employed as giant hydrodynamical detectors for such a background in the muHz to mHz frequency range, which has remained essentially unexplored until today. We demonstrate this approach by using high-precision radial velocity data for the Sun to constrain the normalized energy density of the stochastic gravitational-wave background around 0.11 mHz. These results open up the possibility for asteroseismic missions like CoRoT and Kepler to probe fundamental physics.

Daniel M. Siegel; Markus Roth

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

282

First National Climate Assessment: Background and Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Background and Process Print E-mail Background and Process Print E-mail Workshops of the First National Climate Assessment In February 1997, the U.S. Global Change Research Program and the Office of Science and Technology Policy initiated a series of Regional Climate Change Workshops with the goal of starting the process of examining the vulnerabilities of regions of the United States to climate variability and climate change. What was initially intended to be three or four workshops developed into a series of twenty, covering every state and territory of the United States. The workshops span from May 1997 to September 1998 and represented the first step in conducting a regional assessment. Each workshop was sponsored by one or more government agencies,and was carried out by coordinators from local institutions. For details on each workshop, including its geographic coverage, see:

283

Polarization Observations with the Cosmic Background Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polarization observations of the cosmic microwave background with the Cosmic Background Imager from September 2002 to May 2004 provide a significant detection of the E-mode polarization and reveal an angular power spectrum of polarized emission showing peaks and valleys that are shifted in phase by half a cycle relative to those of the total intensity spectrum. This key agreement between the phase of the observed polarization spectrum and that predicted based on the total intensity spectrum provides support for the standard model of cosmology, in which dark matter and dark energy are the dominant constituents, the geometry is close to flat, and primordial density fluctuations are predominantly adiabatic with a matter power spectrum commensurate with inflationary cosmological models.

A. C. S. Readhead; S. T. Myers; T. J. Pearson; J. L. Sievers; B. S. Mason; C. R. Contaldi; J. R. Bond; R. Bustos; P. Altamirano; C. Achermann; L. Bronfman; J. E. Carlstrom; J. K. Cartwright; S. Casassus; C. Dickinson; W. L. Holzapfel; J. M. Kovac; E. M. Leitch; J. May; S. Padin; D. Pogosyan; M. Pospieszalski; C. Pryke; R. Reeves; M. C. Shepherd; S. Torres

2004-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

Sideband Mixing in Intense Laser Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electron propagator in a laser background has been shown to be made up of a series of sideband poles. In this paper we study this decomposition by analysing the impact of the residual gauge freedom in the Volkov solution on the sidebands. We show that the gauge transformations do not alter the location of the poles. The identification of the propagator from the two-point function is maintained but we show that the sideband structures mix under residual gauge transformations.

Martin Lavelle; David McMullan

2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

285

Cosmic Microwave Background: Past, Future, and Present  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I explain the origin and evolution of anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and argue that upcoming experiments will measure cosmological and fundamental parameters very accurately. Most of the paper focuses on present data, which strongly suggest that the universe is flat. Several arguments are given to prove that present data sets are not contaminated by systematics. New techniques to compare different experiments visually are introduced. These are illustrated for two years of the MSAM and Python experiments.

Scott Dodelson

1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

286

Radiation of a neutral polarizable particle moving uniformly through a thermal radiation field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the properties of thermal electromagnetic radiation produced by a neutral polarizable nanoparticle moving with an arbitrary relativistic velocity in a heated vacuum background with a fixed temperature. We show that the particle in its own rest frame acquires the radiation temperature of vacuum, multiplied by a velocity-dependent factor, and then emits thermal photons predominantly in the forward direction. The intensity of radiation proves to be much higher than for the particle at rest. For metal particles with high energy, the ratio of emitted and absorbed radiation power is proportional to the Lorentz-factor squared.

G. V. Dedkov; A. A. Kyasov

2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

287

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

288

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

289

The impact of non-Planckian effects on radio cosmological backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-Planckian (NP) spectral modifications of the CMB radiation spectrum can be produced due to the existence of a non-zero value of the plasma frequency at the recombination epoch. We present here an analysis of NP effects on the radio cosmological background and we derive, for the first time, predictions of their amplitude on three different observables: the CMB spectrum, the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in cosmic structures, and the 21-cm background temperature brightness change. We find that NP effect can manifest in the CMB spectrum at $\

Colafrancesco, Sergio; Marchegiani, Paolo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The photonuclear neutron and gamma-ray backgrounds in the fast ignition experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the fast-ignition scheme, very hard x-rays (hereinafter referred to as {gamma}-rays) are generated by Bremsstrahlung radiation from fast electrons. Significant backgrounds were observed around the deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron signals in the experiment in 2010. In this paper the backgrounds were studied in detail, based on Monte Carlo simulations, and they were confirmed to be {gamma}-rays from the target, scattered {gamma}-rays from the experimental bay walls ({gamma}{sup Prime }-rays), and neutrons generated by ({gamma}, n) reactions in either the target vacuum chamber or the diagnostic instruments ({gamma}-n neutrons).

Arikawa, Y.; Nagai, T.; Hosoda, H.; Abe, Y.; Kojima, S.; Fujioka, S.; Sarukura, N.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Azechi, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamadaoka Suita (Japan); Ozaki, T. [National Institution Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-city, Gifu (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1989 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels, and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether the testing is in compliance with existing radiation protection standards, and to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of both animals and humans. To implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any release of radioactivity, personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each test. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to NTS activities. Trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas and Tritium, Milk Surveillance, TLD, and PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program. 35 refs., 68 figs., 32 tabs.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Measurement of Neutron Background at the Pyhasalmi mine for CUPP Project, Finland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A natural neutron flux is one of significant kind of background in high-sensitive underground experiments. Therefore, when scheduling a delicate underground measurements one needs to measure neutron background. Deep underground the most significant source of neutrons are the U-Th natural radioactive chains giving a fission spectrum with the temperature of 2-3 MeV. Another source is the U-Th alpha-reactions on light nuclei of mine rock giving neutrons with different spectra in the 1-15 MeV energy region. Normal basalt mine rocks contain 1 ppm g/g of U-238 and less. Deep underground those rocks produce natural neutron fluxes of 10^{-7} - 10^{-6} cm^{-2}s^{-1} above 1 MeV. To measure such a background one needs a special techniques. In the Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow, the neutron spectrometer was developed and built which is sensitive to such a low neutron fluxes. At the end of 2001 the collection of neutron data at the Pyhasalmi mine was started for the CUPP project. During 2002 the background and rough energy spectra of neutron at underground levels 410, 660, 990 and 1410 m were measured. The result of the measurement of the neutron background at different levels of the Pyhasalmi mine is presented and discussed. Data analysis is performed in different energy ranges from thermal neutrons up to 25 MeV and above.

J. N. Abdurashitov; V. N. Gavrin; V. L. Matushko; A. A. Shikhin; V. E. Yants; J. Peltoniemi; T. Keranen

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

293

DOE Vendor Communication Plan I. Background  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vendor Communication Plan Vendor Communication Plan I. Background On February 2, 2011, the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) issued a memorandum entitled "Myth-Busting: Addressing Misconceptions to Improve Communication with Industry during the Acquisition Process." In addition to identifying and refuting common misconceptions about vendor engagement, the memorandum directed agencies to develop high-level vendor communication plans to discuss how each agency will reduce unnecessary barriers, publicize communication opportunities, and prioritize engagement opportunities for high-risk, complex programs or those that fail to attract new vendors during re-competitions.

294

New physics from the Cosmic Microwave Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review the present status of the Cosmic Microwave Background, with some emphasis on the current and future implications for particle physics. Conclusions are: gravitational instability in a dark matter dominated universe grew today's structure; the Universe remained neutral until z<~50; the CMB power spectrum peaks at 150<~l<~350; the large-scale structure of spacetime appears to be simple; something like inflation is something like proven; we will learn a great deal about cosmology, astrophysics and particle physics from MAP and Planck.

Douglas Scott

1999-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

295

1. BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES For geological carbon sequestration, it is essential to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES · For geological carbon sequestration, it is essential to understand Material Characterization for Intermediate-scale Testing to Develop Strategies for Geologic Sequestration to generate comprehensive data sets. Due to the nature of the CO2 geological sequestration where supercritical

296

Radiative heat transfer between dielectric bodies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent development of a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) has led to measurements of radiative heat transfer between a heated sensor and a cooled sample down to the nanometer range. This allows for comparision of the known theoretical description of radiative heat transfer, which is based on fluctuating electrodynamics, with experiment. The theory itself is a macroscopic theory, which can be expected to break down at distances much smaller than 10-8m. Against this background it seems to be reasonable to revisit the known macroscopic theory of fluctuating electrodynamics and of radiative heat transfer.

Svend-Age Biehs

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

297

Radiating gravastars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considering a Vaidya exterior spacetime, we study dynamical models of prototype gravastars, made of an infinitely thin spherical shell of a perfect fluid with the equation of state p = ?, enclosing an interior de Sitter spacetime. We show explicitly that the final output can be a black hole, an unstable gravastar, a stable gravastar or a 'bounded excursion' gravastar, depending on how the mass of the shell evolves in time, the cosmological constant and the initial position of the dynamical shell. This work presents, for the first time in the literature, a gravastar that emits radiation.

Chan, R. [Coordenao de Astronomia e Astrofsica, Observatrio Nacional, Rua General Jos Cristino, 77, So Cristvo 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, M.F.A. da [Departamento de Fsica Terica, Instituto de Fsica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua So Francisco Xavier 524, Maracan 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Rocha, Jaime F. Villas da [Instituto de Biocincias, Departamento de Cincias Naturais, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Av. Pasteur 458, Urca, CEP 22290-240, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Wang, Anzhong, E-mail: chan@on.br, E-mail: mfasnic@gmail.com, E-mail: jfvroch@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: anzhong_wang@baylor.edu [GCAP-CASPER, Department of Physics, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

../fusion/templates/mapguide/maroon/css/maroon_fusion.css background-image: url(../images/background.gif);  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

../fusion/templates/mapguide/maroon/css/maroon_fusion.css body { background-image: url(../images/background.gif); ../fusion/templates/mapguide/maroon/css/ maroon_fusion.css body { background-color: #3e5c5f; ../fusion/templates/mapguide/maroon/css/ maroon_fusion.css #ToolbarVertical { background: #500000; maroon_fusion.css #Toolbar { background

Ahmad, Sajjad

299

Radiation Safety Policy and Procedures Committee  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RSPPC Meeting Minutes APS only RSPPC Meeting Minutes APS only Radiation Safety Policy and Procedures Committee Charter 1. Purpose The committee reviews functional changes to the Access Control Interlock System (ACIS) and Personnel Protection System (PSS) used to provide personnel protection and area exclusion related to APS accelerators, storage ring and other radiation handling areas. The RSPP Committee advises APS management on radiation safety matters. At the request of APS Management the committee reviews projects, recommends radiation safety policy, and evaluates accident investigation conclusions. 2. Membership Members are appointed by the APS Division Directors and APS Director for their knowledge and background in Interlock Systems, Radiation Safety, Accelerator Operations and Work on the Experiment Floor.

300

Natural SnGeS3 from Radvanice near Trutnov (Czech Republic) :  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...diffractometer HZG4/TuR (CuKalpha radiation, stepscanning). To minimize...graphite monochromatized MoKalpha-radiation. Data collection parameters...zaoek Ondurs, P. (1997): Naturally occuring germanium compounds, GeSnS3...

Jiri SEJKORA; Peter BERLEPSCH; Emil MAKOVICKY; Tonci BALI?-ZUNI?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

302

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

303

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

304

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

305

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

306

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

307

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

308

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

309

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

310

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

311

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

312

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

313

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

314

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

315

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

316

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

317

Natural Systems & Climate Change: Strategies for Our Future Background and Discussion Questions for Attendees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of climate change, by protecting air and water quality, fish and wildlife habitat, and many other important) emissions while also cleaning California's air and water, supporting local jobs, building resilience and what changes has that produced or are you anticipating? If not, do you have plans to? Panel Two

California at Davis, University of

318

Si in GaN -- On the nature of the background donor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A characterization of the Si impurity in GaN is performed by Raman spectroscopy. Applying hydrostatic pressure up to 25 GPa the authors study the behavior of the LO phonon-plasmon mode in a series of high mobility Si doped GaN films. In contrast to earlier results on unintentionally doped bulk GaN crystals no freeze out of the free carriers could be observed in Si doped samples. The authors find that Si is a shallow hydrogenic donor throughout the pressure range studied. This result positively excludes Si incorporation as a dominant source of free electrons in previously studied bulk GaN samples.

Wetzel, C.; Chen, A.L.; Suski, T.; Ager, J.W. III; Walukiewicz, W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Materials Science Div.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Notices Background The National Wildlife Refuge System  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

89 Federal Register 89 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 223 / Friday, November 20, 2009 / Notices Background The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 668dd-668ee) (Administration Act), as amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, requires us to develop a CCP for each national wildlife refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and our policies. In addition to outlining broad management direction on conserving wildlife and their habitats, CCPs identify wildlife-

320

Anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background: Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) contain a wealth of information about the past history of the universe and the present values of cosmological parameters. I ouline some of the theoretical advances of the last few years. In particular, I emphasize that for a wide class of cosmological models, theorists can accurately calculate the spectrum to better than a percent. The specturm of anisotropies today is directly related to the pattern of inhomogeneities present at the time of recombination. This recognition leads to a powerful argument that will enable us to distinguish inflationary models from other models of structure formation. If the inflationary models turn out to be correct, the free parameters in these models will be determined to unprecedented accuracy by the upcoming satellite missions.

Scott Dodelson

1997-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fast neutron background measurements at shallow depths  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on measurements of the neutron backgrounds for neutrino experiments at shallow depth (such as the proposed San Onofre neutrino oscillation experiment). A detector capable of pulse-shape discrimination measured the flux of fast neutrons at 20 mwe depth in the Stanford Underground Facility to be (1.07 {+-} 0.30) X 10{sup -6} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. An experiment, situated in the Tendon Gallery of the San Onofre Unit 2 reactor. studied spallation neutrons from muons traversing Pb and Cu. An underground experiment in the SUF, employing a detector filled with Gd-loaded liquid scintillator, is measuring the neutron production rate and multiplicity for muon spallation in low-A material (hydrocarbon-based liquid scintillator).

Chen, M.; Hertenberger, R.; Novikov, V. [Inst. of Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dougherty, B.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Information Gains from Cosmic Microwave Background Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To shed light on the fundamental problems posed by Dark Energy and Dark Matter, a large number of experiments have been performed and combined to constrain cosmological models. We propose a novel way of quantifying the information gained by updates on the parameter constraints from a series of experiments which can either complement earlier measurements or replace them. For this purpose, we use the Kullback-Leibler divergence or relative entropy from information theory to measure differences in the posterior distributions in model parameter space from a pair of experiments. We apply this formalism to a historical series of Cosmic Microwave Background experiments ranging from Boomerang to WMAP, SPT, and Planck. Considering different combinations of these experiments, we thus estimate the information gain in units of bits and distinguish contributions from the reduction of statistical errors and the `surprise' corresponding to a significant shift of the parameters' central values. For this experiment series, we...

Seehars, Sebastian; Refregier, Alexandre; Paranjape, Aseem; Akeret, Jol

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The Cosmic Microwave Background and Particle Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In forthcoming years, connections between cosmology and particle physics will be made increasingly important with the advent of a new generation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. Here, we review a number of these links. Our primary focus is on new CMB tests of inflation. We explain how the inflationary predictions for the geometry of the Universe and primordial density perturbations will be tested by CMB temperature fluctuations, and how the gravitational waves predicted by inflation can be pursued with the CMB polarization. The CMB signatures of topological defects and primordial magnetic fields from cosmological phase transitions are also discussed. Furthermore, we review current and future CMB constraints on various types of dark matter (e.g. massive neutrinos, weakly interacting massive particles, axions, vacuum energy), decaying particles, the baryon asymmetry of the Universe, ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, exotic cosmological topologies, and other new physics.

Marc Kamionkowski; Arthur Kosowsky

1999-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

324

Interactive visual intervention planning in particle accelerator environments with ionizing radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation is omnipresent. It has many interesting applications: in medicine, where it allows curing and diagnosing patients; in communication, where modern communication systems make use of electromagnetic radiation; and in science, where it is used to discover the structure of materials; to name a few. Physically, radiation is a process in which particles or waves travel through any kind of material, usually air. Radiation can be very energetic, in which case it can break the atoms of ordinary matter (ionization). If this is the case, radiation is called ionizing. It is known that ionizing radiation can be far more harmful to living beings than non-ionizing radiation. In this dissertation, we are concerned with ionizing radiation. Naturally occurring ionizing radiation in the form of radioactivity is a most natural phenomenon. Almost everything is radioactive: there is radiation emerging from the soil, it is in the air, and the whole planet is constantly undergoing streams of energetic cosmic radiation. Sinc...

Fabry, Thomas

325

Project Lyman: Quantifying 11 Gyrs of Metagalactic Ionizing Background Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The timing and duration of the reionization epoch is crucial to the emergence and evolution of structure in the universe. The relative roles that star-forming galaxies, active galactic nuclei and quasars play in contributing to the metagalactic ionizing background across cosmic time remains uncertain. Deep quasar counts provide insights into their role, but the potentially crucial contribution from star-formation is highly uncertain due to our poor understanding of the processes that allow ionizing radiation to escape into the intergalactic medium (IGM). The fraction of ionizing photons that escape from star-forming galaxies is a fundamental free parameter used in models to "fine-tune" the timing and duration of the reionization epoch that occurred somewhere between 13.4 and 12.7 Gyrs ago (redshifts between 12 > z > 6). However, direct observation of Lyman continuum (LyC) photons emitted below the rest frame \\ion{H}{1} ionization edge at 912 \\AA\\ is increasingly improbable at redshifts z > 3, due to the stead...

McCandliss, Stephan R; Bergvall, Nils; Bianchi, Luciana; Bridge, Carrie; Bogosavljevic, Milan; Cohen, Seth H; Deharveng, Jean-Michel; Dixon, W Van Dyke; Ferguson, Harry; Friedman, Peter; Hayes, Matthew; Howk, J Christopher; Inoue, Akio; Iwata, Ikuru; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Kriss, Gerard; Kruk, Jeffrey; Kutyrev, Alexander S; Leitherer, Claus; Meurer, Gerhardt R; Prochaska, Jason X; Sonneborn, George; Stiavelli, Massimo; Teplitz, Harry I; Windhorst, Rogier A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Cellular telephone-based wide-area radiation detection network  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

327

The White Dwarf -- White Dwarf galactic background in the LISA data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) is a proposed space mission, which will use coherent laser beams exchanged between three remote spacecraft to detect and study low-frequency cosmic gravitational radiation. In the low-part of its frequency band, the LISA strain sensitivity will be dominated by the incoherent superposition of hundreds of millions of gravitational wave signals radiated by inspiraling white-dwarf binaries present in our own galaxy. In order to estimate the magnitude of the LISA response to this background, we have simulated a synthesized population that recently appeared in the literature. We find the amplitude of the galactic white-dwarf binary background in the LISA data to be modulated in time, reaching a minimum equal to about twice that of the LISA noise for a period of about two months around the time when the Sun-LISA direction is roughly oriented towards the Autumn equinox. Since the galactic white-dwarfs background will be observed by LISA not as a stationary but rather as a cyclostationary random process with a period of one year, we summarize the theory of cyclostationary random processes, present the corresponding generalized spectral method needed to characterize such process, and make a comparison between our analytic results and those obtained by applying our method to the simulated data. We find that, by measuring the generalized spectral components of the white-dwarf background, LISA will be able to infer properties of the distribution of the white-dwarfs binary systems present in our Galaxy.

Jeffrey A. Edlund; Massimo Tinto; Andrzej Krolak; Gijs Nelemans

2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

328

Adaptors for radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

Livesay, Ronald Jason

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

329

Radiation Safety  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

330

High redshift AGNs and HI reionisation: limits from the unresolved X-ray background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rapidly declining population of bright quasars at z~3 appears to make an increasingly small contribution to the ionising background at the HI Lyman limit. It is then generally though that massive stars in (pre-)galactic systems may provide the additional ionising flux needed to complete HI reionisation by z>6. A galaxy dominated background, however, may require that the escape fraction of Lyman continuum radiation from high redshift galaxies is as high as 10%, a value somewhat at odds with (admittedly scarce) observational constraints. High escape fractions from dwarf galaxies have been advocated, or, alternatively, a so-far undetected (or barely detected) population of unobscured, high-redshift faint AGNs. Here we question the latter hypothesis, and show that such sources, to be consistent with the measured level of the unresolved X-ray background at z=0, can provide a fraction of the HII filling factor not larger than 13% by z=6. The fraction rises to 10%.

Haardt, Francesco

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Calculation of gamma radiation dose rate and radon concentration due to granites used as building materials in Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......G. Magusa, North Cyprus, via Mersin 10, Turkey Natural radioactivity concentrations...equivalent from all natural sources of radiation...health(4). Radon gas is a radionuclide present...to determining the natural radioactivity concentration......

A. Abbasi

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

GaTe semiconductor for radiation detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

GaTe semiconductor is used as a room-temperature radiation detector. GaTe has useful properties for radiation detectors: ideal bandgap, favorable mobilities, low melting point (no evaporation), non-hygroscopic nature, and availability of high-purity starting materials. The detector can be used, e.g., for detection of illicit nuclear weapons and radiological dispersed devices at ports of entry, in cities, and off shore and for determination of medical isotopes present in a patient.

Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Burger, Arnold (Nashville, TN); Mandal, Krishna C. (Ashland, MA)

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

333

Constraining largescale structure theories with the cosmic background radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...would be required. Adding a hot dark matter component gives a power...baryons, hot, warm and cold dark matter, coherent fields, i...were in place prior to the COBE discovery for Phil. Trans. R. Soc...Fixsen et al. 1997), in energy ECompton cool /Ecmb = 4y...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Measurements of environmental background radiation at location of coal-fired power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......before the incidence of depleted uranium over Yugoslav territory...Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Health Phys. 66 (6), 821-824...Northern New Jersey. Health Phys. 72 (6), 915-922...before the incidence of depleted uranium over former Yougoslav......

F. Adrovic; M. Prokic; M. M. Ninkovic; R. Glisic

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Constraining largescale structure theories with the cosmic background radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...parameters such as the energy densities of baryons, cold and hot dark matter, in the vacuum...that LSS redshift surveys probe. The density...CMB and LSS redshift survey results we will get...parameter h, various mean energy densities {tot...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

337

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

338

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

339

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

340

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

342

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

343

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

344

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

345

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

346

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

347

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

348

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

349

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

350

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

351

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

352

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

353

System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation.

Miller, William H. (Columbia, MO); Berliner, Ronald R. (Columbia, MO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation. 2 figs.

Miller, W.H.; Berliner, R.R.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

355

Schwarzschild black hole in dark energy background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present an exact solution of Einstein's field equations describing the Schwarzschild black hole in dark energy background. It is also regarded as an embedded solution that the Schwarzschild black hole is embedded into the dark energy space producing Schwarzschild-dark energy black hole. It is found that the space-time geometry of Schwarzschild-dark energy solution is non-vacuum Petrov type $D$ in the classification of space-times. We study the energy conditions (like weak, strong and dominant conditions) for the energy-momentum tensor of the Schwarzschild-dark energy solution. We also find that the energy-momentum tensor of the Schwarzschild-dark energy solution violates the strong energy condition due to the negative pressure leading to a repulsive gravitational force of the matter field in the space-time. It is shown that the time-like vector field for an observer in the Schwarzschild-dark energy space is expanding, accelerating, shearing and non-rotating. We investigate the surface gravity and the area of the horizons for the Schwarzschild-dark energy black hole.

Ngangbam Ishwarchandra; Ng. Ibohal; K. Yugindro Singh

2014-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

356

Statistics of Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a formalism for analyzing a full-sky temperature and polarization map of the cosmic microwave background. Temperature maps are analyzed by expanding over the set of spherical harmonics to give multipole moments of the two-point correlation function. Polarization, which is described by a second-rank tensor, can be treated analogously by expanding in the appropriate tensor spherical harmonics. We provide expressions for the complete set of temperature and polarization multipole moments for scalar and tensor metric perturbations. Four sets of multipole moments completely describe isotropic temperature and polarization correlations; for scalar metric perturbations one set is identically zero, giving the possibility of a clean determination of the vector and tensor contributions. The variance with which the multipole moments can be measured in idealized experiments is evaluated, including the effects of detector noise, sky coverage, and beam width. Finally, we construct coordinate-independent polarization two-point correlation functions, express them in terms of the multipole moments, and derive small-angle limits.

Marc Kamionkowski; Arthur Kosowsky; Albert Stebbins

1996-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Patterns of care study of radiation therapy for esophageal cancer in Japan: influence of age on parameters of treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background. In Japan, the elderly population is growing rapidly, ... good candidates for aggressive surgery or chemotherapy. Radiation therapy offers excellent potential for the treatment...

T. Teshima; H. Ikeda; M. Abe; G. E. Hanks

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Nuclear radiation electronic gear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear radiation electronic gear ... Examines the line of nuclear radiation instrumentation offered by Nuclear-Chicago Corporation and Victoreen Instrument Company. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

S. Z. Lewin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

360

Radiative Decay of the Muon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radiative decay of the muon, ?+?e++?+?e+??, has been measured using muons from the Columbia University Nevis synchrocyclotron. The decay products e+ and ? were observed at relative angles near 180, using scintillation counters and two 9-in.10-in. NaI crystals, which enabled simultaneous measurement of the positron and ? energies. The pulses from the crystals were displayed on oscilloscopes and photographed, and the measured amplitudes of these pulses were calibrated using the positron spectrum of the nonradiative decay. The two-dimensional energy spectrum for positrons and ?'s was obtained for about 900 events, after subtraction of background. This spectrum and the measured rate, obtained by normalizing to the nonradiative decay, were compared with theoretical predictions for the radiative decay. The results were in good agreement with the theory, within statistics, for the case of pure V-A coupling.

E. Bogart; E. DiCapua; P. Nmethy; A. Strelzoff

1967-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

E-Print Network 3.0 - accumulated radiation dose Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. At the end, this seminar concentrates on the dose contributions of naturally occurring ionizing radiation... particles. - The equivalent dose, HT, which takes into account...

362

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient uv-b radiation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

typically been conducted under low levels of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation, a naturally occurring mutagen... . We conducted experi- ments to test whether the inclusion of...

363

E-Print Network 3.0 - ancient rapid radiation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy near the surface that would... greenhouse gases augments the natural greenhouse effect; it increases the radiative energy available to Earth... 's surface and to the...

364

Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Research and Background  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research and Background to someone by E-mail Research and Background to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Research and Background on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Research and Background on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Research and Background on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Research and Background on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Research and Background on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Research and Background on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Get Involved Partners Research & Background

365

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

BACKGROUND June 1999 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that such a study would have little chance of success without adequate estimation of radiation doses was to estimate off-site radiation exposure through a dose reconstruction process. In addition, CDC proposed through the environment; and produced methods for estimating the resulting radiation doses to specific

367

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

368

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

369

SciTech Connect: Neutron inelastic scattering in natural Pb as...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Article: Neutron inelastic scattering in natural Pb as a background in neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron inelastic...

370

Evidence-Based Background Material Underlying Guidance for Federal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Material Underlying Guidance for Federal Agencies in Implementing Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans Evidence-Based Background Material Underlying Guidance for...

371

Muon-induced backgrounds in the CUORICINO experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

background in the neutrinoless double beta decay region ofis searching for neutrinoless double beta decay (0???), a

Andreotti, E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by ultra-relativistic electron bunches, known since the last century, has become increasingly important with the development of high peak current free electron lasers and shorter bunch lengths in storage rings. Coherent radiation can be described as a low frequency part of the familiar synchrotron radiation in bending magnets. As this part is independent of the electron energy, the fields of different electrons of a short bunch can be in phase and the total power of the radiation will be quadratic with the number of electrons. Naturally the frequency spectrum of the longitudinal electron distribution in a bunch is of the same importance as the overall electron bunch length. The interest in the utilization of high power radiation from the terahertz and far infrared region in the field of chemical, physical and biological processes has led synchrotron radiation facilities to pay more attention to the production of coherent radiation. Several laboratories have proposed the construction of a facility wholly dedicated to terahertz production using the coherent radiation in bending magnets initiated by the longitudinal instabilities in the ring. Existing synchrotron radiation facilities also consider such a possibility among their future plans. There is a beautiful introduction to CSR in the 'ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter' N 35 (Editor C. Biscari). In this paper we recall the basic properties of CSR from the theory and what new effects, we can get from the precise simulations of the coherent radiation using numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. In particular, transverse variation of the particle energy loss in a bunch, discovered in these simulations, explains the slice emittance growth in bending magnets of the bunch compressors and transverse de-coherence in undulators. CSR may play same the role as the effect of quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation in damping rings. It can limit the minimum achievable emittance in the synchrotron light sources for short bunches.

Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

373

Two-frequency radiative transfer and asymptotic solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiative transfer equation has been derived with full mathematical rigor [13,14]. In the case the wave nature of the process and is not just about energy transport. Hence the governing equation cannotTwo-frequency radiative transfer and asymptotic solution Albert C. Fannjiang* Department

Fannjiang, Albert

374

Surface-wave-enabled darkfield aperture for background suppression during  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can be directly incorporated onto optical sensors to accom- plish predetection background suppression if the sensor is fully capable of measuring the same weak signal in the absence of background (1, 2- trivial to employ. A sensor that can intrinsically cancel a strong background prior to signal detection

Yang, Changhuei

375

PoGOLite: Neutron Background Studies for High Latitudes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PoGOLite: Neutron Background Studies for High Latitudes Maria Fernanda Muñoz Salinas SH2006. The measurements showed a neutron background ten times higher than expected. Because of this, new simulations of the PoGOLite flight which will take place in the summer of 2012. The neutron background was simulated

Haviland, David

376

Matrix Model in a Class of Time Dependent Supersymmetric Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the matrix model in a class of 11D time dependent supersymmetric backgrounds as obtained in hep-th/0508191 . We construct the matrix model action through the matrix regularization of the membrane action in the background. We show that the action is exact to all order of fermionic coordinates. Furthermore We discuss the fuzzy sphere solutions in this background.

Hong-Zhi Chen; Bin Chen

2006-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

377

A New Appraisal of Radiation Genetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... forty years of its existence, radiation genetics has developed into a vast field with many interrelated, specialist areas devoted to physical, chemical, genetical and cytological analysis of the action ... culminates in the conclusion that "the discovery of the purely material nature of the complex processes of life" is ''one of the major landmarks in the history of dialectical ...

CHARLOTTE AUERBACH

1965-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

378

85Kr management trade-offs: a perspective to total radiation dose commitment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiological consequences arising from the trade-offs for /sup 85/Kr waste management from possible nuclear fuel resource recovery activities have been investigated. The reference management technique is to release all the waste gas to the atmosphere where it is diluted and dispersed. A potential alternative is to collect, concentrate, package and submit the gas to long-term storage. This study compares the radiation dose commitment to the public and to the occupationally exposed work force from these alternatives. The results indicate that it makes little difference to the magnitude of the world population dose whether /sup 85/Kr is captured and stored or chronically released to the environment. Further, comparisons of radiation exposures (for the purpose of estimating health effects) at very low dose rates to very large populations with exposures to a small number of occupationally exposed workers who each receive much higher dose rates may be misleading. Finally, cost studies (EPA 1976 and DOE 1979a) show that inordinate amounts of money will be required to lower this already extremely small 80-year cumulative world population dose of 0.05 mrem/person (<0.001% of natural background radiation for the same time period).

Mellinger, P.J.; Hoenes, G.R.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Greenborg, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Concentrations of Naturally Occuring Radionuclides and Fission Products in Brick Samples Fabricated and Used in and Around Greater Dhaka City  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Radiation Protection Dosimetry Article Concentrations of Naturally Occuring Radionuclides and Fission Products in Brick Samples...measures to minimise the harmful effects of ionising radiation. The radium equivalent activity concentrations......

S. Roy; M.S. Alam; F.K. Miah; B. Alam

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Role of Background in the CERCLA Cleanup Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Background in the CERCLA Cleanup Program Background in the CERCLA Cleanup Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response Office of Emergency and Remedial Response April 26, 2002 OSWER 9285.6-07P OSWER 9285.6-07P page 2 of 13 Table of Contents Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3 of 13 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 4 of 13 Definitions of Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5 of 13 Consideration of Background in Risk Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 6 of 13 Consideration of Background in Risk Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 7 of 13 Consideration of Background in Risk Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 8 of 13 Hypothetical Case Examples .

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Memory effects in radiative jet energy loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In heavy-ion collisions the created quark-gluon plasma forms a quickly evolving background, leading to a time dependent radiative behavior of high momentum partons traversing the medium. We use the Schwinger Keldysh formalism to describe the jet evolution as a non-equilibrium process including the Landau-Pomeranschuk-Migdal effect. Concentrating on photon emission, a comparison of our results to a quasistatic calculation shows good agreement, leading to the conclusion that the radiative behavior follows the changes in the medium almost instantaneously.

Frank Michler; Bjrn Schenke; Carsten Greiner

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

382

Radiation Protection and Safety Training | Environmental Radiation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The objective of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the fundamentals of ionizing radiation protection and safety. The course curriculum combines...

383

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Radiative Atmospheric Divergence...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radiation emitted by the earth. This instrument is onboard a European Union geostationary weather satellite launched in December 2005; it is collecting data over Niamey and the...

384

Measurement of low radioactivity background in a high voltage cable by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The measurement of naturally occurring low level radioactivity background in a high voltage (HV) cable by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR ICP MS) is presented in this work. The measurements were performed at the Chemistry Service of the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. The contributions to the radioactive background coming from the different components of the heterogeneous material were separated. Based on the mass fraction of the cable, the whole contamination was calculated. The HR ICP MS results were cross-checked by gamma ray spectroscopy analysis that was performed at the low background facility STELLA (Sub Terranean Low Level Assay) of the LNGS underground lab using HPGe detectors.

Vacri, M. L. di; Nisi, S.; Balata, M. [Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Chemistry Service, SS 17bis km 18.910, 67100 Assergi (Aq) (Italy)] [Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Chemistry Service, SS 17bis km 18.910, 67100 Assergi (Aq) (Italy)

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

385

Stochastic background of relic gravitons in a bouncing quantum cosmological model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spectrum and amplitude of the stochastic background of relic gravitons produced in a bouncing universe is calculated. The matter content of the model consists of dust and radiation fluids, and the bounce occurs due to quantum cosmological effects when the universe approaches the classical singularity in the contracting phase. The resulting amplitude is very small and it cannot be observed by any present and near future gravitational wave detector. Hence, as in the ekpyrotic model, any observation of these relic gravitons will rule out this type of quantum cosmological bouncing model.

Bessada, Dennis [UNIFESP, Universidade Federal de So Paulo, Laboratrio de Fsica Terica e Computao Cientfica, Rua So Nicolau, 210, 09913-030, Diadema, SP (Brazil); Pinto-Neto, Nelson; Siffert, Beatriz B. [ICRA CBPF, Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fsicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, Urca, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Miranda, Oswaldo D., E-mail: dennis.bessada@unifesp.br, E-mail: beatriz@if.ufrj.br, E-mail: nelsonpn@cbpf.br, E-mail: oswaldo@das.inpe.br [INPE, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Av. dos Astronautas, 1758, 12227-010, So Jos dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

MaGe - a Geant4-based Monte Carlo framework for low-background experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Monte Carlo framework, MaGe, has been developed based on the Geant4 simulation toolkit. Its purpose is to simulate physics processes in low-energy and low-background radiation detectors, specifically for the Majorana and Gerda $^{76}$Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. This jointly-developed tool is also used to verify the simulation of physics processes relevant to other low-background experiments in Geant4. The MaGe framework contains simulations of prototype experiments and test stands, and is easily extended to incorporate new geometries and configurations while still using the same verified physics processes, tunings, and code framework. This reduces duplication of efforts and improves the robustness of and confidence in the simulation output.

Yuen-Dat Chan; Jason A. Detwiler; Reyco Henning; Victor M. Gehman; Rob A. Johnson; David V. Jordan; Kareem Kazkaz; Markus Knapp; Kevin Kroninger; Daniel Lenz; Jing Liu; Xiang Liu; Michael G. Marino; Akbar Mokhtarani; Luciano Pandola; Alexis G. Schubert; Claudia Tomei

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

387

Approach of gas and radiation to equilibrium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Einstein described equilibrium between two?level gas molecules and radiation in terms of a Brownian motion model involving frictional and agitational effects arising from photon absorptions and emissions. This paper extends his treatment to the case of disequilibrium when molecules and radiation are in cavities with either black or perfectly reflecting walls. The precise role of the black walls in promoting equilibrium is explicated in terms of Einsteins formula for the frictional effect and the nature of changes in radiation patterns caused by Doppler shifts of photon frequencies. It is then shown that equilibrium between the two?level gas molecules and radiation cannot be achieved for a container with perfectly reflecting walls. The blockage of equilibrium occurs because a change in the slope of the Planck spectrum at the resonant frequency causes a change in the frictional force.

Frank Munley

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) is a 3-year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy to provide global, retrospective, or real-time specification of the natural and potential nuclear radiation environments. The DREAM model uses Kalman filtering techniques that combine the strengths of new physical models of the radiation belts with electron observations from long-term satellite systems such as GPS and geosynchronous systems. DREAM includes a physics model for the production and long-term evolution of artificial radiation belts from high altitude nuclear explosions. DREAM has been validated against satellites in arbitrary orbits and consistently produces more accurate results than existing models. Tools for user-specific applications and graphical displays are in beta testing and a real-time version of DREAM has been in continuous operation since November 2009.

Reeves, Geoffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Koller, Josef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tokar, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Yue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, Michael G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reiner H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Cloud Formation and Acceleration in a Radiative Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a radiatively heated and cooled medium, the thermal instability is a plausible mechanism for forming clouds, while the radiation force provides a natural acceleration, especially when ions recombine and opacity increases. Here we extend Field's theory to self-consistently account for a radiation force resulting from bound-free and bound-bound transitions in the optically thin limit. We present physical arguments for clouds to be significantly accelerated by a radiation force due to lines during a nonlinear phase of the instability. To qualitatively illustrate our main points, we perform both one and two-dimensional (1-D/2-D) hydrodynamical simulations that allow us to study the nonlinear outcome of the evolution of thermally unstable gas subjected to this radiation force. Our 1-D simulations demonstrate that the thermal instability can produce long-lived clouds that reach a thermal equilibrium between radiative processes and thermal conduction, while the radiation force can indeed accelerate the clouds to ...

Proga, Daniel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Astroparticle Physics with a Customized Low-Background Broad Energy Germanium Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MAJORANA Collaboration is building the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, a 60 kg array of high purity germanium detectors housed in an ultra-low background shield at the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge while demonstrating the feasibility of a tonne-scale experiment. It may also carry out a dark matter search in the 1-10 GeV/c^2 mass range. We have found that customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors produced by Canberra have several desirable features for a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, including low electronic noise, excellent pulse shape analysis capabilities, and simple fabrication. We have deployed a customized BEGe, the MAJORANA Low-Background BEGe at Kimballton (MALBEK), in a low-background cryostat and shield at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Virginia. This paper will focus on the detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a radiation detector in a low-background environment.

MAJORANA Collaboration; C. E. Aalseth; M. Amman; F. T. Avignone III; H. O. Back; A. S. Barabash; P. S. Barbeau; M. Bergevin; F. E. Bertrand; M. Boswell; V. Brudanin; W. Bugg; T. H. Burritt; M. Busch; G. Capps; Y-D. Chan; J. I. Collar; R. J. Cooper; R. Creswick; J. A. Detwiler; J. Diaz; P. J. Doe; Yu. Efremenko; V. Egorov; H. Ejiri; S. R. Elliott; J. Ely; J. Esterline; H. Farach; J. E. Fast; N. Fields; P. Finnerty; B. Fujikawa; E. Fuller; V. M. Gehman; G. K. Giovanetti; V. E. Guiseppe; K. Gusey; A. L. Hallin; G. C Harper; R. Hazama; R. Henning; A. Hime; E. W. Hoppe; T. W. Hossbach; M. A. Howe; R. A. Johnson; K. J. Keeter; M. Keillor; C. Keller; J. D. Kephart; M. F. Kidd; A. Knecht; O. Kochetov; S. I. Konovalov; R. T. Kouzes; L. Leviner; J. C. Loach; P. N. Luke; S. MacMullin; M. G. Marino; R. D. Martin; D. -M. Mei; H. S. Miley; M. L. Miller; L. Mizouni; A. W. Meyers; M. Nomachi; J. L. Orrell; D. Peterson; D. G. Phillips II; A. W. P. Poon; G. Prior; J. Qian; D. C. Radford; K. Rielage; R. G. H. Robertson; L. Rodriguez; K. P. Rykaczewski; H. Salazar; A. G. Schubert; T. Shima; M. Shirchenko; D. Steele; J. Strain; G. Swift; K. Thomas; V. Timkin; W. Tornow; T. D. Van Wechel; I. Vanyushin; R. L. Varner; K. Vetter; J. F. Wilkerson; B. A. Wolfe; W. Xiang; E. Yakushev; H. Yaver; A. R. Young; C. -H. Yu; V. Yumatov; C. Zhang; S. Zimmerman

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

392

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

393

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

394

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

395

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

396

Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

397

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

398

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

399

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Characterization of the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li, Zhanjun Guo, Zhonghui Yang, and Eric Chuang Institutions: Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland Background The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

400

Gravitational Radiation and Very Long Baseline Interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational waves affect the observed direction of light from distant sources. At telescopes, this change in direction appears as periodic variations in the apparent positions of these sources on the sky; that is, as proper motion. A wave of a given phase, traveling in a given direction, produces a characteristic pattern of proper motions over the sky. Comparison of observed proper motions with this pattern serves to test for the presence of gravitational waves. A stochastic background of waves induces apparent proper motions with specific statistical properties, and so, may also be sought. In this paper we consider the effects of a cosmological background of gravitational radiation on astrometric observations. We derive an equation for the time delay measured by two antennae observing the same source in an Einstein-de Sitter spacetime containing gravitational radiation. We also show how to obtain similar expressions for curved Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes.

Ted Pyne; Carl R. Gwinn; Mark Birkinshaw; T. Marshall Eubanks; Demetrios N. Matsakis

1995-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

PARALLEL COMPUTATIONS OF RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER USING THE DISCRETE ORDINATES METHOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the radiative transport equation on parallel computers. Mathematical libraries developed by third parties the discrete ordi- nates method. They observed that the global nature of radiative transport resultedPARALLEL COMPUTATIONS OF RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER USING THE DISCRETE ORDINATES METHOD Gautham

Utah, University of

402

Radiation Safety Program Annual Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................10 AREA RADIATION SURVEYS AND CONTAMINATION CONTROL...........................................11.....................................................................................................13 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT meetings of the Radiation Safety Committee where new users and uses of radioactive materials, radiation

Lyubomirsky, Ilya

403

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of steam buildings. Radiator Labs developed a mechanism that allows heating systems to control heat transfer at each radiator. The Radiator Labs design utilizes an...

404

The universal radiative transport equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSAL RADIATIVE TRANSPORT EQUATION Rudolph W.The Universal Radiative Transport Equation Rudolph W.The various radiative transport equations used in general

Preisendorfer, Rudolph W

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Radiation Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary: Radiation Dose Estimates from Hanford Radioactive Material Releases to the Air- tantly, what radiation dose people may have received. An independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP, additionalProjectworkcouldresultin revisions of these dose estimates. April 21, 1994 Companion

406

Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

407

WI Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

408

The Structure and Evolution of Stars Recommended Background Reading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S dt , (3) Energy Transport (Radiative Diffusion Equation): Lr = -4r2 4ac 3 T3 dT dr , (4) Energy determined by the mechanisms by which energy is transported from the core to the surface, radiation, convec- tion, conduction (energy transport equation); · the central temperature is determined

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

409

The Killing superalgebra of ten-dimensional supergravity backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct the Killing superalgebra of supersymmetric backgrounds of ten-dimensional heterotic and type II supergravities and prove that it is a Lie superalgebra. We also show that if the fraction of supersymmetry preserved by the background is greater than 1/2, in the heterotic case, or greater than 3/4 in the type II case, then the background is locally homogeneous.

Jos Figueroa-O'Farrill; Emily Hackett-Jones; George Moutsopoulos

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

410

Prognosis of patients with advanced carcinoma of the esophagus with complete response to chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy: a questionnaire survey in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background....We estimated the survival of patients with advanced carcinoma of the esophagus in Japan who achieved complete response (CR) with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy.

N. Aoyama; H. Koizumi; J. Minamide

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Backgrounds and Projected Limits from Dark Matter Direct Detection Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple formula is introduced which indicates the amount by which projections of dark matter direct detection experiments are expected to be degraded due to backgrounds.

Scott Dodelson

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

412

Muon-induced backgrounds in the CUORICINO experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Muon-induced backgrounds in the CUORICINO experiment E.the contribution of cosmic ray muons to the CUORICINOKey words: CUORICINO, muons, cosmic rays, double beta decay,

Andreotti, E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COPYRIGHT 2002 Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;3 #12;4 #12;5 Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 98, No'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

Healy, Kevin Edward

414

What is the radiative process of the prompt phase of Gamma Ray Bursts?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the dramatic improvement of our knowledge of the phenomenology of Gamma Ray Bursts, we still do not know several fundamental aspects of their physics. One of the puzzles concerns the nature of the radiative process originating the prompt phase radiation. Although the synchrotron process qualifies itself as a natural candidate, it faces severe problems, and many efforts have been done looking for alternatives. These, however, suffer from other problems, and there is no general consensus yet on a specific radiation mechanism.

Ghisellini, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Bianchi 46 I-23807 Merate (Italy)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Environmental consequences of postulated radionuclide releases from the Battelle Memorial Institute Columbus Laboratories JN-1b Building at the West Jefferson site as a result of severe natural phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated radionuclide releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Battelle Memorial Institute Columbus Laboratories JN-1b Building at the West Jefferson site. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Maximum radioactive material deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum radioactive material deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the events are well below the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The likely maximum residual contamination from beta and gamma emitters are far below the background produced by fallout from nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere.

Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Radon in context of natural radiation exposure: the Czech experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......doses from ingestion of water are reasonably avertable...and intervention (remediation of existing exposure...effective dose caused by water containing 1000 Bq l1...radon concentrations in ground water vary from some Becquerel......

J. Hulka

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© 2009 APS Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology Published online: 17 July 2009 | doi:10 perfect fluid. Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 025301 (2009). | Article |1. Nature Nanotechnology ISSN 1748 : Nature Nanotechnology http://www.nature.com/nnano/reshigh/2009/0709/full/nnano.2009.222.html 1 of 1 18

Müller, Markus

418

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

419

DNA damage: risk comparisons of low radiation vis-a-vis dietary micronutrient deficiencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micronutrients are the substances in minute amounts that are essential for human life. This study discusses laboratory and epidemiological evidence that dietary micronutrient deficiencies cause DNA damage. DNA damage comparisons are made between dietary micronutrient deficiencies and low dose radiation. Laboratory studies show that micronutrient deficiencies can cause greater DNA damage than radiation doses significantly above background environmental levels. Previous concerns that have been expressed about comparing endogenous DNA damages to radiation-induced DNA damages are discussed, in particular, the role of radiation clusters. It is shown that cluster damage does not preclude making comparisons of dietary micronutrient deficiencies vis-a-vis radiation, especially at background environmental levels. Such damage comparisons provide the public with a means of placing radiation risk in perspective by comparing a readily appreciated, everyday concept (dietary deficiencies) with that of radiation.

Daniel P. Hayes

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

A Polarization Sensitive Bolometric Detector for Observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed a bolometric detector that is intrinsically sensitive to linear polarization which is optimized for making measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The receiver consists of a pair of co-located silicon nitride micromesh absorbers which couple anisotropically to linearly polarized radiation through a corrugated waveguide structure. This system allows simultaneous background limited measurements of the Stokes I and Q parameters over ~ 30% bandwidths at frequencies from ~ 60 to 600 GHz. Since both linear polarizations traverse identical optical paths from the sky to the point of detection, the susceptibility to systematic effects is minimized. The amount of uncorrelated noise between the two polarization senses is limited to the quantum limit of thermal and photon shot noise, while drifts in the relative responsivity to orthogonal polarizations are limited to the effect of non-uniformity in the thin film deposition of the leads and the intrinsic thermistor properties. Devices using NTD Ge thermistors have achieved NEPs of 2 x 10^{-17} W/sqrt{Hz} with a 1/f knee below 100 mHz at a base temperature of 270 mK. Numerical modelling of the structures has been used to optimize the bolometer geometry and coupling to optics. Comparisons of numerical results and experimental data are made. A description of how the quantities measured by the device can be interpreted in terms of the Stokes parameters is presented. The receiver developed for the Boomerang and Planck HFI focal planes is presented in detail.

W. C. Jones; R. S. Bhatia; J. J. Bock; A. E. Lange

2002-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Comparison of radiation exposure and associated radiation-induced cancer risks from mammography and molecular imaging of the breast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Recent studies have raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation from medical imaging procedures. Little has been published regarding the relative exposure and risks associated with breast imaging techniques such as breast specific gamma imaging (BSGI), molecular breast imaging (MBI), or positron emission mammography (PEM). The purpose of this article was to estimate and compare the risks of radiation-induced cancer from mammography and techniques such as PEM, BSGI, and MBI in a screening environment. Methods: The authors used a common scheme for all estimates of cancer incidence and mortality based on the excess absolute risk model from the BEIR VII report. The lifetime attributable risk model was used to estimate the lifetime risk of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality. All estimates of cancer incidence and mortality were based on a population of 100 000 females followed from birth to age 80 and adjusted for the fraction that survives to various ages between 0 and 80. Assuming annual screening from ages 40 to 80 and from ages 50 to 80, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality attributed to digital mammography, screen-film mammography, MBI, BSGI, and PEM was calculated. The corresponding cancer incidence and mortality from natural background radiation was calculated as a useful reference. Assuming a 15%-32% reduction in mortality from screening, the benefit/risk ratio for the different imaging modalities was evaluated. Results: Using conventional doses of 925 MBq Tc-99m sestamibi for MBI and BSGI and 370 MBq F-18 FDG for PEM, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality were found to be 15-30 times higher than digital mammography. The benefit/risk ratio for annual digital mammography was >50:1 for both the 40-80 and 50-80 screening groups, but dropped to 3:1 for the 40-49 age group. If the primary use of MBI, BSGI, and PEM is in women with dense breast tissue, then the administered doses need to be in the range 75-150 MBq for Tc-99m sestamibi and 35 MBq-70 MBq for F-18 FDG in order to obtain benefit/risk ratios comparable to those of mammography in these age groups. These dose ranges should be achievable with enhancements to current technology while maintaining a reasonable examination time. Conclusions: The results of the dose estimates in this study clearly indicate that if molecular imaging techniques are to be of value in screening for breast cancer, then the administered doses need to be substantially reduced to better match the effective doses of mammography.

O'Connor, Michael K.; Li Hua; Rhodes, Deborah J.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Clancy, Conor B.; Vetter, Richard J. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, St. James's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Radiation Safety, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Investigation of Naturally Occurring Radio Nuclides in Shir?kuh Granites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the principle natural radiation resources is Granite which can be dangerous for human because of its radiations. Based on this fact in this research we attempt to specify the activity amount of these natural radio nuclides existing in Shir?kuh Granite of Yazd state. To specify the activity amount of this natural radio nuclides it has been applied the measurement method of Gamma spectroscopy using high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector.

Mohammad Mehdi Mazarei; Mojtaba Zarei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

Clements, Emily B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Background Long history of research and education in "nuclear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Degradation Nuclear Materials · Multi physics modelling · Severe nuclear accidents · Non destructive testing#12;Background · Long history of research and education in "nuclear engineering" at Chalmers. · "Nuclear engineering" = multi-disciplinary research area. #12;Background Establishment of the Sustainable

Lemurell, Stefan

425

cognitive backgroundCIS4140-2 1 administrivia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cognitive background human-computer interaction understand computer workings (reasonably well) how about humans? once part of psychology now considered cognitive science may also need some sociology later #12;cognitive backgroundCIS4140-2 4 perceptual 2 perceptions considered for UI auditory visual new interfaces

Damon, Craig A.

426

Hawking radiation in the ghost condensate is nonthermal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider a Schwarzschild black hole immersed in a ghost condensate background. It is shown that the Hawking radiation in the quanta of small perturbations around this background is highly suppressed - in particular, it is not given by a thermal spectrum. This result is in accord with observations that such black holes can be used to violate the generalized second law of thermodynamics, and thus cannot have a standard entropy/area relation.

Feldstein, Brian [Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Alpha Backgrounds for HPGe Detectors in Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Majorana Experiment will use arrays of enriched HPGe detectors to search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge. Such a decay, if found, would show lepton-number violation and confirm the Majorana nature of the neutrino. Searches for such rare events are hindered by obscuring backgrounds which must be understood and mitigated as much as possible. A potentially important background contribution to this and other double-beta decay experiments could come from decays of alpha-emitting isotopes in the 232Th and 238U decay chains on or near the surfaces of the detectors. An alpha particle emitted external to an HPGe crystal can lose energy before entering the active region of the detector, either in some external-bulk material or within the dead region of the crystal. The measured energy of the event will only correspond to a partial amount of the total kinetic energy of the alpha and might obscure the signal from neutrinoless double-beta decay. A test stand was built and measurements were performed to quantitatively assess this background. We present results from these measurements and compare them to simulations using Geant4. These results are then used to measure the alpha backgrounds in an underground detector in situ. We also make estimates of surface contamination tolerances for double-beta decay experiments using solid-state detectors.

R. A. Johnson; T. H. Burritt; S. R. Elliott; V. M. Gehman; V. E. Guiseppe; J. F. Wilkerson

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

428

Adjusted Estimates of Texas Natural Gas Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Energy Information Administration 1 Energy Information Administration Adjusted Estimates of Texas Natural Gas Production Background The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is adjusting its estimates of natural gas production in Texas for 2004 and 2005 to correctly account for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) production. Normally, EIA would wait until publication of the Natural Gas Annual (NGA) before revising the 2004 data, but the adjustments for CO 2 are large enough to warrant making the changes at this time. Prior to 2005, EIA relied exclusively on the voluntary sharing of production data by state and federal government entities to develop its natural gas production estimates. In 2005, EIA began collecting production data directly from operators on the new EIA-914 production

429

Alpha-beta radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is based in part on the discovery that a plastic housing that is lightweight is surprisingly efficient inasmuch as background signals from any gamma radiation are significantly reduced by using a plastic housing instead of a metal housing. A further aspect of the present invention is the profile of the housing as a bi-linear approximation to a parabola resulting in full optical response from any location on the scintillation material to the photomultiplier tube. A yet further aspect of the present invention is that the survey probe is resistant to magnetic fields. A yet further aspect of the present invention is the use of a snap-fit retaining bracket that overcomes the need for multiple screws.

Fleming, Dale M. (Richland, WA); Simmons, Kevin L. (Kennewick, WA); Froelich, Thomas J. (West Richland, WA); Carter, Gregory L. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Ship Effect Neutron Measurements And Impacts On Low-Background Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary particles entering the upper atmosphere as cosmic rays create showers in the atmosphere that include a broad spectrum of secondary neutrons, muons and protons. These cosmic-ray secondaries interact with materials at the surface of the Earth, yielding prompt backgrounds in radiation detection systems, as well as inducing long-lived activities through spallation events, dominated by the higher-energy neutron secondaries. For historical reasons, the multiple neutrons produced in spallation cascade events are referred to as ship effect neutrons. Quantifying the background from cosmic ray induced activities is important to low-background experiments, such as neutrino-less double beta decay. Since direct measurements of the effects of shielding on the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum are not available, Monte Carlo modeling is used to compute such effects. However, there are large uncertainties (orders of magnitude) in the possible cross-section libraries and the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum for the energy range needed in such calculations. The measurements reported here were initiated to validate results from Monte Carlo models through experimental measurements in order to provide some confidence in the model results. The results indicate that the models provide the correct trends of neutron production with increasing density, but there is substantial disagreement between the model and experimental results for the lower-density materials of Al, Fe and Cu.

Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Final report on the Background Soil Characterization Project at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Results of Field Sampling Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents, evaluates, and documents data and results obtained in the Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP). It is intended to be a stand-alone document for application and use in structuring and conducting remedial investigation and remedial action projects in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The objectives of the BSCP consist of the following: determine background concentrations of organics, metals, and radionuclides in natural soils that are key to environmental restoration projects; provide remediation projects with 100% validated data on background concentrations, which are technically and legally defensible; and quantify baseline risks from background constituents for comparison of risks associated with contaminated sites.

Watkins, D.R.; Ammons, J.T.; Branson, J.L. [and others

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Natural Gas Storage in Basalt Aquifers of the Columbia Basin, Pacific Northwest USA: A Guide to Site Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the technical background and a guide to characterizing a site for storing natural gas in the Columbia River Basalt

Reidel, Steve P.; Spane, Frank A.; Johnson, Vernon G.

2002-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

433

Environmental consequences of postulate plutonium releases from Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF), Santa Susana, California, as a result of severe natural phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF), in the Santa Susana site, California. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the earthquake, and the 150-mph and 170-mph tornadoes are above the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The deposition values following the 110-mph and the 130-mph tornadoes are below the EPA proposed guideline.

Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Environmental consequences of postulated plutonium releases from General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California, as a result of severe natural phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Maximum plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the earthquakes, and the 180-mph and 230-mph tornadoes are above the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The deposition values following the 135-mph tornado are below the EPA proposed guidelines.

Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Spinning Test Particle in Kalb-Ramond background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we explore the geodesic deviations of spinning test particles in a string inspired Einstein-Kalb Ramond background. Such a background is known to be equivalent to a spacetime geometry with torsion. We have shown here that the antisymmetric Kalb-Ramond field has significant effect on the geodesic deviation of a spinning test particle. A search for an observational evidence of such an effect in astrophysical experiments may lead to a better undestanding of the geometry of the background spacetime.

Debaprasad Maity; Soumitra SenGupta; Sourav Sur

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

436

Sakai-Sugimoto model in D0-D4 background  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We add smeared D0 charges to the D4 background and discuss the Sakai-Sugimoto model under this background. The corresponding gauge theory is in a state with an expectation value of ?tr(F??F??)?. The D8-branes go less deep than in the original S-S model and massless Goldstones are still found in the spectrum. The effects of this condensate on the meson spectra, pion decay constant, and couplings of the vector mesons and Goldstones in this background state are then investigated.

Chao Wu; Zhiguang Xiao; Da Zhou

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

437

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Natural radioactivity measurements in rock samples of Cuihua Mountain National Geological Park, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......samples were stored in gas-tight, radon impermeable...concentrations of the natural radionuclides 226Ra...radiation hazard indices from natural radioactivity of some...radioactive samples from Cyprus characteristic geological...Matiullah, Kenawy M. A. Natural radioactivity in marble......

Xinwei Lu; Xiaolan Zhang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

440

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"N3050MS3","N3010MS3","N3020MS3","N3035MS3","NA1570SMS3","N3045MS3" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nature/Culture/Seawater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This essay considers seawater as a substance and symbol in anthropological and social theory. Seawater has occupied an ambiguous place with respect to anthropological categories of nature and culture. Seawater as nature ...

Helmreich, Stefan

442

Natural Gas Monthly  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Natural gas annual 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3010CT3","N3020CT3","N3035CT3","N3045CT3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Connecticut (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to...

445

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Rotary Rig Count Rises to Highest Level since February 2009. The natural gas rotary rig count was 992 as of Friday, August 13, according to data released by Baker...

446

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Boston forum is open to the public. Additional information is available at http:www.energy.govnews3197.htm. Natural Gas Rig Count: The number of rigs drilling for natural...

447

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

448

The flying radiation case  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos foil implosion program has the goal of producing an intense, high-energy density x-ray source by converting the energy of a magnetically imploded plasma into radiation and material energy. One of the methods for converting the plasma energy into thermal energy and radiation and utilizing it for experiments is called the flying radiation case (FRC). In this paper the authors shall model the FRC and provide a physical description of the processes involved. An analytic model of a planar FRC in the hydrodynamic approximation is used to describe the assembly and shock heating of a central cushion by a conducting liner driver. The results are also used to benchmark a hydrodynamics code for modeling an FRC. They then use a radiation-hydrodynamics computational model to explore the effects of radiation production and transport when a gold plasma assembles on a CH cushion. Results are presented for the structure and evolution of the radiation hohlraum.

Brownell, J.H.; Bowers, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Applied Theoretical and Computational Physics Div.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Accessible Area is an area that can be easily reached or obtained. In many cases an area must be physically accessible to perform a measurement. However, radioactivity may be measurable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations) is radiation from cosmic sources; naturally occurring. Ambient radiation may include natural background, intrinsic radiation from surrounding materials in this glossary decision rule. Ambient Radiation is radiation that is currently present in the surrounding area

450

ARM - Field Campaign - RAdiative Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsRAdiative Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA STations govCampaignsRAdiative Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA STations (RADAGAST) Campaign Links AMF Niamey Deployment AMF Niamey Data Plots RADAGAST Website Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : RAdiative Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA STations (RADAGAST) 2006.01.01 - 2007.01.07 Website : http://www.arm.gov/sites/amf/nim Lead Scientist : Anthony Slingo Description Science Plan for the ARM Mobile Facility deployment to Niamey, 2006 Draft: 3 February 2005 Anthony Slingo, Environmental Systems Science Centre, University of Reading, UK 1. Background Despite a great deal of effort over many years, significant disagreements persist between estimates of the partitioning of the Earth's radiation budget between the atmosphere and surface. While the radiation budget at

451

Oral Histories: Radiation Biologist Marvin Goldman, Ph.D.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS Oral History of Radiation Biologist Marvin Goldman, Ph.D. Conducted December 22, 1994 United States Department of Energy Office of Human Radiation Experiments September 1995 CONTENTS Foreword Short Biography Educational Background and Early Involvement in Radiation Research Brookhaven Acquaintances and Early Hospital Research (Circa 1952) Vulnerable Populations and Acceptable Risks Research at the University of Rochester (1952-57) Relationship with Newell Stannard and Stafford Warren (1952-57) Participation in "Project Sunshine" and Move to the University of California, Davis (Mid '50s to '58) Participation in Beagle Studies at the University of California at Davis (1958 to '60s) Budget Concerns and Goldman's Other Radiation Research Projects (1965 to Late '60s)

452

Low dose radiation combines with the Src oncoprotein to transform  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radiation combines with the Src oncoprotein to transform radiation combines with the Src oncoprotein to transform pre-malignant human breast cells Paul Yaswen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Goal: Determine whether low dose radiation exerts persistent epigenetic effects that promote malignancy. Background and Significance: Some persistent carcinogenic effects of radiation may not be traceable to specific DNA sequence alterations and may not be linearly related to dose. Through the biochemical initiation of positive feedback loops, ionization-induced events may have heritable non-linear effects on cellular behavior. Inflammatory responses involving the transcription factor NFκB may be subject to such effects. Increased NFκB activity has been strongly linked to carcinogenesis in a number of published in vitro and in vivo studies (reviewed in [1]). Since radiation

453

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

454

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

455

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

FR Cnc Nature Revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of FR Cnc reported a tricky nature. We carried out...

M. C. Glvez; A. Golovin; M. Hernn-Obispo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Natural Gas: More Gasbuggies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... first US experiment in the use of underground nuclear explosions to increase the recovery of natural ...naturalgas ...

1969-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

458

Geology of Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to an accepted plan have produced a most comprehensive geological account of the occurrence of natural ...naturalgas ...

E. F. A.

1936-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

459

RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Background gamma terrestrial dose rate in Nigerian functional coal mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......444-448 (2003). 12. Nakaoka, A., Fukushima, M. and Shinji, T. Environmental...TERRESTRIAL DOSE RATE IN NIGERIAN MINES N d Aerial ropeway Figure 2. Surface background...444 448 (2003). 12. Nakaoka, A., Fukushima, M. and Shinji, T. Environmental......

C. E. Mokobia; F. A. Balogun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EXTRAGALACTIC VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the origin of the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background using the data from the Fermi telescope. To estimate the background level, we count photons at high Galactic latitudes |b| > 60 Degree-Sign . Subtracting photons associated with known sources and the residual cosmic-ray and Galactic diffuse backgrounds, we estimate the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) flux. We find that the spectrum of EGB in the very high energy band above 30 GeV follows the stacked spectrum of BL Lac objects. Large Area Telescope data reveal the positive (1 + z) {sup k}, 1 < k < 4 cosmological evolution of the BL Lac source population consistent with that of their parent population, Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies. We show that EGB at E > 30 GeV could be completely explained by emission from unresolved BL Lac objects if k {approx_equal} 3.

Neronov, A. [ISDC Data Center for Astrophysics, Chemin d'Ecogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Semikoz, D. V. [APC, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

462

1 Mathematical Background 1 1.1 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contents 1 Mathematical Background 1 1.1 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Computability Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.3 Topology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.4 Probability Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.5 Exercises and Problems

Goodman, James R.

463

1 Introduction 1 1.1 Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contents 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Our Goal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.3 ICSI's HMM/ANN Hybrid Speech Recognition System . . . . . . . . 2 1.4 What is Multi­band Processing

Mirghafori, N. Nikki

464

Inhomogeneous Background Error Modeling and Estimation over Antarctica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of the analysis increments in a variational data assimilation scheme is strongly driven by the formulation of the background error covariance matrix, especially in data-sparse areas such as the Antarctic region. The gridpoint ...

Yann Michel; Thomas Aulign

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Lovelock black holes in a string cloud background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an exact static, spherically symmetric black hole solution to the third order Lovelock gravity with a string cloud background in seven dimensions for the special case when the second and third order Lovelock coefficients are related via $\\tilde{\\alpha}^2_2=3\\tilde{\\alpha}_3\\;(\\equiv\\alpha^2)$. Further, we examine thermodynamic properties of this black hole to obtain exact expressions for mass, temperature, entropy and also perform the thermodynamic stability analysis. We see that a string cloud background makes a profound influence on horizon structure, thermodynamic properties and the stability of black holes. Interestingly, the entropy of the black hole is unaffected due to a string cloud background. However, the critical solution for thermodynamic stability is being affected by a string cloud background.

Tae-Hun Lee; Dharmanand Baboolal; Sushant G. Ghosh

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

466

The Cosmic Near Infrared Background: Remnant Light from Early Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The redshifted ultraviolet light from early stars at z ~ 10 contributes to the cosmic near infrared background. We present detailed calculations of its spectrum with various assumptions about metallicity and mass spectrum of early stars. We show that if the near infrared background has a stellar origin, metal-free stars are not the only explanation of the excess near infrared background; stars with metals (e.g. Z=1/50 Z_sun) can produce the same amount of background intensity as the metal-free stars. We quantitatively show that the predicted average intensity at 1-2 microns is essentially determined by the efficiency of nuclear burning in stars, which is not very sensitive to metallicity. We predict \

Elizabeth Fernandez; Eiichiro Komatsu

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

467

Natural Gas Reforming  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Natural gas reforming is an advanced and mature production process that builds upon the existing natural gas pipeline delivery infrastructure. Today, 95% of the hydrogen produced in the United States is made by natural gas reforming in large central plants. This technology is an important pathway for near-term hydrogen production.

468

Atomic Radiation (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

469

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

470

Radiation Safety September 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................... 8 2.6 RUA Holder........................................................................................................ 11 3.3 Radiation Use Authorization (RUA).......................................................................................... 11 3.4 Review of RUA Applications

California at Irvine, University of

471

Radiative polarization of electrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a new method of calculating the radiative polarization of electrons in homogeneous magnetic fields, using the modified electron propagation function.

Julian Schwinger and Wu-yang Tsai

1974-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Interaction of Excimer Laser Radiation with Solids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We review the nature of the interactions that occur when excimer laser radiation impacts on different materials. The physical processes that occur during such interactions can be traced by subsequent physical and chemical analysis of the interface following the irradiation. We illustrate this approach with data obtained for a variety of materials including Cu Al polyimide and foamed polystyrene. We also discuss the processes that initiate material removal in transparent (wide bandgap) materials.

Walter W. Duley; Kevin Dunphy; Grant Kinsman; Stephen Mihailov

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Nuclear Coupling of 33S and the Nature of Free Radicals in Irradiated Crystals of Cystine Dihydrochloride: Part II, Charged Radicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...radicals produced by ionizing radiation to be mostly charged molecules...equivalent positions. With the naturally occuring 33S abundance of 0.76% in...consequences in biochemical reactions and radiation effects. In consideration of...

Joseph H. Hadley; Jr.; Walter Gordy

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Muon-Induced Backgrounds in Double Chooz Emily Conover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to scintillator 8 MeV n capture energy, 30µs backgrounds due to muons remain E¯e = Ee+ + 10-40keV En + 1.8MeMuon-Induced Backgrounds in Double Chooz Emily Conover University of Chicago Second Thesis and Stopped Muons 9Li and 8He 3. Double Chooz Results 4. Conclusions Timeline/Future work Emily Conover (Univ

475

The X-ray background and the evolution of AGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the constraints on the AGN evolution from the cosmic X-ray background and source counts. A synthesis model to fit the X-ray background is presented. In the model, the spectrum of type 2 AGN has been modeled including Compton down--scattering within the absorbing material. Besides, we introduced a dependence on redshift of the relative number of obscured sources and found a decrease of the fraction of type 2 AGN at redshifts larger than 2.

Fulvio Pompilio; Fabio La Franca; Giorgio Matt

1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

476

Muon-induced backgrounds in the CUORICINO experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To better understand the contribution of cosmic ray muons to the CUORICINO background, 10 plastic scintillator detectors were installed at the CUORICINO site and operated during the final 3 months of the experiment. From these measurements, an upper limit of 0.0021 counts/(keV kg yr) (95% CL) was obtained on the cosmic ray-induced background in the neutrinoless double beta decay region of interest. The measurements were also compared to Geant4 simulations.

E. Andreotti; C. Arnaboldi; F. T. Avignone III; M. Balata; I. Bandac; M. Barucci; J. W. Beeman; F. Bellini; T. Bloxham; C. Brofferio; A. Bryant; C. Bucci; L. Canonica; S. Capelli; L. Carbone; M. Carrettoni; M. Clemenza; O. Cremonesi; R. J. Creswick; S. Di Domizio; M. J. Dolinski; L. Ejzak; R. Faccini; H. A. Farach; E. Ferri; F. Ferroni; E. Fiorini; L. Foggetta; A. Giachero; L. Gironi; A. Giuliani; P. Gorla; E. Guardincerri; T. D. Gutierrez; E. E. Haller; R. Kadel; K. Kazkaz; S. Kraft; L. Kogler; Yu. G. Kolomensky; C. Maiano; R. H. Maruyama; C. Martinez; M. Martinez; L. Mizouni; S. Morganti; S. Nisi; C. Nones; E. B. Norman; A. Nucciotti; F. Orio; M. Pallavicini; V. Palmieri; L. Pattavina; M. Pavan; M. Pedretti; G. Pessina; S. Pirro; E. Previtali; L. Risegari; C. Rosenfeld; C. Rusconi; C. Salvioni; S. Sangiorgio; D. Schaeffer; N. D. Scielzo; M. Sisti; A. R. Smith; C. Tomei; G. Ventura; M. Vignati

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

477

Kinematic interpretation of string instability in a background gravitational field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The unstable regime in which the string oscillating modes develop imaginary frequencies is shown to be characterized, kinematically, by a positive relative acceleration among the different points of the string. Instability occurs when this acceleration, induced by the background curvature, is large enough to make the extension of the corresponding causally connected region smaller than the string maximal size. This kinematic characterization is applied, in particular, to discuss string instability in a static and spherically symmetric gravitational background.

M. Gasperini

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Background reduction and sensitivity for germanium double beta decay experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Germanium detectors have very good capabilities for the investigation of rare phenomena like the neutrinoless double beta decay. Rejection of the background entangling the expected signal is one primary goal in this kind of experiments. Here, the attainable background reduction in the energy region where the neutrinoless double beta decay signal of 76Ge is expected to appear has been evaluated for experiments using germanium detectors, taking into consideration different strategies like the granularity of the detector system, the segmentation of each individual germanium detector and the application of Pulse Shape Analysis techniques to discriminate signal from background events. Detection efficiency to the signal is affected by background rejection techniques, and therefore it has been estimated for each of the background rejection scenarios considered. Finally, conditions regarding crystal mass, radiopurity, exposure to cosmic rays, shielding and rejection capabilities are discussed with the aim to achieve a background level of 10-3 c keV-1 kg-1 y-1 in the region of interest, which would allow to explore neutrino effective masses around 40 meV.

H. Gmez; S. Cebrin; J. Morales; J. A. Villar

2007-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

479

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Cellular telephone-based radiation sensor and wide-area detection network  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural background radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

482

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

483

Estimates of Radiation Dose from Strontium-90 Due to Fallout  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2412"` d., 74" h. 2" fiberglas insulation. 1 50() watts, 11 5, 208, or 230...gratings, electro-luminescence, thermal radiation backgrounds, infrared polarizers...chart. Write for complete data and specifications. SMALL ANIMAL BALANCE Model 4203B-TC-SA...

MERRIL EISENBUD

1959-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

484

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DDE ESTIMATED DOSE FROM CONCEPTION TO DECLARATION: DDE Radiation Safety Officer Signature for increased protection from ionizing radiation for declared pregnant radiation workers. The radiation dose of the occupational dose limit of 50 mSv (5.0 rem). The CPMC Radiation Safety Office will provide education

Jia, Songtao

485

RADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. · Radiation therapist - a health professional who designs, calculates (plans) and provides the radiation dose and monitors the delivery of radiation therapy, taking into account the protection and safety of patientsRADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE #12;A Career in Radiation Oncology YOUR CHOICE SAVE LIVES

Tobar, Michael

486

Radiation safety system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......occupational illness to personnel, major damage...acceptable levels. Selection of control measures...or equipment operating correctly in...99 103 to 104 Personnel life safety...and abnormal operating conditions under...radiation risk to personnel, public and...worker radiation training) reduces the......

Vaclav Vylet; James C. Liu; Lawrence S. Walker

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Radiation safety system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......disable this safety function and...circuits and software. Other required...source in case of radiation monitors. Feedback...from other non-safety systems to prevent...write and check software. The expected...logic systems for safety functions can...levels of prompt radiation hazard. ACS......

Vaclav Vylet; James C. Liu; Lawrence S. Walker

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Risks from ionizing radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... RADON indoors now accounts for nearly half of the average UK population exposure to ionizing radiation ... exposure to ionizing radiation. We believe that the extent of the variation in exposure to radon in the United Kingdom and else-where and its magnitude in relation to exposures from ...

R. H. Clarke; T. R. E. Southwood

1989-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

489

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Interstate Pipelines Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural...

490

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Compressor Stations Illustration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline...

491

Nuclear radiation actuated valve  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

How to Detect Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from storage; prepare the instrument and determine background level. Preparing the Meter: Position the Geiger counter with the meter away from you. Locate and open the battery...

493

Radiation Weighting Factors and High Energy Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......generally inadequate for high energy radiation. In order to determine...appropriate wR values in the high energy region, several criteria are...are proposed for neutrons of energy above 100 MeV and for protons above 10 MeV. The wR value for muons is confirmed to be practically......

M. Pelliccioni

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Polarization of the Atmosphere as a Foreground for Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We quantify the level of polarization of the atmosphere due to Zeeman splitting of oxygen in the Earth's magnetic field and compare it to the level of polarization expected from the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The analysis focuses on the effect at mid-latitudes and at large angular scales. We find that from stratospheric balloon borne platforms and for observations near 100 GHz the atmospheric linear and circular polarized intensities is about 10^{-12} and 100 x 10^{-9} K, respectively, making the atmosphere a negligible source of foreground. From the ground the linear and circular polarized intensities are about 10^{-9} and 100 x 10^{-6} K, making the atmosphere a potential source of foreground for the CMB E (B) mode signal if there is even a 1% (0.01%) conversion of circular to linear polarization in the instrument.

Shaul Hanany; Philip Rosenkranz

2003-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

495

Operational background air pollution prediction over Slovenia by QualeAria modelling system - validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Slovenia is a country of very complex terrain and many problems with air pollution in the valleys, canyons and basins, where industrial air pollution is combined with traffic and domestic heating air pollution, giving rise to problems for the health impact and the ecosystems directly or indirectly. Among indirect effects is also effect on solar radiation budget because of photochemical smog and especially particulate air pollution. To assess air pollutants over the country, a preliminary application of an experimental operational forecast system is presented here, with the aim of exploring its potentials and limitations in modelling the background air quality, and to focus the aspects where improvements are needed for a true operational use.

Marija Zlata Božnar; Primož Mlakar; Boštjan Grašič; Giuseppe Calori; Alessio D'Allura; Sandro Finardi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

BAYESIAN INFERENCE OF POLARIZED COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POWER SPECTRA FROM INTERFEROMETRIC DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detection of B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation is one of the frontiers of observational cosmology. Because they are an order of magnitude fainter than E-modes, it is quite a challenge to detect B-modes. Having more manageable systematics, interferometers prove to have a substantial advantage over imagers in detecting such faint signals. Here, we present a method for Bayesian inference of power spectra and signal reconstruction from interferometric data of the CMB polarization signal by using the technique of Gibbs sampling. We demonstrate the validity of the method in the flat-sky approximation for a simulation of an interferometric observation on a finite patch with incomplete uv-plane coverage, a finite beam size, and a realistic noise model. With a computational complexity of O(n {sup 3/2}), n being the data size, Gibbs sampling provides an efficient method for analyzing upcoming cosmology observations.

Karakci, Ata; Korotkov, Andrei; Tucker, Gregory S. [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D. [Department of Physics, 1110 W. Green Street, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Zhang, Le; Timbie, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bunn, Emory F., E-mail: ata_karakci@brown.edu [Physics Department, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

497

Radiation effects in the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yazzie, A. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ (United States). Dept. of History; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leavitt, C.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

499

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

500

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.